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English 11 Advanced, R.

Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Life on the Fringes
Summary This unit, centred around John Wyndham’s The Chrysalids, focuses on developing analytic and creative reading skills, as well as reader-response skills. Students will be encouraged to use The Chrysalids as an anchor for an exploration of prejudice, normalizing, social injustice, dystopia, intolerance, science, and technology. By drawing connections between texts and the real world, students will develop an understanding of how texts reflect on our world (this is particularly true for science fiction and speculative fiction) and will be encouraged to think more deeply about social justice. Outcomes GCOs 1: Students will be expected to speak and listen to explore, extend, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences. 2: Students will be expected to communicate information and ideas effectively and clearly, and to respond personally and critically 4: Students will be expected to select, read, and view with understanding a range of literature, information, media, and visual texts 6: Students will be expected to respond personally to a range of texts 7: Students will be expected to respond critically to a range of texts, applying their understanding of language, form, and genre 8: Students will be expected to use writing and other ways of representing to explore, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learnings; and to use their imagination 9: Students will be expected to create texts collaboratively and independently, using a variety of forms for a range of audiences and purposes 10: Students will be expected to use a range of strategies to develop effective writing and other ways of representing and to enhance their clarity, precision, and effectiveness SCOs 1.1 Examine others’ ideas to clarify and further their comprehension 1.2 Develop ideas by asking relevant questions and responding thoughtfully 1.4 Listen critically to analyze and evaluate to formulate and refine opinions and ideas 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 4.2: Read a wide variety of media and visual texts, focusing on the structure, genre, style, and cultural diversity 6.1: Recognize and articulate information from texts that trigger personal responses 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.4: Demonstrate a willingness to explore multiple perspectives 6.6: Articulate feelings about ambiguities in complex texts to clarify their understanding 1

English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts 8.1: Use writing and other ways of representing to: explore, interpret, and reflect on their own experiences with a range of texts and issues; monitor their language and learning processes and strategies; record and assess their language and learning achievements; express their feelings, and reflect on experiences that have shaped their ideas, values, and attitudes 8.3: Make informed choices of language and techniques to enhance imaginative writing and other ways of representing 9.2: Create coherent structures in writing and media production: make informed choices of form, style, and content for audience and purposes; use effective strategies to engage the reader or viewer 10.1: Apply a variety of writing and representation strategies to construct increasingly complex texts 10.4: Demonstrate a commitment to crafting a range of writing and other representations Time Frame 3.5-4.5 weeks (18-22 days) Outline Introduction





Setting & Apocalypse




Chapters 1, 2, 3: Close Reading


Chapters 4, 5: Affiliation & Empathy


Chapters 6, 7, 8: Injustice & Complacency

Chapters 9, 10, 11: “What makes a man a man?”
In-class Essay





Chapter 12 & “The Valedictorian”


Chapters 13, 14, 15: Life on the Fringes

Chapters 16, 17: “The essential quality of living”
Conclusion & Portfolios










2 classes 1-1.5 classes 2 classes 2 classes 2-2.5 classes 3 classes 1 class 2 classes 1.5 classes 2 classes 2-3 classes

TOTAL: 20-22 classes

Assessment 1. In-Class Essay: Students will generate a list of good essay questions/prompts alongside the teacher and will, on the day of the essay, be given two or three to choose from. The essay is entirely open book and students will be encouraged to draw connections to other texts (films, books, short stories, video games, current events, documentaries). 2. Writing Prompts/Tasks: Every day or every other day. These are informal assessments that should hit up multiple intelligences and multiple modes of expression, and for which students can solicit feedback and input.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon 3. Portfolio: Contains self-selected prompts, in-class essay, and culminating performance task/ project (can be selected from variety of options… See attached hand-out). 4. Reading Groups: Students will discuss writing prompts/certain themes of each chapter in groups (informal assessment) 5. Socratic Circles: At the end of the novel study, we will have several days of Socratic Circles. Students will, throughout, be encouraged to start researching real-world parallels to the themes in The Chrysalids and other texts we have discussed. Students will select complex issues and two accompanying positions, delving into the issue in their discussion as well as defending their choice of topic/research. (See attached hand-out) Texts After: Nineteen Stories of Apocalypse and Dystopia. Eds. Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. New York: Hyperion, 2012. Anthology. Bulliet, Richard W. et al. The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History. 5th ed. Boston: Cengage, 2011. Print. Collins, Suzanne. The Hunger Games. New York: Scholastic, 2008. Print. Harden, Blaine. Escape from Camp 14. London: Pan, 2012. Jemisin, N.K. “The Valedictorian.” After: Nineteen Stories of Apocalypse and Dystopia. Eds. Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. New York: Hyperion, 2012. 45-63. “John Wyndham.” The Guardian. 22 July 2008. Web. <http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2008/jun/ 10/johnwyndham> LeGuin, Ursula. “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas.” <http://harelbarzilai.org/words/ omelas.txt> Olson, Carol Booth. The Reading/Writing Connection: Strategies for Teaching and Learning in the Secondary Classroom (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson, 2011. Roberts, C. “Checklist for Personal Values.” <http://www.selfcounseling.com/help/ personalsuccess/personalvalues.html> Scalzi, John. Fuzzy Nation. New York: Tor, 2011. Kobo. Star Trek:The Next Generation. “The Measure of a Man.” Season Two, Episode 9. Netflix. X-Men. 2000. DVD. X-Men 2. 2003. DVD. The Walking Dead. Prod. Frank Darabont. AMC, 2010-2013. Netflix. Wyndham, John. The Chrysalids.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Introduction
Summary This lesson introduces students to science fiction and dystopian/postapocalyptic literature. In addition, it ensures that we all start on the same page: we will review important terms and concepts, and review what the unit will look like (its assessment as well). Students will leave this lesson with an understanding of what they expect a speculative novel to look like. They will make predictions about The Chrysalids based on the cover(s), a description of the novel, and what they know about the premise. SCOs 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions Bring in all dystopian/post-apocalyptic books from home for manipulative purposes. Covers can be examined, etc. Have definitions of terms from After ready Make PPT on Wyndham/the Cold War Write up reading group descriptions

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan Warm-Up 1. Hand out the portfolio description. Write the timeline on the board (1 class) for discussion. Is this reasonable? Is the essay at a good time for them? Remind students that they will need to keep everything they complete (writing prompts, etc.) for their reflective portfolio. 2. Assign students to their reading groups (if this isn’t done already). Ensure each group has a hand-out and explain that they will be in charge of facilitating small group discussion and then contributing to larger class discussion. They should come to class with ideas/ questions/important passages to discuss.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon 3. Put the terms “dystopian” and “post-apocalyptic” on the board. Have students brainstorm words linked to either term, novels/television series/movies that may be either dystopian or post-apocalyptic. 4. Using student-generated terms, create a definition. Put up the definition from the foreword to After. Why do they think this type of literature is so popular right now? What is the point of writing speculative fiction? 3. Break students into groups. Each group will be assigned a dystopian/ apocalyptic novel/movie to look up on their phones or on the computers. They will briefly describe the text to their classmates as well as explaining the historical period and/or the message (Wikipedia should help them here). Good examples include: The Hunger Games, The Walking Dead, 1984, Brave New World, Resident Evil series, The Matrix, Portal series, Fallout series, Bioshock,V for Vendetta. Why was this novel written/movie or game created/? What is its purpose? What is its central anxiety? Main Act 1. Info-dump: John Wyndham and the Cold War; tensions of the (0.75 classes) time, Wyndham’s contemporaries. (See PPT for more) 2. Writing Prompt: There is a global nuclear war.Vast stretches of land are left blackened and lifeless; cities are hollowed husks, empty except for the irradiated creatures that crawl through abandoned buildings. In remote areas, small communities survive, but each day is a battle for life. There is no electricity.You find one of these communities two hundred years after the fall-out. What are the cultural guidelines? How has surviving a disaster changed this group of people? Explain as though to someone from the pre-war past what this new world is like. Think of The Hunger Games or The Walking Dead for help, if needed. 3. Once students have completed their predictions, put several covers for The Chrysalids up on the board. Have students think about their writing prompt responses in relation to the name of the novel, its description, and the cover. They can write an additional paragraph detailing how (and if) their perceptions have changed. Conclusion 1. For Eng 11A students, we will foreground the cognitive strategies (0.25 class) we’re using in this lesson. By using The Reading/Writing Connection, we’ll take a look at the strategies we tend to use unconsciously. Assessment Informal assessment: Students will generate ideas in small groups and student engagement can be monitored in this way. Students will also respond to writing prompts and will be encouraged to draw connections between the novel and other cultural products. Everything students produce will be moving toward the reflective portfolio. None. 5

Adaptations

English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Extensions Research/ Resources If the lesson wraps up early, we can begin reading aloud. “Introduction.” Terri Windling and Ellen Datlow. After: Nineteen Stories of Apocalypse and Dystopia. New York: Hyperion, 2012. ix-xi. Olson, Carol Booth. The Reading/Writing Connection: Strategies for Teaching and Learning in the Secondary Classroom (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson, 2011.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Setting and Apocalypse
Summary This lesson examines the impact that setting and the way setting is represented in creating dystopian and post-apocalyptic literature/ cultural products. By using multiple media types, we will draw parallels and come to better understand generic conventions. Students should leave the lesson with a greater appreciation for the generic conventions of post-apocalyptic/dystopian literature and film. They should be able to mobilize these strategies in creative writing. SCOs 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 8.1: Use writing and other ways of representing to: explore, interpret, and reflect on their own experiences with a range of texts and issues; monitor their language and learning processes and strategies; record and assess their language and learning achievements; express their feelings, and reflect on experiences that have shaped their ideas, values, and attitudes 8.3: Make informed choices of language and techniques to enhance imaginative writing and other ways of representing 9.2: Create coherent structures in writing and media production: make informed choices of form, style, and content for audience and purposes; use effective strategies to engage the reader or viewer 10.4: Demonstrate a commitment to crafting a range of writing and other representations DVD player, computer, projector, Netflix. Cue up videos Select sections to read from multiple dystopian/post-apocalyptic texts

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan Warm-Up 1. Writing Prompt: How is setting related to tone across texts? What are (0.25 classes) the specific implications for speculative (and especially post-apocalyptic/ dystopian literature/film)? In other words, is setting essential to postapocalyptic/dystopian literature or could the same stories take place elsewhere or be accessed in different ways? 7

English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. Show the first clip from The Walking Dead (Season One, Episode (0.5 classes) One -- from beginning to opening credits -- 4:30). Discuss the setting, how tone is generated, if the setting plants the seeds for thematic development. Then switch to the opening to The Road (first three minutes). How is this different? What similarities can we notice? (There’s a similar silence in the desolate landscape; we get a sense of how things used to be… Immediate sympathy is generated for each lead character). 2. Read the introduction of “The Hunger Games” (p. 3-6). Have students analyze setting again. How does Collins construct a sense of space? How does she make us feel about Katniss right away? Compare this to the first five minutes of the film version. How do these differ? Do we get a better sense of setting in the film or the book? Conclusion 1. Have students generate a list of important traits shared by “The (0.25 class) Hunger Games,” The Walking Dead, and The Road. 2. Writing Prompt: Pick one of the following words and generate a piece of flash fiction (dystopian/post-apocalyptic … can use a pre-existing universe such as The Walking Dead or The Hunger Games or 1984) that uses setting to create empathy/affiliation based on the word: Isolation, destruction, control, loss, fear, pain Assessment Informal. Monitor student engagement and how they translate discussion to creative writing. Collect creative writing pieces at the end of the class to give feedback on. None. Students will work on flash fiction if lesson runs short. Bridging English. p. 131. The Walking Dead. Season One, Episode One. Netflix. The Road. Netflix. The Hunger Games. Print. --. Netflix.

Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapters 1, 2, & 3 -- Close Reading
Summary This lesson explores the culture of Waknuk and asks students to determine whether the society is dystopian or simply postapocalyptic. Connections are drawn between the culture of Waknuk and prejudicial structures in our own culture. How does creating a norm impact those outside of the norm? Students will discuss the novel’s opening and how it compares to their pre-reading exercises. They will begin to draw meaningful connections to the real world and ponder why the novel may have been written/ what it’s saying. How does Wyndham use setting? What do we think about David? SCOs 1.2: Ask discerning questions to explore ideas and information 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts Paper, art supplies, chart paper. Review chapters Choose a section with which you can model close reading (especially related to setting)

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan Warm-Up 1. Facilitate a class discussion about the beginning of The Chrysalids: (0.5 classes) How does Wyndham use setting? What is the tone of the book in the firs three chapters? How does it relate to The Hunger Games and The Walking Dead? What about other dystopian/post-apocalyptic texts the students are familiar with?

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. In their reading groups, students will discuss the three chapters, (1 class) pulling out significant scenes/quotations and discussion thematically. 2. Larger group discussion: Each group will identify one important question/idea/passage they discussed and we will unpack it as a class (model close reading of a passage). Conclusion 1. Read the beginning of Chapter 4 aloud (in order to provoke (0.5 class) interest). Assessment Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources Informal assessment: Monitor student discussion, what they bring forward for group discussion. None. The lesson concludes by reading Chapter 4 aloud and thus an extension should not be necessary. N/A

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapter 4 & 5 -- Affiliation & Empathy
Summary This lesson will examine some of the cognitive strategies that good readers employ without thinking (drafting, etc.) from Reading/Writing Connection (Olson). It then foregrounds a discussion of the customs, conventions, and norms of Waknuk. Students should leave this lesson with a greater sense of who the characters are and a larger personal investment in at least one character, or at least an understanding of the role of affiliation. Students should also be starting to take more control over the reading/thinking processes. 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts Chart paper, post-it notes, markers. Review Olson and prepare notes on discussion of affiliation

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Writing Prompt (choice): Think of at least one real world issue that (0.5 classes) The Chrysalids could be seen as addressing allegorically (can be anachronistic) OR Choose the passage you found most interesting or important and analyze it, explaining your reaction. Link the first prompt to upcoming Socratic Circles. Main Act 1. In reading groups, have students create body biographies for (1 classes) characters that examine that character in depth (try to ensure different groups choose different characters; good choices would be David, Uncle Axel, and Joseph Strorm). In their reading groups, have students either trace someone’s body or draw a body on chart paper. Students should then determine the most important character traits/relationships/quotations (basing this on textual evidence) and should consider the following:

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Placement: Careful placement of drawings and quotations (i.e., important relationship information could go near the heart; what drives characters or their actions may be placed near the spine). Symbols: What objects in the story are most often associated with your character? Do any represent ideas or themes within the text? (For example, a light bulb near the character’s head shows that they are creative or good at problem solving.) Reflection: How is your character perceived by others? How does this differ from how they see themselves? Evolution: Has your character undergone any changes, either physical or emotional, throughout the story? (The picture may be divided in half or printed twice, for "before" and "after" versions.) 2. If some groups have the same character, compare and contrast once this is complete. Conclusion 1. Discuss affiliation (see Olson) and its importance to the reading (0.5 class) experience. Facilitate a discussion about books they’re read in which they felt connected to a character, and encourage students to think about which characters they relate to the most in The Chrysalids. 2. Connect this to our discussion about setting. In what way can setting influence how we feel about a character? Why do we empathize with Katniss? Rick? The sympathetic character in this hostile world. Assessment Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources Informal: Monitor student progress as they create body biographies & reading groups. None. Extra time could be devoted to developing and extending initial thoughts re: Socratic Circles and research. Olson, Carol Booth. The Reading/Writing Connection: Strategies for Teaching and Learning in the Secondary Classroom (3rd ed.). Boston: Pearson, 2011.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapter 6, 7, 8 -- Injustice and Complacency
Summary This lesson questions David’s initial desire to run away from the society he deems as unjust. Does running away solve the problem or does it just let things continue out of sight? What about staying? By interrogating the difficult position those living in an unjust society face, and by connecting The Chrysalids to Ursula K. LeGuin’s “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas,” we will begin to examine the ethical quandary all of us will face, as we all participate in problematic social structures -- often without thinking about the implications of our actions or inaction. Students should leave this lesson with a deeper understanding of injustice and the ethical murkiness surrounding living in an unjust society. They should begin to connect The Chrysalids to outside texts/ issues. 1.2: Ask discerning questions to explore ideas and information 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.4: Demonstrate a willingness to explore multiple perspectives 6.6: Articulate feelings about ambiguities in complex texts to clarify their understanding 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts Chart paper for pro/con organization. Ensure there are copies of “Omelas” for distribution.

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Read “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas” aloud. Have (0.5 classes) students underline important parts or parts that resonate as it is read aloud. How does this society parallel the society in The Chrysalids? What do both stories say about us? What does “Omelas” advocate? Ask students to keep track of questions/reactions to the story to share with class. 13

English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. Break into groups and ask: What do we do when we see injustice? (1.5 classes) David wants to run away; some people leave Omelas because they cannot participate in injustice. Is leaving productive? Have students, in their groups, either argue for or against the necessity for leaving/ withdrawing. 2. As a class, draw up lists detailing the problems with staying or going, as well as the virtues to each. Facilitate a class discussion on the difficulty of this position -- of being a member of an unjust society. How do we become non-complacent? Conclusion 1. Writing Prompt: Compare “Omelas” with The Chrysalids. How do the (0.25 class) messages of these texts compare? Which one has more merit (ethically, philosophically, stylistically)? Assessment Informal assessment: Monitor student discussion to see if students are successfully making connections between “Omelas” and the novel, and then to the outside world. Gather student response to final writing prompt to read and respond. Adaptations Extensions None. Read the introduction to Camp 14. Recap Shin’s life; he had to leave North Korea, but not lives nearby and works as an activist. Is this a good compromise? Tie the question to real life. Harden, Blaine. Escape from Camp 14.

Research/ Resources

STUDENTS SHOULD GENERATE LIST OF ESSAY QUESTIONS

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapters 9, 10, 11 -- “What makes a man a man?”
Summary This question gets at some of the unasked questions from the previous lesson: namely, what does it mean to be human? Is humanity in our DNA? Do questions of sapience come into play? How do cultural values impact who we ascribe humanity to and who (or what) we do not? Students should leave this lesson with an understanding of the way in which culture impact how we think of others. They should grasp some of the deeper currents running through the novel. Students should extend their practice of drawing connections between texts (developing intertextual analysis skills). SCOs 1.2: Ask discerning questions to explore ideas and information 4.2: Read a wide variety of media and visual texts, focusing on the structure, genre, style, and cultural diversity 6.1: Recognize and articulate information from texts that trigger personal responses 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.4: Demonstrate a willingness to explore multiple perspectives 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts Access to projector and computer, Netflix and DVD player. Prepare articles/ideas beforehand (photocopy) Prep movie clips/video clips

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Show clips from X-Men movies. In their reading groups, ask students (0.5 classes) to connect what they’ve watched with The Chrysalids and with contemporary or historical prejudices. These will be shared with the class. 2. Students will, in their reading groups, discuss the most pertinent passages from this week’s reading. They will then share them as a class and bring in other texts as appropriate, demonstrating close reading skills and an understanding of intertextual connections.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. If this hasn’t already happened, highlight the two passages from the (1 classes) text that lay out how different groups perceive humanity. Compare and contrast, drawing parallels to our cultures/views/social psyche. Highlight connection to Socratic Circles again. 2. Distribute articles on AI, dolphins, etc. Have groups construct a set of criteria for determining whether a being is human or not/whether it merits certain rights/freedoms or not. For/Against chart may be useful. 3. Show Star Trek clip re: Data’s sentience. Ask their verdict. Conclusion 1. Writing Prompt: Humanity is… Then pass to a partner and have (0.5 class) them comment, critique, evaluate, respond. Assessment Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources “Measure of a Man.” Star Trek:The Next Generation. Fuzzy Nation. Dolphins as non-human persons. Informal. Monitor student discussion/engagement. None.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapter 12 & “The Valedictorian”
Summary This lesson considers the choice of leaving an unjust society and venturing into the unknown. It returns to the question from the last lesson: what does it mean to be true to who you are? At what cost? Students will leave this class with a deeper appreciation of intertextual connections and with a clearer picture of what they value (flexibility, survival, adventure, being true to one’s self). Students will reflect on their own values and generate affiliation with the characters (to better understand why they make the choices they do) SCOs 1.1 Examine others’ ideas to clarify and further their comprehension 1.2 Develop ideas by asking relevant questions and responding thoughtfully 1.4 Listen critically to analyze and evaluate to formulate and refine opinions and ideas 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 4.1: Read a wide variety of print texts recognizing the relevance to their lives and community 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.6: Articulate feelings about ambiguities in complex texts to clarify their understanding 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions None Prepare value checklists Prepare rubric for debate evaluation Prepare debate rules for distribution

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Warm-Up 1. Read “The Valedictorian.” (0.5 classes) Main Act 1. In small groups, tease out the dilemma at the heart of the short (1.5 classes) story; compare to The Chrysalids & David/Rosalind/Petra's flight. Can be organized graphically, but doesn’t need to be. 2. Debate: Split the class into two parts. They will debate the merits of Zinhle's choice in "Valedictorian" (before she makes it; they could give voice to her thoughts). 3. How does this question change once David et al. are discovered? What choices do they still have to make? (Obviously, not leaving isn't one of them; but how they go about leaving MAY BE) Conclusion 1. Have students individually complete a value checklist. What do they (0.5) value? What matters most to them? They will narrow their choices from 10-15 to 5 and then to 2. How do their values impact their choices? What would they do if they were in Zinhle’s position? Assessment Formal: Students will receive points for speaking/listening during the debate on the following scale: 1.1 Examine others’ ideas to clarify and further their comprehension 1.2 Develop ideas by asking relevant questions and responding thoughtfully 1.4 Listen critically to analyze and evaluate to formulate and refine opinions and ideas None. Should be unnecessary. “The Valedictorian” by N.K. Jemisin. Roberts, C. “Checklist for Personal Values.”

Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

Personal Value Checklist
Step  1:  What  I  Value  Most... From  this  list  of  values  (both  work  and  personal),  select  the  ten  to  fifteen  that  are  most   important  to  you-­‐as  guides  for  how  to  behave,  or  as  components  of  a  valued  way  of  life.  Feel   free  to  add  any  values  of  your  own  to  this  list. Achievement Friendships Physical  challenge Advancement  and   promotion Growth Pleasure Adventure Having  a  family Power  and  authority Affection  (love  and  caring) Helping  other  people Privacy Arts Helping  society Public  service Challenging  problems Ecological  awareness Loyalty Stability Economic  security Market  position Status Effectiveness Work  with  others Financial  gain Freedom Working  alone Honesty Purity Change  and  variety Independence Quality  of  what  I  take  part  in Close  relationships Influencing  others Quality  relationships Community Inner  harmony Recognition  (respect  from   others,  status) Competence Integrity Religion Competition Intellectual  status Meaningful  work Supervising  others Efficiency Merit Time  freedom Fame Order  (tranquility, stability,  conformity) Work  under  pressure Fast  living Personal  development Reputation Cooperation Involvement Responsibility  and   accountability Country Job  tranquility Security Creativity Knowledge Self-­‐Respect Decisiveness Leadership Serenity Democracy Location Sophistication Ethical  practice Money Truth Excellence Nature Wealth Excitement being  around  people  who are  open  and  honest Wisdom

Step  Two: Re-­‐write  the  to  fifteen  values  you  have  chosen  below.  Now  imagine  you  can  only  have  five.   Cross  off  the  remainders.  Eliminate  others  until  you  have  only  two.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapters 13, 14, 15: Life on the Fringes
Summary This lesson examines how those forced to the Fringes create their own norms, values, cultures, how they come to perceive themselves in the scheme of things. It will interrogate what we value, as individuals and as cultures, and how this impacts the choices we make and how we live our lives. Students will be asked to consider their initial predictions about the shape of the world 200 years after nuclear disaster; they will then build on the previous lesson’s connection to personal values and develop, in groups, their own projected communities, thinking about how their values intersect with or differ from the values of the communities in The Chrysalids. SCOs 6.1: Recognize and articulate information from texts that trigger personal responses 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts Chart paper. Prepare list of differing values of each space (for reference during class discussion)

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Writing Prompt: Identify the most important passage out of the three (0.25 classes) chapters.Why is it important? What does it mean to you? How does it relate to your personal values?

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. Students will, in their groups, revisit their initial predictions about (1 classes) what communities might look like 200 years after nuclear disaster. Does this vision show what they value? Does it show something of their outlook on life? 2. Facilitate a quick discussion about how values shape communities. Include sections from Divergent (Veronica Roth). 3. Students will then develop a community and culture for David’s world that reflect what they value -- what institutions, what types of life, what personal and political values. If they value education, how would that manifest itself in day-to-day life? If they consider health care crucial, what would that look like? Or if they consider the purity of the human form essential, might they guard against mutants? How? Remind them to name their communities, articulate social values/norms, think about what institutions exist, what social positions accrue prestige… 4. Once groups have developed their communities, they can share with the class. Facilitate a discussion on how their imagined communities reflect on or react to their own society’s values. Conclusion 1. Writing Prompt: Choose one community from the novel and assess its (0.25 class) values/norms in comparison to your own OR Life on the Fringes means… Assessment Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources Informal. Monitor student discussion and contribution. None. Any free time will be devoted to reading The Chrysalids. None.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Chapters 16, 17: “The essential quality of living”
Summary This lesson examines the role of change in our conception of humanity: Is change our one constant? When we stop changing, we stop growing -- and things become fixed, dark, prejudiced. It also revisits the idea of dystopia: how do we know something is dystopian? Can anything ever be utopian? Students should leave with a sense of how differing values impact the shape of communities, and how no social group is perfect. They should also continue their thought about what makes us human/how we construct and understand personhood/humanity. SCOs 1.2: Ask discerning questions to explore ideas and information 2.3: Ask and respond to questions, including those related to complex texts and tasks 6.1: Recognize and articulate information from texts that trigger personal responses 6.2: Make connections between the ideas and information presented in texts and their own experiences 6.2: Make connections among the themes, issues, and ideas expressed in texts 6.4: Demonstrate a willingness to explore multiple perspectives 6.6: Articulate feelings about ambiguities in complex texts to clarify their understanding 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.7: Explore ways texts reveal and produce ideologies, identities, and positions None Prepare page references

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work Plan

Warm-Up 1. Group prompt: Assign each group one of the two passages on (0.75 classes) change in these chapters. Have them do a close reading and analysis, then evaluating the merit of the statement -- both stylistically (is this heavy-handed? do we believe this is what Wyndham thinks or is it just the appropriate response of either the Fringes or Sealand to the world?) and philosophically.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Main Act 1. Revisit our original descriptions of dystopia/post-apocalyptic lit. In (1 classes) their reading groups, have students discuss the three societies we see and analyze. Point them to pages 145-146 for more about Sealand. 2. Class discussion: Can there ever be a utopia? Think about "Omelas" again (maybe revisit passage about believability); Le Guin suggests that we find Omelas more believable when there is a dark secret. Is that human nature, to need some sort of darkness in order to believe something? Facilitate discussion. Conclusion 1. Writing Prompt: Using what little we know of Sealand (see opening of (0.25 class) the novel), write a description of David et al. arriving. Be conscious of how you describe setting. If you think Sealand is a dystopia, drop in subtle hints; if you think it is only flawed, think about how David, Rosalind, or Petra might perceive these flaws… Would they be unsettled, oblivious, heart-broken, suspicious? Assessment Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources Collect creative writing as formative assessment. Return with feedback. None. Any free time will be devoted to portfolio work. Revisit the introduction to After (Windling and Datlow).

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Portfolios & Conclusion
Summary Wrap up of themes and presentations of favourite pieces from portfolios and/or culminating pieces (can be done in small groups or for entire class). We also revisit a key question: why speculative fiction? Why The Chrysalids? How have their perceptions changed (if at all)? Students will have time to curate their portfolios and to develop a reflective perspective on the unit, genre, and their reading/writing/ thinking processes. SCOs 7.2: Recognize how artful language and structures of genre and text can influence the reader or viewer 7.5: Analyze the merits of language, ideas, and other characteristics of texts and genres 7.8: Reflect on their responses to texts, considering their own and others’ social and cultural contexts 8.1: Use writing and other ways of representing to: explore, interpret, and reflect on their own experiences with a range of texts and issues; monitor their language and learning processes and strategies; record and assess their language and learning achievements; express their feelings, and reflect on experiences that have shaped their ideas, values, and attitudes 8.3: Make informed choices of language and techniques to enhance imaginative writing and other ways of representing 9.2: Create coherent structures in writing and media production: make informed choices of form, style, and content for audience and purposes; use effective strategies to engage the reader or viewer 10.1: Apply a variety of writing and representation strategies to construct increasingly complex texts 10.4: Demonstrate a commitment to crafting a range of writing and other representations Paper, markers, computer equipment, any items required to make the portfolio. Remind students of the portfolio requirements Prepare self-assessment rubric Prepare exit slips

Objectives

Outcomes Met

Materials Pre-Work

Plan

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon Warm-Up 1. Pose the question: Why do we read speculative fiction? What is the most (0.5 classes) important message in The Chrysalids? What about “Omelas”? “The Valedictorian?” Students will discuss in small groups. One individual will be the note-taker and we will develop a list of ideas central to the novel/genre to put up on the board. Main Act 1. Students will have some time to work on portfolios, but most of our (1.5 classes) class time will be spent workshopping their papers in small groups. Conclusion 1. Students will each present the piece that meant the most to them. (1 class) They will also finish exit slips and self-assessment. Assessment Assessment is largely informal; however, student portfolios will also be assessed at the end of the unit. See rubric after the portfolio description. Adapted portfolio requirements for IPP. If students finish up early, they will be able to continue work on their Socratic Circles. None.

Adaptations Extensions Research/ Resources

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Reflective Portfolio
Outcomes 6: Students will be expected to respond personally to a range of texts 7: Students will be expected to respond critically to a range of texts, applying their understanding of language, form, and genre 8: Students will be expected to use writing and other ways of representing to explore, clarify, and reflect on their thoughts, feelings, experiences, and learnings; and to use their imagination 9: Students will be expected to create texts collaboratively and independently, using a variety of forms for a range of audiences and purposes 10: Students will be expected to use a range of strategies to develop effective writing and other ways of representing and to enhance their clarity, precision, and effectiveness Throughout the unit, you will be responding to writing and/or learning prompts that are meant to help you map the way in which you respond to The Chrysalids and the other texts we will be using throughout. These prompts could involve predicting themes or plot events by gathering information and hypothesizing; you may be asked to respond to an ethical issue or to articulate how you feel about a particular character. At the end of the unit, you will be asked to select seven of your best pieces -- that is, things you have produced that either show how you’ve grown as a learner/reader/thinker or the pieces you’re most proud of -- in addition to creating one culminating piece from the attached grid.You will also include your in-class essay, which you will be encouraged to return to and expand upon. There will be class time allotted to workshopping this essay with your reading group members. Be sure to keep all of your writing prompt responses and any other things -maps, character sheets, comics -- you produce during this unit. You’ll need them later! The purpose of this portfolio is for you to start thinking about how you learn, your strengths and weaknesses, and for you to take ownership of your own learning/reading/thinking processes.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

Analytical Review: Write a review of one of the texts we have read during this unit.Your review should evaluate the text on its merits (stylistically, philosophically) and suggest texts to read/films to see in lieu of or in addition to the one you review. Graphic Organizer: Develop a visual organizer that: a) traces the history of David’s culture from Tribulation until the book’s end; b) sorts characters by character traits; or c) compares/ contrasts the definitions of human within the novel. Cover Design:You’re in charge of the cover design of the latest edition of The Chrysalids. Consider important themes, symbols, and the current publishing industry and craft a new cover. Include cover blurbs and an explanation.

Practical Visitor’s Guide to Waknuk:Your best friend is going on an expedition to Waknuk. What does he or she need to know to fit it? To survive? Can alternatively be written as a travel guide for a rather unlikely tourist destination. Wild Card: Is there something you’re dying to try out (rock opera, book review, comic adaptation)? Come and see me with a brief written proposal (2-3 sentences) describing what you would like to do and why you’d like to do it, and we’ll have a chat! Movie Pitch (with storyboard): Write a pitch for selling the film rights to The Chrysalids. Include a short storyboard for an important (and exciting!) theme or casting suggestions. Should be able to be recited in no more than one minute.

Creative Short Story/Poem: Respond, either in a short story or poem, to The Chrysalids, “The Valedictorian,” “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas,” or one of the themes we have discussed in this unit. Letter Home: Write a letter from the perspective of David, Rosalind, or Petra after the novel’s conclusion. What do they want the people of Waknuk to know? How does the writer feel about how things have played out? Scripting: Script a scene from the novel for the stage or for film. Act it out with a peer. Should include stage direction, set instructions, character descriptions, and so on. Be able to justify why you chose this particular scene.

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Socratic Circles
Throughout  this  unit,  you  will  be  encouraged  to  pull  out  themes  and  ideas  from  The   Chrysalids  and  the  other  texts  we  address  and  connect  those  ideas  to  real-­‐world  issues.  Over   the  course  of  the  novel  study,  you  should  select  a  complex  issue  that  interests  you  and  begin   researching  the  writing  and  thinking  that  has  been  done  on  the  topic.  By  the  end  of  the  unit,   you  should  have  two  pieces  (news  articles,  videos,  documentary  clips,  blog  entries,  etc.)  that   relate  to,  complicate,  or  expand  upon  the  big  ideas  we’ve  discussed  throughout. Once  we  have  completed  studying  the  novel,  we’ll  begin  Socratic  Circles.  Each  day  we’ll  have   an  inner  circle  and  an  outer  circle;  the  individuals  in  the  inner  circle  will  each  take  a  turn  as   the  facilitator.  The  facilitator  leads  the  group  discussion  pertaining  to  the  research  he  or  she   has  brought  to  class.  It  is  the  inner  circle’s  job  to  read  the  research  completed  by  the  other   members  of  the  inner  circle;  each  member  should  also  come  to  class  with  ideas,  questions,   and/or  important  passages.  In  short,  you  should  be  prepared  to  delve  into  a  complex   discussion. When  preparing  to  act  as  facilitator,  ensure  that  your  inner  circle  has  access  to  your  research     and  prepare  a  list  of  open-­‐ended  questions  that  will  provoke  discussion.  Remember:  the   purpose  of  a  Socratic  Circle  is  not  to  come  to  an  answer,  but  to  explore  complex  ideas.  An   excellent  way  to  approach  this  goal  would  be  to  include  research  pieces  with  opposing   views. While  the  inner  circle  discusses  an  issue,  the  outer  circle  will  keep  track  of  who  is  speaking   and  the  points  that  the  inner  circle  is  making.  When  discussion  winds  down,  the  outer  circle   members  will  ask  a  question  of  the  inner  circle,  meant  to  clarify,  deepen,  or  expand. One  goal  of  Socratic  Circles  is  to  understand  the  ideas  and  thoughts  of  others  through   asking  questions  and  listening  to  answers.  This  means  that  participants  must  practice  how   to  agree  and  disagree.  Participants  must  be  able  to  disagree  without  being  disagreeable.  In   order  to  do  so,  the  participants  can  use  the  following  suggested  ways  of  responding  as  a   way  of  framing  their  thoughts  before  they  speak.  Speaking  and  responding  in  a  calm,   collaborative  manner  is  essential  to  good  discussion  and  dialogue.   1) I  agree  with__________  because,  but  I  want  to  add  another  reason  why  I  think  _________   is  true.  (Give  another  reason.)   2) I  disagree  with  __________  because  .  .  .   3) I'm  not  sure  why  ___________  said  .  .  .  Can  you  reword  your  comments  to  help  me   understand?   4) I  understand  your  point,  __________,  but  I  want  to  add/disagree/give  another  side  .  .  . 5) This  is  what  I  think  you  are  saying.  .  .  Is  that  correct?

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English 11 Advanced, R. Wheadon

The Chrysalids:
Reading Groups
Members:  ___________________________________________________________________ In  your  reading  group,  you  will  be  responding  to  and  discussing  writing  and  task   prompts,  performing  close  readings  of  passages  from  The  Chrysalids,  and  discussing  the   novel  in  detail.  Your  group  members  serve  as  the  core  of  your  experience  of  the  novel:   together,  you  will  develop  informed  opinions  on  the  texts  and  ideas  we  examine. We  will  frequently  begin  class  with  group  work:  you  should  always  come  to  class  with  the   appropriate  readings  completed  and  with  several  questions,  ideas,  or  important  passages/ quotations  that  you  would  like  to  discuss.  Please  write  your  discussion  points  down  either   on  a  piece  of  paper  or  on  a  cue  card  (you  can  get  these  from  me).  I  will  occasionally   collect  these  in  order  to  gauge  the  extent  to  which  you’re  connecting  with  the  text(s). At  the  end  of  the  unit,  you  will  be  completing  peer  evaluations.  Remember:  the  more  you   contribute  to  discussion  by  bringing  in  ideas,  questioning  your  group  members,  and   engaging  with  the  material,  the  better  your  experience  will  be!   Peer  Assessment: 1. Assign  each  group  member  a  number,  including  yourself 2.  Give  each  group  member  a  score  for  each  category  out  of  five:  1  (never),  2  (rarely),  3   (sometimes),  4  (often),  5  (always) Area Read  the  novel  and  came  prepared  to  discuss  it  (with   questions/ideas/passages  ready) Contributed  meaningfully  to  discussion  in  a  way  that   demonstrated  insight  and  made  discussion  more  complex Listened  carefully  and  respectfully  and,  when  differing   viewpoints  arose,  voiced  disagreement  constructively Raised  interesting  questions  about  the  text(s)  and  engaged   meaningfully  with  the  questions  raised                                 TOTAL: 1 2 3 4

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