Texas Community College Student Day

February 5, 2013
Tentative Schedule! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 3!
Effective Communication! ! ! ! ! ! ! 4
Learn & Prepare!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 6
TACC Legislative Priorities! ! ! ! ! ! ! 10
Legislative Process ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! 11
Capitol Complex Maps!! ! ! ! ! ! ! 18
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Tentative Activity Schedule
February 5, 2013
Prior to 9:30 am: Busses arrive, drop off & park on east side of Capitol
(one block walking distance)
Prior to 9:45 am: Check in and pickup ribbons/lunch tickets in front of
Capitol
10:00 am: Morning program on Capitol Steps Welcome Remarks
10:30 am: Meetings with local legislators, students tour House and Senate
Chambers
11:30 to 12:30 pm: Box Lunch Distribution / eat on Capitol grounds
Afternoon: Students continue Legislative meetings & Capitol tours
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Effective Communication with Elected Officials
To positively represent yourself and your college you must be two things:
appropriate and knowledgeable.
Appropriate:
• Be polite to everyone at all times.
• Dress, speak and behave in a professional manner at all times.
• Work toward collaboration, not conflict. Community Colleges and their students
have much to offer our state. Show how you and your college can help the state
accomplish multiple initiatives and goals. Find and focus on “win-wins” not “us-
them.”
• Make appointments in advance whenever possible.
• Explain your perspective, but avoid abrasive, combative gestures, tones or
language.
• When talking to legislators and/or their staff get to the point quickly and keep
the conversation brief. These are very busy people.
• Write notes summarizing what the legislator/staff person asks or says about
community colleges.
• Provide information when and if you have that information, but avoid guessing.
• If you do not know the answer to a question they ask, write down the question
with the legislator’s name, and give it to the trip coordinator for your college -
they will then find the information the legislator requested.
• Always thank them for their time and consideration of your perspective.
• Never give up if your message appears overlooked the first time. Write, email or
call again to give the legislator updates and to find out if their perspective
changed. Most people take time and multiple exposures to an idea before
embracing change.
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Knowledgeable:
• Learn about the legislators so you can connect on a personal level and
show the relevance of community colleges to causes they already
champion.
• Read the overview of the TACC 5-Point Plan for the 83rd Legislature.
• Discuss when and why financial aid and community college funding
developed as they have so that you become comfortable chatting about
varied aspects of the topic.
• Consider the impact financial aid and funding changes will have on your
college experience, your community and the state as a whole. You might
personalize this information for the legislator; e.g., “In my case, this would
mean..........”
• Ask each other questions before Texas Community College Day so that
you will be prepared to answer any questions the legislators/staff pose.
• Keep in mind that almost every legislator has a community college in their
district. Although many legislators attended a major university, they often
take pride in “their” community college and increasingly view community
colleges as vital to goals included in Closing the Gaps.
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Learn, Prepare, and Make a Difference
• TUITION AT COMMUNITY COLLEGES HAS INCREASED.
• GRANTS & SCHOLARSHIPS HAVE NOT KEPT PACE WITH COLLEGE
COSTS.
• COMMUNITY COLLEGES SHOULD BE ADEQUATELY FUNDED.
• MORE STUDENTS ARE ATTENDING COMMUNITY COLLEGES.
• COMMUNITY COLLEGES: A WISE INVESTMENT
• THE TACC 5-POINT PLAN
TUITION AT COMMUNITY COLLEGES HAS INCREASED
Since 2000, tuition and fees have increased 130%. How much more can
students afford? How many years of good wages will we lose as we delay
completion of our degrees due to rising costs? How many millions of dollars
will the state lose in sales taxes for items we cannot buy because of our
reduced income potential?
GRANTS & SCHOLARSHIPS COVER LESS OF COLLEGE COSTS
Grants and scholarships have failed to keep pace with skyrocketing costs
of tuition, student service fees, books and the cost of living. Even if
scholarships and grants increase, they are pointless if community colleges
have to reduce faculty, limit course offerings, or possibly close their doors.
Texas underfunds aid to community college students compared with aid
from the Federal Government. Texas should increase funding for the Texas
Educational Opportunity Grant (TEOG) to balance aid to community college
students with the greatest unmet need.
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COMMUNITY COLLEGES SHOULD BE ADEQUATELY FUNDED
In the past nine years contracting state budgets forced the state to
underfund community colleges and therefore caused many changes.
Current, and future state budget cuts, will only accelerate these changes.
• Tuition increased significantly.
• The number and variety of course offerings are affected.
• Fewer support materials and copies of information are available to
students.
• Fuller classes result in less interaction and support from professors.
• Hiring delays make it harder to get help from counselors, librarians &
tutors.
• Many students have to delay or prolong their college educations because
they cannot get into classes that fit around their family or work schedules or
they can not afford the ever increasing costs.
Although state funding per contact hour has eroded in the last nine years,
the number of community college students and the cost of equipping
colleges with the latest technologies to ensure up-to-date instruction have
risen dramatically. The State Legislature should work to provide adequate
funding for community colleges while also implementing appropriate
outcomes based funding for colleges.
MORE STUDENTS ATTEND COMMUNITY COLLEGES
Already operating on smaller budgets than universities, increased student
population combined with decreases in funding endangers our community
college system. The 83rd Legislature must work work with community
college to provide funding that will insure the success of all our students.
The 83rd Legislature’s investment in community college education will
create opportunities, spur business growth and expand the state’s tax
base. Funding for Texas community colleges is essential to the economic
health of our state.
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Community College – A Wise Investment
• More than 750,000 students enrolled in Texas public Community Colleges during the
fall of 2012 compared to 560,000 at public Texas universities and 123,000 at
Independent College and Universities.
• 70% of all first-time college students in Texas begin their college education at a
community college.
• Community Colleges educate 52% of all Texans enrolled in postsecondary education.
• Community College transfer students succeed at universities. Compared to students
who enroll in universities their freshman year, community college students are more
likely to graduate, and are more likely to graduate in less time.
• Community Colleges serve a broad cross section of Texans helping our state in
Closing the Gaps to make college accessible to more Texans.
• Average earnings for someone with a 1-year certificate are $26,353 or 16% more than
someone with just a high school diploma.
• Average earnings for someone with an associate degree are $30,974 or 36% more
than someone with just a high school diploma.
• Texas taxpayers see a 6.9% rate of return on their investment in community colleges.
• Students earn 15.4% return on our investment with a payback period of 9.6 years.
• Students expanded earning and spending will contribute to an ever larger tax base for
the remainder of their career.

• Community College Students are hard workers who are already working and
stretching their dollars as far as they can. 72% of community college students work
while attending college.
• 95% percent of community college students remain in the state, therefore keeping the
return on the taxpayer’s investment in the state.
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The community colleges of Texas understand that the most
critical part of their mission focuses on the success of the
students who seek educational opportunities at our
institutions. It is this overarching notion that drives colleges,
their faculty, and staff around the state to make a difference
in the lives of Texans.
The Texas Association of Community Colleges recognizes
that colleges must have a partner in the State of Texas to
ensure that the success of our students remains the priority.
To accomplish this goal, TACC proposes a 5-Point Campaign
that asks state leaders to join us in this critical effort.
5-Point Campaign: Community College Legislative Priorities
• Workforce and Skills Alignment
• Measuring and Funding Success
• College Readiness
• Transfer and Articulation
• Texans in Community Colleges
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5-point campaign: 83rd Session Legislative Priorities
1. Workforce and Skills Alignment:
· Reform the 8kiIIa DeveIopment Fund
· Define cIear pathwaya between high achooI career and technicaI education and community
coIIege career and technicaI programa.
2. Measuring and Funding success:
· Affirm atate funding commitmenta: Core coIIege operationa: $50 miIIion, Contact houra: $1.72
biIIion, 8tudent 8ucceaa pointa: $196.9 miIIion
· Reatore HeaIth Inaurance atate funding to 60º of coata, return to 84º of coata in the 84th aeaaion.
3. College Readiness:
· Requeat funding for UT Auatin for a apeciaI item aupporting the Dana Center in deveIoping and
impIementing the New Mathwaya Project.
· DeveIop and require a 8tudent 8ucceaa courae for aII entering eIigibIe for atate funding.
· Requeat additionaI funding for 8tarIink to provide profeaaionaI deveIopment for facuIty to
engage in 8tudent 8ucceaa initiative.
4. Transfer and Articulation:
· Recommend a cIear and direct pathway for each program to become univeraaI in Texaa through
atatewide-adopted common core curricuIa that Ieada to the Aaaociate Degree.
· Recommend an incentive ayatem for the compIetion of the Aaaociate Degree that rewarda
atudenta, community coIIegea and univeraitiea.
5. Texans in Community Colleges:
· Recommend that 8tate provide aufficient funding for AduIt Baaic Education (ABE).
· Recommend that atate overaight of ABE be moved from the Texaa Education Agency to
the Texaa Higher Education Coordinating Board.
· Endorae the recommendation of the 8unaet Commiaaion to remove aII two-year inatitutiona
from participation in the B-On-Time Ioan program and tranafer the funding for pubIic two-year
inatitutiona to the Texaa EducationaI Opportunity Grant program.
· Recommend increaaed fIexibiIity for community coIIege financiaI aid directora to move funda
between atate financiaI aid programa thereby aIIowing them to direct funda in the moat
efficient manner.
www.Tx8ucceaa.com
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Legislative Process in Texas
How a Bill Originates
A legislator may draft legislation personally or obtain the services of professional staff of
the Texas Legislative Council or the engrossing and enrolling department of the senate. The
Legislative Budget Board drafts the general appropriations bill. Legislation may also be prepared
by organizations or individuals with a particular interest in certain matters. The bill, the most
common type of legislative document, is the only means by which laws may be enacted,
amended, or repealed. All bills except for general appropriations bills are limited to a single
subject.
A bill may originate as the idea of a single member of the legislature or may grow out of
the recommendations of a standing or special committee of the legislature that has conducted
interim studies on specific issues of legislative interest.
Introducing a Bill
A bill may be introduced by any member of the legislature in the member's own chamber,
and the steps in a bill's progress in each house are basically the same. A bill passed by one house
must proceed to the other for final passage before going to the governor for approval or veto.
To introduce a bill in the House of Representatives, a state representative must first submit
the required number of copies of the bill for filing to the chief clerk of the house, who
sequentially numbers each document according to the order in which it is received. The house
rules of procedure permit unrestricted introduction of bills during the first 60 calendar days of
each regular session. After the 60-day deadline, the introduction of any bill other than a local bill
or a bill relating to a matter declared by the governor to be an emergency requires the consent of
at least four-fifths of those members present and voting.
To introduce a bill in the senate, a senator must first submit the required number of copies
of the bill to the secretary of the senate, who sequentially numbers each document according to
the order in which it is received. The senate rules of procedure also permit unrestricted
introduction of bills during the first 60 calendar days of each regular session. After the 60-day
deadline in the senate, the introduction of any bill other than a local bill or a bill relating to a
matter declared by the governor to be an emergency requires the consent of at least four-fifths of
the membership of the senate.
The Role of Committees
The size of the legislature and the volume of work confronting it each session make
thoughtful deliberation on the many proposed measures by the entire membership impossible.
The committee stage in the deliberative process is at the core of legislative politics since the fate
of bills under consideration hinges on committee action. A large percentage of all legislation is
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never reported out of committee. Thus, committee action is the first crucial step in the process by
which a bill becomes law.
Referral to a Standing Committee
When a bill is introduced or is received from the opposite chamber for consideration, it is
read for the first time by its caption only and is referred by the speaker or lieutenant governor to
an appropriate committee.
In the house rules, each committee is assigned jurisdiction over a specific subject matter,
and the speaker refers legislation to house committees based on those subject matter
jurisdictions. The senate rules do not specify subject matter jurisdictions for senate committees.
The lieutenant governor may refer legislation in the senate to any standing committee or
subcommittee, although unofficial subject matter jurisdictions are usually followed.
Committees are formed at the beginning of the regular session and generally consist of 5 to
29 members. For committees of the House of Representatives, membership of most committees
is determined in part by seniority and in part by appointments by the speaker. Each representative
sits on at least one committee, and most representatives sit on two or three committees. The
house in the 79th Legislature had 40 substantive and procedural standing committees.
For committees of the senate, membership is determined entirely by appointments by the
lieutenant governor. Senators generally sit on three or four committees each, and the senate in the
79th Legislature had 15 standing committees.
A bill requiring extensive analysis may be assigned to a subcommittee of the standing
committee to which the bill has been referred. Subcommittees are appointed by the committee
chair from the standing committee’s membership. After concluding its
deliberation on a bill, the subcommittee may submit a written report to the full committee.
Immediately after a bill has been referred to committee, a determination must be made as
to whether a fiscal note or other impact statement is required, and if so, the Legislative Budget
Board prepares the note or statement. In preparing the note or statement, the Legislative Budget
Board may consult the state agencies affected by the legislation. In the house, the fiscal note
must be attached to the affected bill before a public hearing on the bill may be held, and if the
bill is reported from committee, the fiscal note must be attached to the bill as part of the
committee report when it is printed and distributed to the members of the house. A bill may
proceed through the legislative process before an impact statement is completed, but a copy of
the impact statement must be distributed to the members as soon as it has been completed.
Senate practice is for a copy of the fiscal note to be provided to the committee members before a
final vote on a bill in committee is taken. The fiscal note is included as part of the senate
committee report.
The Committee Process
All committee business is required to be conducted in open meetings. No official action or
vote may be taken except in a meeting that is open to the public. The house rules permit a house
committee or subcommittee to meet: (1) in a public hearing where testimony is heard and where
official action may be taken on bills, resolutions, or other matters; (2) in a formal meeting where
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the members may discuss and take official action without hearing public testimony; or (3) in a
work session for discussion of matters before the committee without taking formal action. The
senate rules do not provide for different types of meetings. Therefore, testimony may be heard
and official action may be taken at any meeting of a senate committee or subcommittee.
Although a committee is not required to solicit public testimony on any bill referred to it,
public testimony is almost always solicited on bills of outstanding importance, allowing citizens
the opportunity to present arguments on different sides of an issue. In the senate, a public hearing
must be held on a bill before it can be reported from committee.
A house committee or subcommittee holding a public hearing during a legislative session
must post notice of the hearing at least five calendar days before the hearing during a regular
session and at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing during a special session. If a house
committee or subcommittee is convening for a formal meeting or a work session, written notice
must be posted and transmitted to each member of the
committee two hours in advance of the meeting or an announcement must be filed with
the journal clerk and read in the house while the house is in session. A senate committee or
subcommittee must post notice of a meeting at least 24 hours before the meeting.
Committee Reports

After considering a bill, a committee may choose to take no action or may issue a report on
the bill to the house or senate. The committee report, expressing the committee's
recommendations regarding house or senate action on a bill, includes a record of the committee's
vote on the report, the text of the bill as reported by the committee, a detailed bill analysis, a
fiscal note or other impact statement, and other attachments as necessary.
The required parts of the committee report are assembled and printed and distributed to the
members as a single document. Committee reports are advisory only and may take several forms.
The committee may recommend passage of the bill without amendments, or it may recommend
amendments to the bill or even substitute a new bill for the original document.
In the house, all committee reports are referred to the chief clerk, who forwards them to the
printer. After being printed, a copy of the house committee report printing (which includes bill
text, the committee's recommendation and vote on the bill, the bill analysis, the fiscal note, and
other necessary impact statements and attachments) is placed in the post office box of each
member of the house. The chief clerk then delivers a certified copy of the committee report to the
appropriate calendars committee (the Committee on Calendars or the Committee on Local and
Consent Calendars) for placement of the bill on a calendar for consideration by the full house.
Calendars committees are given wide discretion in scheduling bills for floor action.
The senate rules also require committee reports to be printed. After being printed, a copy of
the senate committee report printing (which includes bill text, the committee's recommendation
and vote on the bill, the bill analysis, the fiscal note, and other necessary impact statements and
attachments) is placed in the bill book on each senator's desk in the senate chamber. Except for
the role of the Committee on Administration in scheduling local and noncontroversial bills for
consideration, there is no equivalent to a calendars committee in the senate. The senate's regular
order of business lists all bills and resolutions that have been reported favorably from committees
in the order in which they were reported to the senate. For all practical purposes, the regular
order of business is merely a listing of bills that are eligible for consideration, because the senate
rules provide that a bill on the regular order of business may not be brought up for floor
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consideration unless the senate sponsor of the bill has filed with the secretary of the senate a
written notice of intent to suspend the regular order of business for consideration of the bill.
House Calendars and List of Items Eligible for Consideration
The house rules provide for four types of calendars:

1. The Daily House Calendar, which contains a list of new bills and resolutions
scheduled by the Committee on Calendars for consideration by the house and which must
be distributed to the members 36 hours before the house may consider those measures (24
hours during special sessions);
2. The Supplemental House Calendar (prepared by the Committee on Calendars),
which must be distributed two hours before the house convenes and which may contain: (a)
measures passed to third reading on the previous day; (b) measures on the Daily House
Calendar for a previous day that were not reached for consideration; (c) measures on the
Daily House Calendar for the current day; (d) postponed business from a previous day; and
(e) notice to call from the table a measure laid on the table subject to call on a previous
ay;
3. The Local, Consent, and Resolutions Calendar, which must be distributed to the
members 48 hours before the listed measures may be considered and which contains a list
of local or noncontroversial bills scheduled by the Committee on Local and Consent
Calendars for consideration by the house; and
4. The Congratulatory and Memorial Calendar, which must be distributed 24 hours
before those measures may be considered and which contains a list of congratulatory and
memorial resolutions scheduled by the Committee on Rules and Resolutions for
consideration by the house.

The Supplemental House Calendar, because it includes the measures listed on the Daily
House Calendar, is the primary agenda followed by the house during its deliberations. The Local,
Consent, and Resolutions Calendar and the Congratulatory and Memorial Calendar are special
calendars that are prepared approximately once a week during the last half of a regular session.
The house rules provide for seven categories that may be used to group bills and
resolutions on the calendars. Those categories, listed in order of priority, are the: (1) emergency
calendar; (2) major state calendar; (3) constitutional amendments calendar; (4) general state
calendar; (5) local, consent, and resolutions calendar; (6) resolutions calendar; and (7)
congratulatory and memorial resolutions calendar. Within each category, senate bills and
resolutions are required to be listed on the calendars separately from house bills and resolutions,
and consideration of senate bills and resolutions on senate bill days (Wednesdays and Thursdays)
has priority in the order specified by house rule.
Except during the latter part of the regular session, when calendars become especially
lengthy, the house normally considers all measures listed on its calendars before adjourning or
recessing for the day.
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List of items eligible for consideration
This list is prepared by the chief clerk of the house, upon request of the speaker, when the
volume of legislation warrants (normally during the last few weeks of a regular session). The list,
which must be distributed six hours before it may be considered, contains: (1) house bills with
senate amendments eligible to be considered; (2) senate bills for which the senate has requested
the appointment of a conference committee; and (3) conference committee reports eligible to be
considered.
Senate Agenda and Intent calendar
The senate agenda includes the following information:
1. notice of intent, giving the number, author or sponsor, and short caption for each
measure that may be considered during the day’s session;
2. list of senate bills returned from the house with amendments;
3. status of bills in conference committees, giving a short caption and brief history of
the action on the bills;
4. local and uncontested bills calendar;
5. gubernatorial appointments to boards and commissions that have been reported
favorably from the Senate Committee on Nominations and are awaiting
confirmation by the senate;
6. committee hearings scheduled, including short captions for all measures
scheduled to be considered by the committees;
7. regular order of business, listing all bills and resolutions that have been reported
favorably from committees in the order in which they were reported to the senate;
8. miscellaneous announcements;
9. senate floor action, giving the numbers and short captions for and action taken on all
measures brought up for consideration during the previous legislative day;
10. senate committee action, giving the same information for all measures considered
by committees on the previous day; and
11. morning call, which includes senate and house bills and resolutions on first
reading and referral to committee, the introduction and consideration of memorial
and congratulatory resolutions, messages and executive communications, and other
motions.
Copies of the senate agenda (usually referred to as “green books” because they are printed
on green paper) are available the morning of each legislative day.
Intent calendar
Senate rules require that bills and resolutions be listed on the regular order of business and
be considered on second reading in the order in which committee reports on the measures are
submitted to the senate. During a regular session, the senate adopts a further rule specifying that
before a bill or joint resolution may be brought up for floor debate out of its regular order, notice
of intent must be filed with the secretary of the senate by 3 p.m. on the last preceding calendar
15
day the senate was in session. A member may give notice on no more than three bills or
resolutions before April 15 and on no more than five bills or resolutions on or after April 15.
Senate rules direct the secretary of the senate to prepare a list of all legislation for which notice
has been given. The list, called the Intent Calendar, must be made available to each member of
the senate and to the press not later than 6:30 p.m. on the day the notice is filed. No bill or
resolution may be considered on its first day on the Intent Calendar, and a vote of two-thirds of
the members present is required before any of the measures listed on the Intent Calendar may be
debated. The senate rules do not require measures to be brought up for consideration in the order
listed on the Intent Calendar, and the senate routinely considers only a portion of those measures
listed on the Intent Calendar for a given day. A senator must give notice from day to day for a
measure that was not brought up for consideration to remain on the Intent Calendar. Any
provision of the senate rule governing the Intent Calendar may be suspended by a vote of four-
fifths of the members present.
Floor Action
The first real floor consideration of a bill occurs on its second reading. After it is read the
second time, again by caption only, the measure is subject to debate and amendment by the entire
membership of the chamber. On second reading, a bill may be amended by a
simple majority. If no amendment is made, or if those proposed are disposed of, the final
action on second reading of a bill is a vote on its passage to engrossment, if the bill is being
considered in the chamber in which it was introduced, or passage to third reading, if the bill is
being considered in the opposite chamber. The bill is then laid before the body for a third reading
and final passage. A bill may be amended again on third reading, but amendments at this stage
require a two-thirds majority for adoption.
Although the Texas Constitution requires a bill to be read on three separate days in each
house before it can have the force of law, this constitutional rule may be suspended by a four-
fifths vote of the house in which the bill is pending. In such cases, the bill is given an immediate
third reading following the vote to pass the bill to engrossment or third reading. The senate
routinely suspends this constitutional provision in order to give a bill an immediate third reading.
The house, however, rarely suspends this provision, and third reading consideration of a bill in
the house normally occurs on the day following second reading consideration.
After a bill has been read a third time, it is voted on for final passage. If the bill receives a
simple majority vote, it is considered passed, and the chief clerk of the house or the secretary of
the senate, as appropriate, certifies the bill's final passage, noting on it the date of its passage and
the vote by which it passed. When the bill is passed in the originating chamber, the bill is
engrossed, and an exact and accurate copy of the bill, with all corrections and amendments
incorporated into it, is prepared and sent to the opposite chamber for consideration. When the bill
is passed in the opposite chamber, a new copy of the bill is not prepared. Rather, the bill is
immediately returned to the originating chamber with any amendments simply attached to the
bill.
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Conference committee
If a conference committee is called for, the presiding officers each appoint five members
from their respective chambers to serve on the committee. The senate rules require that at least
two of the senate conferees be members of the senate committee from which the bill was
reported. A conference committee’s charge is limited to reconciling differences between the two
chambers, and the committee, unless so directed, may not alter, amend, or omit text that is not in
disagreement. Nor may the committee add text on any matter that is not in disagreement or that
is not included in either version of the bill in question. After the committee has met and reached
an agreement, a report is submitted to both chambers for approval or disapproval. The report
must be approved by at least three conferees from each chamber and must contain the text of the
bill as approved by the conference committee, a side-by-side analysis comparing the text of the
compromise bill to both the house and the senate versions, and the signatures of those members
of the conference committee who approved the report. A conference committee report is not
subject to amendment but must be accepted or rejected in its entirety.
Should the proposed compromise remain unacceptable to either chamber, it may be
returned to the same conference committee for further deliberation, with or without specific
instructions, or the appointment of a new conference committee may be requested. Failure of the
conference committee to reach agreement kills the measure. If the conference committee report
is acceptable to both chambers, the bill is enrolled, signed by both presiding officers in the
presence of their respective chambers, and sent to the governor.
Governor's Action
Upon receiving a bill, the governor has 10 days in which to sign the bill, veto it, or allow it
to become law without a signature. If the governor elects to veto the bill and the legislature is
still in session, the bill is returned to the house in which it originated with an explanation of the
governor's objections. A two-thirds majority in each house is required to override the veto. If the
governor neither vetoes nor signs the bill within the allotted time, the bill becomes law. If a bill is
sent to the governor within 10 days of final adjournment, the governor has until 20 days after
final adjournment to sign the bill, veto it, or allow it to become law without a signature.
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12th Street
13th Street
14th Street
10th Street
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12th Street
11th Street
10th Street
13th Street
Martin Luther King Blvd.
Waterloo Park
Centennial
Park
NORTH
Bus
Loading
&
Parking
To Hwy. IH-35
To Hwy. IH-35
CAPITOL
COMPLEX
EXT
Bus
Parking
ONLY
Bus
Loading
ONLY
Bus
Loading
ONLY
Capitol
Loading
Dock
JHR
LBJ
LIB
PDB
REJ
John H. Reagan
Lyndon B. Johnson
Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library
Price Daniel Sr. Building
Robert E. Johnson
TCC
TJR
TRS
THC
TSHM
TWC
TWCX
TLC
WBT
WPC
Tom C. Clark
Thomas Jefferson Rusk
Teacher Retirement System
Texas Historical Commission
Bob Bullock Texas State History Museum
Texas Workforce Commission
Texas Workforce Commission Annex
Texas Law Center
WIlliam B. Travis
William P. Clements, Jr.
CCC
CVC
CDO
CSB
DCG
EOT
ERS
EXT
GM
JER
Capitol Complex Child Care Center
Capitol Visitors Center
Capitol District Office
Central Services Building
Dewitt C. Greer
Ernest O. Thompson
Employee Retirement System
Capitol Extension (Underground)
Governor's Mansion
James Earl Rudder
SCB
SFA
SHB
SIB
SIBX
Supreme Court Building
Stephen F. Austin
Sam Houston Building
State Insurance Building
State Insurance Building Annex
No Visitor
Access on
Capitol Drives
CAPITOL COMPLEX
© 2002, STATE PRESERVATION BOARD Revised 09-19-02
ToTexasStateCemetery
19
E
GE.4
GS.6
GW.15
GW.11
GW.12
GW.16
G
W
.
1
8
G
W
.
6
G
W
.
2
G
W
.
1
7
GW.7
GW.5
G
W
.
4
G
W
.
8
G
S
.
5
GS.2
GS.3
G
S
.
8
GE.5
GN.8
GN.12 GN.11
GN.9
GN.7
GN.10
GE.7
1E.13
1E.9
1E.12
1E.5 1E.3
1N.5
1N.9
1N.7
1N.10
1N.8
1N.12
GN
GW
GE
GS
1W
1E
1E.4
1
E
.
2
1
E
.
6
1
E
.
8
1S.1
1S.3
1S.2
1W.3
1W.14
1W.10 1W.6
1
W
.
4
1W.2
1W.5 1W.9 1W.11
1W.15
1
E
.
1
5
1
E
.
1
4
GE.11
GE.6
GE.10
GE.12
GE.17
AGRICULTURAL
MUSEUM
Ground Floor
(Basement)
First Floor
SOUTH STEPS
WEST
LOBBY
Extension Access
ACCESSIBLE ENTRANCE
ACCESSIBILITY
E
E
E
E
All facilities are accessible
to persons with disabilities.
For assistance call 463-0063.
INFORMATION & TOURS
Monday - Friday, 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Saturday 9:30 am - 3:30 pm
Sunday, Noon - 3:30 pm
Call 463-0063 for more information
E
E
E E
North Wing Elevators
access all office floors
of the Capitol and
Capitol Extension.
North Wing Elevators
access all office floors
of the Capitol and
Capitol Extension.
E
NORTH
LOBBY
SOUTH
LOBBY
EAST
LOBBY
ROTUNDA
Tours
Begin
Here
GROUND
FLOOR
ROTUNDA
CAPITOL BUILDING GUIDE
floors 1 & ground
20
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
2
E
.
1
3
2
E
.
1
3
2E.14 2E.14
2E.16 2E.16
2
E
.
2
0
2
E
.
2
0
2
E
.
2
2
2
E
.
2
2
2
E
.
2
3
2
E
.
2
3
4N.10
3
E
.
6
3
E
.
8
3E.10
3N.4 3N.3
3N.5 3N.6
3
W
.
3
3
W
.
1
3
S
.
2
3
E
.
4
3
E
.
3
3
E
.
2
3S.6 3S.5
3S.3
3W.5
3W.7
3W.9
3W.11
3
W
.
1
5
3
W
.
1
7
3
E
.
1
2
3
E
.
1
8
3
E
.
1
6
4N.4 4N.3
4S.6 4S.5
4S.3
4
E
.
2
4
W
.
1
4S.4
4S.2
4N.9
4N.7 4N.8
4N.5 4N.6
2
E
.
7
2
E
.
7
2
E
.
2
2
E
.
2
2
S
.
2
S
.
22
2
W
2
W
.
7
2
W
2
W
.
9
.
9
2
W
2
W
.
1
3
.
1
3
2
W
2
W
.
1
5
.
1
5
2W.19 2W.19
2
W
2
W
.
6
2
W
2
W
.
2
.
2
9
2
W
2
W
.
2
.
2
7
2
W
2
W
.
2
.
2
5
2
S
.
2
S
.
44
2
S
.
2
S
.
66
2S. 2S.1 1
2
E
.
4
2
E
.
4
2
E
.
6
2
E
.
6
2
E
.
1
0
2
E
.
1
0
2
E
.
9
2
E
.
9
3N
3S
4N
4S
2W 2W 2E 2E
2S 2S
2 N
3W 3E
LEGISLATIVE
REFERENCE
LIBRARY
2N.3
GOVERNOR'S PUBLIC
RECEPTION ROOM
SENATE
CHAMBER
2E.8
HOUSE
CHAMBER
2W.5
HOUSE
CHAMBER
2W.5
Second Floor
Third Floor
Fourth Floor
North Wing Elevators
access all floors
of the Capitol and
Capitol Extension
Capitol Extension Access: Take the North Wing elevators to Floor E1 or E2 of the
underground Capitol Extension. Please visit the Capitol Giftshop on Floor E1 for Texas
and Capitol mementos and books, as well as mints, medicines, and other sundries.
Also located on level E1 are a public cafeteria, an Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) and
vending machines.
North Wing Elevators
access all floors
of the Capitol and
Capitol Extension
HOUSE
GALLERY
3W.2
SENATE
GALLERY
3E.5
INFORMATION & TOURS
Monday - Friday, 8:30 am - 4:30 pm
Saturday, 9:30 am - 3:30 pm
Sunday, Noon - 3:30 pm
Call 463-0063 for more information
ACCESSIBILITY
All facilities are accessible
to persons with disabilities.
For assistance call 463-0063.
CAPITOL BUILDING GUIDE
floors 2, 3, & 4

21
SUPREME COURT
BUILDINGTUNNEL
JOHN H. REAGAN
BUILDING TUNNEL
TEXAS WORKFORCE COMMISSION and
ROBERT E. JOHNSON BUILDING TUNNEL
SAM HOUSTON
BUILDINGTUNNEL
Engrossing &Enrolling g
CAFETERIA
G
I
F
T
S
H
O
P
Public Welcome!
Enter
Press
Corps
House
Mail
Senate
Mail
LOADING DOCK
TO13TH ST. & COLORADO ST.
AUDITORIUM
SEAL
COURT
W M
C
E
N
T
R
ALC
O
U
R
T
O
p
e
n
-air R o
t
u
n
d
a
204
406
306
208
410 402
310
504
302
216
418
318
508
220
206
E1.002
E1.210
215
217
214
213
219
003
006
E1.020
E1.024
E1.034
015
E1.012
E1.016
E1.028
E1.036
038
E1.010
E1.014
E1.026
E1.030
032
E1.018
E1.022
011
E1.008
Office of the
First Lady
&
Governor's
Appointments
102 102A
424
324
512 606
702
802
904
704
804
712
812
716 710
810
610
320
420
312
412
304
404
212
414
314
506
218
422
322
510 608
708
808
714
814
706
806
E1.908
316
416
308
408
E1.004
House
Appropriations
Senate
Finance
LBB
Senators:
E1.600’s through E1.800’s
State Representatives:
E1.200’s through E1.500’s
E1.200's
E1.900's
E1.300's E1.800's
E1.400's E1.700's
E1.500's E1.600's
Baby
Changing
Stations
E E
E E
E
E E
E
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
C
E
N
T
R
A
L


G
A
L
L
E
R
Y
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
Capitol Extension Guide
Floor E1
Extension
First Floor (E1)
ELEVATORS TO CAPITOL NORTH WING
22
SEAL
COURT
ELEVATORS TO CAPITOL NORTH WING
C
E
N
T
R
A
L C
O
U
R
T
O
p
e
n
-
a
ir Ro
t
u
n
d
a
122
114
160
138
132 136
206
154
106
176
178
174
E2.002
E2.180
E2.028
E2.012
E2.036
E2.016
E2.026
E2.010
E2.030
E2.014
E2.022 E2.024
E2.018 E2.020
E2.1018
E2.1016
E2.1014
E2.1012
E2.1010
E2.1006 E2.1002
1008
1001
172
166
170
168
164
116 108 102
124
118
126
128
130
214
422 706
322 802
510 602
210 904
414 714
314 810
506 606
812 312
712 412
820 304
720 404
804 320
704 420
204 908
406 722
306 818
502 610
152 144
150 146
140
148 147
156
212 902
418 710
318 806
508 604
208 906 910
410 718 402 702
310 814
504 608
816 308
716 408
808 316
708 416
302 822
134
110
162
202
158
120 112 104
House
Committee
Staff Suites
E2.100's
E2.202 & E2.206
State Representatives Offices
E2.200 through E2.900's
E2.200's
E2.100's
E2.1000's
E2.300's E2.800's
E2.900's
E2.400's E2.700's
E2.500's
E2.600's
E E
E
E
E
E
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
LIGHT COURT
C
E
N
T
R
A
L

G
A
L
L
E
R
Y
142 142
Extension
Second Floor (E2)
All facilities are accessible
to persons with disabilities.
For assistance call 463-0063.
Capitol Extension Guide
Floor E2
Legislative
Conference
Center Accessibility

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