P. 1
Automata

Automata

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Published by: kirivarnan on May 31, 2009
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05/13/2013

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When input is a:
δ(E, a)

=
=
=
=

δN({3,4,6,7,8,9}, a)
{5}
{5, 8, 9, 3, 4, 6}
{3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9}(ascending order) (D)

When input is b:
δ(E, b)

=
=
=
=

δN({3,4,6,7,8,9}, b)
{7}
{7, 8, 9, 3, 4, 6}
{3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9}(ascending order) (E)

Since there are no new states, we can stop at this point and the transition table
for the DFA is shown in table 2.15.

Table 2.15 Transitional table

The states C,D and E are final states, since 9 (final state of NFA) is present in C, D
and E. The final transition diagram of DFA is shown in figure 2.36

Fig. 2.36 The DFA

δ

a

b

A

B

-

B

-

C

D

E

D

E

D

E

C
D

E

E

D

C

B

b

a

b

a

A

a

b

b

a

13

Regular Languages

Regular expression

Definition: A regular expression is recursively defined as follows.

1. φ is a regular expression denoting an empty language.
2. ε-(epsilon) is a regular expression indicates the language containing an
empty string.
3. a is a regular expression which indicates the language containing only {a}
4. If R is a regular expression denoting the language LR and S is a regular
expression denoting the language LS, then
a. R+S is a regular expression corresponding to the language LRULS.
b. R.S is a regular expression corresponding to the language LR.LS..
c. R* is a regular expression corresponding to the language LR*

.
5. The expressions obtained by applying any of the rules from 1-4 are regular
expressions.

The table 3.1 shows some examples of regular expressions and the language corresponding
to these regular expressions.

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