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II{TRODUCTIO}I
This book is my approach to the basic blues pattern. It includesHalf Step and II minor 7 V Dominant 7 movements,Diminished and V chord substitutions,and varied ways of comping. It also includessomeextensions on the chords,which will improve your overall soundand approachto playing blueschanges. This book will be one of a seriesof books introducing the many common chord patterns that exist in most standard piecesof music. Accompanying this will be a series of melodies and improvised lines to these patternsso you can seehow melodic linesare built and fit the various chord patterns. I chosethe bluesto begin with because it is a very basicpattern that we all knoq so it will be easyto seethe substitutionsas they appear.Once you get the idea of how the patterns and substitutionswork, you can then use theseideasin other songs.With the tape you can hear how the progressions fit together.I hope to simplify and explain how harmoniesand chord forms work on the guitar. This should help you understandsubstitutionsand how theywork. You should take each substitution and practiceit in every key until it becomesautomatic in your fingering and thought process.Then go to the next substitution. It is important to be able to play and move thesechord forms and their ideasfreely in everykey. Because of certain chord fingerings, there are unwanted notes that will sound if you use a pick. I play all examplesin this book finger style. This enablesyou to play only the notesyou want. If you usea pick you may have to refingersomechords. I would like to thank my good friend and fellow guitarist Denny Hardwick for spendingmany hours formulating the material in this book. His help is deeplyappreciated and I'm looking forward to working with him on r34r out next project.

CREDITS: Sound Editor: Dcnny Ha¡dwick TochnicalConsultanu Mark Hill Photos taken by Norman Jambson at Stanford Sicrra Carnp, Fallen Lcaf Lakc, Cdifornia.

) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) )
Copyright O 1979 by Charles Hansen tI of California, Inc., West Los Angeles, Calif. 90025 Alt Rights Reserved International Copyright Secured Made in U.S.A.

TABLEOF CONTENTS
Drrrt'Clorú Forms I 2 3 4 ......5 II V Chord Progression ...... ..ll .....13 . .14 . . 16 . . .l7 .....18 . . 19 ......20 6 8 9 ...10

b( U lcr Blrcs in F And Extensions f rrc{t¡¡ ?ü Chords . . . TLc Trn Around Trrr.{ro¡ndChordslnF. Dorirut Substitution - The Standard M Hdf Stcp Substitution SilkingB¡sslineTurnAround fXninbhedSubstitution Rcvicr' t'ChordSubstitution Il MinorT V DominantTsubstitution . II MinorT V DominantT ProgressionsWith New Resolutions . II llinorr bsy DominantT bqProgression . U s c O f I I M i n o r T V T F o r H a r m o n i c l n t e r e. s.t II MinorT V7 And Voicings t b i c i n g E x a m p l e s. .

II Minor7 v7 And Hatf Step . t hsl Substirution
Review The OneGrip Blues C o m p i n g W i tA hPianoAndBass 2 And 3 NoteChords pssVToGrab4NoteChords....: TraditionalRhythm And The Charleston Beat(LayedBack) GroovingOn The Blues Vsriations On The Charleston Beat Find Review And Conclusion

. . . .22
. .24 . .25 .....26 . . . . . .27 ....28 . . .29 . . . 30 . . . . 3l . . .32

a a a a
I
I
¡ : t D t h E!

rx)ttrNANT 7th cHoRD FORITIS
F-. t :> tqr of F, coasisrs of rhrecchordchanges. Th€yareFt, B b7,and c7. Thc blues .¡ rrr átfctd Fncrns. We arc, in this book, working from the familiar 12 bar blucs sr b* ¡:t tL bñic do&in¡nt ?th chord forms that are usedin the first cxamplcof the Basic c-b.F-orhqrp.tc. t> F . l;', Dd C?chord forms a¡ederivedfrom üe F scale.That is; F is üe I chord, Sb is Oe fr #. d C b r.bc V cüord. See thediagran directlybelow.

t
I I

I

a
I D

a I

9:
t3
lI
F7 ¡s rrcferred to as the I chord.

7--.

I ls

t tx I

n,t 1lja
f4

2t3F++i+i :F BbTisrcferedro¡srhervchofd.

?

t5 D
I 2 3 4 5
) ) )

C7 is referred to as the V chold.

Note:X = MutedString;O: OpenString.

IN F BASICT2BAR BLTIES

2IV

1I

Bb?
sIV

Bb? óIV (Bb?) c7
EI

F7

c7

c7

EXTENSIONS
By adding extensionsto thesebasic 7th chords, you can immediately changethe color of your playing. Someextensions,including 9th's, raised9th's A#\ l3th's and suspensions, are illustrated on the oppositepage.Below is an exampleof the l}bar bluesusing thesechords.

rI

2

3I

1I

Bbe
sIV

Bbe
6tv
7I

F13
8l

F13

c?#e

(Bhe) c?ile

r.13

c7

) )

t
)

EXTL\DED 7rhCTTORDS (BrIrES rN F)

t 2 3 4 5

4

THETTJRNAROUND
The last two measuresof the blues is consideredthe turn around. The basic turn around as seenin the precedingtwo examplesis:

(F13) FT

(c?*e) c?

To add harmonic interest to this basic turn around, G7 preceedsC7.(To play G?, simply move the F7chord form up two frets)

To add more h'a¡monic interest, D7 would preceedG1 (To play D7, simply moye üe C7 chord form up two fretsl THE STA¡TI'ARI' I YI II Y TI.JRN AROUND

F7

G7

Now working from the standard I, VI, II, V Tt¡rn Around, extensionsof thesechords are used for color. A new form for G7 seenat the top of the opposite page, is usedin this turn around.

r13

(Csus)

ozüg

Csuspended

TrrRNAROUNDCHORDS (rN r)

C(srr)

DONfiNANT SI]BSTITUTION THE STANDARD I, YI, II, V CHORD PROGRESSION
Now we haveseenhow the standard I, VI, II, V chordscan be substitutedin the I, V turn around. The sameprinciple is usedin the precedingF7and C7chords. Below is the l2bar blues - the upper line is the basic chord pattern. The lowerline illustrates zubstitutions and extensions.The subsütutions in bars 7 thru l0 use the sameprinciple as is used in bars ll and 12. Seeoppositepage.

BASIC PAITERN F7

Bb?
2IV

F7

F7

,

rI NEWPAITERN F13

3I

4I

A

Bbe
IV

F13

F13

BASIC PAITERN

sIV

6 IV

8I

D7ile

BASICPATTERN

ev
NE\WPATTERN

u I

l2V

G7

F13

Uüg

c?

C?ilg

'a:.,q...W 7

Oo thc fcceding page is what is considerd to be the "Standard Changes" a Jatr. player would rt la tbc Hu¡. Tb.isis the "New Patternl'The "Basic Pattern" would be used in Rock, Folk, or dtr dndcr forms of music. Tbc "!icr Pattern" will now be referred to as "Standard Changesl' and will be used as a basis fc dl n¡h¡itutions to come.

In measures 7 to 10, the Basicchordsare 8 beatsapiece,usingthe I, and V chords.

BASIC

HI
l a 7

F7

C7

c7
lo

v

v

The Standard Changes are 4 beats apiece, when used as substitution chords for the I, and V chords.

STANDARD F?

D7
8VI

G7

c7
lov

The exact principle is used in the turn'around chords. The number of beatsper chord is cut in half; F? for 4 beats,and C7 for 4 beats.
?

: HALF STF,PSI]BSTITUTION
The half step substitution preceedseach new measure by starting Yz step above or belorrythe chord in the new measur€.When proceeding from tbe Vzstep substin¡tion to the next chord it is best to keepthe samevoicing, or chord form, in your movement. The following is an extreme example of half step substitr¡üon. Let your ears guide you as to the proper time and place for this substitution. New chords are ilh¡strated below.

F13

B9

Bbe
2IV

F$fB F1s
3I

813
4I

Fl3

B9
7

Bbe
6IV

F$13

Fl3

Dü?il9 ü#g
EVI

G$7

sIV G?

7I

C$7ü9c?*e

F*13 F13

Cil?üec?ile

I

2 3 4 5

Et3

t 2 3 4 5

WALKII{G BASSLIh{E TUR¡I AROUhID
Here is a good three note chord voicing as used in the turn around, taking advantage of tt¡: new haií srepsubstitution.Notice the "walking bassline" this substitution provides.
IJ

Dt7

a7
VI

G$7
l2

G?

c*7

C7

F$7

u

V

Uscüis form, or voicing for F7,F#7,G7,and G#7.

t 2 3 4 5

Usethis form, or voicing for C7,C#7 , D7,and D#7.

t 2 3 4 5

Now, by adding extensions, you can change the color of the "walking bass line" turn around.

F13
a

Eb7$9

orf,g
VI

Ab13
t2

Gl3

Db7ilg c?#e
V

F$r3

u

DIIUINISHED SI]BSTITUTION
The Bo (B diminished) chord (as shown below) connectsthe IV chorci Gb ) with the I chord (FI The Bois usedeither on the last, or next to last beat of the IV chord before it goesto the I chord.

Gl3

Csus

t 2 3 4 5

REVIEW
So fer tbcre bevebcco ñve waysto changethe BasicI, IV V, bluespattern. t. AatS Elc¡sions a- 9th's b. Raiscd9th's A#e) c. l3th's d. Suspended chords 2. Altering the turn around a. r7 I C;to F7/ cl C?;to F7D7 / G7C7 to the altered turn around b. Adding extensions 3. Dominant Substituüon a. f, tr7 / e / C;toF7 /D7 / cl / c7 4. H¡lf StepSubstitution a. SubstitutingVzstepaboveor belowthe chord of eachnew measure 5. DiminishedSubstitution a. Replacingthe last I or 2 beats of the IV chord (Bb) with Bo as a connectingchord before returning to the I chord (FI Practiceeachof the abovesubstitutionsin all keysuntil you feel comfortablewith it. Then intermix all of the substitutions,taking advantage of everyextensionpossible.Let your earsdecidewhich ¿ue acceptable.

Below is an example of inter-mixing of substitutions,as played by Joe. Some chords in this examplehavenot yet beencovered.

Fl3

rf,rs

F13
7

813

Bb13

813

Bb13
I

BO

F/c

ebz#s

nrlf;gcf rs

c#ts

c13 cüg ce F{13

omtbs c*mzbs

c? De#5 c$e c?bb rü rg

WCONTINTJED
Below are some examples of adding different substitutions. We now leave the key of F, *l ,r. going to uscthe key of C. This is so you can get an idea of how substituiions are usedin other keys. Again, theseexamplescontain somechords not yet illustrated.

(addmaiT)

DbG,b

c6rb A?#bbe Eb13

üt +.hJIl c13

Gl3susnbZf,g

cl1 ob$firrcmaje

I

a a a a a a a a a a
I

r3

Y CHORD SUBSTITUTIOI\
a-:r -r*' o--r! -i 3 ;¡¡r-f_-E a l Jtu1ído . r a l V c h o r d f o r l o r 2 m e a s u r e s ,y o u c a n s u b s t i t u t e t h e V l t o r ¿ o f :-._1¿¡ lu.í I Or ] bcats.

*¡:l

-t e: cr-r-nnple oi substitutingthe V of the I chord for 2 beats.

tl3

Bbe

F13

F13

a a
t t t
I
Tlc nert erample shows the V of the IV chord for I beat. This also uses an extension of the sr*:iution chord. Again, try to extendyour chords wheneverpossible.

t t t t t t t t
I I

F7$5$e

t t t
I I

F7i5i9
I 2 3 4 5

t t t
I
,

t
D t D I
)

e

t t

II MINONÍ, V DOMINANTT SI]BSTITUTION
Thp II Mino/ V DominantT progressionis usually referred to as a II V progression.The II rniil of a given major scale.That is, C7 is the V chord and and V7 chords are derived from scaledegrees Gmiil is the II chord in the F scale.

u
'

A UI

Bb IV

c v

D VI

E

vtl

You may substitute the II chord along with the V chord. Here is an earlier example, using the V chord substitution,then adding the IIminT chord just before the V chord. Then the V chord resolves back to the I chord. This II V is in the key of F. Notice the Ceis just an extensioh of the C7chord.

D D O D D D D

!ü¡l cúridcr rhe tV chord (B b I Here is the Bb scale.Notice the II and V chords.

Bb t

c n

ru

D

Eb
IV

F V

G VI

A VII

Bb
I

!b- üc Y cñord is F7, and the II chord is Cmin7. As before, the IIminT chord is placed just tL Y cüord- Thc¡ üe V resolvesto the I. H¡l

Fsus F7

TEMPORARY I

Bbe

L KeY of BbJ
To undcrsta¡rdthe use of this substitution, you must realize the I chord TEMPORARILY bocs Bt . This is called a key center.The chordsprecedingthe temporary I chord are labeledin rd¡rioo to üat I chord, rather than to the original key. This subsütution should be handled with care. Again, let your ears be the final judge as to rtahcr rbesubstitutionis proper.

F(sus)

16

II MINONÍ Y DOIUII\ANT7 PROGRESSIONS WITH NEW RESOLUTIONS
Sometimes, when a new key centerseems to be established, in the new key the II V progression doesnot resolveto the temporary I chord. In the eÍample below, the chordspreceding the Bb e in bar 2 seemto be establishing the temporarykey of E. (F#min1 Beis in the key of E} But insteadof resolving to E, Bemovesa Vz stepto gb e.

F$m789

FfmT

-Key

of EJ

The II V progression may resolÉ directly into anotherII V asin the examplebelow. This is a very popular bluesprogression. Study it and transpose it into everykey. This will help you understand work. how II V progressions

Key of G

Gm7
7ttz,J

c9
-

Am7
u

D9

Gm7
r2

C9
V

l0v

v

tr ÜflNoil btv rloh'flNAhli'Tb'PR0GRESSION
ro another II V can be madeinto a tlmiil bt *d yz be,tthen a II V that progress€s tn sooc czreg5 r3¡ohr3ro rbc ncrt chord. Thescchordsmay be usedin the turn around.

Am7b6
ntr

D7b9
V Key o f G

Gm?

c9
V Key of F ,

I

IV

Am735

t 2 3 4 5

t 2 3 4 5

r8

USE OF IIMiNTV FOR HAR}IONIC INTEREST
Considerthe first 6 bars of the blues. F13 l

rI F13

2rv Bbe

I

Bbe

The first logical placefor a IIminT V7 is in bar 4 asit progresses to B b .

Bbe
rI
IV I

Cm7

Bbe

Bbe

Key of Bb
the II V in bar 4. The next logical placefor a II V would preceed TEMPORARY I chord for IImiil v7 (Dminz 613¡is Cmiil.

Dm7
IV
3 t

G13
Keyof C

Bbe

Bbe

I

Keyof Bb

'

to you haveto makethe chordyou aregoingto resolve Remember, to find the II V progression, e I the TEMPORARYI chord. In the last example 5) arethe temporary Cmid(bar 4I and Bb

b' tr MINOil bt V DOIWNANf AND YOIüNGS
bsyz beptogrtssion- Theseare gtod Fc üffcrcnr color, a II V precedingbar 3 will usea IIminT v(iintr h¡ rbcn placcdncxt to üe DminTthey don't sound proper. Seethe next pagefor voicings.

Fl3

Em7b5

A7b9

D'nt7

cl3

Cm?

F13

Bbe

Bbe

Em7'?5

5 6 7 8 I

4 5 6 7

¡l4t

20

VOIüNGEXAMPLES
Th" The voicings on this page have the top note on the first string, in a descending-*n3. previous page had the top note jumping from the flrrst string to the second string, therefore the voicings.did not soundright.
I

A?be

Dm9

G7*5be

G7# 509
I

a a t o a a a o o a a o I o
¡

rD I

o a a a a a a a a a a a a a a

Tlc -¡: II V rould s-orrlc in bar 6. This would connect the first and last 6 bars of the blues 'r¡:í-: I- '-\'r J¡.s.. ralher than resolving to a temporary I, the II V progression resolves down a Vz É+ - r.(:s ll \ ¡o¡rcssion.

Tbc completel}bar bluesnow sounds like this, usingII V substitutions.

E m ?b 5

A?be

Dmg

czfisbg

Cm9

I D I D:

t:
, ) ) ) ) ): ): )

D

Gm7

c?f,e

cTbe

Am?

orfg

cTbe

22

NVANDHALFSTEP( b 5) SUBSTITUTIOI{
Considerthe first 2 bars.

Em?b5

:4
¡tl

:r
¡fl

:q

:1

down Vz stepto Dmine.This is alsoa bS Now addingthe half stepsubstitution,E beb5resolves (E b is the b S of e) substitution.

:# r1 :q ¡il
3il
3-l
3fl

E m ?b 5

czilsbg

:q 3rl
4 e-l 4 q 4 4 4 4 4 j7

rt
i

EcgCs
4 5
ó

7 I

jl J-1

n
3l 3l

:1

like this. Thecomplete l2 bar bluesusingthe II V and half step( b5) substitution now sdunds

Em?bb A?beEb9b5 Drie c?{sbg Dbgb5cmg F?*sbg BgbS

Bbm?

c?#e

Noticethe Half stepturn around.

The additionof onemore II V usedas a half stepsubstitution, shouldmakeyou awareof mostof the usesof II V substitutions, as usedin the blues.Noticethe II V's in bars6 thru 9 resolvedown in half steps. of connecting Be sureto change of chords,whilebeingconscious all extensions keys,and practice the top note asclosely for good voicemovement. aspossible

obgbs Em?bbA?benbsbsDme c?ilsbg

sbgsgbs F?#

24
Jr 1ú ¡Í ¡. ¡¡

REYIEW
'Since page ll, we have addedfive new ways to alter the blues.Also includedare tips origooo voicings. l. Y Chord Substitution a. Substitutionthe V chord for one or two beats. 2. II Minof V Domin¡nt7Substitution a. Using the II Mino/ and V Dominant?and resolvingto the temporary I chord. 3. II V's ¡nd New Resolutions a. Using the II V and resolvingdown a Vz step b. Usingthe II V and resolving to anotherII V. bt 4. II Mino/ bsyz subrtitution a. Replacing a II v with II Mino/ bs yz b, in the turn around. ", 5. lI V and Hatf Srept bSl Subsrirurion a. Using a II MinT bs yz bt artd for the last beat of yz be use a b5 substitution. After reviewingall substitutions, take the examples below and study them in the original key. Thenchange keysusingthe same alterations. Here are two of Joe'sversions of the blues.

Fe rfig Ft3 B1s Bbls

Bbl
3

F?#e

C?f,sB?

rzf sfig
5

Flc

¡^bzbs

G?

obz*s

cls r#zfig rzfg nb ryfig eb

Db Csus rf zbs

rf ts F13
l

Flc

F13sus

'rzf sfg
5

Bbe c?#e cilz$s oz#gnbz#g E?üe rz*g sz sbg E?
6

enbs r,Tbe ezf sfig Ebe ulügfs Abl
c13 rf,g

Gl3

obg# s

sz#s$g

7a
-

a a a a ,.--_
-t-

THE OI{EGRIPBLUES
Compare rhe Frngerings of F7#e and É13.
----\.

-D-

-I^YI

f--t

I

v

- - t - J t

rD rt
¡D

a a t a t a
El

m >-/
a a a I a a o
t t
I I

a
o

a

i

Tbc only differenceis in the bassnote. The rest of the chord remainsthe same.As in the followc¡'mple, the bluesmay be playedusing the half stepsubstitutionand these"One Grip" chord

fúDs-

Frtg

813

Bb13

F?#e

c13

F?#e

813

Gl3

Db13
l0

c13

rfzilg
u

F?#e

r#z*g

F?#e
t2

c?#e

I

26

COMPING - WITH A PIANO AND BASS
Comping is a word used to describeaccompanying,or playing chords while another instrument or voice has the melody. When first confrontedwith accompanyrng a pianist, whetherhe is playing the melody,or soloing, much care must be taken to not get in his way. You may be playing too much rhythmically or harmonically. The piano player won't mind if you layout (not play) right at first. This will give you time to listen, and take in the following considerations. 1. LISTEN to the harmonic structurethe pianist uses.Below are somepossibilitiesto consider. a. b. c. d. e. f. Doeshe useraised9th (7#) sounds? Doeshe usea lot of half stepmovement? Doeshe usel3th sounds? (7#5)sounds? Doeshe useaugmented Doeshe usedominant cycles(D7/ G7/C7 etc.)? Doeshe useII V substitutions?

2. Considerthe fact that he has 88 keysand l0 fingers.After you kno% more or less,
what his harmonic designis, then build your chord voicingson top of his, using the top 3 or 4 strings. You can also play 2 and 3 note chordson the inside strings.Full chords,with the bassnote on the 6th string, often soundmuddy. This is why, when compingwith a piano and bass,the top stringsand voicingsare best.

3. Rhythm should be your next consideration.Most pianists are used to being the
dominant player, and would prefer that you play a simple rhythmic figure or play sparingly. This is a good practice; you have more time to listen to what everyone elseis doing. Then if you needto comeon strong, you havethe room. 4. Dynamics (how loud you play), are ALWAYS a concern. This can either make or break the soloist. If you start out nice and eas¡ and build as the momentum builds, you can help, and actually be part of the climax of his solo. In review, the most important thing to do is LISTEN! Take the time to do so. The music will dictate what harmoniesand rhythms you should play.

TWO AI\D THREE NOTE CHORDS
Wbcn compint, it is often a good idea to use fewer notesin your chords. It is evenpossibb to o(mp riü 6¡c Dotc.But to get the soundof the changingchords,you needtwo notes,the 3rd, and 7th of c -r¡ cüord. Noticc üat in the two and three note chord examplesbelow, you need only move Vz ¡¡rp ro ch.nSc cüords. The 3, and 7 aboveeachdiagram indicate which are the 3rd and 7th.

xx

xx

xx

xx

tI

xx

xx

xx

xx

FFFF
F?

P,b?
2

F?

F?

I

Bb?

Bb?

F7

F7

ü7

G7

C7

Now take the following raised9th and I

're) F7fre
;\ff
. l

-/

\---¿ x - xx ó

( Bpr3)
x

7 I I

ffi#

#F
-\rT-t

'4,

\L v

2a

EASY TO GRAB 4 I\OTE CHORDS
It is alwaysimportantwhencomping,to play easyto grab chord forms. Shouldyou hit a note that clashes in your chord, it will be easyto change. Here are someeasyto grab 4 note chord forms. Incorporatethese chordsinto your playingright away-They aregood comping,as well asgood melodychords.

q .1 .1 .1 ¡1 ¡1 .1 .1
f-a

11

XX
5 ó

Bb I3{sdCa}

5
ó

7 8

ct3

A \\'ORD ON TRADITIONALRHYTHM
\A ere available,the guitaristin big bands had to have as much volume as for the guitar to usethe bottom stringsin their chord voicingsso necessarl' be heardover the horns,strings,and the rest of the rhythm section. l -:.: -.\:tl::g sr¡'le$ as " four to the baC' or one strum to eachbeat. This is how the traditional .:. . . :' :..:i;ing uas developed.For good exposure to this style, listen to Django Reinhart, Charlie ( - . - . : . . : : : :a . i : dF r e d d i e Green.

a
t

a

THE CHARTESTOI\ BEAT (I-AYED BACK)
The Charleston beat is useful in helping develop a senseof rhythm. It is also good for settling dou'n the rh¡hm section, if there is a tendencyfor people to rush, or if the beat becomesunsteady. This beat will 9 out of 10 times get things into a groove. Try to feel this groove. The first beat is longer than an eighth note, but not quite a quarter note. The secondbeat is not played exactly on the up-beat;it is layed back, or delayed.

Bbe

30

GROOYING ON THE BLIIES
Onceyou have"the groovef' play the bluesusingthis beat. At first usethe most basicchords,or ones you can grab easily, becauseyour only concern at this point should be to find the rh¡hmic groove.Remember, you may change by usingextensions the color of your playing.

Note: Simile meanscontinuethe samerhythm.

It is beyond the scopeof this book to cover all the possibilities in rhythmic patterns.The following pagehas someexamplesmade from basic "grooves." You should learn them and usethem as a point of departure,or as a basisfor rhythmic improvisation. If you get only one pattern that you can feel and groove on, stay with it. Finding the groove primarily on how much you arelistening.Remember, depends Listen!

VARIAIIONS OI'{ THE CHARLESTON BEAT
beat.Studythe rhythms.Then pickJust of variationson the Charleston Bdon are someexamples om bar üar -voulike, and pracriceit through the bluesuntil you have it. Then pick anottler and add ücm together. cr-eat¡¡all¡-

F9

Bb13

F9

ril tr

F13

813

t

Bbl3

813

Bbe

go

Flc ebz#s A?fi5Db ulilg c?

G?

Dbg Csus C11Ff maj? Fo

Eb ry#g Ab c?

Db13 C13 Fil13F13

F 1 3 r # g # SF 1 3 8 1 3
2

Bbl3

E

Fe rüg*s F?fie Fe#s
3

B.7b5

813 Bb? (add9)

Bb13Ab13

Bb13

6o

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End of recording

32

FINALREVIEW
Hereis a summaryof the variouswaysto change the basicI, IV V bluespattern. l. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Page#2; Adding extensions. Page#4; Altering the turn around. Page#6; Dominantcyclesubstitution. Page #8; Half stepsubstitution. Page #10;Diminished substitution. Page #13;V chordsubstitution. Page #14;II minorTV dominantT substitution. besubstitution. Page #17;IlminorTbi V dotninantT Page#22;IlminorT bt V do*inantT bsand half step( b5) substitution.

Here is a summaryof thingsto consider whencomping.(Pages 26 thru 3l). l. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Listen! Find the harmonicdesign. Voiceyour chordson top of the piano. Alwaysbe awareof dynamics. Useeasyto grab 2, 3, and 4 notechord voicings. Userh¡hmic figures,suchasthe Tiaditional, or the Charleston beats.

CONCLUSION
Takethe abovewaysto alter the blues,and let your earsguideyou as to which of the substitutions and rhythms to use. Sometimesit is best to use the most basic approach. This dependson the situation, the atmosphere, and the players. Experience is undoubtedlythe best teacheryou will find. Bear in mind that all good playershad to work hard to get wherethey are. to playing and harmonic approaches I hope this book helpsyou understandsomeof the concepts the guitar.

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{ ;:::: i;r r¡hich a composition is written or played.The first note of a series of : -':c: íorning an¡'givenmajor or minor scale. PageI ( Lord Chenges or Pattern- Refers to a series of chordsin a particularorder.PageI (Lord Form or Voicing - The way in which the notes or voicesare arrangedand ::::rbured in a chord. Page I I ('bord Being the first chordof a major scale. PageI l\ Cbord - Beingrhe fourth chordof a major scale. PageI \ ('bord - Beingthe fifth chord of a major scale. PageI l-rtctsions - Adding higher scaledegrees to a basic chord. Example:making a 7th -'iord into a 9th, l lth or 13thchord.Page2 ('of or - The soundof a chord or chordpattern . Page2 Tr¡-nAround - The last two bars(l I and 12 of the blues)beforereturningto the beginning of the pattern.Page4 H¡rmonic Interest- That whichmakes the chordsmore pleasing or interesting. Page4 - The commonway to play a particularchord pattern.Page6 sr¡nd¡rd Changes rrrlking BassLine - Movementof the bassnote of a chord.Page9 II Vinor 7 v Dominant 7- Beingthe second and fifth chordsof a major scale. Page14 Temporarf'I- Temporarilymakingany chord a I chord.Page15 f,e¡ Center - When a chord progression temporarilychanges keys.Page15
Tnnspose - To change keys. Poge 16 'r bs tl Vinor V Dominant 7 bg - Being the altered secondand fifth chords of a major scale.Page I7 Fl¡rrened Fifth ( bs) - The fifth degree of a major scale being lowered Vz step in a

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'alterediPage22 chord; thus, the chord becomes Comping- Accompanying or playingchordswhile anotherinstrumentor voicehasthe melody.Page26 and 29 Hrrmonic Design- The useof particularchordsin a particularorder.Page26 R.h¡lbmicFigure- A rhythmicpatternor motif . Page26 degrees of intensityor loudness. h nemics- Varnng and contrasting Page26 Groove- A feel for a rhythmicpattern.Page29
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