A SEMINAR ON

GENERAL CONNECTIONS IN STEEL BUILDINGS

Presentation by

V. ANIL KUMAR
Roll No. 0109-11109 2nd Semester M.E. Structural Eng.

Under the guidance of

Mrs. D. ANNAPURNA
Asst. Professor

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING (AUTONOMOUS) OSMANIA UNIVERSITY, HYDERABAD

1

CERTIFICATE
 

This is to certify that, this is a bonafide record of the seminar presentation entitled “General Connections in Steel Buildings” carried out by Mr. V. ANIL KUMAR bearing Roll no. 0109-11109, of II Semester, M. E. (Structural Engineering), during the academic year 2008-2009 in partial fulfillment of academic requirements.
   

  Guide    Mrs. D. Annapurna  External Examiner 

Asst. Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering

CONTENTS
Page No.

CERTIFICATE

SYNOPSIS

INTRODUCTION

01

IMPORTANCE

01

COMPONENTS OF A CONNECTION

02

CLASSIFICATION OF CONNECTIONS

02

DISCUSSION AND REVIEW

03-12

CONCLUSIONS

13

USEFULL INDIAN STANDARD PUBLICATIONS

13

REFERENCES
 

14

A Seminar on 
GENERAL CONNECTIONS IN STEEL BUILDINGS
Synopsis
Nowadays the use of structural steel in building construction has increased due to its aesthetic appearance, ease of fabrication and faster erection time. The main usage of steel structures includes Industrial Structures (such as buildings, conveyors, and pipe racks etc.), transmission towers, bridges etc. Connections are structural elements used for joining different members of a structural steel framework. In steel construction it is important to note that various members or elements in a structure are to be joined together by means of joints or connections to transfer various loads from one member to the other. The joints or connections play significant role in transfer of load from one member to the other member (for example beam to column or bracings to column or column to base plate etc.) at the same time they hold the total space frame in position. The selection and design of joints in steel construction plays a significant role which governs the safety and serviceability of the structure. This seminar basically deals only with the importance and general classification (or types) of joints in structural steel buildings. The design of connections is not considered in the seminar and confined only to their importance and general classification. The joints are generally classified based on the type of connecting medium used, the type of forces transmitted and the members to be connected, which will be discussed in the seminar.

  INTRODUCTION 
Connections are structural elements used for joining different members of a structural steel framework2.  Any steel structure is an assemblage of different members such as beam, columns, and tension members, which  are fastened or connected to one another, usually at the member ends. Many members in steel structures may  themselves  be  made  of  different  components  such  as  plates,  angles,  I‐beams,  or  channels.  These  different  components  have  to  be  connected  properly  by  means  of  fasteners,  so  that  they  will  act  together  as  a  single  composite  unit.  Connections  between  different  members  of  a  steel  frame  work  not  only  facilitate  the  flow  of  forces  and  moments  from  one  member  to  another,  but  also  allow  the  transfer  of  forces  up  to  the  foundation  level1. 

IMPORTANCE 
 
A structure is only as strong as its weakest link. Unless properly designed and detailed, the connections  may become weaker than the members being joined due to following reasons1:    a. A connection failure may lead to a catastrophic failure of the whole structure.  b. Normally, a connection failure is not as ductile as that of a steel member failure.  c. For achieving an economical design, it is important that connectors develop full or little extra strength  of the members it is joining.     To properly design a connection, a designer must have a thorough understanding of the behavior of the  joint  under  loads.  Different  modes  of  failure  can  occur  depending  on  the  geometry  of  the  connection  and  the  relative strengths and stiffness’s of the various components of the connection. To ensure that the connection can  carry the applied loads, a designer must check for all perceivable modes of failure pertinent to each component of  the connection and the connection as a whole2.         

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 1 of 14

 

COMPONENTS OF A CONNECTION 
Connections mainly include any or in combination with some of the components given below:    a. Bolts (Shop or Site)  b. Welds (Shop or Site)  c. Connecting Plates  d. Connecting Angles  e. Cut sections   

CLASSIFICATION OF CONNECTIONS 
Connections are basically classified2:    1. According the type of connecting medium used:     i) Bolted connections  ii) welded connections  iii)  bolted–welded connections  iv)  riveted connections    According to the type of internal forces the connections are expected to transmit:     i) Shear (semi rigid, simple) connections  ii)  moment (rigid) connections    According to the type of structural elements that made up the connections:     i) Single‐plate‐angle connections  ii)  double‐web‐angle connections  iii)  top‐ and seated‐angle connections,  iv) Seated beam connections, etc.    According to the type of members the connections are joining:     i) Beam‐to‐beam connections  ii) column‐to‐column connections (column splices)  iii) beam‐to‐column connections  iv) Hanger connections  v) Column base plate, etc. 

2.

3.

4.

 

         

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 2 of 14

 

DISCUSSION AND REVIEW 
The above classification of connections is elaborately discussed in this heading. All these connections shall be  designed in accordance of IS800:2007 (Standard Code of practice for General Construction in Steel).   1. According to the type of Connecting Medium Used:

These are the connection which are classified according to the connecting medium is used. They are discussed  below.  i. Bolted Connections2

Bolted  connections  are  connections  whose  components  are  fastened  together  primarily  by  bolts  (fasteners). Depending on the direction and line of action of the loads relative to the orientation and location of  the bolts, the bolts may be loaded in tension, shear, or a combination of tension and shear. For bolts subjected to  shear forces, the design shear strength of the bolts also depends on whether or not the threads of the bolts are  excluded  from  the  shear  planes.  Because  of  the  reduced  shear  areas  for  bolts  whose  threads  are  not  excluded  from the shear planes; these bolts have lower design shear strengths than their counterparts whose threads are  excluded from the shear planes.  The use of either bolting or welding has certain advantages and disadvantages. Bolting requires either the  punching or drilling of holes in all the plies of material that are to be joined. These holes may be a standard size,  oversized, short‐slotted, or long‐slotted depending on the type of connection. It is not unusual to have one ply of  material prepared with a standard hole while another ply of the connection is prepared with a slotted hole. This  practice is common in buildings having all bolted connections since it allows for easier and faster erection of the  structural framing3.  Bolts can be used in both bearing‐type connections and slip‐critical connections. Bearing‐type connections  rely on the bearing between the bolt shanks and the connecting parts to transmit forces. Some slippage between  the connected parts is expected to occur for this type of connection. Slip‐critical connections rely on the frictional  force that develops between the connecting parts to transmit forces. No slippage between connecting elements is  expected  for  this  type  of  connection.  Slip‐critical  connections  are  used  for  structures  designed  for  vibratory  or  dynamic loads, such as bridges, industrial buildings, and buildings in regions of high seismicity. Holes made in the  connected parts for bolts may be standard size, oversize, short slotted, or long slotted.   The typical Bolted connection is in the below Figure 1   

Bolted Moment Connection Figure 1 Bolted Connection

Bolted Splice Connection 

 

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 3 of 14

 

ii.

Welded Connections2

Welded connections are connections whose components are joined together primarily by welds. The four  most  commonly  used  welding  processes  are  discussed  in  Section  48.1  under  Structural  Fasteners.  Welds  can  be  classified according to:  • The types of welds: groove, fillet, plug, and slot  • The positions of the welds: horizontal, vertical, overhead, and flat  • The types of joints: butt, lap, corner, edge, and tee  Although  fillet  welds  are  generally  weaker  than  groove  welds,  they  are  used  more  often  because  they  allow for larger tolerances during erection than groove welds. Plug and slot welds are expensive to make and do  not  provide  much  reliability  in  transmitting  tensile  forces  perpendicular  to  the  faying  surfaces.  Furthermore,  quality control of such welds is difficult because inspection of the welds is rather arduous. As a result, plug and slot  welds are normally used just for stitching different parts of the members together.  Welding  will  eliminate  the  need  for  punching  or  drilling  the  plies  of  material  that  will  make  up  the  connection,  however  the  labor  associated  with  welding  requires  a  greater  level  of  skill  than  installing  the  bolts.  Welding requires a highly skilled tradesman who is trained and qualified to make the particular welds called for in  a  given  connection  configuration.  He  or  she  needs  to  be  trained  to  make  the  varying  degrees  of  surface  preparation required depending on the type of weld specified, the position that is needed to properly make the  weld,  the  material  thickness  of  the  parts  to  be  joined,  the  preheat  temperature  of  the  parts  (if  necessary),  and  many other variables.  A shorthand notation giving important information on the location, size, length, etc. for various types of  welds was developed by the Bureau of Indian Standards to facilitate the detailing of welds. This system of notation  is given in IS: 813.   A typical Welded connection is shown in Figure 2 below.   

Figure 2 Typical Welded Shear Connection

 

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 4 of 14

 

iii.

Bolted-Welded Connections3

A  large  percentage  of  connections  used  for  construction  are  shop‐welded  and  field‐bolted  types.  These  connections  are  usually  more  cost‐effective  than  fully  welded  connections,  and  their  strength  and  ductility  characteristics often rival those of fully welded connections. In current construction practice, steel members are  joined  by  either  bolting  or  welding2.  When  fabricating  steel  for  erection,  most  connections  have  the  connecting  material  attached  to  one  member  in  the  fabrication  shop  and  the  other  member(s)  attached  in  the  field  during  erection. This helps simplify shipping and makes erection faster. Welding that may be required on a connection is  preferably performed in the more‐easily controlled environment of the fabrication shop. If a connection is bolted  on  one  side  and  welded  on  the  other,  the  welded  side  will  usually  be  the  shop  connection  and  the  bolted  connection will be the field connection.   

  End plate Connection        Cleat angle Connection 

Figure 3 Shop Welded Field Bolted Connections iv. Riveted Connections4

The precursor to bolting was riveting.  You will probably have occasion to assess connections made with rivets  sometime in your career, particularly if you work on restoration projects.  Riveting was a very dangerous and time  consuming  process.   It  involved  heating  the  rivets  to  make  them  malleable  then  inserting  them  in  hole  and  flattening the heads on both sides of the connection.  The process required an intense heat source and a crew of  three or more workers.  Below Figure 4 shows a riveted connection in a bridge structure.     In  the  mid  1900s,  high  strength  bolts  were  introduced  and  quickly  replaced  rivets  as  the  preferred  method  for  connecting  members together in the field because of their ease of installation  and more consistent strengths.   Riveting became obsolete as the cost of installed high‐strength  structural bolts became competitive with the cost associated with  the four or five skilled tradesmen needed for a riveting crew3.  < Figure 4 Typical Riveted Connection    

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 5 of 14

 

2.

   According to the type of internal forces the connections are expected to transmit:

These are the connections classified according to the internal forces that are to be transmitted by the  connection and are discussed below.  i. Shear (semi rigid, simple) connections

As its name implies, a simple shear connection is intended to transfer shear load out of a beam while allowing  the  beam  end  to  rotate  without  a  significant  restraint.  The  most  common  simple  shear  connections  are  Double  clip, the shear end plate, and the Tee as shown5.  Under  shear  load,  these  connections  are  flexible  regarding  simple  beam  end  rotation  because  there  is  an  element of the connection which while remaining stiff in shear has little restraint to motion perpendicular to its  plane. This is an angle leg for Double clip, a plate for the shear end plate, and the tee flange for the tee connection.    They are shown in below Figure 5.   

Double angle shear Connection 

End plate shear connection   Figure 5 Shear Connections

 

Fin plate connection 

 

ii.  

Moment (rigid) connections

Moment‐resisting connections are connections designed to resist both moment and shear. These connections  are often referred to as rigid or fully restrained connections as they provide full continuity between the connected  members  and  are  designed  to  carry  the  full  factored  moments.  Figures  6,  7  show  some  examples  of  moment‐ resisting connections2.    The principal reason for using moment‐resisting connections in buildings is to resist the effect of lateral forces  such as wind and earthquake. Consequently they are used most frequently between main beams and columns,  creating a rigid frame. However, even though they are used principally to resist lateral loads, the vertical gravity  load will develop negative bending moments at the ends of the beams6. 

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 6 of 14

 

  Bolted splice Moment Connection       Field Bolted Moment Connection  Figure 6 Moment Connections       

Extended End plate moment connection 

  Eaves Haunch Moment Connection  Figure 7 Moment Connections    In Figure 7, the Left side connection is the end plate moment connection. It is made by shop‐welding a  plate to the end of a beam and field‐bolting it to a column or to another beam. The four bolts around the tension  flange transmit the flange force into the column. Additional bolts may be needed in deeper sections. A bolt may  also be added near the neutral axis of the beam to prevent gaps between the plates.             

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 7 of 14

 

3.

   According to the type of structural elements that made up the connections: These are the connections which are classified according to the components that are used for the  connection. They are discussed below.  i. Single-plate-angle connections These connections made such that one plate is shop welded to secondary section (beam) and the  angle is welded to Primary Section (column or Beam) or single shear plate welded to secondary beam and  bolted to Primary beam or column. The angle or plate will be bolted or welded after erection of the beam.  Skewed connection is used when the secondary beam or member is at some inclination to the main  member. Some typical connections are shown in figure 8 below. 

ii.

      Single angle connection    Figure 8 Single‐plate‐angle connections    Double-web-angle connections Skewed Plate Connection  

 

This connection is made with two angle welded or shop bolted to the web of secondary beam  and after erection the angles are bolted or site welded to the primary member (beam or column) or both  the angle are welded to the secondary beam and site bolted to the primary beam or column. The typical  double angle cleat connection is shown in the Figure 9 below.                                      Double angle Bolted               Connection         Double angle welded‐bolted      Connection      Figure 9 Double angle connections  Double angle Bolted         Connection 

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 8 of 14

 

iii.

top- and seated-angle connections This type of connection is generally used in case of moment connections. In this connection, two  angles are provided at top and bottom of the beam to resist moment. The shear will be resisted by the  web plate. This connection is generally used for lesser moments where heavy loads are not acting. The  typical top‐and seated‐angle connection is shown in Figure10 below.                                      Figure 10 Top‐and seated‐angle connection    Seated beam connections This type of connection is generally used in case of shear connections. In this connection, a  seating angle will be provided at bottom of secondary beam which well be shop welded to the primary  member. This is to facilitate easy erection of the secondary beam and this seating angle resists vertical  shear coming from the beam.  The typical seated beam connection is shown in Figure 11 below.   

iv.

                  Figure 11 Seated‐beam connection   

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 9 of 14

 

4.   i.

   According to the type of members the connections are joining:  Beam-to-beam connections As  the  name  itself  indicates  these  are  the  connections  which  connect  beam  to  beam.  These  include  primary  beam  to  secondary  beam  connection  and  beam  splice.  They  are  shown  in  the  below  Figure 12. 

Beam to beam connection 

 

 

      Beam splice  Figure 12 Beam to Beam connections 

ii.

column-to-column connections As the name itself indicates these are the connections which connect column to column. Column  splice comes under this category. Column splices are used to connect column sections of different sizes.  They are also used to connect columns of the same size if the design calls for an extraordinarily long span.  Splices should be designed for both moment and shear, unless the designer intends to utilize the splices  as  internal  hinges.  If  splices  are  used  for  internal  hinges,  provisions  must  be  made  to  ensure  that  the  connections possess adequate ductility to allow for large hinge rotation.                         Bolted column splice      Welded column splice     

Figure 12 Column Splice   

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 10 of 14

 

iii.

Beam-to-Column connections10 As the name itself indicates these are the connections which connect Beam to column.   Beam to column connections are very common and a variety of details can be used.  Connections between beams and columns are perhaps the most common structural connection  type.  A  wide  range  of  different  types  are  used,  and  these  include  fin  plates,  end  plates,  web  or  flange  cleats, and haunched connections.  The fin plate connection is simple and allows easy site installation.  Fin  plate  connections  are  based  on  a  single  plate  welded  to  the  column.  Beams  are  normally  attached using two or more bolts through the web. Where necessary adjustment can be provided using  slotted holes (for instance horizontally slotted holes in the web of the section attached to the fin plate).  Fin  plate  connections  are  suitable  for  connecting  open  section  beams  to  any  steel  column  including tubular sections where a simple, principally shear type, connection is required.  End plate connections are simple and neat.  End plate connections have a single plate welded to the end of the beam. This is bolted to the  column  flange  or  web  using  two  or  more  bolts  arranged  in  pairs.  Where  necessary,  adjustment  can  be  provided by slotted holes and shim plates between the end plate and the column.  When  the  connections  are  made  to  hollow  section  columns  it  is  not  possible  to  install  conventional nuts onto the ends of the bolts inside the section. Specially threaded holes or proprietary  bolts which incorporate an expanding sleeve should therefore be used.  End  plate  connections  may  be  partial,  flush  or  extended.  Partial  depth  end  plates  transmit  the  minimum  bending  effect  into  the  column;  flush  end  plates  provide  a  neat  detail  and  allow  a  greater  number of bolts; extended plates enable significant transfer of bending between beam and column, but  are not frequently used.  Typical beam to column connections are shown in the Figure 13.   

  Figure 13 Beam to column connections 

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 11 of 14

 

iv.

Hanger connections These are the connections which are connecting struts or beams to the main member. They are  shown in below Figure 14.                  Figure 14 Hanger Connections 

  v. Column base plate2 Column  base  plates  are  steel  plates  placed  at  the  bottom  of  columns  whose  function  is  to  transmit  column  loads  to  the  concrete  pedestal.  The  design  of  a  column  base  plate  involves  two  major  steps: (1) determining the size of the plate, and (2) determining the thickness of the plate. Generally, the  size of the plate is determined based on the limit state of bearing on concrete, and the thickness of the  plate is determined based on the limit state of plastic bending of critical sections in the plate.   Depending on the types of forces (axial force, bending moment, and shear force) the plate will be  subjected to, the design procedures differ slightly. In all cases, a layer of grout should be placed between  the base plate and its support for the purpose of leveling, and anchor bolts should be provided to stabilize  the column during erection or to prevent uplift for cases involving a large bending moment. Anchor bolts  are  provided  to  stabilize  the  column  during  erection  and  to  prevent  uplift  for  cases  involving  large  moments.  Anchor  bolts  can  be  cast‐in‐place  bolts  or  drilled‐in  bolts.  The  latter  are  placed  after  the  concrete  is  set  and  are  not  often  used.  Their  design  is  governed  by  the  manufacturer’s  specifications.  Cast‐in‐place bolts are hooked bars, bolts, or threaded rods with nuts placed before the concrete is set.   Some typical base plate connections are shown below in Figure 15 

Simple Base Plate

Moment resisting base plate Figure 15 Base plates 

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 12 of 14

 

CONCLUSION & REMARKS 
It  is  very  much  essential  for  a  structural  designer  to  have  the  basic  knowledge  of  connections  or  joints  which are used in a structural steel construction. As the type and behavior of the various joints in the steel building  plays a significant role in the stability of the structure, the type and purpose of the joint is to be decided according  to the analysis and design of the steel structure (building) already carried out. If the actual behavior of the joint  differs  with  design  of  the  connection,  it  may  lead  to  complete  collapse  of  the  structure.  Hence  every  structural  designer should have the basic knowledge of connections that are used in a steel structure.   

USEFUL INDIAN STANDARD PUBLICATIONS: 
IS800:2007  Standard code of practice for General Construction in Steel 

Indian Standards for Fits & Tolerances:  919‐1993  Part 1  Part 2  ISO systems of limits and fits:  Bases of tolerance, deviations and fits (second revision)  Tables of standard tolerance grades and limit deviations for holes and shafts (first revision) 

Indian Standard codes for Fasteners:  1148‐1982 1149‐1982 1363‐1992         Part 1          Part 2          Part 3  1364‐1992          Part 1          Part 2          Part 3          Part 4          Part 5  1367‐1992   1928‐1961  1929‐1982 2155‐1982 3640‐1982 3757‐1985 4000‐1992 Specification for hot‐rolled rivet bars (up to 40 mm dia) for structural purposes (third revision)  High tensile steel rivet bars for structural purposes (third revision)  Hexagon head bolts, screws and nuts of product grade C:  Hexagon head bolts (size range M5 to M64) (third revision)  Hexagon head screws (size range M5 to M64) (third revision)  Hexagon nuts (size range M5 to M64) (third revision)  Hexagon head bolts screws and nuts of product grades A and B:  Hexagon head bolts (size range M1.6 to M64) (third revision)  Hexagon head screws (size range M1.6 to M64) (third revision)  Hexagon nuts (size range M1.6 to M64) (third revision)  Hexagon thin nuts (chamfered) (size range M1.6 to M64) (third revision)  Hexagon thin nuts (unchamfered) (size range M1.6 to M10)(third revision)  (Parts 1 to 18) Technical supply conditions for threaded steel fasteners  Specification for boiler rivets (12 to 48mm diameter)  Specification for hot forged steel rivets for hot closing (12 to 36mm diameter) (first revision)  Specification for cold forged solid steel rivets for hot closing (6 to 16mm diameter) (first revision)  Specification for Hexagon fit bolts (first revision)  Specification for high strength structural bolts (second revision)  Code of practice for high strength bolts in steel structures (first revision) 

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 13 of 14

 

6610‐1972 6623‐1985 6639‐1972 6649‐1985 

Specifications for heavy washers for steel structures  Specifications for high strength structural nuts (first revision)  Specifications for hexagonal bolts for steel structures  Specification for hardened and tempered washers for high strength structural bolts and nuts  (first revision) 

Indian Standard codes for Welding:  1024‐1999 1261‐1959  1278‐1972 1323‐1982  3613‐1974 Code of practice for use of welding in bridges and structures subject to dynamic loading (second  revision)  Code of practice for seam welding in mild steel  Specification for filler rods and wires for gas welding (second revision)  Code of practice for oxy‐acetylene welding for structural work in mild steels (second revision)  Acceptance tests for wire flux combination for submerged arc welding (first revision)   

REFERENCES 
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. N. Subramanian; “Design of Steel Structures”; Oxford University Press  Ed. Chen, Wai‐Fah; “Structural Engineering Hand Book”;  Boca Raton: CRC Press LLC, 1999  Perry S. Green, Thomas Sputo, Patric Veltri; “Connections Teaching Tool Kit”; AISC  “www.bgstructuralengineering.com”; internet 

Reidar Bjorhovde, André Colson, Riccardo Zandonini; “Connections in steel structures III”;  Pergamon  Stanley W. Crawley, Robert M. Dillon; “Steel buildings‐Analysis & Design”; John Wiley and Sons 
Graham W. Owens & Brian D. Cheal; “Structural Steel Work Connections”  “Joints in Steel Construction ‐ Simple Connection”; The Steel Construction Institute, Silwood Park  “Joints in Steel Construction ‐ Moment Connection”; The Steel Construction Institute, Silwood Park 

6. 7. 8. 9.

10. “www.corusconstruction.com” ; internet   

General Connections in Steel Buildings

Page 14 of 14