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English 11, R.

Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Life on the Fringes
Summary This unit, centred around John Wyndham’s The Chrysalids, focuses on developing analytic and creative reading skills, as well as reader-response skills. Students will be encouraged to use The Chrysalids as an anchor for an exploration of prejudice, normalizing, social injustice, dystopia, intolerance, science, and technology. By drawing connections between texts and the real world, students will develop an understanding of how texts reflect on our world (this is particularly true for science fiction and speculative fiction) and will be encouraged to think more deeply about social justice. Outcomes GCOs 1: Students will be expected to speak and listen to explore, extend, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences. 2: Students will be expected to communicate information and ideas effectively and clearly, and to respond personally and critically 4: Students will be expected to select, read, and view with understanding a range of literature, information, media, and visual texts 6: Students will be expected to respond personally to a range of texts 7: Students will be expected to respond critically to a range of texts, applying their understanding of language, form, and genre 8: Students will be expected to use writing and other ways of representing to explore, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learnings; and to use their imagination 9: Students will be expected to create texts collaboratively and independently, using a variety of forms for a range of audiences and purposes 10: Students will be expected to use a range of strategies to develop effective writing and other ways of representing and to enhance their clarity, precision, and effectiveness SCOs 1.1 Examine others’ ideas to clarify and further their comprehension 1.2 Develop ideas by asking relevant questions and responding thoughtfully 1.4 Listen critically to analyze and evaluate to formulate and refine opinions and ideas 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 4.2: Read a wide variety of media and visual texts, focusing on the structure, genre, style, and cultural diversity 6.1: Recognize and articulate information from texts that trigger personal responses 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.4: Demonstrate a willingness to explore multiple perspectives 6.6: Articulate feelings about ambiguities in complex texts to clarify their understanding 1

English 11, R. Wheadon 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts 8.1: Use writing and other ways of representing to: explore, interpret, and reflect on their own experiences with a range of texts and issues; monitor their language and learning processes and strategies; record and assess their language and learning achievements; express their feelings, and reflect on experiences that have shaped their ideas, values, and attitudes 8.3: Make informed choices of language and techniques to enhance imaginative writing and other ways of representing 9.2: Create coherent structures in writing and media production: make informed choices of form, style, and content for audience and purposes; use effective strategies to engage the reader or viewer 10.1: Apply a variety of writing and representation strategies to construct increasingly complex texts 10.4: Demonstrate a commitment to crafting a range of writing and other representations Time Frame 3.5-4.5 weeks (18-22 days) Outline Introduction:





Chapters 1, 2, 3:




Chapters 4, 5: Close to Home


Chapters 6, 7, 8: Injustice & Complacency

Chapters 9, 10, 11: What makes a man a man?
Test






Chapter 12 & “The Valedictorian”


Chapters 13, 14, 15: Life on the Fringes

Chapters 16, 17: “The essential quality of living”
Conclusion & Portfolios










2 classes 2 classes 2 classes 2-2.5 classes 3 classes 1 class 2 classes 1.5 classes 2 classes 2-3 classes

TOTAL: 20-22 classes

Assessment 1. Test: Students will be asked to develop their own test for the unit (i.e., what they would expect their peers to know) including an answer key assigning points to varying answers. They will be given Bloom’s Taxonomy and encouraged to think about what questions matter and how answers connect to those questions. 2. Writing Prompts/Tasks: Every day or every other day. These are informal assessments that should hit up multiple intelligences and multiple modes of expression, and for which students can solicit feedback and input. 3. Portfolio: Contains self-selected prompts, test, and culminating performance task/project (can be selected from variety of options… See attached hand-out) 2

English 11, R. Wheadon 4. Reading Groups: Students will discuss writing prompts/certain themes of each chapter in groups (informal assessment) Texts After: Nineteen Stories of Apocalypse and Dystopia. Eds. Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. New York: Hyperion, 2012. Anthology. Harden, Blaine. Escape from Camp 14. London: Pan, 2012. Jemisin, N.K. “The Valedictorian.” After: Nineteen Stories of Apocalypse and Dystopia. Eds. Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. New York: Hyperion, 2012. 45-63. LeGuin, Ursula. “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas.” <http://harelbarzilai.org/words/ omelas.txt> Olson, Carol Booth. The Reading/Writing Connection: Strategies for Teaching and Learning in the Secondary Classroom (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson, 2011. Roberts, C. “Checklist for Personal Values.” <http://www.selfcounseling.com/help/ personalsuccess/personalvalues.html> Scalzi, John. Fuzzy Nation. New York: Tor, 2011. Kobo. Star Trek:The Next Generation. “The Measure of a Man.” Season Two, Episode 9. Netflix. X-Men. 2000. DVD. X-Men 2. 2003. DVD. Wyndham, John. The Chrysalids.

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Introduction
Summary This lesson introduces students to science fiction and dystopian/postapocalyptic literature. In addition, it ensures that we all start on the same page: we will review important terms and concepts, and review what the unit will look like (its assessment as well). Students will leave this lesson with an understanding of what they expect a speculative novel to look like. They will make predictions about The Chrysalids based on the cover(s), a description of the novel, and what they know about the premise. SCOs 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions Bring in all dystopian/post-apocalyptic books from home for manipulative purposes. Covers can be examined, etc. Have definitions of terms from After ready IPP prep Make PPT on Wyndham/the Cold War

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan Warm-Up 1. Put the terms “dystopian” and “post-apocalyptic” on the board. Have (0.5 classes) students brainstorm words linked to either term, novels/television series/movies that may be either dystopian or post-apocalyptic. 2. Using student-generated terms, create a definition. Put up the definition from the foreword to After. Why do they think this type of literature is so popular right now? What is the point of writing speculative fiction?

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English 11, R. Wheadon 3. Break students into groups. Each group will be assigned a dystopian/ apocalyptic novel/movie to look up on their phones or on the computers. They will briefly describe the text to their classmates as well as explaining the historical period and/or the message (Wikipedia should help them here). Good examples include: The Hunger Games, The Walking Dead, 1984, Brave New World, Resident Evil series, The Matrix, Portal series, Fallout series, Bioshock. Why was this novel written/movie or game created/? What is its purpose? What is its central anxiety? Main Act 1. Info-dump: John Wyndham and the Cold War; tensions of the (1 classes) time, Wyndham’s contemporaries. (See PPT for more) 2. Writing Prompt: There is a global nuclear war.Vast stretches of land are left blackened and lifeless; cities are hollowed husks, empty except for the irradiated creatures that crawl through abandoned buildings. In remote areas, small communities survive, but each day is a battle for life. There is no electricity.You find one of these communities two hundred years after the fall-out. What are the cultural guidelines? How has surviving a disaster changed this group of people? Explain as though to someone from the pre-war past what this new world is like. Think of The Hunger Games or The Walking Dead for help, if needed. 3. Once students have completed their predictions, put several covers for The Chrysalids up on the board. Have students think about their writing prompt responses in relation to the name of the novel, its description, and the cover. They can write an additional paragraph detailing how (and if) their perceptions have changed. 4. Why do they think The Chrysalids was written? What will its message be? Conclusion 1. Hand out the portfolio description. Write the timeline on the board (0.5 class) for discussion. Is this reasonable? Is the test at a good time for them? Remind students that they will need to keep everything they complete (writing prompts, etc.) for their reflective portfolio. 2. Assign students to their reading groups (if this isn’t done already). Ensure each group has a hand-out. Assessment Informal assessment: Students will generate ideas in small groups and student engagement can be monitored in this way. Students will also respond to writing prompts and will be encouraged to draw connections between the novel and other cultural products. Everything students produce will be moving toward the reflective portfolio.

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English 11, R. Wheadon Adaptations For IPP: Kirstain will be placed in a group with academically strong peers. She will also be given a different hand-out for the writing prompt (see attached document) that utilizes the POW+WWW strategy. She will be asked verbally and individually about how her perceptions have changed by viewing the covers. If the lesson wraps up early, we can begin reading aloud. “Introduction.” Terri Windling and Ellen Datlow. After: Nineteen Stories of Apocalypse and Dystopia. New York: Hyperion, 2012. ix-xi.

Extensions Research/ Resources

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English 11, R. Wheadon Writing Prompt: Lesson One There is a global nuclear war. All the cities you know are destroyed. Farm lands are burnt. The only animals that live in the forests have mutated beyond recognition. In remote areas, small communities survive, but each day is a battle for life. There is no electricity. Imagine that twohundred years have passed and a small group of people have survived. What are the rules for living there? How are these people different than people today? Respond to this prompt by imagining a character in this setting and thinking of a story. You don’t need to write this today, but you will eventually make the ideas you list below a piece of postcard fiction (a story short enough to fit on a postcard -- it only needs to be a few sentences!). You can write from the perspective of someone from today (all of the things they miss, how nothing is the same) or from the perspective of someone who lives in the small village (what life is like, how they survive). Pick your idea (what are things like after nuclear war? how have people changed?):

Organize your notes: Now In the Future

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English 11, R. Wheadon

Say more: Who is the main character?

When does the story take place?

What does the main character do?

What happens then?

How does the story end?

How does the main character feel?

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapters 1, 2, & 3
Summary This lesson explores the culture of Waknuk and asks students to determine whether the society is dystopian or simply postapocalyptic. Connections are drawn between the culture of Waknuk and prejudicial structures in our own culture. How does creating a norm impact those outside of the norm? Students will discuss the novel’s opening and how it compares to their pre-reading exercises. They will begin to draw meaningful connections to the real world and ponder why the novel may have been written/ what it’s saying. Students will then map Waknuk and surrounding areas (in order to heighten the shock of realizing it’s Labrador) and will begin building an understanding of Waknuk and the broader survivor civilization in Labrador/Newf. SCOs 1.2: Ask discerning questions to explore ideas and information 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts Paper, art supplies, chart paper. Review chapters Prepare prompt sheet for Kirstain

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. In their reading groups, students will make notes on how their (0.5 classes) predictions compare and contrast with the culture as presented in the first three chapters of the novel. These will be shared with the class. 2. What do they think the book is saying? Can they think of any contemporary parallels (how the novel might be functioning as an allegory even today)?

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English 11, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. Students will draw a map of the locations in the novel thus far. Try to (1 class) include everything that has been mentioned. Remind them to connect all of the locations to a page number. This can be done in pairs. Put up around the class. 2. After mapping (or while mapping), have students begin to draft a list of customs for Waknuk. Have them identify passages that they pull the values/customs from, as well as describing why they think that custom has come about.This list will be revised/added to throughout the unit. Conclusion 1. Read the beginning of Chapter 4 aloud (in order to provoke (0.5 class) interest). Assessment Adaptations Informal assessment: Monitor student discussion, what they present to the class, and the maps they produce. IPP: Kirstain will continue working with her group members. Although she is not reading the book, she will have a copy and should have a sense of things from the radio drama. Give her a prompt sheet for listening to The Chrysalids (see attachment). The lesson concludes by reading Chapter 4 aloud and thus an extension should not be necessary. N/A

Extensions Research/ Resources

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids Prompt Sheet
This sheet is meant to help you start thinking about The Chrysalids. You can either write responses to the questions, jot down a few quick thoughts, or think about the answers and come speak with me about what your thoughts are. One of the novel’s most important themes is change. Any time a character wonders what is right or wrong or whenever a character thinks about how his or her life might change, make a note of it. Try to think of what is changing, and what the effects of that change will be. 1. The story begins with David’s description of a dream he has of a city. If his dream tells us that he doesn’t know anything about cities (he thinks planes are strange birds, and that cars are weird horse carriages), what does that tell us about David’s home?

2. What does David think of Sophie when they meet for the first time? Does this change? Does meeting Sophie make David change?

3. In David’s community, there is a description of what true humans look like and anything that does not meet this exact standard is supposedly not human. Does David believe this? Do his feelings about it change?

4. How does David’s relationship with his father change after he tries to protect Sophie? How is David’s relationship with Uncle Axel different? What about with the others who have thoughtshapes (Michael, Rosalind, etc.)?

5. Axel says that people get used to believing things, and that’s why they keep believing them (even if they aren’t true). Can you think of any examples of this from the real world? How does this change David’s way of thinking about Waknuk?

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English 11, R. Wheadon

David feels that he no longer belongs in Waknuk.

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapter 4 & 5 -- Close to Home
Summary This lesson connects the novel to the students’ lives through geographical proximity. It also begins to develop an understanding of characters and to build affiliation with certain characters. Students should leave this lesson with a greater sense of who the characters are and a larger personal investment in at least one character, or at least an understanding of the role of affiliation. Students should also be starting to take more control over the reading/thinking processes. 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts Chart paper, post-it notes, markers. Draw an outline of Canada on the board for class mapping Map out the locations of the corresponding villages in your notes pre-class.

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan Warm-Up 1. Writing Prompt (choice): Put yourself in David’s shoes. Did he handle (0.5 classes) the situation with Sophie in the best way? Could he have done more to protect her? (Keep in mind that he’s ten at the time) OR Rewrite a brief scene/interaction from another character’s perspective (Joseph Strorm, Sophie’s mother, Uncle Axel). 2. Collectively revisit the maps the class created. Discuss how our perceptions have changed. Mention that this is rewriting our first draft-understanding of the novel. Does this mean more to them once they realize that we may be part of the Fringes?

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English 11, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. In reading groups, have students create body biographies for (1 classes) characters that examine that character in depth (try to ensure different groups choose different characters; good choices would be David, Uncle Axel, and Joseph Strorm). In their reading groups, have students either trace someone’s body or draw a body on chart paper. Students should then determine the most important character traits/relationships/quotations (basing this on textual evidence) and should consider the following: Placement: Careful placement of drawings and quotations (i.e., important relationship information could go near the heart; what drives characters or their actions may be placed near the spine). Symbols: What objects in the story are most often associated with your character? Do any represent ideas or themes within the text? (For example, a light bulb near the character’s head shows that they are creative or good at problem solving.) Reflection: How is your character perceived by others? How does this differ from how they see themselves? Evolution: Has your character undergone any changes, either physical or emotional, throughout the story? (The picture may be divided in half or printed twice, for "before" and "after" versions.) 2. If some groups have the same character, compare and contrast once this is complete. Conclusion 1. Discuss affiliation (see Olson) and its importance to the reading (0.5 class) experience. Facilitate a discussion about books they’re read in which they felt connected to a character, and encourage students to think about which characters they relate to the most in The Chrysalids. Assessment Adaptations Informal: Monitor student progress as they create body biographies. IPP: K. Bevin will be encouraged to continue working with her group. During the writing prompt, she should continue working on the piece of fiction she is developing. Writing prompt: The character I am most like is… The character I relate to most is… If I were in Waknuk, I would be most like… (Offer for this to be depicted like a Venn diagram) Olson, Carol Booth. The Reading/Writing Connection: Strategies for Teaching and Learning in the Secondary Classroom (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson, 2011.

Extensions

Research/ Resources

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapter 6, 7, 8 -- Injustice and Complacency
Summary This lesson questions David’s initial desire to run away from the society he deems as unjust. Does running away solve the problem or does it just let things continue out of sight? What about staying? By interrogating the difficult position those living in an unjust society face, and by connecting The Chrysalids to Ursula K. LeGuin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas,” we will begin to examine the ethical quandary all of us will face, as we all participate in problematic social structures -- often without thinking about the implications of our actions or inaction. Students should leave this lesson with a deeper understanding of injustice and the ethical murkiness surrounding living in an unjust society. They should begin to connect The Chrysalids to outside texts/ issues. 1.2: Ask discerning questions to explore ideas and information 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.4: Demonstrate a willingness to explore multiple perspectives 6.6: Articulate feelings about ambiguities in complex texts to clarify their understanding 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts Chart paper for pro/con organization. Ensure there are copies of “Omelas” for distribution.

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Read “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas” aloud. Have (0.5 classes) students underline important parts or parts that resonate as it is read aloud. How does this society parallel the society in The Chrysalids? What do both stories say about us? What does “Omelas” advocate? Ask students to keep track of questions/reactions to the story to share with class. 15

English 11, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. Break into groups and ask: What do we do when we see injustice? (1.5 classes) David wants to run away; some people leave Omelas because they cannot participate in injustice. Is leaving productive? Have students, in their groups, either argue for or against the necessity for leaving/ withdrawing. 2. As a class, draw up lists detailing the problems with staying or going, as well as the virtues to each. Facilitate a class discussion on the difficulty of this position -- of being a member of an unjust society. How do we become non-complacent? Conclusion 1. Writing Prompt: Consider a time when you have seen injustice. How did (0.25 class) you react? Did you react at all? If you were in David’s position, what would you do? OR Visually map the choices available to David or a citizen of Omelas in a Cause/Effect organizer. Assessment Informal assessment: Monitor student discussion to see if students are successfully making connections between “Omelas” and the novel, and then to the outside world. Kirstain will use a visual organizer to trace David’s choices and how they might play out for the writing prompt. Read the introduction to Camp 14. Recap Shin’s life; he had to leave North Korea, but not lives nearby and works as an activist. Is this a good compromise? Tie the question to real life. Harden, Blaine. Escape from Camp 14.

Adaptations Extensions

Research/ Resources

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English 11, R. Wheadon

Cause & Effect: David Leaving
David has two choices: he can leave Waknuk or he can stay. Imagine the effects of either choices. Remember to refer to your book for evidence.

STAY

GO

Effect One

Effect One

Effect Two

Effect Two

Effect Three

Effect Three

Your Verdict:_______________________________________
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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapters 9, 10, 11 -- What makes a man a man?
Summary This question gets at some of the unasked questions from the previous lesson: namely, what does it mean to be human? Is humanity in our DNA? Do questions of sapience come into play? How do cultural values impact who we ascribe humanity to and who (or what) we do not? Students should leave this lesson with an understanding of the way in which culture impact how we think of others. They should grasp some of the deeper currents running through the novel. SCOs 1.2: Ask discerning questions to explore ideas and information 4.2: Read a wide variety of media and visual texts, focusing on the structure, genre, style, and cultural diversity 6.1: Recognize and articulate information from texts that trigger personal responses 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.4: Demonstrate a willingness to explore multiple perspectives 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts Access to projector and computer, Netflix and DVD player. Prepare articles/ideas beforehand (photocopy) Prep movie clips/video clips

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Show clips from X-Men movies. In their reading groups, ask students (0.5 classes) to connect what they’ve watched with The Chrysalids and with contemporary or historical prejudices. These will be shared with the class.

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English 11, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. Have half of the groups revisit Uncle Axel's story about sailing south (1.5 classes) & different groups of survivors, and have the other half re-read his explanation to David re: the image of god. Summarize & evaluate. Is this true? Is how we think about humanity constructed by us or is there some underlying truth? 2. Distribute articles on AI, dolphins, etc. Have groups construct a set of criteria for determining whether a being is human or not/whether it merits certain rights/freedoms or not. For/Against chart may be useful. 3. Show Star Trek clip re: Data’s sentience. Ask their verdict. Conclusion 1. Writing Prompt: What values/norms do I take for granted that may be (0.5 class) products of my culture? How does that impact others who may have different values/sets of knowledge? OR Make a promotional poster for the rights of those from the Fringes. Consider what images/arguments might be persuasive to those who are convinced otherwise. Can be a sketch/mock-up. Assessment Students will receive points on speaking/listening during the debate. Each student will be encouraged either to make a point or to ask a question. Students who are uncomfortable speaking in front of the class will be asked to come and see me individually. IPP: Kirstain should be able to participate in the group work. Extensions Research/ Resources Test review. “Measure of a Man.” Star Trek:The Next Generation. Fuzzy Nation. Dolphins as non-human persons.

Adaptations

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapter 12 & “The Valedictorian”
Summary This lesson considers the choice of leaving an unjust society and venturing into the unknown. It returns to the question from the last lesson: what does it mean to be true to who you are? At what cost? Students will leave this class with a deeper appreciation of intertextual connections and with a clearer picture of what they value (flexibility, survival, adventure, being true to one’s self). Students will reflect on their own values and generate affiliation with the characters (to better understand why they make the choices they do) SCOs 1.1 Examine others’ ideas to clarify and further their comprehension 1.2 Develop ideas by asking relevant questions and responding thoughtfully 1.4 Listen critically to analyze and evaluate to formulate and refine opinions and ideas 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.6: Articulate feelings about ambiguities in complex texts to clarify their understanding 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions None Prepare value checklists Prepare rubric for debate evaluation Prepare debate rules for distribution

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan

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English 11, R. Wheadon Warm-Up 1. Read “The Valedictorian.” (0.5 classes) Main Act 1. In small groups, tease out the dilemma at the heart of the short (1.5 classes) story (organize graphically); compare to The Chrysalids & David/ Rosalind/Petra's flight. 2. Debate: Split the class into two parts. They will debate the merits of Zinhle's choice in "Valedictorian" (before she makes it; they could give voice to her thoughts). 3. How does this question change once David et al. are discovered? What choices do they still have to make? (Obviously, not leaving isn't one of them; but how they go about leaving MAY BE) Conclusion 1. Have students individually complete a value checklist. What do they (0.5) value? What matters most to them? They will narrow their choices from 10-15 to 5 and then to 2. How do their values impact their choices? What would they do if they were in Zinhle’s position? Assessment Formal: Students will receive points for speaking/listening during the debate on the following scale: 1.1 Examine others’ ideas to clarify and further their comprehension 1.2 Develop ideas by asking relevant questions and responding thoughtfully 1.4 Listen critically to analyze and evaluate to formulate and refine opinions and ideas IPP: Kirstain should be able to express herself during the debate and use the checklist to determine values. A simpler checklist could be developed if necessary. Should be unnecessary. “The Valedictorian” by N.K. Jemisin. Roberts, C. “Checklist for Personal Values.”

Adaptations

Extensions Research/ Resources

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English 11, R. Wheadon

Personal Value Checklist
Step  1:  What  I  Value  Most... From  this  list  of  values  (both  work  and  personal),  select  the  ten  to  fifteen  that  are  most   important  to  you-­‐as  guides  for  how  to  behave,  or  as  components  of  a  valued  way  of  life.  Feel   free  to  add  any  values  of  your  own  to  this  list. Achievement Friendships Physical  challenge Advancement  and   promotion Growth Pleasure Adventure Having  a  family Power  and  authority Affection  (love  and  caring) Helping  other  people Privacy Arts Helping  society Public  service Challenging  problems Ecological  awareness Loyalty Stability Economic  security Market  position Status Effectiveness Work  with  others Financial  gain Freedom Working  alone Honesty Purity Change  and  variety Independence Quality  of  what  I  take  part  in Close  relationships Influencing  others Quality  relationships Community Inner  harmony Recognition  (respect  from   others,  status) Competence Integrity Religion Competition Intellectual  status Meaningful  work Supervising  others Efficiency Merit Time  freedom Fame Order  (tranquility, stability,  conformity) Work  under  pressure Fast  living Personal  development Reputation Cooperation Involvement Responsibility  and   accountability Country Job  tranquility Security Creativity Knowledge Self-­‐Respect Decisiveness Leadership Serenity Democracy Location Sophistication Ethical  practice Money Truth Excellence Nature Wealth Excitement being  around  people  who are  open  and  honest Wisdom

Step  Two: Re-­‐write  the  to  fifteen  values  you  have  chosen  below.  Now  imagine  you  can  only  have  five.   Cross  off  the  remainders.  Eliminate  others  until  you  have  only  two.

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapters 13, 14, 15: Life on the Fringes
Summary This lesson examines how those forced to the Fringes create their own norms, values, cultures, how they come to perceive themselves in the scheme of things. It will interrogate what we value, as individuals and as cultures, and how this impacts the choices we make and how we live our lives. Students will be asked to consider their initial predictions about the shape of the world 200 years after nuclear disaster; they will then build on the previous lesson’s connection to personal values and develop, in groups, their own projected communities, thinking about how their values intersect with or differ from the values of the communities in The Chrysalids. SCOs 6.1: Recognize and articulate information from texts that trigger personal responses 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts Chart paper. Prepare list of differing values of each space (for reference during class discussion)

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Writing Prompt: Identify the most important passage out of the three (0.25 classes) chapters.Why is it important? What does it mean to you? How does it relate to your personal values?

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English 11, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. Students will, in their groups, revisit their initial predictions about (1 classes) what communities might look like 200 years after nuclear disaster. Does this vision show what they value? Does it show something of their outlook on life? 2. Facilitate a quick discussion about how values shape communities. Include sections from Divergent (Veronica Roth). 3. Students will then develop a community and culture for David’s world that reflect what they value -- what institutions, what types of life, what personal and political values. If they value education, how would that manifest itself in day-to-day life? If they consider health care crucial, what would that look like? Or if they consider the purity of the human form essential, might they guard against mutants? How? Remind them to name their communities, articulate social values/norms, think about what institutions exist, what social positions accrue prestige… 4. Once groups have developed their communities, they can share with the class. Facilitate a discussion on how their imagined communities reflect on or react to their own society’s values. Conclusion 1. Writing Prompt: If you were to be placed into this world, where would (0.25 class) you fit best? Link the values of each community to the values from your sheet OR Life on the Fringes means… Assessment Adaptations Informal. Monitor student discussion and contribution. IPP: For the first writing prompt, sit with Kirstain and ask her how she finds the story. Is there anything she finds especially meaningful? If not, try to connect it to a different text from a similar genre or with similar ideas (X-Men, The Hunger Games, the short stories we have read). For the second writing prompt, encourage Kirstain to create a Venn diagram of her personal values with those of the community she thinks she would fit in most easily. What are the overlaps? What are the differences? Any free time will be devoted to reading The Chrysalids. None.

Extensions Research/ Resources

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Venn Diagram: Personal and Cultural Values

My values The values of __________

English 11, R. Wheadon

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapters 16, 17: “The essential quality of living”
Summary This lesson examines the role of change in our conception of humanity: Is change our one constant? When we stop changing, we stop growing -- and things become fixed, dark, prejudiced. It also revisits the idea of dystopia: how do we know something is dystopian? Can anything ever be utopian? Students should leave with a sense of how differing values impact the shape of communities, and how no social group is perfect. They should also continue their thought about what makes us human/how we construct and understand personhood/humanity. SCOs 1.2: Ask discerning questions to explore ideas and information 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 6.1: Recognize and articulate information from texts that trigger personal responses 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.4: Demonstrate a willingness to explore multiple perspectives 6.6: Articulate feelings about ambiguities in complex texts to clarify their understanding 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions None Prepare page references

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Read the two discussions of change (one in Fringes, one from (0.75 classes) Sealand) in small groups. Have students pull out the main points. Do they agree?

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English 11, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. In groups, revisit pages 145-146 re: Sealand. Revisit our original (1 classes) descriptions of dystopia/post-apocalyptic lit. Graphically organize the three cultures we see -- Fringes, Waknuk, Sealand -- into characteristics of dystopia vs. just post-apocalyptic to determine how they fit. 2. Writing Prompt: David et al. have lived in Sealand for several months. Write a reflection from one of their perspectives on what they have found. Are they living in a utopia, a dystopia, or something between? (This could also be constructed as a marketing campaign -- a poster, a radio advertisement -- for a specific group) Conclusion 1. Class discussion: Can there ever be a utopia? Think about "Omelas" (0.25 class) again (maybe revisit passage about believability); Le Guin suggests that we find Omelas more believable when there is a dark secret. Is that human nature, to need some sort of darkness in order to believe something? Facilitate discussion. Assessment Informal: Check student participation and see how students are grasping the differing values of each community and how they connect to larger generic structures. IPP: Kirstain will use a visual organizer to separate the communities and their values. Any free time will be devoted to portfolio work. Revisit the introduction to After (Windling and Datlow).

Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources

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English 11, R. Wheadon

Cultural Values: Waknuk, The Fringes, and Sealand
Waknuk

The Fringes

Sealand

Use either keywords or pictures/symbols to depict values.

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Portfolios & Conclusion
Summary Wrap up of themes and presentations of favourite pieces from portfolios and/or culminating pieces (can be done in small groups or for entire class). We also revisit a key question: why speculative fiction? Why The Chrysalids? How have their perceptions changed (if at all)? Students will have time to curate their portfolios and to develop a reflective perspective on the unit, genre, and their reading/writing/ thinking processes. SCOs 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts 8.1: Use writing and other ways of representing to: explore, interpret, and reflect on their own experiences with a range of texts and issues; monitor their language and learning processes and strategies; record and assess their language and learning achievements; express their feelings, and reflect on experiences that have shaped their ideas, values, and attitudes 8.3: Make informed choices of language and techniques to enhance imaginative writing and other ways of representing 9.2: Create coherent structures in writing and media production: make informed choices of form, style, and content for audience and purposes; use effective strategies to engage the reader or viewer 10.1: Apply a variety of writing and representation strategies to construct increasingly complex texts 10.4: Demonstrate a commitment to crafting a range of writing and other representations Paper, markers, computer equipment, any items required to make the portfolio. Remind students of the portfolio requirements Prepare self-assessment rubric Prepare exit slips

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan

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English 11, R. Wheadon Warm-Up 1. Pose the question: Why do we read speculative fiction? What is the most (0.5 classes) important message in The Chrysalids? What about “Omelas”? “The Valedictorian?” Students will discuss in small groups. One individual will be the note-taker and we will develop a list of ideas central to the novel/genre to put up on the board. Main Act 1. Students will receive the bulk of class time to work on their (1.5 classes) portfolios and final projects. Monitor time use and progress. Conclusion 1. Students will each present the piece that meant the most to them. (1 class) They will also finish exit slips and self-assessment. Assessment Assessment is largely informal; however, student portfolios will also be assessed at the end of the unit. See rubric after the portfolio description. Adapted portfolio requirements for IPP. None. None.

Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources

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English 11, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Reflective Portfolio
Outcomes 6: Students will be expected to respond personally to a range of texts 7: Students will be expected to respond critically to a range of texts, applying their understanding of language, form, and genre 8: Students will be expected to use writing and other ways of representing to explore, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learnings; and to use their imagination 9: Students will be expected to create texts collaboratively and independently, using a variety of forms for a range of audiences and purposes 10: Students will be expected to use a range of strategies to develop effective writing and other ways of representing and to enhance their clarity, precision, and effectiveness Throughout the unit, you will be responding to writing and/or learning prompts that are meant to help you map the way in which you respond to The Chrysalids and the other texts we will be using throughout. These prompts could involve predicting themes or plot events by gathering information and hypothesizing; you may be asked to respond to an ethical issue or to articulate how you feel about a particular character. At the end of the unit, you will be asked to select seven of your best pieces -- that is, things you have produced that either show how you’ve grown as a learner/reader/thinker or the pieces you’re most proud of -- in addition to creating one culminating piece from the attached grid.You will also include your mid-point test, which you will be encouraged to return to and expand upon. There will be a small amount of class time allotted to work on your reflective portfolio, aside form the time we spend in class responding to prompts and engaging in group discussion. Be sure to keep all of your writing prompt responses and any other things -maps, character sheets, comics -- you produce during this unit. You’ll need them later! The purpose of this portfolio is for you to start thinking about how you learn, your strengths and weaknesses, and for you to take ownership of your own learning/reading/thinking processes.

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English 11, R. Wheadon

Analytical Essay: Describe and evaluate the most important message of The Chrysalids (can be alongside other texts) OR choose a topic that is of personal interest to you (come see me first). Should be at least 750 words. Graphic Organizer: Develop a visual organizer that: a) traces the history of David’s culture from Tribulation until the book’s end; b) sorts characters by character traits; or c) compares/ contrasts the definitions of human within the novel. Cover Design:You’re in charge of the cover design of the latest edition of The Chrysalids. Consider important themes, symbols, and the current publishing industry and craft a new cover. Include cover blurbs and an explanation.

Practical Visitor’s Guide to Waknuk:Your best friend is going on an expedition to Waknuk. What does he or she need to know to fit it? To survive? Can alternatively be written as a travel guide for a rather unlikely tourist destination. Wild Card: Is there something you’re dying to try out (rock opera, book review, comic adaptation)? Come and see me with a brief written proposal (2-3 sentences) describing what you would like to do and why you’d like to do it, and we’ll have a chat! Movie Pitch (with storyboard): Write a pitch for selling the film rights to The Chrysalids. Include a short storyboard for an important (and exciting!) theme or casting suggestions. Should be able to be recited in no more than one minute.

Creative Short Story/Poem: Respond, either in a short story or poem, to The Chrysalids, “The Valedictorian,” “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas,” or one of the themes we have discussed in this unit. Letter Home: Write a letter from the perspective of David, Rosalind, or Petra after the novel’s conclusion. What do they want the people of Waknuk to know? How does the writer feel about how things have played out? Scripting: Script a scene from the novel for the stage or for film. Act it out with a peer. Should include stage direction, set instructions, character descriptions, and so on. Be able to justify why you chose this particular scene.

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