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TWC Course Handbook Summer Quarter 2009

TWC Course Handbook Summer Quarter 2009

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Published by: The Washington Center on May 28, 2009
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06/15/2009

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Academic Course Handbook and Schedule

Summer Quarter 2009

The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

T h e Wa s h i n g t o n C e n t e r f o r I n t e r n s h i p s a n d A c a d e m i c S e m i n a r s

ACADEMIC COURSE HANDBOOK AND SCHEDULE SUMMER 2009
On behalf of The Washington Center, the academic affairs staff welcomes you to Washington and to one of the most important experiences you will have in your life. The Washington Center Experience will impact you significantly, probably in ways in which you cannot even imagine at this early point in your program. Over the past three decades, The Washington Center has become a recognized leader in the field of experiential learning by working with a diverse group of students who have diverse goals for their internship in the nation’s capital. Trust us to provide you with a framework for learning and contributing that will help you make the most of your experience in Washington, D.C.

Your internship course will help put the experience you are having in Washington in context. We want you to connect your professional activities with the academic rigor you expect from your own campus, keeping in mind the unique access you have to the resources of Washington, D.C. We encourage the faculty to break up the format of the classes and allow for considerable interaction such that active learning can occur. Some courses are highly structured, while others expect you to take more of the initiative, based on your particular learning goals and objectives. The program therefore recognizes that students have different learning styles and seeks to accommodate students from diverse backgrounds by having instructors who have diverse backgrounds and experiences themselves. They are a great resource for you during your time in Washington. So enjoy your course, learn as much as you can, and reflect upon the full experience you will be having in Washington, D.C. Sincerely,

While the internship may be your primary focus, the academic courses offered by The Washington Center have been a longstanding tradition as an integral component of the overall experience. We have found that interns need time to unwind after work in a familiar classroom setting with their peers and a professor who is an expert in a particular field of interest. Though the day at work may be long, the courses provide an opportunity to gather one’s thoughts about important topics and experiences that may have occurred during the previous week or they allow you to speak your mind, debate or reflect upon some of the important issues of the day.

S. Suzan J. Harkness, Ph.D. Managing Director Academic Affairs

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS STAFF
E u g e n e J . A l p e rt , P h . D . Senior Vice President

Oversees academic affairs, seminars and the national Liaison Advisory Board S .S uzan J. H ar knes s, P h.D . Managing Director of Academic Affairs

Oversees internship courses, faculty, curriculum, and assessment

E r in Toothak er Program Coordinator

Primarily responsible for all academic course-related administration

E m a i l : courses@twc.edu

H o w to Co n ta c t Us

P r i m a r y C o n t a c t : Erin A. Toothaker

The front desk of The Washington Center is staffed Monday through Friday until 5:30 p.m.

P h o n e : 202-238-7975 M a i n W a s h i n g t o n C e n t e r P h o n e : 202-238-7900

IMPORTANT NOTICE
It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of any classroom changes or times announced by an instructor during a previous class or written on the course syllabus. In the case of inclement weather, classes are canceled if the federal government is closed (in which case The Washington Center is closed).

C la s s C h a n g e s / Ca n c e l l a ti o n s

Students enrolled in the summer quarter and sophomore exploration program will attend classes from June 8, 2009 to August 16, 2009. If you are a sophomore student you will be participating in ST09-2203 Sophomore Experience: Leadership and Professional Development (only for students who are enrolled in the sophomore exploration program). Most quarter students are enrolled in the same courses as students participating in the summer term program. Your professors will have been informed that you will arrive one week later than the term students.

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

ABOUT THE COURSES
Students have until Friday, June 12, 2009 at 5:00 pm Eastern Daylight Time to drop or add a course using the appropriate form found on the Accepted Students’ website. Requests for course changes must be confirmed in writing after orientation. Direct your drop/add requests to courses@twc.edu. Faculty members are not permitted to add students to their courses. Only TWC academic staff can make changes to the course roster.

C o u r s e E n r o l l me n t

Students may enroll in a second course in order to obtain additional credit from their home institution. Students in the Postgraduate Professional Development Program (PPDP) may enroll in a course only if space is available. Such students should identify themselves to the instructor and are expected to fully participate in each and every class period and turn in assigned work. Please download form number 12 on the Accepted student’s webpage, the PPDP Course Enrollment Form, complete and submit this to courses@twc.edu after the 12th of June.

If cost is a major concern, please contact the course coordinator, courses@twc.edu, and inquire about the fees or book expenses for a particular course.

As stated in the course guide document on our Accepted Students’ website, you should be prepared to cover the cost of any books, handouts, DVDs or any other reading material required for the course. Cost of course materials is the sole responsibility of the student. The cost usually ranges between $60-$80, and some courses may have additional fees for admission to performances, special events, etc. If this is the case, instructors should inform you on the first day of class. If you are not in attendance on the first day, it is your responsibility to inquire. Some faculty have prepared course packets that are required reading for the course. You may be required to purchase such a packet. Since the cost of the packet depends on the number of students in the class, you will be informed of the cost if you are still registered in the course and you are responsible for paying for the packet. Checks or money orders are the only acceptable form of payment and should be made out and sent to The Washington Center. Faculty members are not authorized to accept money from students for course materials.

C ourse Mat erials an d F ees

Each course meets once a week for up to three hours unless otherwise specified. Faculty may choose to extend their class periods to make up for a canceled class or

C our se a nd G r adi ng Pol i ci es

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

may reschedule the class for another night. In some cases, the classroom may be reserved for another function during the term; therefore TWC will notify the instructor in advance and appropriate arrangements to accommodate the class will be made.

All courses begin at 6:30pm. Some classes may be able to meet earlier, 6:00 or 6:15, if everyone in the course finds this change convenient and the management of the location can accommodate an earlier start.

C la s s M e e t i n g T i me s

Class attendance is mandatory and is taken at each session. TWC is notified if a student misses two classes. If you are unable to attend class for a reason beyond your control, you must contact your instructor either in advance or soon after the missed class ends. We recognize that internship events in the evening may conflict with your course schedule; and we advise you to consult you internship supervisor and professor to determine if a conflict is possible. If conflict seems inevitable, you may choose to change your course or make an arrangement with your instructor. However, faculty members are not allowed to excuse a student because of such a scheduling conflict. Thus, please be sure to consult with your agency supervisor to determine if you need to change your course to avoid these conflicts, and keep in mind that you may only change your course during the drop and add period.

At t end ance

Students receiving a guaranteed financial assistance award must complete the course to which they are assigned with a grade of "C" or better to receive the award. Note: Students with a grade of less than a "C" in either the internship or the course forfeit any guaranteed financial assistance and their invoice is adjusted accordingly.

Fi na nci al Ai d

Students with special needs should inform The Washington Center's disability coordinator prior to arrival so we can make the necessary preparations. Email us at disabilityservices@twc.edu for more information.

Sp eci al N eeds

Students who are graduating prior to the end of the term or quarter may need to request an early grade. These students must complete the Early Grade Request form and have it signed by their campus liaison and returned to the Washington Center by the due date. A copy of this form is available online. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that our enrollment services office receives the form on time. Also, be sure to alert the instructor with sufficient notice so the timing of assignments and a final grade can be planned accordingly. Early grade option depends fully upon the student. Please

G ra d e s

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

Students with outstanding balances have their grades withheld until their balance is paid. Reminder notices are not sent. Regardless of who is billed for the program or housing fees, it is the responsibility of the student to ensure proper payment reaches The Washington Center.

TWC strongly discourages students to request a grade of "I" (incomplete). However, if a student is unable to complete all assignments as a result of unforeseen circumstances (i.e. unexpected internship travel, extended illness, etc.), then a written agreement between the student and instructor must be submitted with the final grade sheet. Incomplete agreements should include a final completion date that is no longer than six weeks past the end of the term/semester.

plan accordingly and coordinate with your course professor. Failure to do so may result in lost financial aid, delayed enrollment, or delayed graduation.

Please note the following information for accessing the wireless network at the Washington Center: Network Name: INTERNnet Wireless Password:TWC2009Summer

Wireless A ccess

Courses are created to appeal to students who have at least two years of general education and the courses generally avoid prerequisites. Courses listed at the 3000 level are mostly introductory or of general interest. The 4000 level courses are more in-depth, while 5000 level courses are for more advanced students with specific interests.

C ourse N umbers and Levels

Faculty members prepare a written midterm and final evaluation of each student's progress, which are sent to the student's campus liaison. Students are asked to provide a midterm and final evaluation of the course and instructor. These written evaluations are administrated by the course coordinator and distributed during class. Midterm evaluations are summarized before they are sent to the instructor, so that student’s feedback can remain anonymous. The final evaluation forms are copied and sent to the faculty only after all grades have been submitted. Your reflective feedback on our courses and faculty is very important to us.

As sessm ent

Please note that as a matter of policy, smoking, the consumption of alcoholic beverages, or eating are prohibited in classrooms and during class time. Students are advised to eat dinner prior to class and are welcome to enjoy our outdoor patio or student lounge. Students are responsible for their own computer access and library

Po li c i e s

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

The Washington Center program is an academic program within a professional context, and Washington is a professional city. We therefore strongly encourage you to dress professionally or appropriately at all programming events. For your courses, you should avoid shorts, jeans, short skirts, tank tops, flip-flops, T-shirts or other overly casual attire. This is not only out of deference to your classmates who may be coming directly from their worksite, but also to others who see you at the classroom location, whether it is The Washington Center's offices, a local university or a hotel. While you are in our program, you represent not only yourself, but also the Washington Center and your home institution. You are never really "off duty" during weekdays in Washington.

facilities. Please plan accordingly.

Students are expected to fulfill all academic requirements outlined by program advisors,agency supervisors, associate faculty members, and program coordinators. Students are expected to follow the work schedule of other employees at their placement, not of their college or university or The Washington Center. Interns are expected to notify The Washington Center if they will miss work for more than two consecutive days due to illness or other causes and to receive appropriate permission. Students also need to notify TWC of any early departure at the end of an internship semester or term. If a student will not be attending the last class of the semester or term, they must receive proper permission from their program advisor, campus liaison, and course instructor. Students should take the responsibility to keep their liaison informed of any missed days of work. Incidents of misconduct may be reflected in a student's final evaluation or grade and will be reported to the campus liaison or other college officials. This may result in expulsion from The Washington Center's Internship Program or Academic Seminar and will be maintained in a permanent file. Academic misconduct includes but is not limited to the following acts:
P l a g i a r i s m : Plagiarism is a form of academic misconduct and is considered academic theft. Plagiarism occurs when someone copies or takes the intellectual work of another as one’s own, and fails to properly reference or provide attribution to the original author of the work.

The Washington Center seeks to further students' educational and career goals. Since academic credit is usually available for our programs, we offer a quality experience for students to develop their intellectual, professional, civic and social skills. We expect students to take personal responsibility for their education, and therefore to submit original reports, essays and evaluations, as required. Timeliness and reliability are also required of their participation in all program components. Whether students are at their placement, course, a speaker series, a lecture, a site visit, or involved in other academic components, students are representatives of The Washington Center and their college or university, and are expected to act ethically and with the highest degree of professionalism.

Ac adem i c M i scond uct

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

C h e a t i n g : The use of notes, books, or electronic devices when prohibited, the assistance of another student while completing a quiz or an exam, or the providing of information to another individual for this purpose, unless such collaboration is suggested by the course instructor.
O b s t r u c t i o n : Behaving in a disruptive manner or participating in activities that interfere with the educational mission of The Washington Center at lectures, courses, meetings or other sponsored events. F a l s i f i c a t i o n : The improper alteration of any record, document or evaluation.

At The Washington Center, students are expected to submit original evaluations, essays, papers, and demonstrations, and to cite all appropriate sources of material that influences the work or contributes to its end. If requested, students should be prepared to provide original notes, previous drafts, or other materials to indicate original research or intellectual ownership of an assignment. If the thought, diagram, image, table, paper, photograph, or text is not original, meaning it did not originate from your own thinking or artistry, you must provide citation.

A b s e n t e e i s m : The chronic failure to attend program components (including the internship, internship courses, or other scheduled activities) without a valid reason or prior notification.

The Washington Center reserves the right to impose additional penalties, including expulsion from the program. A hearing regarding these charges may be held at the request of the student.

Any other act of academic dishonesty.

Since The Washington Center does not grant academic credit, the grade received in a course is only a recommended grade sent to the student's campus liaison. Thus, additional avenues of appeal may be available to a student on the home campus, depending upon how the campus liaison interprets The Washington Center's associate faculty member’s grade. In all academic matters, the director of academic affairs is the final arbiter regarding the responsibilities of The Washington Center in these matters.

If students have a problem with the instructor, the course material, class format, or other aspects of the course, they should speak with the instructor first. If speaking with the instructor is not a possible course of action, or if students choose otherwise, students should speak with the course coordinator who will arrange a conference in consultation with the director of Academic Affairs. If students wish to make a formal complaint, they must submit it in writing to the course coordinator, who will then advise the director of Academic Affairs who will be responsible to take action.

St u d e n t G ri e v a n c e s

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars
Saturday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sunday 1 p.m. – midnight Access to Internet: yes

Please note: Some academic libraries have various restrictions on the use of their facilities by outside users. It is advisable to call ahead to determine specific use policies by these libraries. D.C. Public Libraries: www.dclibrary.org/branches/index.html Arlington County Public Libraries: www.arlingtonva.us/lib/ Alexandria County Public Libraries: www.alexandria.lib.va.us/
American University Library, D.C. Bender Library and Learning Resource Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave., N.W. 202-885-3238, 202-885-3200 Mon-Wed 8 a.m. – 2 a.m., Thurs 8 a.m. – midnight, Friday 8 a.m. – 10 a.m. Saturday 9 a.m. – 9 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. – 2 a.m. Access to Internet: yes John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library, 620 Michigan Ave., N.E. 202-319-5070 Mon-Thurs 8 a.m. – 11:30 p.m., Friday 8 a.m. – 10 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. – 10 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 11:30 p.m. Access to Internet: yes 3401 N. Fairfax Dr. 703-993-8100 Mon-Thurs 9 a.m. – 11 p.m., Friday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. Access to Internet: yes

Library a nd C omput er R esource s

Joseph Mark Lauinger Library 37th St. and N St., N.W. 202-687-7452 Mon-Thurs 8:30 a.m. – midnight Friday 8:30 a.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. – 10 p.m., Sunday 11 p.m. – midnight Access to Internet: yes

G eo r g et o w n U n i v er si t y , D .C .

University Libraries:

500 Howard Place, N.W. 202-806-7252 Mon-Thurs 8 a.m. – midnight Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Sunday 12:30 p.m. – 9 p.m. Access to Internet: Yes - go to reference desk to obtain guest password. 101 Independence Ave., S.E. 202-707-5000 http://www.loc.gov/rr/ To obtain library card, go to Reader Registration Station in Jefferson Building. Need a valid ID and proof of address. Access to computer terminals.

Howard University, D.C.

Library of Congress

Catholic University, D.C.

George Mason University Law Library, A r l i ng t on

Learning Resources Division 4200 Connecticut Ave., N.W., Building 41, 5th Floor 202-274-6370 Mon-Thurs 9:00 a.m. – 9 p.m. Friday 9:00 a.m. – 6 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Sunday closed Access to Internet: yes McKeldin Library (main library) 301-405-9075 Mon-Thurs 8 a.m. – 11 p.m. Friday 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Sunday noon – 11 p.m. Access to Internet: yes

University of the District of Columbia, D.C.

University of Maryland at College Park, MD

2807 N. Glebe Road 703-284-1649 Mon – Thurs 9 a.m. – midnight Friday 9 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Marymount University, Arlington

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

DIRECTIONS TO THE WASHINGTON CENTER CLASSROOM LOCATIONS
1100 13th St. NW, Washington, D.C. The AP is at 1100 13th St. NW, at the corner at L and 13th. Nearest Metro is McPherson Square. Farragut North is also within walking distance. 620 Michigan Avenue, NE Washington, DC 20064 Take a red line train (in the direction of Glenmont) to the Brookland-CUA station. Exit to the left when leaving the station. 444 N. Capitol St. NW Washington, D.C. 20001 Take the Red Line to Union Station. Exit Union Station to the front of the building. Head right on Massachusetts Avenue for less than one block and take a left onto North Capitol Street (heading towards the U.S. Capitol). The building is on your right at 444 North Capitol Street. You will need an ID. 1475 Massachusetts Ave. NW To get there from the Orange, Blue or Red Metro lines of Farragut West or North – walk up 17th street passing K Street. Turn right onto M Street after the National Geographic Society and walk 3 blocks to Thomas Circle. Cross Massachusetts Ave at the circle. Turn left onto Massachusetts Ave and the Homewood Suites is the large building on your left. 1825 R Street NW, Washington, D.C. Metro Directons: Exit at the Dupont Circle stop (Q Street North Exit), cross over Connecticut Avenue to 19th Street (about 1 block), turn left on 19th Street to R Street, turn right on R Street, and proceed to 1825 R Street (ISH). 1529 16th Street NW, Washington DC 20036 The JCC is located one block away from the Washington Center at the corner of 16th and P. Take the Red Line to Dupont Circle. Exit at Q Street (North entrance). Walk east

Associated Press (AP)

The Catholic University of America (CUA)

Hall of States (HS)

Homewood Suites (HW)

The International Student House (ISH)

The Jewish Community Center (JCC)

12

The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

on Q Street, crossing over Connecticut Avenue. The Center is located four blocks away on Q Street at the Southeast Corner of 16th Street and Q Street. The Washington DCJCC is also accessible via the S1, S2, or S4 Metrobus. 700 12th Street NW, 10th floor, Washington, D.C. 20005

McClatchy Newspapers, Washington Bureau (McClatchy)

Take the ORANGE, RED or BLUE lines to the Metro Center Station. Exit using the 12th and G Street exit. The classroom is located on the tenth floor, but students should wait for the professor in the lobby, and he will be down at approximately 6:25 to escort the class up to the classroom. NVCC – Arlington Center 4600 North Fairfax Drive Suite 110 Arlington VA 22203 Take the metro to the Ballston Station exit. Exit the station using main exit Walk approx. 2 blocks W on N Fairfax Dr For more directions please see their website for the Arlington campus www.nvcc.edu/about-nova/maps-directions/arlington-center/index.html 1333 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 Please note: We encourage all students to type in our address (see above) into Google Maps (or a similar site) to get a sense of direction before they come to our building for the first time; Scott Circle and the various intersections of avenues can be confusing to those new to D.C. Note: Students will need to use their TWC IDs to enter the TWC Academic Center. Please use the gate on the O street side of the building. OPTION 1:

Northern Virginia Community College (NVCC)

The Washington Center (TWC)

Take the Blue or Orange Line Metro to Farragut West and exit using the 17th Street exit. Immediately turn right off the escalator onto I (Eye) Street and then turn left onto 17th Street (Farragut Square should be on your left). Follow 17th Street for about three blocks and take a right onto Rhode Island Avenue, NW (you should see the Human Rights Campaign building on your right). Follow Rhode Island Avenue for roughly a block and then follow the crosswalks that stay to the left of Scott Circle (Scott Circle should be on your right and a statue of Daniel Webster should be on your left), heading toward the Australian Embassy. Cross the two small crosswalks next to the Australian Embassy to the other side of 16th Street (Scott Circle is still on your right) and then turn left. At this point, the Australian Embassy complex should be on your left (on the other side of the street). Walk up 16th Street (you will pass the Hotel Rouge and a series of statues on your right) for about a block until you reach the corner of 16th and O Streets. The Washington Center is the large white building on the corner. Once you arrive at The Washington Center, walk along the side of the building on O Street until

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

To take the bus from Farragut West, turn right after getting off the escalator and proceed two blocks down I (Eye) Street. Cross 16th Street and immediately turn left to go up 16th Street. You can catch either the S2 or S4 bus in front of the Capital Hilton Hotel. Look for the bus stop near the corner of 16th and L Streets. You can get a bus transfer (free within the District) when you enter the Metro Station or you can use your Smart Card. If you are coming from outside the District, there is a $.35 charge for the transfer, which can be automatically deducted from a Smart Card. Once on the bus, get off at the P Street stop, which is the next stop after the underpass. Make a right and walk 1 block to the corner of 16th and O Streets. The Washington Center building is at the corner of 16th and O Streets. Once you arrive at The Washington Center, walk along the side of the building on O Street until you see a gate next to the main building. Enter the gate and take the first door on your left on the ground floor to enter the Academic Center Classroom Building. There are two classrooms on the ground floor and three on the second floor. You will need to have your Washington Center ID to enter the building.

you see a gate next to the main building. Enter the gate and take the first door on your left on the ground floor to enter the Academic Center Classroom Building. There are two classrooms on the ground floor and three on the second floor. You will need to have your Washington Center ID to enter the building.

OPTION 2:

Make a right and walk 1 block to the corner of 16th and O Street. The Washington Center building is at the corner of 16th and O Street. Once you arrive at The Washington Center, walk along the side of the building on O Street until you see a gate next to the main building. Enter the gate and take the first door on your left on the ground floor to enter the Academic Center Classroom Building. There are two classrooms on the ground floor and three on the second floor. You will need to have your Washington Center ID to enter the building.

If you choose to ride the bus from McPherson Square, cross I (Eye) Street and turn right and cross Vermont St. to catch either the S2 or S4 Metro Bus. There is a bus stop sign on the corner. You can get a bus transfer (free within the District) when you enter the Metro Station or you can use your Smart Card. If you are coming from outside the District, there is a $.35 charge for the transfer, which can be automatically deducted from a Smart Card. Once on the bus, get off at the P Street stop, which is the next stop after the underpass.

Take the Blue or Orange Line Metro to McPherson Square. Take the McPherson Square exit. Go up the escalator and turn around so you are at the corner of Vermont and I (Eye) Street. NW. If you choose to walk (about 12-15 minutes), turn left on I Street and walk toward 16th St. Turn right on 16th St. and walk 5 blocks, around Scott Circle, until you reach the corner of 16th and O Street NW. Once you arrive at The Washington Center, walk along the side of the building on O Street until you see a gate next to the main building. Enter the gate and take the first door on your left on the ground floor to enter the Academic Center Classroom Building. There are two classrooms on the ground floor and three on the second floor. You will need to have your Washington Center ID to enter the building.

14
OPTION 3:

The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

Take the Red Line Metro to Dupont Circle. Take the South (Dupont Circle) Exit. When you exit the escalator, turn around and face the Circle. Walk counterclockwise (to the right) around the circle until you get to Massachusetts Ave. Walk 3 blocks east along Massachusetts Ave until you come to Scott Circle. Make a left on 16th St. Cross to the east side of 16th St at the next available crossing (O Street). Turn right and proceed back toward the Circle until you get to the corner of 16th and O Street. Once you arrive at The Washington Center, walk along the side of the building on O Street until you see a gate next to the main building. Enter the gate and take the first door on your left on the ground floor to enter the Academic Center Classroom Building. There are two classrooms on the ground floor and three on the second floor. You will need to have your Washington Center ID to enter the building

Please remember to have a government-issued ID on you at all times. outside of our offices for the convenience of students. The Washington Center does not endorse or otherwise necessarily support the companies or institutions at which these classes are held. Note: The Washington Center provides these classroom locations

WASHINGTON CENTER COURSES - SUMMER 2009
S T 0 9 - 3 0 23 ST09- 3 1 2 3 - 0 1 ST09- 3 3 4 3 - 0 2 ST09- 3 3 6 3 ST09- 3 3 7 3 ST09- 3 4 3 3 ST09- 3 5 0 3 ST09- 4 1 2 3 ST09- 4 1 5 3 ST09- 4 3 0 3 C O UR S E S IN I NT E RN A T I O NA L A F F A IR S A N D F O RE I G N P O L IC Y
How Washington Really Works: U.S. Foreign Policy Making U.S. Foreign Policy in the 21st Century: Dynamics of Change (Section 1) U.S. Foreign Policy in the 21st Century: Dynamics of Change (Section 2) International Human Rights Conflict, Violence, and War Dangerous Women? Women, Pandemics, and Human Rights! Hunger, Poverty, and Powerlessness: U.S. and Developing World U.S. And China in the 20th and 21st Centuries Public Diplomacy Challenges: The United States and Developing Countries Ethics in International Affairs

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

S T 0 9 - 3 3 43 ST09- 3 3 8 2 S T 0 9 - 3 3 83 ST09- 3 4 1 3 S T 0 9 - 3 4 43 ST09- 3 9 1 3

C O UR S E S IN A N T HR O P O L O G Y , T H E A R T S , A ND T H E HU M A NI T I E S

Peaceful Solutions: An Alternative to Violence Scandalous Washington: Uncovering D.C. History A Taste of D.C.: Exploring Washington’s Culture and Cuisine D.C. In film and TV: People, Places, and Processes Religion and Global Politics Nonprofit Leadership and Management

C O UR S E S IN C O M MU NI C A T I O NS S T 0 9 - 3 2 33
ST09- 3 4 8 0 - 0 1 ST09- 3 4 8 0 - 0 2 ST09- 4 4 8 3 ST09-4 4 9 4

Campaigning for a Cause: Changing the National and the World, One Big Issue at a Time Media, Ethics, and the Movies (Section 1) Media, Ethics, and the Movies (Section 2) The Mass Media and National Politics: How the Washington Press Corps Works Press, Politics, and Power

C O UR S E S IN P U B LI C P O LI C Y IS S U E S S T 0 9 - 3 6 83 S T 0 9 - 4 5 43

Issues of Immigration and Contemporary Debates Science, Society, and Policy

ST09-3417-01 ST09-3417-02 ST09-3553 ST09-3563 ST09-3593 ST09-4583

C O UR S E S IN A M E RI C A N P O L I T I CS

Power, Politics, and Prose (Section 1) Power, Politics, and Prose(Section 2) The Road to the White House: Presidential Elections The Congressional Arena: Practical Problems and Impact Strategies Ethics and the U.S. Congress How Washington Really Works: Government and Business in the New Economic and Political Reality

16
ST09-3783-01 ST09-4603-02 ST09-4283 ST09-4603

The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars
Introduction to Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure (Section 1) Introduction to Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure (Section 2) International Organizations and International Humanitarian Law Our Living Constitution

C O UR S E S IN L A W A ND C RI M IN A L J US T IC E

SS09-3603 ST09-4623

C O UR S E S IN H O M E LA N D O R N A T I O NA L S E C UR I T Y

Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: Historical Perspectives and Current Policy Managing the American Intelligence Community

ST09-2203

C O UR S E S O N LE A D E RS H I P

ST09-3743-01

Sophomore Experience: Leadership and Professional Development (only for students who are enrolled in the sophomore exploration program) Essential Leadership: Creating Change in the Obama Era

C O UR S E S IN I NT E RN A T I O NA L B U S IN E S S S T 0 9 - 3 8 03 ST09- 3823

Global Markets and International Business Strategies International Business: The Middle East

ST09-3813 ST09-4883

C O UR S E S IN B U S IN E S S

Ethical Behavior in Organization From Ideas to Action: The Anatomy of Entrepreneurship

ST09-4983

C O U R S E S I N R E S E AR C H

Research and Writing Seminar

ST09-4543

C O UR S E S IN S C IE N CE , T E C HN O L O G Y , E NG IN E E RI N G , A N D MA T H
Science, Society, and Policy

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

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The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

1333 16th Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20036-2205 Phone: 202.238.7900 http://www.twc.edu Fax: 202.238.7700 info@twc.edu

The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

© Copyright 2008 The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

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