P. 1
072913 Edition

072913 Edition

|Views: 204|Likes:
San Mateo Daily Journal
San Mateo Daily Journal

More info:

Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on Jul 29, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

11/22/2014

www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • July 29, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 296
THE ECONOMY
NATION PAGE 6
‘WOLVERINE’
TOPS MOVIES
DATEBOOK PAGE 17
CESPEDES PLAYS
LIKE AN ALL-STAR
SPORTS PAGE 11
FOUR OUT FIVE U.S. ADULTS STRUGGLE
WITH JOBLESSNESS
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
An eight-story, 196-unit
apartment building is coming to
a large parcel in downtown
Redwood City, according to
developers who say the intersec-
tion of Main and Marshall
streets is a perfect fit for housing
near the city’s “vibrant urban
core.”
“This is an ideal location that
offers a dynamic urban lifestyle
option within walking distance
to shops and restaurants and
close proximity to the area’s
major employment centers and
transportation corridors,” Alex
Waterbury, president of Northern
California development for
Lennar Apartment Communities,
said in a prepared statement.
The building at 601 Main St. is
a joint venture between Lennar
and Resmark Apartment Living.
The building will have seven
floors of apartments sitting on
top of 3,500 square feet of
ground-floor retail space. The
units, which range from studios
to two-bedrooms, will average
901 square feet and include
amenities like pre-wiring for
broadband Internet.
The building will also have a
3,500-square-foot deck on the
fourth floor overlooking Main
Street, a fitness center, pool ,
indoor storage for approximate-
ly 100 bicycles and lounge with
full kitchen for events.
The Redwood City Planning
Commission signed off on the
project and the planned commu-
nity permit in June. At that
meeting, the 50,468-square-foot
site was described as L-shaped,
occupying three-quarters of the
existing block with fronts on
Bradford, Main, Marshall, and
Walnut streets. Access to the
330-space parking garage will
be on Bradford, Walnut and
Marshall streets.
Construction is scheduled to
begin early next year with com-
pletion in early 2016.
New downtown housing in the works
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
ARedwood City landlord accused
by a family living in his duplex of
denying a wheelchair-bound teen a
ramp and blocking his access with
cars and a dumpster will pay
$21,500 to settle a housing dis-
crimination lawsuit out of court.
David Pelayo, owner of the
Hoover Street duplex, settled the
case in June with the Department
of Fair Employment and Housing
on behalf of Melissa Sweezey, her
partner Antonio Virelas, her 18-
year-old son Derek Gaerlan and
South San Francisco-based
Housing Equality Law Project.
Pelayo did not have to admit lia-
bility but agreed to attend fair
housing training.
Gaerlan has cerebral palsy and is
mostly paralyzed, leaving him
reliant on an electric wheelchair.
Pelayo’s inaction on the ramp
request, permission for other ten-
ants to fill the driveway with vehi-
cles and placement of a large
dumpster for weeks kept Gaerlan
unable to reach his back housing
unit and once trapped him between
cars in the rain for hours, said
Mary Prem, executive director of
Paralyzed
man settles
access case
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Mateo City Council will
meet Monday in a special meeting
to authorize the levy of special
taxes for the Bay Meadows Phase
II development currently under
construction.
The levy will generate about
$1.9 million in its first year, will
expire in 2042, and will help pay
down $57 million in bond debt
used to build all the infrastructure
in the state’s newest and biggest
transit-oriented development.
About 90 percent of the levy in
the first year will be paid by devel-
oper Wilson-Meany and builders
TRI Pointe Homes and Shea
Homes. The other 10 percent, or
15 parcels, will be paid by the
development’s first home buyers.
The annual assessment will
City to levy a special
tax for Bay Meadows
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Nonprofits spend lots and lots of
time fundraising in ways that are
wasteful, outdated, lead to ineffi-
ciencies and turn off potential
donors, according to the founders
of an online portal called
CommitChange that pledges to
save nonprofits big money and
help backers know their donations
are being spent wisely.
So much time is spent on
fundraising duties that it weakens
the services nonprofits are able to
provide, said Roderick Campbell,
co-founder of CommitChange,
which was launched in Olympia,
Wash. late last year.
Campbell and partner Jay
Bolton noticed their website was
being tracked online by Adam
Draper, who runs the Boost VC
business accelerator in downtown
San Mateo.
With the Draper name being
synonymous with venture capital
support of some of the world’s
most innovative companies, the
partners started to check in on who
Adam was and learned he and Boost
could help take CommitChange to
the next level.
After all, Adam’s father Tim is
the founder of the Draper
University of Heroes in downtown
San Mateo that supports young
entrepreneurs. Tim Draper also
first funded Hotmail, Skype, Tesla
Motors and many, many more.
Now, Campbell and Bolton are
in the midst of an intense several-
week program in downtown San
Mateo alongside other young
business owners in an effort to
improve the company’s product
and find investors.
Boost VC is not that old either
but has already helped about eight
companies secure angel invest-
ment.
Campbell and Bolton along
with two others were inspired by
President Barack Obama’s last
Committed to change
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Roderick Campbell and Jay Bolton, from Olympia,Wash., have developed an online platform to help nonprofits
be more efficient and are participating in a Boost VC program in downtown San Mateo to help take the com-
pany to the next level.
Redwood City apartment development coming to ‘vibrant urban core’
See ACCESS, Page 20
See TAX, Page 20
Entrepreneurs want to help nonprofits raise money more efficiently
See CHANGE, Page 20
Black male humanity
shown in ‘Fruitvale’
Oscar Grant did not deserve to die.
This is the central message of
“Fruitvale Station,” a film dramatizing
the real-life case of the young unarmed
black man shot in the back by a white
police officer in 2009. It’s a common
message, often heard in film and life in
general. But the way writer/director
Ryan Coogler delivers this message is
extraordinary.
As portrayed by Michael B. Jordan
(beware of plot spoilers ahead) Grant
is a great father — and a convicted
felon. He loves his girlfriend — and he
cheats on her. He wants to hold down a
legal job — and he can’t make it to
work on time. He’s a drug dealer who
takes time to make his bed in the
morning, a hardened convict and a
mama’s boy — a thuggish angel.
By the time the credits roll, Oscar
Grant has become one of the rarest
artifacts in American culture: a three-
dimensional portrait of a young black
male — a human being.
Which raises the question: If Grant
was a real person, what about all these
other young black males rendered as
cardboard cutouts by our merciless cul-
ture? What other humanity are we
missing?
“Everyone either made Oscar out to
be a saint, depending on whatever
their political agenda was, and on the
other side they
made him out to be
this villain,”
Coogler said in an
interview.
“Everything he
had ever done
wrong in his life
was magnified,”
Coogler said. “He
was just a criminal,
a thug, a drug dealer, and he deserved
what he got. You live that type of
lifestyle, you get what you deserve.
His humanity was lost.”
Grant was 22 years old in the early
hours of New Year’s Day, returning
home to Oakland with his girl and
other friends. In the film, a fight starts
on the train when Grant encounters an
enemy from prison. Police detained
Grant and his friends on the platform
of the Fruitvale station.
The police are abusive; Grant and
friends respond with belligerence.
Grant is being held face down on the
platform, unarmed and struggling,
when the officer shoots him once in
the back. Numerous bystanders cap-
tured the scene on video.
That’s the first scene of the film,
using real video shot by bystanders.
Then it jumps backwards one day to fil l
in the blanks of an average brother, to
illustrate the mundane moments with
family, friends and strangers that con-
stitute real life.
When Grant’s death hit the news,
what much of the public saw was a con-
victed drug dealer who had been
released from prison three months
before his death. They saw a trouble-
maker who police said was resisting
arrest. They didn’t see everything else
that’s in “Fruitvale Station.”
“If there’s one thing missing in our
country, it’s an acknowledgment of
the broad humanity of black folks,”
Ta-Nehisi Coates recently wrote on his
blog at TheAtlantic.com. “Racism —
and anti-black racism in particular —
is the belief that there’s something
wrong with black people.”
The remedy: “Close the gap between
what they see and who we really are,”
Coates wrote.
Asked what it felt like to close that
gap, the actor Jordan said, “It felt real.
It felt like I was telling a story for
young African-American males who
are stereotyped and judged before peo-
ple get a chance to know them.”
“We wanted to let people know who
this guy was through the people who
knew him the best,” Jordan said.
“Show the good, bad and the ugly.
Flaws and all.”
“Fruitvale Station” is not unprece-
dented. It’s part of a recent wave of
independent black films that are put-
ting authentic black characters on
more screens than ever.
This can make a difference in how
black men are perceived in the real
world, said black filmmaker Ava
DuVernay.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
smdailyjournal.com scribd.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal facebook.com/smdailyjournal
Phone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290
To Advertise: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.com
Events: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.com
News: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.com
Delivery: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . circulation@smdailyjournal.com
Career: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actor Rodney
Allen Rippy is 45.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1981
Britain’s Prince Charles married Lady
Diana Spencer at St. Paul’s Cathedral
in London. (However, the couple
divorced in 1996.)
“An idea is not responsible for
the people who believe in it.”
— Don Marquis (MAHR’-kwihs), American journalist-author
(born this date in 1878, died 1937).
Rock singer Geddy
Lee is 60.
Actor Wil Wheaton
is 41.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Emirates New Zealand Team AC72 catamaran races on in San Francisco Saturday. Emirates Team New Zealand defeated
Artemis Racing on a forfeit on Saturday in a Round 4 race for the Louis Vuitton Cup, which serves as the selection series to
decide the challenger for the America’s Cup.
Monday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog
and drizzle in the morning. Highs in the
lower 60s. South winds 10 to 20 mph.
Monday ni ght: Partly cloudy in the
evening then becoming mostly cloudy.
Patchy fog and drizzle after midnight.
Lows in the lower 50s. South winds 10 to
20 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Patchy fog and drizzle in the morning. Highs in the
lower to mid 60s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becom-
ing mostly cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle after midnight.
Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Wednesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning.
Local Weather Forecast
On this date:
I n 1030, the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II, was
killed in battle.
I n 1588, the English attacked the Spanish Armada in the
Battle of Gravelines, resulting in an English victory.
I n 1890, artist Vincent van Gogh, 37, died of a self-inflict-
ed gunshot wound in Auvers-sur-Oise, France.
I n 1900, Italian King Humbert I was assassinated by an
anarchist; he was succeeded by his son, Victor Emmanuel III.
I n 1921, Adolf Hitler became the leader (“fuehrer”) of the
National Socialist German Workers Party.
I n 1948, Britain’s King George VI opened the Olympic
Games in London.
I n 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency was
established. Jack Paar made his debut as host of NBC’s
“Tonight Show. ”
I n 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the
National Aeronautics and Space Act, creating NASA.
I n 1967, an accidental rocket launch aboard the supercarri-
er USS Forrestal in the Gulf of Tonkin resulted in a fire and
explosions that killed 134 servicemen.
In 1975, President Gerald R. Ford became the first U.S. presi-
dent to visit the Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz in Poland.
In 1980, a state funeral was held in Cairo, Egypt, for the
deposed Shah of Iran, who had died two days earlier at age 60.
I n 1993, the Israeli Supreme Court acquitted retired Ohio
autoworker John Demjanjuk of being Nazi death camp guard
“Ivan the Terrible” and threw out his death sentence;
Demjanjuk was set free.
Ten years ago: President George W. Bush refused to
release a congressional report on possible links between
Saudi Arabian officials and the September 11 hijackers, say-
ing disclosure “would help the enemy” by revealing intelli-
gence sources and methods.
Actor Robert Horton is 89. Former Sen. Nancy Kassebaum-
Baker is 81. Former Sen. Elizabeth H. Dole is 77. Actor David
Warner is 72. Rock musician Neal Doughty (REO
Speedwagon) is 67. Marilyn Tucker Quayle, wife of former
Vice President Dan Quayle, is 64. Documentary maker Ken
Burns is 60. Style guru Tim Gunn (TV: “Project Runway”) is
60. Rock singer Patti Scialfa (Bruce Springsteen and the E
Street Band) is 60. Actress Alexandra Paul is 50. Country
singer Martina McBride is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer
Wanya Morris (Boyz II Men) is 40. Actress Rachel Miner is
33. Actress Allison Mack is 31. Actor Matt Prokop is 23.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
ETHIC STYLE ARMORY AVIARY
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: If the ocean were run by a corporation, then
Poseidon could be the — “SEA” E.O.
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
SOBYS
TOLCH
GINKTH
NIFTIE
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
le

a
t

p
e
n
n
y
d
e
llp
u
z
z
le
s
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
m
a
g
s
Print your
answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Hot Shot, No.
3,in first place;Eureka,No.7,in second place;and
Lucky Charms,No.12,in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:41.59.
7 8 3
4 22 23 27 38 42
Mega number
July 26 Mega Millions
9 23 40 53 58 6
Powerball
July 27 Powerball
5 15 25 29 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 2 3 9
Daily Four
1 2 8
Daily three evening
18 20 30 40 42 15
Mega number
July 27 Super Lotto Plus
Oscar Grant
3
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Peninsula
º Loog |ast|og post0ra| chaoge
º |ocrease ath|et|c perIormaoce
º Treat repet|t|ve stress |oj0r|es
º |ocrease mob|||ty & ßex|b|||ty
$50 OFF 3 Session
Mini-Series
º Look 8etter
º Fee| 8etter
º |mprove Post0re
º |mprove 8a|aoce
º 8e||eve 0hroo|c Pain
Pa0| F|tzgera|d
™ r e f l o R d e c n a v d A d e fi i t r e C
www.peo|os0|aro|hog.com
448 h. Sao Nateo 0r|ve, Ste 3 º Sao Nateo º 650-343-0777
Yo0 doo't
have to ||ve
||ke th|s!
Service is our Specialty,
Experience is our Strength.
Member FDIC Equal Housing Lender
© Liberty Bank. All rights reserved.
500 Linden Ave., South San Francisco s (650)-871-2400
libertybk.com t "MTP JO 1BMP "MUP 'FMUPO BOE #PVMEFS $reek
"U-JCFSUZ#BOL
XFVOEFSTUBOE
that cash flPX
BOEPQQPSUVOJUZ
EPO’t always
DPJODJEF
FTQFDJBMMZGPSTNBMM
CVTJOFTT0VS
Small Business
Banking services
XJMMIFMQZPVS
CVTJOFTTNBLFUIF
NPTUPVUPGFWFSZ
PQQPSUVOJUy.
Call us today!
We’re ready to
talk about solutions
that are right for you!
OpenFor Business!
J
ohn Sutter was a ambitious man who
wanted to carve out his personal king-
dom in the California wilds of the
Sacramento Valley. He amassed an enormous
fortune and acquired vast acres of land in the
Valley and he almost achieved his goal
except for one historical event that spoiled
his plans — the California gold rush.
Born in Baden, Germany in 1803, his
father was born in Switzerland and John
moved there for schooling. He later joined
the Swiss army and became a captain of the
artillery. Things went well for Sutter and he
married Annette Dubeld at 23. His wife’s
mother was rich and she set him up in a
store business. Sutter proceeded to run the
business into the ground with enormous
debt. He was faced with a dilemma now —
should he stay and raise his five children or
should he run away? Rather than be thrown
into the debtors jail, he chose to leave the
country and his family and arrived in New
York in 1834. He became restless and
moved to St. Louis then on to Santa Fe,
N.M. territory and finally entered Westport,
Oregon Territory. Next he was found in Fort
Vancouver in April 1838.
He wanted to go to Yerba Buena to fulfil l
his dream of starting a new state but the
only boat available was going to Hawaii.
He took the offer hoping to get a boat to
Yerba Buena but the only boat out of Hawaii
was going to Sitka, Alaska. He picked up
goods (on credit of course) he felt he could
sell in California for a profit while waiting
to leave. Finally, he got a boat to
California and arrived in Yerba Buena on
July 1, 1839. At this time, California had
1,000 Europeans and 10,000 Native
Americans. Sutter needed permission from
governor Juan Bautista Alvarado to stay in
California and to acquire a land grant from
John Sutter and the California gold rush
BELMONT
Theft. Awallet and cell phone were stolen
from a gym bag on Old Country Road before
8:48 p.m. Tuesday, July 16.
Suspi ci ous person. Aman was carrying
what looked like a gun case on Lake Road
before 5:31 p.m. Tuesday, July 16.
Vandal i sm. Property was vandalized with
graffiti on Lake Road before 4:52 p.m.
Tuesday, July 16.
Vandal i sm. Aperson was putting nails in
tires and strange liquids in vehicles on
Belburn Drive before 4:17 p.m. Tuesday,
July 16.
Theft. Someone reported a damaged pump
and stolen gas on Harbor Boulevard before
4:10 p.m. Tuesday, July 16.
Vandalism. A man was cutting down tree
limbs and small trees in the park on Twin
Pines Lane before 8:54 a.m. Tuesday, July 16.
FOSTER CITY
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. Someone
waiting for her sister to finish soccer prac-
tice noticed a man with a fake moustache
parked behind staring at the girls before
driving around the block twice before 6:41
p.m. Tuesday, July 23.
Petty theft. Someone left their purse in
her unlocked car overnight and $100 was
taken on Thatcher Lane before 10:12 a.m.
Tuesday, July 23.
Reckless driver. A limousine driver was
seen driving recklessly on Edgewater
Boulevard and Beach Park Boulevard before
11:28 p.m. Thursday, July 18.
Theft. A12-year-old girl’s bike was stolen
on East Hillsdale Boulevard before 7:15
p.m. Thursday, July 18.
SAN CARLOS
Vandal i sm. Property was vandalized on
the 1300 block of Laurel Street before 3:32
a.m. Friday, July 12.
Police reports
Where’s my car?
Fraud. Aperson purchased a vehicle on
eBay but never received it on the first
block of Bloomfield Road in
Burlingame before 5:10 p.m. Saturday,
July 6.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY
HISTORY MUSEUM
John Sutter in 1866.
See HISTORY, Page 4
4
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
the Mexican government he needed to
become a citizen of Mexico also.
On Aug. 29, 1840, he became a Mexican
citizen and a year later he received a grant of
48,827 acres by what is now Sacramento. It
stretched along the Sacramento River from
New Helvetia to the Feather River and pres-
ent-day Marysville. Then he was appointed
to be the alcalde (or chief enforcement offi-
cer) which gave him the power of life and
death over his subjects. He named his set-
tlement New Helvetia, or “New Switzerland”
after his homeland.
Sutter began building his “fort” in 1839
and completed it in 1841. He had visited
Fort Laramie in Wyoming and he was
impressed enough of its form that he pat-
terned Fort Sutter after this army fort. Sutter
was not a big man but he had an imposing
demeanor with a military bearing and a flair
for attracting people to him. By the time he
acquired the land for his kingdom, he had
acquired a number of people along the way
who wanted to share in his dreams. He
became friends of the Indians and they
helped make thousands of adobe bricks for
the home he placed in the center of the com-
pound. Surrounded by a thick and high wall
that would ward off any attack, he placed
workshops and stores in which he was to
produce all goods necessary for the settle-
ment.
In 1841, he purchased the Russian Fort
(Fort Ross) for the sum of $30,000 (on cred-
it). Now he had boards, ammunition, can-
nons and livestock. At the end of 1841,
members of the Bartleson-Bidwell immigra-
tion party arrived, the fist to cross over the
Sierra Nevada. Many more pioneers were to
use the facilities of Sutter Fort and many
were saved by the generosity of Sutter in
rescuing stranded parties in the mountains.
Wheat was grown and a number of trap-
pers were hired by Sutter to trap beavers for
their pelts. One of the first things he did was
to collect the grapes in the area and distill a
potent brandy called aguardiente.
In 1843, another immigration party led
by Joseph B. Chiles and Joseph Walker
arrived. In March 1844, John Fremont and
his bedraggled starving band of “trail blaz-
ers” stopped at the fort. Fremont was to
become a familiar figure in the area for a
number of months and have his hand in the
“Bear Flag” rebellion and the taking over of
California for the U.S. government.
In July 1845, a immigrant group arrived
from the Willamette Valley in Oregon.
Among them was a man who would change
the history of California and the world. His
name was James Wilson Marshall. He was a
millwright. Sutter hired him immediately as
a handyman-carpenter.
Late in December 1845, Fremont and Kit
Carson and their band of “topographers”
were back and eventually he placed General
Vallejo under guard at Sutters Fort after the
Bear Flag Revolt in mid-June 1846. Things
were spinning out of control for the
Mexicans.
Sutter needed water-powered mills to cut
logs into lumber and to grind grain into
flour.
He started a gristmill a few miles upstream
from the fort and he decided to build the
water-powered mill in a well-timbered val-
ley called Cullomah (now Coloma). By late
August, the mill was underway and it was
unfinished when, on Jan. 24, 1848,
Marshall discovered gold in the newly dug
tailrace.
After determining it was gold, Sutter had
Marshall and his workers to keep it quiet
until after the mill was finished. That
worked for a while until work leaked out that
there was gold on the American River.
Because there had been many gold discover-
ies in the past, this news was received cau-
tiously by most at first until newspaper-
man, Samuel Brannan, visited the area and
became convinced that the gold strike was
real. He quickly returned to San Francisco
and shouted out to the world as he walked
down Montgomery Avenue that there was
really gold on the American River.
What was to follow changed the entire
history of San Francisco and the nation.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily
Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
Hotel welcomes second
set of nesting barn owls
A second family of barn owls
has taken up a nest at a Burlingame
hotel that has embraced its new
role as a protector of wildlife.
The San Francisco Airport
Marriott Waterfront reported this
week that a second family of three
young barn owls has been spotted
on its balconies.
The hotel was already playing
host to one family of the noctur-
nal birds that hatched four babies
on the balcony of room 1141 last
month.
This is the second year that owls
have nested at the hotel, and the
first that more than one family has
done so.
Hotel officials have welcomed
their new guests, and were recently
given a “Certified Wildlife
Habitat” designation from the
National Wildlife Federation, they
said this week.
Because barn owls are protected
birds of prey, hotel officials have
not moved them and try to keep
the room on the Concierge Level,
now referred to as the “Hoot
Suite,” vacant. When the hotel is
sold out and the room is needed,
the hotel asks guests to be
respectful of the birds.
In celebration of the barn owls,
children staying at the hotel are
being offered a complimentary
stuffed owl toy, as are guests in
room 1141.
The breeding seasons for barn
owls typically starts in March or
early April, but breeding can occur
at any time of year when food is
plentiful, according to hotel offi-
cials. The female usually lays four to
seven eggs, and stays in the nest to
care for the eggs and chicks while
the male brings food to the nest.
Second suspect arrested in
Montara assault, robbery
A Half Moon Bay man was
arrested Friday in connection with
the assault and robbery of two
teenage boys in Montara, accord-
ing to the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office.
Alec Silva, 18, is the second
suspect to be arrested in connec-
tion with the May 4th attack on
two boys, ages 13 and 14 years
old, sheriff’s office officials said.
The boys were playing on the
basketball courts at Farallone
View School in Montara when
they were approached by two older
teenagers who made derogatory
remarks, the sheriff’s office said.
When the younger boys yelled
back, they were chased into a
wooded area in the Rancho Corral
De Tierra Preserve, which lies
north of the school.
The victims attempted to hide,
but they were discovered, the sher-
iff’s office said.
The suspects allegedly assaulted
them with their fists and stole a
watch, a cell phone and one of the
victim’s tennis shoes.
The two assailants drove off in a
gray Suzuki Samurai.
One of the suspects was later
identified as Austin Krieger, 18, of
Moss Beach. Krieger was contact-
ed at his home on May 9 and
arrested for assault and robbery,
the sheriff’s office said.
Evidence linked to the case was
reportedly seized from his home,
according to the sheriff’s office.
A $300,000 warrant was issued
for Silva’s arrest on Monday on
suspicion of robbery and assault
with force likely to cause great
bodily injury.
Silva turned himself in Friday
afternoon and will be arraigned on
Monday.
A million pounds of
hazardous household
wasted collected from
Peninsula homes
One million pounds of haz-
ardous waste has been collected
over the past three years from
households throughout the
Peninsula, according to
RethinkWaste, a joint powers
authority comprised of San Mateo
County cities and the WEST Bay
Sanitary District.
Since May 2010, residents have
safely disposed of hazardous
household waste such as paint,
solvents, insecticides, cleaning
products and electronics through
RethinkWaste’s door-to-door
waste collection.
“This is an exciting milestone
demonstrating hwo much of this
material is stored out there in resi-
dents’ garages and other storage
places,” said RethinkWaste
Executive Director Kevin McCarthy.
McCarthy said RethinkWaste’s
largest challenge will be continu-
ing to collect vast amounts of con-
sumer waste and to push for more
laws to fund collection programs.
The door-to-door household haz-
ardous waste program gives resi-
dents in participating cities
throughout San Mateo County a
simple process to safely dispose
of hazardous liquids and electron-
ics such as computers and televi-
sions.
Residents can participate by
calling (800) HHW-PKUP or by
sending an email to atyour-
door@wm.com to schedule a col-
lection appointment with collec-
tion partner At Your Door.
Local briefs
5
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
by
Special:
4 Speakers
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — While the
state Legislature remains in ses-
sion most of the year, action on
the most high-profile bills tends
to be clustered in the days leading
up to several deadlines.
Unsurprisingly, it’s during
those periods of fast-paced votes
to approve state budget legisla-
tion and to keep bills alive by
sending them to the opposite
chamber that lawmakers most
often want a do-over on their
votes.
Through the first half of this
year’s legislative session, budget-
related bills dealing corrections,
the court system, mental health
programs and dental care for low-
income adults were among the
measures that generated a signifi-
cant number of altered or added
votes after a bill’s fate had been
decided.
Gun-control measures also saw a
handful of vote flips, as did vari-
ous bills at the end of May when
the chambers considered dozens of
bills during all-day sessions.
The vote-switching practice,
called to attention last year after
an Associated Press investigation,
has a long history in the
Assembly and gives lawmakers
political cover: They can vote one
way on a bill or avoid voting alto-
gether when it matters, only to add
or change their vote after the fact.
That allows them to present an
official record to their con-
stituents that may be at odds with
how they acted at the time the bill
passed or failed.
In the Senate, only the two
party leaders are allowed to change
or add votes.
Members of the Assembly are
allowed to alter their vote before
the end of the day’s session and
only if the action does not change
the outcome of the floor vote. The
practice was used more than 5,000
times last year, the AP review
found.
Since the Legislature recon-
vened in January, every lawmaker
in the Assembly has changed or
added a vote at least once. On
every one of the 97 bills the
Assembly passed on May 30, for
example, at least one legislator
revised his or her vote, with most
of the changes coming from law-
makers who did not record a posi-
tion in the initial tally.
One of the bills considered that
day, AB361, would allow
California to receive federal
money to pay for certain health
services for those with chronic
medical or substance abuse condi-
tions. It passed on the Assembly
floor with the bare 41-vote major-
i t y, but the final count shows 13
lawmakers later adding their sup-
port and another six adding an
opposition vote.
Charles Stewart, spokesman for
bill’s author, Democratic
Assemblywoman Holly Mitchell
of Los Angeles, attributed the
tardy votes to the day’s hectic
schedule, not the bill’s provi-
sions.
“When members do see that a
bill has enough votes, they may
not run to their desks to add on,”
Stewart said.
Assembly Speaker John Perez,
D-Los Angeles,
defends the
practice, say-
ing in a state-
ment that law-
makers “may
be meeting in a
committee off
the floor while
a vote is taking
place, testify-
ing in the Senate, or perhaps in a
media interview that forces them
to miss a vote.”
But government watchdog
groups say allowing lawmakers to
change or add their vote after the
fact hurts public trust and reduces
transparency.
Still, they see little public pres-
sure to change the rule, either
internally or through a ballot ini-
tiative.
Lawmakers alter votes on budget, gun bills
John Perez
Some ankle bracelet
alarms go unchecked
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Three decades after they were introduced as a crime-fight-
ing tool, electronic ankle bracelets used to track an offend-
er’s whereabouts have proliferated so much that officials are
struggling to handle an avalanche of monitoring alerts that
are often nothing more sinister than a dead battery, lost
satellite contact or someone arriving home late from work.
Amid all that white noise, alarms are going unchecked,
sometimes on defendants now accused of new crimes.
Some agencies don’t have clear protocols on how to han-
dle the multitude of alerts, or don’t always follow them. At
times, officials took days to act, if they noticed at all, when
criminals tampered with their bracelets or broke a curfew.
“I think the perception ... is that these people are being
watched 24 hours a day by someone in a command center.
That’s just not happening,” said Rob Bains, director of
court services for Florida’s Ninth Judicial Circuit Court,
which this spring halted its monitoring programs after
two people on the devices were accused in separate shoot-
ings.
At least 100,000 sex offenders, parolees and people free
on bail or probation wear ankle bracelets that can sound an
alarm if they leave home without permission, fail to show
up for work or linger near a playground or school.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
YOUNTVILLE — Tucked away in
Northern California wine country, a
small mental health organization has
found success working with struggling
U.S. service members, reducing suicide
rates with unconventional treatment
methods that include backrubs and
cookouts.
Soldiers in the specialized counsel-
ing program in Napa Valley receive
traditional therapy to treat depression,
post-traumatic stress disorder and
other problems linked to combat
stress.
But at The Pathway Home, services
expand to social gatherings, photog-
raphy classes and even swimming with
dolphins.
About 380 veterans have gone
through the program in the past five
years, and only one has committed sui-
cide. The results have drawn the atten-
tion of an Army detachment that has
stationed itself at the center for train-
ing through September.
Military officials say service mem-
bers respond to the treatment because
it acknowledges their unique experi-
ences and helps them adapt to often
overlooked aspects of civilian life.
“Here they’re not patients, they’re
residents,” said Col. David Rabb who
commands the Army’s 113th Medical
Detachment, Combat Stress Control.
The program “is respecting them for
who they are, they’re warriors,” he
said.
At Pathway’s four-month program,
veterans learn to manage their finances
and receive career, legal and education-
al advice, said Fred Gusman, the orga-
nization’s executive director.
“When you go to a hospital, they’re
not going to help you with your legal
problems,” said Gusman, who helped
start the program in 2008. “They
might have marital counseling. They
might not have marital counseling.
They’re not about getting you in
school, because they’re a medical cen-
ter. Pathway is about the whole per-
son.”
Army officials learn therapy methods
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RENO — The largest outdoor arts
festival in North America is about to
become bigger. Federal land managers
have issued Burning Man organizers a
four-year special recreation permit that
allows a peak population of 68,000 on
the northern Nevada desert this year.
Last year, attendance at the offbeat
art and music festival on the Black
Rock Desert peaked at 56,000 —
below the previous maximum allow-
able population of 60,900. The festi-
val will be held Aug. 26-Sept. 2.
Gene Seidlitz, manager of the U.S.
Bureau of Land Management’s
Winnemucca District, said the agency
is requiring organizers to comply with
more than 60 conditions related to
issues such as security, public safety,
resource management and cleanup.
He said he’s confident that sufficient
requirements are in place to protect the
starkly beautiful desert’s environment
and to ensure public safety.
“Our priorities in managing this per-
mit continue to be the protection and
conservation of natural and cultural
resources, as well as the safety for all
participants and staffs,” Seidlitz said.
Burning Man spokeswoman Megan
Miller hailed the issuance of the multi-
year permit, saying organizers are
establishing the first shuttle bus serv-
ice to the event and making other
improvements to Black Rock City’s
infrastructure to prepare for larger
crowds.
Burning Man fest gets OK for larger crowd
6
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
San Carlos Parks & Recreation
www.cityofsancarlos.org/pr
650-802-4382
C
A
M
P
REGISTER
TODAY!
By Hope Yen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Four out of
five U.S. adults struggle with job-
lessness, near poverty or reliance
on welfare for at least parts of
their lives, a sign of deteriorating
economic security and an elusive
American dream.
Survey data exclusive to the
Associated Press points to an
increasingly globalized U.S.
economy, the widening gap
between rich and poor and loss of
good-paying manufacturing jobs
as reasons for the trend.
The findings come as President
Barack Obama tries to renew his
administration’s emphasis on the
economy, saying in recent
speeches that his highest priority
is to “rebuild ladders of opportuni-
ty” and reverse income inequality.
Hardship is particularly on the
rise among whites, based on sev-
eral measures. Pessimism among
that racial group about their fami-
lies’ economic futures has climbed
to the highest point since at least
1987. In the most recent AP-GfK
poll, 63 percent of whites called
the economy “poor.”
“I think it’s going to get
worse,” said Irene Salyers, 52, of
Buchanan County, Va., a declining
coal region in Appalachia.
Married and divorced three times,
Salyers now helps run a fruit and
vegetable stand with her
boyfriend, but it doesn’t generate
much income. They live mostly
off government disability checks.
Not hiring
“If you do try to go apply for a
job, they’re not hiring people,
and they’re not paying that much
to even go to work,” she said.
Children, she said, have “nothing
better to do than to get on drugs.”
While racial and ethnic minori-
ties are more likely to live in
poverty, race disparities in the
poverty rate have narrowed sub-
stantially since the 1970s, census
data show. Economic insecurity
among whites also is more perva-
sive than is shown in government
data, engulfing more than 76 per-
cent of white adults by the time
they turn 60, according to a new
economic gauge being published
next year by the Oxford
University Press.
The gauge defines “economic
insecurity” as experiencing unem-
ployment at some point in their
working lives, or a year or more of
reliance on government aid such
as food stamps or income below
150 percent of the poverty line.
Measured across all races, the risk
of economic insecurity rises to 79
percent.
“It’s time that America comes to
understand that many of the
nation’s biggest disparities, from
education and life expectancy to
poverty, are increasingly due to
economic class position,” said
William Julius Wilson, a Harvard
professor who specializes in race
and poverty.
He noted that despite continuing
economic difficulties, minorities
have more optimism about the
future after Obama’s election,
while struggling whites do not.
“There is the real possibility
that white alienation will increase
if steps are not taken to highlight
and address inequality on a broad
front,” Wilson said.
The invisible poor
Sometimes termed “the invisible
poor” by demographers, lower-
income whites are generally dis-
persed in suburbs as well as small
rural towns, where more than 60
percent of the poor are white.
Concentrated in Appalachia in the
East, they are also numerous in the
industrial Midwest and spread
across America’s heartland, from
Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma
up through the Great Plains.
More than 19 million whites
fall below the poverty line of
$23,021 for a family of four,
accounting for more than 41 per-
cent of the nation’s destitute,
nearly double the number of poor
blacks.
Still, while census figures pro-
vide an official measure of pover-
t y, they’re only a temporary snap-
shot. The numbers don’t capture
the makeup of those who cycle in
and out of poverty at different
points in their lives. They may be
suburbanites, for example, or the
working poor or the laid off.
In 2011 that snapshot showed
12.6 percent of adults in their
prime working-age years of 25-60
lived in poverty. But measured in
terms of a person’s lifetime risk, a
much higher number — 4 in 10
adults — falls into poverty for at
least a year of their lives.
The risks of poverty also have
been increasing in recent decades,
particularly among people ages
35-55, coinciding with widening
income inequality. For instance,
people ages 35-45 had a 17 per-
cent risk of encountering poverty
during the 1969-1989 time peri-
od; that risk increased to 23 per-
cent during the 1989-2009 period.
For those ages 45-55, the risk of
poverty jumped from 11.8 percent
to 17.7 percent.
By race, nonwhites still have a
higher risk of being economically
insecure, at 90 percent. But com-
pared with the official poverty
rate, some of the biggest jumps
under the newer measure are among
whites, with more than 76 percent
enduring periods of joblessness,
life on welfare or near-poverty.
Signs of declining economic security
Florida apartment gunman
described as lonely, angry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HIALEAH, Fla. — The gunman who went on a shooting
rampage at his South Florida apartment building, killing
six people, was a lonely man who spoke about having pent
up anger, those who knew him said Sunday.
Pedro Vargas, 42, lived on the fourth floor of a barren,
concrete apartment complex in the Miami suburb of
Hialeah with his elderly mother. He rarely spoke with oth-
ers there, and confided to a man who worked out at the same
gym that he liked to work out his anger by lifting weights
and trying to get big.
“He’d just say this was the only thing that would keep
him normal, pulling out all the anger in the gym,” Jorge
Bagos said.Bagos said the gunman expressed frustration
over bad experiences with women and losing all his hair
from using steroids.
Friday night, Vargas set a combustible liquid on fire in his
apartment, sending the unit into flames. Building manager
Italo Pisciotti and his wife went running toward the smoke.
Vargas opened his door and shot and killed both of them,
Lt. Carl Zogby, Hialeah police spokesman said.
By Philip Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The House is set
to go along with a bipartisan Senate
compromise that would link college
students’ interest rates to the financial
markets and offer borrowers lower
rates this fall.
The Senate bill hews closely to one
the House already has passed, and lead-
ers from both parties and in both
chambers expect those differences
won’t stand in the way of quick resolu-
tion, perhaps as early as Wednesday.
House approval would send the
measure to President Barack Obama,
who has said he would sign it into law
“right away. ”
But critics note that if the economy
improves as expected, rates could
climb higher.
If the Republican-led House consents
to the Senate’s tinkering with the
House’s earlier proposal, and Obama
signs the legislation before students
start returning to campus, families
would see better deals on some federal
loans this year than they did in 2012.
Undergraduates could borrow at rates as
low as 3.4 percent for subsidized
Stafford loans and 6.8 percent on
unsubsidized Stafford loans last year,
while graduate students and parents
borrowed at 7.9 percent last year.
Those 3.4 percent rates doubled on July
1 because Congress did not act.
Lawmakers from both parties said the rate
increase was unacceptable and worked on
various proposals to extend rates, over-
haul rates and even remake the entire pro-
gram before classes start this fall.
Both chambers would link the inter-
est rate to the 10-year Treasury note
plus an added percentage, based on the
type of loan. Each sets caps on how
high the loans can go.
But under the Senate bill, once a stu-
dent or parent takes a loan for the
school year the rate would not change.
The House bill would make the interest
rate variable, meaning it could change
every year until the loan is repaid.
Alook at what the House and Senate
bills would mean for students and their
parents:
UNDERGRADUATES: Senate:
Undergraduates who take subsidized
and unsubsidized Stafford loans would
pay the 10-year Treasury note, plus an
additional 2.05 percent. That would
put the interest rate at about 3.9 per-
cent this fall. Rates would be capped at
8.25 percent.
House: Under the House bill, under-
graduates who take subsidized and
unsubsidized Stafford loans would pay
the 10-year Treasury note, plus an
additional 2.5 percent. That would
translate to an interest rate of about
4.3 percent interest rates for loans
taken this fall. Rates would be capped
at 8.5 percent.
GRADUATE STUDENTS: Senate:
Graduate students would borrow at the
interest rate of the 10-year Treasury
notes plus an additional 3.6 percent.
That would bring 5.4 percent interest
rates for borrowers this fall. Rates
would be capped at 9.5 percent.
House: Graduate students and parents
would borrow at the 10-year Treasury
note plus an additional 4.5 percent.
Under this formula, graduate student
loans this fall would carry a 6.3 per-
cent interest rate. Rates would be
capped at 10.5 percent.
Differences small between student loan bills
7
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD 8
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Escalating the con-
frontation after clashes that left
83 supporters of Egypt’s ousted
Islamist president dead, the inter-
im government moved Sunday
toward dismantling two pro-
Mohammed Morsi sit-in camps,
accusing protesters of “terrorism”
and vowing to deal with them deci-
sively.
Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood
denounced Saturday’s bloodshed as
evidence of the brutality of the
military-backed regime. But many
accused the group’s leaders of try-
ing to capitalize on the loss of life
to win sympathy after millions
took to the streets in a show of
support for the military chief who
ousted Morsi in a coup.
Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi said
he would take the popular support
as a mandate to deal with violence
and “potential terrorism” — a
thinly veiled reference to a widely
expected crackdown on Morsi sup-
porters in the sit-in camps in
Cairo and against radical Islamists
in the Sinai peninsula who have
been waging deadly attacks
against security forces since
Morsi was ousted in a July 3 mili-
tary coup.
The coup followed days of mass
protests by millions of Egyptians
demanding that Morsi step down
after a year in office as Egypt’s
first elected president. The month-
long sit-ins have been the launch
pad of street protests that often
ended violently when Morsi’s sup-
porters clashed with opponents or
security forces.
Islamists led by the
Brotherhood staunchly reject the
new post-Morsi leadership and
insist the only possible solution
to the crisis is to reinstate him.
Meanwhile, the interim leadership
is pushing ahead with a fast-track
transition plan to return to a dem-
ocratically elected government by
early next year.
The Brotherhood, accused by
critics of trying to monopolize
power during Morsi’s year in
office, routinely claims its sup-
porters are killed in cold blood by
army troops, police or thugs
sponsored by the Interior
Ministry, which is in charge of
police. However, witnesses and
videos posted on social network-
ing sites show that Morsi’s sup-
porters consistently use rocks,
firebombs and firearms against
opponents, who behave similarly.
Morsi backers defiant in face of Egypt gov’t threat
REUTERS
Supporters of deposed Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi shout slo-
gans as they gather outside the Egyptian embassy in Sanaa to show
solidarity with his supporters in Egypt Sunday.
By Karin Laub
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JERUSALEM — The U.S. on
Sunday announced the resumption
of Israeli-Palestinian talks fol-
lowing years of stalemate, after
Israel’s Cabinet agreed to release
104 Palestinian prisoners con-
victed of deadly attacks.
The return to direct contacts
between the sides gave U.S.
Secretary of State John Kerry his
first concrete achievement after
months of shuttle diplomacy.
The U.S. said preliminary talks
would begin Monday, but it
remains unclear whether they will
lead to a formal resumption of
peace talks that broke down in
2008.
Despite a return to the table,
neither side appeared upbeat. Each
has blamed the other for the lack
of success in 20 years of negotia-
tions interrupted by bouts of vio-
lence.
Earlier Sunday, the Israeli
Cabinet voted 13-7, with two
abstentions, to approve in princi-
ple the release of 104 Palestinian
prisoners. The release is a key part
of the Kerry-brokered deal to
restart peace talks.
The State Department said Kerry
called Israeli Prime Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu and
Palestinian President Mahmoud
Abbas after the Cabinet vote and
invited them to send teams to
Washington.
State Department spokeswoman
Jan Psaki said the teams would
meet Monday and Tuesday to
“develop a procedural plan for how
the parties can proceed with the
negotiations in the coming
months.”
Talks on a final peace deal are to
last six to nine months.
Chief Palestinian negotiator
Saeb Erekat and Abbas aide
Mohammed Shtayyeh will repre-
sent the Palestinians, and Justice
Minister Tzipi Livni and adviser
Yitzhak Molcho will attend for
Israel.
Netanyahu, seeking to over-
come stiff opposition from ultra-
nationalists, told his Cabinet that
“resuming the political process at
this time is important for Israel,”
noting that any deal would be sub-
mitted to a national referendum.
Erekat welcomed the vote on the
prisoners as a “step toward peace,”
one he said is long overdue.
Negotiators made progress in
previous rounds, and the outlines
of a deal have emerged — a
Palestinian state in most of the
West Bank, Gaza and east
Jerusalem, lands captured by Israel
in 1967, with border adjustments
to enable Israel to annex land with
a majority of nearly 600,000 set-
tlers.
Those negotiations broke down
before the sides could tackle the
most explosive issues, a partition
of Jerusalem and the fate of
Palestinian refugees and their
descendants, now several million
people.
Abbas remains leery of negoti-
ating with Netanyahu, fearing any
offer made by the hard-liner would
fall far short of Palestinian
demands, so he has insisted on a
clear framework for negotiations.
Israeli-Palestinian peace talks to resume, officials say
By Sopheng Cheang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia —
Cambodia’s opposition appeared
to make impressive gains in
Sunday’s general election, though
the ruling party claimed a victory
that would extend the mandate of
longtime Prime Minister Hun Sen.
The results, if confirmed, lend sup-
port to opposition contentions
that the vote could usher in oppor-
tunities for greater democracy.
Khieu Kanharith, a spokesman
for the ruling Cambodian People’s
Party, said on his Facebook page
that his party won 68 of the 123
National Assembly seats. He said
the opposition Cambodia
National Rescue Party won 55
seats — gaining heavily on the 29
it held in the outgoing parliament.
The opposition party was
reserving its projections of the
size of its gains pending the
release of more figures. But even
the 55 seats conceded by the rul-
ing party represented a stunning
upsurge in fortune for the CNRP,
which had predicted extensive
vote-rigging.
Opposition leader Sam Rainsy
— who returned to Cambodia this
month from years in self-imposed
exile — said in a statement that it
was a “historic day,” but urged his
supporters to maintain calm and
wait for official results to be
released.
Provisional results from the offi-
cial National Election Committee
were being announced Sunday
night on state television, but only
by individual polling stations,
making it impossible to get an
immediate overview of the count.
It was not clear when final official
tallies would be announced.
If the results stand, it would be a
huge boost for the much belea-
guered opposition, giving it a
strong platform for future growth.
However, a simple majority is suf-
ficient for most legislative busi-
ness, ensuring that the CPP can
continue to administer the country
much as it wishes, though with
increased sensitivity for public
opinion.
Cambodian opposition makes gains in elections
OPINION 9
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
President Obama and the
Martin-Zimmerman trial
Editor,
How regrettable that President
Obama has fallen victim to his dis-
torted view of the Zimmerman/Martin
incident. Mr. Obama stated after the
trial that Trayvon “could have been
me 35 years ago” and that the
“African-American community is
looking at this issue through a set of
experiences that doesn’t go away. ”
What the president admits is that he
cannot distance himself from the past
and is prejudiced in the present. The
president neglects to mention that
neither the FBI, state prosecutors nor
local police found any racial animus
in the background of George
Zimmerman. In short, the record
shows no basis, in fact, that Mr.
Zimmerman was racially motivated
when confronting Mr. Martin.
Nonetheless, the president is deter-
mined to inflame this incident and
turn it into something it isn’t .
Frequent Daily Journal letter writer,
Michael Traynor, recently opined
about Mr. Obama’s remarks and
asked, “how do we make this all
work?” in his letter “President
Obama” in the July 23 edition of the
Daily Journal. Afirst step is this:
identity your prejudices and set them
aside or you risk living in a perpetual
loop of frustration and disappoint-
ment. Reliving past biases will place
oneself into an inevitable environ-
ment of a self-fulfilling prophecy.
Second, don’t let yourself fall into
the “group think” trap which charac-
terizes the actions of individuals as
representative of a much larger group.
Be objective and avoid prejudice.
The jury listened to all the evidence
from both sides and rendered their
judgment. Too bad the president can-
not bring himself to really accept
their verdict. Perhaps, one day, Mr.
Obama can avoid what he laments,
“painting with a broad brush.”
Ethan Jones
San Bruno
Letters to the editor
Guest perspective
By Herb Perez
F
oster City has completed and
approved its annual budget. It
was a detailed and diligent
process which was conducted to meet
a predetermined set of objectives. The
City Council set a goal to balance the
budget while maintaining the quality
of life our residents have come to
expect and deserve. The process took
more than six months with many
hours of review by both staff and the
council. In the end, we as a city were
able to achieve our goals. We bal-
anced the budget and were able to
maintain all levels of service and staff
levels that provide our residents with
a safe and sound community.
This result was only possible
because of the cooperation and dedica-
tion of our city staff, police and fire
who provide the services that keep
our operations running and safeguard
our community and families. All
departments have continued to sharp-
en their pencils to surgically cut
excess expenditures from the budget.
In many cases they have forgone addi-
tional compensation and raises. They
have also assumed greater workloads
and responsibilities. They do so for
their appreciation for our residents
and our community. I am sure I speak
for many when I say “thank you” for
their sacrifices and continued dedica-
tion. I hope we will be able to
address future budgets with this in
mind and build in financial parameters
to better meet the value of their con-
tributions.
This past week, the council
reviewed past and new policy initia-
tives for the coming year. The policy
calendar creates items offered to the
public as action items during the year
at various council meetings. It is
important the public attend and offer
input on these
items. We serve and
represent you. We
have made tremen-
dous progress on
the current agenda.
While each poli-
cy matter is impor-
tant, there are some
which resonate
more deeply with me. The health and
safety of our children and families are
of the utmost concern for me as a pol-
icy maker. I have been and remain
committed to supporting legal protec-
tion for our families and the commu-
nity in regards to these types of
issues. In the coming months, the
council will be conducting a review of
several health and safety issues which
I feel are critical to our continued
enjoyment of the quality of life here
in the city.
It has been well-established that no
one individual may affect the health
of another indiscriminately. In the
case of secondhand smoke, many of
our surrounding communities have
taken aggressive steps to protect
their residents from the perils of car-
cinogenic by-products. Recently, our
city chose to take a less aggressive
approach and passed a non-smoking
resolution for public events only. The
question that remains is whether this
step has accomplished its intended
goal through less obtrusive means
and self-compliance.
Foster City is a unique community
made up of residents with family-cen-
tric values. As a result, our residents
usually comply with the parameters
set forth in city-wide resolutions
intended to enhance our quality of
life. However, some issues are of such
importance that a resolution cannot
adequately attain our community
goals.
The health and safety of our fami-
lies should not be trumped by the per-
sonal desire of any individual who
may choose to participate in any
activity with proven detrimental
health consequences for others. This
is not to say that individuals should
not be able to choose such activities,
but rather where and when they are
permitted can and may best be con-
trolled by ordinance.
Most recently, in New York City,
the mayor undertook a severe course
of action in an attempt to curb the
intake of sugary beverages. Astate
Supreme Court judge ruled the regula-
tory effort to be arbitrary and capri-
cious and most likely difficult, if not
impossible, to enforce. While his
intent was good, his approach was
overreaching and most likely not
effective even if implemented. While
the consumption of these sugary bev-
erages is not healthy, it is a personal
choice that can be better managed
through education and outreach.
Moreover, this choice is that of the
individual and does not cause detri-
ment to a casual bystander unlike the
proven effects of secondhand smoke
There is no doubt that the review of
this issue will yield passionate debate
from our community. There will be
questions as to what degree smoking
should be limited and in what areas or
locations. I look forward to hearing
your thoughts on this important issue
and where/how it fits within a
Sustainable Foster City.
Herb Perez is a member of the Foster
City Council. He can be reached at 468-
3143 or hperez@fostercity.org.
Creating a healthy city
Familiar
faces
T
his November’s ballot will include some familiar
names. In addition to the incumbents running for re-
election, there will be at least two former coun-
cilmembers hoping to return to the dais.
Diane Howard, who served on the Redwood City Council
for the full term of 16 years
from 1994-2009, is mount-
ing a comeback campaign
for the seat Jeff Ira is vacat-
ing. In San Carlos, former
councilwoman Inge Tiegel
Doherty, who served from
2001-2007, hopes to return
to her former post.
Meanwhile, Tom Mohr, for-
mer president of Cañada
College and superintendent
of the San Mateo Union
High School District, is
seeking a seat on the San
Mateo County Community
College District Board.
There’s nothing novel about elected officials moving from
one position to another or occasionally returning to a post
they once held. Since term limits, that has become the new
norm. That is not possible in the state Legislature. The term
limit ban is for life. But not in local government. Take the
case of Joe Simitian. He started out as a Palo Alto school
board member. Then he went on to the Palo Alto City
Council. From there it was the Santa Clara County Board of
Supervisors. He then served as a state Assemblyman and
state Senator. When he was recently termed out of the state
Senate, he decided to run for his old seat on the Board of
Supervisors. No surprise, as a popular familiar face (with
ample campaign funds), he was re-elected. In Mountain View
and Millbrae, where there are eight-year term limits, it’s not
unusual for a termed-out councilmember to run again in two
years.
***
Voters may say they hunger for new faces and a fresh
approach but they usually prefer the devil they know to
someone unknown. Warren Slocum, for many years San
Mateo county’s elected chief elections officer and assessor-
county clerk-recorder, was able to win election to the Board
of Supervisors because of name recognition. Tom Mohr,
very popular in the communities he has served, also has a
leg up in his first try for elected office. Congress has no term
limits and it’s rare an incumbent in our mostly gerryman-
dered party districts gets the heave-ho. It did happen to
longtime — 40 years — East Bay Congressman Pete Stark
who, constituents felt, had stayed too long and was becom-
ing ineffective. Ayoung challenger, Eric Swalwell, won the
seat. One of the most watched elections this fall will be in
the South Bay where newcomer Ro Khanna hopes to do the
same to longtime San Jose Congressman Mike Honda.
***
Some time has passed since both Howard and Doherty
served on their respective councils. They are competing
against incumbents plus some new faces. So it may not be a
slam dunk. Howard will be facing, among others, Ernie
Schmidt, who is on the Redwood City Planning
Commission and had an unsuccessful bid for the Board of
Supervisors. Two incumbents are also running. Doherty will
be facing Karen Clapper, who was recently appointed to the
San Carlos City Council to fill the seat of Andy Klein; new-
comer Cameron Johnson; and incumbents Robert Grassilli
and Matt Grocott. These San Carlos candidates have all
pulled papers to run. Others have announced they might run.
In Burlingame, there will definitely be a new councilmem-
ber as 12-year veteran Cathy Baylock steps down. No term
limits in Burlingame. In Belmont, Coralin Feierbach is also
giving up her seat. No term limits there either. So along
with some familiar names, the November ballot will include
some new faces and more options.
***
In Congress, however, we have not benefited from the
most recent new crop — the Republican tea party members.
Many of them never held elected office before and most all
of them have a dim view of government. They don’t believe
in compromise even with more moderate members of their
own party. They have little in common with the New
Englanders who made up the original tea party. The latter
went on to become abolitionists, the enemies of slavery.
These new tea party folks are primarily white male southern-
ers. They have little in common with southerners Thomas
Jefferson, Robert E. Lee, George Marshall, William Byrd or
Sam Nunn. Instead, they resemble Faulkner’s fictional Flem
Snopes and his itinerant farmer clan, some of whom worked
their way to the top, became mayors, senators and gover-
nors. Flem Snopes never would have voted for food stamps.
Acotton subsidy, yes. Just like U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher
of Tennessee who voted against food stamps for the poor
but over the years his farm has received $3.5 million in fed-
eral agricultural subsidies much of it for cotton.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
OUR MISSION:
It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most
accurate, fair and relevant local news source for
those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
By combining local news and sports coverage,
analysis and insight with the latest business,
lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to
provide our readers with the highest quality
information resource in San Mateo County.
Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we
choose to reflect the diverse character of this
dynamic and ever-changing community.
SMDAILYJOURNAL.COM
Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
Michelle Durand, Senior Reporter
REPORTERS:
Julio Lara, Bill Silverfarb, Angela Swartz
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events
BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen Charles Gould
Gale Green Scott Jacobs
Kathleen Magana Kevin Smith
Leah Staver
INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Paniz Amirnasiri Carly Bertolozzi
Elizabeth Cortes Rachel Feder
Darold Fredricks Natalia Gurevich
Ashley Hansen Tom Jung
Jason Mai Jeff Palter
Nick Rose Andrew Scheiner
Sally Schilling Kris Skarston
Samantha Weigel Chloee Weiner
Sangwon Yun
Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone number
where we can reach you.
• Emailed documents are preferred:
letters@smdailyjournal.com
• Letter writers are limited to two submissions a
month.
Opinions expressed in letters, columns and
perspectives are those of the individual writer and do
not necessarily represent the views of the Daily Journal
staff.
Correction Policy
The Daily Journal corrects its errors.
If you question the accuracy of any article in the Daily
Journal, please contact the editor at
news@smdailyjournal.com
or by phone at: 344-5200, ext. 107
Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
editorial board and not any one individual.
BUSINESS 10
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
S.A.M S A M
1940 Lesl i e St. , San Mateo, CA 94403
Sam
Tsang
Grand Opening!
92
101
Hillsdale
Shopping
Center
Hillsdale
Caltrain
Station
We are Here!
S El Camino Real
West
East
South North
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Just over half of the com-
panies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index
have reported earnings for the second quarter,
and some are faring better than others. Here
are some of the things we’ve learned so far.
Banks and other financial companies have
been the standouts. The materials sector,
which includes miners and chemical compa-
nies, have fared the worst. Earnings are also
contracting in the technology industry.
Some older tech companies are reporting
lower profits as they struggle to adapt while
consumers embrace smartphones and other
mobile devices.
Overall, earnings growth is projected to
slow for a third straight quarter. Analysts
forecast that companies in the S&P500 will
report earnings growth of 4.5 percent for the
April-to-June period, according to S&P
Capital IQ. That’s a drop from 5.2 percent in
the first three months of the year.
It’s not all bad news.
Earnings at U.S. companies are expected
to grow faster in the second half of the year
as the economy strengthens. Rising con-
sumer confidence, boosted by climbing
home prices and an improving job market,
should combine to drive the economy to
stronger growth, helping companies earn
more. The economy should also benefit after
the impact starts to fade from government
spending cuts and higher social security
taxes put in place at the beginning of the
year.
By the fourth quarter of this year, company
profits are expected to leap 11.2 percent from
the same period a year earlier. That would be
the fastest pace since the third quarter of
2011. For now, investors have to be con-
tent with modest growth.
U.S. banks reported surging profits after
setting aside less money for bad loans.
Major banks including Citigroup and
JPMorgan Chase also profited from a
boom in investment banking, as recover-
ing financial markets resulted in big
increases in fees for underwriting stock
and bond offerings. Rising interest rates
also helped banks earn more from lending
money.
The outlook for banks isn’t as encourag-
ing, however. There are signs that the
boom in mortgage refinancing is starting
to peter out. On the positive side, there
weren’t any nasty surprises of the kind
banks have regularly handed investors in
the years following the financial crisis.
There was no mention of massive trading
losses like JPMorgan’s $6 billion
“London whale” debacle last year, or set-
tlements for mortgage-related lawsuits.
Banks are forecast to post earnings
growth of 24 percent in the second quarter,
the best of any industry group in the S&P
500. Of the 39 financial companies that
have posted earnings, 74 percent have
beaten analysts’ expectations for earn-
ings. That’s better than the 66 percent
average for S&P 500 companies overall. In
fact, if you strip out banks, overall earn-
ings are forecast to rise only 0.5 percent,
according to S&P Capital IQ.
“I suspect that over the next few quarters,
to the extent that interest rates continue to
rise, you may well continue to see finan-
cials outperform the broader market,” said
Joseph Tanious, a global market strategist
at JPMorgan Funds.
The earnings have helped financial com-
panies post the second-best returns in the
S&P 500 this month. They’re up 6.1 per-
cent in July, compared with a 5.3 percent
gain for the broader index. Financial
stocks have gained 25.7 percent this year.
Technology companies were meant be
among the biggest beneficiaries of an
improving economy. It hasn’t played out
that way. Some of the biggest names in the
sector are struggling to adapt to new tech-
nologies and how consumers use them.
Microsoft fell 11.4 percent July 19, the
most in more than four years, after the com-
pany wrote off nearly $1 billion from its new
Surface tablet business and said that a poor
reception for its Windows 8 operating sys-
tem crimped revenue.
Intel, which is wedded to the PC market
even as consumers switch to mobile devices,
slumped after the company predicted flat
sales.
Even Google faltered. Its results suggest
that the company is having trouble navigat-
ing the transition from traditional desktop
and laptop computers to smartphones and
tablets.
Earnings are expected to contract 5 percent
for tech companies in the second quarter.
“Technology companies are where we’ve
seen some of the biggest disappointments in
terms of earnings,” said Kate Warne, an
investment strategist at Edward Jones. “The
older technology companies have been a bit
slow to move to newer areas.”
The slump in Europe may not be over, but
there are some signs of hope, judging from
comments made by executives at industrial
companies.
That’s good because many U.S. companies
rely heavily on sales to Europe. Deutsche
Bank’s chief U.S. equity strategist, David
Bianco, estimates that 17 percent of the
profits at S&P500 companies come from the
region.
Bank profits up in second quarter; tech lags
By Tracie Cone
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — There’s no
such thing as “normal” weather in
California wine country, and vine-
yard operators say this year that
truism could mean good news for
wine lovers.
After cool temperatures slowed
ripening and kept grapes on the
vine until fall in recent years,
growers in the nation’s premier
wine region are facing a heat wave
that has made for one of the earli-
est harvests in recent memory.
“It has been a challenging
year,” said Michael Silacci, wine-
maker at Opus One in Napa Valley.
“But it’s shaping up to be an
excellent year.”
Weather hasn’t been this warm
across the region since 1997, a
year that produced a highly
regarded vintage. If the heat
continues as expected it could
mean fruit-intensive wines
from an early and abun-
dant crop.
“We’re a full
month ahead of
2009, ’10 and
’11,” said Jon
Ruel, COO at
Trefenthen Vineyards and presi-
dent of the Napa Valley
Grapegrowers.
Dealing with changing weather
patterns is part of the art of grow-
ing wine grapes, a long dance
with the elements to achieve a
precise combination of sugar
levels and acidity expected
from one of California’s top
commodities, a crop
worth $3.2 billion
on the vine last year,
which created more
than $34 billion
worth of wine.
To bring in that
harvest, growers are accustomed
to being flexible. “There’s no such
thing as a normal year,” Ruel said.
“And this isn’t a normal year.”
Growers can remove leaves to
let more sunshine hit fruit. They
can drop clusters to improve fla-
vors and quicken ripening in cool
years. And they constantly moni-
tor forecasts to know when an
early shot of water will help.
For this vintage, vineyard oper-
ators started picking grapes used
to make sparkling wines this
month, a move that came toward
the end of August last year. And
they’re watching cabernet, merlot
and pinot noir grapes, which are
already in veraison, turning red
and starting to ripen.
“Everything is moving at a
faster pace,” said Silacci, of Opus
One, the cellar founded in 1979 by
the Rothschilds of France and
Robert Mondavi as one of the first
for ultra-premium wine in the U.S.
Weather changes are a major fac-
tor that makes vintages distinc-
tive. In the case of Opus One, the
cool 2011 season produced a
Bordeaux blend with herbal and
fresh fruit notes. The weather was
warmer in 2007, producing wines
with the flavor of ripe fruit.
Warm weather means early wine grape harvest
<< McFadden ready to run wild for Raiders, page 15
• Newman wins Brickyard 400 at Indy, page 13
Monday, July 29, 2013
WORLD SWIM CHAMPIONSHIPS: FRANKLIN, LEDECKY SHINE BUT US MISSES PHELPS >> PAGE 16
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Belmont-Redwood Shores
11-12 Majors All-Stars have done
it.
They have made history.
With their backs against the
wall for the first time all summer,
BRS laid claim to the title of “Best
San Mateo County Little League
Ever” by doing what no District
52 team has ever done —
Belmont-Redwood Shores is on
their way to the Little League
baseball regional finals after cap-
turing the Northern California
championship 9-0 on Sunday.
Having to beat Santa Cruz twice
over the weekend to secure a spot
in San Bernadino, Belmont-
Redwood Shores pitching
absolutely dominated the only
team that has beaten them in post-
season this summer
Last week, it took a tremendous
pitching performance by Santa
Cruz to shutout a team in BRS that
came in averaging nearly 12 runs a
game during the All-Star season.
But on Saturday, Nicolas Lopez
was unhittable — literally. The
left-hander whirled a no-hitter
against San Cruz and struck out 12
in the process.
And on Sunday, behind another
masterful and legendary perform-
ance by Sean Lee, Belmont-
Redwood Shores completed their
championship bid.
While it wasn’t a no-no, the
term “lights out” actually doesn’t
do Lee justice. The young ace was
in a completely different zone,
atmosphere, galaxy, you name it.
Lee allowed just one hit over six
innings of work and struck out 15
of the 18 Santa Cruz batters en
route to a 9-0 shutout.
This is the first championship
of its kind for Belmont in 72
years.
It was quite the occasion for
BRS makes history, wins NorCal title
By Michael Wagaman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Yoenis Cespedes
drove in four runs on his most pro-
ductive day since winning the
Home Run Derby, and the Oakland
Athletics rallied from five runs
down to beat the Los Angeles
Angels 10-6 on Sunday.
Cespedes snapped an 0-for-13
funk with a two-run double in the
third inning, added an RBI single
in the fifth and then doubled in
Josh Donaldson as part of a five-
run sixth.
Eric Sogard added three hits and
two RBIs, and Brandon Moss also
drove in a pair of runs for Oakland.
The A’s (62-43) moved a season-
high 19 games over .500 and
extended their lead to six games
over Texas in the AL West.
Erick Aybar doubled and tripled
for the Angels, who placed Albert
Pujols on the disabled list before
the game with a tear in his left foot
that could end his season.
The A’s took two of the first
three games in this series primari-
ly on the strength of their starting
pitching. They got a big boost
from their offense in the finale and
a little help from the Angels’
defense along the way.
Cespedes provided the biggest
lift with his third three-hit game of
the season. The Cuban slugger
struck out looking in his first at-
bat before his double in the third
helped jump-start Oakland’s come-
back from a 5-0 deficit.
He later hit a towering popup in
the fifth that landed for an RBI sin-
A’s rally to
beat Angels
By Rick Eymer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Travis
Wood did more than just pitch his
way out of trouble.
He also hit his way to victory.
Wood pitched a four-hitter over
seven innings and had a home run
among his two hits in helping the
Chicago Cubs complete a three-
game sweep in San Francisco for
the first time in 20 years, beating
the Giants 2-1 Sunday.
“He threw one in there and I was
able to put a good swing on it and
hit it out of the park,” Wood said.
“I’m always surprised. I’m not try-
ing to hit home runs.”
Welington Castillo also home-
red for the Cubs, who won their
third straight and five of seven
despite playing without Alfonso
Soriano, who was traded to the
New York Yankees on Friday.
“It’s tough to lose him,” Wood
Wood pitches, hits Cubs
to 2-1 win over Giants
By Nancy Armour
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — It took Brek Shea
less than a minute to give the
United States a goal.
And the Gold Cup title.
Shea scored 42 seconds after
coming into the game as a substi-
tute, and his goal in the 69th
minute gave the United States a 1-
0 victory over Panama in the CON-
CACAF Gold Cup final. It is the
fifth Gold Cup title for the U.S.,
but it’s first since 2007. The victo-
ry also extended the Americans’
winning streak to a record 11
games, four more than their previ-
ous best.
When the final whistle sounded,
the Americans on the bench raced
onto the field to join their team-
mates. Several players jumped up
and down, and hugs and high-fives
were exchanged. Coach Jurgen
Klinsmann, who watched the game
from a luxury box after being sus-
pended for his tirade over the offi-
ciating in the semifinal, quickly
made his way down to the field,
pumping his fists in the air as he
walked.
The Panamians, meanwhile,
could only watch in disappoint-
ment. They came into the game
full of confidence after beating
Mexico twice during the tourna-
ment, but never really threatened
the United States.
The only downer on the day for
the Americans was another injury
to Stuart Holden’s right knee. He
collapsed to the ground after col-
liding with another player in the
first half and grabbed at his right
knee. He was able to walk off the
Team USA captures Gold Cup
REUTERS
Team U.S. celebrates their win over Panama in the CONCACAF Gold Cup soccer final in Chicago Sunday.
See CUP, Page 12 See GIANTS, Page 12
See A’S, Page 12
See BRS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The Golden Years are the best years!
Come interact with over 40 exhibitors from all over The Bay Area offering a host
of services, giveaways, information and more!
Free Services include*
º 0oody bags to the
hrst 250 attendees
º 8efreshments
º 0oor Pr|zes
º 8|ood Pressure 0heck
º Ask the Pharmac|st
by San Mateo Pharmacists Assn
º F8FF 0ocument Shredd|ng for
sen|ors age ô2+ by MiracleShred
Ior more inIormation call 650.344.5200 º www.smdaily|ournal.com/seniorshowcase
`While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events sub|ect to change
Senior Showcase
Saturday, August 24, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Little House
800 Middle Avenue, Menlo Park
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Information Fair
For Seniors & those who love them
2
0
1
3
2
0
1
3
Senior Showcase
FREE
ADMISSION
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
field on his own, but U.S. Soccer later said
he had sprained the knee and it would need
further evaluation.
Holden missed almost 2 1/2 years
because of injuries to his right knee, only
returning to the U.S. squad in late May.
The U.S. had been the class of the Gold
Cup, outscoring opponents 20-4 in the
tournament. Klinsmann used a mostly
young team, and its confidence appeared to
grow with every victory.
Though Klinsmann and his players had
insisted his one-game suspension wouldn’t
change anything — “We’re going to use it a
little bit as a rallying cry,” Landon
Donovan said Saturday. “We want to win the
trophy for him.” — they lacked their usual
sharpness early on. Donovan and Eddie
Johnson both struggled to get free, covered
closely by Panama’s dogged defense.
But they found their rhythm in the second
half, creating several chances. The best
came in the 56th minute, DaMarcus Beasley
chipped a ball into Donovan, who was in
front of the goal at the near post. Donovan
got his head on the ball, but not at the angle
he wanted and it flew wide of the net. As the
crowd groaned, Donovan threw back his
head and Beasley swatted the red flag in the
corner.
The Americans were still scratching to
create something — anything — when Shea
replaced Joe Corona in the 68th minute. He
didn’t waste any time making his presence
felt as the Americans pushed forward again.
Alejandro Bedoya fed Donovan, but he
muffed the shot. The ball continued to roll
past Panama’s Roberto Chen and on toward
the net. Parked inches from the goal line,
Shea stuck out his left foot and tapped the
ball past goalkeeper Jaime Penedo for his
second international goal.
The Americans had a chance to double the
lead in the 84th minute when Shea fed a
wide-open Eddie Johnson 2 yards from the
goal. But Johnson couldn’t finish it, send-
ing the ball flying over the cross bar.
Continued from page 11
CUP
said. “He was the leader of this team, he’s
been here the longest and he was swinging a
hot bat. Guys just have to step up and fil l
in.”
The Cubs’ clubhouse broke into sponta-
neous cheering when Soriano homered for
the Yankees and later learned of his game-
winning hit.
“He’s our boy,” Castillo said. “He just
needs to keep doing what he’s been doing.”
For one series, at least, the Cubs found a
way to win without their popular ex-team-
mate.
Pablo Sandoval drove in a run for the
Giants, who have lost four straight and
seven of eight.
Tim Lincecum (5-11) had two hits in addi-
tion to pitching seven innings. He gave up
two runs and four hits. He walked two and
struck out a season-high 10.
“Tim did a great job,” Giants manager
Bruce Bochy said. “Not only did he pitch
well, he got a couple of hits there. It’s a
shame he couldn’t get him the win.
“In all my years I’ve never seen a team go
through such a hard time getting runs in like
we’re having right now. It’s a shame because
we’re getting such great pitching.”
Wood (7-7) allowed an unearned run while
walking four and striking out seven. Wood
was 1-4 over his previous nine games. He’s
been involved in 10 one-run decisions.
“Early on it was kind of a grind but it was
that way for both of us,” Wood said. “I was
able to settle down quite nicely. ”
Pedro Strop threw a scoreless eighth, his
12th consecutive scoreless outing (10 2-3
innings) since joining the Cubs on July 2.
Kevin Gregg recorded the final three outs
for his 22nd save in 25 chances, and his
third straight of the series.
Wood ended the scoreless tie with his third
home run, a solo shot with two outs and on
a 2-2 count, in the fifth. It was the first career
home run Lincecum has allowed to an
opposing pitcher.
Lincecum survived a shaky start to retire
13 of 14 batters until Wood took him deep.
“It was just a couple of location mis-
takes,” Lincecum said. “Except for the two
home runs everything seemed to come out of
my hand better. ”
The Giants left the bases loaded in the
third and had the bases loaded with no outs
in the fifth. Buster Posey’s grounder to Luis
Valbuena turned into a 5-2 double play
before Sandoval doubled to tie the game.
“Thank goodness we got another weird
grounder to third we could turn into a double
play,” Cubs manager Dale Sveum said. “You
don’t see a force and tag like that too often.”
Castillo hit his third home run with two
outs in the seventh, giving the Cubs a 2-1
advantage.
“He was behind in the count and I was
looking for a fastball,” Castillo said. “He
gave it to me.”
The Giants, who have committed a major
league-leading 76 errors, took fielding prac-
tice instead of batting practice before the
game.
NOTES: The Giants activated RHP
Guillermo Moscosco, whom they acquired
in a trade from the Chicago Cubs last week.
RHP Yusmeiro Petit was designated for
assignment to make room for Moscosco.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
gle when Angels center fielder Mike Trout
lost it in the sun. The ball fell between Trout
and right fielder Kole Calhoun as Moss
scored from first with the tying run. Trout
had more fielding problems in the sixth after
the Angels went up 6-5 on Aybar’s double.
Stephen Vogt hit a sinking fly to center
that bounced in front of Trout just as he
nearly collided with Josh Hamilton racing
over from left field. The ball landed in front
of the two outfielders and rolled to the warn-
ing track as both players fell to the turf.
Seth Smith scored on the play to tie it 6-all.
Sogard followed with a single off reliever
J.C. Gutierrez (0-2) to drive in Vogt with the
go-ahead run, then scored on Jed Lowrie’s
RBI double to give the A’s an 8-6 lead. Moss
and Cespedes also had RBIs in the inning.
Jesse Chavez (2-2) pitched two innings
for the win.
Continued from page 11
A’S
SPORTS 13
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
In-Home
Senior Care Services 24/7
Senior Caregiving is our calling!
Professional, reliable, and caring
Live in or hourly care
Personal care and activities
of daily living assistance
• Reasonable rates
• Insured and bonded
• Excellent service and highly rated
650-368-5059 • 650-771-7676
www.MyCareOnCall.com
Justbeage62+andownyourownhome:
✓ Turn home equity into cash
✓ Pay off bills & credit cards
✓ No more monthy mortgage payments
✓ Remain in your home as long as you live
✓ You retain ownership (title) to your home
✓ FHA insured program
Calltodayforafree,easytoreadquote
650-453-3244
R
EVERSE
MORTGAGE
CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE OR QUOTE
SERVING THE ENTIRE BAY AREA
CarolBertocchini,CPA
NMLS ID #455078
Reverse Mortgage
Specialist and a CPA
with over 25 years
experience as a
financial professional
Homeowner must maintain property as primary residence and remain current on
property taxes and insurance
Security 1 Lending.
NMLS ID #107636. Loans will be
made or arranged pursuant to CA
Dept of Corp Residential Mortgage
Lending Act License #4131074
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Jenna Fryer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
INDIANAPOLIS — A born and
bred Hoosier, Ryan Newman spent
his childhood racing everywhere
from Anderson to Winchester and
every short track he could find in a
state mad about racing.
He graduated from Purdue and
landed a summer job working in
Jeff Gordon’s old race shop in
Pittsboro. One of the perks? He
got to live in the shop and sleep
alongside the cars.
And like many Indiana kids, he
revered Indianapolis Motor
Speedway, the track he first visited
in 1986 and later accidentally
stumbled upon NASCAR’s inaugu-
ral 1992 test while out buying
tires with his mother.
A win at the famed Brickyard?
That would be a dream come true
for the South Bend native.
Newman made the boyhood
dream a cool
reality, taking
the checkered
flag Sunday to
end a 49-race
winless streak
in front of his
home state
fans. His par-
ents, who
fueled his love
of racing and took him to the 500
as a kid, joined him for his
biggest win in Indiana.
Newman was as cool and collect-
ed in Victory Lane as he was on the
track when he held off Jimmie
Johnson. There were no tears, no
quiver in his voice and no need to
collect himself as Newman was
strangely stoic.
“I don’t show a lot of emotion, I
think everybody knows that,”
said Newman, who likened the vic-
tory to his 2008 win at the
Daytona 500. “I had the same
emotion, the same thankfulness I
did when I won the Daytona 500
because I feel everybody that has
been a part of my racing career —
from people that bought my rac-
ing uniform, bought me a right
rear tire, given us a credit card to
get to some race track at some
point in my career — those are the
people that helped me get to where
I am today.
“To me, it’s awesome to be here
at Indy. It’s awesome because it’s
my home state. I’ve raced go karts
at pretty much every go kart track
around here, been kicked out of
half of them. Those are the things
that make it special. I think about
those things more than I carry the
emotion on my cheeks.”
So the emotion was seen in
father Greg, who spotted for
Newman on Sunday, and his moth-
er, Diane.
Newman kept it together during
his celebratory burnout and the
drive to Victory Lane, a hallowed
area that he twice had to ask his
crew over the radio for directions
how to get there. He took the cus-
tomary ride in a convertible
around the track with his wife and
two young daughters, and happily
bowed again and again to kiss the
Yard of Bricks.
Sure, he smiled, and shared some
tender hugs with one of his daugh-
ters. But that was the most anyone
was getting out of Newman, who
had admitted to getting emotional
after winning the pole on Saturday
but seemed almost numb follow-
ing Sunday’s win.
“I’m not sure (how I feel) at this
point. I know it’s an amazing feel-
ing,” he said. “I was more emo-
tional yesterday after winning the
pole than I was two laps after
doing my donuts and everything
else today. I’m not sure why. I
took an emotional hit yesterday.
Just an awesome day. ”
Newman beat Johnson twice on
this Brickyard weekend, first when
he set a NASCAR track record in
knocking Johnson off the pole in
qualifying, then Sunday with a fast
final pit stop to snatch the win
from the four-time Indianapolis
winner.
The two were the class of the
field — they combined to lead 118
of the 160 laps — but it was
Johnson who dominated the race
and appeared to be just a bit bet-
ter.
But Johnson pitted from the lead
with 27 laps remaining and it was
a slow final stop for the Hendrick
Motorsports crew.
Newman pitted after that and
took only two tires to move into
the lead after the green-flag stops
cycled through the field. The clos-
est Johnson would get to him
again was when he paid a congrat-
ulatory visit to Newman in
Victory Lane.
Ryan Newman wins Brickyard 400 at Indy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. — The rain, the
gloom, the small gathering of fans didn’t
matter.
For the families of baseball pioneers
Jacob Ruppert Jr., Hank O’Day and James
“Deacon” White this was what they had
long been waiting for.
All three have been dead for more than
seven decades. Now their legacies were
secure with their induction Sunday into the
National Baseball Hall of Fame and
Museum.
“This is a day we will all remember for the
rest of our lives,” said Jerry Watkins, great
grandson of White and one of nearly 50
family members in attendance. “In my
mind, the only way it could have been bet-
ter is if my dad were here to see it. My dad
loved his grandfather, he loved baseball,
and he loved the Chicago Cubs. It was his
lifelong dream to see his grandfather
enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame, and
it was his lifelong dream to see the Cubs
play in the World Series. Dad, today you got
one of them.”
White, a barehanded catcher who grew up
in Caton, N.Y., near Corning, was one of
major league baseball’s earliest stars. In
fact, he was the first batter in the first pro-
fessional game on May 4, 1871, and laced a
double. An outstanding hitter, White was
regarded as the best catcher in baseball
before switching to third base later in his
nearly 20-year career.
Adeeply religious man, White was nick-
named “Deacon” and dubbed “the most
admirable superstar of the 1870s” by Bill
James in his “Historical Baseball Extract.”
White played for six teams and had a .312
career average. He finished with 2,067 hits,
270 doubles, 98 triples, 24 home runs and
988 RBIs before retiring in 1890.
“In my heart, I never believed this day
would come,” Watkins said. “If my grandfa-
ther were alive today, he would say thank
you to the Hall of Fame for this great honor,
and he would say thank you to each of you
for being here. So, on his behalf I say
thank you.”
Ruppert was born in Manhattan in 1867
and instead of college went to work for his
father in the family brewing business.
Baseball Hall doors open
for White, Ruppert, O’Day
Ryan Newman
SPORTS 14
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STOP THE PAIN
Are you taking any of these prescription drugs?
LYRICA | NEURONTIN | CYMBALTA | DILANTIN
TEGRETOL | EPITOL | GABAPENTIN | CARBATROL
/VNCOFTTt#Vrning PBJOtLeg Cramping
Sharp, Electric-like PBJOtPain When Walking
t%JTSVQted Sleeping
DOYOU SUFFER FROM:
OUR ADVANCED TREATMENTS CAN HELP
New Innovative and Exclusive
Treatment Solutions
Relieves Pain - Restores Feeling - Proven Safe & Effective!
No Addictive Medications - No Surgery
Medicare and PPO Insurance Accepted
Dr. Martin Kass, M.D. | Dr. Angelo Charonis, D.C.
650.631.1500 t PremierCC.com
CALL FOR A FREE PHONE CONSULTATION
130 Shoreline %r. Suite #130 t Redwood City
DUE TO
Peripheral Neuropathy
Diabetic Neuropathy
FEET, LEGS, HANDS
Prickling orTingling of Feet/Hands
BRS manager Rudy Lopez, who has won
every conceivable title with this Belmont-
Redwood Shores team — including three
division titles — but always had a long
term vision with this special group of boys.
On Sunday, that goal came to fruition.
Noah Marcelo and Luke Bugbee were
responsible for BRS’ scoring in Game 1 —
Marcelo stole three bases in the first and
Bugbee drove another run in with a single.
On Sunday, the Belmont-Redwood Shores
offense exploded.
Brad Shimabuku smoked a line drive to
left field for an RBI that brought in Marcelo
in the first inning.
Then in the third, Shimabuku jump-started
the offense with a single to left that
Dominic Susa followed with a knock of his
own.
Zach Wong came up and cashed in the two
ducks on the pond with a double to center-
field that made it 3-0.
Marcelo brought in run No. 4 with a bases
loaded walk.
Meanwhile, Lee was in domination mode.
The lone hit for Santa Cruz came in the
fourth with two outs. From there, Lee just
mowed the opposition down.
In the fifth, it was Shimabuku again start-
ing things off with a single. Lee helped his
own cause with a double and now it was 5-0.
BRS put the game way out of reach in the
fifth.
Marcelo led off with a single and Nicolas
Lopez followed with a two run bomb to
make it 7-0.
Not too long after that, Shimabuku col-
lected another hit, this one of the four-bag,
back to back, variety to bring the scoring
to 8-0.
Taylor Douglis brought in the last run of
the game with a hit to right field.
The game ended emphatically with Lee
striking out four batters — yes, four — in
the sixth.
BRS advances to compete in the Western
Region Tournament starting Friday at 4
p.m. and the winning team will advance to
play in the Little League World Series.
Continued from page 11
BRS
JULIE CRAFT
The Belmont-Redwood Shores All-Stars pose with the Northern California banner.
Sports brief
Holden leaves Gold
Cup final with knee injury
CHICAGO — Stuart Holden’s run of bad
luck continues.
The U.S. midfielder sprained his right
knee early in the CONCACAF Gold Cup
final against Panama on Sunday, and it
appears to be another “very serious” injury,
coach Jurgen Klinsmann said. Holden was
out of the game for more than two years after
previous injuries to his right knee.
“We are very, very concerned about
Stuey’s situation,” Klinsmann said after the
1-0 U.S. victory. “I’m not a doctor ... but
Stuart’s a player that when something hap-
pens, he knows. It’s not looking good right
now.”
Holden took a knock on his left knee
about 20 minutes into the first half, but he
grabbed his right knee after he hit the
ground. Trainers worked with him briefly on
the field before he got off and walked to the
sideline, where they continued to work on
him. As Holden sat on the bench, his head
buried in his hands, teammates patted him
on the head and shoulders trying to console
him.
He walked to the locker room a short time
later, and was limping visibly when he
rejoined his teammates for the victory cere-
mony.
SPORTS 15
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ßear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAPA — Darren McFadden
hopes that going downhill will be
just the tonic to revive his career
with the Oakland Raiders.
Back in a familiar offense that
suits his running style perfectly,
McFadden is looking to bounce
back from a disastrous 2012 cam-
paign and return to the big-play
back he was for the two years Hue
Jackson ran the Raiders’ offense.
Oakland switched schemes after
Jackson was fired as coach follow-
ing the 2011 season, returning to
the same zone blocking system
under coordinator Greg Knapp that
McFadden struggled with early in
his career. Those struggles returned
and McFadden had one of the worst
years ever for a Raiders back.
With new coordinator Greg
Olsen bringing back a power run-
ning system,
the Raiders are
hoping to see
the old
McFadden, who
was one of the
league’s top
backs the previ-
ous two years.
“It feels
g r e a t , ”
McFadden said
of the new offense. “I feel like I’m
a downhill runner and it’s some-
thing that coaches see also. By us
getting into a gap scheme offense,
being able to get downhill, they
feel like that suits me a lot more.
I’m looking forward, O-line is
doing a great job, getting in there
on a double-team and opening
holes up.”
The Raiders practiced in pads for
the first time in training camp on
Sunday, giving the first real test of
whether the running game has
improved after dragging down the
offense during a 4-12 season last
year that cost Knapp his job.
The biggest problem was
McFadden’s struggles in the zone
running scheme that does not fit
his style of play. After averaging
more than 5 yards per carry in each
of his two seasons in Jackson’s
offense, McFadden averaged just
3.3 last season — the lowest ever
for a Raiders back with at least 150
carries in a season.
“Last year is last year, ”
McFadden said. “We put that
behind us. We have a lot of new
faces here, a new offensive
scheme, and there are a lot of new
things going on. We’re not going
to concern ourselves with what
went on last year. We’ll look for-
ward to this year. ”
McFadden is much more com-
fortable in a power system where
he is asked to run straight ahead
rather than the zone system where
he often was called on to run later-
ally and wait for a hole before cut-
ting up field.
When McFadden ran in a similar
offense in 2010 and ‘11, he was
one of the game’s best big-play
backs, gaining at least 20 yards on
one of every 15 runs. He led the
NFL in yards rushing before a sea-
son-ending foot injury midway
through the 2011 season and had
become one of the game’s most
dangerous backs.
That all changed last year when
he had only four long runs in 216
carries.
“We know how damaging it can
be for another team with all those
big plays that he can make,” left
tackle Jared Veldheer said. “Even
just grinding out those 5-yard car-
ries, he’s a very good back and you
know we’re happy to be in a kind
of double team the guys back, let
them move the line, and let him do
his thing type of system.”
This season could be the last
chance for the Raiders to see that
kind of play from McFadden,
whose tenure in Oakland has been
hampered by various injuries that
have sidelined him for 23 games
over five seasons. His contract he
signed after being drafted fourth
overall in 2008 expires at the end
of the season, leaving his future
with Oakland up in the air.
McFadden said he is not focused
on his future right now and is just
happy to be back in a system he
likes. That increased comfort level
is obvious to those around him.
“Darren has always been a guy
who has come to work every day
and no matter what the circum-
stances are he’s going to continue
to go out there and compete,”
coach Dennis Allen said.
McFadden looks forward to return to old system
Darren
McFadden
16
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 59 45 .567 —
Washington 52 54 .491 8
Philadelphia 49 56 .467 10 1/2
New York 46 56 .451 12
Miami 40 63 .388 18 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 62 39 .614 —
Pittsburgh 61 42 .592 2
Cincinnati 59 47 .557 5 1/2
Chicago 48 55 .466 15
Milwaukee 43 61 .413 20 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 56 48 .538 —
Arizona 54 51 .514 2 1/2
Colorado 51 55 .481 6
San Diego 48 58 .453 9
San Francisco 46 58 .442 10
Saturday’s Games
Washington 4, N.Y. Mets 1
Atlanta 2, St. Louis 0
Detroit 10, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 7, Miami 4
Milwaukee 7, Colorado 5
San Diego 12, Arizona 3
Chicago Cubs 1, San Francisco 0
L.A. Dodgers 4, Cincinnati 1
Sunday’s Games
Detroit 12, Philadelphia 4
Miami 3, Pittsburgh 2
Washington 14, N.Y. Mets 1
Chicago Cubs 2, San Francisco 1
L.A. Dodgers 1, Cincinnati 0, 11 innings
Colorado 6, Milwaukee 5
San Diego 1, Arizona 0
St. Louis at Atlanta, late
Monday’s Games
St. Louis (Westbrook 7-4) at Pittsburgh (Liriano
10-4), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (J.De La Rosa 10-5) at Atlanta (Beachy
0-0), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Hefner 4-8) at Miami (Ja.Turner 3-3),
4:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 7-7) at Chicago Cubs
(Samardzija 6-9), 5:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Leake 10-4) at San Diego (O’Sullivan
0-2), 7:10 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 63 43 .594 —
Tampa Bay 62 43 .590 1/2
Baltimore 58 48 .547 5
New York 55 50 .524 7 1/2
Toronto 48 56 .462 14
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 59 45 .567 —
Cleveland 56 48 .538 3
Kansas City 51 51 .500 7
Minnesota 45 57 .441 13
Chicago 40 62 .392 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 62 43 .590 —
Texas 56 49 .533 6
Seattle 50 55 .476 12
Los Angeles 48 55 .466 13
Houston 35 69 .337 26 1/2
Saturday’sGames
Tampa Bay 1, N.Y.Yankees 0
Houston 8,Toronto 6
Oakland 3, L.A. Angels 1
Minnesota 4, Seattle 0
Boston 7, Baltimore 3
Cleveland 1,Texas 0
Detroit 10, Philadelphia 0
Kansas City 1, Chicago White Sox 0
Sunday’sGames
N.Y.Yankees 6,Tampa Bay 5
Cleveland 6,Texas 0
Toronto 2, Houston 1
Detroit 12, Philadelphia 4
Boston 5, Baltimore 0
Kansas City 4, Chicago White Sox 2, 12 innings
Oakland 10, L.A. Angels 6
Seattle 6, Minnesota 4
Monday’sGames
Tampa Bay (Price 5-5) at Boston (Doubront 7-4),
3:10 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 2-8) at Cleveland
(McAllister 4-6), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 5-5) at Texas (Garza 1-0), 4:05
p.m.
Toronto (Rogers 3-4) at Oakland (Griffin 9-7), 7:05
p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Kansas City10 6 6 36 31 21
New York 10 7 5 35 33 27
Montreal 10 5 5 35 32 29
Philadelphia 9 6 7 34 33 30
New England 8 7 6 30 27 19
Houston 8 6 6 30 23 20
Chicago 7 9 4 25 25 30
Columbus 6 10 5 23 24 27
Toronto FC 3 10 8 17 19 29
D.C. 2 15 4 10 10 35
WESTERNCONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 11 7 4 37 36 24
Portland 8 3 10 34 31 20
Colorado 9 7 7 34 28 24
Los Angeles 10 9 3 33 32 27
Vancouver 9 7 5 32 33 29
FC Dallas 8 5 8 32 27 27
San Jose 7 9 6 27 23 33
Seattle 7 7 4 25 22 21
Chivas USA 4 11 5 17 18 35
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
———
Saturday’s Games
Toronto FC 2, Columbus 1
Colorado 2, Los Angeles 0
New York 4, Real Salt Lake 3
Philadelphia 1, Vancouver 0
New England 2, D.C. United 1
Montreal 1, Sporting Kansas City 0
Houston 1, Chicago 1, tie
San Jose 2, Portland 1
Sunday’s Games
Chivas USA at Seattle FC, late
Wednesday, July 31
Roma at MLS All-Stars, 6 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 3
Chicago at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m.
Montreal at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.
New York at Sporting Kansas City, 5 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Colorado, 6 p.m.
MLS GLANCE
7/27 7/26 7/28
@Phillies
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/31
@Phillies
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/30
@Phillies
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/1
@Rays
4:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
8/2
vs.BlueJays
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/29 7/28
vs.BlueJays
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/30
vs. BlueJays
12:35p.m.
7/31 7/27 7/25 7/26
7/20 7/27
vs. Chivas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/3
@Montreal
5p.m.
8/7
@ Vancouver
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/10
vs.K.C.
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/18
@Dallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
8/24
Yasiel Puig homers in 11th,
Dodgers beat Reds 1-0
LOS ANGELES — Yasiel Puig
homered with two outs in the 11t h
inning to give the Los Angeles
Dodgers a 1-0 victory over the
Cincinnati Reds on Sunday.
Cincinnati pitchers set a fran-
chise record with 20 strikeouts.
Puig, Adrian Gonzalez, Hanley
Ramirez and Tim Federowicz each
fanned three times as the Dodgers
established their highest single-
game total for strikeouts since
the franchise moved from
Brooklyn to Los Angeles follow-
ing the 1957 season.
Puig drove an 0-1 pitch deep
into the left-field pavilion
against rookie Curtis Partch (0-1)
for his 10th homer and 23rd RBI
in 48 big league games. The
excitable rookie circled the bases
and slid into home plate, where
teammates were waiting for him.
The NL West leaders won for the
26th time in 32 games and
extended their lead to 2 1/2 games
over the Arizona Diamondbacks,
who lost 1-0 to San Diego.
Brandon League (6-3) pitched
two hitless innings for the win.
Puig’s first game-ending homer
in the major leagues came after
the Dodgers were held to one hit
by Tony Cingrani through the
first seven innings.
Cingrani, facing a lineup miss-
ing leadoff hitter Carl Crawford
for the second straight day
because of a high temperature,
tied a career high with 11 strike-
outs in his 12th big league start
before he was lifted for a pinch-
hitter.
The only hit against the 24-
year-old left-hander was a two-out
single through the box in the
third inning by Dodgers pitcher
Chris Capuano — his first hit of
the season. Mark Ellis followed
with a towering drive toward the
left-field corner that Chris Heisey
caught right in front of the short
fence.
Sports brief
By Paul Newberry
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BARCELONA, Spain — Wi t h
Michael Phelps cheering from the
stands and a big assist from a
teammate, Missy Franklin got off
to a thrilling start in her own quest
to win eight gold medals at the
world championships.
Too bad the U.S. men didn’t
have Phelps for their relay.
Megan Romano turned in a bril-
liant anchor leg to ensure Franklin
of a gold in the women’s 400-
meter freestyle relay Sunday
evening, chas-
ing down the
Australians in
the last, furious
strokes.
Coming off a
starring role at
the London
O l y m p i c s ,
Franklin is
now one-for-
one in Barcelona.
Seven more to go.
“Oh, my gosh, it was amazing!”
said Franklin, who clutched hands
with teammate Natalie Coughlin
at the edge of the pool as they
cheered on Romano. “We knew
Megan could do it.”
Overall, it was good start for the
American team on the first night
of pool swimming at the arena
atop Montjuic. Katie Ledecky,
still only 16 and preparing to start
her junior year of high school,
nearly broke the world record
while winning the women’s 400
free. Connor Jaeger pulled out a
bronze in the men’s 400 free,
which was won in dominating
fashion by China’s Sun Yang.
It looked as though the final race
of the night would produce anoth-
er red, white and blue celebration.
Turns out it did — but it was Le
Tricolore that waved throughout
the Palau Sant Jordi when the
French rallied to snatch the gold
away from the Americans in the
men’s 400 free relay.
In a repeat of their stirring
comeback at last summer’s
Olympics, Jeremy Stravius chased
down Jimmy Feigen to set off a
wild celebration among the huge
French contingent in the stands.
“I actually didn’t even see them
until the last five meters,” Feigen
said. “Maybe I should have paid
more attention to them.”
Maybe the result would have
been different if Phelps had not
retired after London. He is in
Barcelona to make some promo-
tional appearances and attend the
evening finals, but only as a fan.
The swimming world is abuzz with
speculation that he’s planning a
comeback, but not yet.
“He was texting me,” said Bob
Bowman, coach of the U.S. men’s
team and Phelps’ longtime men-
tor. “He was disappointed we got
beat.”
Franklin, Ledecky shine, but US misses Phelps
Missy Franklin
DATEBOOK 17
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Duette® Architella® Honeycomb Shades
Easy does it. One tap
gets your day in motion.
Hunter Douglas motorized window fashions
can be controlled by remote, wireless wall
switch or the Hunter Douglas Platinum™
App. With the app and your Apple
®
mobile
device, you can easily set your window
fashions to operate automatically.**
Ask for details today.
ON QUALIFYING PURCHASES
OF HUNTER DOUGLAS
MOTORIZED WINDOW FASHIONS.*
JUNE 15 – SEPTEMBER 3, 2013
$
100REBATE
Rudolph’s Interiors
ãîê - ãäî -1ìîê [ www.ra4e|p|slaterlers.cem
* Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases of Hunter Douglas window fashions with the PowerRise® or
PowerGlide® motorized system made 6/15/13 – 9/3/13 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. A minimum purchase of two
units is required for select styles; if you purchase less than the minimum, you will not be entitled to a rebate. Rebates will be
issued in the form of a prepaid reward card. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be
assessed against card balance 7 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations apply. Ask
participating dealer for details and rebate form. **Additional equipment is required for app operation; ask for details. ©2013
Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of their respective owners.
650-354-1100
L
ast week, we lost a Great Horned
owl, most likely due to starvation
and dehydration. As many of you
know, Peninsula Humane Society & SPCA
cares for sick, injured and orphaned wildlife
from San Francisco through northern Santa
Clara County; this is in addition to the
work and services we offer for dogs, cats and
other domestic animals. In the course of a
year, we receive thousands of wildlife need-
ing our expert care and save a remarkable
number of them. Not this time. The owl
ingested a rat stuck to a glue trap. People
use glue traps (also called sticky traps) to
trap rodents. They lead to an awful death
from starvation and some animals will even
gnaw at their own limbs to get free. They
also target non-intended species like birds,
looking to eat the trapped animals, even
dogs and cats. The owl, which ingested the
trapped rat, arrived in our care with glue on
its beak and couldn’t open it. Quite possi-
bly, the owl ingested some of the glue
along with the rat, which caused gastro-
intestinal blocking. When we euthanized
the owl to relieve the suffering, all signs
showed a complete shutdown in the gastro-
intestinal tract. Truly, a horrible way to die.
The amount of emaciation and dehydration
indicated that it had been glued shut for a
long time. I’m telling this story with hopes
that residents will consider alternatives to
glue traps. While they are not pretty, snap
traps are far more humane, since death is
usually instantaneous, but they must be
placed carefully so pets and children aren’t
injured. There are also humane traps; once
trapped, the rodent can simply be released.
Please also consider getting to the root of
the issue. Our wildlife experts can help you
understand why you may be seeing rodents
and suggest measures to make your home
and yard less attractive. Please call
650/340-7022, ext. 314.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer
Service, Behavior and Training, Education,
Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty
Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR pro-
gram areas and staff. His companion,
Murray, oversees him.
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — “The
Wolverine” slashed monsters and
minions to debut atop the weekend
box office.
The Fox film featuring Hugh
Jackman’s sixth turn as the claw-
wielding superhero opened with
$55 million in North America,
according to studio estimates
Sunday.
Last weekend’s top movie,
Warner Bros.’ low-budget horror
“The Conjuring,” slipped to sec-
ond place, adding another $22.1
million to its take.
“Despicable Me 2” was in third
with $16 million. The Universal
animated sequel, with its cast of
cute, yellow minions, has made
more than $600 million worldwide
since it came out four weeks ago.
“The Wolverine,” which is set in
Japan and features an international
cast, earned another $86.1 million
overseas. The film’s opening-week
take surpassed the $120 million it
cost to make, said Chris Aronson,
Fox’s head of domestic distribution.
“It’s a huge opening for the
clawed one,” he said. “It played
equally well from Maine to Maui.”
Another Fox film, the animated
snail-racing tale “Turbo,” was in
fourth place with $13.3 million.
Adam Sandler’s “Grown Ups 2” fol-
lowed with $11.5 million.
Woody Allen’s latest, “Blue
Jasmine,” enjoyed a stellar opening
of its own, though on a much small-
er scale. Starring Cate Blanchett,
the film opened in just six theaters
but still collected $612,767.
“It’s one of the biggest opening
per-theater averages ever for a non-
animated film,” said Paul
Dergarabedian of box-office tracker
Hollywood.com.
Ticket sales this weekend were up
almost 30 percent over the same
weekend last summer, he said.
“It was a good weekend to be a
moviegoer because the choices just
got a lot more interesting,”
Dergarabedian said, noting a mix
that includes animated, independent
and big-budget action offerings.
“Fruitvale Station,” the Sundance
winner already generating Oscar
buzz, expanded to theaters across
the country and edged its way into
the top 10, contributing to a sum-
mer box office that is up more than
10 percent over last year.
‘The Wolverine’ claws way to top
1.“The Wolverine,” $55 million
($86.1 million international).
2.“The Conjuring,”$22.1 million
($6.9 million international).
3.“Despicable Me 2,”$16 million
($24.5 million international).
4.“Turbo,” $13.3 million ($12.5
million international).
5.“Grown Ups 2,” $11.5 million
($4.2 million international).
6.“Red 2,”$9.4 million ($6.1 mil-
lion international).
7. “Pacific Rim,” $7.5 million
($14.25 million international).
8.“The Heat,”$6.85 million
9.“R.I.P.D.,”$5.85 million
10.“Fruitvale Station,”$4.65 mil-
lion.
Top 10 movies
“The Wolverine”was the weekend’s
top movie at the box office.
18
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Len Moore, Realtor™ Brandon Moore, Realtor™
DRE LIC# 00918100 DRE LIC# 01924680
Cell: 650-444-1667 brandon@vilmont.com
len@vilmont.com
VIP is a family business providing
superior Real Estate Services to
Peninsula residents & property
owners since 1976. Len Moore &
son Brandon are ready to serve
all of your Real Estate needs. Our
teamwork is comprised of Len’s
27+ years of local experience &
market knowledge as a Realtor &
investor plus the energy Brandon
brings to the sales team. Well
located in San Carlos, VIP serves
the SF Peninsula.
Weekend OPEN HOUSES BY
LEN MOORE – DON’T MISS THESE!
Open this Sat. 1:30 – 4:30pm
9150 Alpine Road, La Honda. $925,000. Great home on 17+
acres, a unique opportunity for privacy, peace and quiet.
New listing, Open this Sun. 1:30 – 4:30pm
2460 San Carlos Avenue, San Carlos. $725,000. Cute 3
BR starter home on a huge, west side lot, priced to sell!
ALL ELECTRIC SERVICE™
650-322-9288
FOR ALL YOUR ELECTRICAL NEEDS®
SERVICE CHANGES
SOLAR INSTALLATIONS
LIGHTING / POWER
FIRE ALARM / DATA
GREEN ENERGY
FULLY LICENSED
STATE CERTIFIED
LOCALLY TRAINED
EXPERIENCED
ON CALL 24/7
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
PHOTO COURTESY OF GEORGE YANG
On Friday, July 19, students from China, part of the Little Ambassador’s Program, visited Fos-
ter City.The visit was arranged by the American Chinese Environmental Protection Association.
They were received and welcomed by Mayor Pam Frisella,Councilman Art Kiesel and former
Mayor Linda Koelling. The students and their hosts engaged in discussions about how to
build communities that are healthy, harmonious, fun and sustainable.They were also given
a tour of VIBE Youth Center by the city staffer Beatrice Pascual. In the VIBE, students from
China and America had a chance to interact with each other with music and dance. Another
group of Chinese students,part of the same program,visited Palo Alto earlier in the same week.
The city staff there gave the students a tour of Lucille Stern Park and the model sustainable
house located there.
Little ambassadors
TOM JUNG/DAILY JOURNAL
Filoli in Woodside proved the setting for “Step Back In Time,” a July 17 music and costume
event with a Roaring 20’s theme. Seen stepping out in style are Tanya and Frank Pomposo in
their restored 1926 Chevrolet,with Bartender Mike Germano holding the door.Filoli is an his-
toric site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation and one of the finest remaining country
estates of the early 20th century.
Step back in time
Birth announcements:
Daniel and Christina Richardson,
of Santa Clara, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July 13,
2013.
Michael Garcia and Al ys s a
Giraudo, of Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 14, 2013.
Rajiv and Regan Parikh, of San
Carlos, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July
14, 2013.
Benjamin and Nandita Sommers, of
Millbrae, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July 14,
2013.
Paxton and Andrea Lazar, of
Belmont, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July 15,
2013.
Michael Bennett and Laura
Messerschmi tt, of San Carlos, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 15, 2013.
Molly Krause and Amal i ya
Murphy, of Redwood City, gave birth to
twins, a baby boy and girl, at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July 16, 2013.
Alejandro Olvera Morales and
Erica Olvera, of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City July 16, 2013.
Olcan and Bilgen Serci nogl u, of
Palo Alto, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July 16,
2013.
Brian and Jennifer Tucker, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July 16,
2013.
Ryan and Heidi Golden, of Mountain
View, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July 17, 2013.
Gabriel and Alana Haney, of Half
Moon Bay, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City July 17,
2013.
Peter and Apri l Trieu, of San Carlos,
gave birth to twin baby girls at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July 17, 2013.
Jeremy and Krista Carro l l, of San
Carlos, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City July 19, 2013.
Samuel Dorrance and Gracie
Centeno, of Redwood City, gave birth to
a baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City July 19, 2013.
19
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Freeze your fat away.
<

Stubborn fat
has met
its match.
Transform yourself without
diet, exercise or surgery.

CoolSculpting
TM
is the revolutionary body contouring
treatment that freezes and naturally eliminates fat
from your body. There are no needles, no special
diets, no exercise programs and best of all-
no downtime. Developed by Harvard scientists to
eliminate fat, CoolSculpting
TM
is FDA-cleared, safe
and clinically proven.
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Avenue, Downtown San Mateo 94401
alluraskin.com
Results and patient experience may vary. Ask us if CoolSculpting is right for you. CoolSculpting for non-invasive fat reduction is
cleared for the flank and abdomen. CoolSculpting is a registered trademark and the CoolSculpting logo and the Snowflake
design are trademarks of ZELTIQ Aesthetics, Inc. © 2012. All rights reserved. IC0529-C
• We are a CoolSculpting
TM

Certified Center
• Treatments Available
Everyday Monday to Friday
• Call Us Now at
(650) 344-1121 for
your Complimentary
Consultation so we can
answer all your questions!
SAM SOON
The Bubble Lady earns her title at the San Mateo Public Library Hillsdale July 18. Her visit in-
cluded a range of musically enhanced bubble adventures.
The Bubble Lady
JASON MAI/DAILY JOURNAL
Occidental band mates Chris Sullivan,Diz Dismore,and Tommy O’Mahony jam at Burlingame’s
Dancin’ Off The Avenue July 17.
Dancing in Burlingame
LOCAL 20
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, JULY 29
Mock SAT Test for High School
Students. 8:30 a.m. San Mateo High
School, 506 N. Delaware St., San Mateo.
Free. For more information call 579-
6180.
Silverado Senior Living Presents
‘The Stanford Speaker Series:’
Sexuality and Dementia Patients.
10:30 a.m. to noon. The library at
Silverado Belmont Hills, 1301 Ralston
Ave., Belmont.
Summer Enrichment Series:
Cooking Week. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free. This event will
run until July 31. Registration is
required. For more information and to
register call 591-8286.
TUESDAY, JULY 30
Pets in Need Fundraiser and
Adoption Event. Zoom Room
Belmont, 1412 El Camino Real,
Belmont. $10 per dog. All proceeds
and 10 percent of Zoom Room’s retail
sales benefit this rescue. For more
information and to RSVP go to
www.zoomroom.me/pets.
Employment Roundtable. 10 a.m. to
noon. 1044 Middlefield Road,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information email
rkutler@redwoodcity.org.
Spirit of the Rain Forest. 2 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, Oak Room, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo. Meet live
animals from the rainforest and learn
how they live. Presented by Wildlife
Associates. Free. For more information
call 522-7838.
Wealth and Power: China’s Long
March to the 21 Century. 7 p.m.
Cubberley Community Theatre, 4000
Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Prices vary.
For more information call (800) 847-
7730 or visit
https://www.commonwealthclub.org/
events/2013-07-30/orville-schell-and-
john-delury-rise-china.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 31
Easy to Grow Natives for California
Gardens. Downtown Library, 1044
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. Free.
For more information email
rkutler@redwoodcity.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Speido Ristorante, 223 East 4th
Avenue, San Mateo. $17. For more
information call 430-6500 or go to
sanmateoprofessionalalliance.com.
Music in the Park — Zydeco
Flames. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Stafford Park,
corner of King Street and Hopkins
Avenue, Redwood City. Free.
MenloParkSummer Concert Series:
Jessica Johnson. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Fremont Park, Santa Cruz and
University avenues, Menlo Park. Free.
For more information go to
www.menlopark.org.
BicycleSafety101. 7 p.m. Burlingame
Public Library, 408 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. A 90-minute workshop
by a certified League of American
Bicyclists instructor. Free. For more
information, call 558-7411.
Lara Price (Club Fox Blues Jam). 7
p.m. Club Fox, 2009 Broadway,
Redwood City. $5. For more
information call (877) 435-9849 or go
to www.clubfoxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, AUG. 1
Movies for School Age Children:
Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs.
3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library-
Oak Room, 55 W.Third Ave., San Mateo.
Free. For more information call 533-
7838.
Peninsula Recruitment Mixer. 4 p.m
for Ice Breaker, 4:30 p.m. for
Networking Mixer. Silicon Valley
Community Foundation, 1300 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Network with
dozens of local recruiters. $7 if paid
and registered by July 30, $10 at the
door. For more information, call 483-
1704.
Multi-Chamber Business Expo. 4
p.m. to 7 p.m. South San Francisco
Conference Center, 225 S. Airport Blvd.,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 588-0181.
Hot Harvest Nights Children’s
Entertainment. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Downtown Park Stage, 700 Block of
Laurel Street. Free. For more
information call 593-1068.
Central ParkMusicSeries: BudE. Luv
Orchestra. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Central
Park, 50 E. Fifth Ave., San Mateo. Free.
For more information go to
www.cityofsanmateo.org.
Becky’s New Car. 8 p.m. Dragon
Productions Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. The show will run
through Aug. 4 and is rated PG-13 for
the occasional use of profanity. $30 for
general admission, $25 for seniors and
$15 for students. For more information
go to www.dragonproductions.net.
Movies ontheSquare: OZ: TheGreat
and Powerful. 8:45 p.m. Courthouse
Square, 2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
Free. For more information call 780-
7311 or go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies.
html.
FRIDAY, AUG. 2
The Great Big Garden Bonanza at
Filoli. 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Filoli, 86
Cañada Road, Woodside. Free
admission for members, $15 for adults,
$12 for seniors, $5 for students and
free for children age four and under.
For more information go to
www.filoli.org.
Free First Fridays. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The San Mateo County History
Museum, 2200 Broadway, Redwood
City. All day admission is free to all. At
11 a.m. preschool children are invited
to learn about agriculture. At 2 p.m.
docents will lead tours of the museum
for adults. For more information call
299-0104.
Free Wine or Beer Tastings. 4 p.m. to
6 p.m. Half Moon Bay Library, 620
Correas Street, Half Moon Bay. Start
your weekend off right with a sample
of beer or wine in the wine
department with live music. Enjoy live
music and a bite to eat while sampling
and educating your palette. Free. For
more information, go to
www.newleafhalfmoonbay.eventbrite.
com.
Figures and Faces opening
reception. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Pacific
Art League of Palo Alto, 227 Forest
Ave., Palo Alto. Refreshments will be
served. The exhibitions will be open
through Aug. 29. Admission is free. For
more information call 321-3891.
Huge 2 Story Rummage Sale. 5:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 751 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Prices vary. For more
information email
mickicartr@aol.com.
Brisbane Concerts in the Park:
Cocktail Monkeys in the Park. 5:45
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Brisbane Community
Park Gazebo, 11 Old County Road,
Brisbane. Free. For more information
call (415) 657-4320 or go to
ci.brisbane.ca.us.
Summer Concert: Livewire. 6 p.m. to
8 pm. Burton Park, 1070 Cedar St., San
Carlos. Free. For more information go
to www.cityofsancarlos.org.
Foster City Summer Concert Series:
High-N-Tight. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Leo
Ryan Park, Foster City. Free. For more
information call 286-3380.
Music on the Square: The
Mashtones. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more
information go to
redwoodcity.org/events.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
LegallyBlondetheMusical. 7:30 p.m.
Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. Tickets are available
at pytnet.org and may also be ordered
through the Mountain View Center
ticket office. $20 for adults, $16 for
seniors and children under 12, $7 per
person for groups of 10 or more. For
more information and for tickets call
903-6000.
Coastal Rep Presents HAIR. 8 p.m.
Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main
St., Half Moon Bay. $27. For more
information call 569-3266 or go to
www.coastalrep.com.
Becky’s New Car. 8 p.m. Dragon
Productions Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. The show will run
through Aug. 4 and is rated PG-13 for
the occasional use of profanity. $30 for
general admission, $25 for seniors and
$15 for students. For more information
go to www.dragonproductions.net.
SATURDAY, AUG. 3
San Mateo Walking Tour. Meet at
Second Avenue and El Camino Real at
the parking facility, San Mateo. Dr. Al
Acena will conduct a tour of San
Mateo’s historic downtown.
Walk with a Doc. Leo J. Ryan
Memorial Park, Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. A free program of the San Mateo
County Medical Association’s
Community Service Foundation that
encourages healthy physical activity
for county residents of all ages.Walkers
enjoy one-hour walks with physician
volunteers and can ask questions
about general health topics along the
way. Next walk on Aug. 17 at Red
Morton Park. Free. To sign up visit
www.smcma.org.
Flea market.8 a.m. to 2 p.m. American
Legion, 130 South Blvd., San Mateo.
Free admission. For more information
go to
www.americanlegionpost82sm.org.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
presidential campaign when it raised
lots of money through online dona-
tions.
The campaign shared the fundraising
techniques after Obama beat Romney
in the 2012 election.
The campaign’s fundraising advan-
tage came down to speed by reducing
the time between donors clicking a
button and the actual time it takes to
process the transaction.
Save time, save money, the compa-
ny contends.
“Huge chunks of donations are wast-
ed and do not go toward providing
services,” Campbell said.
The service is also free. Donors are
only charged for a credit card transac-
tion fee and those fees can drop the
more nonprofits that sign up and use
the service, Bolton said.
Bolton has the computer science
background and Campbell worked
extensively with nonprofits, seeing
firsthand how inefficient fundraising
can be.
Charitable giving is a big business
in the United States with individual
donations totalling more than $200
billion a year.
Most of those donations go to larg-
er organizations such as the Red Cross
or United Way.
CommitChange is focusing first on
helping smaller nonprofits with under
a $13 million a year budget.
The site was in the beta stage until it
went fully live last week.
Companies can find a 20 percent to
50 percent gain in efficiency almost
immediately, Bolton said.
A food bank in the Tacoma, Wash.
area has served an estimated 20,000
more meals to the needy after signing
up with CommitChange.
The company just launched a nation-
al database with more than 3,500 non-
profits included in its server.
The goal this summer while the two
are in San Mateo is to partner with
about 10 local nonprofits to help them
succeed, Campbell said.
They are also surrounded by other
young entrepreneurs in Adam Draper’s
accelerator, bouncing ideas off each
other in an effort to improve the prod-
uct and reach the right audience.
To learn more go to: www. com-
mitchange.com
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
CHANGE
increase over time and eventually all
of the new home owners will pay the
special tax, said the city’s Finance
Director David Culver.
All new owners will be required to
sign an affidavit saying they under-
stand the tax will have to be paid and
the city has no liability, Culver said.
The city created the Community
Facilities District No. 2008-1 back in
2008. It encompasses about 800 resi-
dential units.
The council has to authorize the levy
by July 31 to get it on the county’s tax
roll for collection in fiscal year 2013-
14, according to a staff report.
The infrastructure includes the roads,
traffic signals, drainage, sewer sys-
tem, utilities and more needed for the
new community.
TRI Pointe will actually release
homes to its first buyers next week at
the Amelia.
The Amelia has 63 units and nearly
half have already been sold.
Bay Meadows has sold out the first
homes released since its March 16
grand opening. The first three sales
releases at Amelia and Landsdowne by
Shea Homes sold out immediately.
When complete, 1,170 housing
units will ultimately be constructed on
the 83-acre site by several different
builders. Some will be rental units.
Prices for homes at the Amelia cur-
rently range from $715,000 to
$915,000 depending on the floor plan
with some of the units having up to
four bedrooms.
In phase 2, there will be five build-
ings of Class A office space for rent,
ranging from 95,000 square feet to
185,000 square feet and the private
Nueva School. The development sits
between the Hillsdale and Hayward
Park Caltrain stations.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
TAX
HELP.
“It was so sad even hearing about
it,” Prem said.
Gaerlan and his family moved into
the Hoover Street duplex in 2009 and
Prem said Pelayo was quite clear to the
front tenants they needed to leave
space in the driveway for him to get
through. But when new tenants moved
in, Pelayo allowed them to park up to
four cars in the driveway and also
placed the dumpster, Prem said.
Prem said neighbors saw Gaerlan
dropped off by a school bus but unable
to maneuver around the cars. He once
soiled himself while waiting, Prem
said.
Sweezey also encountered problems
getting permission to build a ramp at
her expense and receiving a copy of
her lease. When she got the document,
Pelayo had written on it that “no hand-
icap facilities or alterations can or will
be made by both tenants and landlord.”
Pelayo also delayed the ramp, threat-
ened eviction and demanded renter’s
insurance as a condition of installa-
tion, Prem said.
The family eventually moved, citing
escalating harassment and a $125
monthly rent hike. They live in the
East Bay which creates a two-and-a-
half hour commute for Sweezey but the
housing situation is better, Prem said.
The family attended a workshop
sponsored by Legal Aid Society of San
Mateo which referred them to HELP
and eventually led to the suit filed in
January 2013.
Prem said HELP is publicizing the
case as a way to alert other homeown-
ers and tenants about the rights of
both.
“A lot of people don’t come forward
... but disability is our largest base of
discrimination cases,” she said.
Federal law prohibits a landlord to
discriminate because of disability,
including refusing to provide reason-
able accommodations or modifica-
tions. Exceptions are made when the
request would be financially burden-
some or fundamentally change the
housing provider’s business.
Pelayo could not be reached for com-
ment.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
ACCESS
COMICS/GAMES
7-29-13
weekend’s PUZZLe sOLVed
PreViOUs
sUdOkU
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
e
n
K
e
n
®
is
a
r
e
g
is
te
r
e
d
tr
a
d
e
m
a
r
k
o
f N
e
x
to
y
, L
L
C
. ©
2
0
1
3
K
e
n
K
e
n
P
u
z
z
le
L
L
C
. A
ll r
ig
h
ts
r
e
s
e
r
v
e
d
.
D
is
t. b
y
U
n
iv
e
r
s
a
l U
c
lic
k
fo
r
U
F
S
, In
c
. w
w
w
.k
e
n
k
e
n
.c
o
m
7
-
2
9
-
1
3
aCrOss
1 Previously
4 Chase fies
8 Embers, fnally
11 Future fower
12 Comic strip queen
13 “Bali —”
14 Hit hard
16 Cobra cousin
17 Applied paint
18 Barbarians
20 Inquire
21 Jan. follower
22 Discounts
25 Magazine piece
29 Gunk
30 Mature
31 Lemon —
32 World Series mo.
33 Spoiled
34 Adjust a guitar
35 Playhouse
38 Rumormonger’s start
39 Morse code signal
40 Caesar’s 16
41 Remote button
44 Patricia Hearst, e.g.
48 “Whether — nobler ...”
49 Resolved a problem
(2 wds.)
51 Fruity drink
52 Taboos (hyph.)
53 Gun lobby org.
54 Owns
55 Observed
56 Congeal
dOwn
1 Basics
2 Big swallow
3 Skunk’s defense
4 Streamlined
5 Cowboy’s charge
6 Brunched
7 Gizmo
8 At the drop of — —
9 Wide belt
10 Hula swivelers
12 Yawning gulf
15 Made like sheep
19 Teahouse attire
21 Dancer Astaire
22 Glasgow resident
23 St. Louis landmark
24 Minstrel’s instrument
25 Culture medium
26 Fingerprint, e.g.
27 Actress Turner
28 Washstand item
30 Aid in crime
34 White ribbon
36 Billboards
37 Connections (hyph.)
38 Wall climbers
40 Inert gas
41 Nile god
42 Verdi opera
43 Functions
44 Sharpen
45 Billions of years
46 Certain
47 Sports fg.
50 Sturgeon product
diLBerT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLe
fUTUre sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre swine®
GeT fUZZY®
MOndaY, JULY 29, 2013
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- When it comes to fnancial
or career matters, follow your instincts and play
your hunches. With a little common sense thrown in,
these assets could put you in the proft column.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you believe a friend
has some important information, don’t count on him
or her to call you about it. He or she might not even
know you need it. Make the contact yourself.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- You might only get
partial support for something important that you
want to change. Don’t be disappointed; at least it’s
a starting point.SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Two
persons whom you’ll soon deal with are blessed with
long memories. How you treat them won’t readily be
forgotten -- so make sure you treat them right.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Although you
might have to contend with some extra jobs or
responsibilities, you’ll fgure out how to handle
everything with grace and aplomb. In fact, the
busier you are, the better you’ll perform.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Learning
something new can be an enjoyable experience.
Knowledge you acquire now will be immensely
helpful in the future -- so pay attention.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- You may expend
only nominal effort on something of personal
signifcance, just to get the job done. However,
when it comes to things that beneft your loved
ones, you’ll knock yourself out.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You’ll have a more
enjoyable day if you associate with companions who
share your interests. Try to avoid persons whose
political or religious philosophies confict with yours.
aries (March 21-April 19) -- For some reason, a
few of your customary income channels could yield
larger returns than usual. Take as much advantage of
these conditions as you can -- they won’t last forever.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- A successful endeavor
that requires an unusual combination of sensitivity
and boldness is likely to outshine all of your other
achievements today, especially if competition is
involved.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Much to your credit,
you aren’t apt to reveal any information about a
friend that could tarnish his or her image. The
wisdom of your decision will pay off handsomely.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- Group encounters
could prove to be extremely enlightening if you’re
a better listener than you are a talker. Chances are
you’ll learn more from other people than you ever
expected.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • July 29, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
110 Employment
C3, LLC has the following full-time job
opportunity in Redwood City, CA: Soft-
ware Engineer [Ref#SE2031] to partici-
pate in integration of Business Intelli-
gence tool (MicroStrategy) w/in C3 Ener-
gy platform. Mail resume to C3, LLC.,
Att: L. Burke, 1300 Seaport Blvd., Ste
500, Redwood City, CA 94063. Must in-
clude Ref# to be considered.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
SOFTWARE ENGINEER positions avail-
able at Progress Financial Corporation in
Menlo Park. Software Engineers w/MS
and min. 2 yrs relevant experience and
Senior Software Engineers w/MS and
min. 1 yr relevant experience should
email resume & cover ltr to careers@pro-
gressfin.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA,
CNA’S
needed immediately.
Please apply in person at:
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue,
Suite 200, San Mateo, CA
or call (650)206-5200
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
2140 Carlmont Drive, Bel-
mont, CA 94002
Immediate openings: CNAs
- experience preferred. Must
be able to work 4-on, 2-off
schedule. Apply in person.
We hire nice people!
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
HELP WANTED: FOSTER CITY REC-
REATION FACILITY - part-time staff po-
sition open. Evening and weekend shifts
required. Must live locally. For a full job
description, please email:
Rob@themanorassn.com
110 Employment
COMPUTER EDUCATION -
CONNECTED
LIVING
seeking Part Timer
to teach
computer classes
to seniors at
Assisted Living.
Please send resumes
to:
mwills@teamenterprises.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
OFFICE HELP -
Part Time, $9 per hour. Must have CDL.
Flexible hours. Spanish a plus. Apply in
person, 718 Warrington Ave, Redwood
City.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RESTAURANT -
Now hiring for Quick Service / Counter
Service positions. Apply in person at
753 Laurel Street, San Carlos
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
23 Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
RETAIL -
What if you found opportunity right in
your neighborhood? Choice. Ad-
vancement. Excitement. FULFILLED.
There’s a way. At Walgreens, our
stores offer you numerous and varied
career paths. From beauty advisor to
management trainee and photo tech
to opportunities in Pharmacy, we de-
pend on our team members to be the
face of Walgreens. In return, each job
offers you the potential for growth and
a clear path to advancement – both
within the store environment and be-
yond. It’s a diverse atmosphere in
which you’ll find supportive co-work-
ers, a positive environment and the
tools you need to pursue your inter-
ests and grow your skills.
We are currently hiring for part time
and full time positions for Daly City,
San Mateo, Palo Alto, Mountain View
and the general Peninsula area
stores. To apply, visit www.wal-
greens.jobs.
Walgreens is an Equal Opportunity
Employer and welcomes individuals of
diverse talent and backgrounds. Wal-
greens promotes and supports a
smoke-free and drug-free workplace.
Walgreens. There’s a way.
180 Businesses For Sale
COIN LAUNDRY For Sale in San Fran-
cisco, Net $3-4K a month, $200K,
(650)520-5851
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256551
The following person is doing business
as: Queensway Food, 1611 Adrian Rd.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Queens-
way Food Corporation. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Chizn Hua Shih /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/08/13, 07/15/13, 07/22/13, 07/29/13.)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256597
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Pure Tech, 2) Pure Pom Stars,
321 37th Ave. SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Julie Sam, 1061 Tekman Dr., San
Jose, CA 95122. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 06/13/2013.
/s/ Richard A. Fivis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
07/08/13, 07/15/13, 07/22/13, 07/29/13.)
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
TS No. 12-0070696
Title Order No. 09-8-345127
APN No. 034-332-100
YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A
DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/14/2007.
UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PRO-
TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE
SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU
NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NA-
TURE OF THE PROCEEDING
AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CON-
TACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby giv-
en that RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant
to the Deed of Trust executed by MI-
CHAEL B GUESS AND FELICITAS
SOLZER-GUESS, HUSBAND AND
WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, dated
03/14/2007 and recorded 3/21/2007, as
Instrument No. 2007-042603, in Book
N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the
office of the County Recorder of San Ma-
teo County, State of California, will sell
on 08/20/2013 at 1:00PM, San Mateo
203 Public Notices
Events Center 2495 S. Delaware Street
Auction.com Room San Mateo CA 94403
at public auction, to the highest bidder for
cash or check as described below, paya-
ble in full at time of sale, all right, title,
and interest conveyed to and now held
by it under said Deed of Trust, in the
property situated in said County and
State and as more fully described in the
above referenced Deed of Trust. The
street address and other common desig-
nation, if any, of the real property descri-
bed above is purported to be: 715
FOOTHILL DRIVE, SAN MATEO, CA,
944023319. The undersigned Trustee
disclaims any liability for any incorrect-
ness of the street address and other
common designation, if any, shown here-
in. The total amount of the unpaid bal-
ance with interest thereon of the obliga-
tion secured by the property to be sold
plus reasonable estimated costs, ex-
penses and advances at the time of the
initial publication of the Notice of Sale is
$1,040,918.19. It is possible that at the
time of sale the opening bid may be less
than the total indebtedness due. In addi-
tion to cash, the Trustee will accept
cashier's checks drawn on a state or na-
tional bank, a check drawn by a state or
federal credit union, or a check drawn by
a state or federal savings and loan asso-
ciation, savings association, or savings
bank specified in Section 5102 of the Fi-
nancial Code and authorized to do busi-
ness in this state. Said sale will be made,
in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without cove-
nant or warranty, express or implied, re-
garding title, possession or encumbran-
ces, to satisfy the indebtedness secured
by said Deed of Trust, advances there-
under, with interest as provided, and the
unpaid principal of the Note secured by
said Deed of Trust with interest thereon
as provided in said Note, plus fees,
charges and expenses of the Trustee
and of the trusts created by said Deed of
Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BID-
DERS If you are considering bidding on
this property lien, you should understand
that there are risks involved in bidding at
a trustee auction. You will be bidding on
a lien, not on a property itself. Placing
the highest bid at a trustee auction does
not automatically entitle you to free and
clear ownership of the property. You
should also be aware that the lien being
auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you
are the highest bidder at the auction, you
are or may be responsible for paying off
all liens senior to the lien being auctioned
off, before you can receive clear title to
the property. You are encouraged to in-
vestigate the existence, priority, and size
of outstanding liens that may exist on this
property by contacting the county record-
er's office or a title insurance company,
either of which may charge you a fee for
this information. If you consult either of
these resources, you should be aware
that the lender may hold more than one
mortgage or deed of trust on the proper-
ty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER
The sale date shown on this notice of
sale may be postponed one or more
times by the mortgagee, beneficiary,
trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section
2924g of the California Civil Code. The
law requires that information about trust-
ee sale postponements be made availa-
ble to you and to the public, as a courte-
sy to those not present at the sale. If you
wish to learn whether your sale date has
been postponed, and, if applicable, the
rescheduled time and date for the sale of
this property, you may call 1-800-281-
8219 or visit this Internet Web site
www.recontrustco.com, using the file
number assigned to this case 12-
0070696. Information about postpone-
ments that are very short in duration or
that occur close in time to the scheduled
sale may not immediately be reflected in
the telephone information or on the Inter-
net Web site. The best way to verify
postponement information is to attend
the scheduled sale. DATED:
11/11/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY,
N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-
01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063
Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281-8219
By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECON-
TRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt col-
lector attempting to collect a debt. Any
information obtained will be used for that
purpose. FEI # 1006.171092 7/22, 7/29,
8/05/2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, SOLD!
296 Appliances
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
296 Appliances
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
WEBER BRAND Patio Refrigerator,
round top load, for beer, soda, and wa-
ter. $30 obo SOLD!
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
1990’S UPPER DECK LIFESIZE CUT-
OUTS - Aikman, Marino, Jordan, $20.
each, (650)701-0276
84 USED European (34) and U.S. (50)
Postage Stamps. Most issued before
World War II. All different and all detach-
ed from envelopes. $4.00, 650-787-
8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
CHINESE STAMPS - (90) all different,
early 20th century, $6.for all, (650)430-
6058.
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MENORAH - Antique Jewish tree of life,
10”W x 30”H, $100., (650)348-6428
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
298 Collectibles
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, SOLD!
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
303 Electronics
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1 COFFEE table - 15" high x 24" wide x
50 1/2 " long. Dk walnut with 3 sections
of glass inset. $100.00 (650)726-3568
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center draw locks all comes with
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END tables - 18" x 21" Dk brown wood
with glass tops & open bottoms. $ 75.00
(650)726-3568
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 LAMPS. 25" high. Cream ceramic With
white shades. $60.00 set. (650)726-3568
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
7 FOOT couch with recliners & massag-
ers on ends. Brown. $100.00
(650)726-3568
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR (2), with arms, Italian 1988 Cha-
teau D'Ax, solid, perfect condition. $50
each or $85 for both. (650)591-0063
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
COPENHAGEN TEAK DINING TABLE
with dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions.
48/88" long x 32" wide x 30" high.
SOLD!
COUCH - reclines, very good condition,
fabric material, San Mateo area, $50
(510)303-0454
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
GLASS DINING Table 41” x 45” Round-
ed rectangle clear glass top and base
$85 (650)888-0129
GLIDE ROCKER with foot stool. Dk
brown walnut with brown cushions.
$75.00 (650)726-3568
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
24
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Mustard-colored
kernels
5 Campaign ad
target
10 Best buds
14 Toward shelter, at
sea
15 Boxing venue
16 Dr. Frankenstein’s
helper
17 Musical Horne
18 Lost some color
19 Refuse to
continue
20 *Page-bottom
reference
indicated by an
asterisk
22 Exotic lizard
24 St. Elmo’s __
25 Yawn inducer
26 Vowel sound in
“bug”
29 Designer Gucci
30 That ship
33 Junction point
34 *Skydiver using
low-altitude
starting points
37 Dickens’s Heep
39 Mom, to Auntie
40 __ bear
41 *Nervous wreck
44 Ecstatic review
45 Concorde, e.g.,
for short
46 Crazy as a __
47 Like a three-piece
suit
49 Supply that
exceeds demand
50 Like the Magi
51 “On the wall”
beauty judge in a
film classic
54 Angels or
Dodgers, and, in
a way, what the
first words of the
answers to
starred clues
comprise
58 Garfield’s pal
59 Hot under the
collar
61 Norway’s capital
62 Alternative word
63 Like anchovies
64 Funnyman
Carvey
65 Plant’s beginning
66 “__ are the times
that ...”: Paine
67 State, in France
DOWN
1 Young cow
2 Topping in a tub
3 Nevada gambling
city
4 Compulsive tidy-
upper
5 Vicks
mentholated
ointment
6 Address the
crowd
7 Prefix with vision
8 WSW’s opposite
9 One supplying
drive-time music,
briefly
10 Stimulate, as
curiosity
11 Juanita’s water
12 Choice cut
13 Mlle., in Mexico
21 Point trivially
picked
23 Word after
support or study
25 Sanctify
26 Deliberately
doesn’t invite
27 Jewish wedding
dances
28 Dedicative poet
29 Made in Taiwan,
say
30 Wet impact sound
31 Let out, as a sigh
32 Messed up
35 Knotted
neckwear
36 System with dots
and dashes
38 “You had me at
__”: “Jerry
Maguire” line
42 Camera-toting
traveler, often
43 Curse-inducing
stare
48 Immigrant’s subj.
49 Avarice
50 Light bulb units
51 “The Simpsons”
tavern
52 Gathering dust
53 Increase
54 Hayloft bundle
55 Atty.-to-be’s
exam
56 Forearm bone
57 Tub toy
60 Stadium cheer
By Patti Varol
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
07/29/13
07/29/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, SOLD!
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OAK SCHOOL DESK - with ink well,
pencil holder and under seat book shelf,
great for a childs room or office, $48.,
(650)574-4439
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE , UMBRELLA & 6
CHAIRS - metal/vinyl, $35.,
(650)344-6565
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINER ROCKER - Like new, brown,
vinyl, $99., SOLD!
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR & HASSOCK - light
wood, gold cushions. SOLD!
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
WICKER ENTERTAINMENT CABINET -
H 78” x 43” x 16”, almost new, $89.,
(650)347-9920
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
3 PIECE fireplace set with screen $25
(650)322-2814
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
306 Housewares
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, (650)578-9208
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
1/2 HORSE power 8" worm drive skill
saw $40 OBO (650)315-5902
10" BAN SAW- SOLD!
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
BLACK AND Decker, 10” trimmer/edger
, rechargeable, brand new, $50 SOLD!
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTMANS PROFESSIONAL car buf-
fer with case $40 OBO (650)315-5902
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ELECTRIC HEDGE trimmer good condi-
tion (Black Decker) $40 (650)342-6345
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21” Belt Sander with long cord,
$35 (650)315-5902
NEW DRILL DRIVER - 18V + battery &
charger, $30., (650)595-3933
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
SANDER, MAKITA finishing sander, 4.5
x 4.5"' used once. Complete with dust
bag and hard shell case. $35.00 SOLD!
SMALL ROTETILLER 115 Volt Works
well, SOLD!
TORO ELECTRIC POWER SWEEPER
blower - never used, in box, $35. obo,
(650)591-6842
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
(650)212-7020
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
5 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $9. for all
(650)347-5104
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
AIR CONDITIONER - Window mount,
SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, (650)678-1989
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (2) Hard Cover
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy,
World of Discovery, $12., (650)578-9208
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BAY BRIDGE Framed 50th anniversary
poster (by Bechtel corp) $50
(650)873-4030
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BUBBLE GUM MACHINE - Commercial,
$50., (650)726-1037
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOOD HEALTH FACT BOOK - un-
used, answers to get/stay healthy, hard
cover, 480 pages, $8., (650)578-9208
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HABACHI BBQ Grill heavy iron 22" high
15" wide $25 SOLD!
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model",SOLD!
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAUNDRY SORTER - on wheels, triple
section, laundry sorter - $19., (650)347-
9920
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW COWBOY BOOTS - 9D, Unworn,
black, fancy, only $85., (650)595-3933
310 Misc. For Sale
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RALPH LAUREN TWIN SIZE COM-
FORTER - sheets & bedskirt, blue/white
pattern, perfect condition, $60., SOLD!
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SLIDE PROJECTOR - Airequipt Super-
ba 66A slide projector and screen.
$50.00 for all. (650)345-3840
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STAINED GLASS,
28”x30” Japanese geisha motif, multi
colored, beautiful. $200 (650)520-9366
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
311 Musical Instruments
GUITAR FOR sale. Fender Accoustic,
with case. $89.00 SOLD!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
MARTIN GUITAR 1971 D-18S Great
shape, Great sound. Price reduced to
$1200. SOLD!
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
25 Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box with video. Excellent
condition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS JACKET - size XXL, Beautiful
cond., med., $35., (650)595-3933
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NEW! OLD NAVY Coat: Boy/Gril, fleece-
lined, hooded $15 (415)585-3622
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
brand new, never worn for $25
(650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, SOLD!
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 AIR rifles, shoots .177 pelets. $50 ea
Obo SOLD!
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).SOLD!
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FOR SALE medium size wet suit $95
call for info (650)851-0878
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees, SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
KELTY SUPER TIOGA BACKPACK -
$40., (650)552-9436
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
ROWING MACHINE - SOLD!
STATIONARY EXERCISE BICYCLE -
Compact, excellent condition, $40. obo,
(650)834-2583
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
TENT - one man packable tent - $20.,
(650)552-9436
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL EXERCISE- Pro Form 415
Crosswalk, very good condition $100 call
(650)266-8025
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40.,
(408)764-6142
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWN MOWER - 48 volt Craftman elec-
tric lawn mower, SOLD!
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $65.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
SHOWER CHAIR, WALKER, WHEEL-
CHAIR, POTTY - $25. each obo,
(650)766-9998
SLEEP APNEA breathing machine com-
plete in box helps you breathe, costs $$$
sacrifice for $75, (650)995-0012
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM APART-
MENT - $1300. month, $800. deposit,
close to Downtown RWC, Call (650)361-
1200
440 Apartments
SAN MATEO, Near Hillsdale and 92, 2
bed room $1195 per Month, 3239 Glen-
dora Dr. #5 San Mateo, See Saturday &
Sunday 12-5pm, (925)457-8396
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1997 LEXUS LX 450 full size SUV with
152k miles in best shape, room for 7 &
excellent conditions clean Car Fax must
see hard to find #5011 reduced price for
$8500.00 plus tax,lic., (650)637-3900
2000 TOYOTA SOLARA SLE coupe
with 160k miles with Toyota reputation
for quality and longevity. automatic with
power package #4523 on sale for only
$6350.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2000 VW Passat GLX 4Motion Wagon
with 103kmiles loaded clean Car fax au-
tomatic great safe family or work sport
wagon #4237 on sale for low price of
$5995.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 AUDI A6 AVANT Wagon All wheel
drive with 79k miles in new conditions
fully optioned from factory she is very
popular with families who are looking for
luxury & safety #5050 for $8500.00.plus
fees.
2001 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS sedan 5
speed with 159k miles with power pack-
age & new cluthch great on gas & cold
air conditioning #4333 sale price
$2995.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 MERCEDES BENZ ML 320 SUV
with 133k miles she is loaded with all op-
tions including 3rd row seating great mid
size luxury SUV #4430 on sale for
$6995.00 plus tax lic,etc, (650)637-3900
2002 HONDA CIVIC EX coupe with 161k
miles 2 door automatic runs & looks
great & very gas efficient & reliable
#5047 with clean Car Fax & ready to go
on road $5750.00 plus tax lic,etc,
(650)637-3900
2004 SATURN ION 3 Sedan with 94k
miles in excellent conditions 4 door with
manual stick shift transmission clean Car
Fax power package #4521 priced on sale
for $5850.00 plus normal fees, (650)637-
3900
2012 TOYOTA CAMRY LE automatic
with only 24k miles like new with big sav-
ings still under full factory warranty for
60k miles black with new rims & tiers
#4420 on sale $17995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
ACURA ‘97 - 3.0 CL CP, Black, Auto-
matic, $2800., (650)630-3216
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
OLDSMOBIL”79Royal Delta 88, 122k
Miles, in excelleny Condition $1,800
(650)342-8510
VOLVO ‘00 - 4 door, excellent condition,
$4200 or best offer, (650)678-5155
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma Prerunner Extra
Cab with 195k miles two wheel drive
hard to find in this excellent conditions
tractions control & rear lock differential &
all power package #4501 for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HONDA 90 - 1968 excellent, 165 mpg,
can deliver, $900., (831)462-9836
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
NEW MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Modu-
lar, dual visor, $69., (650)595-3933
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $60 for all
(650)588-7005
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100., (650)726-
1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPEAR tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RADIALS - pair, PT215/60R17, $15. for
pair, (650)344-6565
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
680 Autos Wanted
26
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Bath
TUBZ
Over 400 Tubs on display!
World’s Largest “Hands-On, Feet-In”
Showroom
4840 Davenport Place
Fremont, CA 94538
(510)770-8686
www.tubz.net
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Home repairs &
Foundation work
Retaining wall • Decks • Fences
No job too small
Gary Afu
(650)207-2400
Lic# 904960
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
CHETNER CONCRETE
Lic #706952
Driveways - Walkways
- Pool Decks - Patios - Stairs
- Exposed Aggregate - Masonry
- Retaining Walls - Drainage
- Foundation/Slabs
Free Estimates
(650)271-1442 Mike
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Cleaning service.
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
FERNANDO’S HANDYMAN
Painting - Exterior/Interior,
Stucco, Floors, Demos,
Lawns, Pavers, etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Lic.& Bonded
(650)834-4824
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AAA RATED!
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40 & UP
HAUL
Since 1988
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
HAMZEH PLUMBING
5 stars on Yelp!
$25 OFF First Time Customers
All plumbing services
24 hour emergency service
(415)690-6540
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Hauling
27 Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tree Service
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Coverings
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)868-0082
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Insurance
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Video
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50.,
(415)298-0645
Massage Therapy
ENTERTAINMENT 28
Monday • July 29, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
www.CiminoCare.com
Burlingame Villa
24-hr. Alzheimer’s
& Dementia Care
1117 Rhinette Ave.
Burlingame
(behind Walgreens on Broadway)
(650) 344-7074
Lic #410508825
Mills Estate Villa
24-hr. Assisted Living
Board & Care
1733 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650) 692-0600
Lic #41560033
When Mom Needed
24 Hour Care ...
We found a home-like
DՑRUGDEOHVROXWLRQ
By Chris Talbott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
If musicians were measured not
by the number of records they sold
but by the number of peers they
influenced, JJ Cale would have
been a towering figure in 1970s
rock ‘n’ roll.
His best songs like “After
Midnight,” ‘’Cocaine” and “Call
Me the Breeze” were towering hits
— for other artists. Eric Clapton
took “After Midnight” and
“Cocaine” and turned them into
the kind of hard-party anthems
that defined rock for a long period
of time. And Lynyrd Skynyrd took
the easy-shuffling “Breeze” and
supercharged it with a three-guitar
attack that made it a hit.
Cale, the singer-songwriter and
producer known as the main archi-
tect of the Tulsa Sound, passed
away Friday night at Scripps
Hospital in La Jolla, Calif. His
manager, Mike Kappus, said Cale
died of a heart attack. He was 74.
While his best known songs
remain in heavy rotation on the
radio nearly 40 years later, most
folks wouldn’t be able to name
Cale as their author. That was a
role he had no problem with.
“No, it doesn’t bother me,” Cale
said with a laugh in an interview
posted on his website. “What’s
really nice is when you get a check
in the mail.”
And the checks rolled in for
decades. The list of artists who
covered his music or cite him as a
direct influence reads like a who’s
who of the Rock and Roll Hall of
Fame — Clapton, Neil Young,
Tom Petty, Johnny Cash, Mark
Knopfler, The Allman Brothers,
Carlos Santana, Captain Beefheart
and Bryan Ferry among many oth-
ers.
Young said in Jimmy
McDonough’s biography
“Shakey” that Cale and Jimi
Hendrix were the best guitar play-
ers he had ever heard. And in his
recent memoir “Waging Heavy
Peace,” Young said Cale’s “Crazy
Mama” — his biggest hit, rising
to No. 22 on the Billboard singles
chart — was one of the five songs
that most influenced him as a
songwriter: “The song is true,
simple, and direct, and the deliv-
ery is very natural. JJ’s guitar
playing is a huge influence on me.
His touch is unspeakable.”
It was Clapton who forged the
closest relationship with Cale.
They were in sync musically and
personally. Clapton also recorded
Cale songs “Travelin’ Light” and
“I’ll Make Love To You Anytime”
and included the Cale composition
“Angel” on his most recent album,
“Old Sock.” Other songs like
“Layla” didn’t involve Cale, but
clearly owe him a debt. The two
also collaborated together on
“The Road to Escondido,” which
won the Grammy Award for best
contemporary blues album in
2008.
Clapton once told Vanity Fair
that Cale was the living person he
most admired, and Cale weighed
the impact Clapton had on his life
in a 2006 interview with The
Associated Press: “I’d probably be
selling shoes today if it wasn’t for
Eric.”
That quote was typical of the
always humble Cale. But while
Clapton was already a star when he
began mining Cale’s catalog,
there’s no doubt the music they
shared cemented his “Clapton is
God” status and defined the second
half of his career.
“As hard as I’ve tried I’ve never
really succeeded in getting a record
to sound like him and that’s what I
want,” Clapton said in a “Fast
Focus” video interview to pro-
mote “Escondido.” ‘’Before I go
under the ground, I want to make a
JJ Cale album with him at the
helm.”
Clapton described Cale’s music
as “a strange hybrid. It’s not real-
ly blues, it’s not really folk or
country or rock ‘n’ roll. It’s some-
where in the middle.”
Cale arrived at that intersection
by birth. Born John Weldon Cale
in Oklahoma City, he was raised
in Tulsa. Buffeted by country and
western on one side and the blues
on the other, Oklahoma offered a
melting pot of styles. Cale leaned
on those styles as he spent his
formative years in Los Angeles
and Nashville, but he also used
drum machines and often acted as
his own producer, engineer and
session player. He’d bury his own
whispery vocals in the mix, caus-
ing the listener to lean in and
focus.
“I think it goes back to me
being a recording mixer and engi-
neer,” Cale said in a 2009 biogra-
phy on his website. “Because of
all the technology now you can
make music yourself and a lot of
people are doing that now. I start-
ed out doing that a long time ago
and I found when I did that I came
up with a unique sound.”
Musician JJ Cale dies; wrote Clapton, Skynyrd hits
Rock musician JJ Cale passed away
Friday night.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->