What is Type One Diabetes? Diabetes is caused by the body’s inability to sufficiently regulate blood glucose, or blood  sugar, levels.

  Those who suffer from type 1 diabetes do not produce enough insulin to  regulate these levels due to an insufficient production of insulin.  This lack of insulin  causes blood glucose levels to climb to a dangerous high if left untreated.

Type One Diabetes Facts Type one diabetes is typically less commonly diagnosed than type two diabetes, though  it’s estimated that 700,000 Americans suffer from the disease.  For the most part, it  affects younger individuals, generally forty years and under.  Typically, type one diabetes  is diagnosed at the age of fourteen.  Individuals with type one diabetes may experience  symptoms of hyperglycemia at the onset of the disease.  Other conditions symptomatic of  type 1 diabetes may include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, abdominal pain, blurred vision,  increased appetite accompanied by weight loss, and frequent thirst and urination. Causes and Treatment for Type One Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is commonly caused by an autoimmune disorder.  The cells that produce  insulin in the body exist in the pancreas; this autoimmune disorder causes the body to  attack its own pancreatic cells, perceiving them as foreign tissue.  The cause of this  autoimmune disorder is unknown; however, research reveals that the condition is  frequently genetically inherited. Interestingly enough, those with type 1 diabetes are less likely to inherit the disease from  a close family member than those with type 2 diabetes.  Studies confirm that only four  percent of parents and six percent of siblings who have a family member with type of  diabetes have also inherited the disease. Children of fathers with type one diabetes are  more likely to develop type one autoimmune diabetes than those of mothers with type one  diabetes. The aftermath of some serious viral infections has also been found to cause type one  diabetes in some individuals; mumps, measles, rubella, influenza, polio, encephalitis,  cytomegalovirus, and Epstein­Barr virus are included in this group.  Medical research  shows that in rare incidence, injury to the pancreas, including damage resulting from  toxins, trauma, or surgical removal of all or part of the organ may also cause type 1 

diabetes.  Diabetes is a chronic illness, meaning there is no cure and it requires constant  treatment during the course of a patient’s life.  Fortunately, diabetes can be treated with  regular insulin shots injected into the skin, beneath the fatty tissue, in order that it may  reach and circulate through the blood stream.  Blood sugar levels can now be measured in  order to regulate the necessity of these insulin shots with easy to use, at home blood sugar  test kits. Endocrine Web | Type 1 Diabetes