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T.W.

Positive Behaviour Support Plan Competing Behaviour Pathways Diagram
Arriving to class routine Arrive on time to class Teacher praise Earn signatures on a card towards a coffee

Desired Behaviour Poor time keeping skills Warning bell rings to go to next class T.W. goes for a cigarette and then walks his friends to class and then uses the bathroom. This causes T.W. to walk in late to class.

Maintaining Consequence Escape the busy hallways during transitions

Setting Event(s)

Antecedent Trigger(s)

Problem Behaviour Ask to leave class 10 minutes early to start the transition process

Maintaining Consequence

Alternative Replacement Behaviour Strategies that Make Problem Behaviours Irrelevant, Ineffective, and Inefficient Setting Event Strategies Provide a timer on phone to signal times Preventative Strategies Pre-correct T.W. on desired behaviour Positive Contingency statement – “If you arrive on time, you will earn a coffee towards a coffee.” Cue for upcoming bell to get to class. Teaching Strategies Teach T.W. to use phone for time Teach T.W. a transition routine that includes leaving ten minutes early so he can meet his needs in the bathroom and arrive to class on time Consequence Strategies Give verbal praise and a signature on coffee card for desired behaviour Re-direct T.W. to sit down quietly if he walks in late

T.W. Positive Behaviour Support Plan Competing Behaviour Pathways Diagram
Class work Complete work independently and ask for help when needed. Teacher praise Earn signatures toward a movie pass

Desired Behaviour Rough morning at home Poor written output Noisy environment Told to do work thatT.W. believes is unintersted in or does not understand Verbal outbursts Leaves class

Maintaining Consequence Escape

Setting Event(s)

Antecedent Trigger(s)

Problem Behaviour Ask for a break

Maintaining Consequence

Alternative Replacement Behaviour Strategies that Make Problem Behaviours Irrelevant, Ineffective, and Inefficient Setting Event Strategies Monitor T.W. for indicators of a ‘bad mood’ and send him on a task to office to give him a chance to self-regulate and normalizing the reason for a break Teach T.W. to use relevant programs on the computer for school work Allow T.W. to wear his earphones and listen to music to self-regulate Preventative Strategies Pre-correct T.W. on desired behaviour Positive Contingency statement – “If you complete this amount of work you earn a signature towards a movie pass.” Increase preference/interest in curriculum Alter task length Teach T.W. to ask for help on independent work Teach T.W. rules about swearing Teaching Strategies Self-Monitor - Ask for a break appropriately when feeling stressed/anxious Teach T.W. to monitor his own stress levels by reintroducing the five point scale Self-Manage tasks – set a goal for work to complete for the day Consequence Strategies When T.W. completes work independently give lots of verbal praise paired with a signature towards a movie pass. When T.W. shows signs of anxiety and/or starts engaging in verbal outbursts, remind him to ask for a break. Remove reinforcement of a movie pass when T.W. engages in leaving class.

T.W. Positive Behaviour Support Plan

Positive Behaviour Support Plan for T.W.

Introduction T.W. is a 17 year old male who has been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders that include language difficulties, especially expressive language, difficulties with attention, motor tics, and defiant oppositional behaviour. It is important for anyone working with T.W. to understand his challenges and provide an environment with positive behaviour supports. T.W. is very sociable and enjoys being with his peers both at school and in the community. T.W. enjoys a variety of music genres and playing his guitar. He also enjoys playing video games, being on the computer, fishing, and woodworking. Tieler has expressed interest in working on motorcycles, cars, and getting a job in a trade. T.W. also likes to drink cofee, eat meals from the cafeteria, and enjoys a cigarette during his breaks. T.W. is often successful when he is in situations where activities are presented in a structured and step-by-step way with two steps at most given at one time. T.W. also does well when he knows what is expected of him and when he receives positive attention and support from adults. T.W. also does well when he is allowed to make choices and set the rules for the activities and when he is engaged in a subject he enjoys like science. T.W. also enjoys having one-on-one conversations with adults. T.W. is on a modified high school graduation program where he currently attends four classes – two blocks of cafeteria, one block of Sr. LEAP, and one block of woodwork. There is an E.A. available in the Sr. LEAP and woodwork class. The Sr. LEAP class includes twelve other students who all exhibit challenging behaviours. Past reports and interviews with T.W.’s mom and T.W. himself indicated that T.W. has difficulty with expressive language and receptive language. T.W. will have difficulty with understanding the verbal give and take of conversation, long winded explanations, and relating to another person’s point of view. Instructions need to be short and simple, concrete language, and his responses may not always be socially appropriate or context appropriate. T.W. also has hyper sensitivities to touch and sound. This means that when T.W. is in an anxious state, loud noises and touch can actually be physically painful for him. Currently, T.W’s behaviours are challenging for the school because when he comes in late to class he can be disruptive to the other students. It is also a challenge to keep T.W. engaged in tasks which can lead to verbal outbursts in class in which he eventually leaves the class. When he leaves class, it can also be disruptive because other students will often follow him.

T.W. Positive Behaviour Support Plan After the functional assessment interview and observations it has been determined that when the warning bell rings for class, T.W. is often late to the next class because he is socializing with friends, smoking a cigarette, and going to the bathroom. The function appears to be escape (avoiding busy hallways). This is more likely to occur if T.W. is not keeping track of time. The functional assessment and observation also showed a second routine in which problem behaviour occurs for T.W. In the classroom, when T.W. is asked to complete work independently, he usually responds with a refusal to do so. T.W. will continue to refuse the work with verbal outbursts in response to the teacher asking him to complete his work. T.W. will escalate his behaviour into leaving the class without permission. The function appears to be escape. This is more likely to occur if T.W. has had a rough morning, is feeling anxious, is in a noisy environment, and is asked to do written work. T.W.’s goals are to complete a successful school day without disruption to the classroom and to complete the work that is being asked of him. The long term goal is to finish his grade 12 year at John Barsby and look toward meaningful employment. This can be achieved by: manipulating the environment to reduce setting events and antecedent triggers, teaching T.W. a more socially acceptable way to maintain the consequences of escape, and to reward T.W. when he has engaged in the desirable behaviour of showing up to class on time and completing his work. Teacher Vision of a Successful Classroom Routine T.W. will attend all his classes on time and do his best work. This means recognizing when he needs a break and asking appropriately for one. T.W. will increase his academic output over time with little disruption to the other students. When T.W. does take a break, he should do so without involving other students in a negative way by taking them from their work as well. Arriving to Class Routine Setting Event Strategies 1) Teach to make setting event irrelevant - T.W. cannot tell time from an analogue clock. He will also have difficulty organizing his activities so it fits into a certain time frame. T.W. will work on using his timer on his phone. Preventative Strategies 1) Pre-correction – Remind T.W. to be on time for next class and to set his timer. 2) Positive Contingency Statement – This is a prompt that will predict positive reinforcement for T.W. Tell him, “If you arrive on time to class you will earn a signature towards a coffee.” This statement will help keep T.W. motivated and on track to earn a desired reward.

T.W. Positive Behaviour Support Plan 3) Redundant Cues for predictability – Give T.W. a verbal warning ten minutes before the warning bell will ring to start his phone timer and transition to the next class. The transition routine should be the same – leave class quietly, have a smoke, go to the bathroom, wait at next class door. Teaching Strategies 1) Self-monitoring and management – Teach T.W. to use a timer on his phone to monitor how much time he has left before next class. 2) Transition routine – Teach T.W. a transition routine that will meet his needs between classes. This will include leaving ten minutes early to get a cigarette break, bathroom break, and alone time. This will help T.W. to self-regulate and be ready for his next class. T.W. needs to be consulted on this routine and be allowed to set the routine himself. A visual rehearsal and role play strategy will need to be used to ensure T.W. is able to make it a routine. Consequence Strategies 1) Desired Behaviour – Reward T.W. with praise every time he enters the classroom on time. Also give him a signature on his coffee card towards a coffee. 2) Re-direct T.W. to sit down quietly if he walks in late. Record all lates on Implementation Checklist. Class Routine Setting Event Strategies 1) Monitor T.W. for indicators of a ‘bad mood’ – This could include: rapid eye blinking, rubbing cheek on shoulder, telling people to “back off”, fists clenched, and vocalizations of “I’m going to punch someone…” Give T.W. a task that will allow him to escape the class and self-regulate. This task could include giving him some items to give to Mr. Travers in the office. Always have some items ready so the break can happen immediately. 2) Teach to make setting event irrelevant – Identify and teach computer programs that T.W. could find useful to complete his work. 3) Minimize the likelihood of the setting event – if the class is especially noisy, encourage T.W. to wear his earphones and listen to music. Preventative Strategies 1) Pre-corrections for reminders before verbal outbursts occur – Remind T.W. of desired behaviour to complete his tasks. “Do this amount quietly and ask for help if you need it.”

T.W. Positive Behaviour Support Plan 2) Positive contingency statement – “Remember that when you complete this amount of work, you will earn a signature towards a movie pass.” 3) Change task characteristics to promote desired behaviour – give academic tasks to T.W. that include his interests such as woodworking, motorcycles, music, math, and science. 4) Weaken antecedent trigger – change task length by providing small chunks of work to do at a time.

Teaching Strategies 1) Self-monitor – Teach T.W. to recognize when he is feeling anxious/stressed and ask for a break. Give T.W. a break every time he asks. Enlist the help of a Behaviour Consultant for social skills instruction around identifying feelings. 2) Teach T.W. how to identify his stress levels by re-introducing the five point scale. This scale will allow T.W. to let the staff know what number he is at so his supports can be adjusted according to how he is feeling. This scale helps translate abstract ideas such as feelings into simple numbers. A one must always be used for the lowest value while a five is the highest value. 3) Self-manage – Teach T.W. to set a goal of how much work he should accomplish in one day. 4) Teach T.W. to ask for help when he is having trouble understanding his work. This can be done by reminding T.W. to put his hand up and wait patiently until the teacher can help. 5) Teach T.W. the rules of swearing in the class. T.W. will need a list to be taught a list of words that are inappropriate for class time.

Consequence Strategies 1) Desired Behaviour – When T.W. completes his work independently, give him lots of verbal praise paired with a signature towards a movie pass. 2) Minor Problem Behaviour – When T.W. has a verbal outburst, re-direct him to take a break. 3) Major Problem Behaviour – When T.W. leaves the class without permission, he will not earn a signature towards a movie pass.

T.W. Positive Behaviour Support Plan Monitoring and Evaluation Level of problem behaviour: The teacher and E.A. will be provided with a weekly data form that records the number of free time with a friend for engaging in appropriate behaviour. They will also record instances of problem behaviour including lates, verbal outbursts, and leaving class on the implementation checklist. This is recorded to ensure that the problem behaviour is not increasing over time. Lates/Verbal Outbursts/Leaving Without Permission Student: T.W. Date: Monday ____________________ to Friday _______________________ Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Class 1 Class 2 Class 3 Class 4

Level of implementation by E.A/teacher: Both the teacher and the E.A. will complete an implementation checklist to ensure that all parts of the plan are feasible and used with fidelity. Level of social validity: The implementation checklist will be reviewed for social validity to ensure that the goals are acceptable, and the strategies are useful, effective, and easy to use by the teacher and E.A.

T.W. Positive Behaviour Support Plan
Implementation Checklist Transition/Class Routine for T.W. November 2012 Date: ____________________________________Person Completing Checklist_____________________________ Goal: T.W. will arrive on time to class and complete his work independently. Not In Place Quality of Life Supports 1. T.W. is paired with a Behaviour Consultant to work on social skills 2. Electronic device is being used by T.W. for time keeping 3. There are headphones available for T.W. to use 4. T.W. is being taught computer programs to support schoolwork 5. T.W. is being monitored for a ‘bad mood’ and sent on a break to office Preventative Strategies 1. Use pre-correction strategy – “Remember to arrive to class on time” and “Remember to finish your work and ask for help if you need it.” 2. Use positive contingency statement – “If you arrive to class on time you will earn a signature towards a coffee” and “if you complete your work you will earn a signature towards a movie pass” . 3. Cue for upcoming bell to transition to next class 4. Use preferences in curriculum 5. Alter task length Teaching Strategies 1. Use timer on electronic device 2. Transition Routine 3. Self-monitor feelings of anxiousness and asking for a break 4. Teach the five point scale for stress 5. Self-manage by setting a goal for work 6. Asking for help 7. Swearing rules Consequence Strategies 1. Reward with praise and coffee signature when on time 2. Reward with praise and movie signature when work is completed 3. Re-direct verbal outbursts with a reminder to take a break if needed 4. Remove reinforcement when problem behaviour of lateness and leaving class occurs 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 In Place 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

Problem Behaviour
Late to class Verbal Outbursts Leave class without permission 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 more 5 more 5 more

Social Validity
The goals of the class time routine are acceptable and important The strategies are useful and effective The strategies are difficult to use T.W. is successfully participating in the routine We believe the class time routine is successful Disagree 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 Agree 5 5 5 5 5

T.W. Positive Behaviour Support Plan Implementation Plan Transition/Class Routine Introduction and Rationale The purpose of this implementation plan is to clearly define the support activities in T.W.’s Positive Behaviour Support Plan, identify the roles and responsibilities of everyone involved, and give a timeline of when the activities will be initiated by. The Positive Behaviour Support Plan was developed in collaboration with T.W.’s viceprincipal, classroom teachers, Behaviour Consultant, and mom. This plan was based on a functional assessment interview of the above mentioned people and of a functional assessment observation that confirmed the problematic routines that were outlined in the interview. The support activities below are intended to effectively facilitate the intervention strategies in a timely manner.
Goals Acquire Support Plan Materials Tasks 1) Look into setting timer on phone 2) Make a signature coffee card 3) Make a signature for movie passes 6) Have earphones in class for T.W. 7) Prepare curriculum materials that are of interest to T.W. (trades math and science) Who Amanda By When Nov. 15

Anita

Prepare/Collaborate with team members for intervention

1) Go over written plan and implementation checklist

Amanda, Dave, classroom teachers Amanda

Nov. 14

2) Schedule weekly check-in with classroom teachers to monitor progress, problem solve any issues that arise, and review implementation checklist 3) Set up behaviour consulting for social skills 4) Go over transition routine, swearing rules, and five point scale with T.W. 1) Review and evaluate progress 2) Develop and implement changes

On-going

mom Amanda Ongoing

Team members skillfully use the PBS plan