P. 1
Central Lincolnshire Local Plan Core Strategy

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan Core Strategy

|Views: 347|Likes:
Published by daniel7120
Central Lincolnshire Local Plan
Core Strategy
Publication Version - July 2013
Central Lincolnshire Local Plan
Core Strategy
Publication Version - July 2013

More info:

Categories:Types, Presentations
Published by: daniel7120 on Jul 31, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/01/2014

pdf

text

original

Sections

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan Core Strategy

Publication Version - July 2013

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Who We Are
The Central Lincolnshire Joint Strategic Planning Committee is made up of representatives of 4 Councils: City of Lincoln Council, North Kesteven District Council, West Lindsey District Council and Lincolnshire County Council. This document refers to it as the Joint Committee for brevity. The Joint Committee was formed in 2010 to plan together for Central Lincolnshire’s future. We have a team of staff drawn together from the 3 district councils called the Joint Planning Unit (JPU). Further details and contacts are set out on the back cover of this document.

What is this Document?
Title: Central Lincolnshire Local Plan: Core Strategy – Publication Version Proposed for Submission Formal Status: Publication version of Development Plan Document proposed for submission as required by the Town & Country Planning (Local Development) (England) Regulations 2004 as amended Summary: This Core Strategy sets out the strategic planning policy framework for Central Lincolnshire to 2031. It has been published for a period of public representation of 6 weeks prior to its formal submission to the Secretary of State Route and Date of Approval for Publication: The document was approved for publication by the Central Lincolnshire Joint Strategic Planning Committee on 8 July 2013 Summary of Engagement: The Joint Committee has undertaken stakeholder engagement throughout the preparation of the Central Lincolnshire Core Strategy, including consultation on Issues and Options in 2010 and on a draft plan between 2012 and early 2013. Using the results of this engagement and those of previous consultations by the partner councils on their individual Local Development Frameworks, the Joint Committee has prepared the Publication Core Strategy. The latter is subject to a period of representation. Anyone who feels that the Core Strategy is not 'sound' as defined by national planning guidance and regulations can make a representation on the matter to the Joint Committee Representation period: From 29 July to 9 September 2013 at 5:00pm. Copies of this document and guidance on how to make a representation are deposited at the offices of each of the partner councils forming the Joint Committee (see Contacts on back cover of document), at Libraries in Central Lincolnshire and on the Joint Committee’s website www.central-lincs.org.uk After the Representation period: Following the period for representations on this document, a finalised Core Strategy will be submitted to the Secretary of State in Autumn 2013, and be assessed by an independent Inspector in early 2014 . Estimated Date of Final Adoption: September 2014

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Contents
Central Lincolnshire Key Diagram 1 2 Introduction Central Lincolnshire Today – Portrait & Key Challenges Central Lincolnshire in 2013 Sustainability Profile Key Challenges 3 Our Strategy - Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire The Growth Agenda & Sustainability Vision & Strategic Objectives Policy CL1 – Sustainable Development in Central Lincolnshire 4 Tackling Climate Change – A Low Carbon Future Policy CL2 – Tackling Climate Change Policy CL3 – Renewable & Low Carbon Energy 5 Growing Central Lincolnshire Policy CL4 – Level & Distribution of Growth Policy CL5 – Managing the Release of Land for Housing & Employment Policy CL6 – Site Selection in Central Lincolnshire Policy CL7 – Sustainable Urban Extensions & Other Large Scale Development Sites in Central Lincolnshire Policy CL8 – Sustainable Communities & Neighbourhood Plans Policy CL9 – Infrastructure to Support Growth Policy CL10 – Transport 6 Flourishing Communities & Places Policy CL11 - Health & Wellbeing Policy CL12 - Overall Need for Affordable Housing Policy CL13 - Affordable Housing Contributions & Qualifying Thresholds Policy CL14 - Affordable Housing on Rural Exception Sites Policy CL15 - Type and Size Mix in New Housing Policy CL16 - Meeting the Accommodation Needs of Gypsies & Travellers & Travelling Showpeople Policy CL17 - Delivering Prosperity & Jobs Policy CL18 - Regeneration Priorities in Central Lincolnshire Policy CL19 – Existing & Former Military Establishments 1 11 11 17 20 24 25 26 32 34 36 42 47 56 60 61 63 68 70 74 77 79 86 87 90 93 96 100 103 106

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy CL20 - Retail and Town Centres in Central Lincolnshire Policy CL21 - A Sustainable Visitor Economy Policy CL22 – Strategy for the Rural Area of Central Lincolnshire 7 A Quality Environment Policy CL23 - A Quality Environment Policy CL24 - Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity Policy CL25 - Managing Water Resources & Flood Risk Policy CL26 - Design Quality 8 The Lincoln Area Vision and Objectives for the Lincoln Area Key Diagram - Lincoln Area Policy L1 - Strategy for Growth in the Lincoln Area Policy L2 - Locational Priorities for Development in the Lincoln Area Policy L3 - Green Wedges and Green Infrastructure in the Lincoln Area Policy L4 – Employment Priorities in the Lincoln Area Policy L5 - Regenerating Lincoln Policy L6 – Lincoln City Centre Policy L7 – District & Neighbourhood Centres in the Lincoln Area Policy L8 – Lincoln Western Growth Corridor (Land at Swanpool, Fen Farm & Decoy Farm) Policy L9 – Lincoln South East Quadrant (Land at Canwick Heath and Bracebridge Heath) Policy L10 – Lincoln North East Quadrant (Land at Greetwell including former Greetwell Quarry) 9 The Gainsborough Area Vision and Objectives for the Gainsborough Area Key Diagram – Gainsborough Area Policy G1- Strategy for Growth in the Gainsborough Area Policy G2 – Locational Priorities for Development in the Gainsborough Area Policy G3 – Regenerating Gainsborough Policy G4 – Employment Priorities in the Gainsborough Area Policy G5 – Gainsborough’s Town Centre & Other Centres Policy G6 – Green Infrastructure & Settlement Breaks in the Gainsborough Area Policy G7 – Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood (Land south of Foxby Lane)

110 115 117 118 124 134 141 147 150 154 158 160 165 169 173 176 180 182 187 193 198 201 205 208 210 214 218 221 223 228 231

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy G8 – Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood (Land north of Corringham Road and the A631) Policy G9 - Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood (Land south of the A631 and north of Heapham Road) 10 The Sleaford Area Vision & Objectives for the Sleaford Area Key Diagram – Sleaford Area Policy S1 – Strategy for Growth in the Sleaford Area Policy S2 – Locational Priorities for Development in the Sleaford Area Policy S3 – Employment Priorities in the Sleaford Area Policy S4 – Regenerating Sleaford Policy S5 – Strengthening Sleaford Town Centre and the Network of Other Centres in the Sleaford Area Policy S6 – Green Infrastructure in the Sleaford Area Policy S7 – Sleaford South Quadrant Policy S8 – Sleaford West Quadrant 11 Delivering & Monitoring the Core Strategy

235 238 242 245 247 249 253 256 258 260 265 267 270 273

APPENDICES A B C D E F G H I Monitoring Framework Relationship between Core Strategy and Minerals & Waste Local Plan Saved Policies Deleted by the Core Strategy Central Lincolnshire Evidence Base Summary of Previous Work by Districts Main Urban Area Boundaries Housing Trajectory Explanation of Requirements of Statement of Design Quality Proposed Changes to Policies Maps – Extracts Abbreviations used in the Core Strategy 280 298 299 331 337 339 342 346 349 358

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE KEY DIAGRAM

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

1: INTRODUCTION
1.1 Central Lincolnshire faces a number of key challenges over the next decade and beyond as it seeks to achieve growth while ensuring that its quality of life and environment are conserved and enhanced. There is a need for significantly more housing and jobs in the area and for more and better facilities for its communities, while at the same time protecting the attractiveness and distinctiveness of the environment and ensuring that the area plays its part in tackling wider issues including climate change. The planning system has a crucial role in meeting these challenges at the local level, both through the decision making process on individual planning applications and by producing local planning policies for steering development and shaping places.

WHAT IS THE CORE STRATEGY?
1.2 This document is the Core Strategy for Central Lincolnshire. It is a local development document that sets out the overall approach to development and growth in Central Lincolnshire for the next 20 years. The Core Strategy contains a Vision for Central Lincolnshire in 2031 together with Objectives and Policies for delivering it, covering the following:    How sustainable development will be achieved to improve the quality of life, wellbeing and resilience of Central Lincolnshire’s communities How Central Lincolnshire will contribute to a low carbon future by helping to reduce carbon emissions The overall amount of growth proposed and how this should be distributed around Central Lincolnshire to maximise sustainability, including major locations for new development for Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford The provision of new and improved services and infrastructure (schools, transport facilities, open space, etc) needed as part of growth and how they will be delivered How Central Lincolnshire’s environment will be protected and enhanced, including its ecology, landscapes, built heritage and natural resources, as part of an approach to maintaining the area’s local character and diversity.

1.3 The Core Strategy will be used to guide the actions not only of the Central Lincolnshire Authorities but also those of other bodies and stakeholders involved in shaping the area’s communities and places. To achieve this, the Core Strategy has been developed in partnership with others to identify shared objectives and align strategies where possible. 1.4 The Core Strategy is part of the Local Plan for Central Lincolnshire. The latter refers to all the local planning policies that are in place in the Central Lincolnshire area, including any policies that have been saved from previous local
Introduction

1

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

plans. The Core Strategy is the first element of a revised Local Plan for Central Lincolnshire, and provides an overall planning framework of strategic policies. It is proposed that more detailed policies will be prepared subsequently, including any site-specific allocation of land for housing or other uses. Further details including the timetable for Local Plan preparation are set out in the Local Development Scheme (LDS) for Central Lincolnshire, which can be viewed on the website. 1.5 The Local Plan will evolve over time as it is completed and updated. Over time it will replace the 3 districts’ individual Local Plans and the saved policies in them. The Core Strategy is the start of this process, and clearly identifies which Local Plan policies it is replacing (see Appendix B).

CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE – A SHARED APPROACH
1.6 Central Lincolnshire is a new name and refers to the combined area covered by the City of Lincoln, North Kesteven and West Lindsey. These 3 councils have come together in a formal partnership with Lincolnshire County Council to prepare a joint Local Plan for the area. This approach has a number of key benefits for planning for Central Lincolnshire, including:   A single shared planning vision and strategy for the whole area; The ability to plan in a co-ordinated and integrated way, including policies based on functioning areas rather than council administrative boundaries, particularly in relation to Lincoln and its surrounding areas; Sharing the costs of preparing the Local Plan, including the evidence base.

1.7 The name Central Lincolnshire was taken initially from the Housing Market Area as defined in the adopted East Midlands Regional Plan. It reflects Lincoln’s centrality within the historic county of Lincolnshire, as well as the area’s geographical location between North Lincolnshire and the south Lincolnshire districts of South Kesteven and South Holland. 1.8 Coming together in this way ensures that the four authorities are well placed to meet the new Duty to Co-operate, put in place by the Localism Act 2011, which seeks to ensure that planning policies and aspirations for neighbouring authorities are mutually supported. 1.9 Preparation of the joint Local Plan is being overseen by a new joint committee established by Parliamentary order in 2009. The committee has representatives from each of the four partner Councils, and has full decision-making powers on planning policy matters. Its formal title is the Central Lincolnshire Joint Strategic Planning Committee, but for convenience is referred to in this document as the Joint Committee. The four councils engaged in the joint Local Plan are referred to as the Central Lincolnshire Authorities. The Joint Committee is supported by a team of planning staff called the Central Lincolnshire Joint Planning Unit (JPU).
Introduction

2

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

1.10 The responsibility for processing and decision-making on planning applications remains with the individual local authorities as previously. As part of the Local Plan for Central Lincolnshire, the Core Strategy will be taken into account in decisions on planning applications alongside relevant saved policies from the previous Local Plans. 1.11 Lincolnshire County Council is the determining authority for minerals and waste matters and has the responsibility for identifying sites and policies for minerals and waste development in the county. As such, minerals and waste issues are not covered in the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan, except where they are relevant and pertinent to the sites or policies being proposed. An explanation of the relationship between this Core Strategy and the minerals and waste planning is contained at Appendix B.

HOW WAS THE CORE STRATEGY PREPARED?
1.12 The Core Strategy has been prepared by the Joint Committee over the past 3 years. It has been through a process of continuous stakeholder engagement including the following periods of public consultation:    Preliminary Stakeholder Engagement – August 2010 Issues & Options Consultation – October to December 2010 Consultation on Draft Plan – July to September 2012 (Generic Policies) and January to March 2013 (Area Policies).

1.13 Full details of the engagement on the Core Strategy, including the Joint Committee’s response to comments received in the public consultations, are set out in a separate Report of Stakeholder Engagement, which is available on the Joint Committee’s website and from the offices of the partner authorities. 1.14 In line with the legal duty to co-operate with other public bodies on strategic priorities relating to the Core Strategy, the Joint Committee has worked closely with the relevant bodies to identify and agree shared approaches, including crossboundary issues affecting Central Lincolnshire and neighbouring authorities. Details of these strategic priorities and the joint working undertaken are contained in a separate Statement of Compliance with the Duty to Co-operate. Joint working and partnership approaches will also be key to implementing the Core Strategy. As stated above the creation of the Committee itself goes a long way to meet the Duty to Co-operate between the four partner authorities. 1.15 In formulating the Vision, Objectives and Policies within the Core Strategy, a range of issues and requirements have been taken into account alongside the views of stakeholders and the public: 1. National Planning Policy – during the preparation of the Core Strategy, the new National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) was introduced by the Government to replace the previous system of PPSs and PPGs. As the early
Introduction

3

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

stages of Core Strategy preparation took place in the context of the latter policy documents, an exercise was undertaken in 2012 to review the emerging Core Strategy against the NPPF guidance, and appropriate revisions to objectives and policies made where necessary to ensure consistency. Further details of the NPPF can be found on the DCLG website www.communities.gov.uk. 2. The Regional Plan – the East Midlands Regional Plan (adopted March 2009) was formally revoked by the Government in April 2013 and is therefore no longer part of the development plan for the area. Consequently, the Core Strategy is no longer required to be in general conformity with the Regional Plan as was the case before revocation. Overall, the Core Strategy sought to provide strategic policies to replace the Regional Plan locally where these are considered necessary for planning in Central Lincolnshire. In some cases, relevant aspects of the evidence base and/or policy framework from the Regional Plan have been rolled forward into the Core Strategy following appropriate updating and review where these are considered to represent the best approach locally. References to the Regional Plan are identified in the supporting text to the policies. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities were closely involved in the drafting of the policies for this area in the Regional Plan and as such were supportive of the overall approach, which has formed the basis of the Core Strategy. 3. Growth Points – the Lincoln area and Gainsborough/West Lindsey both have Growth Point status in recognition of the partner authorities’ aspiration to develop the wider areas as major centres of potential housing growth and regeneration. Growth Points were established to give access to central government funding to help with the planning and delivery of new housing and infrastructure in their area. They are not formal planning designations as such, and therefore have to be tested when Local Plans are prepared. The Lincoln area was designated as a Growth Point before the completion of the East Midlands Regional Plan, so its growth objectives are already reflected in the latter and its housing figures. However, the Gainsborough (West Lindsey) Growth Point post-dated the Regional Plan, and the Core Strategy has therefore considered and proposed appropriate levels of growth and housing targets for the area within the context of the overall growth of Central Lincolnshire, drawing on the development of the Gainsborough Regained Strategy. The Government retained the existing Growth Points when it came to power in 2010, though specific funding has been discontinued and alternative arrangements for supporting housing growth have been introduced nationally. 4. Eco-town Status – Central Lincolnshire made a successful bid for Eco-town status in 2010. Funding received under this initiative has been used to pursue high standards for sustainable development in Central Lincolnshire as part of its growth agenda. In particular, the potential for eco-town standards has been assessed via the Sustainable Futures Study and its supporting studies covering Energy and Green Infrastructure [see Evidence Base below]. The Joint Committee is committed to promoting the highest viable standards of

Introduction

4

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

sustainable development and design that can be achieved, and has set out its aspirations and requirements for such in the Core Strategy. 5. Evidence Base – in preparing the Core Strategy, the Joint Committee has undertaken or commissioned research into a range of matters to provide an evidence base for the plan that is objective, robust and as up-to-date as possible while also being proportionate. Where appropriate, stakeholders and delivery partners have been engaged in this process. Appendix C provides more details of the evidence base underpinning the Core Strategy, which includes:       Sustainable Futures Study Energy Study Green Infrastructure Study Strategic Flood Risk Assessments (SFRAs) and Water Cycle Studies Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) and Economic Viability Assessment (EVA)  Employment Land Review  City & Town Centres Update Study  Landscape Characterisation Assessments for North Kesteven and West Lindsey, and Lincoln Townscape Assessment These studies can be viewed via the Joint Committee website. Additionally, the Core Strategy’s evidence base includes other plans and strategies and their evidence bases, including:    The East Midlands Regional Plan Sustainable Community Strategies Lincolnshire Local Transport Plan and Lincoln Transport Strategy

6. Previous Local Plan review work by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities - each of the district councils in Central Lincolnshire had progressed a review of its Local Plan individually prior to the decision to move to a joint plan. All work previously undertaken, including stakeholder responses to previous consultations, has been taken into account alongside the responses to the joint Core Strategy work. A summary of the documents that were being prepared individually by the districts is included in Appendix C. 7. Integrated Impact Assessment incorporating Sustainability Appraisal – Sustainability Appraisal (SA) is an essential part of Core Strategy preparation. It involves a detailed assessment of the impacts of the Core Strategy in environmental, social and economic terms. The results are used to inform policy choices identified when preparing the plan and to ensure that any adverse impacts of specific policies are identified and mitigated as far as possible. To avoid duplication, SA incorporates the requirements of the European Directive on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), which applies to all Local Plan documents with significant environmental impacts. In
Introduction

5

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

preparing the Central Lincolnshire Core Strategy, SA has also incorporated Health Impact Assessment (HIA) and Equality Assessment, to provide a combined assessment called Integrated Impact Assessment (IIA). Further information on IIA including SA is contained in Appendix D. The Core Strategy is accompanied by an IIA Report setting out full details of the process and its findings. This can be viewed via the Joint Committee website. 8. Screening under the Habitats Regulations – European Directives require that the impacts of plans such as Local Plans are assessed in relation to internationally protected habitats and species. This process involves “screening” of policies and consultation with Natural England on the results to establish whether and how any necessary mitigation of impacts is built into the plan. 9. Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) – the IDP identifies the infrastructure requirements needed to support Central Lincolnshire’s growth, including physical, social and green infrastructure. The IDP has been developed in parallel with the Core Strategy and sets out key infrastructure needs in a schedule informed by the level, location and phasing of development in the Core Strategy. It also identifies the costs of infrastructure, together with the proposed sources of funding, known funding gaps, and the proposed delivery mechanisms and partners. 10. Whole Plan Viability and Community Infrastructure Levy Study – in line with the NPPF, whole plan viability has been assessed by Peter Brett Associates LLP, May 2013. The Study assessed the cumulative impact of emerging policies on viability and also assessed the short term deliverability and longer term development of the housing trajectory. Overall, the study found the emerging Core Strategy policies to be viable and to not place an unnecessary level of policy burdens on development. 11. Other Strategies – Partnership working and co-ordination of strategies are key requirements for successful Local Plans. The Joint Committee has therefore liaised closely with relevant bodies that prepare other strategies affecting Central Lincolnshire’s future, including health, transport, housing, economic development and nature conservation. This is to ensure that the Core Strategy and other plans are as closely aligned as possible, and that strategies support each other. Many of the policies in the Core Strategy rely on action or investment by these other parties. 12. Neighbourhood Plans – a number of Neighbourhood Plans are being progressed by communities in Central Lincolnshire (some of which are in receipt of Vanguard funding from a national pot) with the support of the partner authorities and the Joint Committee. These were at a relatively early stage at the time the Core Strategy was published, but the latter provides relevant local guidance on Neighbourhood Plans and how they relate to the planning framework for Central Lincolnshire.

Introduction

6

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

THE SOUNDNESS OF THE CORE STRATEGY
1.16 The Core Strategy has been prepared to meet the Government’s criteria for soundness as set out in the NPPF [see Box]. THE “TESTS” OF SOUNDNESS To be assessed as sound, Local Plans must be:  Positively Prepared – the plan should be prepared on a strategy which seeks to meet objectively assessed development and infrastructure requirements, including unmet requirements from neighbouring authorities where it is reasonable to do so and consistent with achieving sustainable development; Justified – the plan should be the most appropriate strategy, when considered against the reasonable alternatives, based on proportionate evidence; Effective – the plan should be deliverable over its period and based on effective joint working on cross-boundary strategic priorities; and Consistent with national policy – the plan should enable the delivery of sustainable development in accordance with the policies in the Framework.

 

Source: NPPF (DCLG, March 2012) .

DELIVERING & MONITORING THE CORE STRATEGY
1.17 The successful implementation of the Core Strategy is key for its effectiveness, and has therefore been a key consideration in its preparation and content. 1.18 The Joint Committee sees partnership working with other bodies and agencies as crucial for delivery and has therefore aligned the Core Strategy with other strategies and implementation plans that will play a role in achieving sustainable development in Central Lincolnshire. The economic development and housing strategies are key examples where alignment and collaboration are required to deliver the growth agenda as part of the wider vision for sustainable development in Central Lincolnshire. 1.19 Monitoring of the Core Strategy will be undertaken to ensure that its implementation and effectiveness can be assessed, and any necessary changes addressed through future reviews of the plan. 1.20 Further details of the delivery and monitoring approach including key partnerships are set out in Chapter 11 and Appendix A. Additionally, a summary of
Introduction

7

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

the main delivery mechanisms for each policy is included in the text of the plan.

HOW TO USE THE CORE STRATEGY
1.21 The Core Strategy is divided into 11 chapters. The first two chapters introduce the Core Strategy, including the context for its preparation, and provide a portrait of Central Lincolnshire and the planning issues it faces today. 1.22 The remaining 9 chapters set out the planning strategy for Central Lincolnshire for the period to 2031, including the specific policies that will be used to guide development, investment and other activity.    Chapters 3 - 7 cover generic planning themes that apply to the whole of Central Lincolnshire Chapters 8, 9 and 10 set out more detailed planning approaches respectively for the three main settlements of Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford. Chapter 11 explains how the Core Strategy will be delivered and monitored.

1.23 Each policy is accompanied by supporting text that sets out the context and evidence for the policy, and explains any technical aspects or detailed requirements for planning applicants. 1.24 The main proposals in the Core Strategy are illustrated on a Key Diagram located at the front of the document. Further diagrams and maps are included in the chapters where these are felt necessary to provide clarity. Generic Chapters 1.25 The following chapters deal with generic themes and contain generic policies that relate to Central Lincolnshire as a whole, including the main settlements. These policies are prefixed by the letters CL, denoting Central Lincolnshire. Chapter 3 (Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire) - explains the overall approach to planning in Central Lincolnshire, setting out a locally-specific Vision for Central Lincolnshire in 2031, together with the Strategic Objectives for its delivery. The chapter explains how the Core Strategy is underpinned by the concept of sustainable development – meeting people’s needs for housing, jobs, services, etc, while conserving the natural systems that support life on earth and protecting environmental quality. Chapter 4 (Tackling Climate Change – A Low Carbon Future) - explains how Central Lincolnshire will move to low carbon living to tackle climate change together with policies for energy and renewables. Chapter 5 (Growing Central Lincolnshire) – sets out Central Lincolnshire’s growth agenda, including the rationale behind the proposed quantity and
Introduction

8

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

distribution of growth in the area. The Spatial Strategy for Growth proposes growth targets for the period 2011 – 2031, including figures for the provision of new housing and employment development, together with an overall approach to distributing growth in Central Lincolnshire based on sustainability principles. Chapter 5 also covers the infrastructure and transport needs of Central Lincolnshire and how these will be met as part of the area’s growth. Chapter 6 (Flourishing Communities and Places) – addresses the needs of local communities across Central Lincolnshire, in both existing and new locations, covering housing, jobs and services. Policies are included for affordable housing, employment, retail and town centres, and the visitor economy. Additionally, the chapter identifies particular places or locations within Central Lincolnshire where targeted approaches are required to achieve sustainability, including areas of regeneration priority, RAF bases and the rural area as a whole. Chapter 7 (Quality of Environment) – sets out the framework for protecting Central Lincolnshire’s environmental quality, including its natural resources, local character, and heritage of natural and historic assets. Additionally, the Chapter covers design quality, including the range of design considerations that proposals for development will be required to demonstrate via a Statement of Design Quality. Area-based Chapters 1.26 In addition to the generic themes and policies, the Core Strategy sets out more detailed planning approaches for each of the three main settlements of Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford. Each settlement has a separate chapter covering the existing built-up area of the settlement plus the adjoining area that forms the context for its proposed growth. In each case, the area covered is shown indicatively as an inset of the Key Diagram. It is stressed that formal boundaries are not defined for these areas as such, and that they essentially represent a magnification of the relevant part of the main Key Diagram to allow detail to be shown more clearly. 1.27 For each settlement, the Core Strategy provides a specific Vision and Objectives tailored to the locally-specific characteristics and issues of the settlement, and sets out the area policies relating to it. Policies for Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford are prefixed by the letter L, G and S respectively. Colour Coding 1.28 Throughout the Core Strategy, the following approach is used: Visions and Objectives are contained in orange boxes

Introduction

9

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policies are contained in green boxes

Other information such as summaries is contained in blue boxes

Policies Map 1.29 The adopted Core Strategy is accompanied by an updated Policies Map (formerly called the Proposals Map). Extract maps showing the proposed changes to the Policies Map were produced to accompany the Publication and Submission of the Core Strategy.

Introduction

10

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

2: CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE TODAY –
PORTRAIT & KEY CHALLENGES
2.1 The Core Strategy is based on an understanding of Central Lincolnshire’s distinctive characteristics and diversity, how it relates to adjoining areas, and information about past and future trends. This chapter provides a portrait of the area today, covering its communities, economy and environment, together with the key issues and challenges that it faces.

CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE IN 2013
General Context 2.2 Central Lincolnshire lies in the heart of Lincolnshire in the East Midlands region, covering the administrative area of the City of Lincoln, North Kesteven and West Lindsey. Its population lives in a range of settlements that vary greatly in size and character. 2.3 Lincoln is by far the largest settlement, with a population of around 100,000 people living within the main built-up area including the settlement of North Hykeham. Lincoln is also the functional hub of a wider area that encompasses several satellite settlements such as Welton, Saxilby, Skellingthorpe and Washingborough. These villages look to Lincoln for most of their service and employment needs, and effectively boost its population to around 165,000.1 Due to its size and central location, Lincoln is the main centre for jobs and facilities in Central Lincolnshire, and performs a wider regional role that extends to cover much of Lincolnshire and adjoining parts of Nottinghamshire. 2.4 Beyond Lincoln, the main towns in the area are Gainsborough and Sleaford, serving the northern and southern parts of the area respectively. Gainsborough expanded rapidly as an industrial centre in the 19 th century, and has an ongoing legacy of decline that is being tackled through urban regeneration and its designation as a Growth Point. Comparatively, Sleaford functions as a thriving market town which has experienced rapid housing growth and an expanding population over the last two decades. As main towns, Gainsborough and Sleaford both play a significant role in the provision of housing and facilities in their largely rural catchments. 2.5 The rest of Central Lincolnshire is strongly rural, and is characterised by a scattered settlement pattern of nucleated villages plus the small towns of Market Rasen and Caistor in West Lindsey. Average population density is amongst the lowest in lowland England and few settlements exceed a few hundred people. Collectively, the rural area nevertheless accounts for over half of Central Lincolnshire’s total population. Functionally, the rural villages often operate as clusters that share key services, with the larger villages
1

Figure for Lincoln Policy Area as defined in the revoked Regional Plan. Portrait and Key Challenges 11

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Figure 1 – Central Lincolnshire

Figure 2 – Local Authority Context

Portrait and Key Challenges 12

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Figure 3 – Regional Context and Transport Linkages

Portrait and Key Challenges 13

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

acting as local service centres that communities rely on for basic facilities and as social hubs. 2.6 Central Lincolnshire has strong economic and service linkages with the surrounding areas, including Scunthorpe and Grimsby in the Humber area to the north, Doncaster to the north-west, Nottingham to the west, and the smaller nearby service centres including Grantham, Newark and Louth. Transport and Accessibility 2.7 Central Lincolnshire contains an extensive road network, with access to the A1 via the dualled A46, and to the M180 and motorway network to the north via the A15. The A15 is also an important link between Lincoln and Sleaford. The A17 trunk road from Newark to Kings Lynn crosses the south of the area near Sleaford, and is a designated Trans European Network (TEN) route. 2.8 Lincoln forms the main hub of the rail and bus networks for much of Lincolnshire, though the southern and northern parts of Central Lincolnshire also have important connections to adjoining settlements including Grantham, Scunthorpe and Grimsby. There is a twice daily direct train service from Lincoln to London (as well as hourly connecting services via Newark) together with direct services to Nottingham, Sheffield, Peterborough, Gainsborough, Sleaford and Grimsby. However, frequency of services on both trains and buses is often relatively low, with very limited or no evening or Sunday services on many routes, reflecting the difficulty of achieving viable provision in Central Lincolnshire. 2.9 Levels of car ownership and use vary significantly across Central Lincolnshire, being relatively high in the rural areas, but significantly below the national average in Lincoln. This reflects the availability of public transport and journey patterns, with rural areas being much more reliant on the car for access to jobs and services. Population and Development 2.10 Central Lincolnshire has experienced rapid growth in population in recent decades, and was one of the fastest growing areas in the East Midlands, as well as nationally, between 1996 and 2006. Most of this increase was fuelled by in-migration from other UK regions and EU states, including a significant influx from Poland and other Eastern European countries. Notwithstanding the global recession of 2008/09 and the UK’s current economic difficulties, the most recent ONS population projections indicate an ongoing major increase in Central Lincolnshire over the plan period to 2031, with in-migration continuing to dominate. Key attractions of the area include relatively low housing costs, employment opportunities, and an attractive rural environment.

Portrait and Key Challenges 14

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

2.11 In parallel with increasing population, the area has experienced high levels of housing development over recent decades. Many settlements have seen major expansion by new housing, though the provision of affordable housing has generally been inadequate to keep pace. Levels of commuting and car dependency are also relatively high amongst the growing rural population due to the pull of urban centres for jobs and services. In addition to greenfield development adjoining the towns and rural villages, development on brownfield sites has occurred in Lincoln and Gainsborough, and of redundant hospital sites and former MoD bases elsewhere in the area. 2.12 Both Lincoln and Gainsborough have undergone major regeneration to tackle a legacy of physical decay, unemployment and social problems linked to economic restructuring and the closure of traditional engineering industries in the late 1970s and 1980s. The past two decades have seen a notable renaissance of the urban cores based on new investment, physical regeneration and, in Lincoln’s case, the development of the University of Lincoln. Additionally, targeted regeneration and renewal activity has started to improve conditions in residential neighbourhoods with social and economic problems. However, major inequalities still exist in Central Lincolnshire’s communities. Both Lincoln and Gainsborough have urban neighbourhoods that fall within the worst 10% nationally for deprivation, with problems of poor health, anti-social behaviour, crime and poor educational attainment. Pockets of deprivation also occur in the rural area, where affordable housing and access to services are key issues. 2.13 The population of Central Lincolnshire is expected to have changed significantly in profile since the previous Census in 2001, with significantly increased social and ethnic diversity linked to in-migration from the EU and the expansion of the student population in Lincoln. The integration of new and existing social groups and the provision of housing and services to meet the needs of changing communities continue to be key challenges. 2.14 Despite the closure and scaling back of a number of its bases in the post-War decades, the MoD continues to make a major contribution to Central Lincolnshire’s population and economy, including the active RAF bases at Waddington and Cranwell. Some former bases have already had industrial or warehouse development and/or re-use of their housing, in some cases resulting in new communities with limited facilities and poor public transport links. Central Lincolnshire is home to the Red Arrows, and has an expanding tourism sector based on its RAF heritage, linked to Lincolnshire’s wider role as the centre of Bomber Command and as the base for the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight. Economy 2.15 The economy of Central Lincolnshire is traditionally rooted in engineering, agriculture and food processing, and these sectors remain significant alongside tourism, public administration, health and education.

Portrait and Key Challenges 15

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

2.16 The 3 main settlements are Central Lincolnshire’s main locations for jobs, having a range of opportunities based on their urban cores and employment sites. The Lincoln area is the principal focus for jobs, and serves a wider TTWA that extends into Nottinghamshire as well as covering much of Central Lincolnshire and the adjoining Lincolnshire districts. Key components of its employment base are the City Centre, with its range of services and visitor economy, plus a wide variety of employers ranging from small enterprises to larger engineering and manufacturing firms such as Siemens. The public sector, including local government and health, remains a major employer in Lincoln. Significant new employment development, including offices and warehouses, has occurred in locations adjoining the built-up area of Lincoln, especially in Hykeham where there is easy access to the A46. 2.17 The smaller towns, villages and countryside generally have a much more limited and localised employment profile, and net commuting from these areas to the urban centres is significant. 2.18 In recent decades, economic development, urban regeneration and business start-ups have contributed to a more diverse economy in Central Lincolnshire. However, there is still an over-reliance on unskilled and low paid employment, and unemployment remains above the regional and national average, with particular concentrations in certain wards in Lincoln and Gainsborough. Further diversification and investment are therefore required. Strengthening the area’s links to Lincoln University is a key objective, including closer links with business and manufacturing, and increased graduate retention. Environment 2.19 Central Lincolnshire has a varied and contrasting natural environment including gentle chalk and limestone uplands as well as low lying vales and fenland. The area is encompassed by several Joint Character Areas as defined by Natural England, and most of these contain further local variation in landscape character. 2.20 The Lincolnshire Wolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) falls partly within Central Lincolnshire, the remainder being in East Lindsey and North East Lincolnshire. The Wolds are usually considered to represent the scenic highlight of Central Lincolnshire based on their AONB status and distinctive landscape of rolling hills and nestling villages. However, the wider rural landscape of Central Lincolnshire, with its sweeping character and famously big skies, is a highly valued asset throughout the area and contributes greatly to its local distinctiveness and attractiveness. The escarpment of the Jurassic Lincolnshire Limestone, known locally as the Lincoln Edge, runs for the full length of Central Lincolnshire and forms a unifying topographic feature for the area. 2.21 Outside of the urban areas, land use in Central Lincolnshire is predominantly agricultural, with intensive arable crops dominating. Soils are mostly fertile and of high quality for agriculture. Nevertheless, there are also
Portrait and Key Challenges 16

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

natural areas of importance for biodiversity and recreation, including woodland and lowland heath. The Lincolnshire Limewoods National Nature Reserve (NNR) lies east of Lincoln, extending into East Lindsey. A wide range of other habitat types and species are reflected in Central Lincolnshire’s SSSIs and local nature reserves, which collectively play an important role in the area’s biodiversity alongside farmland, gardens and waterways. 2.22 Overall, Central Lincolnshire’s biodiversity is under pressure from various factors including climate change, habitat fragmentation, development and agriculture, in response to which major landscape-scale initiatives are proposed to restore and enhance the area’s ecological networks and corridors. 2.23 Water is an important aspect of Central Lincolnshire’s environment. The area has a long history of land drainage and flood management, and significant areas of low-lying land are maintained for agriculture by pumped drainage, especially in the Fens. River flooding is closely controlled through embankments and washlands as part of wider management plans for the main river catchments. Conversely, Lincolnshire is already experiencing pressure on its water resources from increasing trends in consumer and commercial demand, coupled with predicted increases in the frequency and severity of drought due to climate change. Major new infrastructure to supply the Lincoln area with water abstracted from the Trent is planned for completion by 2014. 2.24 The main rivers in Central Lincolnshire are the Trent, Witham and Ancholme, with the Fossdyke Navigation connecting the first two of these between Lincoln and Torksey Lock. Central Lincolnshire’s waterways are a valuable resource for a range of reasons including recreation, tourism and wildlife and offer considerable opportunities within its green infrastructure network. 2.25 Central Lincolnshire has a rich built and cultural heritage. Lincoln itself has internationally important archaeology and an outstanding historic core centred on the medieval Cathedral, which is classed as one of only 3 tourist icons in the East Midlands region. More generally, the area’s towns and villages offer attractive environments where the protection and enhancement of character is an important issue. 2.26 Compared to the East Midlands as a whole, Central Lincolnshire scores relatively well on measures of tranquillity and for dark skies at night, though this varies in detail between the urban and rural area. Nationwide studies suggest, however, that the area’s performance on both measures worsened considerably between 1997 and 2007 due to rapid development, traffic growth and poorly designed lighting.

SUSTAINABILITY PROFILE
2.27 The overall sustainability of Central Lincolnshire is crucial for its future,

Portrait and Key Challenges 17

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Table 1 – Key Figures for Central Lincolnshire Size of area 2116 sq. km (817 sq. miles) Population (Census 2011) Population aged 65 and over Population at working age Population of main settlements: o Lincoln Principal Urban Area o Gainsborough o Sleaford Population projection (2025) Number of homes (2011) Number of Gypsy and Traveller Caravans (2011) Average employment rate (2012) o City of Lincoln o North Kesteven o West Lindsey Main employment sectors: o Public administration, education and health o Distribution, restaurants and hotels Number of active businesses (2011) Number of schools Number of SSSIs Conservation Areas Non car-owning households (Census 2011) o City of Lincoln o North Kesteven o West Lindsey Number of households in fuel poverty (2011)
Portrait and Key Challenges 18

299,557 18% 62%

119,200 20,842 17,671 333,400 129,000 154 69% 74% 68% 30% 24% 9,450 158 36 74 30% 13% 15% 24,575

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

ensuring that people and communities are prosperous, flourishing and healthy while also playing their part in maintaining the natural resources and environmental systems that support life locally and globally. 2.28 Definitions of sustainable development vary in detail, but the essence is to ensure that the needs of current and future generations are met fairly without exceeding the Earth’s environmental limits and capacities. The UK’s Sustainable Development Strategy Securing the Future (2005) sets out 5 guiding principles for sustainable development:      Living within environmental limits Ensuring a strong, healthy and just society Achieving a sustainable economy Using sound science responsibly Promoting good governance

2.29 The NPPF confirms the Government’s commitment to sustainable development as the overall purpose of the planning system and identifies 3 interlinked dimensions or roles within sustainable development – economic, social and environmental – which the planning system should seek to achieve simultaneously. How Sustainable is Central Lincolnshire? 2.30 The sustainability of Central Lincolnshire today depends on its performance across all of the above aspects – social, economic and environmental. The evidence base for the Core Strategy investigated this in detail, in particular through the study Delivering a Sustainable Future for Central Lincolnshire (AECOM, 2012). This assessed sustainability across the area using nearly 100 indicators in 9 sustainability “domains” as follows: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Managing Resources Ecological Quality Future Resilience Economic Performance Cultural Vibrancy Connections Efficient Living Successful Communities Effective Places

2.31 The study analysed the findings spatially to determine differences in performance across Central Lincolnshire, and to identify key opportunities for future improvement. The following summary of key issues and challenges facing Central Lincolnshire draws on the AECOM work together with other evidence:

Portrait and Key Challenges 19

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

KEY OPPORTUNIES & CHALLENGES FACING CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE ENVIRONMENTAL AND LANDSCAPE 1) Managing Resources       Renewable energy contributes to 3% of energy supply, which is above the national average, but will require major expansion to meet national targets for carbon reduction Central Lincolnshire has significant potential for increased wind energy, but careful assessment of landscape impacts will be required Water resources are stressed across Central Lincolnshire, and will require careful management and public involvement to achieve greater efficiency of water use Air quality and tranquillity are relatively poor in the urban areas, with pollution and noise from traffic as the main cause Disposal of waste water is an issue in some development areas There is strong demand for locally produced food providing a driver for urban agriculture

2) Ecological Quality   The landscape character of Central Lincolnshire is a valuable asset that should be protected Biodiversity varies considerably across Central Lincolnshire. It is highest on the eastern and western borders and on the outskirts of Lincoln, and lowest in south east North Kesteven. The development of ecological corridors is needed to protect and connect existing areas and species in an ecologically coherent manner Improving the biodiversity of lower value areas, including enhancement of urban areas and intensively farmed areas

3) Future Resilience    Reducing flood risk and improving flood resilience through planning, design and land management Need to prepare and implement climate change adaptation plans Promote change to more sustainable consumption of resources, reducing use of finite resources and creating a more self-sufficient Central Lincolnshire

ECONOMIC & CULTURAL 4) Economic Performance   Central Lincolnshire’s economy is currently focused on low knowledge and low productivity sectors. Diversification and strengthening are required to increase resilience and tackle social deprivation Workforce skills are below national average – 60% of the population is
Portrait and Key Challenges 20

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

currently not educated beyond NVQ1 The areas of greatest economic and social disadvantage are to the north and south of Lincoln’s core, Gainsborough, and the Billinghay area, requiring targeted action for regeneration and improvement

5) Cultural Vibrancy     Central Lincolnshire’s residents are broadly satisfied with its cultural facilities, including sports facilities, but few use them However, some areas have poor levels of cultural facilities, notably Gainsborough and Market Rasen 5% of listed buildings and 19% of scheduled ancient monuments are at risk Tourism plays an important role in Central Lincolnshire’s economy, contributing £970 million in 2009, and has scope for further expansion

COMMUNITY & SETTLEMENT 6) Connections     Public transport journey times are good across most of Central Lincolnshire, but scheduling and frequency of services is generally poor Car dependency and use is very high in the rural area, with commuting and access to shops and services being key drivers Access to services is poor in some parts of the rural area, due to low settlement density. West Lindsey in particular has many areas where food stores are more than 5km from most housing Traffic congestion hotspots are focused on main roads surrounding Lincoln and Sleaford

7) Efficient Living     Carbon emissions from road transport are significantly higher in North Kesteven and West Lindsey than in Lincoln due to differing levels of car ownership and reliance The urban areas are more efficient in their use of electricity and gas Lincoln has greater density of housing with less natural loss of heat, but the greater age of its housing compared to North Kesteven and West Lindsey gives broadly the same efficiency across the area Fuel poverty is an issue in both the urban and rural areas

8) Successful Communities  Health varies across Central Lincolnshire, being below the national average in Lincoln and above average in North Kesteven and West Lindsey. Evidence suggests that the main factors in poor health are lifestyle related, including diet, smoking, drugs and exercise levels, which will need tackling through co-ordinated action Crime levels in Lincoln are above the national average

Portrait and Key Challenges 21

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

 

Outside Lincoln, the elderly population is up to 3 times the national average, creating pressure on services and an unbalanced population profile that may have adverse impacts on economic potential Around two thirds of people in Central Lincolnshire feel a sense of belonging, though the figure is less in Lincoln and Sleaford

9) Effective Places    There are shortages of affordable housing across Central Lincolnshire Rural areas exhibit average house prices up to ten times the annual average income Provision of facilities and services is good in Lincoln, but many rural areas, especially in West Lindsey, have poor provision

2.32 Further issues relating to the individual settlements of Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford are addressed in the individual area chapters. It is also envisaged that issues and objectives relating to the smaller settlements will be identified in the next stages of the review of the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan.

KEY CHALLENGES
2.33 The Portrait and Sustainability Profile indicate that Central Lincolnshire faces a range of challenges within the overall aim of achieving sustainable development. There is a need to improve social and economic conditions, including health, housing, jobs and the range and quality of facilities – all of which will require development and growth – while at the same time ensuring that the environment is improved and that growth does not erode the area’s environmental assets or exacerbate pressure on natural resources. 2.34 Specifically, there is a need to plan for the following key challenges facing Central Lincolnshire:      Reducing carbon emissions from transport, the built environment and lifestyles as part of the shift to low carbon living Ensuring that Central Lincolnshire and its communities are resilient to future change, including adaptation to climate change Providing sufficient new housing, jobs and services to meet the area’s needs and increase the sustainability of its communities Ensuring that the infrastructure needs associated with growth are met Increasing the quality of life across Central Lincolnshire, including improvements to health, wellbeing, services and facilities

Portrait and Key Challenges 22

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

Tackling social and economic disadvantage and regeneration needs, including areas of severe deprivation Promoting greater use of local resources to enhance the self-sufficiency, resilience and overall sustainability of communities Protecting and enhancing the natural and built environment of Central Lincolnshire, including key natural, historic and cultural assets, biodiversity, landscapes and natural resources Protecting local identity and diversity in the context of growth and change Ensuring that cross-boundary issues between Central Lincolnshire and adjoining areas are recognised and addressed in the plan, including the opportunities and impacts of growth proposed in the Growth Points and Humber Bank area.

 

2.35 The Core Strategy provides an overall planning framework to meet these challenges, as set out in the following chapter.

Portrait and Key Challenges 23

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

3: OUR STRATEGY - TOWARDS A
SUSTAINABLE CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE
3.1 Chapter 2 identified a range of issues and challenges facing Central Lincolnshire and its constituent communities. The Core Strategy aims to provide a robust planning framework for achieving sustainable development in Central Lincolnshire, ensuring that sustainability principles guide future growth and change across the area and its communities. 3.2 Specifically, in translating national sustainability principles to the local level, the Core Strategy has sought to address the following key questions:       How can we achieve substantial cuts in Central Lincolnshire’s carbon emissions and a shift to low carbon living? What is the appropriate level of growth and how should it be distributed within the area? What is the best approach to reducing unnecessary travel and transport problems? How can the health, wellbeing and resilience of communities be improved across Central Lincolnshire in both urban and rural areas? What does a sustainable economy look like in Central Lincolnshire? How will the area’s character, environmental assets and natural resources be conserved and enhanced in the context of growth and development?

3.3 Answering these questions has drawn on stakeholder views and the Core Strategy’s evidence base, together with previous work on sustainability at the local level by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partner organisations, including:  Previous planning strategies covering Central Lincolnshire, including the now revoked Regional Plan and its Sub-Regional Strategy for the Lincoln Policy Area; The successful bids for Eco-town and Growth Point funding in Central Lincolnshire; and Sustainable Community Strategies (SCSs) and neighbourhood planning.

 

3.4 The Core Strategy’s approach to sustainable development therefore builds on previous work while extending thinking and approaches to reflect more recent national guidance and stakeholder engagement.
Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 24

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

THE GROWTH AGENDA & SUSTAINABILITY
3.5 Significant levels of growth in population and development are a key element of the Core Strategy’s approach to sustainability, carrying forward the growth agenda for the area contained in the revoked Regional Plan. Why Is Growth Needed? 3.6 The need for growth is driven partly by population increase in Central Lincolnshire. The area’s population is expected to continue to expand rapidly over the plan period to 2031, with levels of in-migration from other parts of the UK and from the EU remaining high. On current projections, population will increase by 22%1 by 2031. 3.7    Other factors driving the need for more housing and jobs include: Natural population increase within Central Lincolnshire (i.e. births exceeding deaths) The trend to smaller households, including more people living alone Existing shortfalls in types of housing, including affordable housing.

3.8 Additionally, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities consider that a significant uplift on historic levels of growth and development is needed to improve the sustainability of the area by:  Improving the viability and range of services within Central Lincolnshire and its communities, thereby improving resilience and reducing the need for travel Increasing the ability to provide key infrastructure for social, economic and environmental improvements Reducing the need to commute out of the area for jobs.

 

3.9 It is acknowledged that high levels of growth present a major challenge for Central Lincolnshire, both in terms of delivery, and for the area’s environment and communities. Central Lincolnshire, and Lincolnshire generally, currently possess key quality of life benefits including an uncluttered rural countryside with plenty of space, relatively low crime levels, and a generally good performance by regional standards on measures such as tranquillity and dark skies. It is critical that growth does not undermine these assets, which are highly valued by existing residents and visitors, and which are responsible for attracting people to the area in the first place.

1

2010-based Sub-National Population Projections (ONS, 2012) Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 25

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

3.10 The Core Strategy therefore seeks to balance growth with the protection and enhancement of the area’s environmental quality and character while moving to sustainable patterns of living and resource use.

VISION & STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES
3.11 A Vision and Strategic Objectives have been prepared to guide sustainable development in Central Lincolnshire over the plan period to 2031 as follows: VISION FOR CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE IN 2031 Central Lincolnshire is a thriving and attractive area that enjoys a high quality of life across the full range of its urban and rural communities, which are healthy, inclusive and resilient. The area is widely recognised as a great place to live, work, invest, visit and enjoy life. The area’s population continues to grow, helping to expand and support improved facilities for the area. The growth of the last twenty years has been achieved in line with sustainable development principles, ensuring that Central Lincolnshire’s evolving social and economic needs have been met while conserving the area’s environmental assets and unique character. Central Lincolnshire is now in the forefront of the shift to low carbon living, with communities, businesses and services sourcing most of their energy from renewable and low carbon sources, and achieving high standards of energy efficiency. Use of local resources, including food and other products, is now a key feature of the area, helping to reduce its carbon footprint. Adapting to the effects of climate change continues to be a major challenge as extreme weather events such as droughts, storms and heat waves become more frequent, making climate-proofing a key requirement of planning and development. Growth has been delivered through a range of exemplar developments for living and working, built to the highest viable standards of sustainability and design quality. Brownfield sites have been redeveloped to help regeneration throughout Central Lincolnshire, while also helping to protect farmland and avoid urban sprawl. Other new development has been focused in masterplanned urban extensions providing for growth around Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford, with which they have been well integrated and contribute to the success of these settlements. The smaller towns of Market Rasen and Caistor and the rural settlements have also seen growth to meet their needs. Investment in the infrastructure required alongside new development has been coordinated and targeted towards the most sustainable and viable locations, including a range of transport improvements that
Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 26

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

have helped to minimise further traffic growth in the area. Central Lincolnshire's communities are strong, prosperous, healthy, and inclusive. They have good quality housing of varying size, type and tenure including sufficient affordable housing to meet local needs. The range and quality of facilities in the area has improved significantly, including education, arts, culture, leisure, sport and other key services, all contributing to enhanced quality of life and health. City, town and village centres are thriving and diverse, and collectively meet the majority of Central Lincolnshire’s service needs. Central Lincolnshire has become an economically prosperous and competitive area. Job opportunities have grown significantly in both traditional sectors and through diversification into new sectors including green technologies, knowledge based industries and research. The area is known for its successful and enterprising economy which now attracts high levels of investment. Social deprivation and unemployment are now below the national average. Central Lincolnshire’s environment and ecology, including its natural and built assets, landscapes, natural resources and local distinctiveness have been protected and enhanced through careful planning, design and management, and environmental quality remains a key attraction for both residents and visitors. The area now has an extensive network of green infrastructure contributing to nature conservation, quality of life, recreation and climate change mitigation, and all citizens have easy access to natural greenspace. Declines in biodiversity have been successfully reversed and key habitats and species extended through restoration and the development of ecologically coherent networks. Water resources in Central Lincolnshire continue to require careful management as population grows. Sustainable approaches to water use and drainage have been implemented which emphasise conservation and environmental integration to manage demand pressures and the increasing effects of climate change. Central Lincolnshire’s water resources and waterways have continued to increase in importance for environmental services, recreation and tourism. Soils, air quality and dark skies have also been successfully conserved through careful planning. 3.12 The Strategic Objectives for Central Lincolnshire are the main principles that will be followed to deliver the Vision, setting the broad direction for the detailed policies in the Core Strategy. They will also be used to help monitor the success of its implementation. 3.13 Included below each Strategic Objective are the key policies for its delivery. The objectives are arranged by themes which correspond broadly to the structure of the Core Strategy. It is noted that the Strategic Objectives are
Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 27

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

generally linked and mutually supporting, and should be viewed collectively as Central Lincolnshire’s approach to sustainable development.

Theme: Sustainable Development Objective 1 To ensure that change and growth in Central Lincolnshire delivers sustainable development, such that the area’s social and economic needs are met while protecting and enhancing its environment and contributing to the maintenance of environmental support systems at all levels from local to global.

Key Policies CL1 plus all other policies for Delivery

Theme: Tackling Climate Change – A Low Carbon Future Objective 2 To minimise the causes and impacts of climate change and to promote low carbon living by:  Minimising carbon emissions through the location and design of development;  Promoting energy conservation, energy efficiency and low carbon technologies;  Promoting access by public transport, cycling and walking;  Promoting the use of local services, resources and products to reduce “carbon miles”; and  Promoting adaptation and resilience to climate change, including reduced flood risk. Key Policies CL2, CL3, CL4, CL10, CL25, CL26 for Delivery

Theme: Growing Central Lincolnshire Objective 3 To provide a strategic planning framework to guide the scale, distribution and nature of new development, including regeneration, across Central Lincolnshire, which:  Seeks a significant uplift in historic rates of growth to meet development needs and improve the area’s infrastructure and facilities;  Ensures that patterns of development are sustainable
Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 28

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

and support the wellbeing and quality of life for all the area’s communities and neighbourhoods. Key Policies CL4, CL5, CL6 for Delivery

Objective 4

To ensure that land is used efficiently and maximise the contribution of regeneration to development targets through the re-use of brownfield sites in sustainable locations.

Key Policies CL4, CL5, CL6 and area policies on strategies for growth in for Delivery the 3 main settlements (L2, G2, S2)

Objective 5

To ensure that the infrastructure (services and facilities) needed to sustain and strengthen existing communities and support growth in Central Lincolnshire are adequately provided in a timely and sustainable manner that respects environmental quality and assets.

Key Policies CL9, CL23 for Delivery

Objective 6

To ensure that new development and its supporting infrastructure maximises and strengthens public transport, cycling and walking links and creates attractive alternatives to private car use.

Key Policies CL9, CL10 for Delivery

Theme: Flourishing Communities & Places Objective 7 To improve the quality of life for everyone who lives, visits, works and invests in Central Lincolnshire by promoting opportunities to strengthen and enhance existing settlements and creating sustainable communities that are distinctive, clean, green and safe places.

Key Policies CL11, CL12, CL17, CL18, CL20, CL21, CL22, CL23, CL24, for Delivery CL25, CL26

Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 29

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Objective 8

To foster the conditions for a healthier population by addressing factors underpinning health and wellbeing by:  working with healthcare partners to deliver new and improved health and social care facilities;  improving access to leisure, recreational, sports, play, lifelong learning activities and natural greenspace.

Key Policies CL11, CL24, CL26 for Delivery

Objective 9

To meet the strategic housing needs relating to Central Lincolnshire and all sections of its population, including the provision of an appropriate proportion that is affordable and accessible to those in need.

Key Policies CL4, CL12, CL13, CL14, CL15, CL16 for Delivery

Objective 10

To diversify and strengthen the economic base of Central Lincolnshire by providing the locations and skilled workforce to attract new businesses and new sources of employment; to meet the needs of existing companies; and to take advantage of opportunities to diversify into knowledge-based and tourism supported sectors.

Key Policies CL17, CL21, CL22 for Delivery

Objective 11

To maintain and enhance a mutually supportive hierarchy of thriving, resilient and attractive centres to provide accessible services for residents and visitors to Central Lincolnshire.

Key Policies CL20 for Delivery

Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 30

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Theme: A Quality Environment Objective 12 To protect and enhance Central Lincolnshire's environmental assets including its natural and built heritage, biodiversity, and landscapes, and ensure that these continue to contribute to the area’s local distinctiveness, diversity and character.

Key Policies CL23, CL26 for Delivery

Objective 13

To protect, conserve and enhance Central Lincolnshire’s natural resources, including water, soils, air quality and dark skies, through appropriate planning and management.

Key Policies CL23 for Delivery

Objective 14

To secure the provision and management of high quality Green Infrastructure for Central Lincolnshire, including sports facilities, by enhancing and developing a network of multifunctional green spaces, parks, woodland, rivers, waterways and other corridors within and around settlements that connect them to each other and to the wider countryside.

Key Policies CL24 for Delivery

Objective 15

To ensure that new development achieves high quality sustainable design that contributes to the other Strategic Objectives of the Core Strategy.

Key Policies CL26 for Delivery

3.14 In addition to the Vision and Strategic Objectives for the whole of Central Lincolnshire, the Core Strategy also sets out more detailed objectives

Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 31

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

for particular themes where necessary, and includes an area-based vision and objectives for each of the 3 main settlements - Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford – within the area chapters. PRESUMPTION IN FAVOUR OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 3.15 National planning policy in the NPPF sets out a presumption in favour of sustainable development. This requires Local Plans to meet objectively assessed growth needs unless there would be adverse impacts which “significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits” when assessed against the NPPF’s policies. Development proposals which represent sustainable development should be approved without delay. 3.16 The Core Strategy follows the NPPF approach and provides a clear framework locally for sustainable development and the presumption. Policy CL1 – Sustainable Development in Central Lincolnshire The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with partners, local communities, developers and others to achieve sustainable development in respect of environmental, social and economic change within and beyond Central Lincolnshire. Development will be considered to be sustainable if it is consistent with the Vision, Objectives and Policies of this Core Strategy and other components of the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan, together with the relevant national guidance and any other material considerations including adopted Neighbourhood Plans where extant and relevant. Proposals for development will be viewed positively and approved without delay where they accord with sustainable development as defined in this policy, unless material considerations indicate otherwise. Where there are no policies relevant to a proposed development, or relevant policies are out of date at the time of making the decision, permission will be granted unless material considerations indicate otherwise, taking into account whether:  Any adverse impacts of granting permission would significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits, when assessed against the policies in the National Planning Policy Framework taken as a whole; or Specific policies in that Framework indicate that development should be restricted.

Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 32

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Explanation of Policy CL1: 3.17 Policy CL1 is a headline policy that sets out the overall commitment to sustainability as the basis for the area’s growth and change. It also provides a local definition of sustainable development and confirms the Central Lincolnshire Authorities’ commitment to the presumption in favour of sustainable development in line with the NPPF. Policy CL1 will be implemented by:    Partnership working Further policy development within the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan Development management

Towards a Sustainable Central Lincolnshire 33

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

4: TACKLING CLIMATE CHANGE - A
LOW CARBON FUTURE
4.1 Most scientists and governments consider that mankind’s use of fossil fuels is contributing to the global warming and other changes observed in the Earth’s climate. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions is a key part of limiting climate change, and will require concerted action at all levels from international to local. Yet appropriate supplies of heat and power are key for economic development and keeping our homes warm and comfortable. 4.2 Greenhouse gases include a variety of gases, most of which occur naturally in the atmosphere, but which are increasing due to man’s activity at rates that cannot be assimilated by natural cycles. The most significant of these is carbon dioxide, so measures to tackle greenhouse gases are often referred to as carbon reduction. Carbon Reduction Targets 4.3 In 2008, the UK became the first country to introduce a long-term legally binding framework to reduce its impact on climate change. The Climate Change Act 2008 sets targets that require greenhouse gas emissions to be reduced by at least 80% by 2050 compared to 1990 levels, with a reduction of at least 34% by 2020 as an interim step, whilst continuing to keep the lights burning, and businesses development, through a mixture of energy efficiency measures and a move to renewable power generation. 4.4 The Coalition Government has confirmed its support for these carbon targets, and has recognised the importance of the local planning system in delivering carbon reduction in the NPPF: “Planning plays a key role in helping to shape places to secure radical reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.........This is central to the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development” (Para. 93) 4.5 The Core Strategy therefore places a low carbon future at the heart of the Vision and Objectives for a sustainable Central Lincolnshire, to protect the environment and to support our businesses and communities in meeting the challenges of the future. It sets an overall target to reduce Central Lincolnshire’s carbon dioxide emissions by 20% by 2020 compared to 2005 levels, based on the emerging energy strategies of the partner authorities1. Achieving Low Carbon Living 4.6 Low carbon living means greatly reducing the amount of carbon emitted as a result of our lifestyles, covering everything that consumes energy
1

Including Low Carbon Lincoln Plan, 2013 A Low Carbon Future 34

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

directly or indirectly, including buildings, travel, food and jobs. It will require wide-ranging changes across society and the economy, with the planning system having a key role in delivery. The Local Plan therefore identifies the following objectives to frame action:

OBJECTIVES FOR LOW CARBON LIVING: 1. To promote overall patterns of development and growth that reduce the need to travel by car 2. To encourage travel by public transport, cycling and walking as an alternative to the car 3. To promote energy and resource efficiency in the design and operation of the built environment, including zero carbon development 4. To promote renewable and low carbon energy 5. To support local communities and neighbourhoods in meeting more of their resources locally, including food, timber and energy crops 6. To promote investment and jobs in low carbon industries 4.7 The localised production and use of resources links to the wider aim of promoting sustainable communities as set out in Chapter 6. As well as reducing the carbon emitted in producing and transporting resources, it is hoped that local production will encourage communities to take greater responsibility for their environmental impacts and to participate in sustainable solutions. Adapting to Climate Change 4.8 Even with substantial cuts in global carbon emissions, some climate change is already committed. Alongside the shift to low carbon, it is therefore important for us to adapt to the impacts of this change. 4.9 The first UK Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) 2012, as required by the Climate Change Act 2008, concludes that without action we could see increases in the frequency of flooding and summer overheating, and reductions in water availability. Regionally, the CCRA is supported by a Summary of Climate Change Risks for the East Midlands, which also sets out the implications locally for communities, businesses and other organisations. 4.10 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are committed to developing local approaches to climate change adaptation in line with the National Adaptation Programme which is due to be published in 2013.
A Low Carbon Future 35

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy CL2 – Tackling Climate Change The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are committed to tackling the causes and impacts of climate change, and will work with partners and others to achieve an overall reduction in carbon emissions in Central Lincolnshire of 20% by 2020 based on 2005 levels as the area’s contribution to achieving a low carbon future. To deliver this, the Local Plan will:  Promote an overall pattern of settlement and growth that minimises the need for unnecessary travel, as set out in the Spatial Strategy for Growth; Promote modal shift from the car to less carbon intensive modes of transport through appropriate investment, high quality infrastructure provision and the design of development; Promote a reduction in energy use in line with the Energy Hierarchy as set out in this Core Strategy; Promote the use and development of low carbon and renewable energy to meet identified targets for Central Lincolnshire, as set out in Policy CL3 (Renewable & Low Carbon Energy); Require that the design of development minimises carbon emissions relating to its use of energy and other resources, and encourages low carbon lifestyles by the occupants and users of the development, as set out in Policy CL26 (Design Quality); Promote a low carbon economy in Central Lincolnshire, including investment and jobs in low carbon industries, services and products; Support local communities and neighbourhoods in meeting more of their resource needs locally, including the promotion of decentralised low carbon/renewable energy generation and local production of food and other resources such as biomass and timber;

 

 

Adaptation to climate change will be promoted in decisions regarding the use of land and development, including the management of urban and rural environments, green infrastructure provision, management of water resources and flood risk, and the design of new development. Development will be required to be in accordance with these principles and requirements.

A Low Carbon Future 36

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Explanation of Policy CL2: 4.11 Policy CL2 sets out the Core Strategy’s overall approach to climate change, covering both carbon reduction and adaptation. These are strategic objectives for the Core Strategy, and therefore underpin many of the other policies in the plan. The following policies are particularly important in providing further detail pursuant to Policy CL2:  Policy CL3 (Renewable and Low Carbon Energy) - defines the overall approach to renewable and low carbon energy, including the local targets for Central Lincolnshire, and its relationship to national policy for zero carbon development; Policy CL25 (Managing Water Resources and Flood Risk) – sets out the requirements on new design in relation to managing flood risk and sustainable use of water, including SuDS; Policy CL26 (Design Quality) - covers the design requirements for new development relating to climate change mitigation and adaptation. This includes the efficient use of energy and other resources, and how design relates to the requirements for renewable and low carbon energy in Policy CL3.

4.12 The carbon reduction target for Central Lincolnshire seeks to highlight the scale of reductions needed as Central Lincolnshire’s contribution to the national target, and aligns the Core Strategy with work underway on energy and low carbon within the partner authorities. Monitoring against the target will provide an overview of progress in Central Lincolnshire. If emissions cuts are not on course, review of the Core Strategy may be required to amend the target and relevant policies. Any future local targets for Central Lincolnshire or the partner districts would also be considered as part of any such review. Policy CL2 will be implemented by:      Site allocation in the Local Plan Development management decisions by the partner authorities Linking the Local Plan with the Local Transport Plan and other transport strategies covering Central Lincolnshire The partner authorities taking a lead role in working with energy providers, businesses, communities and other stakeholders to promote and deliver carbon reduction Linking the low carbon agenda with the economic development strategies of the Local Plan, partner authorities and other bodies, including promotion of the employment and investment opportunities related to low carbon in the local economy Linking the low carbon agenda with green infrastructure planning and delivery

A Low Carbon Future 37

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

the JPU and partner authorities pursuing low carbon and climate change objectives in relation to their wider activities, and promoting these with other bodies and agencies

ENERGY FUTURES
4.13 The move to a low carbon future will require major reductions in the carbon intensity of energy across all sectors of activity and the economy. Electricity and heating for homes and businesses are key elements that will need addressing, for which the Core Strategy provides an overall policy framework linking to other strategies and initiatives that will shape Central Lincolnshire’s energy future. Energy Hierarchy 4.14 In defining regional priorities for energy, the revoked Regional Plan sets out the following Energy Hierarchy:     to reduce the need for energy to use energy more efficiently to use renewable energy any continuing use of fossil fuels to be clean and efficient for heating and co-generation.

4.15 This Energy Hierarchy is considered to have clear benefits for Central Lincolnshire and is therefore carried forward into the Core Strategy. It should ensure that our future energy path gives clear priority to energy reduction and energy efficiency, and avoids the potential danger that new generating capacity is developed in preference to demand management measures. In particular, renewable energy targets should not become a driver for more energy installations than are necessary to meet energy needs efficiently. Renewable and Low Carbon Energy – Policy Context 4.16 In addition to cutting energy use and improving efficiency, a substantial increase is needed in the proportion of energy from renewable and low carbon sources to reduce the UK’s carbon intensity, with strong and challenging policy drivers to deliver cuts in greenhouse gas emissions. 4.17 The EU Renewable Energy Directive (2009) sets a target for the UK to achieve 15% of its energy consumption from renewable sources by 2020. Progress towards this target was 3.8% in 2011 and 4.1% in 2012, which is very slightly below the UK’s interim target for 2011-12 [Source: DECC, June 2013]. The Coalition Government has stated its commitment to increasing the proportion of energy from renewable sources as part of its wider energy strategy:

A Low Carbon Future 38

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

“The development of renewable energy sources, alongside nuclear power and The development of carbon capture and storage, will also enable the UK to play its full part in international efforts to reduce the production of harmful greenhouse gases” (DECC website). 4.18 The NPPF advises that local planning authorities should have a positive strategy to promote energy from renewable and low carbon sources, including support for community-led schemes and decentralised supply systems, whilst ensuring that adverse impacts are addressed satisfactorily, including cumulative landscape and visual impacts.” Renewable and Low Carbon Energy Targets for Central Lincolnshire 4.19 Energy from renewable sources accounted for just 0.2% of total annual energy demand in Central Lincolnshire in 20112. However, the evidence base for the Core Strategy identifies considerable renewable and low carbon potential across Central Lincolnshire, with major opportunities linked to wind, biomass, Combined Heat and Power (CHP) and micro-generation. The 2 main studies are:   Low Carbon Energy Opportunities and Heat Mapping for Local Planning Areas Across the East Midlands Study (East Midlands Councils, March 2011, updated July 2011) Central Lincolnshire Renewable and Low Carbon Energy Study (AECOM, November 2011).

4.20 The Central Lincolnshire Energy Study includes an Energy Opportunities Map which identifies opportunities for each of the renewable and low carbon technologies, along with assessments of what is deliverable in Central Lincolnshire against future demand. 4.21 These studies have informed the targets for renewable energy generation in Central Lincolnshire set out in Policy CL3. Zero Carbon Development 4.22 Almost half of the UK’s total carbon emissions are currently related to the use of energy in buildings, including 27 per cent from homes and a further 17 per cent from non-domestic buildings3. In response, the previous Government announced in 2008 that all new homes would be “zero carbon” from 20164. The Coalition Government has confirmed this intention along with the extension of zero carbon to non-domestic buildings from 20195.

2 3

Central Lincolnshire Renewable and Low Carbon Energy Study (AECOM, 2011) Definition of Zero Carbon Homes and Non-Domestic Buildings (DCLG, December 2008) 4 Building A Greener Future: Policy Statement (DCLG, 2007) 5 Written ministerial statements by Grant Shapps on 23 July 2010 and 20 December 2010 A Low Carbon Future 39

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

4.23 Since 2008, there has been considerable debate on the definition of zero carbon and how it is best achieved. In March 2011, the Government announced that zero carbon would be restricted to “regulated emissions” meaning emissions covered by Building Regulations. 4.24 The Government is expected to specify further detailed requirements via amendments to the Building Regulations in the lead up to 2016 and beyond. Two main components are currently proposed - Carbon Compliance and Allowable Solutions – with Carbon Compliance accounting for not less than 70% of regulated emissions (see Figure 4 below). Figure 4 – Indicative Components of Zero Carbon Development for Regulated Emissions (Source: The Carbon Hub)

4.25 While Building Regulations are the main vehicle for framing the definition and timetable for zero carbon development, the local planning system has a key role in supporting delivery through appropriate planning policies, infrastructure delivery and partnership approaches. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will therefore seek to ensure that the Local Plan supports and complements the regulatory framework for zero carbon development as it evolves, and have identified the following objectives: OBJECTIVES FOR ZERO CARBON DEVELOPMENT: 1. To require high standards of energy-efficiency in new development through design matters such as site layout, orientation, materials, etc 2. To promote and facilitate the delivery of on-site/decentralised

A Low Carbon Future 40

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

renewable and low carbon energy, including electricity and heat or Combined Heat & Power (CHP), as required for Carbon Compliance 3. To provide the context for the ongoing development of Local Plan policy for Central Lincolnshire in support of zero carbon development as the national definition and its component requirements are updated in the run-up to 2016 and beyond, including Allowable Solutions 4.26 It is anticipated that local planning authorities will be given the opportunity to play a key role in defining and delivering Allowable Solutions locally, including the collection and use of financial contributions from developers. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities intend to respond positively to any such opportunity, and will prepare further policy or guidance within the Local Plan as appropriate. Additionally, in the period before the full introduction of zero carbon in 2016/19, the Authorities will seek the best viable approaches through the planning process. Decentralised Energy 4.27 Decentralised energy refers to generation at the local level based on individual buildings, sites or areas, in contrast to larger installations such as conventional power stations or large scale wind farms that supply the National Grid. 4.28 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities consider that decentralised generation has a number of key benefits in terms of environmental impacts and community involvement (see next section) and will therefore pursue the following objectives through the Local Plan and partnership working: OBJECTIVES FOR DECENTRALISED ENERGY: 1. To promote proposals for decentralised energy generation, including householder, community or developer-led schemes 2. To require that development proposals incorporate or connect to CHP or district heating where this is viable, and to identify and promote opportunities for such 3. To require that electricity generating uses investigate the potential for use of waste heat, and to identify and promote opportunities for such 4. To prioritise decentralised energy as part of the future development and delivery of Allowable Solutions as appropriate

A Low Carbon Future 41

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Assessing the Impact of Energy Proposals 4.29 Almost all forms of energy generation involve some impact on the environment. The NPPF makes clear that local planning authorities should provide a positive framework that maximises renewable and low carbon energy while ensuring that their impacts are acceptable. 4.30 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are keen to ensure that the area’s renewable and low carbon energy potential is harnessed to support a low carbon future, but that adverse environmental impacts are satisfactorily addressed. As noted above, the Authorities will prioritise energy saving and efficiency measures under the Energy Hierarchy for Central Lincolnshire, and will also promote decentralised approaches, which are considered generally to have a lesser environmental impact than large scale generation. However, larger schemes are also likely to be required to meet the area’s targets for carbon reduction and renewable energy. The creation of large scale generators in Central Lincolnshire may require investment and improvement in the energy distribution network which can make more efficient use of resources whilst also increasing the capacity and reliability of energy supply to support the overall growth agenda. 4.31 Wind turbines are controversial in Lincolnshire as in other parts of the UK, with some sections of the community feeling that the environmental impact outweighs any benefits. The relatively open and sweeping character of the landscape means that windfarms are likely to be visible over large distances. While the theoretical potential for wind energy in Central Lincolnshire is considerable, as individual development proposals come forward, there will be careful consideration of landscape and other impacts in accordance with guidance set out in the relevant National Policy Statements on Energy. 4.32 Where proposals for energy generation or related infrastructure require planning permission from the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, schemes will be required to demonstrate that environmental impacts have been addressed and can be adequately mitigated, as set out in Policy CL3. Policy CL3 – Renewable and Low Carbon Energy As part of their commitment to achieving a low carbon future, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with stakeholders, including communities, developers and others, to deliver the following energy targets as minima for Central Lincolnshire: By 2026 Electricity from renewable energy sources Heat from renewable energy sources 60% 12%

A Low Carbon Future 42

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

To meet these targets, renewable and low carbon sources of energy and associated infrastructure will be actively promoted and supported where the impacts are or can be made acceptable. Specifically, the approach to development will be as follows: Zero Carbon Development  Proposals for residential and non-residential development will be required to contribute to a low carbon future through energy-efficient design and, where appropriate and viable, through the provision of renewable and low carbon energy generation associated with the development;  Additionally, from 2016, development will be required to contribute to carbon reduction on-site, near-site or off-site through Allowable Solutions in line with national policy and guidance on zero carbon development. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are committed to developing policy guidance for defining and delivering Allowable Solutions as part of the Local Plan process; Development proposals must demonstrate how they meet these requirements as part of the Statement of Design Quality required under Policy CL26 (Design Quality). District Heating and CHP  Proposals for new residential, non residential and mixed use development will, where appropriate and viable, be expected to incorporate or connect to a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) or district heating network, particularly generators that use sustainably sourced fuels;  Proposals for electricity generating stations that also generate waste heat must demonstrate that consideration has been given to the feasibility of distributing the waste heat to existing and proposed residential or commercial developments using district heating or CHP. Community Schemes and Micro-generation  Support will be given to community-led renewable and low carbon energy and heat generation projects where these are consistent with the assessment criteria for energy infrastructure proposals set out in this policy;  Planning permission, where required, will normally be granted for proposals for micro-generation technologies, provided that any significant adverse impacts can be acceptably mitigated.

A Low Carbon Future 43

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposals for energy infrastructure will be required to demonstrate that regard has been given to the following:  How the development will contribute to the renewable energy targets set out in this policy;  The renewable and low carbon energy opportunities and (where relevant) the District Heating Priority Areas identified by the Central Lincolnshire Energy Opportunities Map (or any subsequent replacement);  Any adverse impacts of the development, including any long term, indirect, secondary and cumulative adverse impacts, and how these will be mitigated as part of the proposal. In determining proposals for energy infrastructure, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will give consideration to the guidance set out in the relevant National Policy Statements on energy (or any replacement guidance), including the following specific considerations: 1) For all energy infrastructure, as set out in EN-1:              Air quality and emissions Biodiversity and geological conservation Civil and military aviation and defence interests Dust, odour, artificial light, smoke, steam and insect infestation Flood risk Historic environment Landscape and visual impact Land use including open space and green infrastructure Noise and vibration Socio-economic effects Traffic and transport Waste management Water quality and resources; and

2) Additionally in the case of wind turbines, as set out in EN-3:  Shadow flicker from turbine blades. Additionally, consideration will be given to the economic, social and environmental benefits of the proposal to local communities. Explanation of Policy CL3: 4.33 Policy CL3 provides the planning framework for renewable and low carbon energy in Central Lincolnshire in line with national policy. It has 3 main components:

A Low Carbon Future 44

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

i)

Renewable and Low Carbon Energy Targets

4.34 The targets indicate the overall scale of change proposed in Central Lincolnshire and are based on the deliverable potential from the various renewable technologies to generate electricity as a proportion of electricity demand in the area, as assessed in the Central Lincolnshire Energy Study. For simplicity, the targets are expressed as percentages of the predicted total demand for electricity and heat in Central Lincolnshire for 2026 and are minimum deliverable percentages. To help understand the targets and monitor delivery, the figures can be translated into an annual generating capacity in Gigawatt-hours (GWh), as follows: Target for 2026 % of total predicted energy use in Central Lincolnshire, 2026 (minimum targets) 60% 12% Generating capacity equivalent, 2026 (GWh)

Electricity from renewable energy sources Heat from sources ii) renewable energy

869 GWh 333 GWh

Delivery approaches and requirements

4.35 Policy CL3 sets out the main approaches and requirements for delivering Central Lincolnshire’s energy targets. These have been outlined above, but the following additional points are noted in relation to zero carbon development. 4.36 Zero carbon development will play a significant role in meeting the targets through the requirements it places on new development. Both Carbon Compliance and Allowable Solutions are likely to require the provision of renewable and low carbon energy to meet the overall carbon performance required by Building Regulations. Policy CL3 defines the role of the Local Plan in relation to zero carbon development in the period before and following its introduction for new domestic and non-domestic development from 2016 and 2019 respectively. 4.37 Policy CL3 does not identify specific energy or carbon targets for new developments ahead of the proposed changes to Building Regulations, as this is considered too onerous in the present economic climate. However, development will be required to demonstrate the best achievable level of performance during the run-up to 2016/19 as well as after. Compliance will be assessed via the Statement of Design Quality required under Policy CL26, as there are likely to be significant implications for the design of development that need to be addressed as part of the design process. Further details are

A Low Carbon Future 45

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

contained in the Explanation of Policy CL26 and Appendix H. iii) Assessing and mitigating the impact of energy proposals

4.38 The third component of Policy CL3 is the framework for assessing the impact of energy proposals and infrastructure through the development management process. Specifically, it defines what proposals must demonstrate, and the assessment considerations that will be applied, in line with national policy. These assessment considerations are set out in the National Policy Statements (NPSs) for nationally significant infrastructure, including energy generation infrastructure. There are six approved NPSs for energy infrastructure, including an overarching one for Energy (EN-1) and one on Renewable Energy Infrastructure (EN-3). The impact of many of the assessment considerations is influenced by the distance of the development and the direction in which it lies in relation to homes and businesses, etc. 4.39 The need for renewable energy does not automatically override environmental protections and the planning concerns of local communities. The siting of wind turbines should take into account their cumulative impact and properly reflect the increasing impact on the landscape and local amenity as the number of turbines in an area increases. Local topography should be a factor in assessing whether wind turbines have a damaging impact on the landscape and recognise that the impact on predominantly flat landscapes can be as great, or greater, than in upland areas. Great care will be taken to ensure heritage assets are conserved in a manner appropriate to their significance, including the impact of proposals on views important to their setting. 4.40 In order to address cumulative and landscape impacts, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will seek to commission an updated Landscape Character Assessment and Capacity Study for the whole of Central Lincolnshire. This will assess the character and visual sensitivity of Central Lincolnshire's landscape and its capacity to accommodate renewable energy development and associated infrastructure. This will assist the partner authorities in starting an early review of Policy CL3. Policy CL3 will be implemented by:      Partnership working Promoting renewable and low carbon sectors of economy and links with new development Promotion of Energy Services Companies (ESCOs) Development management Development of further guidance

A Low Carbon Future 46

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

5: GROWING CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE
5.1 Central Lincolnshire has seen major housing and economic growth in recent decades and was the fastest growing population in the East Midlands region between 1996 and 2006. While the subsequent recession has impacted on the local and national economy, new homes and jobs are very much needed and projected to increase significantly to 2031 and beyond. The Core Strategy supports and guides the delivery of this growth. 5.2 Sustainable growth will maintain and improve Central Lincolnshire’s economic performance and quality of life. It can bring major benefits to the area, including increased and diversified job opportunities, a broader mix of housing and additional services facilities and infrastructure improvements. 5.3 The Core Strategy and the Local Plan will not only support growth, it will ensure it will be sensitive to and will make the best use of Central Lincolnshire’s unique environment, including its natural resources and heritage. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will plan positively and collaboratively to achieve this, fostering strong relations with all stakeholders who can influence and guide the delivery of sustainable new development in Central Lincolnshire and in neighbouring areas.

THE CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE OBJECTIVELY ASSESSED NEED

GROWTH

AGENDA

AND

5.4 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities have been working together for several years to develop and implement a growth strategy for the area. In relation to spatial planning, this partnership work focused initially on Lincoln as the main centre in Central Lincolnshire with a wide sphere of influence. Specifically, a growth strategy was prepared for a defined area - termed the Lincoln Policy Area - covering Lincoln and its hinterland. The strategy, including growth objectives and other planning policies, was incorporated into the then adopted Lincolnshire Structure Plan (2006) and subsequently updated through the East Midlands Regional Plan (2009). The latter was revoked in April 2013 and the NPPF states that “local planning authorities should ensure the Local Plan meets the full objectively assessed needs for market and affordable housing” 5.5 The Central Lincolnshire Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) predated the NPPF and therefore took its direction from the now revoked East Midlands Regional Plan for the purpose making its assessment of the local housing market. As part of the evidence for the Core Strategy, a Central Lincolnshire Housing Context Paper has been prepared, in part, to supplement the SHMA. This looks at the best available demographic information including the How Many Homes website and seeks to inform an objective assessment of need. This paper concluded that, at the time of drafting, the best available evidence was the 2008based projection. The latter identifies a projected household increase from 2006 to 2026 of 27,400, which is about 30% less than the 2004-based projections that were key in establishing the East Midlands Regional Plan targets.

Growing Central Lincolnshire 47

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

5.6 Household projections essentially look at what has happened in the past and assume the same will happen in the future. If trends are allowed to continue with no intervention, demographic forecasts show Central Lincolnshire will have an unbalanced population, which will only get worse in 20 years’ time as the proportion of working age people shrinks and there is a growing proportion of retired people. 5.7 Economic studies have made it clear that there is great potential for the local economy to grow and expand. Failure to support this business expansion could lead to deterioration in the local economy, adding to the issues created by an unbalanced community and an aging population. Capacity studies including the SHLAA and the Employment Land Review have identified a realistic potential to deliver the level of growth proposed in the plan. This would have the benefit of addressing the wider issues of an imbalanced community and encouraging investment in the area that could take advantage of the range of economic opportunities identified through local economic strategies. 5.8 Central Lincolnshire’s ambition for growth and the desire to manage the negatives effects of continuing trends is reflected in a significant part of the area benefiting from Growth Point status. The Lincoln Policy Area Growth Point was designated in October 2006 and the Gainsborough (West Lindsey) Growth Point was designated in July 2008. Whilst Growth Points are discontinued as a funding mechanism, funding has and will continue to support understanding and meeting the needs of the area. The Lincoln Policy Area Growth Point and proposed programme of development was embedded in the policies and housing targets of the now revoked East Midlands Regional Plan (2009). The Gainsborough (West Lindsey) Growth Point post-dated the Regional Plan, and has therefore been addressed as part of the preparation of the Core Strategy. Both Growth Points promoted levels of growth in excess of trend-based forecasts on the understanding that growth could assist in enhancing the overall sustainability of Central Lincolnshire. 5.9 Central Lincolnshire and its economy exist as part of a wider geographical area that influences the patterns of economic activity and development pressure, as well as its markets for jobs and housing. The Core Strategy seeks to ensure that the implications of proposed growth in adjoining areas and the opportunities this provides are fully considered. 5.10 The Sustainable Futures – Portrait of Place Study considered the role and function of Central Lincolnshire’s settlements taking account of key influences, particularly from major settlements outside of the Central Lincolnshire administrative area. Figure 5 below shows indicative spheres of influence which are useful in demonstrating the “pull” or attraction of settlements in meeting day to day needs of communities and businesses within and outside the area. 5.11 Newark-on-Trent (in Newark & Sherwood District), Grantham (in South Kesteven District) and Nottingham (as part of the 3 Cities of Nottingham, Derby and Leicester) are also Growth Points. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities have identified and explored shared issues and opportunities on strategic matters which influence the delivery of growth and offer mutual improvements for residents and business in all areas. These are considered in more detail in the Statement of Compliance with the Duty to Co-operate.
Growing Central Lincolnshire 48

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

5.12 Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) are a significant opportunity for the public and private sector to work together on economic issues and opportunities in pursuit of economic growth. LEPs have access to funding streams such as the Growing Places Fund and can support businesses in accessing funding such as the Regional Growth Fund which can be used to overcome barriers to economic growth. Central Lincolnshire forms a majority part of the Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership area and is a focus for a number of capital and researchbased projects designed to support growing existing businesses and attracting new businesses to the area. 5.13 The Humber Local Enterprise Partnership includes two enterprise zones and borders the northern boundary of Central Lincolnshire and the Greater Lincolnshire LEP area. Scunthorpe, Grimsby, and the banks of the River Humber are expected to experience significant economic growth, generating new employment opportunities in the engineering, manufacturing and logistics sectors capitalising on the demand for renewable energy technologies in its coastal location. With the M180, the A1, and improvements in the local transport network such as the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and to the A46, there are opportunities for Central Lincolnshire’s residential and business communities to support this growth and share in its benefits. 5.14 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with the LEPs and other agencies to achieve a growing economy, with a good proportion of well paid and skilled jobs. Supporting the delivery of the Local Plan is the wider Central Lincolnshire Partnership (CLP), which pools expertise from key professions such as housing, the economy and infrastructure delivery for all four Local Authorities, working together to establish shared strategies and actions. The CLP has prepared the Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy which sets out shared priorities and actions to provide a coordinated and focused economic strategy for Central Lincolnshire. Key to the work is a strategic framework constructed around the following four clear objectives: 1. Deliver sustainable economic growth in the Lincoln PUA, Gainsborough and Sleaford 2. Facilitate the necessary infrastructure to support growth 3. Stimulate the economy by supporting new and existing businesses, tourism and attracting inward investment 4. Ensuring access to employment and skills provision 5. Deliver and maintain a robust and up-to-date evidence base. 5.15 The CLP has also produced the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy which seeks to guide and coordinate the Central Lincolnshire Authorities work in supporting the delivery of the homes needed in the area. This is guided by the following objectives: 1. Deliver sustainable housing growth
Growing Central Lincolnshire 49

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

2. Deliver affordable housing 3. Meeting the diversity of needs including older persons 4. Maintain and improve the housing stock and bring empty properties back into use 5. Deliver quality and efficiency in new housing stock 6. Maintain a robust and up to date housing evidence base 5.16 Both the Central Lincolnshire Housing and Economic strategies look at a rolling five year period and include action plans setting out key projects and actions designed to support delivery. The objectives will be used to co-ordinate activities to allow the greatest return on the investment of public sector resources in driving the implementation of the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan. The work of the Central Lincolnshire Partnership in facilitating the delivery of growth is considered in more detail in Chapter 11 Delivery and Monitoring the Core Strategy. 5.17 A key role of the Core Strategy is to define the overall level of growth in Central Lincolnshire between 2011 and 2031. This is to ensure that sufficient new housing and employment land are planned to meet Central Lincolnshire’s needs and growth aspirations. It also forms the basis for decisions on where this growth should be located to ensure Central Lincolnshire and its communities can become more sustainable. The policies in this plan will seek to ensure that growth is delivered in Central Lincolnshire as part of the overall aim of sustainable development.

SPATIAL STRATEGY FOR GROWTH
5.18 The Central Lincolnshire spatial strategy seeks to concentrate growth in the main urban areas with growth elsewhere to support local needs. 5.19 As well as the overall level of growth the strategy of urban concentration has been tested locally through consultation on the Core Strategy Issues and Options and considering the broad sustainability of alternative growth distribution scenarios through the Sustainable Futures – Blueprint for Growth Study. Overall, the consultation supported a growth strategy focusing on Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford with some growth in other settlements to support local needs. Evidence including the Sustainable Futures - Blueprint for Growth also concluded that this would be the most sustainable strategy for the growth of Central Lincolnshire. The approach also provides associated opportunities to regenerate urban areas, provide jobs and new homes in accessible locations, and focus infrastructure improvements where they will have the greatest effect in terms of improving and generating new residential and business environments and efficiently unlocking new development. 5.20 Outside of the main urban areas of Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford, Central Lincolnshire’s smaller towns and villages vary in size, demography and accessibility. They have different issues that will need to be addressed and have a range of local opportunities that will need to be realised if they can develop socially, economically and environmentally into more sustainable communities. Every town
Growing Central Lincolnshire 50

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

and village and neighbourhood plays a part in how Central Lincolnshire functions and performs sustainably. The need for new homes, economic growth and investment in infrastructure is Central Lincolnshire wide. Each community therefore needs to be considered for its own contribution to the delivery of a sustainable Central Lincolnshire, which may include proportionate and appropriate development. 5.21 Through the Sustainable Futures Studies, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities have considered all the different types of communities that make up the area and sought to understand the different roles and relationships that exist. The Studies identify that the relationship between settlements can be understood by the degree of attraction or support they offer to each other, recognising that they are related. This attraction relates to their function in providing services and employment, whereas support applies to settlements that are primarily residential and whose residents are likely to need to travel elsewhere to meet their employment and service needs. Figure 5 illustrates these relationships and identifies six types of settlements that make up Central Lincolnshire and have influence in neighbouring areas: Figure 5: Central Lincolnshire Settlement Role and Relationship Diagram

Source: Sustainable Futures – Portrait of Place (AECOM, 2011)

5.22 Considering communities in this way allows us to better understand how, individually or as clusters or groups, they could change and become more sustainable. A community could fall within a certain role now but, subject to community aspirations and conformity with the policies contained within the Local Plan, there may be opportunities to change its current role by using growth or not to address local issues and take opportunities. The six roles and relationships are set out in the table below, which also identifies opportunities to improve sustainability.

Growing Central Lincolnshire 51

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Table 2: Central Lincolnshire Settlement Roles and Relationships Settlement Typology REGIONAL ATTRACTOR Lincoln, including the wider Lincoln Principal Urban Area (PUA) but recognising the individual roles of North Hykeham (which has some attributes of a Primary Attractor) and Waddington and Bracebridge Heath (which have some attributes of Primary Supporters) PRIMARY ATTRACTOR Gainsborough and Sleaford Role and Relationship Sustainability Opportunities

City or Principal Urban See Lincoln area chapter. Area with a regional and nationally significant economic and cultural draw attracting residents from surrounding areas for employment, entertainment, shopping and other activities. All needs could be met within the settlement. Key role in driving growth in Central Lincolnshire

These are towns which See Lincoln, Gainsborough and have significant potential Sleaford area chapters. for growth. They have local employment opportunities and shopping and community facilities focused around a town centre and neighbourhood centres to allow the majority of residents’ needs to be met locally. However the enhanced level of employment, shopping and leisure opportunities of the Regional Attractor remains a draw for
Growing Central Lincolnshire 52

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

residents. Primary attractors have a key role in supporting Lincoln in driving economic growth in Central Lincolnshire. SECONDARY Small Towns which may ATTRACTOR have the potential to become a Primary Market Rasen Attractor. They have a and Caistor lower residential population than Primary Attractors but offer local retail, leisure and services and limited local employment.

 Maintain and enhance role in providing local services and employment and supporting rural communities in the north of Central Lincolnshire.  Improve connections with Attractors including Gainsborough, Lincoln, Grimsby and the Humber Banks to enhance local economic opportunities.  Improve connections with “Supporters” to maintain the viability of local services.  Develop and enhance the cultural and tourism offer though heritage and environmental assets.

TERTIARY ATTRACTOR

Small villages that act as local service centres in rural areas. They have basic amenities which can include small scale shopping uses such as pub/restaurant, post office or health care facilities. They serve basic day to day needs of nearby villages, but residents are attracted to larger settlements particularly for employment, retail and leisure.

 Maintain and enhance role in providing local services and supporting surrounding villages through the development of cluster networks across Central Lincolnshire.  Improve connection with Attractors within and outside Central Lincolnshire.  Improve connections with “Supporters” to maintain the viability of local services.  Where needed use growth as a mechanism to maintain the viability of local services and facilities and to improve housing affordability.  Encourage effective use and reduce consumption of energy and water resources.  Invest in improvements in weaknesses in the broadband network.

PRIMARY SUPPORTER

Large villages located on the outskirts of and well

 Improving connections to Regional, Primary, Secondary and Tertiary

Growing Central Lincolnshire 53

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

connected to a Regional or Primary attractor. They can have basic amenities similar to those of Tertiary Attractors but mainly residential in character and residents are drawn to the Primary or Regional Attractors for the majority of their retail, leisure and employment needs. SECONDARY SUPPORTER The smallest and rural villages and hamlets which lack the majority of services to meet any day to day needs locally. Residents travel to Attractors to meet their basic needs but enjoy a tranquil environment.

Attractors through public transport, walking and cycling to lessen the impact of commuting.  Ensuring proportionate local services are provided and maintained within the settlement or part of a cluster to lessen the need to travel.  Use growth where appropriate to address housing affordability issues.  Maintain a sense of community and local identity.

 Improve Regional, Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Attractors with increased emphasis on building cluster relationships with Tertiary Attractors.  In appropriate locations, use growth to support the generation and retention of basic services locally.  Invest in improvements in weaknesses in the broadband network.

5.23 The Spatial Strategy aims to guide the delivery of growth to achieve sustainable development. The policies in this plan will seek to ensure this is achieved so that all communities benefit from the major growth of Lincoln as the Regional Attractor and Gainsborough and Sleaford as Primary Attractors and the opportunities this brings. The detailed Area chapters for the main urban areas set out policies which carry forward the vision and proposals identified through the Lincoln City Centre, Gainsborough and Sleaford Masterplans. 5.24 Smaller Towns such as Caistor and Market Rasen (Secondary Attractors) and villages (Tertiary Attractors and Supporters) will also have a major role in meeting the needs of the residential and business communities locally and as networks across Central Lincolnshire. However, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities are mindful that if growth is to be sustainable in smaller communities, local people will need to influence and potentially lead it to ensure needs are addressed and opportunities taken as individual communities or through working together as clusters. The Core Strategy therefore does not define the roles of all communities below Secondary Attractor level. Instead, the Central Lincolnshire Local Development Scheme sets out that a second Development Plan Document will be produced which focuses on understanding the roles of individual communities and local site allocations for development. Preliminary Engagement on the Central Lincolnshire Allocations Document took place over the Summer of 2013 and a programme of work is in place aiming to adopt the document in 2016. The document
Growing Central Lincolnshire 54

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

will be informed by extensive consultation and evidence specifically the Sustainable Futures – Portrait of Place. 5.25 In seeking to allocate land for development within the Allocations Document, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with communities to define their role within the typologies identified and assess the potential for growth to improve their sustainability where appropriate and consistent with the Core Strategy’s objectives and growth strategy. Key to understanding sustainability are the connections between places, as represented on the Central Lincolnshire Key Diagram.

PROVIDING NEW HOMES AND ECONOMIC GROWTH
5.26 To realise the Central Lincolnshire Growth Agenda, 42,800 new homes are be planned for between 2011 and 2031. This level of housing provision will seek to meet and exceed demonstrated demographic needs including an allowance for a significant contribution towards affordable housing, but crucially also to provide a level of growth that can achieve a more balanced population and increase economic investment in the area. 5.27 This strategy will enhance the roles of the Lincoln PUA as a Regional Attractor and Gainsborough and Sleaford as Primary Attractors, providing a diverse mix of high quality new homes that will house a growing and resilient workforce in attractive residential environments. 5.28 Targets for housing and economic growth have been set for the three main urban areas informed by an understanding of urban capacity and deliverability up to 2031. Detailed policies which allocate strategic sites and guide development in Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford are set out in the specific Area chapters of the Core Strategy. 5.29 The Central Lincolnshire Core Strategy housing provision is consistent with that proposed in the revoked East Midlands Regional Plan (2009), and exceeds a trend-based assessment of local needs based upon the 2008-based household projections plus 5% buffer required by the NPPF. However, in recognition of the need for a long term strategy for the area, the revoked Regional Plan requirements have been extended by five years, with the new homes delivered in Central Lincolnshire between 2006 and 2011 subtracted. 5.30 How this target will be met over the plan period is detailed in the housing trajectory included at Appendix G. The trajectory details a steady increase in housing delivery on the assumption that the economy moves through recovery to a more buoyant period of growth. For the first five years of the plan it can be seen that the need identified by the 2008-based household projections plus a 5% buffer can be met. Thereafter the trajectory set outs a steady increase in growth each year as the 8 proposed SUEs gather momentum, future reviews of the SHLAA are undertaken and new allocations are brought on stream through the Allocations Documnet in 2016, resulting in the overall target of 42,800 being met by 2031.

Growing Central Lincolnshire 55

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

5.31 In accordance with projected housing delivery rates, the proposed housing targets have been split into 5 year periods to allow the plan to reflect the steady upward curve in growth expected. Delivery and capacity will be closely monitored and reported each year through the SHLAA and the Annual Monitoring Reports together with an assessment of any need for specific interventions as detailed in the Chapter 11 Delivery and Monitoring the Core Strategy. 5.32 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work together and with key agencies to achieve an uplift in the levels of growth historically achieved in the area over the Core Strategy period. They will do this through coordinated housing and economic strategies and focused investment in infrastructure needed to unlock development to be coordinated through the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and Central Lincolnshire Partnership in line with measures identified in Chapter 11. 5.33 It is recognised that the level of housing delivery proposed in Central Lincolnshire between 2011 and 2031 will be challenging. However, planning for this level of growth over a 20 year period will allow the Central Lincolnshire Authorities to allocate and deliver a range of sites of varied size and type and in different locations. A varied land supply which includes a range of both greenfield and brownfield sites will be crucial in ensuring delivery and sustainable development in current and improved economic conditions, and to give the market the best possible chance of recovery. 5.34 The targets for the three main urban areas are informed by an assessment of land availability drawn from the Central Lincolnshire Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA). Following the spatial strategy, which seeks to focus as much growth towards enhancing the roles of the three main urban areas leaves a remaining 9,500 homes to be distributed in the Rural Area to meet local needs and enhance the sustainability of communities. This requirement will be distributed in consultation with local communities through the development of the Site Allocations Document and will allow for communities to develop their own aspirations for their areas either through the preparation of Neighbourhood Plans or through positive engagement in the development of the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan. This work has already commenced with a programme in place for new allocations to be made in 2016. Policy CL4 – Level and Distribution of Growth The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners will pursue a sustainable growth strategy for Central Lincolnshire that delivers an uplift in the levels of growth achieved historically in the area and meets objectively assessed needs for homes and jobs will regenerate places and communities and support necessary improvements to facilities, services and infrastructure. Provision will be made for around 42,800 new dwellings and for around 210 ha of employment land over the plan period 2011 – 2031, distributed as follows: 1. Lincoln Principal Urban Area – to significantly strengthen the role of Lincoln as a Regional Attractor and to meet Lincoln’s Growth Point objectives and regeneration needs, Lincoln will be the principal focus in Central Lincolnshire for new development, including retail, leisure, cultural,
Growing Central Lincolnshire 56

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

office and other employment development appropriate to Lincoln’s role, and will accommodate approximately 44% of Central Lincolnshire’s housing development over the plan period. Growth will be focused in and adjoining the Lincoln Principal Urban Area [the Principal Urban Area is defined as the existing built up area of Lincoln, North Hykeham & South Hykeham Fosseway1, Waddington and Bracebridge Heath as shown in Appendix F] through a combined strategy of urban regeneration and sustainable urban extensions, as detailed in the Core Strategy’s policies for the Lincoln area; 2. Gainsborough - to maintain and enhance the role of Gainsborough as a Primary Attractor and to meet the objectives for regeneration and new housing in the Gainsborough Masterplan and Growth Point, Gainsborough will be the focus for significant employment growth and will accommodate approximately 23% of Central Lincolnshire’s housing development over the plan period. Growth will be focused in and adjoining the Gainsborough Urban Area [The Gainsborough Urban Area is defined as the settlements of Gainsborough, Lea and Morton as shown in Appendix F] through a combined strategy of urban regeneration and sustainable urban extensions, as detailed in the Core Strategy’s policies for the Gainsborough area; 3. Sleaford – to maintain and enhance the role of Sleaford as a Primary Attractor and to support the objectives of the Sleaford Masterplan, Sleaford will be the focus for significant local employment generating development and will accommodate approximately 10% of Central Lincolnshire’s housing growth over the plan period. Growth will be focused in and adjoining the settlement of Sleaford [the Sleaford Urban Area as shown in Appendix F] through a combined strategy of urban regeneration and sustainable urban extensions, as detailed in the Core Strategy’s policies for the Sleaford area; 4. Smaller Towns and Rural Settlements – to support the role of Market Rasen and Caistor as Secondary Attractors and to promote sustainable and prosperous communities elsewhere across the rural area of Central Lincolnshire, sufficient development will take place to meet identified local need for houses and jobs and to enhance the sustainability of communities. These settlements will collectively accommodate approximately 22% of Central Lincolnshire’s housing growth over the plan period. The allocation of sites for housing, employment and other uses in the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan will be made in accordance with this strategic approach to growth and with the other policies in this Core Strategy, having regard to evolving opportunities, constraints and local aspirations. In relation to housing and employment , the following targets will apply:

1

South Hykeham Fosseway as defined by the North Kesteven Local Plan 2007 proposals map. Growing Central Lincolnshire 57

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Lincoln PUA

Gainsborough Urban Area

Sleaford Urban Area

Smaller Towns and Rural Settlements Total Per Annum

Total

Total

Per Annum

Total

Per Annum

Total

Per Annum

Area of Employment land (ha) 2011/122030/31 140 N/A 25 N/A 20 N/A 25 N/A 210

Number of Dwellings 2011/12 2012/132016/17 2017/182021/22 2022/232026/27 2027/28203/31 Total Dwellings 537 3530 N/A 706 77 2045 N/A 409 95 592 N/A 118 281 2766 N/A 553 990 8933

4657

931

1590

318

1093

219

2302

460

9642

5685

1137

2859

572

1468

294

2305

461

12317

4391

1098

3429

857

1252

313

1846

462

10918

18,800

10,000

4500

9,500

42,800

Development relating to each settlement will be distributed in accordance with the relevant area-based policies and other policies in the Core Strategy. The individual settlement roles and growth targets for the Smaller Towns and the Rural Settlements will be reviewed and defined in the ongoing review of the Local Plan, having regard to the aspirations of local communities and the Government’s localism agenda. Explanation of Policy CL4: 5.35 This policy essentially carries forward much of the growth strategy set out in the revoked Regional Plan, though with appropriate updating and revisions to account for a more up-to-date assessment of capacity and deliverability within the three main urban areas. A detailed Housing Trajectory is included at Appendix G which projects housing delivery up to 2031 and sets out the contribution made by

Growing Central Lincolnshire 58

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

each of the main urban areas, including the proposed sustainable urban extensions (see Policy CL7) and development in the rural area. 5.36 The trajectory is based upon a real supply of housing which will be reviewed at least annually and is supported by the Central Lincolnshire Whole Plan Viability assessment. Policy CL4 will be implemented by:         Site allocations in through the Allocation Document Community-led Neighbourhood Plans Annual reviews of the trajectory through the SHLAA and Annual Monitoring Report Development management by the partner authorities Housing and Economic Growth Strategies prepared through the Central Lincolnshire Partnership Masterplans for Lincoln City Centre, Gainsborough and Sleaford Masterplanning for large Sustainable Urban Extensions Investment in infrastructure coordinated through the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan process.

MANAGING THE RELEASE OF LAND FOR HOUSING & EMPLOYMENT
5.37 The Local Plan seeks to ensure that sufficient land is available for new housing and employment development over the course of the plan period. This is achieved through a combination of linked activities, including:      Allocating land for development Monitoring the delivery of new homes and employment development against Local Plan targets Development management decisions on specific proposals Maintaining an up-to-date assessment of suitable, available and deliverable land through the Central Lincolnshire SHLAA and the Employment Land Review Coordinating investment in infrastructure to unlock development sites and to keep development under construction, through the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan.

5.38 To achieve the challenging growth targets and meet the needs of the area, a range of sites (greenfield and brownfield, small and large) will be required. However, it is also important to ensure that regeneration is achieved through the re-use of brownfield sites in the main urban areas and that greenfield sites are not brought forward in a way that undermines this objective or the wider aim of sustainable development underpinning the Spatial Strategy for Growth.

Growing Central Lincolnshire 59

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy CL5 – Managing the Release of Land for Housing and Employment The availability of sites for housing and employment will be kept under review to maintain a constant supply of sites to meet the overall targets for Central Lincolnshire as set out in Policy CL4. In managing the release of sites for development, including the determination of planning applications, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will have particular regard to the following alongside the other policies in the Local Plan: 1. the requirement to maintain a 5 year supply of deliverable housing sites as set out in the National Planning Policy Framework; 2. prioritising the use of suitable previously-developed sites (‘brownfield’ sites) in sustainable locations together with the strategic site allocations for Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) to deliver the Spatial Strategy for Growth for Central Lincolnshire and its constituent strategies for the Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford areas; 3. the need to achieve a balanced distribution of new development across Central Lincolnshire, particularly in relation to the rates of delivery against the housing targets for the 3 main urban areas, and also between different parts of the rural area; 4. the delivery rates and phasing of the sustainable urban extensions (SUEs) to Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford, as proposed in the Core Strategy’s policies for these areas; 5. the contribution that sites can make to the delivery of infrastructure requirements identified in the Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP); 6. the conservation and enhancement of Central Lincolnshire’s environmental quality, including its natural and historic assets and the conservation of water and other natural resources. Where appropriate, phasing plans for SUEs and other major development sites will be developed through future planning documents and site specific Masterplans in accordance with Policy CL7. Explanation of Policy CL5: 5.39 Policy CL5 seeks to prioritise the release of sites for development balanced against the need to maintain a rolling 5 year supply of housing land that this suitable, available and achievable. It seeks to ensure that urban regeneration is achieved and the role of the main urban areas is enhanced by the development of brownfield sites developed in conjunction with masterplanned sustainable urban extensions as priority over the development of other greenfield sites.
Growing Central Lincolnshire 60

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

5.40 The identification of a 5 year housing land supply (and the 5% or 20% additional buffer) for Central Lincolnshire will be updated annually through the Annual Monitoring Report and the SHLAA, in line with the NPPF. In identifying such land, priority will be given to suitable previously-developed sites, followed by suitable greenfield sites, in line with the objectives, growth strategy and other policies in the Core Strategy. The relative sustainability of sites will be a key consideration, alongside the need to protect and enhance environmental and heritage assets including areas designated under saved policies such as Green Wedges. Availability, viability, policy coverage or any other constraints on site deliverability identified through the SHLAA process will also be taken into consideration. Policy CL5 will be implemented by:     Local Plan monitoring Updating and developing the Central Lincolnshire SHLAA Development management by partner authorities The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with key stakeholders to unlock barriers to the delivery of land through infrastructure delivery and overcome site specific constraints.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTING SITES FOR DEVELOPMENT
5.41 Alongside Policy CL5, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities wish to provide clarity in the Core Strategy on how sites will be assessed when being considered for housing, employment and mixed use allocations in the Local Plan, and also how planning applications for sites not considered through or in advance of the Site Allocations process will be assessed. Sites for housing and employment and mixed use will be required across all the types of community identified in Central Lincolnshire. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with communities to understand the sites available in their areas and identify the most sustainable opportunities to accommodate growth, where appropriate, through the development of the Site Allocations DPD. 5.42 Policy CL6 is supplemented by, and should be read in conjunction with, more detailed policies setting out the approach to development in each of the 3 main urban areas of Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford together with the detailed policies which allocate individual Sustainable Urban Extensions. Policy CL6 – Site Selection in Central Lincolnshire In selecting sites for housing or employment, all of the following will be taken into account as important requirements: 1. Being located in or adjacent to the existing built-up area of the settlement and in accordance with the approaches to development set out in the Core Strategy for the Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford areas; 2. Being accessible and well-related to existing facilities and services;

Growing Central Lincolnshire 61

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

3. Being accessible by public transport, or, demonstrate that the provision of such services can be viably provided and sustained; 4. Being sustainable in terms of impacts on existing infrastructure, or, demonstrate that appropriate new infrastructure can be provided to address sustainability issues; 5. Not having adverse impacts that cannot be adequately addressed and mitigated on Central Lincolnshire’s environmental quality, including its natural, built and historic assets and landscape character; 6. Not leading to the loss of locally important open space, playing fields, recreational buildings, green infrastructure, or community facilities, unless adequately replaced elsewhere with no net detriment; 7. Having been subject to appropriate sequential testing and other planning policy requirements in relation to flood risk; 8. Being generally consistent with the Visions, Objectives and Policies of this Core Strategy. Explanation of Policy CL6 5.43 Policy CL6 guides the selection of non strategic housing allocations in Central Lincolnshire, and seeks to ensure that the site allocations in the Local Plan or any new developments are in the most sustainable locations. Policy CL6 will be implemented by:     The adoption of an Allocations Document in accordance with the programme of work set out in the Local Development Scheme Development Management of planning applications for development which meet the requirements of this policy and all other policies in the plan An Integrated Impact Assessment supporting the development of the Allocations Document A review of the Infrastructure Delivery Plan alongside the development of the Allocations Document.

SUSTAINABLE URBAN EXTENSIONS & OTHER LARGE SCALE DEVELOPMENT
5.44 The delivery of large scale development in the form of Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) to the three main urban areas is critical to achieving the sustainable growth of Central Lincolnshire. The Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford area sections of the Core Strategy include the following 8 strategic site allocations:

Growing Central Lincolnshire 62

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

The Lincoln Western Growth Corridor The Lincoln South East Quadrant The Lincoln North East Quadrant The Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood The Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood The Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood Sleaford South Quadrant Sleaford West Quadrant

5.45 These strategic locations for growth are identified on the Key Diagram area insets and are included as strategic allocations in the Core Strategy, as set out in the individual strategic site allocation policies contained within the Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford Area chapters. Site boundaries for each SUE are identified on the Local Plan Policies Map and detailed infrastructure requirements for each site are set out in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan. Further details of each proposed SUE are contained in the Area chapters and in a Topic Paper for each SUE which forms part of the evidence base for the Core Strategy. 5.46 Sustainable Urban Extensions will deliver approximately 35% of Central Lincolnshire’s housing growth. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work together and with the site proponents to ensure that all the sites commence construction as soon as possible and are phased over the plan period and beyond. A detailed masterplan will be prepared for each site through collaborative working arrangements between the developers, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, communities and other stakeholders who can contribute towards the delivery of exemplar sustainable development. Whilst at present the 8 sites identified above are the only large scale development sites proposed in Central Lincolnshire, as a precautionary measure this policy will also seek to comprehensively plan any other large scale proposals should they come forward unexpectedly over the plan period. Policy CL7 - Sustainable Urban Extensions and Other Large Scale Development Sites in Central Lincolnshire The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will ensure that large scale development sites, including the Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) to Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford are delivered through a co-ordinated and comprehensive approach to delivery in pursuit of the highest viable standards of development. To achieve this standard of development proposals for SUEs and any other large scale development sites will be required to demonstrate that they: 1) Contribute to the achievement of sustainable development in Central Lincolnshire, including reductions in carbon emissions through appropriate design and energy infrastructure in accordance with Policy CL1; 2) Provide a suitable mix of uses including housing, employment, green infrastructure, community facilities (including provision for sport and recreation, arts and culture and to allow for social interaction and worship),

Growing Central Lincolnshire 63

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

educational facilities and a new centre or centres determined by the specific needs of the location and consideration of the impact upon existing settlements (including existing City, Town, District and Neighbourhood Centres); 3) Are fully integrated with the main settlement and with surrounding smaller settlements avoiding coalescence where possible, creating new neighbourhoods with their own identity but enhancing the opportunities and services for existing communities where appropriate; 4) Provide a range of house types, sizes and tenures to meet current and future housing needs of Central Lincolnshire, an appropriate proportion of which should be affordable where viable, in line with Policy CL12 & CL13, with viability reviewed over the lifetime of the overall development; 5) Provide and facilitate a range of employment opportunities, uses and types which are appropriate for the site and can meet the needs of the main urban area and surrounding communities; 6) Develop new communities through the establishment of appropriate measures to allow the community to shape the development, contribute to managing its long term sustainability and ensure that the development delivers appropriate opportunities for social interaction, through public buildings, open spaces and the design of new neighbourhoods; 7) Deliver safe and effective access and movement, both within the development and to the City and Town centres and adjacent communities, prioritising walking, cycling and public transport whilst acknowledging that some vehicular movements are inevitable. New development will therefore also be required to provide appropriate highway infrastructure and/or improvements to the existing highway network; 8) Have considered and addressed all forms of flood risk as early on as possible in the planning process (fluvial, surface water, ground water, sewer, reservoir & canal), to ensure that the development is safe, has contributed to reducing flood risk where possible and will not increase flood risk on and off site and that the use of sustainable drainage systems will be included in the development; 9) Ensure that the impact of the development on the environment is positive where possible through measures including Green Infrastructure, Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems, on and off site measures to mitigate the impact on biodiversity and minimising the use of non renewable resources; 10) Generate new neighbourhoods which are locally distinctive, maximise the value of heritage and natural assets and create an identity which is specific to the development but sympathetic to local character; 11) Meet any specific requirements set out in the Local Plan.
Growing Central Lincolnshire 64

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Planning applications for Sustainable Urban Extensions and any other large scale development sites will be expected to be brought forward as phases of a comprehensive scheme and supported by evidence that demonstrates they meet the above criteria, which should include: 1) A detailed Masterplan for the whole SUE to facilitate a comprehensive scheme;
2) An urban design framework for achieving high quality development that

has been agreed with the local planning authority, and that sets out the main design principles for the SUE, including (though not necessarily restricted to) the overall approaches to: block structure; sustainable use of energy and other resources; density; mixing of uses; highway design and frontage issues; street furniture and the public realm; architectural character and themes; and how a consistent standard of design will be delivered through the use of design codes or other agreed means;

3) A detailed Phasing Plan which specifies the individual phases of development and the anticipated rate of delivery informed by the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and the overall levels of growth necessary in Central Lincolnshire; 4) A detailed Transport Assessment and associated Travel Plan prioritising walking, cycling and public transport; 5) An appropriate Health Impact Assessment; 6) Evidence which considers any detrimental impact and enhancements to the landscape setting of the City or Town, environmental and heritage features on and adjacent to the site, including listed buildings, Scheduled Ancient Monuments, other archaeological features and areas of biodiversity interest; 7) Retail Impact Assessment, to consider the implications of any proposed District or Neighbourhood Centre on the City or Town Centres and the role that new centre will play in the overall retail hierarchy; 8) A Green Infrastructure and Ecological Assessment to demonstrate how the development will maximise opportunities to enhance the wider area, through new opportunities and protecting existing assets; 9) An energy supply and usage assessment informed by the Central Lincolnshire Energy Study which minimises energy requirements and prioritises renewable energy sources where appropriate; 10) A detailed Flood Risk Assessment incorporating an assessment of the opportunity to create comprehensive Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems and informed by the Green Infrastructure and Ecological Assessment;

Growing Central Lincolnshire 65

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

11) A detailed Contaminated Land Investigation; 12) A comprehensive assessment of site specific infrastructure requirements informed by evidence including, but not limited to, the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan. Explanation of Policy CL7 5.47 Policy CL7 set outs the Central Lincolnshire Authorities’ expectations for SUES in Central Lincolnshire. It will also be applied to any other large scale proposals that emerge over the plan period which are currently unidentified. It will ensure that strategic developments are brought forward in a planned and consistent manner, are fully integrated with the main urban areas, and that the mix and quality of development delivered meets the needs of Central Lincolnshire and can enhance its overall sustainability. The policy sets out the range of detailed assessments that the developer will need to undertake collaboratively. Further detail on the assessment requirements is contained in the relevant policies of the Core Strategy, but should also be discussed with the local planning and highway authorities as part of ongoing collaborative working on delivery. 5.48 In relation to design, the policy specifies that an agreed urban design framework for the SUE is required with planning applications. This is to ensure that the overall approach to design for the SUE is explored and principles agreed at an early stage, thereby providing a clear framework for more detailed applications as the SUE progresses. The matters to be covered by the urban design framework will need to be discussed and agreed with the local planning authority in relation to each SUE, but will normally include the following as a minimum:   The urban design approach to structuring the development to achieve legibility and permeability, including the use of a block structure or appropriate alternative approach; The urban design approach for promoting the sustainable use of energy, water and other resources in the development, including the range of measures proposed to meet the requirements of Policies CL3 and CL26, and how these will be integrated within the SUE; How densities will vary across the SUE in response to design and other relevant considerations, including focal locations such as the district and/or neighbourhood centre(s), main road frontages, etc; Where and how the SUE will achieve mixed use within the development, including the approach to the district and/or neighbourhood centre(s) and the successful integration of residential and other uses; The principles governing the design of highways and how they relate to buildings and the public realm, to achieve an attractive, safe and people-friendly environment that promotes alternatives to the private car; The principles for the design of the public realm, including branding of street furniture and signage across the development; The overall concepts or themes that will inform the architecture and character of the SUE;

    

Growing Central Lincolnshire 66

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

How urban design for the SUE will respond to and support the delivery of requirements identified in the other assessments listed in Policy CL7, including access and transport; health and wellbeing; conservation of character and heritage; green infrastructure and biodiversity; and flood risk; How consistency and quality of design will be maintained thoughout the SUE, including the use of design coding or other mechanisms.

Policy CL7 will be implemented by:    Detailed Masterplans for each site prepared in collaborative manner Development management by partner authorities Collaborative working on the delivery of infrastructure through the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan.

NEIGHBOURHOOD PLANNING
5.49 The Localism Act 2011 allows communities to shape development in their areas through the preparation of Neighbourhood Plans. They can be used as an opportunity to develop a shared vision to guide the delivery of the sustainable development they need. This can be achieved either through establishing policies through Neighbourhood Plans or granting planning permission through Neighbourhood Development Orders or Community Rights to Build. 5.50 The NPPF makes it clear that where communities wish to progress Neighbourhood Plans they must be in conformity with the strategic policies of the Local Plan and that the Neighbourhood Plan should plan positively to support them. In the case of Central Lincolnshire, all Neighbourhood Plans should be in general conformity with all the policies of the Core Strategy and other appropriate policies of the Local Plan where these relate directly to the specific community. In line with the Central Lincolnshire growth agenda, Neighbourhood Plans can only be used as a tool to promote sustainable growth and plans which seek to restrict are unlikely to be successful. 5.51 In Central Lincolnshire a number of communities have formally designated their Neighbourhood as a Neighbourhood Plan Area. To date these include:      Welbourn Caistor Cherry Willingham Nettleham Saxilby

5.52 All proposals are still in the early stages of development, and none have advanced sufficiently for them to be able to influence the Core Strategy. However it is likely that proposals may have advanced to influence the proposed Allocations Document and Neighbourhood Plans should be prepared in a manner that allows them to be read in conjunction with the Local Plan and form a valuable part of the Central Lincolnshire Development Plan.

Growing Central Lincolnshire 67

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy CL8 – Sustainable Communities and Neighbourhood Plans As part of the strategy to promote sustainable communities throughout Central Lincolnshire, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners will support sustainable growth to meet local needs for housing, employment and other facilities, where this can be achieved in a sustainable and viable way. The production of Neighbourhood Plans will be viewed positively as a mechanism for local communities to participate in planning their neighbourhoods. Such Plans will be tested for general conformity with the Central Lincolnshire Local Plans and will be required to demonstrate with appropriate evidence that their proposals and policies enhance the sustainability of the settlement, and assist in delivering the Vision and Objectives for Central Lincolnshire as set out in the Core Strategy. Specifically, a Neighbourhood Plan should: 1) Promote sustainable growth which meets demonstrated local economic, social and environmental needs; and 2) Be informed by an appropriate understanding of the Neighbourhood Plan’s infrastructure requirements and demands and not prejudice the ability to deliver infrastructure identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan; and 3) Be prepared through extensive engagement with a full cross section of those living and working in the area of the Neighbourhood Plan plus key stakeholders who will influence future development. Explanation of Policy CL8 5.53 This policy guides the preparation of Neighbourhood Plans to ensure that that they are positively prepared and can be found to be in conformity with the policies of the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan, as well as achieving a proportionate evidence base and appropriate engagement. Policy CL8 will be implemented by:    Informing the responses of the Joint Committee and partner authorities to Neighbourhood Plan proposals Providing guidance to Neighbourhood Plans inspectors on how Neighbourhood Plans relate to the Local Plan and particularly the Spatial Strategy for Growth Positively prepared Neighbourhood Plans

Growing Central Lincolnshire 68

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

INFRASTRUCTURE DELIVERY PLANNING
5.54 Growth in Central Lincolnshire will need to be supported by appropriate infrastructure. This is why the Central Lincolnshire Authorities have developed an Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) alongside the Core Strategy. The IDP aligns itself to the key themes in the Core Strategy and identifies what is required by when, how much this will cost, what funding there is available to pay for it and who is responsible for its delivery. 5.55 Developer contributions, particularly through the large urban extensions that are fundamental to the growth strategy, will benefit new and existing residents and help with infrastructure delivery. However, the viability of new development will, in part, determine what standards and level of provision can be achieved. In some cases there will be a need to prioritise infrastructure requirements and these priorities may change over time and as more detailed assessment is undertaken in relation to specific development types or locations. This is why the policy on infrastructure will point to the IDP, rather than identify in detail specific infrastructure items; it enables flexibility for infrastructure requirements to be monitored and reviewed through the Central Lincolnshire Partnership. 5.56 To help with the prioritisation process, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will seek to classify infrastructure into the following broad categories:   Critical – items that are critical to the delivery of the plan, for example major pieces of road infrastructure; Mitigating – items that are needed to mitigate the impact of specific developments that are critical to the Core Strategy, for example GP surgeries, open space and primary school provision; Strategic – items that are individually or together considered necessary to meet the Core Strategy objectives, for example the Witham Valley Country Park and Park and Ride; and Other – any other items that may indirectly support the Core Strategy that are likely to be items negotiated on site.

5.57 The Central Lincolnshire district authorities will seek to introduce a separate but aligned Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) charging schedule to help fund infrastructure. The CIL charging schedule will be based on evidence from the CIL and Whole Plan Viability Assessment Study, which will seek to cumulatively assess the impact of Local Plan policies, infrastructure requirements and an appropriate CIL levy on the viability of development, in line with the requirements of the NPPF and the Harman Report. However, in addition it will be crucial for the authorities to pursue all funding streams available and continue to work with partners and stakeholders, such as developers, utility companies and health care providers, to help deliver against infrastructure requirements. 5.58 As identified above, there are pieces of infrastructure that will be critical to the delivery of the Core Strategy’s Spatial Strategy for Growth in Central Lincolnshire.
Growing Central Lincolnshire 69

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Examples include the proposed Lincoln Eastern Bypass and green spaces to prevent coalescence of settlements. Such infrastructure needs safeguarding from development where this would be harmful. Some policies within the plan, for example in the Quality Environment chapter, will help to achieve this. However, policy CL9, in addition to identifying the approach that the authorities will take for infrastructure provision, seeks to ensure that a level of protection is afforded where it is not covered in other policies.

Policy CL9 - Infrastructure to Support Growth The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will support the delivery of relevant infrastructure to facilitate new development in line with the Infrastructure Delivery Plan and appropriate evidence. Developers will be expected to contribute to the delivery of relevant infrastructure and, where appropriate, this will include financial contributions through both planning obligations and the Community Infrastructure Levy. Where infrastructure items are identified as critical in the Infrastructure Delivery Plan and on the Proposals Map, they should be protected from development, or the harmful effects of development, and their delivery safeguarded until such time as they are implemented or their delivery becomes unnecessary as a result of changing future circumstances. Where the latter is the case, the future use of the land required for their development will be considered within the context of other policies contained within the Local Plan, and the most relevant and appropriate up to date evidence, and the Authorities will seek to use any financial contributions on other appropriate infrastructure items within the area. Explanation of Policy CL9 5.59 Policy CL9 sets out the Core Strategy’s overall approach to infrastructure provision and delivery. Sustainable development is the key theme running through the Core Strategy and delivering appropriate infrastructure to support growth is key to achieving that. 5.60 The following policies are particularly important in providing further detail pursuant to Policy CL9:      Policy CL10 (Transport) Policy CL11 (Health & Wellbeing) Policy CL24 (Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity) Policy CL25 (Managing Water Resources & Flood Risk) SUE Policies

Policy CL9 will be implemented by:  Production of an IDP to be submitted alongside the Core Strategy

Growing Central Lincolnshire 70

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

       

Other policies in the Core Strategy Development of CIL charging schedules by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities based on evidence from the CIL and Whole Plan Viability Study Pursuing all viable funding streams Site allocation in the Local Plan Development management decisions by the partner authorities Linking the Local Plan with the strategies used to evidence the development of the IDP Close partnership working with all partners and stakeholders Monitoring and reviewing the IDP and changing requirements and priorities where this is supported by evidence

Telecommunications 5.61 The NPPF confirms that “advanced, high quality communications facility is essential for sustainable economic growth and plays a vital role in enhancing the provision of local community facilities and services” (Para. 42). Modern telecommunications systems have grown rapidly in recent years and are now considered an integral element of the success of most business operators and individual lifestyles. With the growth of services such as mobile internet access, demand for new telecommunications infrastructure is continuing to grow. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are keen to facilitate this expansion, whilst at the same time minimising any environmental impacts. 5.62 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan has identified that Broadband has a significant role to play in business growth across Central Lincolnshire, with Lincolnshire County Council, Central Government and BT in particular investing significant funds in Central Lincolnshire over the next few years. 5.63 Lincolnshire County Council, in line with its objectives to promote the economy, has prepared a County Broadband Strategy. Central Government, via BDUK, has committed £530m during this parliament. Of this, £14.3m has been allocated to Lincolnshire, which must be match-funded by the local public sector, and will be released to the County Council throughout the lifetime of the project. It is also anticipated that there will be a significant private sector investment, with an expected total project value in the region of £50m. The aspiration is to ensure that 90% of Lincolnshire will have access to internet speeds of more than 24mb per second and that 100% will have a minimum of 2mb. 5.64 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan will be monitored through the Annual Monitoring Report process under the responsibility of the Central Lincolnshire Partnership. This will allow changes to be made as necessary and appropriate, and provides ability to accommodate any changing future circumstances. Such circumstances would include new government policy, changes to available resources and funding arrangements / delivery mechanisms, new evidence, and delivery not happening in the manner expected at the time of producing the plan.

Growing Central Lincolnshire 71

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

TRANSPORT
Policy Context – Transport & Sustainability 5.65 National planning policy in the NPPF sets out the importance of sustainability in relation to transport, stating that:  “Transport policies have an important role to play in facilitating sustainable development but also in contributing to wider sustainability and health objectives” (Para. 29); “The transport system needs to be balanced in favour of sustainable transport modes, giving people a real choice about how they travel” (Para. 29); and “Encouragement should be given to solutions which support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and reduce congestion” (Para. 30).

 

5.66 It is appreciated that the rural nature of Central Lincolnshire has resulted in the reliance of private vehicular usage. This strategy seeks to ensure that where practicable, the most sustainable travel modes such as walking, cycling and public transport are supported. Whilst the Local Plan has little direct influence over issues such as public transport service provision it can:     promote patterns of development that facilitate the use of sustainable modes of transport; create the conditions to generate or support a level of demand required to maintain, improve and enhance transport services and infrastructure; set out the Authorities’ approach to transport in new development; and identify transport infrastructure.

5.67 Inevitably, new development and an increasing population will result in higher demand for travel across Central Lincolnshire and there is a need to ensure this is managed in such as way that its adverse impacts can be minimised and mitigated. The Spatial Strategy for Growth promotes a sustainable transport pattern by focusing development in the main urban areas, where there are higher levels of public transport, transport infrastructure services and facilities. The level of development proposed will support services and facilities in the area by increasing demand from residents, businesses and visitors. 5.68 The promotion of sustainable and prosperous communities in smaller towns and rural settlements will also address the transport issues associated with a dispersed pattern of development, which can lead to increased reliance on the private car. Policy CL10, as set out below, therefore aims to ensure that:  the necessary transport infrastructure is provided

Growing Central Lincolnshire 72

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

new development does not unnecessarily increase car use access to key services and facilities is maintained and enhanced opportunities for journeys to be made by a range of modes are maximised.

Transport Infrastructure 5.69 Transport infrastructure requirements will be considered in more detail in the IDP, as part of wider infrastructure requirements relating to the area’s growth. The IDP has been developed using evidence contained within documents such as the Local Transport Plan, the Lincoln and Gainsborough Transport Strategies, and the Lincoln City Centre, Gainsborough and Sleaford Masterplans. These documents contain packages of transport measures that will promote sustainable travel patterns through the provision of infrastructure and encouraging the production of travel plans. However, it is also appropriate to expect that transport assessments and plans for major developments will consider on site and mitigating infrastructure in more detail at the planning application stage. Developers will be expected to engage and agree with key stakeholders and public authorities the transport provision to be made both on and off site. The Sustainable Urban Extension Policies will provide further guidance regarding what is expected for these sites in this respect. 5.70 At the time of writing the Core Strategy, however, a number of specific transport schemes can be identified that are sufficiently progressed to provide some certainty of delivery, or are so fundamental to the Spatial Strategy for Growth, that they warrant identification now. These are considered in more detail in the Area chapters but include:     the Lincoln Eastern Bypass the East-West Link road in Lincoln a new public transport interchange and Park and Ride in Lincoln junction and highway improvements in the south of Gainsborough.

Local Transport Plan 5.71 The transport strategies and priorities for Lincolnshire are also set out in the 4th Local Transport Plan (LTP4) 2013/14 to 2022/23, which has been prepared by Lincolnshire County Council in collaboration with its partners. The objectives contained within the strategy support the development of a sustainable, efficient and safe transport system, increasing the use of sustainable travel modes, protecting the environment, and improving access to key services. 5.72 Although the 4th Lincolnshire Local Transport Plan has now been prepared, there are still some uncertainties nationally around transport issues. For example, at the time of writing, the new Local Transport Boards that will prioritise funding for major schemes locally are still being set up, and future funding levels are still only
Growing Central Lincolnshire 73

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

indicative. The link between these Local Transport Boards and the new Growth Plans to be prepared by the Local Enterprise Partnerships is still unclear, as is the inclusion of transport funding within the proposed Single Local Growth Fund. In addition, the revised programme for rail service refranchising has delayed discussions on possible service improvements within the Central Lincolnshire area. 5.73 Accordingly, Policy CL10 below has been formulated to provide sufficient direction for the current situation and to support the objectives of the plan, whilst allowing for flexibility to deal with changes to future circumstances. Parking Standards 5.74 Parking standards can be used as part of a package of measures to promote sustainable transport choices as well as ensuring that local amenity is protected. The NPPF suggests setting local standards that take account of the accessibility of the development, the type, mix and use of development, local car ownership, and an overall need to reduce the use of high emission vehicles. 5.75 Lincolnshire County Council has produced a parking standards document, which sets “maximum levels of parking to be applied to new development and redevelopment sites and also to extensions to existing developments or where planning permission is sought for change of use”. At the time of writing the Core Strategy, these parking standards are a material consideration in bringing new development forward. However, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities are working closely with the County Council to review car parking standards in the area through an appropriate policy mechanism. These will aim to accommodate the needs of residents, visitors and businesses, whilst encouraging the use of more sustainable travel modes and taking account of character and visual appearance and the safe operation of transport networks. Policy CL10: Transport The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will support and promote an efficient and safe transport network which offers a range of transport choices for the movement of people and goods, reduces the need to travel by car and encourages use of alternatives such as walking, cycling, and public transport. These could include measures such as reducing traffic speeds, removing through traffic, managing parking, the further development of strategic walking and cycling networks and providing additional infrastructure. New development will be required to contribute to transport improvements in line with appropriate evidence, including the Infrastructure Delivery Plan, the Local Transport Plan, area-based strategies and site-specific transport assessments to ensure that its impacts can be reduced and/or mitigated. All new developments should where possible have regard to the following:  Are located where travel can be minimised and the use of sustainable transport modes maximised;

Growing Central Lincolnshire 74

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Minimise additional travel demand through the use of measures such as travel planning, safe and convenient public transport, walking and cycling links and integration with existing infrastructure; Seek to generate or support the level of demand required to improve, introduce or maintain public transport services, such as rail and bus services; Do not unacceptably impact on the safety and movement of traffic on the highway network or that any such impacts can be mitigated through appropriate improvements; Support the enhancement of existing or proposed transport interchanges; Provide appropriate and effective parking provision and servicing arrangements. Detailed parking standards will be identified through an appropriate policy mechanism; Opportunities to utilise waterways for public transport and/or freight transport.

 

Transport schemes that are considered fundamental to the delivery of growth in Central Lincolnshire will be safeguarded and their delivery pursued through working with developers, landowners, the highway authority and other relevant agencies. Explanation of Policy CL10 5.76 Policy CL10 sets out the Core Strategy’s overall approach to transport. Sustainable development is the key theme running through the Core Strategy and the development of a sustainable, safe and efficient transport system is critical to this. The policy relates to all new developments and it is expected that, where appropriate, Transport Assessments will be submitted alongside applications for planning permission, to ensure that sufficient information is provided for the Authorities to assess both the transport implications of the scheme and the means by which the requirements of this policy will be met. Where travel plans are required, they should include information on the range of measures proposed to reduce car use and promote alternative modes, ensure safety and promote more environmentally friendly freight movement. 5.77 With regards to parking, the Authorities expect applicants to demonstrate an appropriate balance between provision, highway safety, the promotion of sustainable travel modes, convenience, security, amenity, design quality and the impact on townscape and landscape. 5.78 The policy requirement for safeguarding transport schemes relates to all types of transport planned for and programmed during the lifetime of this plan or within a

Growing Central Lincolnshire 75

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

reasonable period thereafter, this includes schemes identified above such as the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and public transport interchange. 5.79 The following policies are also relevant in providing guidance on transport matters:      Policy CL6 (Site Allocation in Central Lincolnshire) Policy CL7 (Sustainable Urban Extensions) Policy CL9 (Infrastructure to Support Growth) Policy CL11 (Health & Wellbeing) SUE Policies in the Area chapters

5.80 However, it is recognised that there are a number of the changing factors that will have an impact on the policies identified above, such as changes to new government guidance and revised parking standards. In many cases the details of transport proposals within new development and its links to the existing transport infrastructure cannot be considered in any detail until a masterplan for the site has been developed and agreed. Policy CL10 will be implemented by:          the production of transport assessments and implementation of travel plans the development of the Local Transport Plan and area transport strategies implementing schemes identified in the IDP development of CIL charging schedules by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities pursuing all viable funding streams on site provision of transport infrastructure development management decisions by the partner authorities close partnership working with all partners and stakeholders monitoring and reviewing the IDP and changing requirements and priorities where this is supported by evidence.

Growing Central Lincolnshire 76

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

6: FLOURISHING COMMUNITIES &
PLACES
6.1 Local communities are where most people live their lives, whether in urban neighbourhoods, suburbs or rural areas. Strong and flourishing communities are crucial for the sustainability of places, and contribute greatly to quality of life and wellbeing. Central Lincolnshire has a wide diversity of communities, ranging from urban areas with severe levels of deprivation and regeneration needs in Lincoln and Gainsborough through to highly dispersed rural populations in the countryside, a number of which are also experiencing deprivation. 6.2 Flourishing communities and places depend upon a combination of interrelated factors. Alongside the strategies of partner organisations, the Core Strategy aims to support and strengthen local communities throughout Central Lincolnshire, focusing on people’s needs, by:       Improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities Meeting housing needs in terms of quality, mix and affordability, including for minority groups such as gypsies and travellers Developing a high quality, sustainable economy supported by an appropriately skilled workforce Identifying the priorities for regeneration activities and the specific approach to former and existing military establishments Ensuring healthy town centres that deliver accessible shops, services and facilities, leisure and employment Developing a sustainable visitor economy.

HEALTH AND WELLBEING
6.3 The World Health Organisation defines health as: “...a state of complete physical, mental and social well being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” Health therefore encompasses both physical and mental health. A wide range of social, economic and environmental factors affect health and the ability of people to fulfil a healthy lifestyle, sometimes referred to as the wider determinants of health. 6.4 Local Plans can support healthy lifestyles and play a key role in reducing health inequalities. Considering health at the planning and design stage of a new development or neighbourhood can improve both the physical and mental health of the local population and promote the creation of healthy and inclusive communities.

Flourishing Communities & Places 77

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

6.5 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities have a number of shared priorities in relation to health and wellbeing which are set out in Lincolnshire’s Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA)1 and the emerging Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy (JHWS) as follows:      improving health promoting healthy lifestyles improving older people’s health and wellbeing reducing inequalities for young people reducing worklessness.

6.6 The JSNA also monitors health issues and trends in Lincolnshire. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are committed to working with partners to tackle health issues and inequalities across Central Lincolnshire, but particularly in the most deprived areas which show high levels of poor health. The following objectives will be pursued through the Local Plan and partnership working:

OBJECTIVES FOR HEALTH AND WELLBEING 1. Working with healthcare partners to deliver new and improved health and social care facilities 2. Improving access to health and social care facilities, and to leisure, open space, sports and recreation and community facilities to encourage physical activity 3. Safeguarding local food growing opportunities and improving access to healthy, affordable and locally produced food 4. Ensuring new development contributes to the creation of safe, accessible and inclusive communities, and helps reduce crime and the fear of crime, through high quality and sustainable design 5. Improving access to and diversifying employment, training and lifelong learning opportunities.

Health Issues in Central Lincolnshire 6.7 Central Lincolnshire’s public health issues are set out in the emerging JHWS and JSNA. The most significant issues are considered to be:  low levels of physical activity  rising levels of obesity  mental health  high rates of road traffic injuries and deaths
1

NHS Lincolnshire and Lincolnshire County Council (2011) Lincolnshire Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2011 Flourishing Communities & Places 78

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

 

excess winter deaths poor access to primary care services in the rural areas, particularly for older people and those without access to a car.

6.8 A number of health issues are common to people in all three Central Lincolnshire districts, but there are also significant health inequalities within the area both spatially and by gender (see Box). HEALTH INEQUALITIES IN CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE Central Lincolnshire has some severe health inequalities which are particularly noticeable at geographies below district level. Park Ward in Lincoln records female life expectancy as 74.6 years compared with 92 years for North Hykeham Forum Ward in North Kesteven (a gap of 17.7 years). For males, once again the gap is most pronounced when viewed at a lower geographical area. Gainsborough South West Ward in West Lindsey records male life expectancy as 71.7 years whereas North Hykeham Moor Ward in North Kesteven shows life expectancy as 84.2 years (a gap of 12.5 years). Disability-free life expectancy varies across Central Lincolnshire; however a large difference is shown in Lincoln. The number of years people are expected to live disability-free beyond 65 years varies between 21.5 years in the northern edge of the city compared to 14.8 years in the area to the east of the city centre (a gap of 6.7 years). Health inequalities in Central Lincolnshire are most apparent in those areas with the highest levels of deprivation, where the prevalence of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is higher than in more affluent areas. Source: Lincolnshire Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (2012) 6.9 As its population grows, Central Lincolnshire is projected to experience the largest percentage increase in people aged 65 and over in the East Midlands by 2030. With an aging population, there is likely to be higher incidence of long-term health conditions that will place considerable demands on existing healthcare services and create the need for new provision. 6.10 In recognition of these challenging health issues, the Core Strategy aims to promote health and wellbeing across Central Lincolnshire through various measures affecting planning and design, as set out in Policy CL11. As health and wellbeing is a cross-cutting theme, many of the measures set out in the other policies of the Core Strategy will also help to deliver positive health outcomes. Policy CL11 - Health and Wellbeing The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work in partnership with Lincolnshire County Council, Clinical Commissioning Groups, and other relevant partners to reduce health inequalities and improve the health and

Flourishing Communities & Places 79

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

well being of all Central Lincolnshire residents. This will be achieved by: 1. Supporting opportunities for healthy and active lifestyles, including:    Providing high quality and accessible open spaces, sports and recreational facilities; Providing a safe and attractive walking and cycling network that is integrated with public transport; Promoting and safeguarding the role of local food growing spaces, including garden plots, community gardens and allotments; and local markets, in providing access to fresh, healthy and affordable food options; Seeking to reduce the over concentration of any use type that detracts from the ability to adopt healthy lifestyles; Ensuring that development is designed, constructed and managed in ways that promote healthy and active lifestyles, in line with Policy CL26 (Design Quality);

 

2. Working with healthcare commissioners and other partners to deliver a high quality network of health facilities, accessible by sustainable modes of transport where possible, and to reflect the needs of the existing and future population. This will be achieved through:  Requiring proposals for new health care facilities to be well related to public transport infrastructure, walking and cycling routes and accessible to all sectors of the community; Considering opportunities for the integration and co-location of health facilities with other services and facilities; The loss of health care facilities will only be permitted if there is no longer a demonstrable need for the land or buildings for healthcare, or that adequate alternative provision will be made to meet the needs of the community affected by the loss of healthcare facilities.

 

3. Requiring the health impacts of major development proposals to be considered early in the planning process through the use of Health Impact Assessments (HIA). Explanation of Policy CL11: 6.11 Policy CL11 sets out the Local Plan’s approach and requirements for health and wellbeing, covering 3 main components:

Flourishing Communities & Places 80

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

i)

Promoting Healthy and Active Lifestyles:

6.12 Physical activity levels among adults are low across Central Lincolnshire. The provision of good quality, accessible green space and of sports and recreational facilities has a direct positive effect on human health by promoting increases in activity levels. This has been shown to reduce obesity, diabetes, strokes and the likelihood of cardiovascular disease, and can also help to cut stress and anxiety. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will therefore seek to deliver new and improved facilities in accordance with Policy CL9 (Infrastructure to Support Growth), Policy CL24 (Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity) and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan. 6.13 Providing a safe, accessible and inclusive network for walking and cycling improves accessibility to a range of services and facilities, reducing the need to travel by car and increasing opportunities for social interaction. This should encourage people to become more physically active with positive impacts on health and wellbeing. Modal shift to walking and cycling should also reduce exposure to air pollution from traffic, which can lead to respiratory and cardiovascular problems. Policy CL10 (Transport) seeks an efficient and safe transport network that offers a range of transport choices, reducing the need to travel by car and promoting alternatives. 6.14 Good nutrition is vitally important for good health. Unhealthy diets along with physical inactivity have contributed to rising obesity levels nationally. For people to make healthy food choices, healthy food options must be easily available and affordable. People on low incomes, including young families and the elderly, are the least able to eat well. Allotments and community gardens can improve both mental and physical health by increasing levels of physical activity, improving access to fresh food and reducing social isolation. Policies CL2 (Tackling Climate Change) and CL24 (Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity) promote and support local food production in Central Lincolnshire. 6.15 The design and layout of new development and neighbourhoods, and the siting of new services and facilities including sports and leisure and open space, can greatly influence health outcomes, with the impacts of poor design continuing long after completion. Access to decent and adequate housing is especially important for the very young and very old in terms of their health and wellbeing. Good design can contribute to health and wellbeing in several ways, as set out under Policy CL26. ii) Accessible Health Care Provision:

6.16 Central Lincolnshire has 1 main hospital in Lincoln, 1 community hospital in Gainsborough, around 50 GP practices, and over 100 other facilities and services including dentists, opticians and pharmacies. There are 3 Clinical Commissioning Groups which cover the Central Lincolnshire area. Overseen by NHS England, the CCGs are responsible for commissioning healthcare services, working to improve health services and reduce health inequalities. 6.17 Provision of and access to good quality health facilities has a direct positive impact on health and wellbeing. Yet access to primary health care in some parts of Central Lincolnshire can be difficult, particularly for those without access to a car,

Flourishing Communities & Places 81

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

including older people and young people. This can cause significant problems not only in terms of accessing key services and facilities, but also in preventing opportunities for daily social interaction which can contribute to feelings of isolation and depression. 6.18 Improvements in health and wellbeing will be achieved through the safeguarding and enhancement of existing healthcare facilities and the creation of new facilities, including hospitals, primary healthcare centres, GPs and dentists where appropriate. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will support the provision of new or improved health facilities in line with the strategies and commissioning plans of the CCGs and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan; and work with health service commissioners to ensure the Central Lincolnshire area has the necessary supply and distribution of facilities and services to meet the needs of the Central Lincolnshire’s growing population. Where appropriate, sites for health use will be identified and allocated in the Local Plan, taking into account future growth and demand for health services. 6.19 In developing proposals for new or expanded healthcare services and facilities, consideration should be given to opportunities for bringing together healthcare services with other services and activities to create a community focus and to allow a wider range of patient care to be provided. The population of Central Lincolnshire is forecast to continue to grow, and this will put increasing pressure on existing services. At the same time, the current economic climate and competing demands for space and resources means that a different approach towards locating services and facilities may be needed, especially if infrastructure is to be provided in the most sustainable and accessible locations. iii) Assessing the Health Impacts of Development Proposals:

6.20 The impacts of proposed developments on health should be assessed and considered at the earliest stage of the design process to avoid negative health impacts and ensure positive health outcomes for the community as a whole. This includes the impacts on those who will live in, live close to, work in or use the development. 6.21 Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is an assessment of the potential impacts on health and provides the opportunity to identify actions that can enhance positive effects and minimise negative effects. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities may request a HIA to be undertaken for planning applications for major developments. For the purpose of Policy CL11, major development is defined as 100 residential dwellings or more and for non residential developments of 10,000m2 or more. Even if a full HIA is not needed, all non-major development proposals will be required to show how health impacts have been considered as part of the Statement of Design Quality, as set out in Policy CL26. 6.22 For those development proposals that are already required to submit an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), it may be possible to consider health and environmental impacts together rather than undertake a separate HIA. It is important that if HIA is integrated with other assessments, that health is properly considered

Flourishing Communities & Places 82

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

and that the range of potential health impacts are identified and assessed. For those development proposals that do not require EIA, a HIA may still be needed. 6.23 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will liaise with Lincolnshire County Council when assessing the need for HIA and the scope and scale of likely health impacts. Guidance on the required scope and content of HIA is available from the development management staff of the district councils. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will also consider whether to prepare Planning Guidance to support this policy. Policy CL11 will be implemented by:  Development Management and consideration of planning applications  The Infrastructure Delivery Plan and ongoing needs assessments will ensure that health infrastructure needs are addressed through new and improved health infrastructure  Consideration of health within screening and scoping opinions, environmental statements and HIAs  Use of Planning Contributions to secure healthcare facilities as part of new development proposals and regenerations schemes  Central Lincolnshire Joint Planning Unit and District Councils working in partnership with Clinical Commissioning Groups, Lincolnshire County Council and other health service partners and health organisations  Allocation and safeguarding of sites for health, sport and open space in the Local Plan as appropriate.

MEETING HOUSING NEEDS
6.24 Whilst the overall level of housing growth required to meet the needs of Central Lincolnshire has been identified in Policy CL4, the NPPF highlights the need for Local Plans “to deliver a wide choice of high quality homes, widen opportunities for home ownership and create sustainable, inclusive and mixed communities”. 6.25 The Core Strategy seeks to address Central Lincolnshire’s housing needs as identified in the evidence base, including the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) and the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy. The key challenges for housing in Central Lincolnshire over the next 20 years include: KEY CHALLENGES FOR HOUSING IN CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE     significant population growth projected over the next twenty years, including particular growth in the number of older residents Housing Affordability is an issue, especially for first time buyers Inequalities in housing quality affecting a range of health and wellbeing issues e.g. poor heating and/or insulation causing hypothermia and even death. Social groups with specific housing needs such as those requiring extra care (the Older People’s Housing Needs Survey identified a need for up to 5,000
Flourishing Communities & Places 83

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

units across Lincolnshire)   Vulnerable people, such as the homeless (in 2010, 144 people were accepted as homeless) Houses in multiple occupation (there are an estimated 2,400 dwellings occupied by more than one household across the 3 authorities with the student population of Lincoln helping to contribute to a high number of these in the City) High numbers of MoD personnel, which in itself does not create problems, but is a potential issue in the event of further base closures Gypsy and traveller requirements

 

6.26 The Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy has responded to these issues by setting the following housing growth objectives: OBJECTIVES FOR HOUSING 1. Deliver sustainable housing growth 2. Deliver affordable housing 3. Deliver housing to meet diversity of need including older persons 4. Maintain and improve the housing stock and bring empty properties back into use 5. Deliver quality and energy efficiency in the new housing stock 6.27 The Local Plan has an important role in helping to deliver these objectives. This section of the Core Strategy focuses particularly on Objectives 2, 3 and 4. Objectives 1 and 5 are covered by other Core Strategy policies on growth (Chapter 5) and design (Chapter 7). Affordable Housing WHAT IS AFFORDABLE HOUSING? Affordable housing is provided for those who cannot afford to buy or rent on the open market. Its scope is currently included within the National Planning Policy Framework and includes:  Social Rented Housing – mainly owned and rented to eligible households by Local Authorities and Registered Providers

Flourishing Communities & Places 84

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Affordable Rented Housing - rented housing let by Registered Providers of social housing to households who are eligible for social rented housing. Rents may be higher than social rents but can be charged at no more than 80 per cent of the local market rent Intermediate affordable housing - housing at prices and rents above those of social rent, but below market price or rents, these can include shared equity and shared ownership where households can part buy or buy at a cost that is lower than market value.

Homes that do not meet the above definition of affordable housing, such as “low cost market” housing, may not be considered as affordable housing for planning purposes. 6.28 The level of need for affordable housing is evidenced through the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA). The SHMA has identified a significant need for affordable housing both in the main urban areas and in rural communities. Across Central Lincolnshire, there is a requirement for 18,200 affordable homes between 2010 and 2031, representing 41% of the overall total housing requirement. Of which, 16,200 (89%) should be social rent / affordable rent and 2,000 (11%) intermediate. 6.29 However, based on actual delivery to date and the timeframe of the Core Strategy a target of 42,800 more homes between 2011/12 and 2030/31 is identified by Policy CL4. Accordingly, 41% of this should be affordable homes, which equates to 17,548 affordable homes between 2011/12 and 2030/31. 6.30 The identified need for affordable housing will be delivered through a collaboration of developer contributions (Policy CL13) and housing initiatives, as identified in the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy (CLHGS). The CLHGS identifies a range of initiatives which would contribute towards the delivery of affordable housing need over the plan period, these include:      Securing affordable housing funding from the Homes and Communities Agency and other external agencies Maximising take up of other Government initiatives that promote intermediate or assisted home ownership Using planning policies to permit cross subsidy in certain defined circumstances Council undertaking their own council house building programmes Investigating mechanisms to fund and provide affordable homes.

6.31 Policy CL12 identifies the overall need for affordable housing over the plan period, which equates to 41% of the overall housing target as set out in Policy CL4. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will aim to meet this target through developer contributions as identified in Policy CL13 and through housing initiatives as identified in the Housing Growth Strategy.

Flourishing Communities & Places 85

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy CL12 - Overall Need for Affordable Housing The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will seek to secure 17,548 affordable dwellings, as defined in National Planning Guidance, to meet the needs of residents unable to compete on the open market. This need will be achieved through developer contributions, as identified in Policy CL13 and through housing initiatives such as those identified within the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy. Explanation of Policy CL12 6.32 Policy CL12 set outs the Central Lincolnshire Authorities’ approach to the overall level of affordable homes sought over the plan period. It will, alongside other Core Strategy Policies relating to the type of housing and design, ensure that when new development is brought forward, the need to deliver a wide choice of homes is incorporated into any plan and viability assessment. 6.33 In implementing this policy it is expected that the housing should “remain at an affordable price for future eligible households or for the subsidy to be recycled for alternative affordable housing provision”, as per the requirement in the NPPF. Affordable housing design should also seek to meet relevant design standards including those contained within the Core Strategy and Code for Sustainable Homes, and as required by the Homes and Communities Agency (HCA). This will ensure that units provided by the developer can be secured by an affordable housing provider contracted with the HCA under the Affordable Housing Programme. If the affordable housing provider is not in contract with the HCA, achieving the standard is still preferable but a revised standard may be agreed between the local authority and the affordable housing provider. Policy CL12 will be implemented by:      Development management by partner authorities Negotiation through Section 106 agreements The delivery of schemes identified within strategies such as the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy Collaborative working between developers, Local Authorities and stakeholders including Registered Providers and the HCA. Monitoring the viability of developments across the area and identifying the need for a review of the development requirements as set out in Policy CL13.

Affordable Housing Contributions and Qualifying Threshold 6.34 The NPPF has identified that whilst Local Plans can be aspirational they need to be realistic. The importance of ensuring the viability of the Local Plan has been further reinforced by the Local Housing Delivery Group Report – ‘Viability Testing Local Plans: Advice for Planning Practitioners’ (June 2012). There is particular emphasis on affordable housing contributions being set at a level where they are

Flourishing Communities & Places 86

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

deliverable alongside other policy and commercial obligations to ensure that development is still viable. 6.35 The economic downturn has had implications for the viability of delivering affordable housing, with increasing development costs (in particular the cost of borrowing money up-front to finance schemes), resulting in a corresponding decrease in the percentage units in a scheme that could be affordable whilst keeping schemes viable. 6.36 Policy CL13 below sets out the level of contribution and qualifying threshold for development sites in Central Lincolnshire for which the Authorities will seek affordable housing in line with the overall target in Policy CL12, the NPPF requirements and within prevailing market conditions. A qualifying site is defined as one that will deliver market housing, comes forward through the planning process and has not yet obtained planning permission or a site with extant planning permission that is resubmitted and considered under a new or revised application. Policy CL13 - Affordable Housing Contributions and Qualifying Thresholds On all qualifying sites of 3 or more dwellings the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will seek to secure 25% of new housing development as affordable on site in line with Policy CL12, with the exception of the Gainsborough Urban Area where a 10% affordable housing contribution will be sought. The Council will seek the maximum level of affordable housing on site. A lower level of provision will not be acceptable unless the Council agrees that exceptional circumstances can be demonstrated. Where financial contributions to off-site delivery are considered to be the only way in which affordable housing requirements can be met, negotiations will start on the basis of achieving the equivalent amount which would have been contributed by the developer/landowner were the affordable housing provided on site. The precise tenure and dwelling mix will be agreed with the Council on a siteby-site basis. However, there will be a maximum limit of 50% intermediate housing allowable on any one site. Explanation of Policy CL13 6.37 The Authorities commissioned a series of studies to comprise its Local Plan evidence base with regards to housing need and demand, affordable housing needs, and the viability of providing affordable housing. Policy CL13 has been moulded by the conclusions and/ or recommendations of the following studies:    The Strategic Housing Market Assessment Economic Viability Assessment Community Infrastructure Levy and Whole Plan Viability Study

Flourishing Communities & Places 87

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

6.38 The Economic Viability Assessment (EVA) considers the viability of meeting affordable housing targets through the planning process. It recommends affordable housing requirements and thresholds which could be applied in each of the Local Authorities and recommends a series of varying affordable housing developer requirements for each of the three constituent local authorities. These respective affordable housing contributions are as follows:    40% City of Lincoln 40% North Kesteven District Council 40% West Lindsey Rural and 20% West Lindsey Urban

6.39 However, the study recognises that there may be individual sites where this is not the case depending on the economic climate, as well as other infrastructure needs and site specific factors that impact on the viability of new development. It also notes that “were any of the Councils to seek a higher level of planning obligations than it is now seeking (e.g. through the operation of CIL) then a trade off with the amount of affordable housing sought would need to be made”. 6.40 The NPPF advises that CIL charges should be worked up and tested alongside the Local Plan, accordingly the Authorities commissioned a study on CIL and Whole Plan Viability. In light of the need for the plan to be deliverable within prevailing market conditions and the need to provide a greater degree of certainty for developers, the study considers a zoned approach to affordable housing contributions with a 25% contribution across the area, with the exception of Gainsborough where a 10% contribution is modelled. 6.41 The zoned affordable housing approach identified in Policy CL13 is considered the most appropriate approach in terms of affordable housing requirements, aligned with a reasonable CIL contribution. It is noted that the requirements of Policy CL13 are less stringent than the recommendation of the EVA study in that the contribution percentages are lower than the recommendations which the study presents as viable. This takes into account the current challenging economic circumstances, and also guidance contained within the NPPF and the Harman Report, which advise that the Local Plan should be based on prevailing market conditions and deliverable within the early years of the plan. However, the viability of developments will need to be closely monitored to identify whether the requirements of Policy CL13 need to be reviewed, with the aim of meeting the affordable housing need as set out in Policy CL12. Definition of Thresholds 6.42 The EVA identifies the threshold above which affordable housing contributions should be sought as sites of 1 or more additional dwellings. However, the Authorities recognise that there may be resource issues relating to such a low threshold and want to ensure that smaller developments are not discouraged, particularly given the aims of the localism agenda to bring forward neighbourhood development and community right to build orders. Conversely, setting the threshold too high could mean an increase in applications for sites sitting just below the threshold and a more limited ability to collect contributions towards affordable housing. In setting the threshold at three dwellings, the Authorities have had regard
Flourishing Communities & Places 88

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

to the evidence which suggests that site size is not a major factor in determining viability, together with monitoring information on the size of site coming forward within the Central Lincolnshire districts. 6.43 The policy also sets out the approach to calculating off-site provision on the basis that this will allow delivery that may not otherwise be achieved. Off-site provision 6.44 Exceptionally and where it is deemed appropriate, off – site provision of affordable housing may be considered as an alternative to on-site provision. Where a site has been identified and secured for the delivery of the required affordable housing, it must be to the satisfaction of the Council. Delivery of such a site should be programmed alongside the delivery of the main site through a Section 106 agreement and the number of units of affordable housing required will be derived from the relevant proportion from the requirement of Policy CL13. Small Sites and Conversions 6.45 Sites where off-site financial contributions may be the only feasible way of helping to deliver affordable housing could include very small sites and conversions or flatted units. It may also be appropriate, particularly on sites of 5 or less dwellings, for a mix of on-site provision and commuted sums to be sought. For example:     6.46 Site of 5 dwellings and target percentage of 25% 25% of 5 dwellings = 1.25 dwellings So, on-site contribution = 1 dwelling Financial contribution equivalent to 0.25 affordable dwellings The approach to calculating the appropriate commuted sum will be as follows:

Equivalent commuted sum = RV 100% MH minus RV AH Where: RV 100% MH = Residual value with 100% market housing RV AH = Residual value with 25% affordable housing (10% in Gainsborough) Policy CL13 will be implemented by:     Development management by partner authorities Negotiation through Section 106 agreements The delivery of schemes identified within strategies such as the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy Collaborative working between developers, Local Authorities and stakeholders including Registered Providers and the HCA.

Flourishing Communities & Places 89

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Monitoring the viability of developments across the area and identify the need for a review of the development requirements as set out in Policy CL13.

Rural Exception Sites 6.47 The SHMA identifies the need for 4,400 affordable homes in rural areas from an overall requirement of around 13,900 for the rural area. The rural nature of large parts of Central Lincolnshire can present specific challenges for the delivery of affordable housing, most notably the lower level of housing delivery in rural areas, when compared to the urban areas, results in a reduced level of affordable housing delivery. However, despite this there are opportunities to increase the delivery of affordable housing in rural areas through the:   Site allocations in the Local Plan to meet general or local housing needs; and Rural exception sites (affordable housing is enabled to meet a local need on sites where housing development would not normally be approved).

6.48 The allocation of sites for affordable housing in the rural area will be considered as part of the preparation of the Allocations Document. However, a rural exceptions policy is included in the Core Strategy to support the overall delivery of affordable housing, in order to meet the requirement of Policy CL12. 6.49 Policy CL14 below allows that, exceptionally, planning permission may be granted for affordable housing on land outside those areas identified as Regional Attractor, Primary Attractors and Secondary Attractors, as identified at Table 2, which would not normally be considered an appropriate location for housing, where it is justified by local need. The Homes and Community Agency (HCA) defines rural housing as being “social housing delivery in settlements with a population of below 3,000”. However, historically across Central Lincolnshire there have been HCA programmes which have been delivered in “larger rural” settlements with a population of up to 10,000. As a result it has not been deemed suitable to specify a population threshold, in order to allow for greater flexibility to the application of rural exception sites as settlements grow. 6.50 In some circumstances, rural exception sites may require an element of market housing to cross subsidise the affordable housing. Such market housing is there purely to provide the financial support to the scheme, which would otherwise have been provided through Social Housing Grant. Policy CL14 sets a limit of 45% for market housing in such circumstances, which is known as the reverse quota. Policy CL14 - Affordable Housing on Rural Exception Sites Planning permission will be granted exceptionally for development providing affordable housing for local people on sites within or adjoining settlements outside those areas identified as Regional Attractors, Primary Attractors and Secondary Attractors, which would not otherwise be considered suitable for housing development, provided that:

Flourishing Communities & Places 90

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

1. A local need has been identified through an appropriate evidence base; 2. The need cannot reasonably be met on sites with residential planning permission or through residential allocations in the Local Plan; 3. The development will seek to minimise the loss of or adversely affect the best and most versatile agricultural land, the biodiversity, character or appearance of the area, heritage assets, or infrastructure; 4. The development is of a scale in keeping with the identified need and the role and function of the settlement; 5. The site is within reasonable distance of local services and facilities and public transport; and 6. The community has been engaged with and consulted upon with regards to any development. The first priority is to seek the delivery of an ‘all affordable’ housing scheme on these sites. Only where it is established that 100% affordable housing cannot be delivered, for example, if grant funding and / or other subsidy is not available, should the option for a reverse quota be considered. Where it can be demonstrated that market housing will be required to cross subsidise affordable housing, the minimum number of market houses should be provided on site to facilitate the affordable housing delivery, and should never exceed 45% of the overall site number. An open book method will be used to assess the financial viability attached to the proposal and should demonstrate that the inclusion of the market housing does not inflate land values beyond the range that would be paid by a Registered Provider for an all affordable exception site housing scheme. Explanation of Policy CL14: 6.51 Rural exception sites should be located within or immediately adjoining settlements. The long-term affordability of houses built under this policy will be controlled by means of a planning condition or planning obligation to ensure that affordable status is maintained in perpetuity. This will allow the community to continue to benefit from their affordability in the long term. 6.52 In some cases it is recognised that, even where land for affordable housing is provided at low or nil cost, there may not be adequate subsidy for the scheme to proceed. In the current economic climate the Government have made it clear that there is less public subsidy for affordable housing, value for money should be achieved and alternative mechanisms to subsidise affordable housing must be found. Accordingly due to the limitations in available funding it may prove necessary, in some circumstances, to allow cross-subsidy schemes to facilitate the development of local affordable housing needs. In such cases, the income generated from sales must be used in its entirety to subsidise the local needs housing. Before such a scheme is allowed to commence, the relevant district Authority would need to be
Flourishing Communities & Places 91

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

satisfied that the requirements in Policy CL14 have been met, and that the minimum number of market dwellings necessary to support the scheme has been established. Policy CL14 will be implemented by:     Development management by partner authorities Negotiation through Section 106 agreements The delivery of schemes identified within strategies such as the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy Collaborative working between developers, Local Authorities and stakeholders including Registered Providers and the HCA.

Housing Type and Size Mix 6.53 The National Planning Policy Framework identifies that Local Planning Authorities should plan for a mix of housing based on current and future demographic trends, market trends and the need of different groups in the community. 6.54 The Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) 2012 has provided evidence of the need and demand for housing and includes evidence on groups that may have a particular need. Accordingly, the type and size mix of new housing should reflect the needs of the population. The SHMA has identified that:   70% of the future requirement for social rented housing is for smaller homes (1 and 2 bedrooms); and 65% - 70% of the future requirement for other tenures is for larger (3+ bedroom being the greatest need) homes.

6.55 It should be noted that providers of social rented housing have traditionally not allocated more space than a household needs and the need for 1 – 2 bedroom social rented housing identified through the SHMA may have been exaggerated in light of changes to housing benefit reforms. Yet, from April 2013, council tenants and housing association tenants have had their benefit entitlement reduced if it is decided that their home is too big for their needs. This is often called the ‘bedroom tax’ or ‘under-occupancy rule’. In addition, the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy has identified a need to address overcrowding and under occupancy in existing stock. Accordingly, it should be recognised that the desirability to both build and occupy one bedroom properties may be such that a more flexible approach is required. 6.56 New dwellings should also be adaptable to the changing needs of people over time. Lincolnshire Extra Care Strategy and Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy consider the housing requirements of older people and those with special needs, and encourage the adoption of lifetime homes. The Core Strategy aims to ensure that the type and mix of homes constructed in Central Lincolnshire meet the needs of future occupants.

Flourishing Communities & Places 92

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy CL15 – Type and Size Mix in New Housing The Council will require proposals for new housing to demonstrate how it will meet local housing needs through the mix of new homes proposed using the best available evidence. The Council will support the provision of new housing and related accommodation to meet the specific needs of the older generation and students. Explanation of Policy CL15: 6.57 Policy CL15 sets out a requirement to provide a range of housing types and sizes to help to increase choice and cater for local needs. 6.58 Based on the best evidence available. A variety of housing types, sizes and densities, including the provision of smaller homes, should be provided in all housing schemes whatever their dwelling numbers. The Council will look to achieve not only a range of housing provision within the site but will also consider the range of housing in the wider locality. 6.59 In determining on site requirements regard should be had to evidence of need contained within the SHMA, the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy and other appropriate evidence, such as the JSNA and the Lincolnshire Extra Care Strategy. Examples will include the need for bungalows or homes that are fit for people with specific needs, such as wheelchair users Policy CL15 will be implemented by:     Development management by partner authorities Housing need survey results Negotiation through Section 106 agreements Collaborative working between developers, Local Authorities and stakeholders including Registered Providers and the HCA

Empty Homes 6.60 Empty homes blight neighbourhoods and are a wasted resource in a time of high housing need. The need to minimise sprawl and loss of green space also require that the current stock of housing is utilised to its full potential. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are therefore committed to bringing empty homes back into use. This is currently guided by the Lincolnshire Empty Homes Strategy and Central Lincolnshire Housing Strategy which runs until 2013. The aims of the strategy are:  Reduce the number of long term empty homes by district specific targets each year

Flourishing Communities & Places 93

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

   

Establish a positive relationship with owners of empty properties to facilitate bringing them back into viable use Increase public and organisational understanding of empty properties across the districts Help to increase the supply of affordable housing, and reduce homelessness Add to the number of good quality, energy efficient properties within each district.

6.61 The Authorities are working to identify opportunities to bring empty homes back into use, and in particular how these can help to increase the number of affordable homes. Central Lincolnshire has received funding through the affordable homes programme, allocated through the HCA, to bring empty homes back into use. Partner organisations, supported by the local authorities, may also receive funding under the Empty Homes Community Grants Funding. These funds will be used in a range of lease models and purchase and repair schemes providing affordable housing from previously vacant stock. Additionally, an ethical lettings agency is being developed to allow an opportunity to utilise the private sector in the provision of affordable housing. Given that there were almost 2,400 long-term empty homes (empty for over six months) in Central Lincolnshire in 2011 this could be a valuable resource in affordable housing delivery. Student Housing 6.62 Students have a particular requirement for a supply of affordable housing close to their place of learning as well as accessible services and facilities. In Lincoln, 3.5% of the housing stock is currently occupied by student households, not including purpose-built student accommodation. 6.63 In the early years of the University of Lincoln, many of its students lived in private rented dwellings, creating significant concentrations of student houses in some inner residential areas of the City and raising concerns for community balance. Subsequently, however, the University has built its own accommodation, leading to an oversupply and adjustment in the private rented sector. 6.64 The University has aspirations for further expansion and, whilst the expectation is that an increased student population will be housed in purpose-built accommodation, provision may still be required in the private rented sector. At present, it is not considered that a specific policy is required in relation to student housing, but the Authorities will continue to monitor the situation, and any new applications for student accommodation should be assessed carefully against the sustainable development principles contained in the Core Strategy. Black and Ethnic Minority (BME) Community 6.65 The evidence base for Central Lincolnshire has not identified any special housing needs for this community, but there is a high incidence of the BME population living in overcrowded conditions or in dwellings of a poorer quality than the general housing stock. The policies above will help to address these issues but
Flourishing Communities & Places 94

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

it is recommended that the Authorities keep under review the quality and accessibility of housing and housing related services for households across all ethnic groups. Meeting the Accommodation Needs of Travellers 6.66 Romany Gypsies have lived in Britain for around 600 years and people have travelled from community to community for even longer. Irish Travellers also have a long tradition of visiting Britain, having travelled and lived here for generations. Wherever they have gone, gypsies and travellers have maintained a separate identity, and both groups are protected as ethnic minorities under the Equality Act. 6.67 Although some Gypsies and Travellers travel for some of the year, the vast majority do not now travel all year round. Increasingly, as traditional seasonal work has declined, Gypsies and Travellers have adapted to permanent residential sites where they can more readily access a doctor, schools, services and employment whilst maintaining the cultural traditions of being a Gypsy or Traveller. 6.68 The assessment of the area’s overall housing needs must include those of Gypsies and Travellers. Whereas most housing needs, including those of some members of the Gypsy and Traveller communities, are met through the provision of ’bricks and mortar’ housing, there is also a need for some caravan and mobile home provision on permanent residential sites. 6.69 Showpeople are members of a community that consists of self-employed business people who travel the country, often with their families, holding fairs. Most Showpeople are members of the Showmen’s Guild of Great Britain, which represents approximately 20,000 travelling showpeople families nationally. Showpeople who hold circuses form a small sub-group which has separate professional organisations. Travelling Showpeople require secure and permanent bases for the storage of their equipment and for residential purposes. Circus people are likely to require an enclosed space in which to rehearse and may also require space in which to exercise animals. 6.70 National planning policy on housing for these groups is currently set out in ‘Planning policy for Traveller Sites’ (PPTS) (DCLG, 2012). which is to be read in conjunction with the NPPF. 6.71 Under the PPTS, local authorities have a duty to analyse their local need, in consultation with local communities, whilst ensuring fairness in the planning system. The PPTS places the emphasis on providing for Travellers at the local level. Specifically, local planning authorities are required to identify and update annually a supply of deliverable sites to provide 5 years supply against assessed needs and to identify further sites or broad locations for years 6-10 and 11-15. To provide more flexibility, cross-authority co-operation is to be considered in identifying sites. The PPTS also requires consideration to be given to allocating and releasing sites solely for affordable Traveller sites.

Flourishing Communities & Places 95

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

6.72 The further policy development of the Local Plan, in respect of pitch and plot targets and allocations, will be informed by the Central Lincolnshire Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessment 2013. 6.73 As required by the PPTS, the Core Strategy sets out the criteria to be taken into consideration in allocating future sites for Travellers where such sites are needed based on updating of the evidence. The criteria also provide the basis for decisions on any planning applications that may come forward. Policy CL16 – Meeting the Accommodation Needs of Gypsies & Travellers and Travelling Showpeople The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will meet the accommodation needs of Gypsies and Travellers and Travelling Showpeople, as identified by the evidence base, through the allocation of Traveller sites. The selection of sites, and decisions on applications for additional sites and for extensions to existing sites, will be guided by Policy CL6 in addition to the following criteria: 1. The site should be located to promote peaceful and integrated coexistence between the site and local community; 2. The site should be located to enable its occupants to access both primary health care facilities and schools within reasonable travelling distances, preferably by walking, cycling or public transport; 3. The site is not located in an area of high flood risk or where it would have adverse impact on Central Lincolnshire’s environmental quality including its natural, built and historic assets and landscape character; 4. The site is capable of providing an acceptable standard of amenity for the site's occupants, and will not have an unacceptable impact on the amenity of nearby residents. 5. The site is capable of being adequately serviced, and would not place undue pressure on local infrastructure; 6. The scale of the site and the number of pitches/plots provided would not dominate the nearest settled community and would not place undue pressure on local infrastructure. The proximity of any existing sites in an area would be taken into account in assessing the impact of a new site on the locality and local services and facilities; 7. The site has safe vehicular access and should be capable of allowing large vehicles and caravans to be manoeuvred and parked safely within it; and 8. Where required, the site should be capable of providing for mixed use residential and business use in a manner that has regard to the safety and amenity of both its occupants and neighbouring residents.
Flourishing Communities & Places 96

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

In addition to the above criteria, in the case of sites for Travelling Showpeople, there will be sufficient space for storage and maintenance of equipment associated with the occupiers. Additional screening may be required having regard to the nature of the equipment that is being stored. Explanation of Policy CL16: 6.74   For the purposes of this policy:

“Travellers” encompasses “Gypsies and Travellers” and “Travelling Showpeople” as defined below; “Gypsies and Travellers” means:

Persons of nomadic habit of life whatever their race or origin, including such persons who on grounds only of their own or their family’s or dependants’ educational or health needs or old age have ceased to travel temporarily or permanently, but excluding members of an organised group of Travelling Showpeople or circus people travelling together as such;

“Travelling Showpeople” means:

Members of a group organised for the purposes of holding fairs, circuses or shows (whether or not travelling together as such). This includes such persons who on the grounds of their own or their family’s or dependants’ more localised pattern of trading, educational or health needs or old age have ceased to travel temporarily or permanently, but excludes Gypsies and Travellers as defined above;

 “pitch” means a pitch on a “Gypsy and Traveller” site and “plot” means a pitch on a “Travelling Showpeople” site (often called a “yard”). This terminology differentiates between residential pitches for “Gypsies and Travellers” and mixed-use plots for “Travelling Showpeople”, which may/will need to incorporate space or to be split to allow for the storage of equipment. Policy CL16 will be implemented by:    Development management by partner authorities The delivery of schemes identified within strategies such as the Central Lincolnshire Housing Strategy Collaborative working between local authorities, developers and stakeholders

PROSPERITY AND JOBS
6.75 A prosperous local economy underpins the success of Central Lincolnshire as a place to live and work, reducing inequality and providing investment and support for people and places. Economic growth is needed for Central Lincolnshire’s residents to prosper and to support the increase in population being planned for the

Flourishing Communities & Places 97

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

area. Such growth needs to balance economic needs with social and environmental ones, and to improve the resilience of the local economy to further economic shocks. The Central Lincolnshire Economy Today 6.76 As outlined in Chapter 2, Central Lincolnshire’s economy is primarily based on traditional industries and other lower value employment sectors, and is characterised overall by low pay, low skills and low productivity. While this has provided the area with some resilience during the current recession, it also has key weaknesses. 6.77 The main employment sectors across the area are ‘public administration, health and education’, comprising some 34% of total employment, and ‘distribution, restaurants and hotels’, which includes retail, comprising 22%2. Compared to national figures, manufacturing and construction are each important to the local economy, as is agriculture, particularly outside of Lincoln. The RAF is also a significant employer within Central Lincolnshire with 5% of households reported to contain RAF personnel. The proportion of employment in knowledge-based industries is well below the national average although the University of Lincoln will have contributed to some growth in these sectors. Whilst data show that Lincoln performs particularly well in respect of formation, survival rates and growth in the stock of VAT registered business, elsewhere in Central Lincolnshire, overall, performance is below the national average. 6.78 Skills levels across Central Lincolnshire are also weak. While the area performs well in terms of the proportion of working age residents qualified to NVQ Level 2 compared to the England average, performance at higher levels is much weaker. Additionally, there are pockets within the area that suffer from serious educational deprivation, with more than 60% not skilled beyond NVQ level 1. 6.79 Employment levels across Central Lincolnshire are around the national average, though there are pockets of high unemployment, long-term unemployment and youth unemployment within the area. Economic Strategy for Central Lincolnshire 6.80 To address these issues, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities have prepared an Economic Growth Strategy3 to support the delivery of growth in Central Lincolnshire. This identifies key strengths of the Central Lincolnshire economy, which include a vibrant micro-business sector with a track record of entrepreneurship and good educational establishments and also the key challenges of:    
2 3

Underdeveloped and under resourced SME sector – undercapitalized and under skilled Inadequate infrastructure and utility provision. Relatively poor communications including broadband Lack of high quality serviced employment land Large but contracting public sector, including the RAF
2010 figures - Lincolnshire Research Observatory Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy 2012 - 2031

Flourishing Communities & Places 98

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Brain drain and out-commuting

The Economic Growth Strategy considers that the potential of the Central Lincolnshire economy to grow is being stifled by lack of capital investment, skills, land and infrastructure. Its stated vision, therefore is: “Unlocking potential to deliver growth” 6.81 To achieve this, the Strategy identifies the following five objectives:

OBJECTIVES FOR THE ECONOMY 1. Deliver sustainable economic growth in the Lincoln PUA, Gainsborough and Sleaford 2. Facilitate the necessary infrastructure to support growth 3. Stimulate the economy by supporting new and existing businesses, tourism, and attracting inward investment 4. Ensuring access to employment and skills provision 5. Deliver and maintain a robust and up to date evidence base

6.82 The Economic Growth Strategy stresses that resources, input and support from a wide range of partners and stakeholders across Central Lincolnshire, including the Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership, together with close links to adjoining areas, such as the South Humber Bank, will be required in the delivery of these objectives. 6.83 The Local Plan and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan aim to support the Economic Growth Strategy through appropriate policies and priorities. The Core Strategy therefore includes three strategic policies which focus on Central Lincolnshire’s economy and its growth:   Policy CL17 (Delivering Prosperity and Jobs) – an overarching policy setting out the strategic priorities for Central Lincolnshire’s economy Policy CL20 (Retail and Town Centres) – which promotes the vitality and viability of centres, and sets out a planning framework to guide development for retail and other town centre uses in Central Lincolnshire over the plan period Policy CL21 (A Sustainable Visitor Economy) – a cross-cutting policy concerned with the economic and other aspects that make for a successful visitor destination.

Flourishing Communities & Places 99

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Delivering Prosperity and Jobs 6.84 Policy CL17 aims to provide a positive planning framework for a high quality, sustainable economy. In line with national planning policy and the Core Strategy’s Vision, a low carbon economy is seen as a key requirement and opportunity for economic development, both as a contribution to carbon reduction and to maximise the business and employment opportunities that it offers for Central Lincolnshire. Policy CL17 – Delivering Prosperity & Jobs The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners will plan positively to develop a high quality, sustainable economy for Central Lincolnshire that is diverse, has an appropriately skilled workforce, and will help to deliver prosperous local communities. In particular, this will involve:   Promoting a low carbon economy, including investment in green technologies and jobs; Supporting new and existing businesses to develop and grow, having regard to balancing economic, social and environmental needs. In doing so, particular emphasis will be placed on providing support for the development and expansion of Central Lincolnshire’s priority economic sectors and clusters together with diversifying the economy into high skill, knowledge-based industries, especially where opportunities for local workforce training are to be provided; Helping to raise the skills levels and employability of residents and meeting the needs of employers by supporting the enhancement of education and training opportunities, and using planning obligations to provide opportunities to assist residents in accessing work; Promoting the distinctive qualities of Central Lincolnshire in marketing the area to attract and retain inward investment, and ensuring that these qualities are not jeopardised; Retaining and safeguarding existing employment premises, sites and allocations for continued employment use that are able to meet the needs of modern, economically viable business and/or contribute to the sustainability of local neighbourhoods, and which are required for the delivery of the wider Central Lincolnshire growth strategy; Supporting new ways of working, having regard to balancing economic, social and environmental needs; Recognising the importance of the economy in the rural area to the sustainability of local communities and Central Lincolnshire as a whole, and supporting development and initiatives that will enable the rural economy to diversify and grow whilst having regard to balancing economic, social and environmental needs.

 

Flourishing Communities & Places 100

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Area-based priorities for employment are set out in the area chapters for Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford. For the Smaller Towns and Rural Settlements, the priorities are:  small business workshops, in particular at Market Rasen, Caistor, Saxilby and the larger rural villages;  mixed use town centre schemes to include office space at Market Rasen and Caistor;  business modernisation and expansion space at Market Rasen and Caistor. Sites that support these priorities and which are flexible to demand will be released for employment land use, including through site allocations in the Local Plan, in accordance with the Core Strategy policies CL4 – CL7. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners will monitor and review the take-up of employment land and the area priorities as appropriate. Explanation of Policy CL17: 6.85 Policy CL17 identifies a range of measures and priorities to meet the overall aim of a high quality and sustainable economy: i) Sectoral priorities

6.86 Business development is encouraged across a range of sectors to increase the area’s resilience to economic shock and avoid overdependence on a small number of large employers. Key sectors for growth are based on the Economic Growth Strategy, as follows:        engineering/advanced manufacturing food and farming retail creative and digital industries construction defence the visitor economy.

6.87 The majority of these sectors are defined as “knowledge intensive industries”4, as are education and health. These should help to raise the skills levels of residents, not only to meet the needs of employers but also to improve the employability of the working age population, thus boosting the ability to take up employment opportunities that arise and helping to reduce worklessness. The University of Lincoln provides potential opportunities to further enhance knowledge-intensive industries within the area. The relationship developed between Siemens and the University, Lincoln College and local schools, culminating in the opening of the
4

Defined by LG Improvement and Development (April 2012) as including: high and medium-tech manufacturing; high-tech services such as communications, computer services and research and development; financial and business services; creative and cultural industries; education and health.

Flourishing Communities & Places 101

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Engineering School, is a model of good practice, giving young people opportunities for training in skills that could help them to prosper. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are keen to support such proposals to improve training and skills. Planning obligations will be used to provide opportunities to assist residents in accessing work. Construction is one of the key employment sectors to be supported and one which can provide opportunities for local workforce training as the Sustainable Urban Extensions are developed. 6.88 Policy CL17 acknowledges the importance of the rural economy to the wider Central Lincolnshire economy and for the sustainability of local communities. The low wages that characterise Central Lincolnshire apply particularly in those rural areas where agriculture is a principal employment sector. Support is therefore given to broadening the range of business and employment opportunities in the rural area, particularly for higher skilled and paid work, such as in the knowledge-intensive industries. This can help in turn to reduce out-migration by younger people, retain skills and contribute to the overall sustainability of local communities. Such support includes proposals for the diversification of agricultural and other land-based rural business. 6.89 Small businesses are important to Central Lincolnshire’s economy, and particularly its rural economy. The ability to work from home is an incentive for many people to set up their own business. Whilst the speed of broadband in rural Central Lincolnshire is an issue, improved technology is enabling more employees to work from home. Home-based working and other flexible working practices such as livework units are also supported in principle by this policy. 6.90 The policy seeks to promote Central Lincolnshire’s quality of life as a key asset in marketing the area for inward investment. In planning positively for substantial growth, the policy stresses that economic needs must be balanced both with Central Lincolnshire’s environmental quality and the social needs of its communities. ii) Area Priorities

6.91 Policy CL17 sets out area-based priorities within Central Lincolnshire. Further details on the economic priorities for the Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford areas are set out in the relevant area chapters. Policy CL17 will be implemented by:     Development management by partner authorities Negotiation through Section 106 agreements The delivery of schemes identified within strategies such as the Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy Collaborative working between developers, Local Authorities and stakeholders.

Flourishing Communities & Places 102

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

REGENERATING PLACES & COMMUNITIES
6.92 Most settlements have some regeneration needs. As noted in Chapter 2, both Lincoln and Gainsborough have undergone major regeneration along with new investment and, in Lincoln’s case, the development of the University of Lincoln centred on the Brayford campus, which has promoted cultural activity and a vibrant evening economy. Additionally, targeted regeneration and renewal activity has started to improve conditions in residential neighbourhoods with social and economic problems. 6.93 However, major inequalities still exist in Central Lincolnshire. Both Lincoln and Gainsborough have urban neighbourhoods that fall within the worst 10% nationally for deprivation, with problems of poor health, anti-social behaviour, crime and poor educational attainment. Pockets of deprivation also occur in the rural area, where affordable housing and access to services are key issues. In Sleaford, the Masterplan concludes that, whilst there are areas of high quality townscape, there are other areas that lack a high quality public realm and that the town centre needs to fulfil its potential as a destination. 6.94 The Lincoln City Centre, Gainsborough Regained and Sleaford Masterplans are key to driving positive changes in these areas. Generally, the Core Strategy seeks to support regeneration of Central Lincolnshire’s communities by:      Delivering regeneration through growth and infrastructure provision Creating sustainable neighbourhoods within which most of people’s daily needs can be met Re-using derelict and vacant land Improving inner urban areas and neighbourhoods with aging housing or poor quality environments; and Tackling areas with high levels of social deprivation.

6.95 Some of these elements will be delivered through other policies within the Core Strategy, such as the affordable housing policy for rural exception sites and promoting development on brownfield land, but Policy CL18 sets out the overall regeneration priorities for Central Lincolnshire. Further policy detail is set out in the Area chapters relating to Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford, and Policy CL19 provides a specific focus on regeneration issues relating to former and existing RAF bases. Policy CL18 - Regeneration Priorities in Central Lincolnshire The Central Lincolnshire Authorities, together with their partners, will focus regeneration activity and investment, as they consider appropriate, on those areas with greatest identified need where intervention will benefit the local community and/or wider resident population as a whole. The priorities are:

Flourishing Communities & Places 103

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

Urban and rural areas and communities with significant levels of deprivation; Areas with significant levels of physical decay; Former RAF bases and associated settlements with significant issues of deprivation and/or poor quality environments. The nature of regeneration activity considered appropriate in the case of former RAF bases and associated settlements is set out in Policy CL19; and Other major establishments, where the closure or reduction in operations of which significantly impacts on quality of life for residents and/or the environment. In such instances, and as appropriate, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners will seek to work with owners and occupiers of the establishment at the earliest opportunity to ensure sustainable outcomes.

In addition to the above, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, together with their partners, will provide support, as they consider appropriate, to other communities with significant identified regeneration needs where this will achieve the provision of additional services, facilities, affordable housing, employment and/or any other requirements that will contribute to their improved sustainability. In all the above instances, any regeneration activity, investment or other means of support considered appropriate by the Central Lincolnshire and their partners may be informed by a Neighbourhood Plan prepared by the local community. Where a community chooses to prepare a Neighbourhood Plan, this should be in line with Policy CL7 (Neighbourhood Plans). Such regeneration activity will be in accordance with Policy CL23 (A Quality Environment). Explanation of Policy CL18: 6.96 Policy CL18 will ensure that positive efforts are made to stimulate regeneration and inward investment to areas where it is most needed, but this does not preclude regeneration activities elsewhere and indeed this will be supported. Any new development will of course have to accord with other policies within the Core Strategy such as those relating to the environment and design. 6.97 Regeneration covers a wide range of activities that contribute to the creation of high quality, sustainable places. New development and infrastructure such as community facilities and transport schemes are part of the picture, as is the reuse of vacant buildings and derelict land. Additionally, however, the role of heritage and character are critical, helping to create a sense of place, along with the provision of accessible public open space and enhancements to green infrastructure. Regeneration schemes should encourage improvements across all of these social, economic and environmental dimensions where possible.
Flourishing Communities & Places 104

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

6.98 The following policies are particularly important in providing further detail alongside Policy CL18:             Policy CL2 (Tackling Climate Change) Policy CL3 (Renewable and Low Carbon Energy) Policy CL5 (Managing the Release of Land for Housing and Employment) Policy CL8 (Sustainable Communities and Neighbourhood Plans) Policy CL19 (Existing & Former Military Establishments) Policy CL20 (Retail and Town Centres in Central Lincolnshire) Policy CL23 (A Quality Environment) Policy CL24 (Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity) Policy CL26 (Design Quality) Policy L5 (Regenerating Lincoln) Policy G3 (Regenerating Gainsborough) Policy S4 (Regenerating Sleaford).

Policy CL18 will be implemented by:       Development management by the partner Authorities Measures to encourage inward investment through partnership working between Local Authorities, Lincolnshire Enterprise Partnership and other key stakeholders Promotion of opportunities identified in the area specific masterplans Effective masterplanning of new development, particularly the Sustainable Urban Extensions Aligning the Local Plan with economic and housing strategies The promotion and development of Neighbourhood Plans

RAF BASES
6.99 Lincolnshire is renowned as the ‘Home of the Royal Air Force’ (RAF) and Central Lincolnshire in particular has been an important location throughout the history of military flight in the UK. The county’s topography and its location on the eastern side of the country made it ideal for the development of airfields during World Wars I and II. Notably:     Lincoln became one of the top five aircraft manufacturing centres, many of the aircraft built there flying out to service from West Common Morton Hall near Swinderby became the headquarters for Bomber Command during WWII A training station was established at Cranwell, becoming the RAF College in 1920 RAF Scampton was the base used for the ‘Dambusters’ raid and is home to the Red Arrows.

Flourishing Communities & Places 105

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

6.100 Although many airfields have been closed since 1945 and the land returned to agricultural use or redeveloped, the area still remains a major focus for the RAF nationally with important bases including the air training school at Cranwell and RAF Waddington, with RAF Coningsby just over the border in East Lindsey. The RAF and MoD presence plays a major role in supporting the local economy and local communities and should continue to be a major presence in the area for many years to come. Some sites within Central Lincolnshire are expected to support defence outputs for at least the next fifteen years though others have a future that is not fully assured and could be subject to review. Some of the closed bases have provided opportunities for industrial and warehouse development. Others have enabled the creation of new residential communities and employment generating uses, such as the new development at Swinderby, now known as Witham St Hughs. 6.101 Where sites are expected to be retained, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work closely with the MoD, via mechanisms such as an Armed Forces Community Covenant, to ensure that the needs of service personnel, ex-servicemen and their families are met. These include housing needs, infrastructure and employment. MoD bases may also support and provide infrastructure for civilian residents such as leisure facilities and public transport services, and have a role in ensuring other elements of this plan can be achieved, for example, enhancing biodiversity and heritage. Indeed some work has already taken place in relation to aviation heritage and this forms a good foundation for the future, such as a Battle of Britain Memorial proposal near Lincoln. 6.102 For sites where the future is less certain, as well as former air bases that still present a variety of regeneration issues, such as Brookenby, Hemswell Cliff and Newtoft, there is a need to plan based on the sustainability objectives identified in this plan. In particular, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities are keen to ensure that regeneration needs are met within the context of the area’s Spatial Strategy for Growth, and that the quality of life and sustainability of communities is enhanced. Policy CL19 therefore sets out a framework approach for existing and former military establishments in the area. Policy CL19 - Existing and Former Military Establishments The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners will support development that is appropriate for helping to enhance the operational capability of existing Ministry of Defence (MoD) establishments. In relation to former military bases, the Authorities and their partners will support regeneration through appropriate investment and other activity by: 1. Working with the Ministry of Defence at the earliest opportunity to ensure sustainable outcomes in respect of any proposed disposal of the existing MoD estate in the area, including minimising the impact on the local economy. Where appropriate the re-use and/or redevelopment will be guided by a masterplan, supplementary planning document or other similar mechanism; 2. Working with local residents, businesses and other stakeholders to
Flourishing Communities & Places 106

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

address identified deprivation and/or other social, economic or environmental issues and enhance the sustainability of settlements that have been created following the full or partial disposal historically of MoD bases; and 3. Seeking to ensure that any detrimental impact on the environment and/or local communities relating to other former military establishments is minimised, and opportunities to enhance such sites are taken where appropriate. In all cases, proposals for regeneration, including any proposed development of housing or other uses, will be subject to the overall Spatial Strategy for Growth as set out in Core Strategy. Opportunities to retain, enhance and interpret the historic RAF legacy will be promoted where appropriate as part of the protection of Central Lincolnshire’s heritage and to develop its tourist offer. At existing military establishments, any such proposals shall be consistent with and not adversely impact on or restrict current and future operational capabilities or plans for the site. Explanation of Policy CL19: 6.103 Although the positive impact of MoD bases and services personnel in the area has not been fully quantified at present, the Armed Services Community Contract seeks to build a better understanding between the RAF, local authorities and the community. Moreover, experience within Lincolnshire and elsewhere tells us that the significance of a base closure is not to be underestimated, and would stretch well beyond the movement of RAF personnel and their families. As identified above, these bases have a significant impact on the economy both directly (via job creation for local civilians and contractors) and indirectly (through spending on services and leisure facilities, and the families of services personnel working within the area). In addition, the SHMA identifies that the strong rental market in Central Lincolnshire is in part due to the number of MoD personnel living here, though this could change if the MoD relies increasingly on reservists in future rather than full-time service personnel housed in Service Family Accommodation. 6.104 There is a need to ensure that these issues are fully considered and understood, and that any negative impacts of proposed closure are mitigated. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will establish ongoing partnerships with stakeholders such as the MoD to ensure this is achieved and that account can be taken of any changing circumstances in the operation of the MoD or its estate. Policy CL19 will be implemented by:    Development management by partner authorities Negotiation through section 106 agreements Collaborative working between the Local Authorities, MoD, developers and other stakeholders.
Flourishing Communities & Places 107

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

RETAIL AND TOWN CENTRES
Context and Issues 6.105 Town centres are at the heart of communities providing accessible shops and services, employment and leisure facilities. Vital and viable town centres not only provide economic and social benefits, but also help to foster civic pride, promote local identity and contribute towards the aims of sustainable development. 6.106 Currently, town centres and high streets are under major strain nationally. Household spending is falling, shops are closing and public spending is being squeezed. In addition, town centres and high streets are also facing challenges from the constantly evolving retail sector. The ‘Town Centre First’ national planning policy was introduced in response to the growth of out-of-town centres and this has been supported by successive governments. However, as highlighted in the Portas Review5 into the future of high streets, out–of-town centres are part of today’s retail landscape and together with internet shopping provide the convenience and choice that many customers welcome. 6.107 The need to reinvent town centres to compete and survive is not a new concept for many towns across the country. However, the current economic climate has brought to the forefront the need for town centres and high streets to offer something new and different. Action for Market Towns in its report ‘Twenty First Century Town Centres’ states: “High Streets and town centres that are fit for the 21st century need to be multifunctional social centres, not just competitors for stretched consumers. They must offer irresistible opportunities and experiences that do not exist elsewhere. They need to be rooted in the interests and needs of local people, and able to meet the demands of a rapidly changing world.” 6.108 Achieving this involves a broad and complex spectrum of stakeholders, measures and initiatives, one of which is a positive planning policy framework. 6.109 The NPPF indicates that, to ensure the viability and vitality of town centres6, planning policies should be positive, promote competitive town centre environments and consumer choice and include policies for the management and growth of centres over the plan period. Central Lincolnshire’s Town Centres 6.110 The Central Lincolnshire City and Town Centres Study (2012) was commissioned to assess the health of the area’s town centres, identify a single integrated retail hierarchy for Central Lincolnshire, provide an assessment of the future capacity for retail and commercial leisure development, and make

5 6

Mary Portas, An independent Review of the Future of Our High Streets (December 2011) The term ‘town centre’ in this context encompasses city, town, district and local centres Flourishing Communities & Places 108

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

recommendations on the ability of the main centres to accommodate the type and scale of need identified. The Study shows that at the start of the Plan period:  Overall, Central Lincolnshire has a healthy market share of convenience goods expenditure, and whilst significant variations occur across the area depending upon location and goods type, there is a reasonably good market share of comparison goods expenditure. There is, however, leakage from peripheral areas close to alternative centres outside of the area, in particular in the north and north-east; Lincoln is a popular and well-performing retail and leisure destination with the historic city centre attracting considerable numbers of tourists and shoppers each year. It has a large amount of retail floorspace and a strong representation from national retailers, reflecting its role as an important sub-regional shopping centre; Gainsborough provides an important role as a retail and service destination for the local area and its performance has improved since the opening of Marshall’s Yard in recent years. There is, however, a distinct contrast between the new development and the older parts of the centre in terms of vitality and viability; Sleaford is a popular retail destination and provides an important service to the local area. Its convenience goods offer is, however, relatively weak for a town of its size and catchment and is subject to significant leakage in respect of comparison goods; Market Rasen has a more localised role than Gainsborough, Lincoln and Sleaford, and suffers from significant leakage to larger centres; Individual health checks of 23 additional centres across the area indicate that the vast majority are performing well, appear to be trading healthily and perform a key role serving the local population, including leisure services.

 

6.111 Whilst on the whole the Study has identified that Central Lincolnshire’s town centres are reasonably healthy, there are local issues and certainly no room for complacency. Policy CL20 therefore seeks to protect and enhance the vitality and viability of Central Lincolnshire’s town centres, in line with the NPPF, by directing most new retail and other town centre development to them. Informed by the Study, a four tier hierarchy of centres is defined to provide guidance on the scale and nature of new development appropriate to each of them. 6.112 The policy also seeks to support and enhance the area’s centres in terms of their attractiveness, accessibility and the range of facilities for users by directing investment and initiatives to them. This might include:    improving or establishing local markets creating new public open spaces for people to enjoy, bringing people together both informally and through holding events allowing new leisure uses that will create or enhance an evening economy
Flourishing Communities & Places 109

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

converting vacant upper floors for residential to bring life into the centre outside of opening hours and provide natural surveillance to assist in the reduction of crime and anti-social behaviour

6.113 Partnership working with organisations such as the Business Improvement Groups and providing support as appropriate for business improvement district and other activities, such as the Market Rasen Portas Pilot scheme, is an important part of this wider approach to maintaining and enhancing their vitality and viability. 6.114 In addition to these main centres, many urban neighbourhoods and villages have local shops and facilities which play an important role in meeting community needs and in reducing the need for travel to more distant facilities. Protecting such local facilities is an important part in maintaining flourishing and sustainable local communities across Central Lincolnshire. Policy CL20 – Retail and Town Centres in Central Lincolnshire The following retail hierarchy will be used by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners to guide investment and other activity to improve the vitality and viability of the identified centres, and in planning applications for retail and other town centre uses (as defined in the NPPF): Tier Type of Centre 1 City Centre Role and Function Largest centre within Central Lincolnshire, having an extensive catchment and a subregional role, providing a wide range of town centre uses Centres providing a range of facilities and services for a wider catchment area Centres serving particular areas within the main settlements, typically including a range of services such as banks, building societies, restaurants, library, and usually with at least one supermarket Location Lincoln

2

Town Centre

Gainsborough Sleaford Market Rasen  Caistor  Existing locations are all within the Lincoln PUA, and are defined in Policy L6. The potential requirement for new District Centre development serving the proposed SUEs is covered in Policy CL7 and in the individual SUE policies in the area chapters.

3

District Centre

Flourishing Communities & Places 110

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

4

Neighbourhood Centres within the main Centre7 settlements that serve their locality, typically including a small supermarket and a limited range of other local shops and services such as a pharmacy, sub-Post Office, newsagent, hot food takeaway

Existing locations are all within the Lincoln PUA, and are defined in Policy L6. The potential requirement for new Neighbourhood Centre development for proposed SUEs is covered in Policy CL7 and in the policies for the individual SUEs in the area chapter.

*These designations are provisional and are subject to review (see below). For the Rural Area, the definition of an appropriate hierarchy of centres and the designation of locations will form part of the wider review of settlement roles for the small towns and villages proposed in Policy CL4. This will include a review, and where necessary re-designation, of centres as currently defined in saved policies. The boundaries of all centres referred to in this table will remain as defined by the saved policies of the adopted Local Plans for the City of Lincoln, North Kesteven and West Lindsey, unless and until reviewed and amended by the Local Plan. Additionally, the review of boundaries will cover primary and secondary shopping streets and frontages as appropriate. Development proposals for retail and/or other town centre uses will be focused in the centres defined in this policy, and will be appropriate in scale and nature to the size and function of the relevant centre and to the maintenance of the retail hierarchy as a whole. Development proposals for retail and/or other town centre uses in out-ofcentre and edge-of-centre locations will be required to demonstrate their suitability through a sequential site test in line with the NPPF. In addition, a robust assessment of impact on nearby centres will be required for any retail, leisure and/or office proposals that: 1. Provides a floorspace that is greater than 500 m² gross; or 2. Is located within 500 m of the boundary of a District Centre and is greater than 300 m² gross; or 3. Is located within 500 m of the boundary of a Neighbourhood Centre and is greater than 200 m² gross. The Local Plan will make provision for additional floorspace for retail and other town centre uses over the Plan period in line with the most up to date available evidence on Central Lincolnshire’s need, including allocation of sites where
7

The term Neighbourhood Centre is used in the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan rather than Local Centre as in the NPPF. This is to avoid confusion with the Local Shopping Centres as designated in the City of Lincoln Local Plan, and which refer to much smaller local parades or groupings of shops. Flourishing Communities & Places 111

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

appropriate. New centres will be required in relation to the proposed SUEs at Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford, as set out in Policy CL7 and in the individual SUE policies in the area chapters. Such provision must be appropriate in scale and location to the need of the areas they serve. The development of new centres will be required to consolidate and enhance the existing network and hierarchy of centres and not harm the vitality and viability of existing centres. Outside of the defined centres, existing local shops and related facilities such as public houses and post offices will also be protected and enhanced where they support the sustainability of local communities. Explanation of Policy CL20: Retail Hierarchy 6.115 Based on the Central Lincolnshire City and Town Centres Study 2012, Policy CL20 defines a hierarchy of retail centres for Central Lincolnshire, superseding the individual approaches in previous Local Plans covering the area. 6.116 The Core Strategy only designates centres for the 3 defined urban areas (Lincoln PUA, Gainsborough Urban Area and Sleaford Urban Area), while provisionally confirming the status of Market Rasen and Caistor as Town Centres. This is because the identification of a hierarchy and designation of centres in the Rural Area is planned as part of the wider review of settlement roles proposed in the next stages of the Local Plan preparation. This review would also consider the retail status for Market Rasen and Caistor as centres. In the case of the Lincoln PUA, the District and Neighbourhood Centre designations are set out in Policy L6. No such centres are designated for Gainsborough or Sleaford in this Core Strategy, based on the 2012 Study, but planned facilities relating to the growth of these settlements are likely to be required, particularly for the proposed SUEs. The approach to provision of retailing and centres for the SUEs is set out in Policy CL7 (Sustainable Urban Extensions) and the individual policy for each SUE in the area chapters. 6.117 It is noted that the Core Strategy does not set out a retail hierarchy below Neighbourhood Centres. Further consideration of this issue will take place in a later stage of Local Plan preparation, including a review of Lincoln’s Local Shopping Centre designations. Primary Shopping Areas 6.118 The City and Town Centres Study identifies recommended primary shopping areas for each of the four main centres. Consideration of these boundaries will take place as part of the during further policy development for the Local Plan together with a review of town centre boundaries.

Flourishing Communities & Places 112

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Impact Assessment 6.119 The NPPF requires applications for retail, leisure and office development outside of town centres which are not in accordance with an up-to-date Local Plan to be assessed against a proportionate, locally set floorspace threshold. If no such local threshold is set, the default threshold set by the NPPF is 2,500 m². The City and Town Centres Study advises against having a blanket threshold for all types of centre across Central Lincolnshire, as a store of 500 m² (e.g. a ‘Tesco Express’, ‘Sainsbury’s Local’ or similar) would be likely to have a greater impact on a lower tier centre than on, for example, Lincoln City Centre. It therefore advocates a tiered approach to reflect the role and function of a centre within its sphere of influence, as set out in the policy. Retail Growth 6.120 The City and Town Centres Study identifies the quantitative need for additional retail floorspace in each of the four main centres over the Plan period. This has been done for two population growth scenarios, one of which seeks to reflect the level of population and housing growth proposed under the Local Plan. The calculation of quantitative need takes into account per capita expenditure growth forecasts, though the Study expresses caution beyond the first ten years due to inherent economic and other uncertainties in making more long-term predictions. The Study also advises that the level of available expenditure identified is based on the forecast growth in population and housing and will need regular review to ensure that it accords with housing completions and actual population growth. Due to these uncertainties, the Policy itself does not include floorspace need figures but instead refers to those included in the most up-to-date evidence base, which at the start of the Plan period is the Central Lincolnshire City and Town Centres Study 2012. The need for future provision of floorspace for commercial leisure use is discussed in general terms in the Study whilst the Central Lincolnshire Employment Land Review 2010 and its component ELRs for the individual local authority administrative areas provides an indication of need for town centre office use. The allocation of sites for town centre uses will also be informed by current and future masterplans for Lincoln City Centre, Gainsborough and Sleaford. Policy CL20 will be implemented by:      Development management by partner authorities Negotiation through Section 106 agreements The delivery of schemes identified within strategies such as the Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy and the Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy Collaborative working between Local Authorities, developers and stakeholders Implementation of Lincoln City Centre Masterplan, Gainsborough Masterplan and the Sleaford Masterplan.

Flourishing Communities & Places 113

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

THE VISITOR ECONOMY
6.121 A sustainable visitor economy helps to create vibrant and prosperous communities and a sense of place where people want to live, work, visit and invest. 6.122 The visitor economy concept embraces the total visitor experience. It recognises the importance of the more qualitative factors and the wider set of individuals and organisations contributing to the success of a destination. It therefore includes not only the economic activity of visitors but also all of the elements that make for a successful visitor destination, including:  The area’s natural environment, heritage and culture, iconic buildings, facilities including retail, sport, leisure and cultural, food, gardens, events, festivals, and so on i.e. all the things that make a place special, distinctive, capable of engendering pride and interest, and worth experiencing; The infrastructure that helps to reinforce and shape the sense of place and make it an easy place to visit, including signage, transport, parking, interpretation, public space, amenities, etc; The services that cater for the needs of visitors (and of residents) that create economic and social activity and increase spending, including hotels, bars, pubs, restaurants, galleries, plus the everyday events and day-to-day services that make the place clean, safe and welcoming.

6.123 The visitor economy has both direct and indirect economic benefits but is also important to such matters as social inclusion, enterprise and business formation, regeneration, heritage conservation, cultural activities and health. The NPPF fully recognises the importance of the visitor economy in contributing to economic wellbeing and sustainable development. The Visitor Economy in Central Lincolnshire 6.124 The visitor economy is one of the most important sectors in Central Lincolnshire’s economy. The Lincolnshire Chamber of Commerce reports8 that the Visitor Economy is worth just under £1 billion to the county as a whole, supporting 17,000 jobs and attracting 17 million visitors a year. Lincoln, the principal destination in Central Lincolnshire, attracts over 3 million visitors a year, generating over £125 million and supporting 2,000 jobs. The Visit Lincoln Partnership considers that, by comparison with similar historic towns, there is potential for the Lincoln’s visitor economy to grow and this is true across the wider Central Lincolnshire area. This is reflected in the Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy which targets the visitor economy as a key sector in its action plan for achieving growth. 6.125 The Lincoln Castle Revealed project, providing a showcase for the Magna Carta, is an example of how growth in this sector will be achieved, the overall value of tourism to Lincoln being estimated to increase by 29 – 55%, and having effects across Central Lincolnshire as a whole with many visitors to Lincoln staying in the rural area.
8

East Midlands Tourism STEAM Report 2011 Flourishing Communities & Places 114

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

6.126 The Lincolnshire Chamber of Commerce has stated that: “The Visitor Economy is a sector that requires a framework for support and to facilitate growth.” 6.127 Policy CL21 is part of that framework, seeking to deliver a sustainable visitor economy for Central Lincolnshire. Policy CL21 - A Sustainable Visitor Economy The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners will support development and activities that will deliver high quality sustainable tourism, culture and leisure, including sporting attractions. Such development and activities will contribute to the local economy, benefit local communities and visitors, and respect the intrinsic natural and built environmental qualities of the area. In particular this will involve:  Supporting the growth and enhancement of existing and new tourism, cultural, and leisure developments, including sporting attractions, that are appropriate to their location, and will enhance and protect the existing offer within Central Lincolnshire; Supporting opportunities to strengthen and celebrate Central Lincolnshire’s local distinctiveness and cultural diversity; Supporting partnership projects, regeneration schemes, infrastructure improvements and development that enhances the value of and promotes opportunities for visitors to access, understand and engage with Central Lincolnshire’s green infrastructure network and its landscape, waterways, cultural and heritage assets; Supporting the growth of, and promoting visitor connections with, the creative industries and the production of local food and drink; Supporting the growth of ‘green tourism’; The development of high quality visitor accommodation in sustainable locations. Development proposals should be appropriate for the character of the local environment in scale and nature and should be located within existing settlements unless it can be demonstrated that there is an overriding benefit to the local economy and/or community and/or environment. In all locations, the re-use of existing buildings and previously developed land will be prioritised.

 

  

Flourishing Communities & Places 115

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Explanation of Policy CL21: 6.128 ‘Green tourism’ is sustainable tourism. Any business that has been accredited ‘green’ under the nationally adopted Green Tourism Business Scheme will have implemented initiatives across its business that contribute a significant benefit to the environment and to responsible tourism. Businesses are assessed against a wide range of criteria covering environmental and social factors, as well as up-to-date technological developments. Policy CL21 will be implemented by:    Development management by partner authorities The delivery of schemes identified within strategies such as the Central Lincolnshire Economic Strategy Collaborative working between Local Authorities, developers and stakeholders

THE RURAL AREA
6.129 Over half of Central Lincolnshire’s population lives in rural areas, which are characterised by a dispersed pattern of villages and market towns. While the Local Plan’s Spatial Strategy for Growth focuses the bulk of development on the 3 main urban areas, significant growth is also likely outside of these areas to support local needs for housing and jobs. Existing communities also face a number of key issues relating to access to services and transport. 6.130 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities have therefore developed specific objectives for the Rural Area, which is defined as that part of Central Lincolnshire lying outside of the 3 main urban areas (i.e. the Lincoln PUA, Gainsborough Urban Area and Sleaford Urban Area). Policy Context 6.131 National planning policy on rural areas is set out in the NPPF, including the following key objectives:     Supporting sustainable economic development Promoting the development and diversification of agriculture and other landbased businesses Supporting sustainable rural tourism Promoting the retention and development of local services and community facilities in villages, including local shops, sports venues, cultural buildings, public houses and places of worship.

6.132 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities fully support these objectives and have sought to translate them into a local approach to support and strengthen the Rural Area within the wider strategy for sustainable development in Central Lincolnshire.

Flourishing Communities & Places 116

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy CL22 – Strategy for the Rural Area of Central Lincolnshire The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and their partners will support the Rural Area of Central Lincolnshire through an integrated and sustainable approach to planning based on the Core Strategy’s Vision and Objectives. To achieve this, the Local Plan will:   Promote and support the sustainability of rural communities, so that they are prosperous, balanced and resilient; Protect, enhance and expand existing services, facilities and other infrastructure across the Rural Area in line with the Infrastructure Delivery Plan, Sustainable Futures Study and the review of rural settlement roles proposed as part of the Local Plan review; Maintain and enhance the smaller towns (Market Rasen and Caistor) including their roles in supporting their surrounding areas; Seek to ensure that rural housing needs, including affordable housing, are met in line with the Spatial Strategy for Growth in Central Lincolnshire; Promote a sustainable rural economy, including support for innovation, diversification and use of local resources (locally produced food, biomass, timber and other renewable construction materials, etc). Opportunities to link the rural and urban economies and resource use in Central Lincolnshire will be promoted; Promote improved access to the countryside and sustainable rural tourism; Promote improved accessibility and public transport provision serving the Rural Area as part of the transport strategy for Central Lincolnshire; Protect, nurture and enhance the quality of the rural environment and countryside, including its natural and historic value, landscape character and local distinctiveness.

  

  

Policy CL22 will be implemented by:    Partnership working Development management by the partner Authorities Linking the Local Plan to strategies for housing, economic development, transport, biodiversity, etc and seeking to ensure that the rural objectives are addressed

Flourishing Communities & Places 117

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

7. A QUALITY ENVIRONMENT
7.1 Central Lincolnshire has a rich and distinctive environment that is valued and enjoyed by those who live, work, visit and invest here. Its largely rural countryside and historic towns and villages are attractive aspects of Central Lincolnshire as a whole, while the landscape of the Lincolnshire Wolds and Lincoln’s historic core are assets of national or wider importance. It is crucial that the significant growth planned over the next 20 years is delivered carefully to ensure that environmental quality, character and diversity are protected and, where possible, enhanced. Natural resources including biodiversity, water, soils, air and unpolluted skies also need to be protected and managed as part of sustainable development. 7.2 The Core Strategy seeks a positive and proactive approach to the environment in Central Lincolnshire, with the emphasis on achieving quality places that are attractive and sustainable, and which contribute to quality of life, community wellbeing and local character. The overall approach and priorities for the environment are set out in Policy CL23 (A Quality Environment), while supplementary policies provide more detail on particular aspects as follows:    Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity (Policy 24) Managing Water Resources & Flood Risk (Policy 25) Design Quality (Policy 26).

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
7.3 The Core Strategy’s approach to environmental quality encompasses the range of components that make up the environment of Central Lincolnshire, including:       Landscape Historic, built and cultural assets Biodiversity and geodiversity Environmental infrastructure and ecosystem services Open space, recreation and outdoor sports provision Other natural resources including water, air and soils.

7.4 As these components are often linked with each other (and with other social and economic objectives), the Core Strategy promotes their integration in planning and environmental management where appropriate. This is to ensure that environmental resources are considered in their wider context, rather than as isolated natural, historic or recreational sites. A holistic approach to the environment also maximises opportunities for the enhancement of assets and their contribution to quality of life. 7.5 Many of these components also play a crucial role in defining local character and sense of place of Central Lincolnshire, together with the diversity of places and landscapes within it.

A Quality Environment 118

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Key Challenges and Opportunities for Environmental Quality 7.6 Central Lincolnshire’s environment presents a number of challenges and opportunities that can, in part, be addressed through policies in the Core Strategy. These include: Key Challenges Opportunities  Support protection and enhancement of Ensure change to landscapes is all landscapes including nationally carefully and sustainably managed designated landscapes (Lincolnshire so that our landscapes continue to be Wolds AONB) highly valued, distinctive expressions  Ensure new development adequately of local identity takes account of, and where possible enhances, landscape character  Reuse and adapt buildings  Preserve assets of archaeological Reduce heritage at risk interest either in situ or by record  Approve appropriate enabling development  Focus growth on existing urban settlements to reduce urban sprawl and Minimise damage to areas of traffic growth tranquillity and dark skies as Central  Ensure that design minimises light Lincolnshire grows pollution  Restore degraded or declining habitats Protect and enhance biodiversity,  Link and extend ecological corridors and including key habitats and species networks  Ensure our environment is appropriately used for recreation, education and tourism     Ensure local character and diversity of places is conserved and enhanced  Improve and extend Central Lincolnshire’s green infrastructure network Improve access to our environment Enhance existing tourism attractions and develop new ones Attract new recreational uses Increase public participation Improve quality of new development so that it contributes positively to local character and diversity Ensure sustainable approaches to water resources

Ensure rivers and water resources continue to support wildlife, recreation and tourism, as well as providing water for business, agriculture and homes

A Quality Environment 119

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Protect our environment from the consequences of climate change including increased flood risk

 

Promote adaptation and resilience to climate change Ensure sustainable environmental approaches to design and layout for managing and reducing flood risk.

7.7 Many of the opportunities identified above rely on partnership working with other bodies and local communities. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are keen to maximise links between the Local Plan and other local strategies, plans and initiatives relating to Central Lincolnshire’s environment. For example, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with the Greater Lincolnshire Nature Partnership (GLNP) and other agencies to protect and enhance green infrastructure and biodiversity in the area. Landscape and Character WHAT IS LANDSCAPE? The European Landscape Convention (ELC) (2004) defines landscape as: “An area, perceived by people, whose character is the result of the action and interaction of natural and/or human factors”. The Convention embraces all landscapes, both outstanding and ordinary, that determine the quality of people’s living environment. The Convention therefore covers natural, rural, urban and peri-urban [urban fringe] areas. By addressing landscape as part of an integrated approach to conserving and enhancing Central Lincolnshire’s quality of environment, the Core Strategy meets the ELC’s aims of promoting the protection, management and planning of landscape.

7.8 Central Lincolnshire contains a wide diversity of landscapes, reflecting its varied geology, ecology, history and development. In seeking to understand and conserve this diversity, a range of landscape character assessments is available, as follows: i) National   Character of England Landscape, Wildlife and Cultural Features Map (Natural England, 2005) (Figure 7 shows National Character Areas in Central Lincolnshire) National Character Area Profiles (Natural England website, as available & updated)

i) Regional  East Midlands Regional Landscape Character Assessment (EMRLCA, 2010)

A Quality Environment 120

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

ii) Local      Lincolnshire Historic Landscape Characterisation (HLC) Project (2011) Lincoln Townscape Assessment (LTA, 2009) Lincoln Growth Points Characterisation Project (2011) North Kesteven Landscape Character Assessment (2007) West Lindsey Landscape Character Assessment (1999)

Figure 6: National Character Areas in Central Lincolnshire

7.9 Further information on the character assessments for Central Lincolnshire is available on the Joint Committee website (www.central-lincs.org.uk). 7.10 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are committed to maintaining and using landscape and townscape character assessments in the planning process, and to supporting identified management and conservation objectives for character areas in partnership with others. This includes a requirement on new development to take account of existing landscape character, as set out in Policy CL26 (Design Quality). Lincolnshire Wolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty 7.11 Approximately 5% of Central Lincolnshire lies within the Lincolnshire Wolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). The AONB was designated in 1973 and is one of only two nationally protected landscapes in the East Midlands region,
A Quality Environment 121

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

the other being the Peak District National Park. AONBs, together with National Parks, are considered to represent the finest landscapes in England and Wales and are accorded the highest level of protection. The NPPF states that “great weight” should be given to conserving landscape and scenic beauty in AONBs. 7.12 The latest Lincolnshire Wolds AONB Management Plan sets out an updated Strategy and Action Plan for the period 2012-2017. This, and its future reviews, will form the basis for managing the AONB and will ensure that the landscape is conserved for the use and enjoyment of future generations as the area evolves and changes. 7.13 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities fully support the AONB and the importance of its careful conservation and management, and will take account of the AONB Management Plan alongside national guidance in planning decisions affecting the area. Local Landscape Designations 7.14 The saved Local Plan policies covering Central Lincolnshire include a number of local landscape or scenic designations e.g. Areas of Great Landscape Value, Lincoln Cliff Landscape Character Area. These remain as material considerations for development management purposes until such time as they are reviewed, replaced or deleted within the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan. OBJECTIVES FOR LANDSCAPE: 1. To support the protection and enhancement of all Central Lincolnshire’s landscapes, including natural, rural, urban and urban fringe areas; 2. To ensure that intrinsic landscape character is respected, conserved and enhanced through sensitive development and management; 3. The promotion of the highest level of protection for the nationally designated landscape of the Lincolnshire Wolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Natural Resources 7.15 Natural resources encompass the full range of natural systems, networks and attributes that form the natural environment of Central Lincolnshire, including:        Green infrastructure Biodiversity and geodiversity Water resources and flood management Air quality Soils and agricultural land Skies, including dark skies at night Tranquillity (freedom from unreasonable noise or visual disturbance).

A Quality Environment 122

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

7.16 In line with national planning policy on the natural environment in the NPPF, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will seek the careful management of natural resources to ensure their conservation and enhancement as part of the overall aim of achieving a quality environment and sustainable development in Central Lincolnshire. 7.17 Data on natural resources will be used to define and assess the impact of development proposals and, where appropriate, for the preparation of further detailed policies in the Local Plan. In some cases, this may involve further development of the evidence base for the Local Plan to meet NPPF requirements, including the identification of areas of tranquillity. One existing local data source provider on biodiversity and geodiversity is the GLNPs Lincolnshire Environmental Records Centre (LERC). The Historic Environment 7.17 Central Lincolnshire has a rich historic environment that contributes strongly to its character and quality of life. There are over 2,300 listed buildings, 73 conservation areas and 210 scheduled ancient monuments. In addition, there are numerous other heritage assets that are not of sufficient quality to justify listing but are considered to be locally significant. 7.18 Central Lincolnshire’s heritage assets are irreplaceable and require careful management as part of social, environmental and economic change in the area, including new development, regeneration and other pressures such as climate change. The NPPF states:"When considering the impact of a proposed development on the significance of a designated heritage asset, great weight should be given to the asset's conservation" (Para 132). Heritage at Risk 7.19 In August 2009, Lincolnshire’s local authorities agreed to undertake a Lincolnshire Heritage at Risk Project to help safeguard the county’s heritage. In Central Lincolnshire, the Project identified the following: Heritage asset Places of Worship Unlisted buildings Listed buildings Parks & gardens Conservation areas Archaeology Total in Central Lincolnshire 232 608 2,125 110 73 208 Total surveyed 232 379 1,607 61 15 140 Assets at risk 23 24 104 12 2 28 % at risk 10 4 5 11 3 13

A Quality Environment 123

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

7.20 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are committed to working in partnership with English Heritage and others to secure a year-on-year reduction in the number of heritage sites at risk as part of the National Heritage Protection Plan (NHPP) 1. 7.21 The Authorities are currently contributing to the preparation of a strategy for the protection of historic assets under the Heritage at Risk initiative, and will consider the implications for the Local Plan and development management upon its completion.

Policy CL23 – A Quality Environment The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with stakeholders including communities, developers and others to protect the environmental quality, character and diversity of Central Lincolnshire by: 1. Positive and sustainable management of its natural and historic environment, including landscapes, built heritage, green infrastructure, biodiversity, geodiversity, water, air, soils, dark skies, and areas of tranquillity; 2. Identifying, protecting and enhancing designated natural and heritage assets and their settings, including those defined as being locally significant through the planning process; 3. Promoting opportunities to link and extend environmental assets and networks to meet the objectives of the Core Strategy; 4. Maintaining and enhancing public access to the area’s natural and historic assets and networks; 5. Ensuring that opportunities for the reuse, restoration and/or adaptation of disused or underused assets of architectural or local merit are considered and, where appropriate and viable, incorporated sensitively into development schemes; 6. Promoting opportunities to strengthen the long term resilience of the area’s natural and historic assets, networks and resources to climate change and changing weather and, where appropriate and viable, requiring the sensitive incorporation of such into development schemes. Development proposals will be required to contribute positively to environmental quality and local character, and not have an unacceptable effect on the area’s natural or historic environment and assets.

1

The NHPP sets out how English Heritage, with help from partners in the sector, will prioritise and deliver heritage protection for the next four years (2011-2015) A Quality Environment 124

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Explanation of Policy CL23: 7.22 Policy CL23 sets out the Core Strategy’s overall approach and priorities for the environment. The conservation and enhancement of Central Lincolnshire’s environment is a strategic objective for the Core Strategy, and therefore underpins many of the other policies in the plan. The following policies are particularly important in providing further detail pursuant to Policy CL23:  Policy CL24 (Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity) – covers the approach to be taken in conserving and enhancing Central Lincolnshire’s green infrastructure, including biodiversity. Policy CL25 (Managing Water Resources & Flood Risk) – seeks to protect and improve the area’s water environment and resources, prevent an increase in flood risk, and ensure compliance with the Water Framework Directive; Policy CL26 (Design Quality) – covers the design requirements for new development in relation to making a positive contribution to environmental quality and local character.

7.23 Together, these policies form a positive, proactive strategy for the conservation, enhancement and enjoyment of Central Lincolnshire’s environment and will be used to inform future development proposals and decisions, as well as related management plans and strategies. 7.24 In determining planning applications against Policy CL23, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will have particular regard to the following: i) Local management plans and strategies: 7.25 The management of change of many assets, including AONBs, Scheduled Monuments and Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs), is covered by international and national legislation and guidance which must be followed. Additionally, a number of local management plans and strategies provide guidance on specific areas including the Lincolnshire Wolds AONB and many Conservation Areas. These form part of the Local Plan evidence base and should be considered in development proposals and decisions that could affect such assets. ii) The assessed significance of heritage assets: 7.26 The NPPF requires local authorities to “identify and assess the particular significance of any heritage asset that may be affected by a proposal (including by development affecting the setting of a heritage asset) ” (Para. 129). In this context, significance is defined in national guidance as the value of the heritage asset “to this and future generations because of its heritage interest. That interest may be archaeological, architectural, artistic or historic. Significance derives not only from a heritage asset’s physical presence, but also from its setting”. 7.27 Designated heritage assets, including Scheduled Monuments, Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas, are considered to have a level of significance that
A Quality Environment 125

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

justifies special protection measures. Additionally, the Core Strategy promotes the wider use of the national definition of significance to demonstrate the local significance of other built and natural assets. In line with the requirements of the NPPF, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will therefore take account of the available evidence, and any necessary expertise, in assessing the significance of heritage assets in Local Plan preparation and development management. iii) Enhancement of Central Lincolnshire’s environment: 7.28 The Core Strategy promotes enhancement of environmental assets and resources as part of its management of change, including those of local significance and those at risk, so they can be used and enjoyed in the future. Development proposals will be expected to contribute to this objective. Enhancement may take many forms but is essentially any measure that will improve the quality and significance of an existing asset and/or environment. Examples include, but are not restricted to:       Improving the accessibility, recreational or educational value of an asset; The reuse and adaptation of disused or underused assets for more viable uses including commercial, industrial, tourism, sport or recreation; The maintenance and extension of green infrastructure to promote wildlife, recreation and access; The use of positive conservation management regimes to enhance habitats for biodiversity; The improvement and sustainable use of the water environment; Carefully considered adaptation of assets and environments to make them more resilient to climate change including the provision of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS); and Ensuring new developments make a positive contribution to the local character and distinctiveness of places in Central Lincolnshire through appropriate and considered design in context.

Policy CL23 will be implemented by:    Development management decisions by the partner authorities Partnership working between the Central Lincolnshire Authorities and relevant bodies including Town and Parish Councils, English Heritage, Natural England and the Lincolnshire Wolds Countryside Service Regular updating of the evidence base

A Quality Environment 126

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE AND BIODIVERSITY
7.29 Green Infrastructure (GI) means the network of green space that exists within and between our cities, towns and villages. It is the open space that communities use for informal or formal recreation, and also includes habitats for wildlife, supporting natural processes, biodiversity and geodiversity (see Box). Open green spaces can combine several functions and contribute to a “multi-functional” network.

WHAT IS GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE? Green Infrastructure (GI) includes a variety of different green space types, including: parks, playing fields, recreation grounds (for formal sports or informal use), woodland, wildlife habitats, nature reserves, urban green space, green corridors & access routes, river corridors, rivers and waterways, water bodies (e.g. lakes), churchyards, cemeteries, allotments, street trees and gardens. GI provides places and space for:       Outdoor relaxation, recreation and play Wildlife and natural habitats, with access to nature for people Management of water resources and flood risk Local food production - including allotments and gardens Growing local resources - biomass, local timber and other building materials, Improved health & wellbeing – providing opportunities for exercise and lowering stress levels.

WHAT IS BIODIVERSITY? The term ‘biodiversity’ is shorthand for biological diversity – the variety of living organisms in a particular area. It also encompasses how these organisms interact with each other in the natural environment as part of an ecosystem. WHAT IS GEODIVERSITY? Geodiversity is the variety of rocks, minerals, fossils, soils and landscapes, together with the natural processes which form them. It provides the key link between landscape, biodiversity and people over time. 7.30 GI is a core component of sustainable development, with an important role in achieving sustainable communities and economic prosperity, as well as delivering environmental quality and ecosystem services. In particular, the established benefits of GI include:     Addressing climate change adaptation and mitigation Tackling flood alleviation and water management Improving quality of place Improving physical and mental health and social wellbeing
A Quality Environment 127

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

       

Increasing community cohesion and volunteering opportunities Increasing land and property values Sustaining economic growth and investment Increasing tourism Enhancing recreational and leisure opportunities Protecting and enhancing biodiversity and geodiversity Protecting and enhancing landscape character and cultural heritage Obtaining products from the land - grown and used locally

Green Infrastructure in Central Lincolnshire 7.31 Central Lincolnshire has a varied natural environment with a wealth of Green Infrastructure assets of national status and local importance (see Box). GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS IN CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE  Wildlife and geological sites of national importance:  Bardney Limewoods National Nature Reserve (NNR)  23 Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) covering 526 hectares  42 Ancient Woodlands as defined by Natural England  Sites of local natural environment & wildlife importance:  7 Local Nature Reserves (LNRs)  1Nature Improvement Area (NIA) for the Humberhead Levels has been identified (DEFRA, Feb 2012), with a small eastern part falling within West Lindsey  Non-statutory sites of local importance:  329 Local Wildlife Sites (LWSs)  Approximately 242 Sites of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCI) and County Wildlife Sites (CWS)  14 Local Geological Sites (LGSs)  6 local Regionally Important Geological Sites (RIGSs)  Protected greenspace designated in adopted Local Plans covering Central Lincolnshire, including the green wedges in the Lincoln area  Other woodlands with public access for recreation, including Stapleford Woods, Laughton Forest and Willingham Woods  Walking, horse-riding and cycling networks including Public Rights of Way Network, Promoted Walks and National and Local Cycle Routes, all providing community access to the wider countryside  The inland waterways of the River Trent, River Witham, Fossdyke Navigation and River Ancholme are water corridors which are multi-functional green infrastructure assets with a wide range of roles  Open spaces which are also historic assets:
A Quality Environment 128

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

12 national Registered Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England within the area, many of which are situated around Lincoln and Sleaford

 The wider countryside and landscapes, including the designated Lincolnshire Wolds AONB There are no internationally designated sites for nature conservation within Central Lincolnshire. However, there a number of such sites in adjoining areas, including the Humber Estuary and the Wash, for which the impact of the Core Strategy has therefore been assessed under the Habitats Regulations. Policy Context & Evidence Base 7.32 A variety of policy documents and evidence has contributed to Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity policy development for Central Lincolnshire, as follows: i) National:       The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) UK Sustainable Development Strategy - Securing the Future (2005) Natural Environment White Paper - The Natural Choice: securing the value of nature (DEFRA, June 2011) Planning for Biodiversity and Geological Conservation - A Guide to Good Practice (ODPM, DEFRA, & English Nature, March 2006) Natural England's Green Infrastructure Guidance (Natural England NE176, Jan 2009) Biodiversity 2020: A Strategy for England’s wildlife and ecosystem services (DEFRA, August 2011)

ii) Regional:   Policies in the now revoked Regional Plan Green Infrastructure Guide for the East Midlands (EMGIN, NE, EA, EMRA, 2008)

iii) Local:  Green Infrastructure Study for Central Lincolnshire - see below

A Quality Environment 129

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Lincolnshire Biodiversity Action Plan and Lincolnshire Local Geodiversity Action Plan (Lincolnshire Biodiversity Partnership (LBP), now Greater Lincolnshire Nature Partnership (GLNP), October 2011 and March 2010). Local Wildlife Sites Guidelines for Greater Lincolnshire, and Local Geological Sites Guidelines for Greater Lincolnshire

Green Infrastructure Study for Central Lincolnshire 7.33 The GI Study for Central Lincolnshire (Chris Blandford Associates, 2011) was undertaken to examine the area’s GI and to provide supporting evidence on the GI provision and approaches needed to support the growth proposed for the area. The GI Study provides a strategic framework for guiding planning and investment in GI for Central Lincolnshire. 7.34 The GI Study provides a detailed Audit and Assessment of the GI assets in Central Lincolnshire, and also includes a GI Strategy that identifies the needs and opportunities for safeguarding and enhancing the area’s GI as follows: NEEDS & OPPORTUNITIES FOR GI IN CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE      Reversing the loss and fragmentation of natural and semi-natural habitats Creating an ecological network to deliver local and regional biodiversity targets Protecting open land from development in and around settlements, in particular Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford Promoting high quality design of new development to enhance the integrity and local distinctiveness of its landscape and townscape context Retaining and increasing the area of trees and woodland in suitable locations, including acknowledging their contribution to reducing flood events and improving water quality. Promoting and supporting opportunities for high quality, locally produced food Embed the generation of renewable energy into the management of the multifunctional Green Infrastructure network Improving and accessing the recreational value of waterways through new or enhanced visitor and waterway infrastructure Filling strategic gaps in the rights of way network in rural and urban areas as part of a well-connected sustainable strategic access network Addressing deficiencies of accessible natural greenspace and Local Nature Reserves based on Natural England's Accessible Natural Greenspace Standard.

    

A Quality Environment 130

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Addressing a deficiency of 55ha in Local Nature Reserves for existing populations, based on Natural England's Accessible Natural Greenspace Standard, and an additional deficiency of 146ha by 2031 to meet the needs of future population arising from planned growth.

Green Infrastructure Strategy & Objectives 7.35 The GI Study includes a Green Infrastructure Strategy including a series of objectives for GI in Central Lincolnshire. These have been incorporated in the Core Strategy as follows: OBJECTIVES FOR GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE IN CENTRAL LINCOLNSHIRE 1. To safeguard the ecosystem services in Central Lincolnshire on which human prosperity and wellbeing depend 2. To promote a landscape-scale approach to address loss and fragmentation of wildlife habitats in Central Lincolnshire, by working to achieve more, bigger, better and interconnected areas for wildlife 3. To protect and enhance the natural and heritage assets (and their settings) that underpin the landscape/townscape character of Central Lincolnshire, ensuring that these assets continue to contribute to local distinctiveness 4. To promote opportunities for spaces for sustainable, safe and attractive access, recreation and movement to encourage healthy lifestyles and wellbeing for communities in Central Lincolnshire 5. To ensure that greenspaces are designed and managed to incorporate a range of sports and recreation facilities 6. To increase the quality, accessibility and use of natural greenspace and other GI assets by local communities in Central Lincolnshire 7. To enhance rights of way and cycling networks across Central Lincolnshire to encourage a modal shift to walking and cycling 8. To promote opportunities for sustainable local energy and food production in Central Lincolnshire to contribute to reducing the area’s carbon footprint 9. To adapt to and mitigate climate change by enabling Central Lincolnshire to be more resilient to flooding (thus reducing flood risk), drought and higher urban temperatures, and contribute to improving water quality 10. To provide a quality environment for local communities and businesses in Central Lincolnshire, attracting and retaining inward investment 11. To realise opportunities for new businesses, skills and jobs related to GI management and green technologies in Central Lincolnshire.
A Quality Environment 131

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Green Infrastructure Network 7.36 As the population grows, so will pressures on Central Lincolnshire’s existing GI, highlighting the need for investment in new and enhanced GI provision to support growth proposals. The Green Infrastructure Strategy seeks a high quality network of multifunctional open space and green corridors, to be delivered through a combination of conservation and enhancement of existing assets and new provision. This Green Infrastructure Network has the following locational components as shown on the Concept Plan at Figure 7: 1) Strategic Green Corridors - a broadly defined network providing the backbone of the Network; 2) Strategic Green Access Links - predominantly off-road pedestrian and cycling routes; 3) Urban Green Grids for Lincoln, Gainsborough & Sleaford [see Area chapters for details]. 7.37 These corridors and links represent the areas considered to have the greatest potential for enhancement to meet the Core Strategy’s objectives for GI. However, it is stressed that this does not preclude improvements elsewhere in the wider countryside. 7.38 Partnership working is already underway in relation to delivery of the network, including the proposed Witham Valley Country Park, which aims to provide a facility serving Central Lincolnshire. Landscape-scale Approach 7.39 Many of Central Lincolnshire’s natural and semi-natural habitats have been lost and fragmented, leaving small areas of habitat that are isolated from each other and surrounded by relatively inhospitable land uses, reducing biodiversity and increasing vulnerability. To address these issues at a landscape scale, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners in the Greater Lincolnshire Nature Partnership (GLNP) are seeking to identify and map ecological networks for Central Lincolnshire, informed by biodiversity opportunity mapping studies, and to promote and enhance connectivity at the landscape-scale between clusters of wildlife sites. The creation of the ecological network will be a long-term process, but is fundamental to meeting local and national biodiversity targets. The opportunities and proposals identified for future landscape scale biodiversity network connectivity should be used to supplement and inform the implementation of the Green Infrastructure Network. The findings of the Central Lincolnshire Biodiversity Opportunity Mapping Study (when completed) will provide additional evidence to support the enhancement of the network.

A Quality Environment 133

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Biodiversity & Geodiversity Action Plans 7.40 The Lincolnshire Biodiversity Action Plan (LBAP, October 2011) was produced by the Lincolnshire Biodiversity Partnership (LBP). They became the Greater Lincolnshire Nature Partnership (GLNP) from November 2012, and.are responsible for monitoring and updating it. The LBAP is a nature strategy that identifies priority habitats and species in Lincolnshire, and conservation and enhancement actions to take place at a local level, which will also contribute to national and international conservation commitments. 7.41 The LBAP identifies declining biodiversity as a key issue in Lincolnshire, including the habitat fragmentation and isolation noted above. The LBAP sets out the vision of a Lincolnshire richer in biodiversity and, through engagement with stakeholders and partners, aims to:  Conserve and enhance Lincolnshire’s biodiversity; recreating habitats on a landscape scale and developing networks of interlinked natural areas – a ‘living landscape’ of which wildlife is an integral part, not confined to specially protected sites; Ensure that biodiversity is recognised as an essential element of life in the historic county of Lincolnshire: including its contributions to health and wellbeing; the economy, recreation and tourism; and provision of ecosystem services (such as flood protection, retention of water resources, carbon storage and crop pollination).

7.42 The Greater Lincolnshire Nature Partnership (as LBP) also produced the Lincolnshire Local Geodiversity Action Plan (LGAP, March 2010, latest edition), which promotes action to conserve and enhance the diverse geological heritage of Lincolnshire whilst promoting and managing the sustainable use of its geodiversity resources. Policy CL24 – Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with partners, stakeholders and others to conserve, restore and enhance the green infrastructure, biodiversity and geodiversity of Central Lincolnshire for the benefit of residents, visitors and wildlife. In doing so, the Local Plan will support the creation of a high quality, accessible and multi-functional network of green infrastructure across the area, which contributes to healthy and active lifestyles and delivers the benefits of rich and diverse natural environments and ecosystems for Central Lincolnshire. The Local Plan, other strategies, development , and local investment will: Green Infrastructure 1. Maximise the potential of existing and new green infrastructure, including public and other open spaces, by promoting proposals that benefit:

A Quality Environment 134

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

recreation; accessibility; tourism; biodiversity; geodiversity; flood and water management; the conservation of landscape, character and built heritage; carbon reduction and resilience to climate change. Improvements to links between green infrastructure assets within and extending beyond the area should be considered; 2. Support the implementation of the Green Infrastructure Strategy for Central Lincolnshire, including the Green Infrastructure Network as illustrated in the Concept Plan in Figure 7. This includes linking larger areas of accessible public and other open space and areas of biodiversity value across Central Lincolnshire. Development proposals crossing or adjacent to the Network should make provision for its implementation and/or enhancement; 3. Avoid the loss of public and other open spaces and public access routes that contribute to the functioning of the overall Green Infrastructure Network. Where an adverse impact on green infrastructure is unavoidable, development will only be permitted if suitable mitigation measures for the Network are provided; 4. Support targeted environmental and access improvements in line with the assets, needs and opportunities identified in the Green Infrastructure Study generally and for the relevant Green Infrastructure Zones; 5. Support the delivery of strategic landscape, biodiversity and recreational designations, initiatives and projects, including the Witham Valley Country Park, where they present suitable opportunities for safeguarding and enhancing green infrastructure; 6. Support the delivery and management of suitable green infrastructure provision including recreational open space within development proposals and allocations, subject to the availability of appropriate evidence, and the provisions of saved policies in the area’s Local Plans together with any future revisions. Biodiversity & Geodiversity 7. Safeguard nature conservation, biodiversity and geodiversity assets within and outside of Central Lincolnshire from adverse effects of development by: i) Not permitting development where it would harm internationally, nationally or locally designated wildlife or geological conservation sites; Protecting locally designated Local Wildlife and Geological Sites), from development that could negatively impact upon them; and Ensuring that species which are legally protected, in decline or rare in Central Lincolnshire and/or which are covered in Biodiversity
A Quality Environment 135

ii)

iii)

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Action Plans are not harmed; 8. Implement the local priorities in the Lincolnshire Local Biodiversity and Geodiversity Action Plans, the Green Infrastructure Strategy for Central Lincolnshire and other relevant evidence; 9. Pursue opportunities to conserve and enhance biodiversity and ecological networks, having regard to priority biodiversity habitats and species and the restoration of declining habitat assets; 10. Promote appropriate management and access for features of the landscape of importance for wildlife and/or geological conservation. This includes avoiding the loss, deterioration or significant adverse impact on irreplaceable habitats and features, including ancient woodland and aged or veteran trees; Proposals for development will be required to accord with these policy principles and requirements and not adversely affect any designated site or any important habitat, species, geological feature or green infrastructure asset . Adequate information must be submitted with planning applications that may affect such assets to allow the likely impacts to be fully assessed. Without this there will be a presumption against granting permission. Where, exceptionally, the benefits of a development outweigh the importance of a local nature conservation site, species, habitat or green infrastructure feature, the adverse impacts must be minimised and mitigated as far as possible and any losses offset either off-site or as an integral part of the development, to achieve a net gain for green infrastructure and biodiversity.

Explanation of Policy CL24: 7.43 Policy CL24 provides a proactive and strategic framework for Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity in line with national policy and the evidence base. Its main components are: i) Setting out the overall approach to green infrastructure for Central Lincolnshire to deliver the GI Strategy and the GI Network for the area; ii) Providing protection for the existing and future network of corridors, open spaces and habitats for recreation and wildlife, including biodiversity, geodiversity and landscape assets and areas covered by national designations (e.g. SSSI, NNR, AONB) or considered locally important (e.g. Local Wildlife and Geological Sites, Local Nature Reserves, Nature Improvement Areas); iii) Setting out the requirements on proposed development for development management. 7.44 The following policies are particularly important in relation to delivery of Policy CL24:
A Quality Environment 136

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

          

Policy CL2 - Tackling Climate Change Policy CL6 - Site Selection in Central Lincolnshire Policy CL8 - Infrastructure to Support Growth Policy CL10 - Transport Policy CL11 - Health and Wellbeing Policy CL21 – A Sustainable Visitor Economy Policy CL22 - A Strategy for the Rural Area of Central Lincolnshire Policy CL23 - A Quality Environment Policy CL25 - Managing Water Resources and Flood Risk Policy CL26 - Design Quality Green Infrastructure policies for the Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford areas

Policy CL24 will be implemented by:    Partnership working with stakeholders, communities, landowners, environmental authorities and organisations Development management decisions by the partner authorities Further policy development within the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan, including the allocation and safeguarding of sites for green infrastructure, biodiversity, geodiversity and open space and recreation.

SPORT & RECREATION
7.45 Provision of accessible local sports and recreation facilities plays an important part in people's health, wellbeing and quality of life. National Policy 7.46 National planning policy on sports and recreation in the NPPF focuses on promoting healthy and inclusive communities, while linking to related policy for access to open space and green infrastructure. The NPPF replaced the previous national planning policy for sports, recreation and open space in PPG17 (Planning for Open Space, Sport and Recreation, July 2002). 7.47 The NPPF states that ‘Planning policies should be based on robust and up-todate assessments of the needs for open space, sports and recreation facilities and opportunities for new provision.’ (Para. 73). It explains that such assessments should identify needs, deficits or surpluses of open space, sports and recreation facilities in the local area, and that the information gained should be used to determine what provision is required. Guidance on how assessments should be undertaken is still currently set out in the national guidance ‘Assessing Needs and Opportunities: A Companion Guide to PPG17’ (DCLG, Sept 2002). 7.48 The NPPF also sets out policy relating to the retention of existing facilities, including the national criteria against which any proposed loss of facilities and land from development should be assessed.

A Quality Environment 137

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Evidence Base and Proposed Policy Approach for Central Lincolnshire 7.49 Supplementing existing evidence for Central Lincolnshire, the GI Study (Dec 2011) undertook a desk-top audit of existing outdoor open space, sports and recreational spaces and indoor built facilities, using a typology and methodology in compliance with PPG17 and its Companion Guide. However, it did not include an assessment of current and future needs and deficiencies and opportunities (with regard to levels of provision, quality and accessibility of different types of sites, or play provision). The GI Study therefore recommends that additional evidence is gathered. 7.50 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are working jointly to scope out the evidence requirements. The Authorities are committed to the provision of high quality sports and recreational provision of sufficient quantity and quality to meet the current and future needs of its communities, including safeguarding existing facilities and land, and will be developing appropriate local policies and standards in the Local Plan. To contribute to this 3 Sports Studies for Central Lincolnshire have been commissioned, to assess provision and needs, which are: an Indoor Sports Study (built facilities); a Playing Pitch Strategy; and a Minority Sports Study. The findings of these strategic Sports Studies (when completed) will provide additional evidence to support development of the Local Plan, decisions on development proposals and future provision of facilities for Central Lincolnshire. 7.51 In the meantime, Policy CL24 (Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity) in this plan supports the delivery and safeguarding of sports and recreational open space provision within development proposals, land allocations and communities. The policy explains that this is subject to the availability of appropriate evidence and the provisions of relevant saved policies in the area’s existing Local Plans together with any future revisions. Policy CL6 (Site Selection in Central Lincolnshire) includes a requirement that sites should not lead to the loss of locally important open space, green infrastructure or community or recreational facilities unless adequately replaced elsewhere. Policy CL 21 (A Sustainable Visitor Economy) supports the growth and enhancement of existing and new tourism, cultural and leisure developments, including sporting attractions. Policy CL11 (Health and Wellbeing) includes a requirement to provide high quality and accessible open spaces, sports and recreational facilities.

MANAGING WATER RESOURCES & FLOODING
7.52 Central Lincolnshire’s rivers and water resources are a valuable asset, supporting wildlife, recreation and tourism, as well as providing water for business, households and agriculture. Inland waterways are a multifunctional asset that can contribute to many Local Plan objectives, including important opportunities for regeneration, tourism, and sustainable transport. Water resources require careful management to conserve their quality and value, and to address drainage and flooding issues.

A Quality Environment 138

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

7.53 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) requires Local Plans to take account of the impacts of climate change over the longer term, including flood risk, water supply and water quality. Local Issues 7.54 Central Lincolnshire contains significant areas of low lying land for which a number of organisations are responsible for managing flood risk and drainage, including the Environment Agency (EA), LCC as Lead Local Flood Authority, Anglian Water and Severn Trent Water Companies, the Canal and River Trust and a number of Internal Drainage Boards (IDBs). Flood defences protect many of the existing built-up areas from river flooding to a currently acceptable standard, but it is anticipated that the threat of flooding will increase in the future as a result of climate change predictions. These include predicted sea level rise, more intense rainfall and increased river flows. These factors could also exacerbate surface water flooding which, despite accounting for the majority of incidents recorded during the 2007 floods, has not been given as much weight as river flooding in the past. 7.55 In Central Lincolnshire as in many parts of the country, settlements were often established and developed on rivers or other water bodies. Lincoln’s development has included land along the River Witham and its tributaries since at least Roman times; Gainsborough has developed alongside the River Trent, Sleaford on the River Slea and Market Rasen on the banks of the River Rase. Many existing homes, retail centres, businesses and related infrastructure are therefore located in close proximity to these watercourses at a relatively high level of risk from fluvial flooding. 7.56 Conversely, however, these settlements with their compact cores and transport hubs are also the most sustainable locations for future development in terms of accessibility, reducing carbon emissions from transport, and preventing urban sprawl in the surrounding countryside, while also having significant regeneration needs and areas of previously-developed land. A careful balance therefore needs to be struck between managing sustainable levels of growth in these areas against placing increasing numbers of people and property at risk of flooding and protecting existing communities that are at risk of flooding. 7.57 Central Lincolnshire also lies within the East of England area of serious water stress where drought is a cause for concern. The East Midlands and Anglian regions have recently experienced the driest spring for over a century which then gave way to the wettest April to June so far on record. 2 Such events are expected to increase over time with climate change as rainfall patterns become more unpredictable and summer temperatures increase. This is a major challenge in the context of Central Lincolnshire’s planned growth, and will require careful conservation and management of water resources to ensure that demand for water can be achieved in a sustainable manner. 7.58 Parts of Central Lincolnshire are currently constrained by the capacity of waste water infrastructure, and will require coordinated timing between development and infrastructure provision. The predominantly rural nature of the area means that
2

Centre for Hydrology and Ecology & the Met Office (Oct 2012) A Quality Environment 139

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

there are developments without mains drainage connection that will require careful design and management. 7.59 The River Trent as it skirts the edge of Central Lincolnshire and runs adjacent to the main town of Gainsborough, from Cromwell Weir to the River Humber, is tidal. As such, any proposals that affect or might affect the marine area should make reference to and be guided by the Marine Policy Statement or any subsequent replacement. The Marine Policy Statement provides a shared UK vision for clean, healthy, safe, productive and biologically diverse oceans and seas by ensuring a consistent approach to marine planning across UK waters. 7.60 The Core Strategy seeks to respond to these local issues by supporting the growth necessary to provide prosperous communities that are also sustainable, adequately serviced and safe, and which have the ability to adapt to climate change. It also seeks to support flood risk reduction, the efficient use of water, the suitable management of waste water and the protection or improvement of water quality. Evidence Base & Partnership Working 7.61 Strategic Flood Risk Assessments (SFRAs) have been prepared for Central Lincolnshire to support the planning process and provide a better understanding of the risks in the area. SFRAs have been produced for West Lindsey, North Kesteven and the wider Lincoln area, supplemented by additional flood risk information data from the EA, Lead Local Flood Authority and IDBs. Other plans that have informed the preparation of the Local Plan through partnership working include:     Catchment Flood Management Plans for the River Witham, River Trent and Grimsby and Ancholme; Anglian and Humber River Basin Management Plans; The emerging Local Flood Risk Management Strategy; Water Cycle Studies for Central Lincolnshire and the Gainsborough area.

7.62 Lincoln has been a particular focus when considering flood risk as the major settlement and main area for growth in Central Lincolnshire. It has a thriving city centre, including the retail core and University campus, together with areas of social deprivation and former industrial sites in need of regeneration, much of which is located in areas at risk of flooding. To assist in balancing the need for growth and regeneration with the need to avoid putting people and property at risk of flooding, a strategic level sequential assessment has been developed for the wider Lincoln area, in association with the EA, taking all available flood risk information into consideration. This includes a criteria-based proforma which seeks to identify sufficient reasonably available sites with a lower probability of flooding, assessed against the wider sustainability objectives. 7.63 Both the SFRA and sequential assessment have informed decisions on the proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) as strategic allocations in the Core Strategy, and will be used in the further allocation of sites as the Local Plan progresses.

A Quality Environment 140

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

7.64 It is essential that recently forged working relationships between all of the relevant organisations continue and are strengthened. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are individually and collectively working closely with the EA, IDBs, the Lead Local Flood Authority, water companies and many others. Lincolnshire County Council is establishing a Local Joint Flood Risk and Drainage Management Strategy which includes a means of recording and investigating all future reported flooding incidents. Existing and future close working arrangements with the County Council should ensure that any flooding patterns can be observed and if patterns do change over time they can be reflected in future monitoring and review of Core Strategy policies. Policy CL25 – Managing Water Resources & Flood Risk The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will seek to ensure that development proposals do not increase flood risk, will provide for the satisfactory treatment of foul water, will ensure the timely provision and efficient use of water resources and will demonstrate the protection, improvement and sustainable use of the water environment. This will be achieved by: Flood Risk Working in partnership with the appropriate agencies (the Environment Agency, Lincolnshire County Council as Lead Local Flood Authority, Internal Drainage Boards, Anglian Water, Severn Trent and the Canal and River Trust) and developers to ensure that flood risk and the impacts of climate change are considered as early on in the development process as possible and a satisfactory solution secured. Proposals should demonstrate : 1) That they are informed by and take account of the best available information from all sources of flood risk and by site specific flood risk assessments where appropriate; 2) That there is no unacceptable increased risk of flooding to the development site or to existing properties; 3) That the development will be safe during its lifetime, does not affect the integrity of existing flood defences and any necessary flood mitigation measures have been agreed with the relevant body; 4) That the adoption, ongoing maintenance and management of any mitigation measures have been considered and any necessary agreements are in place; 5) How proposals have taken a positive approach to reducing overall flood risk and have considered the potential to contribute towards solutions for the wider area; and

A Quality Environment 141

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

6) That they have incorporated Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) in to the proposals unless they can be shown to be impractical. Protecting the Water Environment Ensuring through development management that developers, through early discussions with relevant organisations and with regard to the relevant Water Cycle Studies, can confirm that adequate water resources and foul water treatment and disposal already exist or can be provided in time to serve the development without detriment to existing users and the water environment. Proposals should demonstrate: 1) That foul water treatment and disposal already exists or can be provided in time to serve the development; 2) That water is available to support the development proposed; 3) That development contributes positively to the water environment and its ecology where possible and does not adversely affect surface and ground water quality; 4) That development with the potential to pose a risk to groundwater resources is not located in sensitive locations to meet the requirements of the Water Framework Directive; 5) How efforts have been made to maximise the efficient use of water, including water storage and harvesting wherever practical; 6) How sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) to deliver improvements to water quality, the water environment and where possible to improve amenity and biodiversity have been incorporated into the proposals unless they can be shown to be impractical; 7) That relevant site investigations, risk assessments and necessary mitigation measures for source protection zones around boreholes, wells, springs and water courses have been agreed with the relevant bodies (e.g. the Environment Agency and relevant water companies); 8) That adequate provision is made to safeguard the future maintenance of water bodies to which surface water is discharged, preferably by an appropriate authority (e.g. Environment Agency, Internal Drainage Board, Water Company, the Canal and River Trust or local council); 9) That no new combined sewer overflows are created in areas served by combined sewers, and that foul and surface water flows are separated where possible; and 10) That suitable access is safeguarded for the maintenance of water resources, flood defences and drainage infrastructure.
A Quality Environment 142

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Explanation of Policy CL25 Policy CL25 sets out the Authorities’ approach and requirements on developers, covering: i) Flood Risk 7.65 In accordance with the NPPF and supporting technical guidance, the policy seeks to ensure that development does not place itself or others at increased risk of flooding. All development will be required to demonstrate that regard has been given to existing and future flood patterns from all sources and that the need for effective protection and flood risk management measures, where appropriate, have been considered as early on in the development process as possible. This will include the application of a sequential risk based approach to the location of development which seeks to direct development away from areas of greatest risk where suitable alternative sites exist (Sequential Test). 7.66 The NPPF acknowledges that it may not always be possible, consistent with wider sustainability objectives, for development to be located in areas with lower probability of flooding. In these circumstances development is required to demonstrate through an Exception Test that it would provide wider sustainability benefits to the community, that it would be safe for its lifetime and would not increase risk elsewhere. Further advice on the Sequential Test and Exception Test is contained in the Technical Guidance to the NPPF. ii) Drainage and SuDS 7.67 With the increased likelihood of more intense rainfall combined with further development in Central Lincolnshire, there will be an increase in the incidence of surface water runoff, placing greater pressure on existing drainage infrastructure. The discharge of surface water to combined sewer systems should be exceptional. This will ensure that capacity constraints of existing systems are not put under severe pressure by placing unnecessary demands on existing sewage works and sewage systems which in turn could compromise the requirements of the Water Framework Directive. The discharge of surface water to combined sewer systems can also contribute to surface water flooding elsewhere. In the past, flood risk and drainage issues have tended to receive inadequate consideration and often late in the development process. Policy CL25 seeks to encourage early discussion between developers and the development management teams at the relevant district planning authority, in liaison with the EA, IDBs, Lincolnshire County Council as Lead Local Flood Authority, the Canal and River Trust, Anglian Water and Severn Trent. This should ensure that if a flood risk and drainage solution is needed that requires land take, it is factored into the development process as early on as possible and that assumed solutions are tested and achievable. For example, it should be noted that the Canal and River Trust is not a land drainage authority and as such is not obliged to accept discharges from developments. 7.68 Under Schedule 3 of the Flood & Water Management Act 2010, a drainage system for any construction work with drainage implications must be approved

A Quality Environment 143

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

before construction work commences. The purpose of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) is to replicate, as closely as possible, the natural drainage from a site before development without transferring pollution to groundwater. The variety of SuDS techniques available means that virtually any new development should be able to deliver a drainage scheme based around these principles. SuDS seek to minimise the impacts from development on the quantity and quality of the runoff, and maximise amenity and biodiversity opportunities. SuDS techniques such as infiltration and retention, mimic runoff from a site in its natural state and enable rainwater to be managed close to its source. SuDS are predominantly features used for the controlled discharge and cleansing of surface water drainage, such as green roofs, swales and ponds. These features will generally be above ground and manage flows at source. Underground “end of pipe” features, such as tanks, are not considered to be sustainable drainage systems. Developers should ensure that good SuDS principles consistent with national standards are considered and incorporated into schemes as early on in the development process as possible. . iii) European Water Directive 7.69 Development can cause pollution to the water environment in a number of ways. These can include effluent from industrial sites and waste water from residential properties as well as pollution from the runoff from impermeable urban surfaces such as highways, sediment from land under construction and pollutants from contaminated land. The increased amount of waste water and sewage effluent produced by new development has to be managed to ensure that there is no deterioration in the quality of the water courses receiving this extra volume of treated effluent. This is a requirement of European Legislation in the form of the Water Framework Directive. Existing sewage systems’ limitations are reflected in locally prepared Water Cycle Studies which have identified existing infrastructure constraints across the Central Lincolnshire area. The delivery of development should coincide with the provision of infrastructure improvements provided by Anglian Water and Severn Trent without detriment to the environment. In recognition of this, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities are working closely with the water companies and the Environment Agency to ensure that infrastructure improvements are delivered in a timely manner and ensure that there is no threat to water quality and the environment. Policy CL25 will be delivered by:     The development management process (working with the EA, IDBs and LCC as Lead Local Flood Authority) Developer contributions on-site and by commuted sums through section 106 legal agreements and, possibly, through the Community Infrastructure Levy Master planning for Lincoln, Gainsborough, Sleaford - strategic development sites and Town/City Centres Regular updating of the Local Plan evidence base.

A Quality Environment 144

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

DESIGN QUALITY
7.70 Well designed buildings and places contribute to the achievement of sustainable development by:    Creating the physical and social conditions for sustainable economic growth Meeting the needs of present and future generations and supporting health, social and cultural wellbeing Positively contributing to the protection and enhancement of our natural, built and historic environment.

7.71 The Government places great emphasis on the achievement of high quality and inclusive design in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), which states: “Permission should be refused for development of poor design that fails to take opportunities available for improving the character and quality of an area and the way it functions” (Para. 64) 7.72 In Central Lincolnshire, the Authorities are keen to achieve high quality sustainable design that meets the diverse needs of the people who live, work and visit the area. An integrated approach to design 7.73 Policy CL26 sets out the Core Strategy’s overall approach and priorities for high quality, sustainable and inclusive design. This encompasses an extensive range of design considerations, some of which straddle the themes of the Core Strategy. Policy CL26 must therefore be read alongside other policies which relate to design, covering the following issues:            Efficient use of energy, water and other resources Adaptability and resilience to the effects of climate change, particularly flooding Connectivity and movement including promoting sustainable transport Inclusive design Safety and accessibility including reducing crime and fear of crime Health and wellbeing Architectural quality Respecting Central Lincolnshire’s rich and distinctive natural and built environment Respecting local character, diversity and distinctiveness Promoting a high quality public realm Density and the efficient use of land.

7.74 The Core Strategy’s integrated approach to design quality covers all aspects of the built environment, including the design of buildings, infrastructure, spaces and places. It applies to development at every scale from individual buildings to public

A Quality Environment 145

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

and private spaces and wider area development schemes such as the Sustainable Urban Extensions (Policy CL7). Recognising and enhancing Central Lincolnshire’s local character and distinctiveness 7.75 Central Lincolnshire is made up of countless locally distinctive places including high streets, market squares, industrial estates, urban neighbourhoods, rural villages and landscapes. A variety of built and natural forms and features contribute to the character of a place which will alter over time as new development and environmental changes occur. 7.76 Local distinctiveness can be clouded, lost or degraded if developments do not respond to, or are unsympathetic to, the context in which they occur, or if change to the environment is not appropriately managed. Development and places must be designed so that they positively respond to, but are not restricted by, existing local character. The Core Strategy promotes high quality design which will contribute to and enhance existing local character while encouraging architectural innovation and originality. As such, new development must be designed with consideration to local landscape and townscape character assessments. Sustainable Design and Construction 7.77 Reflecting the principles of sustainable development and low carbon living set out in Chapters 3 and 4 of the Core Strategy, it is vital that new buildings and places are also sustainable in terms of their use of energy, water, construction materials and land. Consideration should therefore be given to appropriate siting, orientation, landscaping and building design to ensure the appropriate and efficient use of energy, water, materials and land during the construction and use of new buildings and places. 7.78 One way in which development proposals could meet the principles and requirements of this policy is through a Code for Sustainable Homes, BREEAM New Construction or BREEAM Communities Assessment, or equivalent national assessment approved by the local planning authority should these be replaced. Both pre and post assessments should be undertaken and completed by a licensed assessor. Inclusive Design 7.79 One of the fundamental aims of sustainable development is social progress that recognises the needs of everyone. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are committed to working collaboratively with others to create inclusive and accessible environments that can be used safely, easily and with dignity by all people regardless of their age, gender, mobility, ethnicity or circumstances. WHAT IS INCLUSIVE DESIGN? Inclusive design:  Puts people at the heart of the design process
A Quality Environment 146

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

Responds to human diversity and difference Offers dignity, diversity and choice Provides flexibility in use.

The adoption of flexible design principles will enable people to:  Use developments safely, with dignity and confidence  Use developments without undue effort, stress, separation or special treatment  Make effective choices about how they use the development  Participate equally in the development’s activities  Be independent and in control of the experiences they are having in the development  Have enough space to ensure their comfort and convenience  Enjoy a healthy environment  Know where they are and find their way around Source: Access all areas: planning for an inclusive environment, Planning Advisory Service (2007) 7.80 The majority of development proposals will be required to demonstrate how the inclusive design principles have informed the overall design of the development. 7.81 Where appropriate, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will require development proposals to take account of relevant standards and guidance including Lifetime Homes and Lifetime Neighbourhoods. Policy CL26 - Design Quality All new development, including changes to existing buildings, shall achieve high quality sustainable design that meets a diverse range of needs and contributes positively to local character and distinctiveness. Where possible, the development will be expected to enhance the place in which it is proposed. To achieve this, development proposals must have taken into account the following matters: 1) How, from the outset, the design of the development has been based on a thorough understanding of local character, in particular how the development positively relates to and connects with the place in which it is proposed, taking account of scale, density, materials, appearance, landscape, layout and access, and other relevant matters; 2) How the development promotes the sustainable use of natural resources and contributes to a low carbon future, including how it mitigates and adapts to climate change. Specifically, this includes how it: i. minimises carbon emissions relating to its construction and use of energy, and promotes low carbon lifestyles by occupants and users;

A Quality Environment 147

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

ii. meets the specific requirements relating to renewable and low carbon energy set out in Policy CL3 (Renewable & Low Carbon Energy), including consideration of opportunities for Combined Heat and Power (CHP), district heating and other forms of renewable or low carbon energy; iii. reduces the demand for and use of water and other natural resources; and iv. is resilient to the impacts of climate change, including increased frequency and severity of heat waves, droughts and flooding; 3) How the development promotes healthy and active lifestyles by occupants and users in line with Policy CL11; 4) How the development as a whole, including buildings, transport infrastructure, and public and private spaces around buildings, is inclusive, flexible and adaptable to meet changing needs over time; 5) How the development as a whole, including buildings, transport infrastructure, and public and private spaces around buildings, are fit for purpose, safe, durable, efficient and attractive, including the use of innovative or original architectural approaches where appropriate; 6) How the development as a whole, including buildings, transport infrastructure and public and private spaces around buildings, will safeguard and, where possible, enhance residential and local amenity; 7) How the development meets the specific requirements relating to design set out in the following Core Strategy policies:  Policy CL10 (Transport)  Policy CL24 (Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity)  Policy CL25 (Managing Water Resources and Flood Risk)  In the case of a proposed Sustainable Urban Extension (SUE), the relevant policy for the site in the area chapters of the Core Strategy; 8) How the design takes account of relevant national and local guidance on design matters, including any supplementary planning documents or similar guidance. All new development proposals will be required to demonstrate the above principles have been addressed via a Statement of Design Quality.

Explanation of Policy CL26: 7.82 Policy CL26 sets out the Core Strategy’s overall approach and priorities for design. To demonstrate compliance with the criteria set out in this policy, applicants are required to submit a Statement of Design Quality for the proposed development

A Quality Environment 148

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

for assessment by the relevant district planning authority. Guidelines for meeting these requirements and the Statement of Design Quality are included in Appendix H of the Core Strategy. 7.83 To provide assessment and support to ensure high standards of design are achieved, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will use the design review services offered by Opun, the regional Design Review Panel, and, when appropriate, refer major projects for national design review by Design Council Cabe at the Design Council. Policy CL26 will be implemented by:      Delivery will be principally through the development management process. The Statements of Design Quality will be used to assess the approach taken to Design Quality in planning applications Submission of BREEAM/BREEAM Communities and Code for Sustainable Homes pre and post assessments undertaken by licensed assessors Collaborative design and masterplanning of places Design review through Opun and Cabe Preparation of further detailed guidance in Supplementary Planning Documents as appropriate.

A Quality Environment 149

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

8. THE LINCOLN AREA
8.1 Lincoln is a relatively compact but growing city located at the very centre of Central Lincolnshire. It is by far the largest settlement in Central Lincolnshire and is the main centre for population, employment and facilities, serving both its own residents and a large part of Lincolnshire and beyond. 8.2 The City itself with North Hykeham forms a central settlement of about 100,000 people, but is also the hub of a wider area that encompasses a ring of “satellite” villages such as Welton, Nettleham and Skellingthorpe. These settlements look to Lincoln for many of their services and employment needs. 8.3 This chapter focuses on planning for the Lincoln area, covering both the City itself and its relationship to the satellite villages and the adjoining countryside. Key to the area’s future will be delivering economic growth and planned development while protecting Lincoln’s character, including its unique setting and outstanding heritage assets.

WHAT IS THE LINCOLN AREA?
8.4 The Lincoln area has a number of different definitions depending on what is being considered. For example, Lincoln’s Travel to Work Area (TTWA) covers a wide area that extends into Nottinghamshire, while the City of Lincoln administrative boundary is drawn very tightly. However, as explained in Chapter 1 (see Paragraph 1.26), formal boundaries for the Lincoln area are not defined in this Core Strategy, as it is intended primarily as an inset of the main Key Diagram for which greater magnification is required to show the detail of proposals. In broad terms, it represents the area which is most significantly and directly affected by the proposed growth of Lincoln over the plan period, corresponding roughly to the Lincoln Policy Area as defined in the revoked Regional Plan. The area is represented indicatively by the Lincoln Area Inset of the Key Diagram. 8.5 For policy purposes, the Core Strategy carries forward the Lincoln Principal Urban Area (PUA) as set out in the revoked Regional Plan. This is defined as the existing built-up area of the administrative City of Lincoln plus the existing built-up areas of Bracebridge Heath, North Hykeham and Waddington parishes in North Kesteven, as shown in Appendix F (Main Urban Area Boundaries). 8.6 Most of the policies in this chapter are framed with reference to the Lincoln PUA boundary, such as the housing and employment land targets and the proposed network of District and Neighbourhood Centres. However, a number of policies have wider applicability that clearly extends beyond the PUA boundary and relates to the wider Lincoln area, for example the Green Wedges, landscape, tourism and transport issues. The Vision and Strategic Objectives for Lincoln are therefore defined with reference to the Lincoln area as a whole. This is done to achieve a wider view of planning for Lincoln as a functioning area with challenges that are best addressed by looking at the relationships between the city and the surrounding settlements within its sphere of influence.

The Lincoln Area 150

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

8.7 While this Core Strategy was being prepared, the formal revocation of the Regional Plan has taken place, as part of which the Lincoln Policy Area SubRegional Strategy has been revoked. This chapter and the policies in it are intended to provide an updated framework for the Lincoln area to replace that in the revoked Regional Plan.

THE LINCOLN AREA TODAY – CONTEXT & KEY CHALLENGES
THE LINCOLN AREA – A PORTRAIT Lincoln:  is a regional centre for services including employment, retail, leisure, culture, health and education    has a Travel To Work Area (TTWA) of 300,000 people which includes a large part of Lincolnshire and extends into Nottinghamshire has a unique setting where the River Witham cuts through the limestone escarpment of the Lincoln Edge has outstanding historic assets including the Cathedral and Castle, and internationally important archaeology including prehistoric and Roman remains is a major tourist destination and one of only 3 tourist icons in the East Midlands region has a thriving Further and Higher Education sector that is contributing greatly to the city’s economic revival and increasing diversity has large variations in income, health and educational attainment. 10,000 Lincoln residents live in areas considered ‘deprived’ (within the 10% most deprived in England), with one area in the south of Lincoln ranking as within the 1% most deprived in England has almost ¼ of children considered to be living in relative poverty, accounting for 4,500 children has started to recover economically from the dramatic decline in its traditional engineering base in the 1980s, but has an over-reliance on lowskill and low-wage service jobs has a high quality network of green space and natural habitats supporting a rich biodiversity and access to informal recreation is situated at the confluence of 5 national landscape character areas, reflecting the diversity of its local landscape and ecology

  

 

 

The Lincoln Area 151

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

has flood management measures that have so far prevented serious flooding, but are in need of improvement based on climate change predictions has an increasingly diverse population, based on the growing number of students and economic migration. In 2011/12, there were more than 10,000 undergraduate students and 1,000 postgraduate students studying at the University of Lincoln. In 2011/12, 910 migrant workers entered the City of Lincoln, 66% of whom came from EU Accession (largely central and eastern European) countries

Table 3 – Key Figures for the Lincoln area1 Size of area Population of Lincoln PUA (Census, 2011)    Total Population Population aged 65 and over Population at working age 119,200 16% 68% 202,176 59,530 34% (Economic Zone) 25% (Economic Zone) 47 2 13 49 2 32 436 51,273 26% 1391 38.8 sq. km

Population of Economic Zone (Census, 2011) Number of houses (Valuation Office, 2011) Main employment sectors:   Public administration, education and health Distribution, restaurants and hotels

Number of schools Number of SSSIs Conservation Areas Local Wildlife Sites Local Nature Reserves Scheduled Monuments Listed Buildings Number of households Non car-owning households (Census, 2011) Number of households in fuel poverty (LSOA, 2010)
1

All figures relate to the Lincoln PUA (as illustrated in Appendix F) unless otherwise stated The Lincoln Area 152

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

8.8 The Lincoln area faces key challenges over the next two decades. Overall, it has a clear need for renewal and growth to tackle a variety of social, economic and environmental needs while simultaneously conserving and enhancing its existing environmental quality and the unique setting and heritage of Lincoln. These are covered in more detail within the chapter, but can be summarised as follows: KEY CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES FACING THE LINCOLN AREA   Maintaining and strengthening Lincoln’s role as a Regional Attractor within Central Lincolnshire Delivering ambitious levels of growth and development, including the housing and employment targets for the Lincoln PUA, with appropriate supporting infrastructure Ensuring that access and movement in the Lincoln area are facilitated in a sustainable manner with appropriate investment in transport infrastructure and services as part of the growth of the PUA and Central Lincolnshire Enhancing the sustainability, health and wellbeing of all communities and neighbourhoods in the Lincoln area Boosting the local economy to realise Lincoln’s full potential as the main driver of economic growth in Central Lincolnshire, through tackling poor skills and employment diversity, increasing inward investment in key sectors and partnership working Realising and developing Lincoln’s particular potential as a lead area within Lincolnshire for low carbon technologies, biomass energy and energy saving through innovative design and development and effective partnerships for knowledge transfer, manufacture and delivery between the business, education and public sectors Regenerating areas of physical decay or vacancy and neighbourhoods with high levels of social deprivation and/or poor environments Protecting the ranking and primacy of Lincoln’s City Centre within the regional retail hierarchy through appropriate retail expansion as Central Lincolnshire grows, coupled with enhancement of its role as the main destination in Central Lincolnshire for services, culture, recreation, tourism and other facilities Growing and enhancing the visitor economy, and linking it with tourism in the surrounding countryside and other opportunities for green tourism in Lincolnshire such as waterways and food Conserving and enhancing Lincoln area’s unique natural and historic

 

 

The Lincoln Area 153

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

environment, character and assets in the context of growth, including the central landmark contribution of Lincoln Cathedral and its setting, and the wealth of biodiversity, landscape, townscape, open spaces and historic buildings that frame the area’s special character and quality of life

VISION & OBJECTIVES FOR THE LINCOLN AREA
8.9 A Vision and Strategic Objectives have been prepared to guide sustainable development in the Lincoln area over the plan period to 2031 as follows: VISION FOR LINCOLN IN 2031 Lincoln is a vibrant, creative and attractive city at the heart of Central Lincolnshire, and has realised its potential as a regional centre providing services, employment, housing, and other opportunities for its residents and the surrounding area. It is recognised as an outstanding place to live, work, learn, invest and visit and is internationally renowned for its successful economy, culture and special character. Lincoln is both the main hub and driver of Central Lincolnshire’s economy, and provides excellent job opportunities that cater for a range of skills. Augmenting its traditional base in engineering, services and tourism, growth has also occurred in other sectors including green technology, cultural industries and food. Lincoln is a leader in the low carbon economy and environmental innovation through the Low Carbon Lincolnshire partnership. Many more graduates now choose to stay and move into the area, and employment and educational attainment are now above the national average. Complementing urban regeneration, new communities have been successfully developed through sustainable urban extensions at Swanpool, Canwick Heath and Greetwell providing a range of housing in attractive, welldesigned neighbourhoods with local facilities and high quality public transport linkages to the City Centre. Green space within these developments is linked to Lincoln’s wider network of Green Wedges that continue to frame Lincoln’s overall shape and protect its unique character and rich biodiversity. Much of the built-up area is served by low carbon energy networks which utilise Lincolnshire’s extensive biomass resources and its expertise in renewable technologies. Concerns over flood risk in the Lincoln area have been successfully overcome and the Swanpool site is regarded nationally as an exemplar for flood-resilient design and development. The risk of flooding in Lincoln is well managed, taking account of more frequent severe weather events, and the City is more resilient to the impacts of flooding. Lincoln forms a sustainable transport hub for Central Lincolnshire, with improved rail links to London, Nottingham and other centres. The City has a popular park and ride system for commuters and shoppers that was delivered as part of a sustainable transport strategy alongside the Eastern

The Lincoln Area 154

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Bypass and improvements to public transport, cycling and walking networks. These measures have limited traffic levels in the Lincoln area to 2012 levels, while air quality has improved over the same period. Lincoln City Centre is a thriving and popular destination that offers an excellent range of attractions including shops, restaurants, leisure and cultural venues and a vibrant night-time economy. New shopping facilities at Lindongate and St. Mark’s have expanded Lincoln’s retail offer, while investment has tackled the city’s previous legacy of vacant land through a range of imaginative regeneration schemes. Based on its central Brayford Campus, the University of Lincoln continues to increase in popularity and reputation, and remains a key driver in the Central Lincolnshire economy with strong links to local businesses. Lincoln’s hilltop cathedral and historic core remain central to the city’s unique identity and were designated as a World Heritage Site in 2018. This has greatly raised Lincoln’s profile with visitors and investors, along with the showcasing of the Magna Carta via the Lincoln Castle Revealed project. Lincoln’s visitor economy is thriving and now attracts many overnight stays based on the range and quality of its attractions. The regeneration and growth of Lincoln has delivered major improvements in the health, wellbeing and safety of Lincoln’s communities since 2012, through expanded training and job opportunities, investment and improved co-ordination of services including health, social care, leisure, recreation and education. Lincoln’s neighbourhoods are now prosperous, safe and sustainable, and levels of deprivation and unemployment are well below the national average. The Lincoln area is a flagship for the growing success of Central Lincolnshire and Lincolnshire as a whole. 8.10 The following specific objectives for the Lincoln area are identified alongside the Strategic Objectives for Central Lincolnshire: Objective 1 Strengthen Lincoln’s role as a regional centre for jobs, services and growth, including the development of 18,800 new homes and 140ha of employment land and proportionate investment in infrastructure. Key Policies L1, L2, L3, L4, L5, L6, L7, L8, L9, L10 for Delivery Objective 2 Deliver Lincoln’s growth in a co-ordinated and sustainable way by:  prioritising the re-use of previously-developed land in the built-up area  focusing urban expansion in 3 masterplanned urban extensions at Swanpool, Canwick Heath and Greetwell that are successfully integrated with Lincoln and surrounding settlements  maintaining a network of Green Wedges that define the shape of

The Lincoln Area 155

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Lincoln and the surrounding villages, and protect Lincoln’s unique setting and character in the context of planned growth. Key Policies L1, L2, L3, L4, L5, L7, L8, L9, L10 for Delivery Objective 3 Promote a sustainable approach to access and travel in and around Lincoln that capitalises on the city’s wider role as a public transport hub and successfully tackles issues of accessibility, parking, traffic congestion, air pollution and environmental quality through appropriate planning and infrastructure provision including park and ride, improved public transport, cycling, walking and targeted highways improvements. Key Policies L1, L2, L5, L6 for Delivery Objective 4 Support the creation of a diverse, resilient and highly competitive local economy in the Lincoln area that acts as the main hub and driver of economic growth in Central Lincolnshire and delivers major increases in jobs and skills, with a particular emphasis on the following key sectors:  specialist engineering and manufacture, including low carbon technologies  retail  tourism and cultural industries  construction and energy saving  business and professional services L1, L2, L3, L4, L5

Key Policies for Delivery Objective 5

Support the regeneration and improvement of areas of physical and/or social need in the Lincoln area, including:  derelict, vacant or underused sites  inner urban neighbourhoods with aging housing or poor quality environments, including those in Park and Abbey wards  other areas with high levels of social deprivation, including Boultham and Moorland wards and the St. Giles estate.

Key Policies L1,L2, L3, L4, L5, L6, L7 for Delivery Objective 6 Enhance and grow Lincoln’s City Centre to meet the evolving needs of residents and visitors as Central Lincolnshire grows, including expansion of its retail offer through appropriate new shopping floorspace that retains the compactness and walkability of the shopping core and boosts Lincoln’s retail competitiveness. Key Policies L1, L2, L3, L4, L5, L6 for Delivery

The Lincoln Area 156

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Objective 7

Maintain and enhance a network of attractive, thriving and sustainable District and Neighbourhood Centres to provide for local shopping and services needs within the Lincoln PUA in a manner that complements but does not compete with the City Centre. Key Policies L1, L6, L8, L9, L10 for Delivery Objective 8 Protect and enhance Lincoln’s unique setting, built heritage and biodiversity by ensuring that growth and development respect these assets and contribute to environmental quality, character and diversity. Key Policies L1, L2, L7, L8, L9, L10 for Delivery

LINCOLN AREA STRATEGY FOR GROWTH
8.11 The Spatial Strategy for Growth in Central Lincolnshire identifies the Lincoln PUA as the principal focus for development, with 44% of Central Lincolnshire’s total planned new housing provision and 67% of its employment land for the plan period located in and adjoining the Lincoln PUA. This reflects the Core Strategy’s focus on the main urban areas generally, as set out in Chapter 5, as well as the specific opportunities that the Lincoln area offers for sustainable development, based on its existing role as a Regional Attractor and main public transport hub for Lincolnshire. Lincoln also has significant regeneration needs, including a legacy of vacant and underused land and buildings and neighbourhoods with significant problems of multiple deprivation that require intervention. 8.12 The Strategy for the Lincoln Area seeks to realise this potential for sustainable development to improve the Lincoln area itself in terms of economic, environmental and social conditions, as well as consolidating and enhancing Lincoln’s wider role within Central Lincolnshire (and Lincolnshire generally) as a sustainable hub for jobs, services and facilities. Lincoln’s growth has the potential to benefit all of Central Lincolnshire as the main driver for sustainable economic growth and development. 8.13 he Strategy therefore seeks to strengthen Lincoln’s role as a Regional Attractor, based on the settlement roles identified in Chapter 5 and Policy CL4. In achieving this, various aspects of growth need to be carefully planned to ensure that the benefits are delivered in a sustainable way that maintains and enhances the Lincoln area’s environment and quality of life. These include:   Infrastructure – ensuring that appropriate infrastructure is identified and delivered to support growth Transport – ensuring that access and movement are addressed in a sustainable way alongside growth, with appropriate investment in transport infrastructure and other measures to avoid traffic congestion and cut carbon emissions

The Lincoln Area 157

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

KEY DIAGRAM – LINCOLN AREA

The Lincoln Area 158

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The Lincoln Area 159

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Communities – ensuring that the neighbourhoods and communities of the Lincoln area share in the benefits of growth through appropriate opportunities and environmental improvements, and that the adverse impacts of developments are carefully managed and mitigated Economy – ensuring that inward investment benefits the residents of Central Lincolnshire, and supports the overall strategy of sustainable development Regeneration – ensuring that growth gives priority to areas in need of regeneration socially and/or physically City Centre and Retail – ensuring that Lincoln City Centre evolves and expands to meet the needs of the increasing population while maintaining and enhancing its quality and character Quality of Environment – ensuring that the special quality, character and heritage of Lincoln and its setting are conserved as the Lincoln area grows and changes. In particular, the dominance of Lincoln Cathedral in the city’s townscape and in views approaching the city should be retained, and the importance of the Lincoln Edge and Lincoln Gap as the landscape setting for Lincoln respected. Green Infrastructure – maintaining and enhancing a network of green infrastructure as part of planned growth.

  

8.14 Policy L1 below sets out this integrated approach to sustainability as a headline policy for the Lincoln area, embodying the Vision and Strategic Objectives. Policies in the rest of the chapter flow from it to provide more detail on particular aspects, as follows:        L2 – Locational Priorities for Development in the Lincoln Area L3 – Green Wedges and Green Infrastructure in the Lincoln Area L4 - Employment Priorities in the Lincoln Area L5 – Regenerating Lincoln L6 – Lincoln City Centre L7 – District & Neighbourhood Centres in the Lincoln Area L8, L9 & L10 – detailed policies for the 3 proposed SUEs for Lincoln.

8.15 It is noted that these policies focus on issues for which a specific approach is felt to be needed for the Lincoln area. The Lincoln area is, however, also subject to the generic policies in the Core Strategy as set out in Chapters 3 – 7, including those covering issues of major significance to it, such as low carbon living, infrastructure, affordable housing and design quality.

Policy L1 – Strategy for Growth in the Lincoln Area The growth and regeneration of Lincoln will be delivered through a coordinated and sustainable approach to planning and development based on
The Lincoln Area 160

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

the area’s Vision and Strategic Objectives. This approach integrates housing, economic, regeneration, transport, infrastructure and environmental policy to achieve major housing and economic growth linked to infrastructure improvements, whilst protecting and enhancing Lincoln’s environmental quality, heritage assets and unique character. To achieve this, the Local Plan and any development proposals should: 1. Support the strengthening of Lincoln’s role as a Regional Attractor (ie. as a regional centre for retail, employment, culture, leisure, tourism, education and other services), through significant growth, regeneration activity, and improvements to its infrastructure and the range and quality of facilities it provides for residents and visitors; 2. Support Lincoln as the main focus for new development in Central Lincolnshire in the period 2011 - 2031, including delivery of approximately 18,800 dwellings (44% of Central Lincolnshire’s new housing provision) and 140 ha of employment land within or adjacent to the Lincoln Principal Urban Area (PUA), as set out in Policy CL4; 3. Locate development relating to the Lincoln area in a strategic and sustainable manner as set out in Policy L2; 4. Promote sustainable, high quality access and movement in the Lincoln area through appropriate measures that address accessibility, traffic congestion, parking, carbon emissions, environmental quality and air pollution, including investment to achieve modal shift to public transport, cycling and walking along with necessary highways improvements; 5. Support the creation of a diverse, resilient and highly competitive local economy in Lincoln that is the main hub and driver of economic growth in Central Lincolnshire and delivers major increases in jobs and skills levels; 6. Regenerate the Lincoln area physically, socially and economically; 7. Promote the enhancement and growth of Lincoln City Centre to meet the needs of residents and visitors as Central Lincolnshire grows, as detailed in Policy L5; 8. Maintain and enhance a network of thriving District and Neighbourhood Centres to support sustainable communities in the Lincoln PUA, as detailed in Policy L6; 9. Review the individual and collective roles of Lincoln’s satellite settlements, (including those within the Principal Urban Area) to define their appropriate levels and types of growth, as part of the preparation of the proposed Allocations Document, having regard to local aspirations and any Neighbourhood Plans for those settlements; 10. Protect, nurture and enhance Lincoln’s natural and historic environment and assets as a key component of the strategy for growth by:
The Lincoln Area 161

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

i)

Respecting Lincoln’s unique character and setting, including its landscapes, townscapes, biodiversity, geodiversity, views and corridors that contribute to these; Protecting the dominance and approach views of Lincoln Cathedral on the skyline; Maintaining a strategic network of green infrastructure including protected Green Wedges for the Lincoln area, as set out in Policy L3; and Conserving and promoting Lincoln’s natural and built heritage as key elements of Lincoln’s quality of life and local distinctiveness, and for their benefits for the economy, regeneration and tourism.

ii) iii)

iv)

Policy L1 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and co-ordinate strategies affecting the Lincoln area, including housing, economic development, regeneration, transport and infrastructure Pursuing investment opportunities and funding to regenerate and grow Lincoln Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities Further policy development in the Local Plan, including the proposed Allocations Document.

  

LOCATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR ALLOCATING AND RELEASING SITES FOR DEVELOPMENT
8.16 To deliver the development targets for the Lincoln PUA identified in Policy CL4, the Core Strategy has two main locational priorities for development as follows: 1) re-using suitable previously-developed sites (‘brownfield’ land) within the existing built-up area of the PUA; and 2) focusing urban expansion in large-scale sustainable urban extensions (SUEs) that can be masterplanned with appropriate infrastructure and a range of facilities and to integrate with Lincoln and adjoining settlements. 8.17 It is intended that these two components will meet the bulk of the development targets for the Lincoln PUA for the period 2011 – 2031, and will provide sufficient sites for new housing and employment development on an ongoing basis throughout the plan period, as set out in the Housing Trajectory for Central Lincolnshire (see Chapter 5 and Appendix G). 8.18 Specifically, the Core Strategy identifies and allocates 3 SUEs for the Lincoln area, all of which adjoin the Lincoln PUA boundary, as follows:

The Lincoln Area 162

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

1) Lincoln Western Growth Corridor (Swanpool); 2) Lincoln South East Quadrant (Canwick Heath); 3) Lincoln North East Quadrant (Greetwell area). 8.19 Each of the three proposed SUEs is covered by an individual policy in the Core Strategy (see this chapter) that deals with the specific matters relating to its planning and delivery in more detail. In the case of Western Growth Corridor and South East Quadrant, development is expected to continue beyond the current plan period, as set out in the individual policies. How were these priorities decided? 8.20 The locational priorities for the Lincoln area carry forward those set out in the revoked Regional Plan 2009 within the Lincoln Policy Area Sub-Regional Strategy, but have undergone detailed review and testing as part of Core Strategy preparation to assess whether they remain the best approach to growth. In particular, the Sustainable Futures Study has investigated potential development locations across the Lincoln area, with supporting information on sites from the Central Lincolnshire SHLAA and Employment Land Availability Study. Successive engagement with stakeholders has also been undertaken as the Core Strategy has moved from options about the form and direction of growth for Lincoln (see Issues & Options Report) through to specific SUE proposals. 8.21 The emphasis on previously-developed land as a priority is consistent with the NPPF Core Planning Principles and has key benefits for Lincoln and Central Lincolnshire, including:       Directing resources and investment to the existing urban area to maintain and strengthen its role as the hub of the Lincoln area Regenerating areas and sites that are derelict, vacant or underused, especially in central Lincoln Supporting the prosperity, vitality and diversity of the City Centre as a location for living, working, shopping, etc Reducing development pressure on greenfield land in the urban area and the surrounding countryside Making use of Lincoln’s existing infrastructure and reducing the need to duplicate this in more peripheral locations Utilising locations that have good access to Lincoln’s existing facilities, including its public transport hub, cycling and walking routes, thereby reducing journey lengths and reliance on the private car.

8.22 The evidence base, including housing monitoring data, indicates that significant capacity exists on previously-developed sites in the Lincoln PUA, and that new sources of previously-developed land are likely to continue to come forward through the lifetime of the plan. However, previously-developed land within the PUA is not sufficient on its own to meet the scale of growth proposed for the Lincoln area, so other sources will be required.
The Lincoln Area 163

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

8.23 Having assessed all reasonable options for the form and direction of growth, the three SUEs were selected as the most sustainable approach for Lincoln. Other options considered individually and in combination were: incremental piecemeal growth adjoining or near the PUA; major expansion of Lincoln’s satellite villages; and one or more freestanding new settlements at some distance from Lincoln. None of these approaches matches the SUEs for overall sustainability. 8.24 In terms of specific locations, the three SUEs represent the most sustainable package for the Lincoln area based on their performance individually and collectively for sustainability and deliverability. Key considerations when assessing potential development locations included2:          Overall contribution to the wider Vision and Strategic Objectives for the Lincoln area Relationship to infrastructure and its delivery Proximity to Lincoln and its facilities to reduce new infrastructure requirements and minimise journey lengths and car reliance Potential to integrate physically and functionally with the existing built-up area, including impacts on existing centres, neighbourhoods and other settlements Potential contribution to low carbon living, including renewable or low carbon energy schemes Social and economic benefits and opportunities Environmental impacts and ease of mitigation, including landscape, biodiversity, built heritage and natural resources Flood risk and drainage issues Deliverability and availability in relation to the plan period and key pieces of Lincoln’s infrastructure, including the Lincoln Eastern Bypass.

Infrastructure to support growth 8.25 The growth of Lincoln will inevitably place greater demands on the area’s infrastructure, including transport, education, health, water, sewage treatment, energy networks and so on. It is important that new development is supported by new infrastructure and contributes to its delivery. 8.26 Two key pieces of infrastructure have been identified in the Strategy for Growth, as follows:  Lincoln Eastern Bypass  Upgrading Lincoln’s flood defences. 8.27 The SUEs in particular will need to be co-ordinated and phased to these key infrastructure items. Further details are covered in the individual SUE policies. Site allocation and the release of land in the Lincoln area 8.28 Apart from the three SUEs, the Core Strategy does not allocate individual sites either within or outside the Lincoln PUA boundary. Such allocation will be
2

For further details, see Sustainable Futures (AECOM, 2012) The Lincoln Area 164

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

considered through the preparation of the proposed Allocations Document, and sites identified on a revised Policies Map if appropriate. 8.29 As discussed in Chapter 5 (Growing Central Lincolnshire), the Allocations Document will include consideration of the role and level of growth for settlements within the Rural Area, including those settlements that are within the wider Lincoln area but outside the PUA boundary, such as Saxilby, Nettleham, Welton, Skellingthorpe, Washingborough and Navenby. Such satellite settlements may have the potential for further growth in a supporting role to Lincoln where this can be achieved sustainably and is consistent with the aspirations of residents and stakeholders to be established through engagement. 8.30 It is stressed that this staged approach to site allocation within the Local Plan should not preclude development other than the SUEs coming forward ahead of the adoption of the Allocations Document. Such development proposals will be assessed against the Core Strategy policies, particularly Policy CL5, and any relevant saved policies. Clearly, it is intended and hoped that development on previously-developed sites and in the rest of the Lincoln area continues under the Core Strategy where it can demonstrate that it is sustainable and consistent with the NPPF and the development plan. Policy L2 – Locational Priorities for Development in the Lincoln Area In meeting the targets for housing and employment growth in the Lincoln area and to regenerate Lincoln, development will be focused simultaneously on previously-developed sites within the Lincoln Principal Urban Area (PUA) and in Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) that are carefully integrated with Lincoln and other adjoining settlements and supported by necessary facilities and infrastructure provision. Priorities for the allocation and/or release of land for development in the Lincoln area for the period 2011 – 2031 will be as follows:  Making best use of suitable previously-developed land and buildings within the Lincoln PUA for housing and other uses, with first priority given to sites in Central Lincoln, followed by those in the rest of the PUA; Bringing forward, on a planned basis, three strategic Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) as follows:  Western Growth Corridor (Land at Swanpool, Fen Farm and Decoy Farm, as allocated on the Policies Map) – up to approximately 2,700 dwellings and 40 ha of employment land within the plan period, plus related uses, community facilities and infrastructure, as detailed in Policy L8;  South East Quadrant (Land at Canwick Heath and Bracebridge Heath, as allocated on the Policies Map) - approximately 2,200 dwellings and 19 ha of employment within the plan period, plus related uses,

The Lincoln Area 165

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

community facilities and infrastructure, as detailed in Policy L9; and  North East Quadrant (Land at Greetwell including the former Greetwell Quarry, as allocated on the Policies Map) –approximately 1,400 dwellings and 6 ha of employment land, plus related uses, community facilities and infrastructure, as detailed in Policy L10; and  Other sustainable housing sites within or adjoining the Lincoln PUA identified in the proposed Allocations Document, to provide the balance of housing if required to meet the Core Strategy’s housing target for the Lincoln area.

Policy L2 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward previously-developed sites for re-use or redevelopment as part of the regeneration of Lincoln  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other and with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward the 3 proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions and necessary supporting infrastructure  Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities  Further policy development, including site allocations, in the Local Plan.

CONSERVING LINCOLN’S CHARACTER & HERITAGE
8.31 The level of growth planned for Lincoln presents a major challenge for the conservation of the natural and historic environment of the city and surrounding villages, requiring major change and development to be accommodated while maintaining and enhancing the contribution of these assets to Lincoln’s quality of life and character. Shaping Lincoln’s Growth – Green Wedges and other Green Infrastructure 8.32 Lincoln’s special character arises in large part from its unique setting around the Lincoln Gap, where the River Witham cuts east through the Jurassic limestone ridge from the Trent lowlands to the Fens. The City’s historic core is focused on the north side of the Gap where Lincoln Cathedral forms a dominant landmark that can be seen from all parts of the city and surrounding areas. The flanking limestone escarpment of the Lincoln Edge north and south of the Gap also contributes to Lincoln’s highly distinctive topography, having remained largely undeveloped, while the river valleys of the Witham and its tributaries penetrate the built-up area as green corridors that also help to define the shape of the city and link it to the surrounding countryside. Except on the south-east, where the suburban growth of North Hykeham extends for several miles, Lincoln retains the feel of a relatively small city surrounded by countryside. Currently, there is clear separation between Lincoln and its satellite villages which retain their character as individual settlements. 8.33 Earlier planning frameworks recognised the need to protect the setting and character of Lincoln and the surrounding villages by defining a network of Green

The Lincoln Area 166

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Wedges. These were first identified in their current form in the City of Lincoln Local Plan 1998, and subsequently extended through joint working into the adjoining areas of North Kesteven and West Lindsey via the Lincolnshire Structure Plan (2006, now abolished) and the respective local plans for these areas. All existing Green Wedges defined in the Lincoln area are covered by saved policies in these 3 local plans, and have boundaries defined on the Local Plan Policies Map. The revoked Regional Plan 2009 confirmed the importance of the Green Wedges for Lincoln’s urban fringe and required their designation in new Local Plans. 8.34 The Core Strategy carries forward the existing Green Wedges as a key planning tool for shaping the growth and expansion of Lincoln and its relationship to the surrounding countryside and settlements. In particular, Green Wedges have a number of roles as follows:        Protecting structurally important areas of open land to shape the form and direction of Lincoln’s development, including prevention of coalescence between Lincoln and adjoining settlements Protecting the historic landscape setting and character of Lincoln from inappropriate development Conserving areas of importance for nature conservation and heritage assets Protecting long views into and out of Lincoln, including those of Lincoln Cathedral Providing recreational open space as part of a wider network of Green Infrastructure Providing an accessible attractive network for cycling, walking and horseriding Providing wildlife habitats and corridors.

8.35 The current Green Wedge network is shown indicatively on the Key Diagram for the Lincoln area, and will form the basis of the network over the plan period. However, a review of Green Wedges is proposed as part of the future development of the Local Plan. This will identify opportunities to consolidate, extend or enhance the network, and will make any revised or new boundary designations for Green Wedges as appropriate. Other Green Infrastructure in the Lincoln area 8.36 Green Wedges are one element of a wider network of multi-functional open space or Green Infrastructure (GI) serving the Lincoln area. Policy CL24 covers the overall aims and policy approach to GI across Central Lincolnshire. Policy L3 below augments this with the specific issues and requirements relating to the Lincoln area. 8.37 The GI network for the Lincoln area is underpinned by the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study (Chris Blandford Associates, 2011). This sets out a Green Infrastructure Concept Plan for the Lincoln Area, the main components of which are:

The Lincoln Area 167

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The Lincoln Area 168

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

   

Strategic Green Corridors (see Policy CL24) Strategic Green Access Links (see Policy CL24) Lincoln Urban Green Grid Local Green Links.

8.38 The Authorities will work in partnership with others to deliver this network and other appropriate GI as part of the Strategy for Growth in the Lincoln Area. Lincoln’s Natural and Built Heritage 8.39 Alongside its green infrastructure, the Lincoln area has a particularly rich and diverse natural and built environment, including:  a varied landscape at the meeting point of 5 National Character Areas (Trent & Belvoir Vales; Northern Lincolnshire Edge with Coversands; Southern Lincolnshire Edge; Central Lincolnshire Vale; and Lincolnshire Fens); a rich and varied biodiversity reflecting the range of geological and ecological conditions that form one of Central Lincolnshire’s biodiversity ‘hotspots’; a rich townscape with a large number of listed buildings and Conservation Areas; archaeology of international significance.

  

8.40 It is crucial that this heritage is conserved as part of the Strategy for Growth in the Lincoln Area, and that development helps to protect and enhance these environmental assets in terms of accessibility, setting and ongoing. 8.41 Development in the Lincoln area will therefore be carefully assessed against relevant Core Strategy policies, particularly CL23 (A Quality Environment), CL24 (Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity) and CL26 (Design Quality), alongside Policy L3 below. Policy L3 – Green Wedges and Green Infrastructure in the Lincoln Area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with partners and stakeholders to protect, enhance and deliver an integrated green infrastructure network for the Lincoln area. In addition to meeting the general principles for green infrastructure and biodiversity in Policy CL24, this network will meet the specific requirements for the Lincoln area, and will be achieved through development management, investment and appropriate management of land. In relation to growth and development in the Lincoln area, the Local Plan will: 1) Protect and enhance the existing network of green spaces, including Green Wedges and wildlife sites, as defined and designated in the saved policies and Policies Maps of the Local Plans for the City of Lincoln, North Kesteven and West Lindsey, together with any future revisions to the
The Lincoln Area 169

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

network; 2) Undertake a review of the existing Green Wedge network as part of the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan to consolidate, enhance and, where appropriate, extend the network, including revised or additional designation of land if required, taking account of: i. The opportunities identified in the Green Infrastructure Study for Central Lincolnshire; ii. the proposed locational priorities for development in the Lincoln area, including the Sustainable Urban Extensions, as set out in Policy L2; iii. the other requirements and objectives set out in this policy; 3) Maintain, enhance and develop a comprehensive local Green Infrastructure Network based on the Green Infrastructure Network Concept Plan for the Lincoln area, by: i. The provision of Strategic Green Access Links within a landscaped setting to connect communities and businesses with local leisure opportunities/destinations, green spaces and public transport services; ii. The protection, enhancement and creation of Local Green Links to connect the Lincoln Urban Green Grid to the Strategic Green Access Links, greenspace and habitats in the countryside around the city, including the Witham Valley, and also to the surrounding satellite villages; 4) Support the delivery of the Witham Valley Country Park through the creation of a substantial, accessible network of managed outdoor spaces for the benefits of residents and visitors; 5) Protect the Lincoln Edge escarpment and its natural character from inappropriate development; 6) Protect and enhance the environmental quality of landscapes that contribute to the character and setting of Lincoln and its setting, including the key access corridors, Green Wedges and woodlands; 7) Retain existing important natural green spaces, including woodland, and provide significant levels of habitat re-creation to form stepping stones to link existing wildlife habitats; 8) Provide extensive levels of new accessible natural green space to meet the needs of the expanding population for outdoor recreational space, and to act as ecological buffer zones to protect sensitive wildlife habitats; 9) Protect, enhance and promote managed access to archaeological sites,
The Lincoln Area 170

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

historic landscapes and other historic and environmental assets as part of the Green Infrastructure Network; 10) Promote the use of green roofs and walls to provide wildlife linkages between green spaces. Development in the Lincoln area will be required to be in accordance with these principles and requirements.

Explanation of Policy L3: 8.42 All existing Green Wedges and related designations for the natural environment and biodiversity in the saved policies of the 3 district Local Plans are confirmed within the Core Strategy for planning and development management purposes until such time as they are reviewed and updated within the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan. This network will be protected as part of the Strategy for Growth in the Lincoln Area, and planning permission not normally granted for development on land covered by these designations except when it complies with the relevant saved policy and is consistent with the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan. Exceptionally, where development within a Green Wedge or a related open space designation is proposed as part of a SUE or other site that is allocated in the Local Plan, this may be considered acceptable provided it forms part of a coherent masterplan for the development as a whole and that compensating strategic open space is satisfactorily demonstrated and delivered as part of the proposal. Policy L3 will be implemented by:       The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and implement strategies and proposals for green infrastructure in the Lincoln area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners pursuing investment and funding for the provision and management of green infrastructure Promoting green infrastructure objectives in other strategies and programmes, and developing linkages between green infrastructure and other strategies Promoting green infrastructure objectives in the land management practices of the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, partners, stakeholders, communities and individuals Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, including appropriate masterplanning processes Further policy development in the Local Plan, including site allocation and designation

LINCOLN’S ECONOMY
8.43 As a Regional Centre, Lincoln is of crucial importance to Central Lincolnshire’s economic growth and prosperity. In line with the Economic Growth Strategy objectives, economic resilience in the Lincoln area will be achieved by:

The Lincoln Area 171

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

   

diversifying the employment offer encouraging inward investment ensuring the availability of a skilled labour force, and providing sufficient high quality employment land. Key sectors identified for growth in the Lincoln area include:

8.44     

specialist engineering and manufacture, including low carbon technologies retail tourism and cultural industries construction and energy saving business and professional services

8.45 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are addressing skills levels in Lincoln through a number of initiatives including neighbourhood access centres, a redundancy support scheme and an Education Business Partnership. The provision of new schools is also being sought through the Infrastructure Delivery Plan. Along with the proposed expansion of the University of Lincoln and the strengthening of the relationship between the University and the business sector, these measures will help to improve educational attainment and graduate retention. 8.46 The provision of suitable development opportunities for the growth sectors for the Lincoln area is evidenced in the Central Lincolnshire Employment Land Review, and underpins the figures set out below in Policy L4. 8.47 Issues cited by companies looking to relocate in Lincoln include access and parking problems and the lack of freehold office and industrial premises with space to grow. To address these issues, a package of transport measures is proposed for the Lincoln area including new infrastructure, improved public transport, walking and cycling connectivity, and a parking strategy. As part of the economic strategy for Lincoln, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities therefore support the identification and funding of appropriate transport infrastructure, as well as providing a choice of employment sites in locations that meet the needs of the existing and future businesses. 8.48 A significant number of economic opportunities exist across the Lincoln area including:      Intervention sites identified in the City Centre Masterplan The Sustainable Urban Extensions Sites along the A46 corridor to the west of Lincoln, such as Teal Park / LN6 and a high quality business park at the Western Growth Corridor The Brayford Enterprise Park including the University Science Park Regeneration sites identified in Policies L5 and L6.

8.49 The City Centre is an important location for a range of employment opportunities including retail, offices, services, cultural industries and the public sector, including local authorities and the police. Currently, these public services are heavily focused in Lincoln’s Civic Quarter but may decide to reconsider their

The Lincoln Area 172

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

locations in future years to tie in with wider provision. If so, this area with its secondary routes to the historic core of uphill Lincoln could offer huge potential for economic regeneration. 8.50 The proposed SUEs will be masterplanned to ensure new residential development is supported by employment that can be easily accessed by all modes, and take advantage of new transport infrastructure such as the Lincoln Eastern Bypass, in line with policies L8 to L10. 8.51 The LN6 area, centred on Hykeham, offers major opportunities for employment growth based on its proximity to the A46 and available sites. The area has received support for its Neighbourhood Plan from the DfT’s Local Sustainable Transport Fund. Policy L4 – Employment Priorities in the Lincoln Area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with their partners and other stakeholders to strengthen, broaden and grow the economy of the Lincoln area in line with the status of the Lincoln Principal Urban Area (PUA) as a Regional Attractor within Central Lincolnshire. In pursuit of this, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will help to improve conditions for investment through: identifying infrastructure needs and funding for their provision; the allocation of employment sites in the Local Plan in line with policies CL7, CL23, CL26, L5 and L6; improving quality of place; supporting the delivery of the City Centre Masterplan; and initiatives to improve training and education. The Local Plan will support the following sectors as clusters that offer a strong basis for growth:        specialist engineering and manufacture, technologies retail tourism and cultural industries construction and energy saving business and professional services health knowledge economy including low carbon

To attract inward investment and the expansion of existing businesses, a wide choice of sites and accommodation types will be required. In particular, the following will be encouraged in the Lincoln PUA:    Small industrial workshops (0-200 sq.m) particularly in the north and south of the City Grow-on industrial space (200-500 sq.m units) Serviced offices (50-200 sq.m) at both city centre and business park locations
The Lincoln Area 173

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

Offices – (100-500 sq.m) suites in city centre Offices – (1500-3000 sq.m) units– both City Centre and business park locations Incubator units/managed workspace.

In accordance with Policy CL4, approximately 140 ha of land will be allocated in the Local Plan for employment use within and immediately adjoining the Lincoln PUA to meet the employment needs of both the existing and future population including the following allocations at the Sustainable Urban Extensions:    Western Growth Corridor – 40 ha South East Quadrant – 19 ha North East Quadrant – 6 ha

Other priority locations to cater for economic growth, within which development will be positively encouraged include, but are not limited to:    Employment sites delivered through the City Centre Masterplan LN6/Teal Park Brayford Enterprise Park including the University Science Park

The allocation of specific sites will be made through further Local Plan work involving a criteria-based assessment of both existing and potential new allocations to provide a portfolio of high quality sites that are accessible, flexible to the needs of modern industry, deliverable and meet the needs of Central Lincolnshire’s population as it grows. The take-up of employment land will be monitored and allocations reviewed both to ensure deliverability of sites and that the needs of the labour force are being met. The priority sectors and premises for growth will also be reviewed and updated as necessary in line with the Central Lincolnshire Economic Strategy. Policy L4 will be implemented by:        The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other and with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward the 3 proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions and necessary supporting infrastructure Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities Further policy development in the Local Plan, including site allocations Implementation of the Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy and work with key stakeholders including Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership to bring forward new economic development City Centre Management initiatives such as the Business Improvement District. Alignment between the Local Plan and relevant strategies and initiatives affecting the City Centre, including the Local Transport Plan Regeneration of Lincoln (see Policy L5)
The Lincoln Area 174

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

REGENERATING LINCOLN
8.52 In recent years, the Lincoln area has seen major successes in tackling physical, social and economic needs left as a legacy of the decline of Lincoln’s employment base in heavy engineering and industry from the 1980s. The development of Lincoln University from the mid 1990s has contributed strongly to the city’s revival, bringing new investment and cultural diversity, and regenerating areas to the west of the City Centre along the Brayford Waterfront. In addition, there have been major new cultural developments in the Danesgate area, and neighbourhood management initiatives that seek to improve areas in the City where deprivation is an issue. 8.53 Continuing to build on these successes is a key challenge, and will be achieved by improvements and investment in the remaining legacy areas and communities with regeneration needs. The City of Lincoln Local Plan (1998) strategy for urban regeneration focused on a central crossroads: one axis running east/west, the other north/south, with a crossing in the heart of the city. Whilst this is still relevant, regeneration needs extend much further across the city including inner urban areas and peripheral housing areas. 8.54 Area regeneration will relate largely to ensuring that the housing, economic and social needs of future and existing residents can be met through new development while protecting or enhancing Lincoln’s environmental quality and assets. Neighbourhoods with high levels of social deprivation will be prioritised, which currently include those covered by Lincoln City Council’s Neighbourhood Management initiatives. Neighbourhood Management teams work with some of the most disadvantaged communities across the city on a wide variety of community development projects. These are currently overseen by a Neighbourhood Board (or Partnership); there are currently 5 such Boards operating in the city with early focus being in areas such as St. Giles and Moorland. 8.55 Other inner urban neighbourhoods with aging housing or poor quality environments include those in Park and Abbey wards. Several schemes will encourage regeneration, including the new East-West Link road, Lincoln North East Quadrant SUE, Lindongate, and a recent planning permission for 150 new apartments on Newark Road. The East-West Link will, for example, improve the level of access to underused and derelict sites along its route and allow new commercial and residential development and public spaces to be created. In addition, areas of traffic pressure, such as the southern High Street, will in part be relieved by the scheme and by the Lincoln Eastern Bypass, thereby enabling improvements to the quality of the environment. The North East Quadrant provides an opportunity to develop a new Sustainable Urban Extension whose influence can extend beyond its boundaries to encourage new investment in areas adjoining the site such as the Allenby Road industrial area. Poor housing will also be addressed through schemes such as the Empty Housing Strategy and by regulation and enforcement of private sector housing standards, licensing and accreditation including Houses in Multiple Occupation, landlords and student accommodation.

The Lincoln Area 175

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

8.56 In addition, there are number of significant developments in the pipeline that should help to enhance social and economic conditions in their locations, including the extension to the Wragby Road Tesco Extra Superstore and Lincoln Castings at North Hykeham. Policy L5 - Regenerating Lincoln The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will pursue the regeneration of the Lincoln area economically, socially and environmentally, and will seek to address social deprivation through new housing, employment, social, environmental and public realm development and other improvements. To achieve this, the Local Plan and development proposals will support the following regeneration priorities: 1) The creation of sustainable neighbourhoods where the day-to-day needs of residents and businesses can be met within a walkable distance; 2) Ensuring that the allocation of sites for housing and employment development supports regeneration where possible; 3) Promoting appropriate development, including new housing and employment schemes, in areas of high deprivation; 4) Promoting conservation-based regeneration to protect and enhance Lincoln’s heritage offer; 5) Improving the City Centre, including its retail, commercial and residential offer, as detailed in Policy L6; 6) Maintaining, strengthening and improving East-West and North-South connectivity, particularly in the City Centre; 7) Restructuring Lincoln’s public transport infrastructure to improve accessibility and create a single and seamless interchange in the City Centre; 8) Enhancing the public realm through the creation of new public spaces and improvement of existing spaces; and 9) Improving access to derelict or underused sites through new transport infrastructure and encouraging inward investment.

The Lincoln Area 176

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy L5 will be implemented by:      The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and implement strategies and proposals for the regeneration of the Lincoln area including the Local Enterprise Partnership The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners pursuing investment and funding for regenerating the Lincoln area Promoting regeneration objectives in other strategies and programmes, and developing linkages between the Local Plan and these Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, including appropriate masterplanning processes Further policy development in the Local Plan including site allocation and designation

LINCOLN CITY CENTRE
8.57 Lincoln City Centre is the main hub in Central Lincolnshire for shopping, employment and other facilities, including leisure, arts, tourism, public services and higher education. It also has a lively evening economy based on its restaurants, hotels, bars and cultural venues including the Drill Hall, Engine Shed and theatre. It has seen many changes in recent years, including the development of a Cultural Quarter based around the Collection. As Central Lincolnshire grows, the City Centre will need to continue to evolve to ensure that Lincoln’s role as a Regional Attractor is maintained and enhanced to meet the needs of shoppers, residents, businesses and visitors. 8.58 However, there are a number of barriers that, if not addressed, could hamper the delivery of improvements. In particular, issues include:  ensuring sufficient land for employment and retail development  access and movement  parking 8.59 The north and south sections of High Street are, in part, severed by the railway line with the section north of the railway line performing more strongly than the southern section, while links between uphill and downhill Lincoln could be improved. Nevertheless, the High Street still dominates the City Centre with very little leakage east or west of this axis. Part of the reason for this is poor connectivity and a large number of derelict and underused buildings and sites. Better linkage of the surrounding neighbourhoods to the City Centre is needed for them to benefit fully from their close proximity to its range of facilities and opportunities. 8.60 Policies CL4, L1 and L4 will in part address issues relating to land availability but this will need to be delivered in conjunction with other improvements. In particular, the East-West Link road will provide an alternative route to the High Street to overcome the problem of increased down time at the rail crossing and to improve access to the bus / rail interchange proposed as part of the Lindongate scheme.

The Lincoln Area 177

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

City Centre Retailing & the Central Shopping Core 8.61 Lincoln City Centre benefits from a broad retail offer that currently sustains it as a thriving retail centre. As well as the larger national retailers, it has the diverse/niche shops of the historic Uphill area and the vibrant entrepreneurial small business market in South High Street. It is, therefore, largely focused on comparison goods (for example electrical items and clothes) whilst the edge-of-centre and out-ofcentre developments are largely anchored by convenience (food) shopping. 8.62 However, there is no room for complacency. While Lincoln’s national retail ranking was 39th in 20113, placing it ahead of Meadowhall Shopping Centre and emphasising its regional importance for retailing, its ranking has declined from 35th in 2005 and 30th in 2007. This relative decline is likely to be linked to the UK recession, but a ‘do nothing’ scenario could lead to Lincoln being unable to strengthen its retail offer and greater competition from other centres including Grimsby, Newark and Grantham. A lack of current space for new retail and leisure operators could pose a particular risk in future if not addressed. The City & Town Centres Study 2012 identifies the need for significant additional retail floorspace in Lincoln up to 2031, with a City Centre first approach, plus improvements to lower tier Centres in line with Policy L7. In the City Centre, Lindongate is seen as the priority for additional facilities over the short to medium term. This will deliver a large proportion of the required retail space as well as commercial elements and parking. However, there may also be potential for the redevelopment of land at St Mark’s Retail Park in the longer term to benefit the overall vitality and viability of the City Centre. Improvements to the Waterside Shopping Centre, given its link to the Lindongate Scheme, and the opportunity to improve its connections with the riverfront, would also be supported. 8.63 Expansion of the shopping core boundary to reflect these developments will be considered in detail in the next stages of the Local Plan, alongside those of the other centres in Central Lincolnshire as identified in Policy CL20. City Centre Masterplan 8.64 The role of the City Centre Masterplan4 is an important strategic one, influencing development, policy and delivery and, whilst not a formal planning document, will be used as a material consideration in planning applications. It is a framework for future decision-making that will steer development to achieve the Vision for Lincoln. Some work has already taken place, such as public realm improvements to the High Street and Bailgate but more is still required. 8.65 The City Centre Masterplan has recently undergone a refresh, but still continues to identify key intervention sites that relate to individual areas, providing background information on each location, notable achievements to date, key observations, and recommended specific measures and design principles. It also presents five main principles that will help to deliver a vibrant, well-connected and well-managed City Centre with a strong mix of uses, as follows:
3 4

Venuescore Linking Lincoln – City Centre Masterplan (2013) The Lincoln Area 178

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013) [Committee Draft]

‘Re-stitching’ the City Centre to its wider context – a Movement Strategy and Street Hierarchy that aim to provide existing and proposed new communities sustainable neighbourhoods with improved connectivity; Consolidating Urban Blocks – ensuring new development relates effectively with the public realm and strengthens and enlivens the City’s streets; Achieving a Good Mix of Uses; A Strategic Merchandising Plan – a Retail Strategy for the City to strengthen Lincoln’s retail market dominance and contribute directly to the wider visitor offer; Enhancing Lincoln’s Character Areas – considers how future proposals should collectively enhance the City’s diverse and people orientated cultural offer.

 

8.66 The Masterplan and proposed intervention sites have a relationship with the City Centre ‘quarters’ that have been defined based on their roles and concentrations of particular uses. This branding helps coherence and usability of the City Centre. Figure 2 – Lincoln City Centre and its main quarters

179

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy L6 - Lincoln City Centre The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with partners and stakeholders to promote, improve and grow Lincoln City Centre as the main hub in Central Lincolnshire for retail, employment, leisure, culture and other services, and for the visitor economy, in line with Lincoln’s role as a Regional Attractor and the proposed growth in Central Lincolnshire. To achieve this, the Local Plan will: 1) Plan for a City Centre that is high quality, sustainable and fit-for-purpose, in line with the Core Strategy’s Vision and Objectives for the Lincoln area. This includes the physical expansion of the City Centre to meet identified growth needs where this is supported by robust evidence; 2) Seek to enhance the overall offer that the City Centre provides in terms of the range and quality of services and facilities for visitors and residents; 3) Protect and enhance the quality, attractiveness, character and assets of the City Centre as a place to visit, work and live, in line with policies CL23, CL24 and CL26; 4) Support the creation and enhancement of distinctive quarters within the City Centre in accordance with partner strategies and initiatives; 5) Improve pedestrian linkages, walkability and connectivity within the City Centre, and between the City Centre and adjoining residential areas; 6) Seek to further improve the linkage between uphill and downhill areas of the City Centre in terms of pedestrian access and public transport, including promotion of innovative solutions such as a funicular railway where such can be demonstrated to have an acceptable impact; 7) Ensure that access to the City Centre is maintained and enhanced in the context of the growth of Lincoln and Central Lincolnshire, with priority given to walking, cycling and public transport, as part of the wider Transport Strategy for the Lincoln Area; 8) Support the ongoing regeneration of areas within the City Centre, in line with Policy L5; 9) Support the ongoing development of higher and further education establishments in the City Centre, including the University of Lincoln, and ensure that these are well integrated with and contribute positively to their surroundings physically, socially and economically; 10) Prioritise the City Centre as a location for development for retail and other town centre uses in line with Policy CL20.

The Lincoln Area 180

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Area policies, designations and site allocations in future Development Plan Documents will be prepared as appropriate to support the implementation of this policy. Development in the Lincoln area will be required to be in accordance with the above principles and requirements. Policy L6 will be implemented by:       Working in partnership with relevant stakeholders and developers. City Centre Management initiatives. Alignment between the Local Plan and relevant strategies and initiatives affecting the City Centre, including the Local Transport Plan. Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities. Preparation of further policies in Local Plan, including new/revised site allocations and designations as required. The regeneration policy, which provides a framework against which any new proposals will be assessed, support the City Centre Masterplan, and other delivery mechanisms that are indentified by appropriate evidence, and encourage joint working with key stakeholders and partners to realise regeneration opportunities.

OTHER CENTRES IN THE LINCOLN AREA
District & Neighbourhood Centres 8.67 The provision of retail and related services in the Lincoln PUA is based on a range of centres of differing size and role, ranging from the City Centre to small centres containing a few shops that serve purely local needs. The Core Strategy defines a hierarchy of centres for Central Lincolnshire as a whole in Policy CL20, based on the City & Town Centres Study (2012). Below Lincoln City Centre (Tier 1) and the town centres (Tier 2), two further tiers of centre are defined based on size and catchment area as follows5:   Tier 3 = District Centre Tier 4 = Neighbourhood Centre

8.68 In addition to centres previously designated in the saved Local Plans, the Core Strategy identifies further District and Neighbourhood Centres within or adjoining the Lincoln PUA as follows: (i) Existing areas which are considered to operate as District or Neighbourhood Centres, based on the Core Strategy evidence base and previous work on the

5

The roles of District and Neighbourhood Centres are defined in Core Strategy Policy CL20 and are based on the national hierarchy set out in former Planning Policy Statement 4: Planning for Sustainable Economic Growth (DCLG, 2010). This hierarchy was applied to Central Lincolnshire via the City & Town Centres Study (2012). The Lincoln Area 181

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

City of Lincoln LDF:  Carlton Centre/Wragby Road (= District Centre)  Burton Road (= Neighbourhood Centre)  Monks Road (= Neighbourhood Centre) (ii) Future District and Neighbourhood Centres that will be needed in connection with the proposed SUEs for Lincoln, as set out in the individual policies for these sites.

Policy L7 – District & Neighbourhood Centres in the Lincoln Area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will support the maintenance and development of a network of attractive, thriving and accessible District and Neighbourhood Centres to serve local retail and service needs in the Lincoln Principal Urban Area, in line with Policy CL20. Such Centres will complement but not compete with the City Centre. Proposals for development in District and Neighbourhood Centres will be required to: 1. Contribute to the vitality and mix of uses in that Centre, and meet a need within the immediate locality; 2. Be appropriate in scale and nature to their location; and 3. Prioritise and promote access by walking, cycling and public transport. The following are designated as District Centres to serve the Lincoln PUA: Administrative Area City of Lincoln District Centre Birchwood Nettleham Road Wragby Road/ The Carlton Centre Relationship to Saved Local Plans, including Site Boundaries Defined as DMUC in CLLP. Boundary retained. Defined as DMUC in CLLP. Boundary retained. This designation enlarges the Wragby Road DMUC, as defined in CLLP, to include the Carlton Centre. There is no policy boundary for the latter at present, so this will be defined by the Local Plan review as appropriate. Defined as District Centre by NKLP, but no defined boundary. Latter to be defined by Local Plan review as appropriate.

North Kesteven

The Forum (North Hykeham)

The Lincoln Area 182

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The following are designated as Neighbourhood Centres to serve the existing built-up areas of the Lincoln PUA: Administrative Area City of Lincoln Neighbourhood Centre Burton Road Relationship to Saved Local Plans, including Site Boundaries Defined as Local Shopping Centre in CLLP. Boundary retained for Neighbourhood Centre designation. Defined as DMUC in CLLP. Boundary retained for Neighbourhood Centre designation. Not identified as a centre in CLLP. Boundary to be defined by Local Plan review as appropriate. Defined as DMUC in CLLP. Boundary retained for Neighbourhood Centre designation. All 3 centres are defined as District Centres in NKLP, but do not have site boundaries. Latter to be defined by Local Plan review as appropriate.

Junction of Boultham Park Road and Skellingthorpe Road Monks Road (including Post Office and Co-op Food Store) Newark Road (Bracebridge)

North Kesteven

Bracebridge Heath Old Hykeham (North Hykeham) Waddington

Additionally, new District and Neighbourhood Centres will be required in relation to the proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) in the Lincoln area, in line with Policy CL20 and the relevant policy for each SUE. The status of centres in the Rural Area, including existing District Centres, will be reviewed and revised as appropriate as part of the wider review of settlement roles in the proposed Allocations Document.

Explanation of Policy L7: 8.69 Policy L7 provides more detail on the retail centres for the Lincoln PUA by setting out the individual District Centres and Neighbourhood Centres serving the area. It is noted that the terms District Centre and Neighbourhood Centre have been chosen to provide consistency across the Lincoln PUA, and in some cases involve the redesignation or renaming of existing centres. In relation to the saved City of Lincoln Local Plan (CLLP), the new designations replace the term District Mixed Use Centre (DMUC). However, as they essentially correspond to Lincoln’s DMUCs in
The Lincoln Area 183

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

terms of the location and broad role of these centres, all existing DMUCs are confirmed as either a District or Neighbourhood Centre in the Core Strategy. The site boundaries of the former DMUCs are therefore retained under saved Policy 74A of the CLLP, as shown on the adopted Policies Map, until such time as they are reviewed and amended within the joint Local Plan process. In relation to the saved North Kesteven Local Plan (NKLP), centres within the PUA that were defined as District Centres have been reviewed by the City & Town Centres Study (2012) and confirmed or redesignated as appropriate. Site boundaries for such centres are not defined in the NKLP, so these will be identified as appropriate in the joint Local Plan. Details of the new and previous status of each centre are set out in the policy. Policy L7 will be implemented by:    Aligning the Local Plan with relevant strategies and initiatives relating to the District Centres and how they link with surrounding areas and neighbourhoods Preparation of further policies in the Local Plan, including new/revised boundaries for centres as required Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities

Smaller Centres in Lincoln 8.70 Individual centres below the Neighbourhood Centre tier are not identified in the Core Strategy, as these are not considered to play a strategic role in planning the Lincoln area, albeit that they are important locally and will normally be protected under Policy CL20 (Retail & Town Centres in Central Lincolnshire). It is noted that saved Policy 74A in the City of Lincoln Local Plan defines Local Shopping Centres, and that this designation is proposed for retention alongside the Core Strategy. The Local Shopping Centres are shown on the adopted Policies Map, and saved Policy 74A also sets out the uses that are considered appropriate within them for development management purposes. It is envisaged that such centres will be reviewed as part of the Local Plan in future, and revised or renewed designations made if necessary.

SUSTAINABLE URBAN EXTENSIONS TO LINCOLN
8.71 Three sustainable urban extensions (SUEs) to Lincoln are proposed for the plan period, as set out in Policy L2 above. They are: 1) Western Growth Corridor (land at Swanpool, Decoy Farm and Fen Farm); 2) South East Quadrant (land at Canwick Heath and Bracebridge Heath); and 3) North East Quadrant (land in the Greetwell area including the former Greetwell Quarry). 8.72 Details of each proposed SUE are set out below under the individual SUE policies. 8.73 Collectively, the SUEs constitute 34% of the total housing target for the Lincoln PUA for the plan period. They are a key component of the Lincoln Area
The Lincoln Area 184

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Strategy for Growth, providing planned expansion of the city in a way that maximises sustainability and the benefits for the Lincoln area. 8.74 The three SUEs will need to be delivered in a phased and co-ordinated way based on the delivery of key pieces of supporting infrastructure. The completion of the Lincoln Eastern Bypass is of particular significance, as transport modelling work indicates that it is needed for satisfactory access and traffic management for both the North East Quadrant and South East Quadrant. Western Growth Corridor is not dependent on such major road construction beyond the provision of key access points, but will require the prior completion of appropriate flood risk management measures. It is therefore envisaged that development of Western Growth Corridor will be able to commence earlier than the other two SUEs in the Lincoln area. 8.75 Further details for each proposed SUE are contained in a Topic Paper which forms part of the evidence base for the Core Strategy.

WESTERN GROWTH CORRIDOR (SWANPOOL)
8.76 Western Growth Corridor (WGC) lies between Lincoln City Centre and the A46 Bypass on the west side of Lincoln. It will be a masterplanned SUE that exploits its close proximity to the City Centre and other adjoining built-up areas through appropriate linkages whilst also forming a distinctive new community of one or more defined neighbourhoods that have their own facilities including shops, primary school provision and employment. It will be a flagship development for the growth and renaissance of Lincoln as a thriving and sustainable city, with high quality design that incorporates cutting edge approaches to low carbon living and water management. 8.77 The proposed SUE will deliver approximately 2,700 new homes by 2031 (with the potential for more beyond that date) including a broad mix of housing types and sizes to meet a range of needs. Key to the development will be a range of facilities serving the SUE’s local needs including shops, a community centre, and other uses such as a health centre, post office, banking facilities and places of worship. Based on the Central Lincolnshire SUEs Retail Provision Study (WYG, 2013), this provision is expected to be in the form of a new District Centre located towards the east or south of the SUE, plus a smaller centre providing more modest local needs convenience (ie. food) shopping located towards the west of the development. In scale, the latter centre is envisaged as a local shopping parade as defined in the NPPF hierarchy. Housing should also be included as an integral part of the Centre to ensure a range of uses and passive surveillance. 8.78 Alongside housing, the SUE will contain significant new employment development to provide job opportunities for residents as well as contributing to Lincoln’s wider employment needs as identified in Policy L4 (Employment Priorities in the Lincoln area). Some large-scale employment is envisaged in the form of business parks located at the eastern and western ends of the site, adjoining the City Centre and A46 bypass respectively. Additionally, there will be opportunities for smaller-scale employment in the new District Centre. 8.79 The SUE will exploit its potential for low carbon energy provision, including district heating or Combined Heat & Power (CHP), based on the range of different
The Lincoln Area 185

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

energy users within and adjoining the site. In particular, areas to be considered for inclusion and/or linkage for district heating include Beevor Street, Lincoln University Campus and Birchwood, as well as potential linkage to the North Hykeham Energy from Waste (EfW) plant. 8.80 Road access to the site will be via a number of points, including Tritton Road, Beevor Street, Skellingthorpe Road and the A46, as part of a sustainable transport approach that will favour modes of travel and movement other than the private car. High quality and efficient public transport links to the City Centre and other key locations are crucial, and should be linked to improved services for the surrounding areas such as Birchwood and Skellingthorpe. Connectivity by walking and cycling will be a key feature both within the SUE and its linkage to surrounding areas, with a high quality network of walking and cycling routes that are attractive and safe. In particular, the network will make full use of the green corridors and other green infrastructure for the site, and link to adjoining routes to key destinations including the City Centre, Birchwood, Hartsholme Park and Sustrans cycle route along the Fossdyke. 8.81 The management of flood risk is a crucial issue for delivering the site’s potential as an SUE. The level of risk at present varies across the site, which is split between Flood Zones 1, 2 and 3. It is recognised that a significant area of the site identified for development potential falls within Flood Zone 3, albeit that it is currently protected by Lincoln’s existing flood defences. Technical work has identified an approach to development that achieves satisfactory mitigation of flood risk for the SUE and surrounding areas. This involves the creation of a development platform by raising the height of the land in areas proposed for development with a corresponding reduction of height at the former Skewbridge Tip (which is reclaimed as part of the development). 8.82 The creation of a high quality environment for living and working is central to the vision for WGC as an attractive, sustainable and innovative development. Structural green space will form an integral part of the development, and provide a range of functions including water and flood management, recreation and relaxation space, nature conservation, and also provide opportunities for allotments, sports facilities, biomass production and other open space uses. High standards of urban design will be a feature of the SUE, with imaginative and inspiring layouts and buildings that reflect both the site’s potential for low carbon energy (particularly district heating/CHP) and its distinctive setting close to Lincoln with dramatic views of the Cathedral and historic hillside. Appropriate ‘theming’ of styles and materials and ‘branding’ of street furniture and signage across the development are sought to increase the identity of the development as a new and distinctive community within Lincoln. High quality hard and soft landscaping will contribute to the SUE’s emphasis on quality and sense of place. 8.83 The SUE will protect, and where appropriate enhance, existing natural and historic environmental assets within or near the site, including appropriate management arrangements for visitor access where required. Identified assets include:

The Lincoln Area 186

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

(i) Critical Natural Assets as designated in the City of Lincoln Local Plan [reference numbers refer to Appendix C of that Plan]:       The Pheasantry [20] Catchwater Drain [21] Foal Close [22] Land east of Foal Close [23] Swan Pool [24] Boultham Mere (Local Nature Reserve) [25]; and

(ii) The Old Decoy Scheduled Ancient Monument in North Kesteven. 8.84 Additionally, the following areas are designated as Basic Natural Stock in the City of Lincoln Local Plan and are therefore subject to saved Policy 44B of that Plan as confirmed by Core Strategy Policy L3 [reference numbers refer to Appendix C of the City of Lincoln Local Plan]:       Land north of Skellingthorpe Road [49] Fen Plantation [50] Skewbridge Swath [51] Skewbridge Former Tip [53] Spike Island [56] Pyewipe to West Holmes Junction [57]

8.85 There are currently outline planning applications for the site, though these have been on hold pending the resolution of the flood risk management issue noted above. It is envisaged that a fully revised or new application will be developed alongside or shortly after the Core Strategy to reflect the updated position. Accompanying the revised application will be a detailed Masterplan and Phasing Plan setting out how the development will be delivered over the plan period. 8.86 It is expected that construction will commence on site in 2015 and the SUE will, after an initial start, be built out at around 150 dwellings per annum over the plan period. Infrastructure requirements and affordable housing provision will be triggered through different phases of development and in accordance with the Masterplan and Phasing Plan accompanying the outline planning application. Policy L8 – Lincoln Western Growth Corridor (Land at Swanpool, Fen Farm and Decoy Farm) This area to the west of Lincoln, as shown on the Policies Map, is identified as a strategic site for a Sustainable Urban Extension (SUE) to deliver the following mix of uses:   Approximately 2,700 dwellings to be constructed in the plan period to 2031 as part of a larger development beyond that plan period; Employment uses (offices, start-up units, Research & Development uses, warehousing and light industry compatible with its location) totalling

The Lincoln Area 187

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

approximately 40 hectares, in the form of:  A high quality business park of approximately 26 hectares at the western end of the SUE;  A business park of approximately 11 hectares located at the eastern end of the SUE; and  Smaller-scale employment provision of an appropriate scale and type in the proposed Centres; A new District Centre and a smaller new centre of an appropriate scale to provide the SUE with local retail, service, employment and community uses in line with Policies CL20 and L7; Appropriate education provision, including an on-site primary school; Associated transport, green and other infrastructure.

In addition to the generic requirements for Sustainable Urban Extensions in Policy CL7, the development will be required to meet the following locally specific requirements: Delivery, Phasing & Infrastructure The development shall be phased to ensure that it meets the requirements of Policy CL7 and positively contributes to the wider objectives for the Lincoln area and Central Lincolnshire over its construction period and beyond. To achieve this, the development and Phasing Plan should have regard to: a. The Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan, including infrastructure capacity and improvements needed in the Lincoln area to support the overall level of growth proposed; b. The timing and construction of key transport infrastructure, especially the new access roads to the City Centre and to the A46 road, and how these will impact on the wider area; c. The provision of public transport to serve the development, including services to the City Centre; d. The objective that development of the eastern part of the site, including access to the City Centre, is phased early to achieve successful linkage of the SUE and the City Centre; e. The requirement to deliver the proposed retail, employment and other uses in parallel with residential development to meet the needs of those living or working in the SUE; f. The provision of any major flood defence, green infrastructure or other infrastructure required for the SUE. Connectivity and Transport To ensure that the development contributes positively to sustainable access and transport in the Lincoln area, the detailed Transport Assessment, Travel
The Lincoln Area 188

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Plan and the development should: a. Take full account of planned projects identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan, Lincoln Area Transport Strategy, and transport infrastructure impacts and opportunities associated with the wider growth strategy for the Lincoln area; b. Ensure that the development is well served by public transport including high quality services to the City Centre, and is provided with appropriate supporting infrastructure such as bus stops and shelters; c. Ensure high quality, safe and effective pedestrian and cycling links within and adjoining the development, including very strong connectivity to the Witham Valley Country Park, existing Sustrans Routes and to routes into the City Centre; d. Make provision for the following access points to the site:  To the A46 via a new roundabout junction  To Skellingthorpe Road via a fourth arm at the existing Birchwood Avenue junction and a new junction adjacent to Hartsholme Park  To Tritton Road south of the Dixon Street junction, requiring a bridge over the railway line  To Beevor Street to the north east, requiring a bridge over the railway line; e. Assess and contribute to mitigation where appropriate of any unacceptably adverse traffic or highways impacts on the surrounding road network; Retail and Other Services The SUE shall be provided with a new District Centre plus additional local retail and service provision as required to serve the needs of those living or working in the SUE in line with Policy L7. Such provision shall complement the existing hierarchy of centres in the Lincoln area and not adversely affect the vitality and viability of Lincoln City Centre, Birchwood District Centre or other centres in the Lincoln area; A Quality Environment To ensure that the development contributes positively to the conservation and enhancement of the environmental quality and character of the Lincoln area, and that adverse impacts are minimised and mitigated, the masterplan and development should: a. Provide a network of green infrastructure that links to the wider Green Infrastructure Network for the Lincoln area as set out in Policy L3, and which: i) protects and, where appropriate, enhances sites within and
The Lincoln Area 189

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

adjoining the development that are designated for open space, landscape or nature conservation purposes, including Critical Natural Assets, Basic Natural Stock and Green Wedges in the saved Local Plans for the City of Lincoln and North Kesteven; ii) creates a green swath to provide a substantial area of public open space running through the development connecting to Hartsholme Lakes as part of the Witham Valley Country Park; protects and creates view corridors of Lincoln Cathedral and into the development, particularly from the north east. Such corridors should be integrated into the development as a contribution to its identity and form part of the design context required under Policy CL26; retains, where possible, existing field boundaries and dykes within and adjoining the development as part of the layout and articulation of the development; retains and protects the Old Decoy Scheduled Ancient Monument and its setting including an appropriate buffer zone; satisfactorily resolves any issues of public access or visitor management in relation to designated sites and biodiversity arising from the development;

iii)

iv)

v) vi)

b. Ensure that flood risk within the site and adjoining areas is reduced and managed through appropriate mitigation, in line with Policy CL25; c. Achieve a satisfactory relationship visually and functionally between the development and the surrounding areas and settlements, including Birchwood, Skellingthorpe, Swanpool Garden Suburb and the adjoining parts of Central Lincoln; and d. Deliver the satisfactory reclamation of the former Skewbridge Tip.

Policy L8 will be implemented by:    The development of a masterplan Ongoing partnership working with relevant bodies, stakeholders and local communities Development management

The Lincoln Area 190

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

SOUTH EAST QUADRANT (CANWICK HEATH)
8.87 South East Quadrant (SEQ) lies on the limestone plateau of the Lincoln Heath between the villages of Canwick and Bracebridge Heath. At its closest, the SUE is within 1 mile (1.6 km) of Lincoln City Centre, with the escarpment of the Lincoln Edge, including Lincoln’s South Common, forming an important open area between the development and the edge of the city’s existing built-up area. It will be a masterplanned SUE that exploits its close proximity to Lincoln and the City Centre through appropriate linkages whilst also forming a distinctive new community of neighbourhoods that has its own facilities including shops, schools and employment. Building on Central Lincolnshire’s reputation for innovative design established at Swanpool, the SEQ will embody high quality urban design that achieves an attractive and distinctive place and incorporates cutting edge approaches to sustainable design including low carbon energy and water management. 8.88 The proposed SUE will deliver approximately 2,200 new homes by 2031 (with further potential beyond that date to a total of 6,000 dwellings) including a broad mix of housing types and sizes to meet a range of needs. Key to the development will be a range of facilities serving the SUE’s local needs including shops, a community centre, and other uses such as a health centre, post office, banking facilities and places of worship. Based on the Central Lincolnshire SUEs Retail Provision Study (WYG, 2013), this provision is expected to be in the form of a new District Centre, probably located towards the west of the SUE, plus a smaller centre providing more modest local convenience (ie. food) shopping probably located towards the east of the SUE. In scale, the latter centre is envisaged as a local shopping parade as defined in the NPPF hierarchy. Housing should also be included as an integral part of the new Centres to ensure a range of uses and passive surveillance. 8.89 Alongside housing, the SUE will contain new employment development to provide job opportunities for residents as well as contributing to Lincoln’s wider employment needs as identified in Policy L4 (Employment Priorities in the Lincoln Area). Approximately 19ha of employment land is proposed as part of the development. Additionally, there will be opportunities for smaller-scale employment in the new Centres. 8.90 The SUE will exploit its potential for low carbon energy provision, including district heating or Combined Heat & Power (CHP), based on the range of different energy users within and adjoining the site. 8.91 The delivery of SEQ (and of NEQ) will be linked and co-ordinated with the construction and completion of the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and other transport infrastructure improvements needed in relation to the site. Direct access from the Eastern Bypass will not be provided, and the main road access points will be from the A15/B1188/B1131 and potentially from Heighington Road (with junction improvements at Canwick Hill) as part of a sustainable transport approach that will prioritise modes of travel and movement other than the private car. High quality and efficient public transport links to the City Centre and other key locations are crucial. Connectivity by walking and cycling will be a key feature both within the SUE and its linkage to surrounding areas, with a high quality network of walking and cycling routes that are attractive and safe. In particular, the network will make full use of the
The Lincoln Area 191

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

green corridors and other green infrastructure for the site, and link to adjoining routes to key destinations including the City Centre. 8.92 The creation of a high quality environment for living and working is central to the vision for SEQ as an attractive, sustainable and innovative development. Structural green space will form an integral part of the development, and provide a range of functions including water and flood management, recreation and relaxation space, nature conservation and also provide opportunities for allotments, sports facilities, biomass production and other open space uses. High standards of urban design will be a feature, with imaginative and inspiring layouts and buildings that reflect both the SUE’s potential for low carbon energy (particularly district heating/CHP) and its distinctive setting on the Heath close to Lincoln with views of Cathedral and across the dip slope of the limestone to the distant Fens and Wolds. Appropriate ‘theming’ of styles and materials and ‘branding’ of street furniture and signage across the development are sought to increase its identity as a new and distinctive community within Lincoln. High quality hard and soft landscaping will contribute to the SUE’s emphasis on quality and sense of place. 8.93 The SUE will protect, and where appropriate enhance, existing natural and historic environmental assets within or near the site, including appropriate management arrangements for visitor access and habitat conservation where required. Identified assets include: (i)    (ii) Critical Natural Assets as designated in the City of Lincoln Local Plan [reference numbers refer to Appendix C of that Plan]: Bracebridge Old Clay Pit [10] Cross O’Cliff Orchard [11] South Common [13] The Canwick/Bracebridge Heath Green Wedge as designated in the North Kesteven Local Plan [see Appendix 5 of that Plan].

8.94 The relationship between the development and its setting will require careful management visually and functionally. Specifically, the character, biodiversity and landscape/townscape contribution of the South Common make it an extremely valuable asset for Lincoln that the development will need to respect with appropriate buffering and access arrangements. The integrity and character of Canwick and Branston as distinct and separate villages will also need to be respected. The appearance of the development from surrounding areas needs to be sensitively planned, including views across the Witham Valley from the historic core of Lincoln and from the south and east across the Heath plateau. Sensitive approaches to lighting will be important for minimising light pollution in an area that is currently open farmland. 8.95 An outline planning application for the site is expected in 2015. Accompanying the application will be a detailed Masterplan and Phasing Plan setting out how the development will be delivered over the plan period. It is expected that construction will commence on site in 2018 following completion of the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and that the SUE will, after an initial start, be built at around 200
The Lincoln Area 192

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

dwellings per annum through the plan period. Infrastructure requirements and affordable housing provision will be triggered through different phases of development and in accordance with the Masterplan and Phasing Plan accompanying the outline planning application. Policy L9 – Lincoln South East Quadrant (Land at Canwick Heath and Bracebridge Heath) This area to the south east of Lincoln, as shown on the Policies Map, is identified as a strategic site for a Sustainable Urban Extension (SUE) to deliver the following mix of uses:      Approximately 6,000 dwellings in total, of which about 2,200 dwellings to be delivered in the plan period to 2031; Employment uses totalling about 19 hectares including small offices, start-up premises and light industry compatible with the location; A new District Centre and a smaller new centre of an appropriate scale to provide the SUE with local retail, service, employment and community uses in line with Policies CL20 and L6; Appropriate education provision, including an on-site primary school and an on-site secondary school; Associated transport, green, social and other infrastructure.

In addition to the generic requirements for Sustainable Urban Extensions in Policy CL7, the development will be required to meet the following locally specific requirements: Phasing and Infrastructure The development shall be phased to ensure that it meets the requirements of Policy CL7 and positively contributes to the wider objectives for the Lincoln area and Central Lincolnshire over its construction period and beyond. To achieve this, the development and Phasing Plan should have regard to: a. The Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and recognise infrastructure capacity and improvements needed in the Lincoln area to support the overall level of growth proposed; b. The timing and construction of key transport infrastructure such as the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and the East-West Link road; c. Ensuring sustainable communities are developed through each phase of development, and over the period of construction, by delivering the proposed new Centres, employment and other uses in parallel with residential development; d. Where viable, ensuring development that achieves successful linkages with the City Centre and existing development is phased early in the construction period; and

The Lincoln Area 193

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

e. The need for investment in upgrading utility services in the wider Lincoln area. Connectivity and Transport To ensure that the development contributes positively to sustainable access and transport in the Lincoln area, a detailed Transport Assessment, Travel Plan and the development should: a. Take full account of, and contribute towards, planned projects identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan, Lincoln Area Transport Strategy, and the impacts and opportunities associated with the wider growth strategy for the Lincoln area, including bus priority on the B1188 Canwick Road; b. Ensure that the development is well served by public transport including high quality services to the City Centre and other key facilities, and is provided with appropriate supporting infrastructure such as bus stops and shelters; c. Ensure high quality, safe and effective pedestrian and cycling links within and adjoining the development, including very strong connectivity to routes into the City Centre; d. Make provision for appropriate access points to the site which should include:  From the A15, B1188 or B1131  From Heighington Road, but only with major improvements at the junction with Canwick Hill; e. Have no direct access onto the Lincoln Eastern Bypass; f. Assess and, where appropriate, contribute towards mitigation of any unacceptable adverse impacts on existing transport infrastructure, including Canwick Avenue and the A15; and g. Not prejudice the delivery of the dualling of the Lincoln Eastern Bypass or Park & Ride within the Lincoln area. A Quality Environment To ensure that the development contributes positively to the conservation and enhancement of the environmental quality and character of the Lincoln area, and that adverse impacts are minimised and mitigated, the masterplan and development should: a. Provide a network of green infrastructure that links to the wider Green Infrastructure Network for the Lincoln area as set out in Policy L3, and which:
The Lincoln Area 194

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

i) protects and, where possible, enhances the sites within and adjoining the development that are designated for open space, landscape or nature conservation purposes, including the Critical Natural Assets, Basic Natural Stock and Green Wedges in the saved Local Plans for the City of Lincoln and North Kesteven; and ii) provides an appropriate buffer zone between the development and Lincoln’s South Common to protect the setting and views of the latter, and satisfactorily addresses access and any visitor management issues for the latter arising from the development; b. Protect and create view corridors to and from Lincoln Cathedral and the historic core and hillside of Lincoln and across the Witham Valley, including the views of Lincoln from Heighington Road. These corridors should be integrated into the development as a contribution to its identity and form part of the design context under Policy CL26; c. Ensure that flood risk in surrounding areas is mitigated and, where appropriate, reduced through the implementation of measures such as sustainable urban drainage systems, in line with Policy CL25; d. Take account of, and where possible enhance, the provision of facilities such as allotments and the Canwick Golf Course that encourage selfsufficiency, health and wellbeing; and e. Protect and, where possible, enhance the heritage assets on and adjoining the site, including listed buildings, and accommodate any proposals for a ‘Bomber Command’ memorial as appropriate. Policy CL9 will be delivered by:    The development of a masterplan Ongoing partnership working with relevant bodies, stakeholders and local communities Development management

NORTH EAST QUADRANT (GREETWELL AREA)
8.96 North East Quadrant (NEQ) lies on the north eastern edge of Lincoln between the existing residential area of Bunkers Hill and the predominantly industrial area at Allenby Road. Sitting within the line of the proposed Lincoln Eastern Bypass, it forms a natural urban extension to the Lincoln PUA and has been demonstrated to be one of the most sustainable locations for growth for the latter. At its closest, the SUE is within 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of Lincoln City Centre. The area is dominated by the former Greetwell Quarry that has been used for both quarrying and mining until relatively recently. Previous ironstone mining will present some challenges and the

The Lincoln Area 195

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

quarry face has been designated as a Site of Specific Scientific Interest (SSSI) on account of its geological make up, so any new development would be expected to maintain and enhance this feature. 8.97 NEQ will be a masterplanned SUE that exploits its close proximity to Lincoln and the City Centre through appropriate linkages whilst also forming a distinctive new community of one or more defined neighbourhoods that have their own facilities including shops, primary schools and employment. Its location provides the opportunity to link into the employment areas to the west of the site and the City Centre. Building on Central Lincolnshire’s reputation for innovative design established at Swanpool, the NEQ will embody high quality urban design that creates an attractive and distinctive place and incorporates cutting edge approaches to sustainable design including low carbon energy and water management. 8.98 The proposed SUE will deliver approximately 1,400 new homes by 2031 including a broad mix of housing types and sizes to meet a range of needs. Alongside housing, the SUE will contain new employment development to provide job opportunities for residents as well as contributing to Lincoln’s wider employment needs as identified in Policy L4 (Employment Priorities in the Lincoln Area). Approximately 6 ha of employment land is proposed as part of the development. Additionally, there may be opportunities for some smaller-scale employment within the SUE. 8.99 An on-site primary school (two form entry) incorporating extended hours provision will be required as part of the SUE. This will be on a serviced site of approximately 1.8 ha that will be expected to be provided by the developer together with a proportionate financial contribution towards the cost of providing the school, subject to the level and mix of housing. It is expected that the masterplan will incorporate provision for a children’s nursery to be provided by the private sector. Secondary education to serve the SUE will be provided in line with the Infrastructure Delivery Plan. 8.100 While the SUE is relatively close to the designated District Centre at Wragby Road/the Carlton Centre, it will also require its own new centre serving local needs including local shops, a community centre and other uses such as a health centre, post office, and places of worship. The scale of provision of such facilities should complement rather than compete with existing centres, including the Carlton Centre. Housing should be included as an integral part of the new centre to ensure a range of uses and passive surveillance. 8.101 The SUE will exploit its potential for low carbon energy provision, including district heating or Combined Heat & Power (CHP), based on the range of different energy users within and adjoining the site. 8.102 The delivery of NEQ (and of SEQ) will be linked and co-ordinated with the construction and completion of the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and other transport infrastructure improvements needed in relation the site. Direct access from the Eastern Bypass will not be provided, and the main road access points will be from Greetwell Road, Carlton Boulevard and St. Augustine Road, as part of a sustainable transport approach that will favour modes of travel and movement other than the
The Lincoln Area 196

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

private car. High quality and efficient public transport links to the City Centre and other key locations are crucial. Connectivity by walking and cycling will be a key feature both within the SUE and its linkage to surrounding areas, with a high quality network of walking and cycling routes that are attractive and safe. In particular, the network will make full use of the green corridors and other green infrastructure for the site, and link to adjoining routes to key destinations including the City Centre. 8.103 The creation of a high quality environment for living and working is central to the vision for NEQ as an attractive, sustainable and innovative development. Structural green space will form an integral part of the SUE, and provide a range of functions including water and flood management, recreation and relaxation space, nature conservation, as well as providing opportunities for allotments, sports facilities, biomass production and other open space uses. High standards of urban design will be a feature, with imaginative and inspiring layouts and buildings that reflect both the SUE’s potential for low carbon energy (particularly district heating/CHP) and its setting close to Lincoln with views of the Cathedral and across the Witham Valley. Appropriate ‘theming’ of styles and materials and ‘branding’ of street furniture and signage across the development are sought to increase the identity of the development as a new and distinctive community within Lincoln. High quality hard and soft landscaping will contribute the SUE’s emphasis on quality and sense of place. 8.104 The SUE will protect, and where appropriate enhance, existing natural and historic environmental assets within or near the site, including appropriate management arrangements for visitor access where required. Identified assets include: (i)  (ii) (iii) Critical Natural Assets as designated in the City of Lincoln Local Plan [reference numbers refer to Appendix C of that Plan]: Greetwell Hollow [37] The geological SSSI of the Greetwell Quarry. Archaeological remains including a prehistoric triple ditch boundary, industrial archaeology associated with former ironstone mining in the area, and potential Roman remains.

8.105 It is envisaged that construction will commence on site in 2018 following completion of the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and that the SUE will, after the initial start, be built at around 150 dwellings per annum over the plan period. Infrastructure requirements and affordable housing provision will be triggered through different phases of development and in accordance with the Masterplan and Phasing Plan accompanying the outline planning application. Liaison with Anglian Water will be required to ensure that the development is accompanied by necessary upgrades to sewerage capacity.

The Lincoln Area 197

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy L10 – Lincoln North East Quadrant (land at Greetwell including former Greetwell Quarry) This area to the north east of Lincoln, as shown on the Policies Map, is identified as a strategic site for a Sustainable Urban Extension (SUE) to deliver the following mix of uses within the plan period to 2031:      Approximately 1,400 dwellings; Employment uses totalling approximately 6 hectares including small offices, start-up premises and light industry compatible with the location; A new Centre of an appropriate scale, providing for local retail, services and community uses in line with Policy CL20; Appropriate education provision, including an on-site primary school; and Associated transport, green, social and other infrastructure.

In addition to the generic requirements for Sustainable Urban Extensions in Policy CL7, the development will be required to meet the following locally specific requirements: Phasing and Infrastructure The development shall be phased to ensure that it meets the requirements of Policy CL7 and positively contributes to the wider objectives for the Lincoln area and Central Lincolnshire over its construction period and beyond. To achieve this, the development and Phasing Plan should have regard to: a. The Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and recognise infrastructure capacity and improvements needed in the Lincoln area to support the overall level of growth proposed; b. Ensuring sustainable communities are developed through each phase of development, and over the period of construction, by delivering the proposed District Centre, employment and other uses in parallel with residential development; c. Where viable, ensuring development that achieves successful linkages with the City Centre and existing development is phased early in the construction period; d. The timing and construction of key transport infrastructure such as the Lincoln Eastern Bypass and the East-West Link road; e. The need for investment in upgrading utility services in the wider Lincoln area. Transport and Connectivity To ensure that the development contributes positively to sustainable access and transport in the Lincoln area, a detailed Transport Assessment, Travel

The Lincoln Area 198

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Plan and the development should: a. Take full account of, and contribute towards, planned projects identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan, the Lincoln Area Transport Strategy, and the impacts and opportunities associated with the wider growth strategy for the Lincoln area; b. Ensure that the development is well served by public transport including high quality services to the City Centre and other key facilities, and is provided with appropriate supporting infrastructure such as bus stops and shelters; c. Ensure high quality, safe and effective pedestrian and cycling links within and adjoining the development, including links to the National Cycle Route 1 and Sustrans local routes; d. Make provision for the following access points to the site:  To the south via a new junction onto an improved Greetwell Road;  To the north via accesses onto Carlton Boulevard and St Augustine Road; e. Have no direct access onto the proposed Lincoln Eastern Bypass; f. Assess and, where appropriate, contribute towards mitigation of any unacceptably adverse impacts on existing transport infrastructure, such as Greetwell Road and Carlton Boulevard; and g. Not prejudice the delivery of the dualling of the Lincoln Eastern Bypass or Park & Ride within the Lincoln area. A Quality Environment To ensure that the development contributes positively to the conservation and enhancement of the environmental quality and character of the Lincoln area, and that adverse impacts are minimised and mitigated, the masterplan and development should: a. Provide a network of green infrastructure that links to the wider Green Infrastructure Network for the Lincoln area as set out in Policy L3, and which: i) protects and, where appropriate, enhances the sites in or adjoining the development that are designated for open space, landscape or nature conservation purposes, including the Critical Natural Assets, Basic Natural Stock and Green Wedges designated in the saved Local Plans for the City of Lincoln and West Lindsey; provides an appropriate buffer zone between the development and Greetwell Hollow and satisfactorily addresses access and any visitor management issues for the latter arising from the
The Lincoln Area 199

ii)

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

development; iii) provides adequate compensating open space within or adjoining the development for any loss of the designated Green Wedge south of Greetwell Road; ensures that flood risk in the surrounding area is adequately mitigated and, where appropriate, reduced through the implementation of measures such as sustainable urban drainage systems, in line with Policy CL25;

iv)

b. Protect or enhance the designated SSSI at Greetwell Quarry; c. Protect and create view corridors of and from Lincoln Cathedral (and other important buildings on the north escarpment) that are integrated into the development as a contribution to its identity, and form part of the design context under Policy CL26; d. Protect and enhance the setting of the designated heritage assets at Greetwell; e. Ensure, where practicable, that the archaeology of ironstone mining is retained with appropriate interpretative material on site; and f. Address geotechnical issues such as ground stability and mining voids relating to the site and its development. Policy CL10 will be implemented by:    The development of a masterplan Ongoing partnership working with relevant bodies, stakeholders and local communities Development management

The Lincoln Area 200

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

9. THE GAINSBOROUGH AREA
9.1 With a population of around 19,000, Gainsborough is the second largest settlement in Central Lincolnshire, providing employment, services and facilities for the surrounding villages both in Lincolnshire and across the River Trent in Nottinghamshire. It is also the administrative centre for West Lindsey District. Past development has extended the built-up area of Gainsborough northwards to the built edge of the village of Morton (population 1,325) without a discernible break. The town is also linked to the village of Lea (population 1,009) by past development extending northwards from the village.

9.2 An important inland port and agricultural market centre during the 19 th century, the town grew steadily until World War II as heavy engineering industries prospered. The closure of large employers brought about by the decline of manufacturing has, however, led to a whole range of economic and social issues
The Gainsborough Area 201

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

and left Gainsborough with a legacy of decay and deprivation. The town additionally experienced a population decline of 4.3% between 1991 and 2001, principally amongst the younger generation. 9.3 Since the latter years of the 20th century a programme of initiatives has been pursued by the public authorities and their partners to tackle the range of regeneration needs and deprivation issues experienced by the town and its residents, and reverse the population decline. These include in 2007 the adoption by West Lindsey District Council of ‘Gainsborough Regained – The Masterplan’ (the Masterplan) setting out ambitious plans for the growth of the town together with regeneration initiatives, and in 2008 the town’s designation as a Growth Point. 9.4 This chapter builds upon these initiatives, establishing the planning strategy framework for continuing the regeneration of the town and enhancing the prosperity of the Gainsborough area.

WHAT IS THE GAINSBOROUGH AREA?
9.5 The Gainsborough area comprises the combined settlements of Gainsborough, Lea and Morton (defined in Policy CL4 as the ‘Gainsborough Urban Area’) together with an undefined area around this urban area that provides the setting for these settlements and which therefore will be impacted upon to some degree by the specific policies within this chapter. The inclusion of Lea and Morton with Gainsborough for spatial planning purposes stems from the Masterplan. The very close proximity of these two villages to the town means that their futures are inextricably linked to that of Gainsborough. Planning for these three settlements as a whole will enable any further coalescence to be prevented and the identities of the two villages safeguarded. At the same time it is recognised that the town’s sphere of influence will extend beyond this more immediate area, however it is felt that any issues or opportunities arising from this within Central Lincolnshire will be addressed by the generic policies and/or further development of the Local Plan following the review of individual settlement roles as outlined in Policy CL4. The review of individual settlement roles will include Morton and Lea, however any future growth at these villages will be considered with reference to the role of the Gainsborough Urban Area.

The Gainsborough Area 202

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

THE GAINSBOROUGH AREA TODAY – CONTEXT AND KEY CHALLENGES
THE GAINSBOROUGH AREA – A PORTRAIT Gainsborough:  is the second largest settlement in Central Lincolnshire and provides an important role as a main centre for employment, retail, services, leisure, culture, health and education  has a unique riverside setting, a prominent escarpment that affords extensive views across the Trent Valley and is surrounded by pockets of land protected for their biodiversity or quality of landscape is within 45 minutes drive of two international airports has one of the finest medieval houses in the country, Gainsborough Old Hall, together with other cultural, heritage and leisure assets including Gainsborough Golf Club experienced a 25.1% decline in 15 – 29 year olds between 1991 and 2001 compared to 10.4 % nationally has areas of significant deprivation particularly in respect of employment, education and crime has higher than average proportions of terraced housing, a number of which are in poor physical condition and/or privately rented. Despite lower than average house prices, affordability is a problem due to low wage rates has a narrow employment base, higher than average unemployment and a shortage of skills amongst its workforce has a ‘state of the art’ Educational Village and a consistently top performing grammar school is home to a number of high-profile companies including PING, Eminox and Paragon has significantly enhanced its retail offer by the opening of the award winning Marshall’s Yard has a number of strategic but vacant sites remaining in and around the town centre which require investment to support the regeneration of the town has flood management that has so far prevented serious flooding, but may need improvement based on climate change predictions

 

  

     

The Gainsborough Area 203

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Table 4 – Key Figures for the Gainsborough Area1 Size of area Population of Gainsborough Urban Area (Census, 2011):    Total Population Population aged 65 and over Population at working age 20,842 17% of Output Areas 63% of Output Areas 30,647 10,220 26% (Economic Zone) 26% (Economic Zone) 12 0 3 3 1 1 88 9,248 29% 277 6.9 sq. km

Population of Economic Zone (Census, 2011) Number of houses (Valuation Office, 2011) Main employment sectors: o Public administration, education and health o Distribution, restaurants and hotels Number of schools Number of SSSIs Conservation Areas Local Wildlife Sites Local Nature Reserves Scheduled Monuments Listed Buildings Number of households (Census, 2011) Non car-owning households (Census, 2011) Number of households in fuel poverty (LSOA, 2010)

9.6 The Gainsborough area faces key challenges over the next two decades. Overall, it has a clear need for growth to achieve the regeneration of the town and address its social, economic and environmental issues whilst at the same time enhance and conserve its environmental quality and heritage. These are covered in more detail within the chapter, but can be summarised as follows:

1

All figures relate to the Gainsborough Urban Area (as illustrated in Appendix F) unless otherwise stated The Gainsborough Area 204

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

KEY CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES FACING THE GAINSBOROUGH AREA   Maintaining and strengthening Gainsborough’s role as a Primary Attractor within Central Lincolnshire Delivering ambitious levels of growth and development, including the housing and employment targets for the Gainsborough area, with appropriate supporting infrastructure Enhancing the prosperity, sustainability, health and wellbeing of all communities and neighbourhoods in the Gainsborough area Regenerating areas of physical decay and neighbourhoods with high levels of deprivation and/or poor environments Boosting the local economy to realise Gainsborough’s full potential as a main centre for economic growth in Central Lincolnshire, through tackling poor skills and employment diversity, increasing inward investment in key sectors and partnership working Broadening the housing mix within the town to provide a greater percentage of larger houses to attract investors into the area Achieving an integrated, environmentally enhanced and strengthened town centre, maintaining its role within the Central Lincolnshire retail hierarchy Conserving and enhancing Gainsborough area’s natural and historic environment, character and assets in the context of growth

 

  

VISION & STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES FOR GAINSBOROUGH
9.7 A Vision and Strategic Objectives have been prepared to guide sustainable development over the plan period to 2031 as follows: VISION FOR GAINSBOROUGH IN 2031 Gainsborough is a socially balanced, economically prosperous and environmentally sustainable town, where people choose to live, work, invest and visit, and which provides a thriving service centre for its rural hinterland. The population has grown substantially over the past twenty years with three new communities having been successfully developed through sustainable urban extensions to the south of Foxby Lane, and on the north and eastern fringes of the town either side of the A631. Within each of these neighbourhoods is a broad range of quality homes in an attractive
The Gainsborough Area 205

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

environment together with local shops, services and facilities such as education and health. Job opportunities are also located within easy reach. Accessible green space within the neighbourhoods is linked to a wider network of accessible green corridors that permeate through and around the town providing leisure opportunities and protecting the quality of Gainsborough’s setting, its distinctive escarpment feature and rich biodiversity. Accessible green space also helps to protect the separate identifies of Lea and Morton. Growth provided through the new neighbourhoods has supported new investment and created a strong, diverse and high quality local economy with a broad range of employment for a suitably skilled workforce, which in turn has contributed to the regeneration of the town, tackling issues of deprivation and physical decay which had existed within areas of the South-West and East Wards. Gainsborough’s town centre is well-integrated, strong and healthy offering a broad mix of retail, service, leisure, cultural and housing uses. It is welldesigned with a restored historic built fabric and capitalises on its River Trent frontage. Opportunities and challenges presented by climate change are embraced by the town. It is well connected throughout the town and beyond with good rail and bus services and a network of safe cycling and walking routes, making use of the network of green corridors, which provide sustainable travelling options as a real alternative to the use of the car. The design and construction of development involves adaptation and mitigation measures including the use of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems and low-carbon energy solutions. 9.8 The following specific objectives for the Gainsborough area are identified alongside the Strategic Objectives for Central Lincolnshire: Objective 1 Reinforce the role of Gainsborough as a Primary Attractor through growth including the development of 10,000 new homes and 25 ha of employment land and proportionate investment in local infrastructure

Key Policies G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, G6, G7, G8, G9 for Delivery Objective 2 Ensure that growth does not adversely impact upon the characters of Lea and Morton and that they retain separate identities Key Policies G1, G2, G6, G7, G8, G9 for Delivery Objective 3 Achieve the regeneration of Gainsborough economically, socially and environmentally, addressing multiple deprivation through new and broader housing, employment, social, environmental and public
The Gainsborough Area 206

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

realm development and other improvements Key Policies G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, G6, G7, G8, G9 for Delivery Objective 4 Build a more resilient local economy with substantial job growth, transition to a higher skilled economy and provide premises of a variety of sizes, suitable for a broad range of potential investors Key Policies G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, G7, G8, G9 for Delivery Objective 5 Strengthen the role of the town centre, broadening and improving the offer and encouraging new development that contributes to the enhancement of the urban form Key Policies G1, G3, G5, for Delivery Objective 6 Improve connectivity to, from and within Gainsborough that enables alternative transport options to the car Key Policies G1, G2, G3, G5, G6, G7, G8, G9 for Delivery Objective 7 Increase opportunities for accessing green space both within and around Gainsborough, together with protecting and enhancing biodiversity and the quality of the town’s landscape setting Key Policies G1, G2, G3, G5, G6, G7, G8, G9 for Delivery

The Gainsborough Area 207

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

KEY DIAGRAM – GAINSBOROUGH AREA

The Gainsborough Area 208

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The Gainsborough Area 209

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

GAINSBOROUGH AREA STRATEGY FOR GROWTH
9.9 The Central Lincolnshire Spatial Strategy for Growth identifies Gainsborough as a main urban area and Primary Attractor, with 10,000 new dwellings and 25 ha of employment land to be delivered over the plan period. 9.10 This level of growth is needed to support the ongoing regeneration of Gainsborough and ensure its future prosperity. Major housing growth is needed to create the critical mass of population, and therefore spending power, that can act as the catalyst for a range of other investment, particularly by the private sector, in employment, retail and leisure activity. Expanding the local employment land offer as part of a growth programme will provide a greater choice of options for investors and an improved choice of employment for residents. Higher levels of disposable income can contribute to town centre regeneration. 9.11 Policy G1 below sets out an integrated approach to sustainability as a headline policy for the Gainsborough area, embodying the Vision and Strategic Objectives. Policies in the rest of the chapter flow from it to provide more detail on particular aspects, as follows:       G2 – Locational Priorities for Development in the Gainsborough Area G3 – Regenerating Gainsborough G4 – Employment Priorities in the Gainsborough Area G5 – Gainsborough’s Town and Other Centres G6 – Green Infrastructure and Settlement Breaks in the Gainsborough Area G7, G8 & G9 - detailed policies for the 3 proposed SUEs for Gainsborough.

9.12 These policies focus on issues for which a specific approach is felt to be needed for the Gainsborough area. The Gainsborough area is, however, also subject to the generic policies in the Core Strategy as set out in Chapters 3 – 7. Policy G1 – Strategy for Growth in the Gainsborough Area Growth in the Gainsborough area will be delivered through a co-ordinated and sustainable approach to planning and development based on the Core Strategy’s Vision and Objectives for the Gainsborough area. This approach integrates housing, regeneration, economic, transport, green infrastructure and environmental policy to achieve major housing and economic growth linked to infrastructure improvements, whilst protecting and enhancing Gainsborough’s environmental quality and character. To achieve this, the Local Plan and any development proposals, should: 1. Support the strengthening of Gainsborough’s role as a Primary Attractor (i.e. as a key centre for retail, employment, culture, leisure, tourism, education and other services) through significant growth, regeneration activity, and improvements to its infrastructure and the range and quality of facilities it provides for residents and visitors; 2. Support the role of Gainsborough through significant growth in Central
The Gainsborough Area 210

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Lincolnshire in the period 2011 – 2031, including delivery of approximately 23% of Central Lincolnshire’s new housing and 25 ha of employment land within and adjacent to the Gainsborough Urban Area, as set out in Policy CL4; 3. Plan the pattern of growth of the Gainsborough area in a strategic and sustainable manner with appropriate supporting infrastructure, as set out in Policy G2; 4. Support the regeneration of Gainsborough socially, economically and environmentally as detailed in Policy G3; 5. Support the creation of a diverse, resilient and highly competitive local economy in Gainsborough as detailed in Policy G4; 6. Promote the enhancement and growth of Gainsborough Town Centre to meet the needs of residents and visitors as Central Lincolnshire grows, as detailed in Policy G5; 7. Maintain and enhance a network of thriving Neighbourhood Centres to support sustainable communities and neighbourhoods in Gainsborough as detailed in Policy G5; 8. Review and define the individual and collective roles of villages in the Gainsborough area, including those in the Gainsborough Urban Area, including their appropriate levels and types of growth, as part of the preparation of the proposed Allocations Document, having regard to local aspirations and any Neighbourhood Plans for those villages; 9. Promote a sustainable and high quality transport system for the Gainsborough area to support its growth and tackle issues of carbon emissions, traffic congestion, air quality and accessibility, including investment to achieve modal shift to public transport, cycling and walking along with necessary highways improvements; 10. Protect, nurture and enhance Gainsborough’s environmental and heritage assets by conserving and promoting Gainsborough’s natural and built heritage as key elements of its quality of life and local distinctiveness, and for their benefits for tourism, regeneration and the economy. 11. Define and promote a strategic network of green infrastructure to link the Gainsborough Urban Area with the surrounding countryside and communities as set out in Policy G6. Policy G1 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop, co-ordinate and implement strategies affecting the Gainsborough area, including housing, economic development, regeneration, transport, infrastructure and green infrastructure

The Gainsborough Area 211

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

Pursuing investment opportunities and funding to regenerate and grow Gainsborough Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities Further policy development in the Local Plan, including the proposed Site Allocations Document.

LOCATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT IN THE GAINSBOROUGH AREA
9.13 To meet the development targets for the Gainsborough Urban Area identified in Policy CL4, the Core Strategy has two main locational priorities for development as follows: 1) re-using suitable previously-developed sites (‘brownfield’ land) within the Gainsborough Urban Area with the priority being sites within or adjoining the town centre; 2) focusing urban expansion in large-scale sustainable urban extensions (SUEs) that can be masterplanned with appropriate infrastructure and a range of facilities and that can be integrated with Gainsborough. 9.14 It is intended that these two components will meet the bulk of the development targets for the Gainsborough Urban Area for the period 2011 – 2031, and will provide sufficient sites for new housing and employment development on an ongoing basis throughout the plan period, as set out in the Housing Trajectory for Central Lincolnshire (see Chapter 5 and Appendix G). 9.15 Specifically, the Core Strategy identifies and allocates three SUEs for the Gainsborough Area, all of which adjoin the Gainsborough Urban Area boundary, as follows: 1. Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood - land south of Foxby Lane; 2. Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood - land north of Corringham Road and the A631; 3. Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood - land south of the A631 and north of Heapham Road. How were these priorities decided? 9.16 The locational priorities for the Gainsborough area are consistent with those set out in the adopted Regional Plan 2009 which prioritises the use of suitable previously-developed land and delivering development in a way that:    shortens journeys and facilitates access to jobs and services strengthens rural enterprise and linkages between settlements maintains the distinctive character and vitality of rural communities.

The Gainsborough Area 212

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

9.17 The Masterplan identifies potential locations for residential development. These locations reflect the following principles, as set out in the Masterplan and which were established through consultation and consideration of environmental, highway and sustainability issues during the masterplanning process:       To increase the vibrancy and sustainability of the town centre by introducing new high quality housing onto current poor quality town centre industrial sites To significantly increase residential land to the south and east of the town, to take advantage of the proximity of the A631 and railway station. This would also minimise through traffic in the town centre To build family housing in the vicinity of the Education Village To retain the identity of Morton and Lea by avoiding large scale residential development To build residential land close to but not encroaching on the proposed green corridor around the town To integrate the existing housing allocation and allocated sites.

9.18 Based on these principles, the single major landowner in the area, Thonock and Somerby Estates, worked in partnership with West Lindsey District Council to produce initial feasibility plans for three proposed new neighbourhoods. This work was then further developed and a successful bid made for Growth Point status for Gainsborough in 2008. Outline planning permission was granted by West Lindsey District Council for the southern neighbourhood in 2011. 9.19 The Core Strategy preparation process has enabled the locational priorities initiated through the Masterplan to be confirmed, successive engagement with stakeholders having been undertaken as it has moved from options about the form and direction of growth for Gainsborough (see Issues & Options Report) through to specific SUE proposals. The Sustainable Futures Study also investigated potential development locations across the Gainsborough Area, with supporting information on sites from the Central Lincolnshire SHLAA and Employment Land Review. Infrastructure to support growth 9.20 The growth of Gainsborough will inevitably place greater demands on the area’s infrastructure, including transport, education, health, water, sewage treatment and so on. It is important that new development is supported by the required infrastructure and that it contributes to its delivery. The SUEs in particular will need to be co-ordinated and phased to ensure key infrastructure items are delivered to the benefit of the wider area. Further details are covered in the individual SUE policies. Site allocation and the release of land in the Gainsborough area 9.21 Apart from the three SUEs, the Core Strategy does not allocate individual sites either within or outside the Gainsborough Urban Area boundary. This will be considered through the preparation of the proposed Allocations Document, and sites identified on a revised Policies Map if appropriate. 9.22 As discussed in Chapter 5 (Growing Central Lincolnshire), the Allocations Document will include consideration of the role and level of growth for settlements
The Gainsborough Area 213

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

within the Rural Area, including those settlements that are within the wider Gainsborough area but outside the defined Gainsborough Urban Area, such as Blyton, Corringham and Upton. Such settlements may have the potential for growth, not only to meet their own local needs but also possibly in a supporting role to Gainsborough, where this can be achieved sustainably and is consistent with the aspirations of residents and stakeholders to be established through engagement. Morton and Lea will also be given similar consideration at the same time but within the context of growth proposals for the Gainsborough Urban Area as a whole and subject to their separate identities being maintained. 9.23 It is stressed that this staged approach to site allocation within the Local Plan should not preclude development other than the SUEs coming forward ahead of the adoption of the Allocations Document. Such development proposals will be assessed against the Core Strategy policies, particularly Policy CL5, and any relevant saved policies. Clearly, it is intended and hoped that development on previously-developed sites and in the rest of the Gainsborough Area continues under the Core Strategy where it can demonstrate that it is sustainable and consistent with the NPPF and the development plan. Policy G2 – Locational Priorities for Development in the Gainsborough Area In meeting the targets for housing and employment growth in the Gainsborough area and to regenerate Gainsborough, development will be simultaneously focused on suitable previously-developed sites within the Gainsborough Urban Area and in Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) that are carefully integrated with Gainsborough and supported by necessary facilities and infrastructure provision. Priorities for the allocation and/or release of land for development in the Gainsborough area for the period 2011 – 2031 will be as follows:  Making best use of previously-developed land and buildings within the Gainsborough Urban Area for housing and other uses, with first priority given to sites within and adjoining Gainsborough Town Centre, and; Bringing forward through detailed master plans, on a planned and phased basis, three strategic Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) as follows:  Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood (Land south of Foxby Lane as allocated on the Policies Map) - approximately 2,500 dwellings, employment land, community services and facilities, and infrastructure, as detailed in Policy G7;  Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood (Land north of Corringham Road and the A631 as allocated on the Policies Map) - approximately 2,400 dwellings, employment land, community services and facilities, and infrastructure, as detailed in Policy G8;  Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood (Land south of the A631 and

The Gainsborough Area 214

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

north of Heapham Road as allocated on the Policies Map) - approximately 2,100 dwellings, employment land, community services and facilities, and infrastructure, as detailed in Policy G9; and  Other sustainable sites within or adjoining the Gainsborough Urban Area, identified through site allocations to provide the balance of housing and/or employment if required to meet the Core Strategy targets for the Gainsborough area.

Policy G2 will be implemented by:     The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward previously-developed sites for re-use or redevelopment as part of the regeneration of Gainsborough The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other and with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward the 3 proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions and necessary supporting infrastructure Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities Further policy development in the Local Plan, including site allocations

REGENERATING GAINSBOROUGH
9.24 The regeneration of Gainsborough has been an ongoing priority since the mid 1990s. Substantial public and private investment has been made into schemes based around improving the physical environment. At the turn of the 21st century a major flood defence scheme opened up public access in the town along the River Trent, followed by the restoration of important riverside warehouse and mill buildings, creating homes and space for leisure, retail and office uses. Later in 2007, the Marshall’s Yard retail development opened in the listed former Britannia Iron Works. 9.25 Whilst these schemes have also brought about economic and social benefits to Gainsborough, deprivation remains a key issue for the town. In 2010:   Gainsborough South West ward had one of its three Lower Super Output Areas (LSOAs) in the 5% most deprived nationally2 and one in the 20% most deprived; and Gainsborough East, had one of its four LSOAs in the 10% most deprived and two in the 20% most deprived and Gainsborough North had one of its four LSOAs in the 20% most deprived.

9.26 Deprivation from the domains of education, skills and training, employment and crime and disorder are of particular concern.
2

Indices of Multiple Deprivation for England 2010 (Department for Communities and Local Government)

The Gainsborough Area 215

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

9.27 The Masterplan identifies particular issues that need to be addressed to tackle deprivation within the town which the Local Plan supports through Policy G4 and other policies:  Economic diversification

Chapter 6 sets out the need to diversify Central Lincolnshire’s economy and encourage the growth of knowledge intensive industries. This is particularly true for Gainsborough, a town historically dominated by the manufacturing industry which has seen the closure of significant employers and now has higher than average levels of unemployment. Policies CL17 and G6 seek to address this issue.  Educational attainment and skills

Educational attainment plays a key role in determining people’s future life chances, with young people who leave formal education without qualifications being more likely to be at risk of unemployment, low pay and poor job satisfaction. At the same time, the availability of a skilled labour force is a key factor for businesses when making long-term decisions on location and investment. A long period of low educational attainment and low expectations, coupled with a high proportion of the labour force active within manual sectors, has resulted in Gainsborough’s workforce being dominated by low skills and qualifications. Improving educational attainment and the skills base of the workforce in Gainsborough is essential for growing and diversifying the local economy. This issue is already being addressed with the opening in 2009 of the Gainsborough Educational Village, involving the merging of two secondary schools with low educational attainment to form the Trent Valley Academy. A special school, the Aegir Community School, is also located at the site. Other initiatives that have been established include an annual Gainsborough Employment and Skills Fair and the provision of apprenticeship and training opportunities as a requirement of a local authority commissioned scheme to bring empty homes back into use.  Housing and the Physical Environment

Parts of Gainsborough are characterised by poor environment and low quality, high density terraced housing in the private rented sector, with little or no open space and children’s play facilities. The low cost of housing in the town has contributed to these areas becoming characterised by a range of social problems, particularly crime and unemployment. In 2009 part of South West Ward was identified as a priority neighbourhood for improvements to be delivered. Following an assessment and consultation a Neighbourhood Action Plan has been drawn up, principally focussing on:  improving the standard and quality of accommodation of privately owned and privately tenanted homes;  improving and maintaining the physical appearance of the area to maximise its attractiveness and encourage investment;
The Gainsborough Area 216

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

 undertaking improvements to commercial premises in line with residential properties to create an overall change in the area;  ensuring that the community has been involved in shaping the proposals and that they have widespread support for them. 9.28 The Masterplan introduced a step change in addressing the regeneration of Gainsborough by promoting ambitious levels of growth to create the critical mass needed to enable the town to once again prosper. The objective of the Local Plan growth strategy in respect of Gainsborough is to provide this significant population increase. However, it is vital that in doing so every opportunity is sought to deliver development to those areas of the town where it can lead to physical, economic and social improvements. Policy G4 seeks to achieve this by requiring the allocation of housing and employment sites to support regeneration wherever possible. Policy CL5 will also support this aim by prioritising the use of previously-developed land to deliver regeneration objectives. 9.29 A regenerated Gainsborough needs to be a well-connected, coherent town with new development fully integrated to the existing town, providing good access for all modes of transport. The Gainsborough Transport Strategy 2010 identifies a number of current and potential issues associated with travelling to, from and within Gainsborough. These include:  limited accessibility from regional locations, which may deter investment in the town. Despite being better connected than other parts of Lincolnshire, Gainsborough is still some distance from the A1/motorway network, and accessibility to regional destinations by public transport is limited limited travel options for those on a low income or without access to a private car, car ownership in the town being relatively low.

9.30 The Transport Strategy has been developed, taking into account feedback from a consultation exercise, to help control the growth in traffic volumes, minimise the level of congestion in future by providing a range of quality travel options for the town, including walking and cycling, and achieve modal shift. Policy G3 seeks to support the Strategy. 9.31 Gainsborough’s core area is based on a medieval street pattern which persisted during the town’s population explosion of the 19th century, the medieval plots being in-filled to the rear creating distinctive yards and alleys which strongly characterise the town’s central area today. Although some of the medieval pattern of narrow streets, alleys and courtyards is still evident today, clearance of the historic fabric during the 20th century, and subsequent redevelopment where this has taken place, has in most instances impacted detrimentally on the quality of the townscape. At the same time a new main thoroughfare has resulted in the town having its back to the riverfront, one of its greatest assets. Improving the quality of the townscape by revitalising the existing historic fabric, raising the standard of urban design for new development and re-establishing the historic linkages across the town will contribute to providing the right conditions to attract future investment. Policy G3 therefore seeks to protect, enhance and make best use of Gainsborough’s heritage assets and ensure that the re-development of sites achieves environmental
The Gainsborough Area 217

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

enhancement. Support for the development of key town centre sites which can serve to enhance the town centre offer as well as the environment is also provided by Policy G5. Policy G3 - Regenerating Gainsborough The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will pursue the regeneration of the Gainsborough area economically, socially and environmentally, and will seek to address multiple deprivation through new housing, employment, social, environmental and public realm development and other improvements. Informed by and in support of the Gainsborough Masterplan, and subsequent updates, the Local Plan and development proposals will support the following regeneration priorities:      Ensuring that the allocation of sites for housing and employment development supports regeneration where possible; Neighbourhood renewal in areas of high deprivation and, in particular, the Gainsborough South West Ward; Improving education and skills provision; Improving connectivity to and within the Gainsborough Urban Area including by foot, cycle and public transport; Protecting, enhancing and making best use of Gainsborough’s natural and built heritage assets including the riverside area, Gainsborough Old Hall, and All Saints Church; Redeveloping key sites for uses that will contribute to the environmental enhancement and overall prosperity of the town.

Policy G3 will be implemented by:      The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and implement strategies and proposals for the regeneration of Gainsborough The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners proactively pursuing and promoting opportunities for investment and funding for regenerating the Gainsborough area Promoting regeneration objectives in other strategies and programmes, and developing linkages between these and the Local Plan Actions by West Lindsey District Council and others focused towards the delivery of specific projects identified in the Gainsborough Masterplan or subsequent refresh. Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, including appropriate masterplanning processes

The Gainsborough Area 218

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Further policy development in the Local Plan, including site allocation and designation

EMPLOYMENT PRIORITIES IN THE GAINSBOROUGH AREA
9.32 As referred to under Regenerating Gainsborough, the Masterplan identifies economic diversification as a key priority for the town in order to move towards future economic sustainability. 9.33 Business Register and Employment Survey data identifies that in 2010 employment in Gainsborough is concentrated in three sectors as illustrated in Table 3 below. Table 5 – A comparison of sectoral employment 2004 Gainsborough Public Administration, Education and Health Distribution, hotels and restaurants (includes retail) Manufacturing Total employment in the 3 sectors 27.4% 32.7% Central East Lincolnshire Midlands 34.2% 28.2% 2010 England 27.6%

28.0%

26.3%

21.9%

21.4%

22.5%

23.6% 79.0%

17.8% 76.8%

10.3% 66.4%

13.4% 60.0%

8.7% 58.8%

Sources: Annual Business Inquiry 2004/Business Register & Employment Survey 2010 9.34 Comparing the 2010 data to the Annual Business Inquiry figures for 2004 shows a growth in employment in the public sector whilst employment in manufacturing, which had been the dominant sector, declined in the period to 2010. Manufacturing, however, remains an important sector in Gainsborough and, indeed, since 2010 public sector employment cuts and known expansion proposals by two of the town’s leading manufacturers, Ping and Eminox, may well lead to a reversal in the relative prominence of these two sectors. 9.35 Table 3 also provides a comparison for these three principal sectors with the figures for Central Lincolnshire, the East Midlands and England. These further illustrate the continued significance of the manufacturing sector to the town together with the reliance for employment on three principal sectors, highlighting the need for diversification of the local economy in Gainsborough. 9.36 The need to improve the skills base of the labour force, supported by Policy G3 is critical for attracting new employment sectors to the town. This is reinforced by

The Gainsborough Area 219

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

employment forecasts3 which indicate that for West Lindsey District as a whole, whilst manufacturing will remain an important sector, it will decline over the plan period. At the same time there is expected to be significant growth in the construction, distribution and other (mainly public) services sectors. 9.37 The objective of Policy CL17 is to develop a high quality, sustainable economy across Central Lincolnshire as a whole which is diverse and has an appropriately skilled workforce. Supported by Policies CL17 and G4, Policy G5 below sets out the components needed to achieve this within the Gainsborough area. 9.38 The 2010 Employment Land Review (ELR) for West Lindsey District identifies Gainsborough as having a primarily local property market in both the industrial and office sectors with the industrial market being far larger than the office market. There is little inward investment due to the town’s relative isolation and good opportunities elsewhere. Additionally, the ELR reports that the town suffers from a negative perception by outsiders. 9.39 Gainsborough has two principal industrial areas – the Corringham Road and Heapham Road Industrial Estates, both situated on the eastern edge of the town, close to the A631, both with good take-up of units, including by companies relocating from central town sites. A third phase of the Heapham Road estate, Somerby Park, is attracting development, including a biomass processing facility. An incubator and business centre has been constructed on the Foxby Lane Business Park but the remainder of the freehold plots remain available. 9.40 There is currently no shortage of good quality employment land within the town, though the growth proposals are expected to create an increase in demand. Policy G5 identifies the proposed SUEs as the principal locations for additional employment land allocations. Other sites will also be considered for allocation as part of the further work on the Local Plan. It is important that land to be made available for employment use can provide high quality, deliverable sites in accessible locations and be flexible to meet the needs of modern industry. 9.41 Whilst there is no shortage of employment land, in respect of West Lindsey as a whole, the ELR points to a lack of available small workshop units, grow-on space of above 500 m² new modern units and freehold units. The ELR also suggests that there is sufficient office space within Gainsborough, this and the need for small industrial/workshop premises, especially freehold, being confirmed by the 2010 Gainsborough Employment Study (GES). 9.42 Gainsborough needs to attract inward investment. The GES suggests that the level of activity in certain sectors would justify the town’s promotion as a strong location for construction and general engineering. Construction, in particular, would form a natural development and spin-off from the significant levels of growth being proposed for the town. The drive for energy efficiency may provide an opportunity to present Gainsborough as a location for green construction industries. There may
3

LEFM Feb 2009 – based on population RSS 2009, Cambridge Econometrics (Source: Lincolnshire Business Accommodation Study 2009) The Gainsborough Area 220

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

also be opportunities to take advantage of both the town’s farming hinterland for encouraging agricultural related industries and also its good access to the Grimsby and Hull ports and Doncaster and Humberside airports for attracting companies making use of these points of entry/exit to the UK. Policy G4 – Employment Priorities in the Gainsborough Area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with their partners and other stakeholders to strengthen, broaden and grow the economy of the Gainsborough area in line with Gainsborough’s status as a Primary Attractor within Central Lincolnshire. In doing so, in accordance with Policy CL4, approximately 25 ha of land will be allocated in the Local Plan for employment use within and immediately adjoining the Gainsborough Urban Area to meet the employment needs of both the existing and future population, including the following allocations at the proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions:    Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood – employment land to accommodate around 15,000m² of Class B1 and B2 Uses4 Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood – 7 ha Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood – 7.5 ha

The allocation of other specific sites will be made through further Local Plan work involving a criteria-based assessment of both existing and potential new allocations to provide a portfolio of high quality sites that are accessible, flexible to the needs of modern industry, deliverable and meet the needs of Central Lincolnshire’s population as it grows. The Local Plan will support the following sectors and premises as employment priorities for the Gainsborough area:         General engineering Agricultural services/supply chain Construction/energy saving Professional and business services Incubator units Small business/industrial workshops, particularly freehold Serviced office space Sites for business modernisation and/or consolidation

The take-up of employment land will be monitored and allocations reviewed both to ensure deliverability of sites and that the needs of the labour force are being met. The sector and premises priorities for growth will also be reviewed and updated as necessary in line with the Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy.

4

As approved by WLDC outline planning consent ref: 125020 The Gainsborough Area 221

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy G4 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward sites for employment in Gainsborough  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other and with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward the 3 proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions and necessary supporting infrastructure  Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities  Further policy development, including site allocations, in the Local Plan  Implementation of the Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy and any more locally based strategy subsequently developed by West Lindsey District Council  Working with key stakeholders including the Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership to bring forward new economic development.

GAINSBOROUGH’S TOWN CENTRE AND OTHER CENTRES
9.43 Gainsborough provides an important role as a retail and service destination for the local area and is identified as a ‘Main Town Centre’ in Central Lincolnshire’s retail hierarchy set out in Policy CL20. 9.44 The opening of Marshall’s Yard in 2007 has provided a significant step change in the appeal of the town as a shopping and leisure centre, attracting several national retailers into the site. The scheme has also strengthened the profile of Gainsborough in national town centre rankings5, advancing 257 places from 611th in 2007 to 354th in 2010. 9.45 The success of Marshall’s Yard has, however, shifted the retail focus away from the traditional town centre and this is one of the issues that stakeholders within the town centre are working to address, supported by this policy. The Masterplan describes the traditional town centre as “generally low quality, characterised by poor quality shop fronts, examples of unfortunate planning and design decisions, but with isolated pockets of higher quality buildings and public realm.” In more recent years significant high quality public realm improvements have been undertaken centred on the Market Place which could act as a catalyst to attract investment into the enhancement of the built fabric of the traditional centre, to in turn help attract new businesses and more shoppers and other visitors. Improvements to the town’s twice weekly street market have also been carried out. 9.46 The Central Lincolnshire City and Town Centres Study 2012 advises the diversity of uses in the town centre is broadly similar to the national average apart from in leisure services where there is a shortfall, despite the offer available at Marshall’s Yard. Taking into account committed convenience and comparison goods development (primarily the extant planning permission for the Tesco Extra store on Trinity Street) and the success and apparent strong trading of Marshall’s Yard, there is no quantitative need for additional convenience goods over the Plan period and only limited need for additional comparison goods in the shorter term. However, it suggests that the town would benefit from a more rounded and comprehensive offer, particularly in light of the growth strategy.
5

Venuescore The Gainsborough Area 222

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

9.47 As referred to under ‘Regenerating Gainsborough’, there are a number of opportunities within the town centre for enhancing the offer and achieving environmental improvements. These are:   Elswitha Quarter – being promoted as a mix of uses to complement the existing town centre offer with a focus on leisure services Lindsey Centre/Lindsey Centre car park/Belton’s Printing premises – redevelopment to better meet the current needs of retailers and which could provide improved links, and therefore footfall, from Marshall’s Yard into the Market Place area Magistrate’s Court - a small site possibly suitable for office, hotel, leisure or residential use (above ground floor due to flood risk) Baltic Mill - a small site possibly suitable for office, hotel, leisure or residential use (above ground floor due to flood risk) .

 

9.48 The Central Lincolnshire City and Town Centres Study advises that there are no existing concentrations of shops in the Gainsborough Urban Area that meet the definition of District or Neighbourhood Centres. A new development of retail units has opened at Corringham Road subsequent to the finalisation of the Study. Consideration of its status against the Central Lincolnshire retail hierarchy will take place as part of the further work on the Local Plan. The growth of Gainsborough will provide opportunities to provide additional local retail and service provision to cater for the day to day needs of communities. Such centres will be small in scale to support and complement the town centre and not compete with it. The appropriate scale and location for additional retail facilities to serve local needs arising from the SUEs will be determined with reference to location, dwelling density and existing retail and service provision. The designation of any District and Neighbourhood Centres, if appropriate, would need to be in accordance with the definitions set out in Policy CL20. Policy G5: Gainsborough’s Town Centre and Other Centres The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with partners and stakeholders to strengthen Gainsborough Town Centre and encourage new development that contributes to the enhancement of Gainsborough’s role as a Main Town Centre within the Central Lincolnshire retail hierarchy. To achieve this, the Local Plan will: 1) Plan for a town centre that is high quality, well-designed and is connected to the River Trent, in line with the Vision and Objectives for the Gainsborough area; 2) Focus the development of Town Centre uses serving the Gainsborough area within Gainsborough town centre in line with Policy CL20;

The Gainsborough Area 223

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

3) Seek improved integration of Marshall’s Yard with the traditional town centre based on the Market Place; 4) Promote a broader range of town centre uses, including housing where appropriate, and in particular an increase in leisure and cultural provision; 5) Safeguard and support the enhancement of the existing and development, as appropriate, of new markets; 6) Support the delivery of projects identified through the Gainsborough Masterplan and its updates to enhance the environment and offer of the town centre, including the redevelopment of the Elswitha Quarter and the Lindsey Centre/Beltons Printing premises site; 7) Seek further environmental enhancement of the historic fabric of the traditional town centre based on the Market Place; 8) Seek opportunities to provide more public green open space; 9) Improve access into and around the town centre, prioritising public transport, cycling and walking, including associated facilities. To complement but not compete with Gainsborough Town Centre, a network of other centres will be developed and maintained. New centres will be an integral part of the proposed strategic Sustainable Urban Extensions and should provide a range of services and facilities to meet the daily needs of current and future residents of the Gainsborough area. To achieve this, the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan will identify new Centres for the Gainsborough area and ensure that new development within them: 1. Contributes to the vitality and mix of uses of the locality; 2. Meets a need within the immediate locality; 3. Is of an appropriate scale and does not have a detrimental impact on the objectives to strengthen Gainsborough Town Centre; 4. Prioritises and promotes access by walking and cycling. Policy G5 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and implement strategies and proposals, drawn from the Masterplan or subsequent refresh and related projects  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners proactively pursuing and promoting opportunities for investment and funding for regenerating the Gainsborough town centre  Promoting the strengthening of Gainsborough town centre in other strategies and programmes, and developing linkages between these and the Local Plan
The Gainsborough Area 224

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

   

Actions by West Lindsey District Council and others focused towards the delivery of specific projects identified in the Gainsborough Masterplan or subsequent refresh Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, including appropriate masterplanning processes Working with proponents of strategic sites to ensure new neighbourhood centre are fit for purpose and delivered Further policy development in the Local Plan, including site allocation and designation.

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE AND SETTLEMENT BREAKS
9.49 The provision and maintenance of a high quality Green Infrastructure Network is a key component of the Growth Strategy for Central Lincolnshire and is fundamental for ensuring the level of growth proposed for the Gainsborough Urban Area is accommodated in a sustainable manner. 9.50 Consultation for the Masterplan established the view amongst residents that there is a lack of public open space in Gainsborough’s centre together with a shortage of opportunities for walking and cycling around the town’s edge, despite being surrounded by open countryside. To this end the Masterplan identifies opportunities for increasing open space in proposals for key town centre sites and also the objective of linking the various woodlands and sites of nature conservation located around the periphery to create an accessible green corridor from the riverside at Morton in the north to the Lea Marsh SSSI in the south. A series of riverside walks and a footbridge across the Trent would then complete the loop. 9.51 The deficiency in natural green spaces both in and around Gainsborough is confirmed by the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study. The Study also identifies the need to protect and enhance areas of open land in and around the setting of the town that contribute to its character and prevent further coalescence with Lea and Morton. 9.52 Policy G5 supports the provision of public green open space in the town centre whilst Policy G6 supports the implementation of the recommendations and proposals for the Gainsborough Area as set out in the GI Study. 9.53 Gainsborough lies within the Study’s Trent Strategic Green Corridor, a priority area with key opportunities for strategic GI enhancement, linkage and creation, including to the west of the River Trent in Nottinghamshire. Within this Corridor, an East Gainsborough Strategic Green Access Link will be created which will connect communities and businesses within the eastern and southern SUEs to local leisure opportunities and destinations, green spaces and public transport. This East Gainsborough Link will connect to a Trent Strategic Green Access Link both to the north and south of the town, the Trent Link following the route of the river, thereby achieving the Masterplan objective of creating a green corridor around the town. 9.54 Within the built-up area of the town the concept of an Urban Green Grid will be developed which will extend out into the SUEs. The Grid will comprise multifunctional networks of green and blue links and spaces threading through the
The Gainsborough Area 225

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

built environment, weaving together areas where people live and work with public transport networks and the wider countryside. In doing so the Grid will provide the local community with green areas for recreation and access to nature, a sense of place, education opportunities and help to contribute towards sustainable travel by providing safe routes for walking and cycling. The Grid will also include green roofs and walls to provide linkages for wildlife. 9.55 Linking the Urban Green Grid to the Strategic Access Links, green spaces and habitats around the town and adjoining villages of Lea and Morton will be a network of Local Green Links. This network will include the open space of the ‘Gainsborough Escarpment’, the prominent north-south landscape feature that affords extensive views west across the Trent Valley and which has been afforded protection from development under local planning policy for a number of years. 9.56 Gainsborough is attached to the village of Lea by past development extending northwards from the village. This development however is only to the west of the Gainsborough Road, there being open countryside to its east. In order to retain the intrinsic character of Lea, local planning policy has aimed to prevent further coalescence of Gainsborough with the village through the designation of a ‘settlement break’. Unfortunately a greater degree of coalescence has taken place between the town and Morton without any discernible break; however the village has its own identity which, together with that of Lea, the Masterplan recognises should be maintained. Undeveloped land that helps to maintain the individual identities of Lea and Morton and prevent further coalescence with Gainsborough will be protected from development. At the same time opportunities will be sought in these and other locations around Gainsborough to create accessible green space, potentially by linking and/or extending the arc of woodlands to the east of the town.

The Gainsborough Area 226

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The Gainsborough Area 227

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy G6 – Green Infrastructure and Settlement Breaks in the Gainsborough Area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with partners and stakeholders to protect, enhance and deliver an integrated green infrastructure network for the Gainsborough area. In addition to meeting the general principles for green infrastructure and biodiversity in Policy CL24, this network will meet the specific requirements for the Gainsborough area, and will be achieved through development management, investment and appropriate management of land. In relation to growth and development in the Gainsborough area, the Local Plan will: 1) Protect and enhance the existing network of green spaces, including wildlife sites, protected open space and settlement breaks as defined and designated in the saved policies and Policies Map of the West Lindsey Local Plan, together with any future revisions to the network; 2) Undertake a review of the existing network as part of the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan to consolidate, enhance and, where appropriate, extend the network, including revised or additional designation of land if required, taking account of: i) the opportunities identified in the Green Infrastructure Study for Central Lincolnshire; ii) the proposed locational priorities for development in the Gainsborough area, including the Sustainable Urban Extensions, as set out in Policy G2; and iii) the other requirements and objectives set out in this policy; 3) Pursue the planning and delivery of the proposed Green Infrastructure Network for the Gainsborough Area as illustrated in the Concept Plan, including: i) the protection, enhancement and creation of green infrastructure within the Trent Green Strategic Corridor, including, wherever appropriate, working with partners and stakeholders to the west of the River Trent to ensure that such protection, enhancement and creation respects the Trent Vale as an entity; ii) the development of the Trent and East Gainsborough Strategic Green Access Links to connect communities and businesses with local leisure opportunities/destinations, green spaces and public transport services; and iii) the protection, enhancement and creation of Local Green Links, including incorporating the open space of the Gainsborough Escarpment, to

The Gainsborough Area 228

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

connect the Gainsborough Urban Green Grid to the Trent and East Gainsborough Strategic Green Access Links, green spaces and habitats in the countryside around the Gainsborough Urban Area, including to the west of the River Trent to link with the Bassetlaw Green Infrastructure Network and beyond; 4) Protect undeveloped land between Gainsborough and Morton to the north and Gainsborough and Lea to the south as opportunities to locate natural greenspace accessible to all in these areas; 5) Protect views east – west across the Trent Valley from the Gainsborough escarpment including from inappropriate development; 6) Enhance the environmental quality of landscapes that contribute to the character and setting of Gainsborough and its setting; 7) Retain existing important natural green spaces and provide significant levels of habitat re-creation to form stepping stones to link existing wildlife habitats. Promoting the use of small watercourse ditches and drains as wildlife corridors; 8) Provide extensive levels of new natural green space accessible to all to meet the needs of the existing and expanded population for outdoor recreational space, and to act as ecological buffer zones to protect wildlife habitats; 9) Protect, enhance and promote managed access for all to archaeological sites, historic landscapes and other historic environmental assets as part of the Green Infrastructure Network; 10) Promote the use of green roofs and walls to provide wildlife linkages between green spaces; and 11) Promote the management of the Trent floodplain as a multi-functional green corridor to enable sustainable water resource management and the creation of wildlife and recreational corridors. Development in the Gainsborough area will be required to be in accordance with these principles and requirements. Policy G6 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and implement strategies and proposals for green infrastructure in the Gainsborough Area  Developing the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure evidence base  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners pursuing investment and funding for the provision and management of green infrastructure  Promoting green infrastructure objectives in other strategies and programmes, and developing linkages between green infrastructure and other strategies

The Gainsborough Area 229

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

Promoting green infrastructure objectives in the land management practices of the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, partners, stakeholders, communities and individuals Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, including appropriate masterplanning processes Further policy development in the Local Plan, including site allocation and designation.

SUSTAINABLE URBAN EXTENSIONS TO GAINSBOROUGH
9.57 There are three SUEs proposed for the town. The delivery of all three strategic sites will overlap and be in accordance with the infrastructure requirements of the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and the Gainsborough area. All SUEs in Central Lincolnshire will be subject to detailed masterplans and brought forward in line with the requirement of Policy CL7 Sustainable Urban Extensions in Central Lincolnshire. 9.58 Further details for each proposed SUE are contained in a Topic Paper which forms part of the evidence base for the Core Strategy.

GAINSBOROUGH SOUTHERN NEIGHBOURHOOD
9.59 The Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood will be an expansion of the main built-up area of the town and provide a significant contribution to the type and level of growth required to ensure the continued regeneration of Gainsborough. The Southern SUE will be a balanced neighbourhood that will form an integrated extension to the existing community and which will provide services and facilities that can also benefit areas in close proximity which include pockets of deprivation. 9.60 The site already benefits from outline planning permission following referral to the Secretary of State. Consideration of the planning application was subject to a Planning Performance Agreement, the development requirements and phasing being the results of negotiation under the PPA, extensive consultation and a masterplanning exercise. 9.61 The SUE will deliver a broad range of up to 2,500 new homes by 2031, including affordable housing, over four phases. Included within the total provision, but excluded from the four phases, are some 310 units to be built as part of the Centre. Construction is expected to start during 2014/2015 with the completion of some 60 dwellings in the first year, rising through the plan period to an annual build rate of around 150 -175 dwellings 9.62 The Centre is key to the success of the development, providing, along with the residential units, employment space and retail and community uses. Very localised shopping will be provided at two further locations. The scale of retail to be provided at the Centre will complement rather than compete with Gainsborough Town Centre. In addition, two primary schools will be built within the neighbourhood, with secondary education initially being provided by the Trent Valley Academy and Queen Elizabeth's High School.

The Gainsborough Area 230

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

9.63 The scale of employment space being provided at the SUE takes into account its close proximity to existing opportunities for employment development at the Foxby Lane Business Park and at Phase 3 of the Heapham Road Industrial Estate (Somerby Park). Employment will also be provided by the shops, services and schools to be included within the SUE. It is additionally expected that the types of dwellings to be provided on the SUE, including a requirement for a specific percentage of Lifetime Homes, will result in a proportion of residents working from home. 9.64 Interspersed between the developed areas will be a network of green infrastructure benefiting wildlife and providing leisure opportunities and also links for pedestrians and cyclists to gain access to the proposed East Gainsborough Green Access Link and beyond. To compensate for the impact the development of this greenfield site will have on biodiversity, and notwithstanding that the masterplan indicates that around 40% of the site will remain undeveloped, the delivery of an Offsite Ecological Compensation Area has been agreed. Whilst located within an Area of Great Landscape Value, the site has the advantage of largely being in the form of a shallow bowl that faces along its northern edge the existing built edge of Gainsborough. The remainder of the site is encircled by existing mature woodland which will serve to largely screen the development from the south and south-east. 9.65 Access to the site will be at four points off Foxby Lane, which itself will be subject to highway improvements including new roundabouts and traffic calming measures. Modal shift and sustainable transport solutions are key aspects of the development. 9.66 A Sustainable Urban Drainage System is to be used in respect of surface water drainage for the majority of the site. Elsewhere, where necessary, a combination of other methods will be used. The Lea Road Sewage Treatment Works is to be upgraded to cater for foul drainage from the development, the timing for which is included in the Section 106 Agreement. An on-site Combined Heat and Power Energy Centre is planned to serve the latter three phases of development. Policy G7 - Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood (Land south of Foxby Lane) This area to the south of Gainsborough, as shown on the Policies Map, is identified as a strategic site for a Sustainable Urban Extension (SUE) to deliver the following mix of uses within the plan period:   In the region of 2,500 dwellings of an appropriate mix; Employment land to accommodate around 15,000 m² of Class B1 (Business) and B2 (General Industrial) uses such as small offices, start up business premises and other small scale industry compatible with a residential area and the location; A new Centre of an appropriate scale and nature, providing for Class A uses of around 2,000 m², community uses and services, including for health and community policing;

The Gainsborough Area 231

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

  

Additional retail provision of very limited scale and nature at two further locations; Two on-site primary schools and proportionate contributions towards improving education provision in the Gainsborough Area; and Associated transport, green, social and other infrastructure.

Phasing and Infrastructure The development shall be phased to ensure that it meets the requirements of Policy CL7 and positively contributes to the wider objectives for the Gainsborough area and Central Lincolnshire over its construction period and beyond. To achieve this, the development and Phasing Plan shall have regard to: a. The Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and recognise infrastructure capacity and improvements needed in the Gainsborough area to support the overall level of growth proposed; b. Ensuring sustainable communities are developed through each phase of development, and over the period of construction, by delivering the proposed District Centre, employment and other uses in parallel with residential development; c. Where viable, ensuring development which will achieve successful linkages with the Gainsborough Town Centre and existing development is phased early in the construction period; d. The timing and construction of improvements to locally key transport infrastructure such as Foxby Hill/Foxby Lane; and e. The need for investment in upgrading utility services in the wider Gainsborough area, particularly where there are known capacity issues such as the existing sewage treatment works. Transport and Connectivity To ensure that the development positively contributes towards improved movement in the Gainsborough area a detailed Transport Assessment, Travel Plan and the development should: a. Take full account of, and contribute towards, planned projects identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and the impacts and opportunities associated with the wider growth strategy for the Gainsborough area; b. Include measures to encourage the use of public transport, walking and cycling, such as the provision of services and infrastructure both within the development and to adjoining areas and Gainsborough Town Centre; c. Make provision for four vehicular access points to the site from Foxby Lane;
The Gainsborough Area 232

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

d. Assess and, where appropriate, contribute towards mitigation of any unacceptably adverse impacts on existing transport infrastructure, such as Foxby Hill/Foxby Lane. A Quality Environment To ensure that the development contributes positively to the conservation and enhancement of the environmental quality and character of the Gainsborough area, and that adverse impacts are minimised and mitigated, informed by historic landscape characterization, the masterplan and development shall: a. Respect the site’s location within an Area of Great Landscape Value as designated by the West Lindsey Local Plan. To assist the integration of the development into its surroundings, wherever possible existing trees, remnant hedges and ponds should be incorporated into the landscape structure, supplemented by new planting of native woodland and hedgerows together with the creation of new ponds as necessary; b. Provide a network of green infrastructure that links to the wider Green Infrastructure Network for the Gainsborough area as set out in Policy G6, and which: i) protects, including by the provision of buffers, and, where appropriate, enhances and/or links sites within and adjoining the site that are subject to environmental designations such as Local Wildlife Sites, Ancient Woodlands and other Strategic Greenspace identified in the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study 2011 including Warren Wood, Bass and Park Springs Wood, Lea Wood and Pickering Pond Wood; ii) incorporates historic field boundaries, wherever possible, and other historic landscape features, including Park House moated site and medieval deer park, into the layout of the new development wherever possible; and iii) provides a variety of linked formal and informal open spaces together with sustainable access links and connectivity both within the development and between it, the rest of the Gainsborough urban area, including the Eastern and Northern SUEs, and the adjoining countryside, including the potential East Gainsborough Green Access Link, as identified in the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study 2011.

The Gainsborough Area 233

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

THE GAINSBOROUGH NORTHERN NEIGHBOURHOOD
9.67 The Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood provides an opportunity to enhance the role and sustainability of the town, providing a significant contribution to the type and level of growth required to ensure the continued regeneration of Gainsborough. The proposed Sustainable Urban Extension will deliver in total some 2,400 new homes, 1,970 of these by 2031, to comprise a broad mix of housing sizes and types to meet the needs of the town, including, in particular, low density housing development. 9.68 Key to the development will be a new Centre providing shops, services such as health care, and community facilities for the local area. The scale of retail provision at the Centre will be in line with that of a Neighbourhood Centre in Policy CL20 and will complement rather than compete with Gainsborough Town Centre. 9.69 The development will provide around 7 ha of employment land. The site is considered to be particularly suited to smaller units and start up premises, especially in the B1 office/light industry Use Class, which would help to meet the employment priorities set out in Policy G4. There is also potential for accommodating adjacent to the A631 some storage and distribution uses together with larger general industrial businesses, however the main location for these will be the adjoining Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood. 9.70 Located within an Area of Great Landscape Value, it will be crucial for the development to be designed in such a way that it is integrated with its surroundings, contributing positively to the quality and character of the area. The creation of a network of green infrastructure will help towards achieving this, benefit wildlife, and provide leisure opportunities and also links for pedestrians and cyclists to gain access to the East Gainsborough Green Access Link and beyond. 9.71 Vehicular access to the main site will be provided from both Corringham Road and also potentially via a new roundabout on the A631 to the east of the Thorndyke Way/Corringham Road junction, which would also serve the Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood. Additional highway improvements will also be needed, including at the existing Thorndyke Way/Corringham Road junction. Sustainable transport solutions, including the provision of cycle and pedestrian routes, will be a key aspect of the development. 9.72 Construction is expected to commence on site during 2017/18 with the completion of 60 dwellings in the first year, rising through the plan period to an annual build rate of around 150 – 175 dwellings. Infrastructure requirements and affordable housing provision will be triggered through different phases of development and in accordance with the masterplan and phasing plan accompanying the outline planning application. Throughout the lifetime of the development there will be a need for developer contributions towards sewerage infrastructure, there currently being a lack of capacity to accommodate the scale of development and to provide for a new primary school to service the development. Secondary education will initially be provided by the Trent Valley Academy and Queen Elizabeth's High School with contributions for improving secondary education in the area to be made towards a new secondary school to be provided on the
The Gainsborough Area 234

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood. There will also be the need for developer contributions to transport infrastructure works and improvements. Policy G8 - Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood (land north of Corringham Road and the A631) This area to the north of Gainsborough, as shown on the Policies Map, is identified as a strategic site for a Sustainable Urban Extension (SUE) to deliver the following mix of uses within the plan period:  In the region of 2,400 (of which 1,970 will be provided in the plan period) dwellings of an appropriate mix;  Around 7 ha of employment land for Class B1/B2/B8 uses to include start-up and small business premises, with an emphasis on B1 uses;  A new Neighbourhood Centre of an appropriate scale, providing for retail, services and community uses of a local nature in line with Policy CL20;  Education provision, including the provision of an on-site primary school and proportionate contributions towards improving secondary education provision in the Gainsborough Area; and  Associated transport, green, social and other infrastructure. Phasing and Infrastructure The development shall be phased to ensure that it meets the requirements of Policy CL7 and positively contributes to the wider objectives for the Gainsborough area and Central Lincolnshire over its construction period and beyond. To achieve this, the development and Phasing Plan shall have regard to: a. The Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and recognise infrastructure capacity and improvements needed in the Gainsborough area to support to overall level of growth proposed; b. Ensuring sustainable communities are developed through each phase of development, and over the period of construction, by delivering the proposed Centre, employment and other uses in parallel with residential development; c. Where viable, ensuring development which will achieve successful linkages with the Gainsborough Town Centre and existing development is phased early in construction period; d. The timing and construction of improvements to locally key transport infrastructure such as the Belt Road, Corringham Road and the A631/B1433 junction; and e. The need for investment in upgrading utility services in the wider Gainsborough area, particularly where there are known capacity issues such as the existing sewage treatment works.

The Gainsborough Area 235

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Transport and Connectivity To ensure that the development positively contributes towards improved movement in the Gainsborough area a detailed Transport Assessment, Travel Plan and the development should: a. Take full account of, and contribute towards, planned projects identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and the impacts and opportunities associated with the wider growth strategy for the Gainsborough area; b. Include measures to encourage the use of public transport, walking and cycling, such as the provision of services and infrastructure both within the development and to adjoining areas and Gainsborough Town Centre; c. Make provision for appropriate access points to the site and additional improvements to the existing highway to include:      new junction onto the Gainsborough Educational Village access road to serve phase one new roundabout at existing junction of Thorndyke Way (A631) and Corringham Road, to include a fourth spur to the Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood new junction on Corringham Road between The Belt Road and Thorndyke Way potential new roundabout on A631 to east of Thorndyke Way/Corringham Road junction to serve both the Gainsborough Northern and Eastern Neighbourhoods pedestrian and cycle crossing of The Belt Road to link the SUE with phase 1, the Gainsborough Educational Village and the remainder of the town

A Quality Environment To ensure that the development contributes positively to the conservation and enhancement of the environmental quality and character of the Gainsborough area, and that adverse impacts are minimised and mitigated, informed by historic landscape characterization, the masterplan and development shall: a. Respect the site’s location within an Area of Great Landscape Value as designated by the West Lindsey Local Plan. To assist the integration of the development into its surroundings, wherever possible existing trees, remnant hedges and ponds should be incorporated into the landscape structure, supplemented by new planting of native woodland and hedgerows together with the creation of new ponds as necessary; and b. Provide a network of green infrastructure that links to the wider Green
The Gainsborough Area 236

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Infrastructure Network for the Gainsborough area as set out in Policy G6, and which: i) protects, including by the provision of buffers, and, where appropriate, enhances and/or links sites adjoining the site that are subject to environmental designations such as Local Wildlife Sites and other Strategic Greenspace identified in the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study 2011 including Somerby Wood, Hornby Wood, Corringham Scroggs Wood, and Wharton Wood; ii) incorporates historic field boundaries into the layout of new development wherever possible; and iii) provides a variety of linked formal and informal open spaces together with sustainable access links and connectivity both within the development and between it, the rest of the Gainsborough urban area, including the Trent Vale Academy and the Eastern and Southern SUEs, and the adjoining countryside, including the potential East Gainsborough Green Access Link, as identified in the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study 2011.

GAINSBOROUGH EASTERN NEIGHBOURHOOD
9.73 The Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood provides an opportunity to enhance the role and sustainability of the town, providing a significant contribution to the type and level of growth required to ensure the continued regeneration of Gainsborough. The proposed Sustainable Urban Extension will deliver some 2,100 new homes, 960 of these by 2031, to comprise a broad mix of housing sizes and types to meet the needs of the town. 9.74 Key to the development will be a new Centre providing shops, services such as health care and community facilities for the local area. The scale of retail at the Centre will be in line with that of a Neighbourhood Centre in Policy CL20 and will complement rather than compete with Gainsborough Town Centre. 9.75 The development will provide around 7.5 ha of employment land and will include start-up and small business premises in helping to provide for the employment priorities set out in Policy G4. Given the site’s proximity to the adjacent A631, however, there will be a particular focus on storage and distribution uses together with larger general industrial businesses. 9.76 Located within an Area of Great Landscape Value, it will be crucial for the development to be designed in such a way that it is integrated into its surroundings, contributing positively to the quality and character of the area. The creation of a network of green infrastructure will help towards achieving this, benefit wildlife, and provide leisure opportunities and also links for pedestrians and cyclists to gain access to the East Gainsborough Green Access Link and beyond. The site of Somerby Deserted Medieval Village lies adjacent to the east of the SUE, suitable
The Gainsborough Area 237

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

protection for it being able to be provided by a buffer of informal public open space within the development, and which also has potential as an educational resource. 9.77 Access to the site will be provided both from the north via an improved Thorndyke Way (A631)/Corringham Road junction, possibly a new roundabout, and off Heapham Road from the south–west, creating a link to the Southern Neighbourhood. A possible third access may be created via a new roundabout on the A631 to the east of the Thorndyke Way/Corringham Road junction, which would also serve the Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood. Sustainable transport solutions, including the provision of cycle and pedestrian routes, will be a key aspect of the development. 9.78 Detached from the existing town in advance of the Gainsborough Southern and Northern Neighbourhoods being developed, the Eastern Neighbourhood is likely to be the last of the three SUEs to come forward in respect of residential uses. The employment element could however progress prior to the housing commencing. Construction is expected to commence on site during 2020/2021 with the completion of some 60 dwellings during the first year followed by an annual build rate of around 90 dwellings over the remainder of the plan period. Infrastructure requirements and affordable housing provision will be triggered through different phases of development and in accordance with the masterplan and phasing plan accompanying the outline planning application. Throughout the lifetime of the development there will be a need for developer contributions towards sewerage infrastructure, there currently being a lack of capacity to accommodate the scale of development and to provide for both a new primary and secondary school, with the latter to serve the Gainsborough area as a whole. There will also be the need for developer contributions to transport infrastructure works and improvements. Policy G9 - Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood (land south of the A631 and north of Heapham Road) This area to the east of Gainsborough, as shown on the Policies Map, is identified as a strategic site for a Sustainable Urban Extension (SUE) to deliver the following mix of uses within the plan period:     In the region of 2,100 dwellings of an appropriate mix (of which 960 will be provided within the plan period); Around 7.5 ha of employment land for Class B1/B2/B8 uses with an emphasis on B2/B8 uses to include start-up and small business premises; A new Neighbourhood Centre of an appropriate scale, providing for retail, services and community uses of a local nature; Education provision, including the provision of an on-site primary school and 8 ha of land for a secondary school together with proportionate contributions towards improving education provision in the Gainsborough Area; and Associated transport, green, social and other infrastructure.

The Gainsborough Area 238

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Phasing and Infrastructure The development shall be phased to ensure that it meets the requirements of Policy CL7 and positively contributes to the wider objectives for the Gainsborough area and Central Lincolnshire over its construction period and beyond. To achieve this, the development and Phasing Plan shall have regard to: a. The Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and recognise infrastructure capacity and improvements needed in the Gainsborough area to support the overall level of growth proposed; b. Ensuring sustainable communities are developed through each phase of development, and over the period of construction, by delivering the proposed District Centre, employment and other uses in parallel with residential development; c. Where viable, ensuring development which will achieve successful linkages with the Gainsborough Town Centre and existing development is phased early in the construction period; d. The timing and construction of improvements to locally key transport infrastructure such as the Heapham Road and the A631/B1433 junction; and e. The need for investment in upgrading utility services in the wider Gainsborough area, particularly where there are known capacity issues such as the existing sewage treatment works. Transport and Connectivity To ensure that the development positively contributes towards improved movement in the Gainsborough area a detailed Transport Assessment, Travel Plan and the development should: a. Take full account of, and contribute towards, planned projects identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and the impacts and opportunities associated with the wider growth strategy for the Gainsborough area; b. Include measures to encourage the use of public transport, walking and cycling, such as the provision of services and infrastructure both within the development and to adjoining areas and Gainsborough Town Centre; c. Make provision for appropriate access points to the site and additional improvements to the existing highway to include:   new roundabout at existing junction of Thorndyke Way (A631) and Corringham Road, as required by Policy G8 potential new roundabout on A631 to east of Thorndyke
The Gainsborough Area 239

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

 

Way/Corringham Road junction to serve both the Gainsborough Northern and Eastern Neighbourhoods, as required by Policy G8 further vehicular access to Heapham Road improvements to Heapham Road between site junction and Foxby Lane junction

d. Assess and, where appropriate, contribute towards mitigation of any unacceptably adverse impacts on existing transport infrastructure, such as Corringham Road and Heapham Road. A Quality Environment To ensure that the development contributes positively to the conservation and enhancement of the environmental quality and character of the Gainsborough area, and that adverse impacts are minimised and mitigated, informed by historic landscape characterization, the masterplan and development shall: a. Respect the site’s location within an Area of Great Landscape Value as designated by the West Lindsey Local Plan. To assist the integration of the development into its surroundings, wherever possible existing trees, remnant hedges and ponds should be incorporated into the landscape structure, supplemented by new planting of native woodland and hedgerows together with the creation of new ponds as necessary; and b. Provide a network of green infrastructure that links to the wider Green Infrastructure Network for the Gainsborough area as set out in Policy G6, and which: i) Protects, including by the provision of buffers, and, where appropriate, enhances and/or links sites adjoining the site that are subject to environmental designations such as Local Wildlife Sites and other Strategic Greenspace identified in the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study 2011 including Somerby Wood, Hornby Wood and Whites Wood; ii) Incorporates historic field boundaries into the layout of new development wherever possible; iii) Provides a variety of linked formal and informal open spaces together with sustainable access links and connectivity both within the development and between it, the rest of the Gainsborough urban area, including the Northern and Southern SUEs, and the adjoining countryside; and iv) Protects the setting of Somerby Medieval Settlement and related medieval archaeology, and the former parkland of Somerby Hall.

The Gainsborough Area 240

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policies G7, G8 & G9 will be implemented by:    The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working together and with key stakeholders to manage the delivery of the developments overt the plan period Establishing detailed masterplans and phasing plans alongside outline planning applications for the comprehensive development of the sites Reserved matters planning applications for each phase of development.

The Gainsborough Area 241

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

10. THE SLEAFORD AREA
10.1 Sleaford is a historic market town situated on the River Slea in the heart of Lincolnshire. It is the main retail, service and employment centre for people living in the town and in the surrounding villages.

10.2 Sleaford has experienced rapid population growth over the past 30 years rising from 8,000 in 1981 to around 18,000 today with a further 30,000 people living within 10 miles of the town. Growth has largely been the result of people moving to the area attracted by the quality of life, low crime rates, relatively low house prices, good-quality education and its central location with good road and rail links to national employment centres including London, which all have the potential to be enhanced and in turn develop Sleaford’s role locally and nationally.

The Sleaford Area

242

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

10.3 The public sector is the main employment sector alongside agriculture and manufacturing. The town has lower unemployment rates than the national average but is an area of relatively low wages largely due to significant levels of employment in the agriculture and food processing sectors. 10.4 Sleaford hosts the National Centre for Craft and Design, a major tourist attraction located in the town centre. The town has a strong heritage, an attractive market place and a tight urban grain. The River Slea runs through the Town Centre assisting to provide a pleasant environment. Parts of the town are in need of regeneration, including the approach to the Town Centre from the railway station and the former Bass Maltings which is a Grade II* Listed Building. Regeneration, infrastructure investment, and a full realisation of the benefits offered by Sleaford’s assets and location could really unlock the town’s potential as an exemplar living, working, shopping and recreational environment and to enhance Sleaford role within Central Lincolnshire and beyond.

SLEAFORD TODAY – CONTEXT & KEY CHALLENGES
SLEAFORD – A PORTRAIT Sleaford:      is an attractive market town which acts as a major centre for services, employment, retail, leisure, culture, health and education has three highly performing secondary schools located in the town centre has good road and rail connections benefitting from its location in the heart of Lincolnshire will be generating renewable energy from the straw burning Sleaford Renewable Energy Plant (SREP) expected to be completed in 2014. suffers from a lack of diversity in employment premises and environments, with a need for high quality office space and smaller premise including industrial workshops, grow-on industrial space and serviced offices has a surrounding area characterised by lower than average wage rates and a narrow employment focus has an attractive town centre but a narrow town centre offer, in part due to the predominance of smaller premises which are not always attractive to retailers and suitable for the sale of comparison goods. Benefits from two bypasses (the A17 to the north and the A15 to the west) but has a constrained road network in and around the town centre, which results in queuing traffic in the high street (Southgate) and detracts from the quality of the town centre environment has a lack of capacity in the foul water drainage network which will need upgrading to allow the town to sustainably develop

 

The Sleaford Area

243

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Table 6 – Key Figures for the Sleaford Area1 Size of area Population of Sleaford Urban Area (Census, 2011):    Total Population Population aged 65 and over Population at working age 17,671 17% of Output Areas 64% of Output Areas 38,767 8,690 (LSOA) 29% (Economic Zone) 22% (Economic Zone) 7 0 1 5 2 1 179 7,668 20% 160 (LSOA) 5.5 sq. km

Population of Economic Zone (Census, 2011) Number of houses (Valuation Office, 2011) Main employment sectors (2011): o Public administration, education and health o Distribution, restaurants and hotels Number of schools Number of SSSIs Conservation Areas Local Wildlife Sites Local Nature Reserves Scheduled Monuments Listed Buildings Number of households (Census 2011) Non car-owning households (Census 2011) Number of households in fuel poverty (2010)

1

All figures refer to the Sleaford Urban Area (as defined in Appendix F) unless otherwise stated The Sleaford Area

244

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

VISION AND OBJECTIVES FOR SLEAFORD
10.5 A Vision and Objectives have been prepared to guide sustainable development in Sleaford over the plan period to 2031 as follows: VISION FOR SLEAFORD IN 2031 By 2031, Sleaford will have grown sustainably into a better, more confident place with a thriving local economy which provides a diverse range of services and employment opportunities. Significant levels of residential and economic development will have taken place including the delivery of two Sustainable Urban Extensions, a town centre superstore, new retail units and attractive locations for employment within and adjoining the Sleaford Urban Area. Sleaford’s visitors and residents alike will enjoy increased access to a wealth of natural green spaces with green corridors permeating through the town and connecting with the surrounding countryside which provide recreational and educational opportunities, sustainable travel options and net gains in biodiversity. An attractive and lively waterside environment will offer an improved leisure and culture offer and provide a focus for community recreation and tourism. The Sleaford area will be a welcoming and accessible network of interdependent, sustainable communities which are well connected to each other and their surrounding areas. The day to day needs of the area’s communities will be met by local neighbourhood centres which will provide a range of local shops, services and other facilities. Sleaford town centre will be an attractive and vibrant place with a pedestrian focused public realm which is clean, green and safe and engenders community pride. The retail offer of the town centre will have developed and diversified strengthening Sleaford’s competitiveness, resilience and role as a Primary Attractor. The regeneration of the town’s key opportunity areas including the former Bass Maltings complex, Money’s Yard and the Market Square (including Corn Exchange) will have attracted new businesses, residents and visitors to the area and created desirable places to live, work, shop and socialise. Southgate will be transformed into a vibrant and welcoming gateway into the town centre. 10.6 The following specific objectives for the Sleaford area are identified alongside the Strategic Objectives for Central Lincolnshire:
The Sleaford Area

245

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Objective 1 Key Policies for Delivery Objective 2 Key Policies for Delivery Objective 3 Key Policies for Delivery Objective 4

Reinforce the role of Sleaford as a Primary Attractor through growth including the development of 4,500 new homes and 20ha of employment land and proportionate investment in local infrastructure S1, S2, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8

Build a more resilient local economy with substantial job growth, transition to a higher skilled economy and providing premises of a variety of sizes, suitable for broad range of potential investors S1, S2, S3, S4

Prioritise the reuse of previously developed land by regenerating key opportunity areas including the former Bass Maltings complex, Money’s Yard and the Market Square S1, S2, S4

Key Policies for Delivery Objective 5 Key Policies for Delivery Objective 6

Improve movement in and around the town and encourage sustainable travel by improving public bus services, cycle routes, walking routes and providing parking for private cars in appropriate locations around the town centre S1, S2, S5

Ensure growth and development is supported by appropriate infrastructure including sewerage, energy and transport infrastructure S1, S2

Key Policies for Delivery Objective 7 Key Policies for Delivery

Create clean, green and safe environments by increasing green infrastructure provision and identifying and delivering key opportunities for improving connectivity and movement within and around the town S1, S2, S6, S7, S8

Create an attractive and lively waterside environment by identifying and delivering key opportunities for enhancing leisure and culture offer along the River Slea S1, S5, S6

The Sleaford Area

246

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

KEY DIAGRAM – SLEAFORD AREA

The Sleaford Area

247

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The Sleaford Area

248

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

SLEAFORD AREA STRATEGY FOR GROWTH
10.7 The Spatial Strategy for the Growth of Central Lincolnshire identifies Sleaford as a main urban area and Primary Attractor, identifying a need for 4,500 new dwellings and 20 ha of employment land to be delivered over the plan period. 10.8 The growth of the Sleaford area will drive investment in, and be hand in hand with significant infrastructure improvements. Through proposed growth it is envisaged that Sleaford’s role nationally and within Central Lincolnshire will be enhanced as a more attractive place to live, visit work and do business. This is in line with the Regional Plan (2009) which seeks to maintain and enhance the roles of “Main Towns” as locally significant employment and service centres. 10.9 Policy S1 below sets out an integrated approach to sustainability as a headline policy for the Sleaford area, embodying the Vision and Strategic Objectives. Policies in the rest of the chapter flow from it to provide more detail on particular aspects, as follows:       S2 – Locational Priorities for Development in the Sleaford Area S3 – Employment Priorities in the Sleaford Area S4 – Regenerating Sleaford S5 – Strengthening Sleaford Town Centre and the Network of Neighbourhood Centres in the Sleaford Area S6 – Green Infrastructure in the Sleaford Area S7 & S8 - detailed policies for the 2 proposed SUEs for Sleaford.

10.10 These policies focus on issues for which a specific approach is felt to be needed for the Sleaford area. The Sleaford area is, however, also subject to the generic policies in the Core Strategy as set out in Chapters 3 – 7. Policy S1 – Strategy for Growth in the Sleaford Area Growth in the Sleaford area will be delivered through a co-ordinated and sustainable approach to planning and development based on the Core Strategy’s Vision and Objectives for the Sleaford area. This approach integrates housing, economic, regeneration, transport, green infrastructure and environmental policy to achieve major housing and economic growth linked to infrastructure improvements, whilst protecting and enhancing Sleaford’s environmental quality and character. Sustainable growth in the Sleaford Area will be achieved through a combined strategy of prioritising the re-use of suitable brownfield sites within the Sleaford Urban Area, the delivery of two strategic Sustainable Urban Extensions to the Sleaford Urban Area (Sleaford West Quadrant (Policy S8) and Sleaford Southern Quadrant (Policy S7)) and non strategic sustainable expansions of the Sleaford Urban Area into the surrounding countryside.
The Sleaford Area

249

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

To achieve this, the Local Plan and any development proposals should: 1. Support the strengthening of Sleaford’s role as a thriving Market Town and Primary Attractor (key centre for retail, employment, culture, leisure, tourism, education and other services) through significant housing and economic growth, regeneration activity, and improvements to its infrastructure and the range and quality of facilities it provides for residents and visitors; 2. Support the role of Sleaford through significant growth in the period 2011/12 – 2030/31, including delivery of approximately 10% (4,500 homes) of Central Lincolnshire’s new housing and 20ha of employment land within or adjacent to the Sleaford’s main built up area, as set out in Policy CL4; 3. Plan the pattern of growth of the Sleaford area in a strategic and sustainable manner with appropriate supporting infrastructure, as set out in Policy S2; 4. Support economic and employment growth in Sleaford by creating a more diverse and highly competitive local economy, as detailed in Policy S3; 5. Support the regeneration of Sleaford socially, economically and environmentally, as detailed in policy S4; 6. Promote the enhancement and growth of Sleaford Town Centre and support a network of small Neighbourhood Centres to meet the needs of residents and visitors as Central Lincolnshire grows, as detailed in Policy S5; 7. Review and define the individual and collective roles of villages in the Sleaford Area, including their appropriate levels and types of growth, as part of the preparation of further Development Plan Documents, having regard to local aspirations and any Neighbourhood Plans for those settlements; 8. Promote a sustainable and high quality transport system for the Sleaford area to tackle issues of carbon emissions, traffic congestion particularly within and around the Town Centre, air quality and accessibility, including investment to achieve modal shift to public transport, cycling and walking alongside necessary highways improvements; 9. Protect, nurture and enhance Sleaford’s environmental and heritage assets conserving and promoting Sleaford’s natural and built heritage as key elements of Sleaford’s quality of life and local distinctiveness, and for their benefits for tourism, regeneration and the economy; and 10. Define and promote a strategic network of green infrastructure including linking the Sleaford Urban Area to the surrounding countryside and communities as set out in Policies S6 and CL24.
The Sleaford Area

250

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy S1 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and co-ordinate strategies affecting the Sleaford area, including economic development, regeneration, transport, infrastructure, green infrastructure and housing The implementation of a Movement and Parking Strategy for Sleaford Town Centre Pursuing investment opportunities and funding to regenerate and grow Sleaford Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities Further policy development in the Local Plan, including the proposed Allocations Document

   

LOCATIONAL PRIORITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT IN THE SLEAFORD AREA
10.11 To meet the need for development, the vision and objectives, the Sleaford Masterplan and deliver the development targets for the Sleaford Urban Area identified in Policy CL4, the Core Strategy has two main locational priorities for development as follows: 1) re-using suitable previously-developed sites (brownfield land) within the existing built-up area of the town; and 2) focusing urban expansion in large-scale Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) that can be masterplanned with appropriate infrastructure and a range of facilities and to integrate with Sleaford and adjoining settlements. 10.12 It is intended that these two components will meet the bulk of the development targets for the Sleaford Urban Area2 for the period 2011 – 2031, and will provide sufficient sites for new housing and employment development on an ongoing basis throughout the plan period, as set out in the Housing Trajectory for Central Lincolnshire (see Chapter 4 and Appendix G). Where the land supply requirements are not being met by these sources, it is recognised that the release of greenfield sites in sustainable locations within or adjoining the Sleaford Urban Area will be necessary in accordance with the Central Lincolnshire Core Strategy Delivery Strategy and Monitoring Framework (see Chapter 11 and Appendix A). 10.13 Specifically, the Core Strategy identifies and allocates 2 SUEs for the Sleaford Area, both of which adjoin the Sleaford Urban Area boundary, as follows: 1) Sleaford South Quadrant (Land at Stump Cross Hill and Land to the South East of London Road); and 2) Sleaford West Quadrant (Land to the west of Drove Lane and to the east of the A15).
2

This is defined by Policy CL4 and Appendix I of the Core Strategy. And corresponds to Sleaford as defined in the saved North Kesteven Local Plan The Sleaford Area

251

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

How were these priorities decided? 10.14 The locational priorities for the Sleaford Area carry forward those set out in the adopted Regional Plan (2009) prioritises making best use of previously developed land and delivering development in a way that:    shortens journeys and facilitates access to jobs and services strengthens rural enterprise and linkages between settlements maintains the distinctive character and vitality of rural communities.

10.15 North Kesteven District in partnership with the Homes and Communities Agency and Lincolnshire County Council prepared a Masterplan for Sleaford completed in April 2011. This looked at a number of development options for the town and its findings are very much consistent with the Core Strategy policies. The Sleaford Masterplan recognises that to achieve the investment needed in infrastructure, services and job creation, there will need to be a critical mass of residential growth. In considering options to deliver this critical mass it identified the need to bring forward all available and suitable brownfield sites as well as SUEs. The Sleaford Masterplan concludes that the most sustainable options for SUEs are to the west and the south of the town. 10.16. The Sustainable Futures Study also investigated potential development locations across the Sleaford Area, with supporting information on sites from the Central Lincolnshire SHLAA and Employment Land Review. Successive engagement with stakeholders has also been undertaken as the Core Strategy has moved from options about the form and direction of growth for Sleaford (see Issues & Options Report) through to specific SUE proposals. Infrastructure to support growth 10.17 The growth of Sleaford will inevitably place greater demands on the area’s infrastructure, including transport, education, health, water, sewage treatment and so on. It is important that new development is supported by new infrastructure and contributes to its delivery. 10.18 Three key pieces of infrastructure have been identified in the Strategy for Growth, as follows:    Sleaford South East Regeneration Route (SSERR) Additional primary, secondary and sixth form education capacity delivered through two new primary schools and one new secondary facility Upgrade to the water supply and foul sewerage network

10.19 The SUEs in particular will need to be co-ordinated and phased to ensure these key infrastructure items are delivered to the benefit of the wider area. Further details are covered in the individual SUE policies.

The Sleaford Area

252

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Site allocation and the release of land in the Sleaford area 10.20 Apart from the two SUEs, the Core Strategy does not allocate individual sites either within or outside the Sleaford Main Urban Area boundary. This will be considered through the preparation of the proposed Allocations Document, and sites identified on a revised Policies Map if appropriate. 10.21 As discussed in Chapter 5 (Growing Central Lincolnshire), the Allocations Document will include consideration of the role and level of growth for settlements within the Rural Area, including those settlements that are within the wider Sleaford area but outside the main urban area, such as Greylees, Ruskington, Cranwell, Leasingham and Heckington. Such satellite settlements may have the potential for further growth in a supporting role to Sleaford and meeting their own local needs where this can be achieved sustainably and is consistent with the aspirations of residents and stakeholders to be established through engagement. 10.22 It is stressed that this staged approach to site allocation within the Local Plan should not preclude development other than the SUEs coming forward ahead of the adoption of the Allocations Document. Such development proposals will be assessed against the Core Strategy policies, particularly Policy CL5, and any relevant saved policies. Clearly, it is intended and hoped that development on previously-developed sites and in the rest of the Sleaford Area continues under the Core Strategy where it can demonstrate that it is sustainable and consistent with the NPPF and the development plan. Policy S2 – Locational Priorities for Development in the Sleaford Area In meeting the targets for housing and employment growth in the Sleaford area and to regenerate Sleaford, development will be focused on previouslydeveloped sites within the Sleaford Urban Area and in Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) that are carefully integrated with Sleaford and supported by necessary facilities and infrastructure provision ensuring that infrastructure and access to facilities in the Sleaford Area is improved as a result of the development. Priorities for the allocation and/or release of land for development in the Sleaford Area for the period 2011/12 – 2030/31 will be as follows:  Making best use of previously-developed land and buildings within the Sleaford Urban Area for housing and other uses, with first priority given to sites within and adjoining Sleaford Town Centre, and; Bringing forward through detailed Masterplans, on a planned and phased basis, two strategic Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) as follows:  Sleaford West Quadrant (land off Drove Lane as allocated on the
The Sleaford Area

253

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policies Map) - approximately 1,750 dwellings, 3ha of employment land, a new neighbourhood centre, education and community facilities, infrastructure and other related uses, as detailed in Policy S8; and  Sleaford South Quadrant - (Land off London Road incorporating land at Stump Cross Hill as allocated on the Policies Map) – approximately 1,600 dwellings, appropriate employment opportunities including small offices and small scale work space, a Neighbourhood Centre, education and community facilities and infrastructure, as detailed in Policy S7.  Other sustainable housing sites within or adjoining the Sleaford Urban Area identified in the proposed Allocations Document, to provide the balance of housing if required to meet the Core Strategy’s housing target for Sleaford.

Policy S2 will be implemented by:     The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward previously-developed sites for re-use or redevelopment as part of the regeneration of Sleaford The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other and with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward the 2 proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions and necessary supporting infrastructure Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities. Further policy development, including site allocations, in the Local Plan.

ECONOMIC PRIORITIES FOR THE SLEAFORD AREA
10.23 As a Main Urban Area, the long term economic sustainability of Sleaford is fundamental to the success of the Central Lincolnshire Growth Agenda. Alongside Policy CL17 (Delivering Prosperity and Jobs), economic growth in the Sleaford area will need to be achieved by diversification into new growth sectors and improving competitiveness and skills and improvement of the town centre and through regeneration. 10.24 Sleaford’s historic wealth and status as a ‘market town’ was predicated on its central location at the hub of a large sparsely populated rural district. In common with many ‘market’ towns in rural England, Sleaford now finds itself surrounded not by dependent agricultural communities, but by affluent and well serviced commuter villages benefiting from the easy access to a variety of nearby destinations by private car for a range of goods and services. It therefore has to compete for consumer spend. While population has more than doubled since 1980, and will continue to grow under the Core Strategy, the town centre has for a variety of reasons, not delivered the services, amenities, or quality and range of retail and leisure experiences its residents need, leading to substantial leakage of consumer spend.
The Sleaford Area

254

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The growth of on-line shopping has exacerbated this trend. A strategy for the redevelopment and regeneration of Sleaford Town Centre is a key aspiration of the Sleaford Masterplan. 10.25 A large proportion of Sleaford’s existing opportunities for business and employment are located to the north east of the town on the Woodbridge Road Industrial Estate (WRIE) and the Sleaford Enterprise Park (SEP). This comprises premises and businesses mainly operating in the storage and distribution (Class B8) and office and industrial enterprises (Class B1 & B2). The location benefits from good access to the A17 and a degree of separation from residential areas making it very attractive to storage and distribution and industrial processes and not so attractive to offices and knowledge intensive industries. The take up in this location has been very positive and evidence suggests this will be the case moving forwards. There is still space available and this location will remain a key focus for economic growth in the Town. 10.26 In addition to the WRIE and the SEP, North Kesteven and Lincolnshire County Council both have offices in the town providing a broad range of public sector opportunities and there are also significant opportunities in the Defence Sector arising from RAF Bases spread across Central Lincolnshire. To the north east of Sleaford, RAF College Cranwell provides a key national training facility which generates many other employment opportunities through support services and civilian contracts. Ensuring the right local conditions are in place to ensure Sleaford remains attractive to the public and defence sectors is integral to the economic strategy for the area, whilst recognising that the balance between public and private sector employment opportunities is likely to change over the Core Strategy period. 10.27 Recognising that the SEP and WRIE may not be entirely attractive to knowledge intensive and office based enterprise, the Core Strategy identifies opportunities for new locations to the west of the town capitalising on the A15. The Sleaford West SUE (see Policy S8) will provide space for high quality and attractive office based and light industrial uses (Class B1), but in an attractive setting fully integrated with the new neighbourhoods of the wider development. The Masterplan also identifies a similar opportunity on Grantham Road adjacent to the A15. 10.28 To achieve further growth and diversification of the Sleaford economy the Central Lincolnshire Employment Land Review identified a need for smaller premises to support the creation of a larger and more dynamic Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) sector. It specifically identifies a need for:    Industrial workshops – 10-20 units of 0-200 sq.m totalling 1500-2500 sq.m Grow-on industrial space – 200-500 sq.m units Serviced offices – 50-200 sq.m suites totalling 2000 sq.m

10.29 Above all the employment strategy for Sleaford is about maintaining a diverse supply of attractive land and premises to allow the Sleaford economy to become more resilient and generate a wider range of opportunities for the local population to generate a more diverse and resilient labour force.
The Sleaford Area

255

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy S3 – Employment Priorities in the Sleaford Area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with their partners and other stakeholders to strengthen, broaden and grow the economy of the Sleaford area in line with Sleaford’s status as a Primary Attractor within Central Lincolnshire. In doing so, in accordance with Policy CL4, approximately 20ha of land will be allocated in the Local Plan for employment use within and immediately adjoining the Sleaford Urban Area to meet the employment needs of both the existing and future population, including land at the Sleaford Enterprise Park and a minimum of 3 ha of land at the Sleaford West Quadrant (Policy S8 – Sleaford West Quadrant). The allocation of other specific sites will be made through further Local Plan work involving a criteria-based assessment of both existing and potential new allocations to provide a portfolio of high quality sites that are accessible, flexible to the needs of modern industry, deliverable and meet the needs of Central Lincolnshire’s population as it grows. The Local Plan will focus on growth sectors and promote growth in Small and Medium Enterprises. It will also support and safeguard jobs in existing sectors of strength including engineering, construction, tourism, food and farming and its associated supply chain and allied industries. Employment development should be designed and located so that it can contribute towards the delivery of sustainable communities and a resilient workforce providing attractive and accessible working environments and supporting the desirability of Sleaford as a location for growth sectors and a diverse range of economic development opportunities. To achieve this employment development should where appropriate: 1) be compatible with and integrated with neighbouring uses; and 2) support the creation of a diverse and resilient workforce by providing opportunities for training and where appropriate support the development of education and training services within the town. The take-up of employment land will be monitored and allocations reviewed both to ensure deliverability of sites and that the needs of the labour force are being met. The sector and premises priorities for growth will also be reviewed and updated as necessary in line with the Central Lincolnshire Economic Strategy.

The Sleaford Area

256

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy S3 will be implemented by:      The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward sites for employment in the Sleaford Area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other and with partners, developers and communities to promote and bring forward the 2 proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions and necessary supporting infrastructure Development management by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities. Further policy development, including site allocations, in the Local Plan Implementation of the Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy and work with key stakeholders including the Greater Lincolnshire Local Enterprise Partnership to bring forward new economic development.

REGENERATING SLEAFORD
10.30 Sleaford has limited levels of social deprivation. However, there are some parts of the town that would benefit from significant investment and improvement in the built environment as well as an enhancement in the opportunities available to those living, working and visiting the town. 10.31 Movement in and around the town is restricting its ability to regenerate. Sleaford benefits significantly from the A15 and A17 as major primary routes, the opportunities presented by these routes need to be maximised for businesses, residents and visitors. The upgrade to the Joint Line (rail) which runs through Sleaford travelling between Peterborough and Doncaster will also generate opportunities for improving connections with surrounding communities and neighbouring centres as well as increased use of rail for the freight movement. However, movement within and around the town is challenging. Private vehicles are encouraged into the town centre through the nature of the existing road network and the presence of car parking. Improving connections to primary routes, developing linkages with surrounding settlements, with a focus on non car travel and seeking to reduce vehicle circulation through the town centre are crucial to achieving the regeneration required. 10.32 There are a number of significant developments in the pipeline, which collectively should enhance the town centre offer and contribute towards improving movement. In March 2011, planning permission was granted for a Tesco Extra superstore. This development is dependent on a new access road, linking Boston Road (crossing the railway line) to Mareham Lane which is known as the Sleaford South East Regeneration Route (SSERR). The link road would provide a much improved access to the Bass Maltings where planning permission was granted in April 2011 for the redevelopment of the Grade II* Listed Building complex for a range of uses including, new homes, retail and commercial floor space, healthcare facilities, offices and community buildings.

The Sleaford Area

257

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

10.33 Sleaford Railway station is located at the southern end of the town centre acting as a major gateway to the town. The appearance of this part of town is relatively run down, with the regeneration of Sleaford Southgate key to improving the southern end of the town centre and the overall perception and feel of the town. 10.34 Regeneration of Southgate, the proposed Bass Maltings scheme and the new Tesco superstore present significant opportunities to improve the town centre offer, new services and quality of the built environment. Policy S4 – Regenerating Sleaford The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will support and promote development which contributes towards the regeneration of the Sleaford Urban Area and Sleaford Town Centre where it seeks to achieve improvements to the built and natural environment, quality of life and prosperity. To achieve this the Local Plan will and development proposals should, where appropriate: 1. Support projects associated with the delivery of the Sleaford Masterplan and the regeneration of Sleaford Town Centre; 2. Support measures to make walking, cycling and public transport more attractive; 3. Contribute towards the delivery of new homes in the area, improving the quality of the existing housing stock and providing high quality residential environments; 4. Support the provision of improved education and training opportunities; 5. Assist with improving traffic circulation and reducing the number of vehicle movements in and around the Town Centre including supporting the delivery of the Sleaford South East Regeneration Route (SSERR) and closure of the level crossing; 6. Contribute towards improving key gateways into the town, with a specific focus on public transport hubs such as the Sleaford Railway Station; 7. Make the best use of existing landmarks, social assets and heritage assets including the Market Place, St Denys’ Church, the National Centre for Craft and Design, Money’s Mill & Yard, the Castle Site, the Bass Maltings, the Sleaford Leisure Centre and the Handley Monument; 8. Protect, enhance and maximise the benefit of the Sleaford Conservation Area and other heritage assets including Market Place, the Corn Exchange, the Bass Maltings, Money’s Mill, Handley Monument and
The Sleaford Area

258

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Northgate; 9. Contribute to enhancements to the public realm through creating new and improving existing public spaces; 10. Maximise the Sleaford waterside environment as a means of improving the public realm, enhancing opportunities for recreation and biodiversity and to ensure it is maximised as a key route to and from the Town Centre and for connections to Sleaford’s neighbourhood and surrounding villages in the Sleaford Area; 11. Support the development of cultural assets and improve access to existing cultural facilities such as the National Centre for Craft and Design; 12. Support the generation of energy from renewable sources and local energy generation whilst taking into account the local character and existing opportunities including the Sleaford Renewable Energy Plant and the potential for district heating. Policy S4 will be implemented by:       The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and implement strategies and proposals for the regeneration of Sleaford and specifically Sleaford Town Centre The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners proactively pursuing and promoting opportunities for investment and funding for regenerating the Sleaford area Promoting regeneration objectives in other strategies and programmes, and developing linkages between these and the Local Plan The actions of the Sleaford Regeneration Group and associated groups focused towards the delivery of specific projects identified in the Sleaford Masterplan Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, including appropriate masterplanning processes Further policy development in the Local Plan, including site allocation and designation.

THE TOWN CENTRE AND NETWORK OF OTHER CENTRES
10.35 Significant housing growth in the town has not been met with proportionate investment in services, facilities, shopping, leisure and employment opportunities in the town centre. Sleaford’s central location means that it competes with Grantham, Boston, Spalding, Stamford and Newark as well the major centres of Lincoln, Peterborough and Nottingham, but at present it is not competing as well as it should be. The North Kesteven Retail Study 2007 and the Central Lincolnshire City & Town Centres Study 2012 identified that approximately 85 pence in every pound spent by residents in comparison goods is spent outside the town.

The Sleaford Area

259

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

10.36 A key barrier to enhancing the town centre’s retail core is the constant circulation of vehicular traffic around the one-way traffic management system (primarily Carre Street and Southgate). This has many negative impacts upon the town centre including delays to public transport, problems for deliveries to local businesses and a contribution to a poor environment for pedestrians and cyclists. 10.37 The retail offer is also constrained in part due to the town centre’s heritage and charm. Sleaford has a tight urban grain, with small premises. Whilst this generates an attractive built environment it results in a shortage of modern larger retail premises desired by the retail sector, particularly national multiples and for the sale of comparison goods. Therefore, to diversify the retail offer, there is a need to improve the range of premises available to meet the needs of retailers and service providers. Larger premises and ultimately a more varied range of premises are needed to broaden the town centre offer and the Sleaford Masterplan identifies a number of opportunities where this could be achieved. 10.38 As set out above, a number of projects are in the pipeline which seek to strengthen the town centre offer. The new Tesco Extra superstore will provide a net sales area of up to 5,621m2 of which no more than 2,511m2 for the sale of comparison goods. Furthermore, the provision of a new store in the town will allow Tesco to vacate their existing premises on Northgate. These premises have planning permission for four non-food retail units, which will add to the offer. The Bass Maltings scheme will deliver 1391m2 of retail space, commercial floorspace, healthcare facilities, offices, community buildings, whilst not directly within the town centre, this will increase services and facilities available in the Sleaford area in close proximity to the town centre. 10.39 These proposals will extinguish the need for further significant retail convenience and comparison retail in the medium term (retail study), although it is accepted and felt that there could be scope for redevelopment and intensification of existing retail developments. 10.40 Sleaford Town Centre boundary and the Town Centre Main Shopping Streets are set out in the saved of policies of North Kesteven Local Plan. Policy S5 – Strengthening Sleaford Town Centre and the Network of Other Centres in the Sleaford Area The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will work with partners and stakeholders to strengthen Sleaford Town Centre and encourage new development within or adjoining Sleaford Town Centre which contributes towards enhancing Sleaford’s role as a Primary Attractor. The Central Lincolnshire Local Plan will, and new development should achieve this where appropriate by: 1. Focusing the development of main Town Centre uses on Sleaford Town Centre;
The Sleaford Area

260

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

2. Supporting the delivery of projects identified through Sleaford Masterplan which seek to enhance Sleaford Town Centre; 3. Supporting the regeneration of Southern Southgate in providing a range of additional services and facilities and improving the southern gateway into Sleaford Town Centre; 4. Supporting the provision of a broad range of premises which diversify and support an improved Town Centre offer for retail, leisure and community use, subject to an assessment of retail impact in line with Policy CL20; 5. Ensuring any development proposed is compatible with adjacent buildings and land uses and does not result in an overconcentration of specific uses, in whole or part of the Town Centre; 6. Assisting with improving access in and around the Town Centre by prioritising modes of transport other than the private car and improving necessary vehicle movements through the provision of the Sleaford South East Regeneration Route (SSERR); 7. Contributing to enhancing Sleaford’s cultural offer, developing a visitor economy and making best use of Sleaford Town Centres heritage and cultural assets; and 8. Supporting the creation of a high quality environment, including the East West Leisure Link, maximising the potential of the Riverside and delivering attractive and useable public spaces. To complement but not compete with Sleaford Town Centre, a network of other centres will be maintained and developed. These centres will be at the heart of both strategic Sustainable Urban Extensions and should provide a range of services and facilities to meet the day-to-day needs of current and future residents of the neighbourhood. To achieve this the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan will identify new Centres for the Sleaford area and ensure that new development within them: 1. Contributes to the vitality and mix of uses of the locality; 2. Meets a need within the immediate locality; 3. Is of an appropriate scale and does not have a detrimental impact on Sleaford Town Centre; and 4. Prioritises and promotes access by walking and cycling.

The Sleaford Area

261

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy S5 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and implement strategies and proposals, drawn from the Masterplan and related project.  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners proactively pursuing and promoting opportunities for investment and funding for regenerating the Sleaford area  Promoting Sleaford town objectives in other strategies and programmes, and developing linkages between these and the Local Plan  The actions of the Sleaford Regeneration Group and associated groups focussed towards the delivery of specific projects identified in the Sleaford Masterplan  Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, including appropriate masterplanning processes  Working with proponents of strategic sites to ensure new neighbourhood centres are fit for purpose and delivered  Further policy development in the Local Plan, including site allocation and designation

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE SLEAFORD AREA
10.41 The provision and maintenance of a high quality Green Infrastructure Network is a key component of the growth strategy for Central Lincolnshire and is fundamental to sustainably accommodating the level of growth required in the Sleaford area. 10.42 In looking at the Sleaford area the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study identifies a deficiency in natural green space sites particularly to the east and west of the town. It also suggests that there is a deficiency in sub regional scale sites within the area. As the population grows there will be a need to address these deficiencies. 10.43 The Sleaford Masterplan reiterates the need for a strong green access link running east to west travelling along the River Slea through the town centre and connecting the urban area to the countryside and surrounding villages. This East West Leisure Link (EWLL) is also designed to expand the leisure offer of the town centre. The EWLL is fundamental to sustainably integrating growth into Sleaford by providing a wide range of Green Infrastructure opportunities including improved options for sustainable travel. 10.44 The EWLL would also fulfil the role of connecting the Sleaford West Quadrant (Policy S8) to the town centre where there is the potential for this site to seek to meet the sub regional scale deficiency identified and provide a large destination park which capitalises on the watercourses and serves an identified need for the current and future residents. 10.45 The EWLL forms part of wider concepts for Green Infrastructure in the Sleaford area drawn from the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study. The EWLL will be an integral component in the delivery of improved Strategic Green
The Sleaford Area

262

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Access Links between Sleaford and surrounding villages, towns and cities. The Green Infrastructure Study identifies the need for Strategic Green Access Links to work towards generating green connections for movement, recreation and habitat creation, linking Lincoln to Sleaford, Grantham to Sleaford and Sleaford to Spalding. These Strategic links are identified on the overall Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure concept plan (see Chapter 7). The Sleaford Green Infrastructure Network is illustrated on Figure 11 below. 10.46 The Central Lincolnshire growth strategy focuses new development towards a combined strategy of urban regeneration and masterplanned SUEs. To improve the quality of life for residents and biodiversity an Urban Green Grid concept will be developed for the Sleaford Area as recommended by the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study. The Sleaford Urban Green Grid will be a multi-functional network of green and blue infrastructure for recreation, access to nature, education opportunities and to encourage sustainable travel. The Sleaford Urban Green Grid will also ensure a sense of place and a high quality public realm is developed particularly in and around the town centre and Market Place and key gateways such as the Railway Station and main routes into and out of the town and town centre. The use of street trees, landscaping and green roofs and walls together with new public open spaces delivered as integral parts of new development will be fundamental to achieving the Sleaford Urban Green Grid concept. 10.47 New development in the Sleaford area, particularly SUEs, has the potential to help address identified Green Infrastructure deficiencies but also to help deliver high quality and resilient living and business environments.

The Sleaford Area

263

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The Sleaford Area 264

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy S6 – Green Infrastructure in the Sleaford Area The Central Lincolnshire Local Plan and new development will protect and enhance the network of Green Infrastructure in the Sleaford area in accordance with Policy CL24. A Sleaford Urban Green Grid and Strategic Green Access Links will be enhanced, developed and maintained into a comprehensive local Green Infrastructure Network in the Sleaford area through: 1. The provision and management of Strategic Green Access Links which maximise the potential for Green Infrastructure to be used for access into the Town Centre, around the Sleaford Urban Area, and to improve connection with surrounding villages, Central Lincolnshire and beyond; 2. The development of the Sleaford East West Leisure Link as the key component of the Sleaford Urban Green Grid in accordance with the Sleaford Masterplan and Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan; 3. Providing new accessible natural green space for outdoor recreation, for habitat creation, to contribute towards managing climate change, flood risk and water resources as part of new development; 4. The development, protection and enhancement of the River Slea Navigation Corridor and optimising the use and value and safeguarding the quality of all Sleaford’s Waterways for recreation, tourism and as biodiversity habitats; 5. Encouraging tree planting and the provision of green roofs and green walls as part of the Sleaford Urban Grid and to provide linkages for wildlife, to contribute towards managing climate change, and positively impact upon the landscape setting of the Sleaford Area; 6. Exploring opportunities for food to be produced locally and for the community to grow their own food through means including community gardens, allotments and traditional orchards; 7. Improving and protecting the landscape setting of the Sleaford Urban Area and the surrounding villages by ensuring key gateways are landscaped to enhance the setting of the town, minimise its impact upon the open character of the countryside and to maintain the setting and integrity of surrounding villages; 8. Maximising the potential and enhance the settings of heritage assets, to contribute to the Green Infrastructure Network and the Sleaford Urban Green Grid; and 9. Ensuring existing woodland including the Sleaford Wood is safeguarded, new woodland is planted and recreational access to woodland is enhanced in accordance with the management of its impact.
The Sleaford Area

265

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy S6 will be implemented by:         The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working with each other, partners and local communities to develop and implement strategies and proposals for green infrastructure in the Sleaford area Developing the Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure evidence base The Central Lincolnshire Authorities and partners pursuing investment and funding for the provision and management of green infrastructure Promoting green infrastructure objectives in other strategies and programmes, and developing linkages between green infrastructure and other strategies Promoting green infrastructure objectives in the land management practices of the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, partners, stakeholders, communities and individuals Development management decisions by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, including appropriate masterplanning processes Further policy development, including site allocation and designation, in the Local Plan A clear delivery strategy around the East West Leisure Link (EWLL)

SUSTAINABLE URBAN EXTENSIONS TO SLEAFORD
10.48 There are two SUEs proposed for the town. Both strategic sites will be delivered concurrently over the plan period in accordance with the infrastructure requirements of the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and the Sleaford area. All SUEs in Central Lincolnshire will be subject to detailed masterplans and brought forward in line with the requirement of Policy CL7 (Sustainable Urban Extensions and Other Large Scale Sites in Central Lincolnshire). 10.49 Further details for each proposed SUE are contained in a Topic Paper which forms part of the evidence base for the Core Strategy.

SLEAFORD SOUTH QUADRANT
10.50 Sleaford South Quadrant will be a natural expansion of the main built-up area of the town where substantial growth has taken place in recent years. Sleaford South Quadrant will be fully integrated with existing communities and provide for much needed services in this part of the town. 10.51 The proposed Sustainable Urban Extension (SUE) will deliver approximately 1,600 new homes including a broad mix of housing sizes and types to meet the needs of the town. Key to the development will be a new Centre incorporating a community centre, local shops and services to provide a community hub for the site as well as to meet the existing need in this part of the town. Whilst the site is not viewed appropriate for large scale employment uses due to managing impacts on the highway network, it has the potential to provide for small-scale employment work space to meet the needs identified in Policy S3 (Employment Priorities in the Sleaford Area).
The Sleaford Area

266

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

10.52 Access to the site will be from London Road and Stump Cross Hill, however sustainable transport solutions will be a key aspect of the development. The site will incorporate Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems into a high quality environment which benefits from a strong network of green infrastructure. There will be the potential to create a high quality pedestrian environment which favours modes of travel and movement other than through the use of the private car. The development will connect into the Mareham Pastures Local Nature Reserve creating attractive walking and cycling links to the town centre and the Railway Station. 10.53 An outline planning application for the site is expected in June 2013. Accompanying the application will be a detailed masterplan and phasing plan setting out how the development will be delivered over the plan period. It is envisaged that the first phase of development will include the new Neighbourhood Centre with 40 new dwellings expected to be delivered on site in 2015/16 increasing to approximately 100 dwellings a year over the plan period. Throughout the lifetime of the development there will be a need to upgrade sewerage infrastructure and make significant contributions to or direct improvements to secondary education and transport infrastructure, the exact details of which are yet to be determined. 10.54 Infrastructure requirements and affordable housing provision will be triggered through different phases of development and in accordance with the masterplan and phasing plan accompanying the outline planning application. Policy S7 – Sleaford South Quadrant Mix of Uses This area (incorporating land at Stump Cross Hill and land to the south-east of London Road), as shown on the Policies Map, is identified as a strategic site, to deliver the following mix of uses within the plan period:     In the region of 1,600 dwellings of an appropriate mix; Employment land uses such as small offices, start up business premises and other small scale industry compatible with a residential area and the location; A new Centre of an appropriate scale, providing for local retail, services and community uses; and Education provision, including the provision of an on-site primary school and proportionate contributions towards improving education provision in the Sleaford Area.

Phasing and Infrastructure The development should be phased to ensure that its implementation has a positive impact upon the wider growth objectives for the Sleaford Area and Central Lincolnshire over its construction period and thereafter. To achieve this the development and Phasing Plan should have regard to:
The Sleaford Area

267

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

a. The Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and recognise infrastructure capacity and improvements needed in the Sleaford Area to support the overall level of growth proposed; b. Ensuring sustainable communities are developed through each phase of development and over the period of construction; c. The timing and construction of the Sleaford South East Regeneration Route; d. The closure of the Sleaford Southgate level crossing over the railway line; e. The need for investment in upgrading utilities services in the wider Sleaford Area; and f. The sustainable growth of Sleaford over the lifetime of construction seeking where viable to ensure the first phase of development takes place on the land immediately adjoining the existing built up area of Sleaford and includes the provision of the new Centre. Transport and Connectivity To ensure that the development positively contributes towards improved movement in the Sleaford Area a detailed Transport Assessment, Travel Plan and the development should: a. Take full account of planned projects identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and transport infrastructure impacts and opportunities associated with the wider growth strategy for the Sleaford Area; b. Include a range of measures which promote walking and cycling; c. Ensure high quality passenger transport links to Sleaford Town Centre and convenient pedestrian and cycle routes within and adjoining the development; d. Ensure the main access for the development is taken from London Road; e. Assess and contribute towards mitigation where appropriate to any unacceptably adverse transport impacts on Silk Willoughby, Quarrington, King Edward Street and Castle Causeway, the junction between London Road and Grantham Road and minor roads linking London Road to Grantham Road; f. Maximise the opportunities associated with the proximity to the Sleaford Railway Station and include measures to encourage rail travel.
The Sleaford Area

268

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Quality Environment To ensure that the development contributes positively to the conservation and enhancement of the environmental quality and character of the Sleaford area, and that adverse impacts are minimised and mitigated, the Masterplan and development should: a. Provide a network of green infrastructure that links to the wider Green Infrastructure Network for the Sleaford Area as set out in Policy S3, and which: i. Maximises the potential and mitigates the impacts associated with Moor Drain and incorporates a comprehensive Sustainable Urban Drainage System; and ii. Achieves strong connections to the adjacent Mareham Pastures Local Nature Reserve; and b. Achieve the satisfactory integration of the development visually and functionally with surrounding areas and settlements.

SLEAFORD WEST QUADRANT
10.55 Sleaford West Quadrant offers the opportunity to diversify the existing employment offer of the town through the generation of a high quality employment location integrated into an attractive residential environment, benefitting from a prominent position and access on to the A15. 10.56 The proposed SUE will deliver approximately 1,750 new homes including a broad mix of housing sizes and types to meet the needs of the town and complement the surrounding neighbourhoods. The development will include a minimum of 3ha of employment land adjacent to the A15 targeted towards knowledge intensive enterprise (Class B1). This will provide a different opportunity to that available on the Sleaford South East Quadrant, adding to the diversity of opportunities available in the town. It will be targeted towards businesses that can be positively integrated with new neighbourhoods to generate live work communities and distinctive neighbourhoods. 10.57 The development will also include a new Centre of an appropriate scale incorporating, a community centre, local shops and service provision to provide for the site as well as to meet an existing need. 10.58 The site provides the opportunity to link into the town centre via the EWLL which will provide a green corridor focussed around the River Slea providing attractive pedestrian and cycle routes. The main vehicular access will be provided
The Sleaford Area

269

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

through a new roundabout on the A15. However vehicle movement through the development and into the town will need to be managed appropriately to ensure that the surrounding neighbourhoods are not adversely affected and to ensure it does not generate capacity issues with the existing road network. 10.59 An outline planning application for the site is expected in 2013/14. Accompanying the application will be a detailed masterplan and phasing plan which sets out how the site will be delivered over the plan period. Throughout the lifetime of the development there will be a need to contribute towards sewerage infrastructure and provide for a new secondary school to service the development and town. There will also be the need to make significant contributions to transport infrastructure including the provision of a new traffic island on the A15. 10.60 It is expected that construction will commence on site in the year 2016/17 with the development of non residential uses adjacent to the A15 commencing first alongside approximately 25 dwellings building up to 100-150 units a year over the plan period with infrastructure requirements and affordable housing provision triggered through different phases of development and in accordance with the masterplan and phasing plan accompanying the outline planning application. Policy S8 - Sleaford West Quadrant Mix of Uses This area (incorporating land to the west of Drove Lane and to the east of the A15), as shown on the Policies Map, is identified as a strategic site, to deliver the following mix of uses within the plan period:     In the region of 1,750 dwellings of an appropriate mix; A minimum of 3ha of mainly use class B1 employment land uses including a range of premises to complement the existing employment offer in the Sleaford area; A new Centre of an appropriate scale, providing for local retail, services and community uses; and Education provision, including the provision of an on-site primary school and secondary school.

Phasing and Infrastructure The development should be phased to ensure that its implementation has a positive impact upon the wider growth objectives for the Sleaford area and Central Lincolnshire over its construction period and thereafter. To achieve this the development and Phasing Plan should have regard to: a. The Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and recognise infrastructure capacity and improvements needed in the Sleaford Area to support to overall level of growth proposed;
The Sleaford Area

270

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

b. Ensuring sustainable communities are developed through each phase of development and over its lifetime to meet the requirements of Policy CL7 – Sustainable Urban Extensions; c. The timing and construction of the Sleaford South East Regeneration Route; d. The closure of the Sleaford Southgate level crossing over the railway line; e. The need for investment in upgrading utilities services in the wider Sleaford area; f. Supporting the early delivery of the Sleaford East West Leisure Link; and g. The sustainable growth of Sleaford over the lifetime of construction seeking where viable to ensure the first phase includes the provision of the new Centre. Transport and Connectivity To ensure that the development positively contributes to improved movement in the Sleaford area a detailed Transport Assessment, Travel Plan and the development should: a. Take full account of planned projects identified in the Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan and transport infrastructure impacts and opportunities associated with the wider growth strategy for the Sleaford Area; b. Include a range of measures which promote walking and cycling which maximise opportunities associated with the proximity to the River Slea and support the delivery and use of the East West Leisure Link; c. Ensure high quality passenger transport links to Sleaford Town Centre and convenient pedestrian and cycle routes within and adjoining the development; d. Provide for the main access to the development to be taken via a new junction with the A15 with appropriate measures to manage any adverse impact on movement within the wider Sleaford Area and the Town Centre; and e. Maximise the opportunities associated with the proximity to the Sleaford and Rauceby Railway Stations and include measures to encourage rail travel. Quality Environment To ensure that the development contributes positively to the conservation and
The Sleaford Area

271

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

enhancement of the environmental quality and character of the Sleaford area, and that adverse impacts are minimised and mitigated, the Masterplan and development should: a. Provide a network of green infrastructure that links to the wider Green Infrastructure Network for the Sleaford Area as set out in Policy S3, and which: i. Maximises the potential and mitigates the impacts associated with the River Slea and incorporates a comprehensive Sustainable Urban Drainage System; and ii. Contributes towards the delivery of the a Sleaford East West Leisure Link connecting the site to the Town Centre and providing opportunities for walking, cycling and recreation; and b. Achieve the satisfactory integration of the development visually and functionally with surrounding areas and settlements.

Policies S7 & S8 will be implemented by:  The Central Lincolnshire Authorities working together and with key stakeholders to manage the delivery of the developments overt the plan period  Establishing detailed masterplans and phasing plans alongside outline planning applications for the comprehensive development of the sites  Reserved matters planning applications for each phase of development.

The Sleaford Area

272

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

11. DELIVERING AND MONITORING
THE CORE STRATEGY
11.1 The Core Strategy is rightly ambitious about the amount, type and location of future development we wish to see to benefit the communities of Central Lincolnshire. Making that development happen requires the combined efforts of the public and the private sectors and local communities, working together. The Core Strategy is being written at a time of international economic uncertainty, national guidance in the NPPF placing a greater emphasis on both the importance of delivery, and the importance of financial viability as the “engine” of development. There are also major changes under way in the way the public sector is organised and infrastructure investment is funded. Together these issues mean that while we can set out a general commitment and approach to how we will work together to deliver the plan, to check that it is working, and suggest steps we will take if delivery falls short, we cannot be precise about longer term mechanisms. 11.2 Appendix A sets out the approach to who will deliver the policies in the Core Strategy, how they will do it, the mechanisms we will use to check that the policy is being delivered and what steps we will take if they are not. 11.3 Chapter 1 of the Core Strategy describes joint planning arrangements for Central Lincolnshire. These arrangements are a formal expression of an established approach to joint working. All partner councils have recognised that in order to deliver the housing and economic growth agenda necessary to sustain Central Lincolnshire, it is necessary to have an oversight of plans, strategies and other mechanisms that will implement the specific policies of the development plan documents. These include the Community Infrastructure Levy, the Infrastructure Delivery Plan, and Authorities’ Monitoring Reports, as well as the Core Strategy.

DELIVERY
11.4 The Core Strategy sets out strategic policies which have been prepared in dialogue with the public, developers and organisations including those responsible for services such as flooding and drainage, health, education, utilities, and the natural and historic environment, as well as neighbouring authorities. It allocates 8 sites for major housing and employment development and together with the saved policies of existing local plans, it will guide future development. 11.5 Additional allocations for development of various types will be made in the Allocations Document, which is anticipated to be adopted in 2016 in accordance with the programme of work set out in the Local Development Scheme. 11.6 Both these policy documents are supported by the Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) which accompanies the Core Strategy and which sets out

Delivering and Monitoring the Core Strategy 273

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

the infrastructure necessary to deliver the growth strategy, and which has also been prepared in partnership with the relevant organisations. The IDP is not a just a plan it is a living document which will be reviewed regularly and will guide how the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will manage infrastructure investment in the area. 11.7 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are also preparing a Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) which once formally adopted will enable a financial contribution from qualifying development towards the provision of infrastructure. 11.8 The high level project plan for all these documents is set out in the Local Development Scheme produced by the Joint Planning Unit and revised from time to time. Progress is reported in the joint Authorities’ Monitoring Reports. 11.9 In addition, local communities may decide to produce Neighbourhood Plans, Neighbourhood Development Orders or Community Right to Build proposals which will guide development in their specific areas, in line with the general approach of the Core Strategy. Once formally adopted, these also will be used to guide development proposals. 11.10 In accordance with the NPPF we have assessed the high level viability of the Core Strategy overall1, and the viability of individual Sustainable Urban Extensions, to ensure that they are deliverable. This does not mean that every development site can be delivered against every policy in the plan at every stage in the economic cycle. But the assessment, coupled with the flexibility built into a number of key policies, means that we can be confident that our policies have a good chance of being delivered. Appendix A, the Delivery and Monitoring Framework, highlights a number of policies where viability issues are particularly important and will need to be kept under review through monitoring. 11.11 We have worked closely with landowners and developers to make sure this strategy can be delivered, and we will continue to do so since one of the main mechanisms for delivery of the Core Strategy is through decisions on planning applications. These decisions will continue to be made through the individual local planning authorities who make up Central Lincolnshire, though there will continue to be close working between them, particularly on the Sustainable Urban Extensions which often straddle administrative boundaries (and thus require applications to be made to more than one authority) or impact on more than one area. 11.12 However, integrating with the policies and programmes of other organisations is an important element of spatial planning, and goes beyond the traditional and more limited approach to determining planning applications. A number of mechanisms for doing this, which complement the formal Joint Planning Committee, have been established and are described
1

Whole Plan Viability Assessment and SUE Topic Papers Delivering and Monitoring the Core Strategy 274

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

briefly below, and although these can be expected to change over time as needs change there is a general, positive and continuing commitment to joint working. Together with the formal partnership embodied by the existence of the Joint Planning Committee itself these can be seen to demonstrate an active engagement in the statutory Duty to Co-operate set out in the Localism Act 2011. They should also be considered alongside other arrangements, described below, for engaging with the Local Economic Partnership and with the NHS, and with other councils in accordance with the measures identified in the Statement of Compliance with the Duty to Cooperate.

PARTNERSHIP WORKING
11.13 A Strategic Group of directors of partner authorities develops strategy and provide strategic management and oversight for the joint planning arrangements in Central Lincolnshire, and for the wider programme of activities associated with the growth strategy. 11.14 A Co-ordination of Delivery Group aims to co-ordinate the projects, plans, and strategies which, individually or in combination, have significant implications for population or economic growth, infrastructure, or a combination of these factors. These are projects in which the public sector leads, or is a delivery partner. Many of these are included within the IDP, though they may also include projects such as tourism-related improvements, public car parking construction or refurbishment or specific environmental improvements. The Group brings together relevant senior officers from the partner authorities. 11.15 SUE Delivery Groups work to prioritise and collectively enable the delivery of the Central Lincolnshire Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs). Their key objectives are:     To coordinate and enable the delivery of the SUEs in accordance with the agreed Vision for each, working with the landowners and developers. To proactively engage with partners, stakeholders and key agencies involved in the delivery of sustainable growth and the SUE. To communicate the growth agenda and its benefits To monitor and review progress, and take action appropriately

11.16 These groups bring together the relevant officers of partner authorities together with other agencies as appropriate, and in effect “project manage” SUE delivery. 11.17 The IDP/CIL Group of officers works collectively to develop and review the IDP and to bring forward CIL, and to monitor both programmes. In this it links strongly to the Co-ordination of Delivery Group, which co-ordinates projects which may be partly funded through CIL, to the SUE Delivery Groups, and to the overall process of monitoring described below. IDP monitoring will be incorporated in the joint Authorities’ Monitoring Reports.

Delivering and Monitoring the Core Strategy 275

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

11.18 It is these groups of officers, who include representation from the JPU, who may be expected to investigate if the Core Strategy is not being delivered, and bring forward measures to address this, according to their role and reporting to the Joint Planning Committee as appropriate. This approach represents extensive represents extensive public and private sector partnership working on matters which are not limited to development of planning policy. 11.19 The Greater Lincolnshire Local Economic Partnership (GLLEP) is the privately led, public/private sector partnership body tasked by government with promoting economic development and driving growth in the county. Each LEP has been tasked by government with preparing a Growth Plan for the local economy, and proposed changes in how public money for infrastructure is distributed will increase the role of LEPs in future. It is therefore important that the GLLEP is engaged in and supports the growth of Central Lincolnshire. The County Council, one of the Central Lincolnshire Authorities, is currently represented on the LEP Board, and the LEP has agreed to adopt the Central Lincolnshire Growth Strategy as part of its overall growth plan for Greater Lincolnshire. 11.20 The NHS underwent considerable reorganisation in 2013, with public health responsibilities being handed to upper tier authorities including Lincolnshire County Council and primary care being organised through Clinical Commissioning Groups. Health is a particular issue in Lincolnshire and this is given added importance by the need to plan health provision in step with housing and population growth. Links have been made by members of the Strategic Group and other senior staff of the Central Lincolnshire Authorities with the new bodies, and it is envisaged that this partnership will evolve over time. 11.21 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities will also continue to work with other councils in both formal and informal arrangements in response to issues identified by our ongoing discussions; specifically those measures identified the Statement of Compliance with Duty to Cooperate.

THE GROWTH TRAJECTORY AND MAINTAINING A 5 YEAR SUPPLY OF SITES
11.22 A housing trajectory is set out in Appendix G. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities are not directly responsible for the majority of house building, which is reliant not only on private developers and registered providers, but also on the overall state of the economy and factors such as the availability of mortgage finance. 11.23 The Core Strategy makes provision for housing development in line with the requirements of the NPPF. The housing trajectory in Appendix G sets out the expected rate of housing delivery across the plan period based upon strategic approach to development taken in the Core Strategy, with some 35% of housing growth being accommodated in Sustainable Urban Extensions to the main towns, which will take time to open up and to achieve
Delivering and Monitoring the Core Strategy 276

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

peak delivery, and the ongoing preparation of the Allocations Document. The trajectory demonstrates that housing delivery cannot be at a steady rate across the whole plan period and the rate of delivery will increase overtime subject to the market being able to support delivery. 11.24 The Central Lincolnshire authorities are content, however, that ongoing work with key stakeholders including national agencies, site proponents for the individual SUE’s, the production of the Site Allocations Development Plan Document and ongoing promotion of the area and investment in infrastructure can deliver the requisite level of growth, together with the necessary infrastructure. Delivery will be monitored each year. 11.25 The Core Strategy does not seek to impose phasing policies or artificially hold back development which accords with the priorities set out in policies L2, G2 and S2, so if market demand is strong, delivery may progress faster than assumed in the trajectory. Alternatively, if key SUE sites are being delayed, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will assess the reasons and instigate measures to overcome any constraints. This may include:     seeking alternative sources of funding or re-phasing existing schemes if lack of infrastructure is delaying development, appropriate renegotiation of S106 agreements and site phasing plans to improve cash flow, bringing forward sites anticipated to come on stream later in the plan period, and identifying alternative deliverable sites in accordance with policy CL4.

11.26 Policies L2, G2 and S2 set out the growth strategy for the three main urban areas. They prioritise the development of brownfield sites within the urban areas to be delivered in tandem with Sustainable Urban Extensions. Thereafter they recognise that other greenfield sites adjoining the urban area will need to be released to make up the balance of housing and employment land if the requirements are not being met. 11.27 Therefore provided the 5 year requirements are being met on brownfield sites and the SUEs, the Central Lincolnshire Authorities will strictly control the release of other greenfield sites, through subsequent planning documents and the development management process. 11.28 A similar approach applies to employment development, and here the views of the GLLEP will be particularly important.

MONITORING THE CORE STRATEGY
11.29 Regular monitoring and review are important parts of the planning system, to ensure that the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan policies are being implemented, remain relevant and respond both to changing local circumstances and the national policy position.

Delivering and Monitoring the Core Strategy 277

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

11.30 Regulations issued under the Localism Act in 20122 require local planning authorities to prepare and publish what are known as Authorities’ Monitoring Reports at least annually. The regulations state the minimum information they should contain, and this includes:         A regular update on the Local Development Scheme, including the timetable for preparing local development plan documents and any reasons for deviation from this timetable Monitor the release of land and the provision of housing, employment and other uses Report progress on policies in the Core Strategy, and highlight the need for action where any are not being met Highlight any unintended significant effects of development Provide information on Neighbourhood Planning Indicate how infrastructure is being delivered against the IDP Provide information on actions results from co-operation with any other local planning authority, county council or other relevant body Indicate how development has responded to design and sustainable development policies

11.31 The framework set out in Appendix A indicates how we will jointly monitor policies in the Core Strategy. This framework may be expected to alter over time as new methods of monitoring, or relevant new indicators collected elsewhere, become available. Some indicators, such as those using Census data, are only updated infrequently, and consequently may not be updated an annual basis. 11.32 The partner authorities have formally agreed to share information so that a joint Authorities’ Monitoring Report can be prepared annually by the JPU on their behalf. This does not preclude individual partner councils monitoring other matters which are of particular local interest. It is envisaged that over time the Authorities’ Monitoring Report will evolve and will include commentary and analysis drawing on data from other bodies, such as the GLLEP, particularly pertaining to the different areas of Central Lincolnshire.

REVIEWING THE CORE STRATEGY
11.33 Although the Core Strategy is intended to be a robust document, at some point it will need to be reviewed, either as a whole or in part, to roll it forward beyond its current end date, to deal with any serious shortfalls or unintended consequences identified through monitoring, or if it becomes inconsistent with national policy. If applicable, this will be highlighted in the first instance in the Authorities’ Monitoring Report. As set out in the Central Lincolnshire Local Development Scheme it is envisaged that following the production of planning policy through the Core Strategy and Allocations Document a single consolidated Local Plan would be produced. Whilst the scope is yet to be determined this could incorporate a review of the Core
2

Town and Country Planning (Local Planning) (England) Regulations 2012 Delivering and Monitoring the Core Strategy 278

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Strategy, the outcomes of the site allocations process and any identified additional policy requirements or change in circumstances.

Delivering and Monitoring the Core Strategy 279

Appendix A – Monitoring Framework
Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy

Who will deliver it?

How it will be delivered

Indicator  The effectiveness of this policy will be monitored by measuring performance against the indicators developed for policies CL2 – CL26  Planning appeal decisions  Per capita reduction in CO2 emissions in the Local Authority Area  Number of private sector dwellings in each local authority with a SAP rating of 30 or less (reported every 5 years)  Exception reporting of schemes in excess of Building Regs standards

What we will do if the policy is not being delivered If application refusal rates are above national average and local planning authority decisions are being upheld on appeal, consider providing further advice and guidance to applicants. If local planning authority decisions are not being upheld on appeal, review relevant policies and their application in decision making. Investigate the reasons for non-delivery and take appropriate action, which may include policy review

CL1 Sustainable Development in Central Lincolnshire

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/ town/community councils, other public sector partners, landowners and developers

Through the development management process in local planning authorities, and applicants implementing approvals

Appendix A

CL2 Tackling Climate Change

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils, other public sector partners especially Natural England & Environment Agency, landowners and developers

Through the site allocation and development management processes, by linking the Core Strategy to transport and economic development strategies, and to green infrastructure planning and delivery, by Central Lincs. Authorities being proactive working with stakeholders and in managing their own assets to deliver carbon reductions

280

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

CL3 Renewable and Low Carbon Energy

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils, GLLEP, developers, utility and other private sector companies.

CL4 Level & Distribution of Growth

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils, other public sector partners, public and private infrastructure providers, developers

Partnership working between public and private sector, including GLLEP, to promote suitable provision and business opportunities, particularly in new developments. Production of planning guidance as necessary. Development management process. Through the Site Allocation Document and Neighbourhood Plans and Development Orders, development management processes including masterplanning for key settlements and sites, by linking the Core Strategy to housing, transport & economic development strategies, and the IDP

 Renewable energy installed by type (megawatts)  Number of planning applications submitted /approved /refused for renewable and low carbon energy generation  Number of new dwellings granted planning permission  Net additional dwellings (previous years)  Net additional dwellings (current year)  New and converted dwellings on previously developed land (percentage)  Conversion of offices to residential use  Net additional

Investigate the reasons for non-delivery and take appropriate action, which may include proactive steps to encourage suitable investment, policy review etc

Investigate the reasons for non-delivery or any sustained geographical imbalance in delivery, as demonstrated by delivery 15% below annual average for each of three consecutive years. Take appropriate action, which may include proactive steps to mitigate development constraints, seeking additional sources of funding, policy review etc

Appendix A

CL5

Central Lincs Authorities,

By monitoring

Investigate reasons why sites

281

Managing the Release of Land for Housing and Employment

parish/town/community councils, developers

development at least annually, reviewing and updating the SHLAA, Employment Land Review and IDP regularly, supporting Neighbourhood Plans and Development Orders, development management processes, working together with other partners to unblock the delivery of sites

dwellings (future years)  The effectiveness of this policy will be monitored by measuring performance against the indicators developed for policies CL4, CL17, CL18, CL19 and CL23  The effectiveness of this policy will also be monitored through updates to key evidence base studies including the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA), Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) and Employment Land Review (ELR)  The effectiveness of this policy will

are not being developed, including any spatial differences across Central Lincs. Take appropriate actions which may include proactive steps to encourage suitable investment, policy review etc. Release additional sites identified in the SHLAA and Employment Land Review to maintain 5 year supply +20%.. Approve appropriate “departure” applications.

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix A

CL6

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils,

Through the Site Allocations DPD,

If this policy is not delivered, the number of successful

282

Site Allocation in Central Lincolnshire

landowners and developers

Neighbourhood Plans and Development Orders, Sustainability Appraisal and development management processes

be monitored through the site allocations and SHLAA process

CL7 Sustainable Urban Extensions in Central Lincs.

Central Lincs Authorities,parish/town/communit y councils, public and private sector infrastructure providers, landowners, developers

Through implementation of site specific policies and visions, masterplans and phasing plans and related S106 agreements, and IDP

CL8 Sustainable Communities and Neighbourhood Plans

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils

By designated bodies, including parish and town councils, supported by local planning authorities

 The effectiveness of this policy will be monitored by a qualitative annual review of the progress on the Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) to be produced by the partner authorities  Number of designated Neighbourhood Plan areas/forums adopted/progressi ng  Number of designated Neighbourhood Development Orders

appeals on the basis of inadequate land supply will increase, reducing the influence of councils and local stakeholders. If unsuitable land is proposed for allocation, formal objections from key public sector stakeholders such as EA can be expected. It is therefore in the interests of the Central Lincs Authorities to implement this policy. Continue to work proactively with landowner and developer to understand the reasons for non-delivery and take appropriate action, which may include steps to unblock constraints to development, to improve viability, to vary terms of planning consent or S106 The production of Neighbourhood Plans and Development Orders is discretionary and dependent on the views of the local community.

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix A

283

CL9 Infrastructure to Support Growth

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils, public and private sector infrastructure providers, developers, GLLEP

Through production of an IDP and its regular monitoring, review and communication to relevant stakeholders, project overview through Central Lincs. governance mechanisms, by allocation of sites, implementation of other policies in the CS, development of CIL charging schedule and other funding streams, development management processes including S106 agreements Development management processes including masterplanning and S106 agreements, implementation of CIL charging and spending schedules, producing, reviewing and implementing Local Transport Plan and IDP, working in partnership

adopted/progressi ng  The Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) will include a set of indicators to monitor its effectiveness. These indicators will be used to monitor this policy.

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Central Lincs partnership and governance mechanisms should flag any issues in delivery and enable steps such as seeking to re-prioritise programmes, influence the programmes of external providers, seeking additional sources of funding or forwardfunding provision, varying the provisions of S106 agreements.

Appendix A

CL10 Transport

Central Lincs. Authorities, including LCC as Highway authority, public and private sector transport infrastructure providers, landowners and developers

 Number of planning applications granted at appeal for Highways reasons  Transport Schemes delivered  Additional indicators may be developed drawing on Lincolnshire

Investigate the reasons for non-delivery. Seek to understand any technical/behavioural issues. Seek alternative sources of funding eg through LEP, LTP process, review of CIL charges. Review and prioritisation of IDP.

284

with all stakeholders to obtain funding

County Council's Transport Monitoring Report  Number of major developments (over 100 dwellings residential and over 10,000m² non-residential) subject to Health Impact Assessment (HIA)  Development of additional and/or expanded/ remodelled healthcare facilities  Index of multiple deprivation health deprivation and disability domainrank in England by area  Gross affordable housing completions  Tenure of affordable housing completions  Number of empty homes brought back into use Investigate the reasons for non-delivery. Seek to understand any technical/behavioural issues and provide appropriate advice/guidance. Seek alternative sources of funding e.g. through LEP, LTP process, review of CIL charges. Review and prioritisation of IDP.

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

CL11 Health and Wellbeing

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town and community councils, public and private commissioners/providers of healthcare and recreation facilities, developers

Through production of an IDP and its regular monitoring, review and communication to relevant stakeholders, project overview through Central Lincs. governance mechanisms, implementation of other policies in the CS, site allocation, development of CIL charging schedule and other funding streams, development management processes including masterplanning and S106 agreements By partnership working between Central Lincs. Authorities, registered providers and HCA together with landowners and developers through the development management process

Appendix A

CL12 Overall Target for Affordable Housing

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town and community councils, registered providers, housebuilders, landowners and developers

Delivery of this policy is very dependent upon scheme viability. Regular monitoring of the policy, and review of the Housing Strategy, will indicate the degree of need and whether the policy is being achieved, or if it needs to be reviewed upwards or

285

and S106 agreements, and by local communities identifying particular local needs/opportunities

 Percentage of eligible planning permissions providing affordable housing

CL13 Affordable Housing Thresholds

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town and community councils, HCA, registered providers, housebuilders, landowners and developers

CL14 Affordable Housing on Rural Exception Sites

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town and community councils, HCA, registered providers, housebuilders, landowners and developers

By partnership working between Central Lincs. Authorities, registered providers and HCA together with landowners and developers through the development management process and S106 agreements, and by local communities identifying particular local needs/opportunities By partnership working between Central Lincs. Authorities, registered providers and HCA together with landowners and developers through the development management process and S106 agreements,

 Gross affordable housing completions  Tenure of affordable housing completions  Percentage of eligible planning applications providing affordable housing or financial contributions  Gross affordable housing completions on Rural Exception Sites

downwards. Open book valuations, staircasing and review mechanisms will be used within S106 agreements to ensure that overall development is not inhibited but that development contributes towards meeting the need identified in the policy. Delivery of this policy is very dependent upon scheme viability. Regular monitoring of the policy will indicate to what extent the mechanisms within it are enabling the provision of affordable housing without inhibiting overall development. If monitoring demonstrates that there are persistent viability issues affecting delivery of affordable housing, the policy will be reviewed. By its nature the policy is exceptional, and would not be expected to be commonly used. If monitoring demonstrates that it is not being used but there is evidence of localised need, consideration would be given to wider publicity for the policy through

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix A

286

CL15 Type and Size Mix in New Housing

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town and community councils, registered providers, housebuilders, landowners and developers

and by local communities identifying particular local needs/opportunities By partnership working between Central Lincs. Authorities, registered providers and HCA together with landowners and developers through the development management process and S106 agreements, and by local communities identifying particular local needs/opportunities

parish/town/community councils.  Number and type of new dwellings granted planning permission  Net additional dwellings (bedroom breakdown)  Net additional student dwellings (purpose built and not purpose built)  Additional indicators to be considered through the Housing Strategy Group  Net additional pitches (Gypsy and Traveller)  Indicators to be used from the Gypsy and Traveller count return  Net additional pitches (future years – 5 year supply)

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

If monitoring indicates serious mismatch between local needs and delivery, the reasons will need to be investigated as this could be due to viability issues or lack of awareness by developers of local issues. Appropriate steps would then be taken such as using the Developer Forum and mechanisms such as guidance to increase awareness and understanding.

Appendix A

CL16 Meeting the Accommodation Needs of Gypsies & Travellers & Travelling Showpeople

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town and community councils, landowners and developers and the travelling community

By partnership working between Central Lincs. Authorities together with landowners and developers, and the travelling community, through the site allocations process and development management process and S106 agreements.

Non-delivery of this policy is likely to be demonstrated by adverse appeal decisions, which would lead to review of how the policy is being interpreted in practice.

287

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

CL17 Delivering Prosperity & Jobs

Central Lincs. Authorities, GLLEP, public and private sector providers of education and training, individual businesses and investors, landowners, developers

By partnership working between Central Lincs. Authorities and the GLLEP, together with businesses, investors, landowners and developers and others to deliver local economic strategies through the site allocations and development management process.

CL18 Regeneration Priorities in Central Lincs.

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town/community councils, other public and private sector stakeholders including regeneration groups, landowners and developers, GLLEP

Aligning planning policy, including any Neighbourhood Plans/NDOs, with economic and housing strategies, effective masterplanning on key development sites, encouraging inward investment through

 Total amount and type of completed employment floorspace gross and net (m²)  Total amount of employment floorspace on previously developed land- by type (m²)  Employment land available- by type (m²)  Unemployment Claimants % rate  Central Lincolnshire Authorities to produce contextual data on progress against this policy  New and converted dwellings on previously developed land (percentage)  Total amount of employment floorspace on previously developed land- by

If monitoring demonstrates that the policy is not being delivered it will be necessary to research the reasons for this and to take action and assess the need to review the policy as appropriate

Appendix A 288

If this policy is not being delivered it will be necessary to understand why, and potentially to reassess the priorities

partnership working with GLLEP and others, implementing the IDP and LTP, the development management process

CL19 Existing and former Military Establishments

Central Lincs. Authorities, Ministry of Defence, parish/town/community councils, GLLEP, local businesses and other stakeholders including heritage interests

By effective liaison between Central Lincs. Authorities and MoD, working with stakeholders to develop masterplan and SPD approaches to future use and heritage protection, as appropriate, and through development management processes, including S106 agreements. Aligning planning policy, including any Neighbourhood Plans/NDOs, with economic and housing strategies, and the Masterplans for Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford, effective masterplanning on key development sites,

CL20 Retail and Town Centres in Central Lincolnshire

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town/community councils, GLLEP, local businesses and town centre groups, landowners, investors, developers

type (m²)  Central Lincolnshire Authorities to produce contextual data on any key areas identified for regeneration  Number of existing MOD sites classed as Core, Retained or Proposed for Disposal  Index of Multiple Deprivation (overall) – rank in England, of areas which include newly created settlements following full or part disposal of MOD sites  Total amount of floorspace for ‘town centre uses’ (A1, A2 and D2) within and outside town centres (m²)  Vacancy rates within town centres  Town Centre

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

If monitoring indicates that this policy is not being delivered it will be necessary to research the reasons why, and to focus on measures which are more successful. This may include reviewing the approach to land uses of former bases.

Appendix A

If this policy is not being delivered, as evidenced for example through adverse planning appeal decisions or lack of investment, it will be necessary to understand why, and potentially to reassess the mix of uses and priorities in the policy

289

CL21 A Sustainable Visitor Economy

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town/community councils, GLLEP, businesses, landowners, public and private sector investors, developers

CL22 Strategy for the Central Area of Central Lincolnshire

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town/community councils, GLLEP, Registered Providers, businesses, landowners, public and private sector investors, developers, relevant interest groups

encouraging inward investment through partnership working with GLLEP and others, implementing the IDP and LTP, the development management process including S106s Aligning planning policy, including any Neighbourhood Plans/NDOs, with economic strategies, effective masterplanning on key development sites, encouraging inward investment through partnership working with GLLEP and others, implementing the IDP and LTP, the development management process Through policy development including Neighbourhood Plans and NDOs, the operation of other relevant policies in the CS, the operation of development management processes,

Health check (every 3 years)  Planning applications approved/refused

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Indicators from STEAM data which could include:  Bed Stocks  Employment in Tourism  Tourism revenue  Number of tourist days  Tourist numbers

If this policy is not being delivered it will be necessary to understand why, and potentially to reassess the approach being taken to both policy and development management decisions.

Appendix A

 Accessibility to Services % All Persons

If monitoring demonstrates that the policy is not being delivered and that access is not being maintained, or is deteriorating, it will be necessary to research the reasons for this and any geographically specific issues and to assess the need to

290

CL23 A Quality Environment

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town/community councils, public bodies such as English Heritage, Natural England, the Environment Agency, the Lincolnshire Wolds Countryside Service, relevant interest groups, landowners, developers

and co-ordination with Housing, Economic Development and biodiversity strategies, implementing the IDP and LTP By partnership working to support appropriate management of assets, through development management processes, masterplanning of key sites

review the policy as appropriate

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

CL24 Central Lincs. Authorities, Green Infrastructure parish/town/community councils, and Biodiversity public bodies such as Natural England, the Environment Agency, the Lincolnshire Wolds Countryside Service, relevant interest groups, landowners, developers

By partnership working to support appropriate management of assets, through the production of further policy/advice as appropriate, through development management processes, masterplanning of key sites

 % of Conservation Areas with an up to date (less than 5 years) Conservation Area Appraisal or Management Plan  Number of planning applications involving Listed Buildings  Total area of Grade 1 to 3a agricultural land  Proportion of Local Sites where positive conservation management is being achieved  Number recreational/sports facilities needed

If this policy is not being delivered it will be necessary to understand why, and potentially to reassess the approach being taken to both policy and development management decisions, including the provision of appropriate advice and information.

Appendix A 291

If this policy is not being delivered it will be necessary to understand why, and potentially to reassess the approach being taken to both policy and development management decisions, including the provision of appropriate advice and information.

CL25 Managing Water Resources and Flood Risk

Central Lincs. Authorities, LCC as lead local flood authority, parish/town/community councils, Internal Drainage Boards, Environment Agency, British Waterways Trust, water and sewerage utility companies, landowners, developers

Through partnership working on the overall flood management process, including the collection and review of appropriate evidence including flood risk assessments, the site allocations and development management processes, including S106 agreements, CIL charging and spending schedules, IDP schemes, masterplanning key sites

CL26 Design Quality

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town/community councils, applicants for planning permission, developers, Opun, CABE

Through the development management process including collaborative masterplanning, and through design review

 Number of planning permissions granted contrary to Environment Agency advice on Water Framework Directive and water quality grounds  Number of planning permissions granted contrary to Environment Agency advice on flood risk  The number of properties for each approved SuDS application  Data regarding water quality in Central Lincolnshire (to be supplied by Environment Agency)  Number of applications assessed by Design Panels  Number of

If this policy is not being delivered it will be necessary to understand why, and potentially to reassess the partnership approach as well as the approach being taken to both policy and development management decisions, including the provision of appropriate advice and information.

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix A

If this policy is not being delivered it will be necessary to understand why, and potentially to reassess the approach being taken to both policy and development

292

L1/G1/S1 Strategy for Growth in the Lincoln/Gainsborou gh/Sleaford Area

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/ town/community councils, other public sector partners, GLLEP, landowners and developers, interest groups

Through the site allocations and development management processes in local planning authorities, private and public sector investment, and applicants implementing approvals

L2/G2/S2 Locational Priorities for Development in the Lincoln/ Gainsborough/ Sleaford Area

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils, other public sector partners, public and private infrastructure providers, landowners and developers, investors

Through the site allocation and development management processes, by Central Lincs. Authorities being proactive working with stakeholders and in managing their own assets

planning applications refused on reasons relating to CL26 The effectiveness of these policies will be monitored by measuring performance against the indicators developed for policies CL2 - 26 on an area basis , together with contextual information provided by partner authorities including planning appeal decisions The effectiveness of these policies will be monitored by measuring performance against the indicators developed for policies CL4,5,6,7,8 on an area basis , together with contextual information provided by partner authorities including

management decisions, including the provision of appropriate advice and information. If the strategy for an area is consistently not being delivered, there will be a need to understand why and potentially review the priorities of the Core Strategy

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix A 293

Investigate the reasons for any sustained geographical imbalance in delivery and take appropriate action, which may include policy review

L3/G6/S6 Green Wedges and Green Infrastructure in Lincoln/Green Infrastructure and Settlement Breaks in the Gainsborough Area/Green Infrastructure in the Sleaford Area

Central Lincs. Authorities, parish/town/community councils, public bodies such as Natural England, the Environment Agency, the Lincolnshire Wolds Countryside Service, relevant interest groups, landowners, developers

By partnership working to support appropriate management of assets, through the production of further policy/advice as appropriate including Neighbourhood Plans and NDOs, through development management processes and masterplanning of key sites, including provision and funding through S106 agreements, through linkages to other strategies and programmes Through the Site Allocation Document and Neighbourhood Plans and Development Orders, development management processes including masterplanning for key settlements and sites, by linking the Core Strategy to housing, transport & economic

planning appeal decisions The effectiveness of this policy will be monitored by measuring performance against the indicators developed for policy CL24 and CL25, together with contextual information provided by partner authorities, including monitoring of S106 agreements for key sites and any associated expenditure on GI her with r The effectiveness of these policies will be monitored by measuring performance against the indicators developed for policies CL4,5,6,7,8,9,10,17, 11,18,20,23,24,26 on an area basis , together with

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Investigate the reasons for non-delivery and take appropriate action

Appendix A

L5/G3/S4 Regenerating Lincoln/Gainsborou gh/Sleaford

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils, other public sector partners, GLLEP, private sector businesses, landowners, developers

Investigate the reasons for non-delivery or any sustained geographical imbalance in delivery. Take appropriate action, which may include proactive steps to mitigate development constraints, seeking additional sources of funding

294

development strategies, the IDP and the GLLEP Growth Plan and any city/town centre management proposals L4/G4/S3 Employment Priorities in the Lincoln/Gainsborou gh/Sleaford Area Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils, GLLEP, other public and private sector partners and interest groups, landowners and developers By monitoring development at least annually, reviewing and updating the Employment Land Review and IDP regularly, Local Development Orders, site allocation and development management processes, working together with other partners to unblock the delivery of sites, and by linking the CS to the Economic Strategy, the GLLEP Growth Plan and the LTP Aligning planning policy, including any Neighbourhood Plans/NDOs, with economic and housing strategies, and the Masterplans for Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford, site allocation

contextual information provided by partner authorities including planning appeal decisions The effectiveness of these policies will be monitored by measuring performance against the indicators developed for Policies CL4,5,6,17 on an area basis, together with contextual information provided by partner authorities. This may include specific information on employment collected by the LRO. The effectiveness of these policies will be monitored by measuring performance against the indicators developed for policies CL 20 on an area basis, together

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Investigate reasons why sites are not being developed, including any spatial differences across Central Lincs. Take appropriate actions which may include proactive steps to encourage suitable investment, policy review etc. Release additional sites identified in the SHLAA and Employment Land Review to maintain 5 year supply +20%. Approve appropriate “departure” applications.

Appendix A

L6/L7/G5/S5 Lincoln City Centre/District & Neighbourhood Centres, Gainsborough Town & Other Centres, Strengthening Sleaford Town

Central Lincs Authorities, parish/town/community councils, GLLEP, local businesses and town centre groups, landowners, investors, developers

If this policy is not being delivered, as evidenced for example through adverse planning appeal decisions or lack of investment, it will be necessary to understand why, and potentially to reassess the status of centres in the policy

295

Centre & the network of Neighbourhood Centres in the Sleaford Area

L8/9/10 G7/8/9 S7/8 Site Specific Policies for the Sustainable Urban Extensions

Central Lincs Authorities,parish/town/communit y councils, public and private sector infrastructure providers, landowners, developers

process and effective masterplanning on key development sites, encouraging inward investment through partnership working with GLLEP and others, implementing the IDP and LTP, the development management process including S106s, any city/town centre management proposals Through the development management process including implementation of site specific policies and visions, masterplans and phasing plans and related S106 agreements, and IDP as set out in the policy for each site. Through the SUE Delivery Groups bringing together developers and the public sector in partnership to resolve issues and progress development.

with contextual information provided by partner authorities.

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The effectiveness of these policies will be monitored by a qualitative annual review of the progress on the SUEs, produced by the partner authorities, including whether masterplans and phasing plans have been prepared for each and progress against them and related S106 agreements, as well as by numerical indicators such as development

Continue to work proactively with landowner and developer to understand the reasons for non-delivery and take appropriate action, which may include steps to unblock constraints to development, to improve viability, to vary terms of planning consent or S106, or to bring partners together to facilitate community provision

Appendix A

296

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

completed

Appendix A

297

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix B – Relationship between Core Strategy and Minerals & Waste Plan
B1 Lincolnshire County Council (LCC) is the determining authority for minerals and waste matters and has the responsibility for identifying sites and policies for minerals and waste development in the County. As such, minerals and waste issues are not covered in the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan, except where they are relevant and pertinent to the sites or policies being proposed. Issues where Minerals and Waste will be relevant to the plan may include:  The designation of Mineral Safeguarding Areas in the LCC Minerals and Waste Local Plan – on sites allocated in this Local Plan, it will be necessary to consider the potential impact that development may have on sterilising those minerals, i.e. preventing them being extracted ahead of development; Existing permitted mineral sites and infrastructure where they may have a potential to affect the amenity of the public if new housing development were to be allowed to close the boundary; and Existing and proposed waste sites which may seek to use employment related sites. And existing and allocated waste management facilities where they have the potential to affect the amenity of the public if new housing development were to be allowed to close to the boundary.

B2 The Mineral Safeguarding Areas (MSAs) will be identified through the emerging LCC Minerals and Waste Local Plan. It should also be noted that LCC are proposing to safeguard potential sources of dimension stone (limestone) within the City of Lincoln, for use in connection with Lincoln Cathedral. In addition it is proposed that the County will identify Minerals Consultation Areas (MCAs), as a mechanism in a two-tier authority area to ensure that consultation takes place between the County and District Planning Authorities. B3 It should be noted that at the time of writing this Local Plan publication document these Mineral Safeguarding Areas were still in draft and were yet to be adopted into policy. Mineral Consultation zones have been identified through Policy M16 of the adopted Lincolnshire County Council Minerals Local Plan 1991 and until such a date, to which it is superseded by the Minerals and Waste Local Plan should be utilised for both allocations and the determination of planning applications.

Appendix B 298

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix C – Central Lincolnshire Local Plan: Core Strategy – Saved Policies Proposed for Deletion
Saved Local Plan Policies to be Deleted by Policy CL1 (Sustainable Development in Central Lincolnshire): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes No relevant policy No relevant policy No relevant policy

Saved Local Plan Policies to be Deleted by Policy CL2 (Tackling Climate Change): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes While the aims of this policy are reflected in the CLLP’s Vision and Objectives, there is no equivalent headline policy covering Climate Change or Low Carbon. Policy 41 (Energy Efficiency) and the Green Design SPD is addressed under the CS policy on Design. Policy 71 (Renewable Energy) is addressed under the CS policy on Low Carbon Energy & Renewables. While the Plan’s objectives cover a number of these aspects, there is no overall policy regarding climate change and low carbon. Policy C21 (Energy Efficiency) is addressed under CS policy on Design. Policy C17 (Renewable Energy) is addressed under CS policy on Low Carbon & Renewables. While the Plan’s objectives cover a number of these aspects, there is no overall policy regarding climate change and low carbon. Policy Sus8 (Energy Efficiency) is addressed under CS Policy on Design. Policy Sus11 (Energy Generation/Renewable Energy) is addressed under CS policy on Low Carbon & Renewables.

CLLP

None

NKLP

None

WLLP

None

Appendix C 299

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL3 (Renewable & Low Carbon Energy): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy 71 (Renewable Energy) sets out the issues to be considered in assessing renewable energy proposals. These issues are either covered by this policy or by the National Policy Statements on Energy Infrastructure. Policy 41 (Energy Efficiency) is addressed under the Core Strategy policy on Design Quality. Policy C17 (Renewable Energy) sets out the main considerations for determining planning applications for renewable energy generation and distribution. These considerations are either covered by this policy or by the National Policy Statements on Energy Infrastructure. Policy C21 (Energy Efficiency) is addressed under the Core Strategy policy on Design Quality. Policy SUS11 – Energy Generation/ Renewable Energy was deleted from the ‘West Lindsey Local Plan (First Review) 2006’ in 2009 therefore there is no existing policy to be replaced.

CLLP

71 – Renewable Energy

NKLP

C17 – Renewable Energy

WLLP

None

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL4 (Level & Distribution of Growth): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes The housing requirement for the City of Lincoln covers the period to 2011, and is substantially out of date. However, there is no policy setting out these figures in the CLLP. Individual site allocations will remain until superseded by the proposed Site Allocations DPD, except for H1 (Skewbridge) and H2 (Land north of Greetwell Quarry) which are addressed under CS Policies L2 and L3. For employment land requirements, the site allocations in the CLLP are based on figures, but the latter are included in the text rather than a policy. Site allocations for employment land or other uses at Skewbridge and North East Quadrant are addressed under CS policies L8 and L10.

CLLP

None

Appendix C 300

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The housing provision figures in the policy are superseded by CL4 and the housing trajectory on which it is based. The remainder of the policy is superseded by Policy CL6. There is no comparable policy covering employment land figures. NKLP sets out a Locational Strategy including hierarchies of settlements covering the Lincoln Policy Area (as defined by the Regional Plan) and the rest of NK district. The Plan states in Para 2.23 that the Council will take account of these hierarchies in deciding where development should take place, but they are not contained in a policy. Technically, there is therefore no policy to delete or amend. However, the hierarchy is superseded by policy CL4 down to smaller towns, and will be reviewed below this level as part of the proposed Site Allocations DPD Individual site allocations for housing will also remain until superseded by the proposed Site Allocations DPD. Saved Policy Strat 3 (Settlement Hierarchy) is amended in part The settlement hierarchy above Primary Rural Settlements has been superseded by CL4. Settlements below this level will be reviewed as part of the proposed Site Allocations DPD The WL housing requirement and housing supply figures are set out in detail in the WLLP Strategic Framework document. While these figures are effectively superseded by Policy CL4 and the CS Housing Trajectory, they are not included in a policy in the WLLP as such. Individual site allocations pursuant to the figures are set out in WLLP policies Strat 2 (Residential Allocations – Towns) and Strat 3 (Residential Allocations – Lincoln Policy Area) and will remain until superseded by the proposed Site Allocations DPD. Policy Strat 10 (Longer term Development Options (Lincoln and Bardney) is considered under the Lincoln area policies in relation to North East Quadrant.

NKLP

Policy H1

WLLP

No policies relating to the housing requirement or site allocations are deleted by this policy.

Appendix C 301

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL5 (Managing the Release of Land for Housing & Employment: Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy 56A (New housing(self contained) and Policy 66 (Proposed Allocations for Business & Industry) will remain in place until superseded by new site allocations for housing and employment respectively in the proposed Site Allocations DPD, except where they are superseded by the Western Growth Area and North East Quadrant SUE policies L7 and L8. The other development management policies in Chapter 7 on Homes and Chapter 8 on Business & Industry will be reviewed as part of a subsequent DPD. The development management component of Policy H1 (Housing) is deleted (Note: the housing provision figures are deleted by Policy CL4). Policies C1 (Development within settlement cartilages) and C2 (Development in the countryside) are retained for review as part of the proposed Site Allocations DPD, because they relate to settlement curtilages (which approach needs reviewing and unifying across Central Lincolnshire). Policies relating to Development in the Countryside (DC1 – DC8) will be reviewed as part of a wider review of development management policies via a future DPD. The sequential approach and phasing proposals set out in Strat 9 are superseded by CL5 and the area-based policies for Gainsborough. No other policies in Chapter A are proposed for deletion here. Policies relating to windfall (Strat 4 – 8) and development in the open countryside (Strat 12) will be reviewed as part of a wider review of development management policies via a future DPD. Policies setting out individual site allocations for housing (Strat 2), mixed use (Strat 14) and employment (Strat 15), are retained until replaced by the proposed Site Allocations DPD.

CLLP

None

NKLP

Policy H1

WLLP

Policy Strat 9 (Phasing of Housing Development)

Appendix C 302

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL6 (Site Allocation in Central Lincolnshire): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes No relevant policies relating to criteria for allocation No relevant policies relating to criteria for allocation No relevant policies relating to criteria for allocation

Local Plan policies to be deleted by Policy CL7 (Sustainable Urban Extensions): Local Plan CLLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes No generic policy relating to SUEs. CLLP policies relating to WGC and NEQ are addressed under Policies L8 and L9. No generic policy relating to SUEs. NKLP policies relating to WGC and SEQ are addressed under Policies L8 and L10. No generic policy relating to SUEs. WLLP policies relating to NEQ are addressed under Policies L9.

NKLP

None

WLLP

None

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL8 (Sustainable Communities & Neighbourhood Plans) Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes No relevant policies No relevant policies No relevant policies

Local Plan policies to be deleted by Policy CL9 (Infrastructure to Support Growth): Local Plan CLLP Policy/Policies None Policy C4 (Infrastructure provision by developers) Reasons / Notes No relevant policies in relation to CL9 (Infrastructure to Support Growth) Policy C4 of the NKLP identifies the criteria required for the provision of infrastructure needed to support development.

NKLP

Appendix C 303

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policy CL10 of the Core Strategy identifies the infrastructure to support the delivery of growth identified. It notes the need to follow the IDP and provides mechanisms to which infrastructure will be funded. As such Policy CL9 supersedes Policy C4 of the NKLP. Policy STRAT 19 of the WLLP identifies the infrastructure requirements which need to be considered to support development and other land uses. WLLP Policy STRAT 19 (Infrastructure Requirements) Policy CL10 of the Core Strategy identifies the infrastructure to support the delivery of growth identified. It notes the need to follow the IDP and provides mechanisms to which infrastructure will be funded. As such Policy CL9 supersedes Policy STRAT 19 of the WLLP

Local Plan policies to be deleted by Policy CL10 (Transport) Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy 4 (Footpaths and cycleways in new housing areas) is superseded by Policy CL10. Policy 4 identified the need for new housing development to provide sage, user friendly facilities for both pedestrians and cyclists, and wherever possible link these directly to the existing network. Policy CL10 ensures that new developments have regard to the minimisation of additional travel demand through the use of walking and cycling links and integration with existing infrastructure. As such Policy 4 is deleted. Policy 6 (Public Transport Facilities) is superseded by Policy CL10. Policy 6 looks to ensure that permission is granted to improve the integration, efficiency, accessibility, safety, convenience and comfort of public transport station and other public transport facilities. Policy CL10 supports the enhancement of existing or proposed transport interchanges, and also seeks to ensure that the level of demand required to improve, introduce or maintain public transport services is achieved. As such Policy 6 is deleted. Policy 11 (railways halts) sets out that permission will be granted for the

4 (Footpaths and Cycleways in new Housing Areas)

CLLP

6 (Public Transport Facilities)

11 (Railway Halts)

Appendix C 304

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

development of stations and halts. This is covered by the criteria in Policy CL10 which identifies that support will be given to the enhancement of existing or proposed interchanges. The policy also seeks to generate or support the level of demand required to improve, introduce or maintain public transport facilities. As such, Policy 11 is superseded and deleted by policy CL10. Policy T1 of the NKLP identifies that development will be granted if adequate and effective measures are taken to facilitate access by all modes of transport, with a particular focus on public transport, walking and cycling. In addition the policy identifies that the site’s location and infrastructure must be satisfactory. T1(Accessibility to Developments) The need for plans and decisions to ensure that developments which generate significant movement are located where the need to travel can be minimised and the use of sustainable transport modes can be maximised is embodied in Policy CL10 and national planning policy. As such, the considerations of Policy T1 are covered by Policy CL10 of the Core Strategy and the National Planning Policy Framework and therefore supersede policy T1. Policy T2 (public transport facilities) sets out its support for the provision of public transport services in new developments. Policy CL10 seeks to generate or support the level of demand required to improve, introduce or maintain public transport services. As such, the principals of policy T2 are covered by CL10, and are subsequently superseded. Policy T3 (maximising travel choice) sets out the provision for criteria for the grant of permission for groups, complexes or estates of buildings sharing common access roads. This criterion is fully superseded by Policy CL10, which identifies the need to integrate with existing infrastructure. Policy T4 (safety) ensures the safety of people using roads, cycleways, footpaths, bridleways or railways in respect to new

NKLP

T2 (Public Transport Facilities)

T3 - Maximising Travel Choice

T4 – Safety

Appendix C 305

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

development. This policy criteria is covered by Policy CL10, which identifies that development should not unacceptably impact the safety and movement of traffic on the highway network. As such, Policy T4 is superseded and subsequently deleted. Policy T5 (Parking Provision) identifies the provision of off-street parking in accordance with the Council’s adopted maximum parking standards. This policy is covered by Policy CL10, which identifies the need to provide appropriate and effective parking provision. In addition this is also covered by Lincolnshire County Council parking standards documents. As such, this policy is superseded and subsequently deleted. Policy CORE 1 (Vehicle and Parking Standards) outlines the standards for appropriate vehicle and cycle parking spaces. This policy is covered by Policy CL10, which identifies the need to provide appropriate and effective parking provision. In addition this is also covered by Lincolnshire County Council parking standards documents. As such, this policy is superseded and subsequently deleted. Policy CORE 2 (Highway Development Standards) outlines the standards for highway development standards. This policy is covered by Policy CL10 in regards to highway safety and functional requirements, and is also covered by Policy CL26 (Design Quality) which ensures that the development is based on a thorough understanding of local character. As such, this policy is superseded and subsequently deleted.

T5 - Parking Provision

CORE 1 (Vehicle and Parking Standards)

WLLP

CORE 2 (Highway Development Standards)

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL11 (Health & Wellbeing): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes No relevant policies No relevant policies No relevant policies

Appendix C 306

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL12 (Overall Need for Affordable Housing): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Whilst this policy relates to affordable housing it does not directly supersede any of the policies currently contained within the City of Lincoln Local Plan. This policy identifies the ‘need’ for affordable housing over the plan period and does not identify the level of contributions expected by developers, which has been evidenced through the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA). Whilst this policy relates to affordable housing it does not directly supersede any of the policies currently contained within the City of Lincoln Local Plan. This policy identifies the ‘need’ for affordable housing over the plan period and does not identify the level of contributions expected by developers, which has been evidenced through the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA). Whilst this policy relates to affordable housing it does not directly supersede any of the policies currently contained within the City of Lincoln Local Plan. This policy identifies the ‘need’ for affordable housing over the plan period and does not identify the level of contributions expected by developers, which has been evidenced through the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA).

CLLP

None

NKLP

None

WLLP

None

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL13 (Affordable Housing Contributions and Qualifying Thresholds): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy 57 (Affordable Housing) sets out the criteria for affordable housing contributions in the City of Lincoln. The policy considerations are covered by the policy CL13, which identifies the thresholds for qualifying sites in Central Lincolnshire, where the authorities will seek affordable housing delivery in line with the target of Policy CL12. Policy H5 (Affordable Housing) sets out the

CLLP

57 – Affordable Housing

NKLP

Policy H5 – Affordable

Appendix C 307

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Housing

criteria for affordable housing contributions across North Kesteven District Council. The policy also identifies where the policy will consider a lower affordable housing contribution, in light of exceptional development costs. This is to be superseded by policy CL13, which identifies the thresholds for qualifying sites in Central Lincolnshire, where the authorities will seek affordable housing delivery in line with the target of Policy CL12. In addition Policy CL13 identified a cascade approach to determining the delivery of affordable housing when exceptional development costs have an impact on development viability in light of affordable housing costs. Policy RE6 (Affordable Housing) sets out the criteria for affordable housing contributions sought in West Lindsey District Council. This policy is to be superseded by Policy CL13 of the Core Strategy which identifies the thresholds of affordable housing contributions for qualifying sites in Central Lincolnshire, where the authorities will seeks affordable housing delivery in line with the target identified in Policy CL12.

WLLP

Policy RES 6 – Affordable Housing

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL14 (Affordable Housing on Rural Exception Sites): Local Plan CLLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes No relevant policies Policy H6 (affordable housing on rural exceptions sites) identified that small rural exception sites will be granted in exceptional circumstances for local people. NKLP Policy H6 – Affordable Housing on Rural Exceptions sites Policy CL14 of the Core Strategy identifies the criteria for affordable housing on rural exception sites. It presents the criteria to which in exceptional circumstances affordable housing on rural exception sites will be allowed. As such the policy requirements of Policy H6 are covered and subsequently superseded by Core strategy policy CL14. Policy RES 7 (Rural Exceptions Housing) identifies that small scale development which provides affordable housing for local people will be permitted as an exception to other

WLLP

Policy RES 7 – Rural Exceptions Housing

Appendix C 308

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

planning policies. These issues are covered by Policy CL14 of the Core Strategy, which identifies the criteria for affordable housing on rural exception sites. It presents the criteria to which in exceptional circumstance affordable housing on rural exception sites will be allowed.

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL15 (Type & Size Mix in New Housing): Local Plan CLLP Policy/Policies 35 Design of New Developments Reasons / Notes Is deleted in part by policy CL15, which seeks to ensure that developers demonstrate that they can achieve local housing needs through best available evidence. The Policy is covered by the NPPF and also by policy CL26. As such the policy is superseded and subsequently deleted. Replaced in part by policy CL15 and in full by CL26. Is deleted in part by policy CL15 which looks to ensure that developers demonstrate that local housing needs will be met through best available evidence. Policy is however also superseded by Policy CL26 (Design Quality), with the key objective to achieve high quality design that responds to the character of the area.

NKLP WLLP

C18 - Design RES1 Housing Layout and Design

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL16 (Meeting the Needs of Gypsies, travellers & Travelling Showpeople): Local Plan CLLP Policy/Policies 61B Reasons / Notes 61B sets out the considerations for assessing planning applications for gypsy caravan sites. CL16 updates these considerations, which are also considered to be in accordance with current national planning policy as set out in ‘Planning Policy for Traveller Sites’. H9 sets out the considerations for assessing planning applications for gypsy caravan sites. CL16 updates these considerations, which are also considered to be in accordance with current national planning policy as set out in ‘Planning Policy for Traveller Sites’. RES17 requires planning permission for both

NKLP

H9

WLLP

RES17 (part)

Appendix C 309

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

new permanent mobile home parks and gypsy/traveller sites to only be granted where they conform to policies for the location of permanent residential dwellings. CL16 sets out more detailed considerations to be taken into account in assessing such proposals for traveller sites, which are also considered to be in accordance with current national planning policy as set out in ‘Planning Policy for Traveller Sites’.

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL17 (Delivering Prosperity & Jobs): Local Plan CLLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes Saved policies relating to proposed and existing allocations to remain in force until superseded by Allocations DPD E1 needs to be retained as it relates to designations that will themselves be retailed until the adoption of the Allocations document. It is also concerned with retail development on employment sites and refers to the sequential approach set out in Policy R1, the criteria within this policy to be retained (see CL20). E2 will be superseded by policy L8 - Lincoln Western Growth Corridor. Whilst CL17 supports the rural economy, E4 sets out the criteria for assessing development proposals and should be retained. E5 specifically deals with proposals for the conversion of buildings in the countryside to non-residential use and should be retained. E6 specifically deals with proposals for farm diversification and should be retained. E7 sets out criteria against which proposals for non-employment use of land or buildings last used for employment use. It is considered that CL17 includes a suitably worded bullet point that is adequate for assessing such proposals. E8 sets out criteria for assessing transport depots/haulage businesses and should be retained. E9 and E10 are not relevant to CL17

NKLP

E3 & E7

Appendix C 310

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

STRAT14 and STRAT15 set out mixed use and employment allocations which will stay in force until reassessed through the Allocations document. ECON 4 specifically deals with proposals for farm diversification and should be retained. ECON 5 specifically deals with proposals for intensive livestock units and should be retained. ECON 9 sets out criteria against which proposals for non-employment use of land or buildings last used for employment use. It is considered that CL17 includes a suitably worded bullet point that is adequate for assessing such proposals. ECON 13 – Lincoln Eastern Bypass superseded by CL9

WLLP

ECON 9

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL18 (Regeneration Priorities in Central Lincolnshire): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes CLLP’s regeneration policies are area specific and would sit under the more generic CL18 No relevant policies No relevant policies

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL19 (Existing and Former Military Establishments): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes No relevant policies No relevant policies No relevant policies

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL20 (Retail & Town Centres in Central Lincolnshire): Local Plan CLLP Policy/Policies Policy 74A is modified in Reasons / Notes The Vision and Objectives of the CLLP are

Appendix C 311

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

respect of the status of some of the centres defined therein, reflecting the revised retail hierarchy in Policy CL21. However, the boundaries of all centres are retained as per the CLLP Proposals Map pending review. Policy R1 is superseded in part – specifically, the hierarchy of centres is modified by the revised retail hierarchy for Central Lincolnshire in Policy CL20. However, the development management criteria relating to development outside the defined centres are retained pending review though the Central Lincolnshire Local Plan. None

broadly consistent with the new hierarchy, but the plan does not have a specific policy defining the City’s retail centres in a wider context. The Structure Plan and Regional Plan formerly provided this wider hierarchy. Policy 74A and 74B are retained as they are the basis for the boundaries of designated centres.

NKLP

WLLP

The plan does not set out a retail hierarchy as such.

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL21 (A Sustainable Visitor Economy): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes CLLP policies 78, 79, 80, 81 and 84 are specific to particular areas of the City and should be retained. CLLP None

CLLP policy 85 provides detailed considerations to be taken into account in respect of boat moorings not covered by CL21 RST7 safeguards the River Slea Navigation Corridor from development that would prevent restoration of the canal to a navigable state, or adversely affect public access. Whilst CL21 would provide support for the restoration of the canal to a navigable state and enhancing public access to it, it is considered that it would not safeguard it from development that could prevent its restoration. As such, RST7 should be retained. RST8 guides development of new and

NKLP

None

Appendix C 312

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

extension of existing holiday caravan and camping sites, as well as the intensified use of existing sites setting out specific requirements in respect of the provision of ancillary buildings. CL21 requires the development of high quality visitor accommodation in sustainable locations. The considerations that need to be taken into account in the development of holiday caravan and camping sites is not necessarily the same as for other forms of visitor accommodation and as such it is considered that RST8 should be retained. WLLP None No relevant policies saved

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL22 (Strategy for the Rural Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes While Policy CL22 applies to the unbuilt area within the City of Lincoln administrative area beyond the PUA boundary, it relates primarily to rural settlements in North Kesteven and West Lindsey. Policies relating to open countryside and green infrastructure on Lincoln’s periphery are addressed under Policy CL24 (Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity). While Policy CL22 touches on a variety of policy areas in the NKLP, it is strategic in nature and does not replace the development management policies as such. While Policy CL22 touches on a variety of policy areas in the WLLP, it is strategic in nature and does not replace the development management policies as such.

CLLP

None

NKLP

None

WLLP

None

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL23 (A Quality Environment): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Whilst the overall general aims and objectives of this headline environment Policy CL23 are reflected in (and supplement) the CLLP’s overall Key Aims and Strategy for the environment (Chap 1), and relevant detailed policies for specific recreation, open space, access, heritage, landscape, biodiversity and natural resources assets in chapters on

CLLP

None

Appendix C 313

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Access (Chap 3), Built Environment (Chap 5), Natural Environment & Open Space (Chap 6), Leisure & Tourism (Chap 10); there is no equivalent overall headline strategic policy covering A Quality Environment. Policy CL23 is strategic in nature and does not replace the detailed development management criteria based policies for access, open space, and natural environment assets as such, many of which are also shown on CLLP proposals maps (e.g. on Strategic Footpaths & Cycleway network, Basic Natural Stock (variety of open spaces), SSSIs, Critical Natural Assets (ecology & landscape)). Whilst this policy relates to the environment generally it does not directly supersede any of the environment asset policies currently contained within the City Of Lincoln Local Plan. Relevant existing CLLP policies, including land allocations and environment designations, remain saved until and unless replaced by subsequent further DPD and Local Plan policies. Notes: See notes under WLLP Whilst the overall general aims and objectives of this headline environment Policy CL23 are reflected in (and supplement) the NKLP’s overall environment Objectives (Chap 2), and relevant detailed policies for specific recreation, open space, access, heritage, landscape, biodiversity and natural resources assets in chapters on Core Policies (Chap 3), Housing (Chap 4), Transport (Chap 6), Recreation (Chap 8), Landscape & Wildlife (Chap 10), and Historic Built Environment (Chap 11); there is no equivalent overall headline strategic policy covering A Quality Environment. Policy CL23 is strategic in nature and does not replace the detailed development management criteria based policies for open space, natural environment and heritage assets as such, many of which are also shown on NKLP proposals maps (e.g. on Conservation Areas, Scheduled Ancient Monuments, SSSIs, Lincoln Cliff Landscape

NKLP

None

Appendix C 314

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Character Area, Local Nature Reserves). Whilst this policy relates to the environment generally it does not directly supersede any of the environment asset policies currently contained within the North Kesteven Local Plan. Relevant existing NKLP policies, including land allocations and environment designations, remain saved until and unless replaced by subsequent further DPD and Local Plan policies. Notes: See notes under WLLP Whilst the overall general aims and objectives of this headline environment Policy CL23 are reflected in (and supplement) the WLLP’s overall environment Aims & Objectives (Strategy Framework-Chap A, para A3); and relevant detailed policies for specific recreation, open space, access, heritage, landscape, biodiversity and natural resources assets in chapters on Recreation (Chap 4), Natural & Built Environment (Chap 6); there is no equivalent overall headline strategic policy covering A Quality Environment. Policy CL23 is strategic in nature and does not replace the detailed development management criteria based policies for open space, natural environment and heritage assets as such, many of which are also shown on WLLP proposals maps (e.g. on Conservation Areas, Historic Parks & Gardens, SSSIs, Areas of Great Landscape Value). Whilst this policy relates to the environment generally it does not directly supersede any of the environment asset policies currently contained within the West Lindsey Local Plan. Relevant existing WLLP policies, including land allocations and environment designations, remain saved until and unless replaced by subsequent further DPD and Local Plan policies.

WLLP

None

Notes: Policy CL23 sets out the overall, overarching, strategic approach and priorities for a quality Environment in Central Lincolnshire, to contribute towards meeting

Appendix C 315

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

the Core Strategy’s strategic objectives for its conservation and enhancement. This Policy advocates positive and sustainable management, protection and enhancement of the area’s natural and built environment, including natural and heritage assets, landscapes, green infrastructure network, biodiversity, natural resources (including water), and requires proposals to contribute positively to environmental quality and local character (eg through design quality). Policy CL23 is therefore broad and strategic in nature, and touches on a variety of policy areas in the existing Local Plan. Policy CL23 is supplemented by other policies in the Quality Environment chapter (ie CL24, CL25, CL26) which provide further details pursuant to CL23, and together form a positive strategy for the protection and enhancement of Central Lincolnshire’s environment. As Policy CL23 is strategic in nature it therefore does not replace the detailed development management policies for natural environment and heritage assets in the existing Local Plan.

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL24 (Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity: Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Whilst the aims and objectives of this Policy CL24 are reflected in (and supplement) t the CLLP’s overall Key Aims & Strategies for the Environment and a Healthy City (Chap 1), and also relevant existing detailed policies for specific access, open space, biodiversity and geological assets in chapters on Access (Chap 3) and Natural Environment & Open Space (Chap 6); there is no overall equivalent headline strategic policy covering Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity. Relevant existing CLLP policies, including land allocations and environmental designations (manyof which are also shown on CLLP proposals maps) remain saved until and unless replaced by subsequent further DPD and Local Plan policies.

CLLP

None

Appendix C 316

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

RST2 (protection of existing public rights of way),and RST4 (Public access to the countryside)

NKLP

No others

Comments

These NKLP policies seek to reject proposals that adversely affect the existing public rights of way network; and to encourage proposals that will increase public access to the countryside for informal recreation. Policy CL 24 seeks to protect and enhance a multi-functional Green Infrastructure Network across Central Lincolnshire including green corridors and access links This includes promoting publicly accessible green spaces and corridors in the countryside, and protecting green infrastructure through resisting the loss of public and other open spaces and access routes that contribute to the network. This includes protecting and enhancing public rights of way, which is consistent with the NPPF (para 75). As such, Policy CL24 replaces NKLP Policies RST2 and RST4 (associated access routes are not shown on NKLP proposals maps). Whilst the aims and objectives of this Policy CL24 are reflected in (and supplement) the NKLPs NK overall environment Objectives (Chap 2), and other relevant existing detailed policies for specific GI/open space assets in chapters on Recreation, Wildlife and Landscape;, there is no overall equivalent headline strategic policy covering Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity. Relevant existing specific NKLP policies, including land allocations and environmental designations, remain saved until and unless replaced by subsequent further DPD and Local Plan policies. Comments on NKLP Policy LW1 – Landscape Conservation. Policy LW1 seeks to protect the distinctive landscapes of the Landscape Character Areas identified by the Countryside Agency (now part of Natural England). In a minor departure from these LCA, this policy also specifically identifies, allocates and protects an additional designation - the physically dominant and locally important Lincoln Cliff Landscape Character Area – which is shown on the Proposals Map ( paras 10.5 & 10.13). LW1 policy also seeks to ensure new development contributes to the local distinctiveness of the area by requiring applicants to consider the effect their development proposal has on the particular character, quality or interest of the area, and

Appendix C 317

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

views. As such Policy CL23, along with Policy CL26, and the general requirements of this Policy 24 seeking the protection and enhancement of local valued landscapes and landscape character, can be viewed as repeating and replacing most of this policy’s aims. However, if Policy LW1 is deleted the associated land allocation on the Proposals Map of the Lincoln Cliff Landscape Character Area will also be deleted, unless subsequently replaced in Allocations or Local Plan DPD documents.. Policy LW1 and its allocation should therefore remain currently. This WLLP policy seeks to reject development proposals that involve extinguishment or diversion of an existing public right of way, unless an alternative provided is not significantly detrimental to existing and future users. This supplements the Highway Authority’s (County Council) existing responsibility to protect rights of way for public use and enjoyment. Policy CL 24 seeks to protect and enhance a multi-functional Green Infrastructure Network across Central Lincolnshire including green corridors and access links This includes promoting publicly accessible green spaces and corridors in the countryside, and protecting green infrastructure through resisting the loss of public and other open spaces and access routes that contribute to the network. This includes protecting and enhancing public rights of way, which is consistent with the NPPF (para 75). As such, Policy CL24 replaces WLLP Policy CRT9 (associated access routes are not shown on WLLP proposals maps). . Whilst the aims and objectives of this Policy are reflected in (and supplement) the WLLP’s overall environment Aims & Objectives (Strategy Framework - Chap A) and relevant detailed policies for specific recreation, open space, access, landscape, biodiversity and natural resources assets in chapters on Recreation (Chap 4), Natural & Built Environment (Chap 6); there is no overall equivalent headline strategic policy covering Green Infrastructure and Biodiversity. Relevant existing WLLP policies, including land allocations and environmental

Policy CRT9 (Public Rights of Way)

WLLP

No others

Appendix C 318

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

designations (many of which are also shown on WLLP proposals maps), remain saved until and unless replaced by subsequent further DPD and Local Plan policies.

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL25 (Managing Water Resources & Flood Risk): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy 39 seeks to ensure that development does not take place unless adequate water resources exist or can be provided in time to serve the development without detriment to existing users. This is incorporated into policy CL25 and expanded upon. Policy 40 seeks to ensure that development does not take place unless satisfactory means of treating and disposing of foul water are or can be made available in time to serve the development. This is incorporated into policy CL25 and expanded. Policy 46B seeks to safeguard the biodiversity and ecology of the water environment, prevent pollution and other degradation, minimise flood risk, mitigate against erosion, protect the public and safeguard access for maintenance. Although not phrased in overtly development management language, policy CL25 covers and expands on all of the points in policy 46B other than direct reference to erosion. This is however covered indirectly through the protection, improvement and sustainable use of the water environment and through the requirements of the Water Framework Directive. Policy C10 seeks to prevent new development being put at unacceptable risk of flooding or causing such risk elsewhere, ensuring that development will be safe over it’s lifetime and where possible result in the overall reduction of risk. This is covered and expanded on in policy CL25. Reference is made to the EA flood zones, but it is felt that this is adequately covered by the

39 – Water Supply

40 – Sewage Disposal

CLLP

46B – Protecting the Water Environment

NKLP

C10 – Flood Risk

Appendix C 319

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

NPPF Technical Guide and does not need to be repeated. Policy CL25 makes reference to the need to direct development away from areas at greatest risk and the advice in NPPF and the Technical Guide and expands on this to cover more up to date information on surface water flooding. The need for flood risk assessments is covered by NPPF and in the supporting text for policy CL25. Policy C14 seeks to ensure that surface water disposal is adequately taken into consideration. Policy CL25 seeks to ensure that all sources of flooding including surface water and it’s management is taken into consideration as early on in the development process as possible including the incorporation of SuDS. Policy C15 requires every reasonable effort to maximise the efficient use of water and that development does not result in demand for water that will unacceptably deplete water resources. Policy CL25 requires confirmation that there are adequate water resources, that development contributes positively to the water environment and that it maximises the efficient use of water. Policy NBE14 requires adequate existing or proposed sewage or surface water runoff treatment and disposal. It also detailed criteria for assessing the suitability or otherwise of septic tanks or cesspools. Although CL25 does not go into the level of detail in NBE14 or specifically refer to septic tanks or cesspools, it does state that development should demonstrate that adequate foul water treatment and disposal exists or can be provided and requires early consideration of drainage issues.

C14 – Surface Water Disposal

C15 – Water Supply

NBE14 – Waste Water Disposal

WLLP

NBE15

NBE15 seeks to ensure that there is no risk to the quantity and quality of water resources or to fisheries, amenity and nature conservation. Although CL25 does not make specific reference to fisheries it does seek to protect the quantity and quality of the water environment and also to improve it where

Appendix C 320

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

possible.

Saved Local Plan Policies to be deleted by Policy CL26 (Design Quality): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Largely replaced by CL26 - With regards to parking standards set out in 34 and Appendix B, these are considered to be out of date by the Local Planning Authority and CL10 states that revised standards will be identified through future planning policy. Replaced in full by CL26 Replaced in full by CL26 Replaced in full by CL26 Replaced in full by CL26 Replaced in full by CL26 Consideration of the safety of people using transport infrastructure is covered by this policy and Policy CL10 in the Core Strategy. The Core Strategy doesn’t set out specific local density standards, but seeks high quality design through CL26. Density is an important consideration in any proposed development scheme, however the key objective is to achieve high quality design that responds to the character of the area in terms of existing density, siting, layout, massing, scale, design and landscaping etc. Site specific guidance maybe provided through Site Allocations DPD where appropriate.

34 Design and Amenity Standards CLLP 35 Design of New Residential Areas 36A Accessibility in New Developments C18 Design C20 Accessibility NKLP C21 Energy efficiency T4 Safety

WLLP

RES1 Housing Layout and Design

LINCOLN AREA Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L1 (Strategy for Growth in the Lincoln Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes L1 (together with Lincoln Area Vision and Objectives) supersedes and updates the Aims and Strategies for Lincoln in Chapter 1 of the CLLP, but there is no formal policy as such. NKLP sets out a Locational Strategy for the Lincoln Policy Area in Chapter 2, but there is no formal policy corresponding to L1 as such.

CLLP

None

NKLP

None

Appendix C 321

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

The individual roles of satellite settlements around Lincoln will be reviewed as part of the proposed Site Allocations DPD. Policy R1 (Retail and Town Centre Development) defines retail centres for the Lincoln area within North Kesteven, and is considered under Policies CL20 and L7. There is no strategic policy in WLLP relating to L1. WLLP None Policy Strat 13 (Undeveloped Breaks between Settlements and Green Wedges Around Lincoln) is considered under Policy L3.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L2 (Locational Priorities for Development in the Lincoln Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes There is no equivalent overall locational policy in CLLP. CLLP None Policy 56A (New Housing) is considered under the individual SUE policies for Western Growth Corridor (L8) and North East Quadrant (L10). NKLP sets out a Locational Strategy for the Lincoln Policy Area in Chapter 2, but there is no formal policy corresponding to L2. There is no strategic policy in WLLP relating to L2. WLLP None Policy Stat 10 (Longer Term Development Options (Lincoln and Bardney)) is considered under the SUE policy for North East Quadrant (L10).

NKLP

None

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L3 (Green Wedges & Green Infrastructure in the Lincoln Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes The policy augments the existing Natural Environment policies in the CLLP. All existing policies, including site allocations and designations, remain saved until and unless replaced by further DPD policies. Policy LW2 (Green Wedges) is the parent policy for the defined boundaries of the Green Wedges within North Kesteven. It remains saved until and unless replaced by

CLLP

None

NKLP

None

Appendix C 322

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

subsequent DPD policy or policies. Policy Strat 13 (Undeveloped Breaks Between Settlements and Green Wedges around Lincoln) is the parent policy for the defined boundaries of the Green Wedges within West Lindsey. It remains saved until and unless replaced by subsequent DPD policy or policies.

WLLP

None

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L4 (Employment Priorities in the Lincoln Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes 66 includes provisions relating to employment land at Skewbridge that are superseded by Policy L4 in combination with L8 (Lincoln Western Growth Corridor). The other site allocations in Policy 66 are retained for now, as these will be reviewed and where appropriate confirmed or deleted through the proposed Site Allocations process. Note: other policies on employment are essentially for development management. E1 is the parent policy for employment site allocations, and includes the Decoy Farm allocation (E2 DFBP), which is superseded by Policy L4 in combination with L8 (Lincoln Western Growth Corridor). The other site allocations E1 are retained for now, as these will be reviewed and where appropriate confirmed or deleted through the proposed Site Allocations process. Note: other policies on employment are essentially for development management. Strat 10 – Longer term Development Options (Lincoln & Bardney) is modified by Policy L$ with reference to North East Quadrant L4 sets out a new employment land figure for North East Quadrant, linked to th strategic allocation of the site under Policy L10 (Lincoln North East Quadrant). Note: Policy Strat 15 on employment allocations does not include any allocation for NEQ or other areas in the Lincoln area.

CLLP

66 (Proposed Allocations for Business & Industry) is modified by Policy L4 with reference to Western Growth Corridor.

NKLP

E1 (Employment Development Sites) is modified by Policy L4 with reference to Western Growth Corridor.

WLLP

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L5 (Regenerating Lincoln): Local Plan CLLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes The CLLP sets out a detailed strategy for

Appendix C 323

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

urban regeneration, but does not include a strategic policy on priorities. While much of the strategy has been superseded by new priorities and initiatives, the individual Revival Area policies 19A – G are retained for development management purposes until such time as replacement policies are brought forward in a DPD. While a number of policies relate indirectly to the Core Strategy’s regeneration policies, none deals solely or explicitly with regeneration priorities in the Lincoln area. There are no policies relating regeneration of the Lincoln area. to the

NKLP

None

WLLP

None

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L6 (Lincoln City Centre): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes The CLLP sets out objectives for the City Centre, but these are not set out in a formal policy as such. Some CLLP policies are relevant to Policy L6, but are proposed for retention for development management purposes pending more detailed Local Plan policies, including:  Policy 89A (Education Development Districts) Policy 10 (Uphill/Downhill Link) had previously been deleted. NKLP WLLP None None There is no strategic policy in NKLP relating to L6. There is no strategic policy in WLLP relating to L6.

CLLP

None

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L7 (District & Neighbourhood Centres in the Lincoln Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy 74A is retained in relation to the existing boundaries of the centres defined therein, though the District Mixed Use Centres are carried forward and renamed District Centres in L7. Policy R1 is retained in respect of its designation of centres in North Kesteven pending the Site Allocations DPD

CLLP

None

NKLP

None

Appendix C 324

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

There is no strategic policy in WLLP relating to L7. WLLP None Policy RTC3 (Retailing and Village Use Areas in Primary Rural Settlements) is retained pending the Site Allocations DPD.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L8 (Lincoln Western Growth Corridor): Local Plan Policy/Policies 56A (New housing) is modified – housing site allocation H1 (Skewbridge) is deleted. All other housing site allocations in this policy except H2 are retained for now until reviewed under the Site Allocations process. 103 (The Skewbridge Area) NKLP WLLP E2 (Decoy Farm Business Park) None Reasons / Notes Site allocation H1 is within the strategic site allocation for Lincoln Western Growth Corridor.

CLLP

103 sets out detailed policy for Skewbridge area, but is wholly replaced by Policy 103 Decoy Farm lies within the strategic SUE allocation

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L9 (Lincoln South East Quadrant): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes Outside plan area and postdates plan The site is not identified in the plan, as it emerged later through joint working on the Structure Plan/RSS. Outside plan area and postdates plan.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy L10 (Lincoln North East Quadrant): Local Plan Policy/Policies 56A (New housing) is modified – a small part of site allocation H2 (Land north of Greetwell Quarry) is deleted. All other housing allocations in this policy except H1 are Reasons / Notes Site allocation H2 has largely been built out as the Bunkers Hill development, but small undeveloped parts of it fall within the boundary of the strategic site allocation for the North East Quadrant (NEQ), and are therefore subject to Policy L10.

CLLP

Appendix C 325

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

retained for now until reviewed under the Site Allocations process. 70 sets out the after-uses and planning requirements for Greetwell Quarry; these are superseded by the wider strategic SUE allocation for North East Quadrant (NEQ) in Policy L10 92 sets out detailed policy for land north of Greetwell Quarry, and is superseded by the wider strategic SUE allocation for North East Quadrant (NEQ) in Policy L10. Outside plan area While these sites have planning consent or are built out, they are within the site allocation for the North East Quadrant (NEQ), and are therefore subject to Policy L10.

70 (Greetwell Quarry)

92 (Land North of Greetwell Quarry) NKLP None Strat 2 (Residential Allocations – Lincoln Policy Area) is modified: housing site allocations LF5 (Wragby Road) and LF6 (Hawthorn Road) are effectively superseded. WLLP Strat 10 (Longer term Development Options) is part deleted: the identification of North East Quadrant/Lincoln Eastern Growth Corridor as a longer term development option no longer applies.

The land identified as a longer term development option by this policy (and as shown on the WLLP Proposals Map) falls within the boundary of the strategic site allocation for the North East Quadrant (NEQ), and is therefore now subject to Policy L10.

GAINSBOROUGH AREA Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G1 (Strategy for Growth in the Gainsborough Area: Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes WLLP policy STRAT 3 lists a settlement hierarchy that identifies Gainsborough as a town along with Market Rasen including Middle Rasen and Caistor. But as it also includes these as well as the role of all other settlements in West Lindsey, it will need to remain and be read alongside this policy. STRAT 4 provides policy guidance for windfall and infill housing development in Gainsborough and the Urban area of Lincoln but contains detailed development management criteria and is not strategic in nature.

WLLP

None.

Appendix C 326

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Policies STRAT 14 and STRAT 15 identify mixed use and employment sites but also covers other settlements and is not strategic. They will need to remain and be read alongside this policy. General policies such as WLLP policies SUS 1 Development Proposals and Transport Choice, RTC 1 Town Centre Development, etc are relevant but are not specific to Gainsborough and will be considered under the relevant generic policies. WLLP Policy STRAT 13 Undeveloped Breaks between Settlements and Green Wedges Around Lincoln is considered under Policy G6.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G2 (Locational Priorities for Development in the Gainsborough Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes The WLLP contains a settlement hierarchy but does not identify the three SUEs and therefore does not have a corresponding policy.

WLLP

None.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G3 (Regenerating Gainsborough): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes While a number of policies relate indirectly to the Core Strategy’s regeneration policy, none deals solely or explicitly with regeneration priorities in the Gainsborough Area other than WLLP policy RTC 2 Retail Development In Trinity Street, Gainsborough which is in South West Ward.

WLLP

None.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G4 (Employment Priorities in the Gainsborough Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy STRAT 15 Employment Allocations covers all settlements and is not specific to Gainsborough.

WLLP

None.

Appendix C 327

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G5 (Gainsborough’s Town and Other Centres): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes RTC 1 Town Centre Development also covers Market Rasen and Caistor as will policy RTC 5 Miscellaneous Town Centre Uses. Policy RTC 6 Neighbourhood Retailing covers all areas including rural.

WLLP

None.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G6 (Green Infrastructure and Settlement Breaks in the Sleaford Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy STRAT 13 Undeveloped Breaks Between Settlements and Green Wedges around Lincoln define the boundaries of the green wedges around Lincoln as well as the settlement breaks throughout West Lindsey including those between Gainsborough and Morton and Gainsborough and Lea. However, as it does not refer to the Gainsborough area only, it remains saved until and unless replaced by subsequent DPD policy or policies.

WLLP

None.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G7 (Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes Site outside CLLP area Site outside CLLP area Site is new allocation which post dates the NK Local Plan

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G8 (Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes Site outside CLLP area Site outside CLLP area Site is new allocation which post dates the NK Local Plan

Appendix C 328

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy G9 (Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood): Local Plan CLLP NKLP WLLP Policy/Policies None None None Reasons / Notes Site outside CLLP area Site outside CLLP area Site is new allocation which post dates the NK Local Plan

SLEAFORD AREA Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy S1 (Strategy for Growth in the Sleaford Area: Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes NKLP sets out a locational Strategy for district which identifies Sleaford as a first tier settlement outside of the Lincoln Policy Area, which is embedded in policy C1 of the Plan. However the locational strategy also identifies the roles of other settlements and for this reason will need to remain and be read alongside this policy. Policy R1 (Retail and Town Centre Development) defines retail centres for the within North Kesteven, and is considered under Policies CL20 and L6.

NKLP

None

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy S2 (Locational Priorities for Development in Sleaford): Local Plan NKLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes NKLP sets out a Locational Strategy for the District, but there is no formal policy corresponding to S2.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy S3 (Employment Priorities in the Sleaford Area): Local Plan NKLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes While a number of policies relate to Employment Priorities in the North Kesteven area, none relate directly to employment in the Sleaford Area.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy S4 (Regenerating Sleaford): Local Plan NKLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes While a number of policies relate indirectly to

Appendix C 329

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

the Core Strategy’s regeneration policy, none deals solely or explicitly with regeneration priorities in the Sleaford Area

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy S5 (Strengthening Sleaford Town Centre and the Network of Neighbourhood Centres in the Sleaford Area): Local Plan Policy/Policies Reasons / Notes Policy R2 fulfils the role of specifying appropriate town centre uses which is largely superseded by PPS4, the draft NPPF and this policy. However R2 also picks up the town centre boundary and primary shopping frontages and provides a hook for designation on the proposals map. The town centre boundary is also picked up in Policy R1, which will need to be saved by virtue of its role in identifying service centres and retaining the town centre boundary until it can be reviewed. The retail study suggests that the primary shopping frontages may not be the most effective policy mechanisms, favouring instead a more flexible approach which would is tune with the masterplan. On this basis and provided the concept of primary shopping frontages is no longer supported suggest R2 should be deleted. The primary shopping frontage issue would need to be picked up in the overall approach to retailing in Central Lincolnshire.

NKLP

Policy R2 – Mixing Uses within Sleaford Town Centre

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy S6 (Green Infrastructure in the Sleaford Area): Local Plan NKLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes There are many policies, which relate to the management of GI, however none of these relate directly to the Sleaford Area.

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy S7 (Sleaford South Quadrant): Local Plan NKLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes Site is new allocation which post dates the NK Local Plan

Saved Local Plan policies deleted by Policy S8 (Sleaford West Quadrant): Local Plan NKLP Policy/Policies None Reasons / Notes Site is new allocation which post dates the NK Local Plan

Appendix C 330

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix D: Central Lincolnshire Evidence Base
Title
Housing Central Lincolnshire Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment

Description

Date completed
April 2013

The SHLAA is a requirement of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) used to assess the availability of land for housing over a fifteen year period. It does not allocate any land for housing nor does it provide any commitment to the potential granting of planning permission on the sites that it assesses. The study is reviewed at least annually. Central Lincolnshire Strategic An assessment of the local housing market including the need for Housing Market Assessment affordable housing across the area. Central Lincolnshire Affordable Prepared alongside the Strategic Housing Market Assessment its Housing Economic Viability purpose is to assess the viability of residential development schemes Assessment to provide well reasoned justification for thresholds and affordable housing targets. Lincolnshire Gypsy and An assessment of the accommodation needs of Gypsies and Traveller Assessment Travellers in Lincolnshire, with appropriate outputs for the whole of Lincolnshire, each HMA and the individual five districts. Central Lincolnshire Housing This paper considers relevant CLG/ONS household and populations Context Paper projections as part of the objective assessment of housing need. Central Lincolnshire Housing The Central Lincolnshire Housing Growth Strategy sets out the key Growth Strategy housing related challenges faced by Central Lincolnshire and the actions needed to meet these challenges. Transport and Infrastructure Lincolnshire Local Transport Under the Transport Acts 2000 and 2008, every local transport Plan authority in the country has to publish a Local Transport Plan (more commonly known as the LTP). The 4th Lincolnshire Local Transport Plan sets out the transport strategy for the county for the next 10 years. It is supported by a range of other policies and strategies covering specific transport related issues or areas. Lincoln Transport Strategy This strategy assesses the current traffic and transport problems and issues in the Lincoln area and sets out a strategy for improvement,

November 2012 September 2012

331

April 2007 July 2013

April 2013

February 2008

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Gainsborough Transport Strategy Central Lincolnshire Infrastructure Delivery Plan Environment Central Lincolnshire Green Infrastructure Study Habitats Regulation Assessment Screening Record Report
332

This study assesses the current traffic and transport problems and issues in the area and assesses the possible options for future improvements or provide solutions to the problems and issues raised The Infrastructure Delivery Plan (IDP) will sit alongside the Core Strategy and will identify what physical, social and green infrastructure is needed to support the vision for Central Lincolnshire over the period covered by the Strategy. The Central Lincolnshire GI Study was undertaken to provide robust Green Infrastructure evidence for Central Lincolnshire, as a key part of the evidence base, to underpin and support development of spatial planning policies through the Local Plan, including the Core Strategy. The purpose of the Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA) is to establish if the emerging proposed draft Central Lincolnshire (CL) Core Strategy planning policies and proposals (a land use plan) could cause ‘likely significant effects’ which could affect specific ‘internationally’ important nature conservation sites within or near to the CL Core Strategy plan area, which form part of the European Natural 2000 network. A detailed assessment of the character, distinctiveness and qualities of the landscape of North Kesteven. A detailed assessment of the character, distinctiveness and qualities of the landscape of West Lindsey. The Lincoln Townscape Assessment (LTA) was a three-year project that mapped all the areas of Lincoln in terms of their character. In 2009, City of Lincoln Council was successful in its application to Central Government for Growth Points Funding to extend the Lincoln Townscape Assessment (LTA) characterisation project outside of the city boundary and into those areas around the city forecast for growth over the next decade and more. This includes the areas covered by proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) as well as settlements and open spaces immediately surrounding Lincoln The study looks at the impact of growth in relation to water services and will focus on water supply, sewage disposal, flood risk

October 2010 July 2013

December 2011

April 2013

North Kesteven Landscape Character Assessment West Lindsey Landscape Character Assessment Lincoln Townscape Assessment Lincoln Fringe Character Project

September 2007 August 1999 April 2012 2010

Central Lincolnshire Water Cycle Study

June 2010

Gainsborough Water Cycle Study

Lincoln Policy Area Strategic Flood Risk Assessment West Lindsey Strategic Flood Risk Assessment North Kesteven Strategic Flood Risk Assessment Renewable and Low Carbon Energy Study for Central Lincolnshire
333

Lincoln Area Sequential Assessment Lincoln Western Growth Corridor Technical Working Group Flood Risk Report Economy Central Lincolnshire Employment Land Review West Lindsey Employment Land Review West Lindsey Employment Land Review Update North Kesteven Employment Land Review City of Lincoln Employment

management and surface water drainage. The purpose of the Gainsborough Water Cycle Study is to assess the existing water infrastructure and water environment to determine if it can accommodate the proposed levels of growth or where further work may be required to facilitate the growth and ensure that it does not detrimentally impact upon the natural environment. Strategic Flood Risk Assessments provide Local Authorities with accurate information about flood risk on a district-wide basis. Strategic Flood Risk Assessments provide Local Authorities with accurate information about flood risk on a district-wide basis. Strategic Flood Risk Assessments provide Local Authorities with accurate information about flood risk on a district-wide basis. The study helps the Central Lincolnshire authorities to understand how the area can contribute to meeting national targets and also provides an Action Plan which will help the authorities work together with others to deliver some of the renewable and low carbon energy opportunities and address issues such as fuel poverty. This study looks at the capacity of the Lincoln Area, and assesses the potential alternative development sites to those located in flood zones This report considers the flood risk and risk management options associated with the development of the proposed Strategic Allocation known as the Western Growth Corridor. The Central Lincolnshire Employment Land Review combines and summarises four separate commissions previously undertaken which are listed below. A review of employment land in West Lindsey is required in order to inform the policies and allocations in the Local Plan This report assesses the supply, need and demand for employment land and premises (use class B) in West Lindsey. It is an update on the report produced in 2007. This report assesses the supply, need and demand for employment land and premises (use class B) in North Kesteven. This report assesses the supply, need and demand for employment

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

July 2010

February 2010 July 2009 November 2009 November 2011

July 2013 July 2013

September 2010 June 2007 April 2010 March 2010 October 2009

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Land Review Central Lincolnshire Sustainable Urban Extensions Retail Provision Study Central Lincolnshire City and Town Centres Study

City of Lincoln Retail and Town Centre Study North Kesteven Retail and Commercial Leisure Study West Lindsey Retail and Commercial Leisure Study Central Lincolnshire Economic Growth Strategy 2012-2031 – Unlocking the Potential to Deliver Growth Health and Wellbeing Lincolnshire Joint Strategic Needs Assessment 2012 Health and Well Being Strategy for Lincolnshire 20132018 Sustainability Delivering a Sustainable
334

land and premises (use class B) in the City of Lincoln. An appraisal of the scale of provision which may be required to appropriately serve the shopping needs of the future population of eight planned Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) in the settlements of Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford. The City and Town Centres Study for the Central Lincolnshire area was undertaken to be provide evidence and inform the emerging Core Strategy. This provides an update to the earlier studies completed separately for the City and Districts which are available to download before. The key focus of the study is an up to date assessment of the future capacity for retail development across Central Lincolnshire and, in particular, in the main centres of Lincoln, Gainsborough, Sleaford and Market Rasen. The purpose of this study is to provide the evidence base for new planning policies for retail and leisure development to be included in the emerging Local Plan. The purpose of this study is to provide the evidence base for new planning policies for retail and leisure development to be included in the emerging Local Plan. The purpose of this study is to provide the evidence base for new planning policies for retail and leisure development to be included in the emerging Local Plan. Sets out a joint economic strategy, for the Central Lincolnshire Authorities.

July 2013

May 2012

2007 July 2007 September 2008 June 2013

An overarching health needs assessment for Lincolnshire presenting data on a range of issues. Based on the priorities in the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment, the Joint Health and Well Being Strategy aims to inform and influence decisions about health and social care services in Lincolnshire. The study will feed directly into the Core Strategy informing how

2011 (updated as new data is released) September 2012

May 2010

Future for Central Lincolnshire

Sustainability Appraisal Scoping Report Consultation Draft Central Lincolnshire Interim Sustainability Appraisal Report and Technical Appendices
335

Central Lincolnshire Integrated Impact Assessment Work in Progress Main Report and Technical Appendices (Generic Policies) Central Lincolnshire Integrated Impact Assessment Work in Progress Supplementary IIA Report – Area Policies for Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford Monitoring Demographic Trends and Projections in Central Lincolnshire Central Lincolnshire House

growth is distributed across Central Lincolnshire together with assisting in defining the parameters of detailed allocations for large urban extensions to Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford. The sustainability objectives for Central Lincolnshire’s communities will be a thread through all policies in the LDF and will help deliver the Localism Agenda in Central Lincolnshire. The study also the respective sustainability merits of alternative large scale development proposals in the area. The SA Scoping Report sets out the scope and level of detail that should be covered by the SA and includes a framework of sustainability objectives to test the sustainability of proposed plan objectives and policies As part of the preparation of the Core Strategy Issues and Options Report, an Interim Sustainability Appraisal (SA) report was produced for consultation from 25th October to 6th December 2010. It included a compatibility appraisal of the Draft Core Strategy Objectives against the 18 SA Objectives and provided updated SA Scoping information, following consultation undertaken on a draft SA Scoping Report in August 2010. Produced to accompany the Partial Draft Core Strategy Generic Policies, setting out the results of the impact assessment work, including Sustainability Appraisal, Strategic Environmental Assessment, Health Impact Assessment and Equalities Analysis. Produced to accompany the Partial Draft Core Strategy Area Based Policies, setting out the results of the impact assessment work, including Sustainability Appraisal, Strategic Environmental Assessment, Health Impact Assessment and Equalities Analysis.

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

July 2010

October 2010

June 2012

January 2013

This paper considers relevant CLG/ONS household and populations projections as well as evidence on migration trends to and from Central Lincolnshire. The Central Lincolnshire House Building Trend Analysis provides a

August 2012 2012

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Building Trend Analysis Central Lincolnshire Authorities Monitoring Report Masterplans Sleaford Masterplan

detailed analysis of the permissions and completions data for housing from the three Central Lincolnshire authorities (North Kesteven, City of Lincoln and West Lindsey) as well as Central Lincolnshire as a whole. The AMR is the main mechanism for assessing the performance, implementation and effects of the Local Plan. This is reviewed each year.

April 2013

The Sleaford Masterplan aims to set out a framework and strategy for the change and growth of the town over the next 20 to 25 years. Gainsborough Regained The Gainsborough Regained Masterplan set out a framework and strategy for the change and growth of the town over the next 20 to 25 years. Lincoln City Centre Masterplan A vision for Lincoln City Centre. Other Central Lincolnshire Whole This report consider the overall viability of the Central Lincolnshire Plan Viability and Community core Strategy alongside proposed the proposed Community Infrastructure Levy Study Infrastructure Levy 8 Sustainable Urban An individual topic paper has been prepared for each of the proposed Extension Topic Papers Sustainable Urban Extensions. Each paper sets out opportunities and constraints and a plan for bringing forward each of the 8 proposed strategic allocations

April 2011 2007 2013 July 2013 July 2013

336

NOTE: Whilst this list seeks to be comprehensive it is not exclusive, and may be subject to review and updating over time. In certain cases other existing evidence may also be relevant.

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix E – Summary of Previous Work by Districts
City of Lincoln E1 The City of Lincoln Local Plan was adopted in 1998. Formal review of the whole plan commenced in 2002 as a joint initiative that aligned the plan with the preparation of the then Community Plan for Lincoln. A combined Issues & Options Paper was issued for consultation in 2002 entitled Our City, Our Future. E2 In line with advice from the Government, the Council decided to transfer directly to the preparation of a new Local Development Framework (LDF) ahead of the 2004 legislation and the regulations relating to the latter. The following Development Plan Documents (DPDs) and consultation were pursued in the context of the evolving national legislation and guidance on LDFs, taking into account the previous Issues & Options consultation of 2002: (i)     (ii)  (iii)  (iv)  Core Strategy Emerging Options consultation – November 2004 Access & Transport: Issues Update and Draft Objectives – November 2004 Preferred Options Report (Our City, Our Future Consultation) – October to December 2005 Preferred Options Report for Climate Change, Energy & Design, and District Mixed Use Centres – November to December 2006 Housing DPD Emerging Options consultation – November 2004 Regenerating Lincoln & Its Economy DPD Emerging Options consultation – November 2004 Central Rail Corridor Area Action Plan Emerging Options consultation – July 2005

E3 Following a critical friend review of Lincoln’s Core Strategy process in 2006, the need to address cross-boundary planning issues more robustly added to the impetus for a joint LDF for Central Lincolnshire with North Kesteven and West Lindsey district councils. The scope and priorities for DPDs within the joint LDF were identified through the Local Development Scheme process. None of the above DPDs was carried forward into the joint

Appendix E 337

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

LDF as such, although the Central Lincolnshire Core Strategy has picked up on the previous work including the various consultations. North Kesteven E4 The North Kesteven Local Plan was adopted in 2007. The review process did not reach the stage of formal consultation on a DPD before the move to a joint LDF for Central Lincolnshire. West Lindsey E5 The West Lindsey Local Plan First Review was adopted in 2006. The preparation of an LDF for West Lindsey commenced in 2007, with the following documents and consultation having been pursued prior to the move to a joint LDF for Central Lincolnshire: (i)    (ii)  Core Strategy DPD Early consultation with parishes – February and March 2007 Issues & Options Report (August 2007) – August to October 2007 Preferred Options (January 2008) – draft document prepared but not pursued to consultation Gainsborough AAP Issues & Options (August 2007) – August to October 2007

E6 The scope and priorities for DPDs within the joint LDF were reviewed through the Local Development Scheme process. The previous work in West Lindsey has been assimilated into the Central Lincolnshire Core Strategy as appropriate. The preparation of a Gainsborough AAP remained as a proposed DPD until the Coalition Government planning reforms in 2012, which re-introduced a single Local Plan as the preferred structure for local development plans. Note: the term LDF was replaced by the term ‘Local Plan’ in Government planning policy guidance (NPPF, etc) in 2012.

Appendix E 338

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix F - Main Urban Area Boundaries
F1 These plans are included to indicate the Main Urban Area Boundaries as defined within the relevant area Policies at the current time, but are not intended to support detailed site specific decisions. Lincoln Principal Urban Area Boundary

Note: The Lincoln Principal Urban Area is defined as the built-up parts of Lincoln City, North Hykeham, South Hykeham Fosseway (as defined in the North Kesteven Local Plan 2007), Waddington and Bracebridge Heath.

Appendix F 339

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Gainsborough Urban Area Boundary

Note: Boundary based on the saved policies of the West Lindsey Local Plan (2006).

Appendix F 340

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Sleaford Urban Area Boundary

Note: Boundary taken from the saved policies of the North Kesteven Local Plan (2007)

Appendix F 341

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix G - The Central Lincolnshire Housing Trajectory
G.1 The housing trajectory has been informed by evidence including:    The Central Lincolnshire Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment The Infrastructure Delivery Plan The 8 Sustainable Urban Extension Topic Papers

G.2 The NPPF requires the Local Planning Authority to plan to meet objectively assessed need. The trajectory identifies that the need for additional households projected by the 2008-based household projections will be met in the first five years of the plan and exceeded over years 6-15. G.3 From 2016 the trajectory identifies a steady increase in housing delivery as housing allocations are made through the Site Allocations DPD and the 8 proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions come on stream, resulting in the overall Core Strategy target being met by the end of the plan period. G.4 Based on an assessment of specific sites the trajectory has informed appropriate housing targets for the periods: Years 2012/13-2016/17 2017/18-2021/22 2022/23-2026/27 2027/28-2030/31 Period Years 0-5 Years 6-10 Years 11-15 Years 16-20 Total 8933 9652 12327 10925 Annual Target 1787 1930 2465 2731

G.5 The trajectory measures performance against the following targets, which are each indicated by a line on the chart as follows:    The Orange line represents the targets set out in Policy CL4. The Green line represents the objective assessment of need based on the 2008 based projections plus a 5% buffer added to the first five years (1390 per annum + 69.5 = 1459 per annum) The Pink line shows the 2008-based projections with 20% buffer (1390 per annum + 278 = 1668 per annum)

G.6 The Central Lincolnshire Authorities recognise that further Central Government Statistical releases will be become available as the plan is finalised and over the plan period. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities have produced a detailed Housing Topic Paper, which identifies the key information sources and provides a short action plan for keeping the assessment of need up to date.

342

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

G.7 Delivery against the targets set out in Policy CL4 and the most up to date demographic projections will be closely monitored . This will be achieved through a range of measures including the annual review of the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment, future reviews of the Strategic Housing Market Assessment and Annual Monitoring Reports.

343

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix H - Explanation of the Requirements of Statement of Design Quality (Policy CL26)
H1 Policy CL26 requires that all development proposals, both Outline and Full, incorporate and can demonstrate the achievement of a series of stated design requirements. Compliance with the policy requires the submission of a Statement of Design Quality for the proposed development for assessment by the relevant district planning authority. To avoid duplication, the Statement of Design Quality can be incorporated with the Design & Access Statement where the latter is required. H2 The following notes indicate the scope and content that will generally be required in the Statement of Design Quality. The Central Lincolnshire Authorities recognise that it will not always be possible to fulfil all the criteria set out in the policy. The Statement should therefore be proportionate to the size and scale of the proposed development. However, pre-application discussion with the planning officers of the relevant district planning authority is recommended for further guidance on the requirements for individual proposals. Local Character and Place H3 To ensure high quality, locally distinctive development is delivered in Central Lincolnshire, all development proposals i.e. all scales and types, should be based upon a clear understanding and assessment of the inherited character of the place(s) in which they are proposed and the place(s) they might help to create. H4 The design process must consider how the development relates to and connects with the place in which it is proposed. ‘Place’ must be defined, whether it is a street, a neighbourhood, an industrial estate or a green field. Where possible the development will be expected to enhance the place in which it is proposed. However in some cases, such as small extensions to existing buildings, it is appreciated there may be limited opportunities to enhance. This approach will ensure that new development creates successful places with character, vitality and identity. H5 Local evidence and studies covering characterisation and design issues should be used, where available, to inform the Statement of Design Quality to ensure it is clear how the development takes account of existing character and distinctive forms and features. A list of evidence and studies is provided in the Core Strategy. However, this will evolve over time, and applicants should check with planning officers as part of pre-application discussions. Climate Change and a Low Carbon Future H6 Sustainability and design quality are inseparable. New development is required to contribute positively to tackling climate change and the achievement of a low carbon future. The Statement of Design Quality must demonstrate how the design of the proposed development contributes to the sustainable use of resources, including reductions in carbon emissions from its construction and operation. Key considerations include, but are not restricted to:

Appendix H 346

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

    

How the location, layout, building orientation, landscaping, tree planting and overall design of the development reduces energy demand and use; How the development actively supports and/or delivers decentralised renewable and low carbon energy; Whether the development, including buildings, can incorporate or connect to renewable and low carbon technologies as detailed in Policy CL3 (Renewable & Low Carbon Energy ); How the design of the development reduces water demand and use; How resilient the development is to the impacts of climate change including flooding, drought and heat waves.

H7 Further policy requirements relating to this objective are set out in the following Core Strategy’s policies, and should also be demonstrated within the Statement:   Policy CL24 - Green Infrastructure & Biodiversity Policy CL25 - Managing Flood Risk and Water Quality

H8 Development offers an opportunity to create habitats and to incorporate beneficial biodiversity features as part of good design. The Statement of Design Quality should demonstrate how opportunities have been sought to enhance the biodiversity value of the development. Measures which can be considered include, but are not limited to:     Green roofs Living walls Native trees and hedgerows Bird and bat boxes

Adaptability, Flexibility and Fitness for Purpose H9 New development is expected to be designed to a high quality, providing functional internal and external spaces that are inclusive and adaptable to people’s changing needs over time. H10 The Statement of Design Quality must therefore demonstrate how the proposed development is designed to be adaptable and flexible to respond to changes in use, lifestyle and demography throughout its lifetime. This is particularly important for commercial development, which may be changed to another use in the future. Key considerations include, but are not restricted to:     How accessible and convenient the development is for a variety of people, including those with young children, black and minority ethnic communities, older people and those with temporary or permanent disabilities or illnesses; How adaptable the infrastructure layout is and whether it will be able to accommodate alternative uses and buildings in future; Whether the development, including buildings, can be adapted to new or intensified uses if conditions change in future; Whether the buildings have access to broadband/high speed internet.

Appendix H 347

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

H11 Development proposals should also improve and ensure the long-term safety and enjoyment of a place, whether people live, work, shop or spend their leisure time there. Key considerations include, but are not restricted to:  Will public and private spaces be clearly defined and designed to have appropriate access and be able to be well managed and safe to use? (Building for Life 12, 11)

Residential Amenity H12 It is expected that in meeting the design requirements outlined above, development proposals will also demonstrate how the development will impact on local and residential amenity1. If a significantly adverse impact is identified, development proposals must include appropriate mitigation measures that reduce the impact to an acceptable level. National and Local Guidance H13 The Core Strategy advocates the use of relevant national guidance and standards to improve the quality of design of development proposals. At the current time this includes:  Building for Life12  Code for Sustainable Homes  BREEAM and BREEAM Communities Assessment  Lifetime Homes  Quality Reviewer  Manual for Streets  Secured by Design  Active Design H14 In addition, local guidance and standards may be prepared by the Central Lincolnshire Authorities to supplement national guidance and the Core Strategy where this is considered necessary. Any such guidance will be taken into account by the district planning authority in assessing development proposals. It is recommended that the Statement of Design Quality therefore demonstrates that the proposed development has taken account of any relevant Supplementary Planning Guidance on design. H15 Information on relevant local guidance is available from the district planning authority.

1

Amenity – something that contributes to an area’s environmental, social, economic or cultural needs. The term’s meaning is a matter for the exercise of planners’ discretion, rather than being defined in law (Dictionary of Urbanism)

Appendix H 348

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Appendix I - Proposed Changes to
Policies Map: Extracts
The following extract maps show changes to the Policies Map for Central Lincolnshire proposed in connection with this Core Strategy. The proposed changes all relate to the proposed Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs) to Lincoln, Gainsborough and Sleaford, as set out in the individual SUE policies.

Appendix I 349

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposed Change 1: Lincoln Western Growth Corridor (Land at Swanpool, Fen Farm and Decoy Farm) - Strategic Site Allocation for Proposed SUE [Policy L8]

Appendix I 350

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposed Change 2: Lincoln South East Quadrant (Land at Canwick Heath and Bracebridge Heath) - Strategic Site Allocation for Proposed SUE [Policy L9]

Appendix I 351

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposed Change 3: Lincoln North East Quadrant (Land at Greetwell including former Greetwell Quarry) - Strategic Site Allocation for Proposed SUE [Policy L10]

Appendix I 352

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposed Change 4: Gainsborough Southern Neighbourhood (Land south of Foxby Lane) - Strategic Site Allocation for Proposed SUE [Policy G7]

Appendix I 353

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposed Change 5: Gainsborough Northern Neighbourhood (Land north of Corringham Road and the A631) - Strategic Site Allocation for Proposed SUE [Policy G8]

Appendix I 354

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposed Change 6: Gainsborough Eastern Neighbourhood (Land south of the A631 and north of Heapham Road) - Strategic Site Allocation for Proposed SUE [Policy G9]

Appendix I 355

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposed Change 7: Sleaford South Quadrant (Land at London Road) - Strategic Site Allocation for Proposed SUE [Policy S7]

Appendix I 356

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Proposed Change 8: Sleaford West Quadrant (Land at Drove Lane) – Strategic Site Allocation for Proposed SUE [Policy S8]

Appendix I 357

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

Abbreviations used in the Core Strategy
AONB BDUK CHP CIL CLP CLLP CoLC DCLG DECC DEFRA DMUC DPD EA EfW ELR ESCO EU EVA EWLL GES GI GLNP HCA IDB IDP JHWS JSNA LBP LCC LDF LEP Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty Broadband Delivery United Kingdom Combined Heat & Power Community Infrastructure Levy Central Lincolnshire Partnership City of Lincoln Local Plan City of Lincoln Council Department of Communities & Local Government Department of energy & Climate Change Department of the Environment, Farming & Rural Affairs District Mixed Use Centre Development Plan Document Environment Agency Energy from Waste Employment Land Review Energy Service Company European Union Economic Viability Assessment East West Leisure Link Gainsborough Employment Study Green Infrastructure Greater Lincolnshire Nature Partnership Homes & Communities Agency Internal Drainage Board Infrastructure Delivery Plan Joint Health & Wellbeing Strategy Joint Strategic Needs Assessment Local Biodiversity Partnership Lincolnshire County Council Local Development framework Local Enterprise Partnership
Abbreviations

BREEAM Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method

358

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

LERC LNR LSOA LTP LWS MoD NEQ NHHP NHS NIA NKDC NKLP NNR NPPF NPS NVQ ODPM ONS PPA PPTS PUA RIGS SEP SEQ SFRA SHLAA SHMA SME SNCI SSSI SuDS SUE RAF RV

Lincolnshire environmental Record Service Local Nature Reserve Lower Super Output Area Local transport Plan Local Wildlife Site Ministry of Defence North East Quadrant National Heritage Protection Plan National Health Service Nature Improvement Area North Kesteven District Council North Kesteven Local Plan National Nature Reserve National Planning Policy Framework National Policy Statement National Vocational Qualification Office of the Deputy Prime Minister Office for National Statistics Planning Performance Agreement Planning Policy for Travellers Sites Principal Urban Area Regionally Important Geological Site Sleaford Enterprise Park South East Quadrant Strategic Flood Risk Assessment Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment Strategic Housing Market Assessment Small & Medium Enterprises Site of Nature Conservation Importance Site of Special Scientific Interest Sustainable Drainage Systems Sustainable Urban Extension Royal Air Force Residual Value
Abbreviations

359

Central Lincolnshire Local Plan – Core Strategy: Publication Version (July 2013)

TEN TTWA WGC WLDC WLLP WRIE

Trans European Network Travel to Work Area Western Growth Corridor West Lindsey District Council West Lindsey Local Plan Woodbridge Road Industrial Estate

Abbreviations

360

All maps are reproduced from the Ordnance Survey mapping with the permission of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office ©Crown copyright. Unauthorised reproduction infringes ©Crown copyright and may lead to prosecution or civil proceedings. City of Lincoln Council Licence No. LA 100018414 North Kesteven District Council Licence No. LA 100017926 West Lindsey District Council Licence No. LA 100018701

This document is also available in: Large print, Braille, Audio tape, Electronic formats such as CD, and different languages For a copy of the document please contact the Central Lincolnshire Joint Planning Unit using the following options: Email: talkplanning@central-lincs.org.uk Phone: (01522) 699013 or (01529) 414155 Address: Central Lincolnshire Joint Planning Unit Floor 5 City Hall Beaumont Fee Lincoln LN1 1DF

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->