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Three Whistleblowers Talk About Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning

Three Whistleblowers Talk About Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning

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Published by Renes Mee Abney
http://www.vice.com/read/three-whistleblowers-talk-about-edward-snowden-and-bradley-manning

The US government's pursuit of those who break rank to expose its secrets has emerged as the dominant narrative of this decade's war for information. Bradley Manning recently learned of the consequences of leaking troves of sensitive documents. Edward Snowden, meanwhile, is still in Russia in a self-imposed exile (he supposedly left the Moscow airport he'd been holed up in for over a month last week, after being granted asylum in the country). With their cases dominating the headlines, I thought I'd speak to a trio of high-profile whistleblowers who know all about the repercussions of speaking truth to power.

DR MARK WHITACRE

Mark Whitacre was on the fast-track to corporate stardom. At 32, he was fourth in line for the throne at a 30,000 employee-strong Fortune 500 company. There was a big problem, though. His company, ADM, was swindling billions annually in an international price-fixing scheme.

In the early 1990s, he became a whistleblower after his wife said that, if he didn’t tell the authorities, she would. He wore a wire to work every day for three years, documenting the fraud perpetrated at the company’s highest levels. But Whitacre was no saint; he would be thrown in jail after he lost his whistleblower immunity when it was revealed he had embezzled $9 million.

VICE: What led to your decision to become a whistleblower?

Dr Mark Whitacre: My wife began to notice changes in me. I became obsessed with the corporate jet and the money. She could tell something was weighing heavily on me. This one time, she had me really open up, and that’s when I told her about price fixing, where we formed an international cartel. She forced me to come forward. In my case, I would say my wife was probably the whistleblower more than me.

I read something about you having to wear a wire for three years. What was that experience like?
It was very uncomfortable. It’s the longest duration in US history for anyone to wear a wire. No one’s ever worn a wire every day for three years.

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http://www.vice.com/read/three-whistleblowers-talk-about-edward-snowden-and-bradley-manning

The US government's pursuit of those who break rank to expose its secrets has emerged as the dominant narrative of this decade's war for information. Bradley Manning recently learned of the consequences of leaking troves of sensitive documents. Edward Snowden, meanwhile, is still in Russia in a self-imposed exile (he supposedly left the Moscow airport he'd been holed up in for over a month last week, after being granted asylum in the country). With their cases dominating the headlines, I thought I'd speak to a trio of high-profile whistleblowers who know all about the repercussions of speaking truth to power.

DR MARK WHITACRE

Mark Whitacre was on the fast-track to corporate stardom. At 32, he was fourth in line for the throne at a 30,000 employee-strong Fortune 500 company. There was a big problem, though. His company, ADM, was swindling billions annually in an international price-fixing scheme.

In the early 1990s, he became a whistleblower after his wife said that, if he didn’t tell the authorities, she would. He wore a wire to work every day for three years, documenting the fraud perpetrated at the company’s highest levels. But Whitacre was no saint; he would be thrown in jail after he lost his whistleblower immunity when it was revealed he had embezzled $9 million.

VICE: What led to your decision to become a whistleblower?

Dr Mark Whitacre: My wife began to notice changes in me. I became obsessed with the corporate jet and the money. She could tell something was weighing heavily on me. This one time, she had me really open up, and that’s when I told her about price fixing, where we formed an international cartel. She forced me to come forward. In my case, I would say my wife was probably the whistleblower more than me.

I read something about you having to wear a wire for three years. What was that experience like?
It was very uncomfortable. It’s the longest duration in US history for anyone to wear a wire. No one’s ever worn a wire every day for three years.

Related Articles:
http://abneyassociatesclausen.wordpress.com/
http://online.wsj.com/community/groups/abney-associates-1685/topics/hong-kong---abney-associates

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Renes Mee Abney on Aug 05, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/29/2015

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The US government's pursuit of those who break rank to expose its secrets has emerged as the dominant narrative

of this decade's war for information. Bradley Manning recently learned of the consequences of leaking troves of sensitive documents. Edward Snowden, meanwhile, is still in Russia in a self-imposed exile (he supposedly left the Moscow airport he'd been holed up in for over a month last week, after being granted asylum in the country). With their cases dominating the headlines, I thought I'd speak to a trio of high-profile whistleblowers who know all about the repercussions of speaking truth to power. DR MARK WHITACRE Mark Whitacre was on the fast-track to corporate stardom. At 32, he was fourth in line for the throne at a 30,000 employee-strong Fortune 500 company. There was a big problem, though. His company, ADM, was swindling billions annually in an international price-fixing scheme. In the early 1990s, he became a whistleblower after his wife said that, if he didn’t tell the authorities, she would. He wore a wire to work every day for three years, documenting the fraud perpetrated at the company’s highest levels. But Whitacre was no saint; he would be thrown in jail after he lost his whistleblower immunity when it was revealed he had embezzled $9 million. VICE: What led to your decision to become a whistleblower? Dr Mark Whitacre: My wife began to notice changes in me. I became obsessed with the corporate jet and the money. She could tell something was weighing heavily on me. This one time, she had me really open up, and that’s when I told her about price fixing, where we formed an international cartel. She forced me to come forward. In my case, I would say my wife was probably the whistleblower more than me. I read something about you having to wear a wire for three years. What was that experience like? It was very uncomfortable. It’s the longest duration in US history for anyone to wear a wire. No one’s ever worn a wire every day for three years. Read full story

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