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Quilt Blocks Around the World: 50 Appliqué Patterns for International Cities & More - Mix & Match to Create Lasting Memories

Quilt Blocks Around the World: 50 Appliqué Patterns for International Cities & More - Mix & Match to Create Lasting Memories

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Published by C&T Publishing, Inc. an imprint of NBN Books

You loved Quilt Blocks Across America—now author Debra Gabel shows you the rest of the world in her signature style. Debra’s sequel features 50 all new 6” square appliqué patterns for exciting locales like Tokyo, Sydney, and Venice, plus general travel-themed designs. Perfect for any kind of appliqué. An inspiring gallery of the quilt blocks “in action” gives you plenty of ideas for sewing something special to commemorate your travels…real or imagined. Pages lay flat for tracing the patterns and color templates make fabric selection easy. Includes a CD inside with PDF files for resizing and printing as needed.

You loved Quilt Blocks Across America—now author Debra Gabel shows you the rest of the world in her signature style. Debra’s sequel features 50 all new 6” square appliqué patterns for exciting locales like Tokyo, Sydney, and Venice, plus general travel-themed designs. Perfect for any kind of appliqué. An inspiring gallery of the quilt blocks “in action” gives you plenty of ideas for sewing something special to commemorate your travels…real or imagined. Pages lay flat for tracing the patterns and color templates make fabric selection easy. Includes a CD inside with PDF files for resizing and printing as needed.

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Publish date: Jan 1, 2012
Added to Scribd: Aug 24, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781607054368
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9781607054368

Quilt Blocks

Around the World
DEBRA GABEL
50 Appliqué Patterns for International Cities & More
Mix & Match to Create Lasting Memories
Print PDF
Patterns
Any Size
from CD
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Quilt Blocks
Around the World
DEBRA GABEL
50 Appliqué Patterns for International Cities & More
Mix & Match to Create Lasting Memories

Where We’ve Been, 51˝ × 51˝, by Patti Rusk
Text and illustrations copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel
Photography copyright © 2012 by C&T Publishing, Inc.
Publisher: Amy Marson
Creative Director: Gailen Runge
Acquisitions Editor: Susanne Woods
Editor: Gailen Runge
Book Designer: Kerry Graham
Cover Designer: Kristy Zacharias
Production Coordinator: Zinnia Heinzmann
Production Editor: S. Michele Fry
Photography by Diane Pedersen and Christina Carty-Francis of C&T
Publishing, Inc.
Published by C&T Publishing, Inc., P.O. Box 1456, Lafayette, CA 94549
All rights reserved. No part of this work covered by the copyright hereon
may be used in any form or reproduced by any means—graphic, electronic,
or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or information
storage and retrieval systems—without written permission from the pub-
lisher. The copyrights on individual artworks are retained by the artists as
noted in Quilt Blocks Around the World. These designs may be used to make
items only for personal use or donation to nonprofit groups for sale. Each
piece of finished merchandise for sale must carry a conspicuous label with
the following information: Designs copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel from
the book Quilt Blocks Around the World from C&T Publishing, Inc.
Attention Copy Shops: Please note the following exception—publisher and
author give permission to photocopy pages 20–65 and 67–70 for personal
use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.
We take great care to ensure that the information included in our products
is accurate and presented in good faith, but no warranty is provided nor
are results guaranteed. Having no control over the choices of materials or
procedures used, neither the author nor C&T Publishing, Inc., shall have any
liability to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damage caused
directly or indirectly by the information contained in this book. For your
convenience, we post an up-to-date listing of corrections on our website
(www.ctpub.com). If a correction is not already noted, please contact our
customer service department at ctinfo@ctpub.com or at P.O. Box 1456,
Lafayette, CA 94549.
Trademark (™) and registered trademark (®) names are used throughout
this book. Rather than use the symbols with every occurrence of a trade-
mark or registered trademark name, we are using the names only in the
editorial fashion and to the benefit of the owner, with no intention of
infringement.
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Gabel, Debra, 1961-
Quilt blocks around the world : 50 appliqué patterns for international cities
& more : mix & match to create lasting memories / Debra Gabel.
p. cm.
ISBN 978-1-60705-435-1 (soft cover)
1. Appliqué--Patterns. 2. Quilting--Patterns. 3. Cities and towns in art. I.
Title.
TT779.G33 2012
746.44’5--dc23
2011031347
Printed in China
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Las Vegas Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Another Day in Paradise, by Stephanie De Abreu
Nairobi Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Singapore Block, 12˝ × 12˝
3
Dedication
I would like to dedicate this book to my father, Arthur
James Ogden, who passed away on January 25, 2011, at
the age of 84. My dad was a man’s man, and he had a
great spirit. He was incredibly kind, helpful, and generous
with his time. My dad was extremely resourceful and cre-
ative. He was proud of me and of my accomplishments.
My dad served in the Army and has been to many of
the cities in this book. He returned to several of the
European cities with my mom after he retired, but as a
tourist and not as a soldier. With much love and respect,
I dedicate this book to you, Dad!
these two ladies doing what I love to do. Mindy is an inspi-
ration and has a pretty terrific husband, Rick.
A big thank-you to Hilda Ogden, my mom, who hand
bound the edges of the quilts we made for this book.
Mom is not really into quilting, but she did a great job on
the bindings. She helps whenever she can in the studio
with ironing, binding, stuffing patterns, and keeping all
the pins artistically arranged in the pincushions.
The Yahoo World Blocks online volunteer group, many of
whose members I have never met, has been exceptional
in providing samples, pattern testing, editing of instruc-
tions, and input. Many of the volunteers’ samples appear
in the Gallery (pages 71–77). Quilters who participated
in Quilt Blocks Across America made several of the gallery
entries. My new friend from the group, Lee Hofstetter, has
made especially amazing samples. Special thanks to Lee! I
can see a long-term friendship blossoming here. Meeting
talented new quilters while creating the books I have
written has been so rewarding.
Lastly, I would like to thank all the guilds and quilt shops
that have invited me to lecture and lead workshops. You
are all part of the success of these patterns, and you all
played a critical role in helping me zero in on this com-
panion book of world cities that C&T Publishing would
bring to market. Everyone’s kindness and positive energy
are sincerely appreciated.
Acknowledgments
It is hard to believe that I am sitting at my computer
writing acknowledgments for this new book just 12
months after my first book, Quilt Blocks Across America,
was sent to C&T Publishing! I would like to thank C&T
Publishing, and especially Susanne Woods, Gailen Runge,
Zinnia Heinzmann, and Amy Marson, for being so kind and
professional in providing this opportunity. The writing and
production were painless with C&T’s help.
I must send out a huge acknowledgment to my studio
assistant, Patti Rusk. Patti has teenagers and comes to
the studio a few days a week. We work well together and
commiserate on the trials and tribulations of raising teen-
agers. I must say we have a grand time! Patti has helped
me every step of the way with this book, serving as my
sounding board and helping prepare samples for sewing
and appliqué by our satellite studio assistant, Mindy
Williams. I would design each city block and choose the
fabrics. Patti would then cut, iron, and fuse the pieces, as
well as sew up a few of the blocks.
Mindy Williams is my quilting goddess! Mindy was a stu-
dents in a class I taught in Philadelphia a few years back. I
ran into her again in the spring of 2010 in her home state
of Delaware. One thing led to another, and Mindy agreed
to sew and raw-edge appliqué the blocks Patti and I put
together. Mindy is a master sewer! Her stitches are impec-
cable. I am so thankful to have the honor of working with
Detail of British Isles, page 72
Quilt Blocks Around the World
4
Contents
Preface . . . 5
How to Use This Book . . . 7
General Block Directions . . . 12
Supplies . . . 16
International City Patterns . . . 19

Cities with Stripes, 57˝ × 57˝, by Debra Gabel, Patti Rusk, Mindy Williams, and Maria O’Haver
World Patterns . . . 66
Gallery . . . 71
Supplies and Resources . . . 78
About the Author . . . 79
Preface
5
Preface
This is my second quilting book, and I must say the
journey progressed more smoothly this time. I knew
what to expect and planned better. Writing a book,
especially a book that has so many patterns, can seem
like a daunting task. With the support of my studio
assistants and online sample makers, the book
progressed in an orderly and efficient way.
My quilting pattern company, Zebra Patterns, offers
more than 100 commercial patterns, and my first
book, Quilt Blocks Across America, contains 51 patterns.
The success of Quilt Blocks Across America has made
this book possible, which brings my pattern count to
well over 200. This second book by C&T seemed like a
natural follow-up to Quilt Blocks Across America. Now
quilters can make ancestry quilts, travel memory quilts,
and even bucket list quilts that span the globe!
The whole concept of destination quilts started at
Pittsburgh’s spring 2009 International Quilt Market, the
initial venue for launching the Zebra Patterns line nationally.
The patterns were well received by quilt shops, publishers,
and fabric companies, with particular attention paid to the
CityStamp, StateStamp, NationStamp, and GetAwayStamp
patterns. My stamp patterns are unique renditions of
extra-large postage stamps that were totally concocted
in my head. These stamp patterns made it clear to me
that quilters want to make quilts that reflect their lives
and travels. Quilt Blocks Across America made the 50 states
accessible, and now the world blocks make the whole
world available to include in special memory quilts. Quilt
Blocks Across America provided positioning templates, color
layouts, a CD with paper patterns, and a large gallery. Quilt
Blocks Around the World has been set up in the same format
so that quilters can use both books to chronicle and visually
answer the question, “Where ya been?”

World Chain, 74˝ × 74˝, by Debra Gabel, Patti Rusk, Mindy Williams, and Maria O’Haver
Quilt Blocks Around the World
6
The initial spark that led to Quilt
Blocks Across America naturally
progressed to these world block
designs. I cannot tell you how
many people asked if I thought
I would do other countries. I
had already been “baking” the
idea of countries or world des-
tinations in my head before I
finished the U.S. state blocks.
I thought long and hard about what imagery to include
in the second book’s blocks. My original thought was to
create “country” blocks. I quickly discovered that other
countries, like the United States, are extremely diverse
within their borders. I did not think I could do a whole
country justice in a six-inch-square quilt block. Quickly
my attention turned toward international cities and
destinations. I felt confident that I could capture the flavor
of world destinations by focusing on notable landmarks.
That is the intention of this book: to capture the flavor of
each destination in six inches of cloth.
Once I zeroed in on the book’s concept, I needed to pick
the top world destinations. That was no simple task. Of
course I started with the obvious, like London, Paris, New
York, and Tokyo. There were twelve to fifteen “must have”
cities, but then the next level of decisions became a bit
more difficult. Once I had the top 30 or so cities chosen,
it became a research project to figure out where most
world travelers go and to include destinations all over the
world. I did ample research on the Internet about the top
50 international travel destinations. I cross-referenced and
reassured myself that the top 30 were the right choices.
The criteria for the last 20 were set once I looked up and
read about each city and its landmarks. If the city had
great landmarks that could be translated into cloth, it
made the list. C&T acquisitions editor Susanne Woods and
I came up with a brilliant idea for how to really be sure we
had chosen well. We thought C&T should send us to every
destination in the book, plus those under consideration,
to ensure that we brought great cities to you, the quilter.
Somehow we never got around to formally proposing
the idea to Amy Marson, the publisher, for approval. Ha!
I told many of my friends and students about the idea.
They all agreed but thought it would be better if I took
them instead of Susanne! I have been to only a few of the
cities in the book and now have many more to add to my
bucket list.
Each project begins with a short paragraph overview of
the city featured in the block and its notable character-
istics and landmarks. Researching the cities took me to
each destination for a short while, at least in my imagina-
tion. We live in a fascinating world, with so many amazing
human contributions that are master works of art. You
will see many architectural feats throughout that are
stunning, but they do have many small details, such as
windows and doors. Be sure to read the Embellishing
Small Pieces section (page 8) to keep you out of the
insane asylum after doing scores of tiny windows and
details. The blocks were designed at six inches to get as
many great designs in one book as we could. I strongly
recommend enlarging the patterns up to at least eight
inches. That said, I blew up my blocks 200 percent to
twelve inches, which made the pieces much more
manageable.
Translucent Patterning, the same unique process intro-
duced in Quilt Blocks Across America, allows the quilter to
trace each piece and see color, positioning, and overlap all
in one block. Imagine looking down through the roof of a
building with X-ray vision, and you will get the idea. A CD
with digital PDF representations of each block’s pattern
pieces is included for added ease of use. My sincere hope
is that your journey with the patterns in this book is a fun
and exciting way for you to respond in cloth to the ques-
tion, “Where ya been?”
How to Use This Book
7
How to Use This Book
Quilt Blocks Around the World presents primarily raw-edge
fused appliqué patterns with general directions for use, plus
several tips and suggestions. You will find 50 patterns: 46
for international destination cities and four general world
blocks. The page layouts are consistent throughout. The
cities are listed alphabetically starting on page 19. The world
blocks are separate, starting on page 66. The patterns are
all designed as 6˝ × 6˝ finished blocks, but I strongly suggest
that you consider enlarging the designs for ease of use. The
larger the block size, the bigger the small pieces will be. You
may hand turn the designs if you are a hand turner. You can
enlarge the designs by using the included CD or by making
an enlarged color copy at any office products retailer or copy
shop, or even at a growing number of public libraries. Keep
in mind that you can enlarge the designs onto two pages and
tape them together should you want a larger width than the
standard 8½˝ × 11˝ sheet of paper. On page 2 you will find a
“permission to copy” statement for copy shops.
Tip
I strongly suggest that you consider enlarging the
designs for ease of use.
Descriptive and Directions
Paragraphs
Each block’s page starts with a brief descriptive paragraph,
making reference to notable facts about the city and the
images in the pattern. The next paragraph gives simple
general instructions, followed by creative suggestions, if
applicable, to enhance that particular block. If the simple
directions on each pattern page are not informative enough
for you, please read the entire General Block Directions
chapter (pages 12–15), which describes how to assemble
the blocks. By following the block directions and using the
creative suggestions, you will be able to make a beautiful
international block for your personalized quilt or project. You
can always write to me at debra@zebrapatterns.com with any
questions. You can also combine these blocks with blocks
from Quilt Blocks Across America. The blocks in the two books
are scaled the same to allow easy combining of U.S. and inter-
national destinations.
Tip
Read each block’s directions paragraph carefully.
Each paragraph starts with general piecing and
fusing instructions, followed by embellishment
suggestions or alternative ways to create some of
the details, when applicable.
About the Block Designs:
Mix, Match, and Edit
You can easily edit any block to your particular experience.
Maybe your experience at a world destination was more
about a beach than urban sightseeing. You could take the
Caribbean block and insert “San Juan” to represent your
Puerto Rico beach experience. You could add a favorite ele-
ment from another block to the new block you are creating.
Or maybe, as another example, you went to other destina-
tions in France in addition to Paris. You could replace “Paris”
with “France,” include just the Eiffel Tower, and mix it with
some countryside elements. Feel free to mix and match to
better represent your response to “Where ya been?”
Tip
Feel free to mix and match graphics from other
blocks to make your block ring more true to your
vision of the answer to “Where ya been?”
4
½
˝
S
k
y
Mix and match to
create a new block!
3
½
˝
L
a
n
d
4
½
˝
S
k
y
3
½
˝
L
a
n
d
4
½
˝
S
k
y
3
½
˝
L
a
n
d
4
½
˝
S
k
y
3
½
˝
L
a
n
d
Use the type
from San Juan.
Use most of the
Caribbean Block
and flip elements.
Remove the sand
castle and chair.
Change fabric colors.
Take the tortoise and
rocks from the
Galapagos Islands
and flip pieces.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
8
PATTERN PIECES WITHOUT NUMBERS
Some of the smallest details, such as windows and doors,
may not have numbers. This indicates that the pieces would
be translated easier via thread or fabric paint. Some of these
details can even be eliminated if you feel they are just too
small. These small objects become more manageable after
the pattern has been enlarged. By enlarging the 6˝ block
200 percent, a tiny ¼˝ window becomes a more manageable
½˝ piece.
Unnumbered pieces
are best translated
by using fabric paint
or embroidery.
Pieces without numbers
4
½
˝

S
k
y
3
½
˝

L
a
n
d
31
1
2
4
24
24
26
27
28
41
42
43
43
29 29 29 29 29 29
30
33 33 33 33
34 34 34
35 35 35
36
37
34
32
6
9 9 7
8
8
5
14
16
18
19
20 20
23
21 22
16 17 17 17 17 17 17
15 10 10 10 10 10 10
11 11 11 11 11 11
12
13
7 7
25
38
39
40
3 3 3
3
3
3
3
EMBELLISHING SMALL PIECES
Sewing on decorative beading can be effective for some
of the small details, such as windows and doors. On many
of the buildings, small bars of trim separate portions of the
structures. Decorative lace works well in these areas. Often I
use readily available fabric paint or markers from craft stores
to paint or draw tiny details. Just be sure the paint or markers
you use are made for fabric. Using products not especially
made for cloth can result in bleeding colors, cracking, or
other undesirable effects. Fabric glitter is yet another method
for adding a bit of embellishment to your projects. The key
to embellishment is to use it sparingly. Overuse of embellish-
ments can quickly lead to tacky results.
Creating Block Backgrounds
for All Blocks
Throughout this book, most of the 6½˝ × 6½˝ unfinished
patterns will have a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ sky piece sewn to a 4½˝ × 6¾˝
land piece to make up the background of the block. The
unfinished pieced block should be 7½˝ tall × 6¾˝ wide; the
extra background will allow you to position the seamline and
trim the block to exactly 6½˝ square. The seam between the
land and sky needs to be a standard ¼˝, pressed toward the
darker fabric. A few blocks have solid backgrounds, which
should be cut as 7˝ × 7˝ squares. You will place the fused
appliqué pieces on either the pieced background or the full
square background to complete the block.
3
½
˝

s
k
y
4
½
˝

l
a
n
d
Trim to 6½˝ across.
2
(Land piece—cut 4½˝ × 6¾˝.)
1
(Sky piece—cut 3½˝ × 6¾˝.)
Trim excess to make
block 6½˝ square.
¼˝ seam pressed
to dark fabric
Numbering of Pattern Pieces
The sky and land pattern pieces are always numbered 1
and 2 respectively. The remaining elements are numbered in
the order in which they are to be assembled. Piece 3 will be
positioned after the background is created, unless otherwise
noted, and will then be followed by pieces 4, 5, and so on.
After background is done, position pieces in numeric
order (after background, position 3, then 4 …).
Positioning
4
½
˝

S
k
y
3
½
˝

L
a
n
d
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
5
6 7
7
8
9
10
10
10
2
Pieces 1 and 2
will always be sky
and land, pieced
with ¼˝ seam
pressed to dark.
How to Use This Book
9
Translucent Patterning
and Tracing
All the patterns have been drawn with translucent overlap-
ping color in order to show how the pieces fit together. Look
carefully at the pieces and then trace the outline of each
numbered piece. The translucency allows you to see the
overlap of the drawn pieces. Do not use the pattern colors for
fabric choices. Refer to the small picture adjacent to the city
paragraphs and to the block directions at the top of each
page for color recommendations. You will be tracing each
numbered element separately onto tracing paper. If you do
not want to trace, all the pieces are separated on the included
CD in PDF format.

sky

lan
d
1
3 3
3
3
3
3
3
4
5
6 7
7
8
9
10
10
10 10
2
T
R
A
C
IN
G
P
A
P
E
R
100% color patterns
for fabric selection
Smaller illustration
adjacent to written
paragraphs on each
page is 100% color
for fabric choices.
Pieces are translucent
for tracing each
overlapping appliqué
piece. Do not use for
color reference.
Translucent patterns
for tracing
Trace each element onto
tracing paper and write
number on traced piece.
Trace and number
pattern pieces onto
tracing paper.
Special Pattern Element
A complete image of the Las Vegas sign for the Las Vegas
block (page 41) is included on the CD also. This element was
included separately because it is intricate and difficult to
trace and translate into pieces. The detailed significance is
so meaningful that it should appear in cloth as accurately as
possible. The Vegas sign is in one piece on the CD and can be
printed onto printable fabric. Once the Vegas sign is printed
and fused following the manufacturer’s instructions, you can
use it as you would any other element in the block. The pat-
tern pieces also have been provided for those brave quilters
who love a challenge.
City Names
When I was designing this book, I decided to use a different
font for each international city, unlike in my last book, Quilt
Blocks Across America, which has state abbreviations all in the
same font. Using various fonts further enhanced the setting
of the blocks. Some of the typefaces are challenging not only
to cut but also to stitch. You might use commercial fusible
lettering or computer-generated typography, or embroider
the letters by hand or machine using a similar font.
Tips
TIP 1: If you have an embroidery unit on your
sewing machine, you could embroider the letters
using a similar font found in your software.

TIP 2: You could cut out the city name type and
stitch it on with quilt-shop-quality invisible thread,
thereby minimizing the necessary accuracy around
complex curves and shapes. The invisible thread
will keep the appliqué down, and the thread will
not show, allowing just the cut fabric to define the
lettering edges.

TIP 3: Creating your own two-color type on a
computer and printing the letters on printable
fabric is yet another way to make the type on
each city block.

TIP 4: You could use commercially available fusible
lettering.
Raw-Edge Sewing
Sewing the raw edges of the appliqué pieces is both a
functional and an aesthetic task. Functionally, stitching down
the raw edges holds the pieces in place and minimizes edge
fraying. Aesthetically, sewing down the raw edges is an
opportunity to add another design element through color
or stitch choice. Raw-edge sewing will reflect your own
personal choices. If you want the edging to blend, use
matching-color threads. If an added noticeable line is desired,
use a contrasting thread. The length and width of your zigzag
stitching are also matters of personal taste. I use a somewhat
narrow, tight zigzag, which I often describe as a dense zigzag
or a slightly open satin stitch. You can also use a decorative
or blanket stitch to hold the edges down. Again, it is all
subjective. I would recommend making a small test sample
using fused scraps to try out your raw-edge stitch. Sew a few
inches of the fused scrap piece and examine the stitching to
ensure that you are satisfied with the results before starting
the real block.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
10
Anchor the stitching by sewing three stitches in place with
the sewing machine. Then the zigzagging begins. When
sewing the zigzag edging, it is important to position the
stitching so that the outermost part of the stitch just pierces
the underlying fabric. The main “bite” of the stitch stays on
the cut pattern piece. If you straddle the pattern piece edge,
you will see the zigging edges on the underlying fabric. If
you miss the edge and zig only on the pattern piece, you will
leave a sliver of unfinished fabric edging that will be prone to
fraying. Try to pierce just outside the pattern piece edge. At
the end of the zigzag stitching, I again anchor the stitching
by sewing three stitches in place with the sewing machine.
Use matching thread
and pierce edge
of underlying fabric.
Underlying fabric
pattern piece
Anchor by sewing
in place 3 times.
Pattern piece
PRESSER FOOT: Using an open-toe presser foot on your
sewing machine will help with edge stitching accuracy. Also,
if your sewing machine has a needle-position adjustment,
move the needle position to the far right. Use the right prong
of the open-toe sewing foot to follow the right edge of the
fabric, providing accurate stitch placement. See diagram (at
right).
THREADS: Using good thread is essential to any quality
sewing project. Many retail chain stores and discount depart-
ment stores carry inexpensive threads. Avoid these threads
at all cost! The thread is the “glue” in your project. If you use
cheap threads, the glue will come undone quickly as well
as be detrimental to your sewing machine. There are many
quality threads on the market today. Your local quilt shop will
be able to guide you to strong, beautiful, clean threads. A
printed number on each spool of thread indicates the weight
of the thread. Higher thread numbers are finer threads.
For example, a 60- or 100-weight thread will be very fine.
A 40-weight thread is standard. A 30-weight or 12-weight
thread is heavy.
I typically use a combination of threads. I use a thin thread
in my bobbin, usually a 60-weight. This has two major ben-
efits. The first is that it allows the top thread (I typically use
a 40-weight thread) to lie on top of the project better. The
second is that with finer thread, you can get many more yards
on the bobbin spool, making bobbin changes less frequent. If
I am submitting a competition quilt, I will match the top and
bottom thread colors. White, black, and medium gray or tan
will suffice for most projects.
Needle position
to far right
Open-toe foot
Tips
TIP 1: Use an open-toe presser foot for visibility of
zigzag stitching.

TIP 2: If your sewing machine has an adjustable
needle position, move the needle to the far right.
That allows you to ride the edge with the right
prong of the open-toe foot and easily keep the
stitching on the edge.

TIP 3: Use a thin thread (60- to 100-weight) on the
bobbin and a 30- to 40-weight top thread to allow
the heavier thread to lie nicely on the quilt top.
Also, the thinner bobbin thread lasts twice as long
as the 30- to 40-weight top thread.

TIP 4: Use a 70 / 10, 80 / 12, or 90 / 14 Microtex
needle for raw-edge sewing. Changing needles fre-
quently will also improve your stitch quality.
How to Use This Book
11
RAW-EDGE ZIGZAG CORNERS,
POINTS, AND CURVES
OUTER CORNERS: When sewing raw-edge outer corners,
zigzag to the corner edges. Stop sewing when the needle is
in the down position on the pattern piece’s outer edge. Then
pivot the work. Begin sewing again, crossing the first stitches.
You might need to hand turn the sewing machine wheel and
slightly adjust the fabric to get the needle in the right posi-
tion so it pivots in the corner.
Stop zigzag
at corner; pivot
and continue sewing,
crossing first stitches.
Stitches just pierce
underlying fabric.
Outer corner
Underlying fabric
pattern piece
Anchor by sewing
in place 3 times.
Pattern piece
INNER CORNERS: When sewing raw-edge inner corners,
zigzag to the inner corner. Stop sewing when the needle is
in the down position on the pattern piece’s outer edge. Then
pivot the work. Begin sewing again. There will not be any
stitches in the inner corner area.
Stop zigzag
at corner on pattern
piece edge; pivot,
leaving corner open.
Inner corner
pattern piece
Anchor by sewing
in place 3 times.
Pattern piece
Underlying fabric
CURVES: When sewing raw-edge curves, going slowly is
critical. Sew one or two stitches, stop with the needle down,
and then pivot. The number of stitches and the degree of piv-
oting depend on the tightness and size of the curve. The goal
is to keep the zigzag stitches even throughout the curve.
Stitch slowly
around curves,
stopping with
needle down to
pivot each stitch.
Curve
Underlying fabric
pattern piece Pattern piece
POINTS: When sewing raw-edge points, it is necessary to
decrease the stitch width as you approach the end of the
point. End at the point with the needle down, and then
reverse the stitch by slowly increasing the stitch width until
the stitch is back to the original width.
Gradually
decrease the
stitch width into
the point. End at
point with needle
down; pivot and
reverse up other
side of point.
Point
pattern piece Pattern piece
Underlying fabric
Using Organza or Tulle for
Shadows or Sun Rays
Some of the patterns in this book have shadows, while others
have subtle sun rays. These items are optional. Using white
organza or tulle for the sun rays will produce a light, translu-
cent effect. Using a dark-colored organza or tulle for shadows
generally works well. These items are enhancements that can
be left off the block if you want to simplify it.
When working with organza or tulle, proceed in the same
manner as you would for creating fabric pattern pieces.
Mistyfuse Ultraviolet fusible is excellent for the fusible
backing. It is very light and will maintain the sheer fabric’s
translucent properties. The ultraviolet version protects the
pieces from discoloring over time.
Organza and tulle are sheer, open-weave fiber products.
When you apply fusible webbing to the back, it will bleed
through to some extent. This makes using a nonstick pressing
sheet essential. I prefer the 21˝ × 27˝ Fat Goddess Sheet for
appliqué pressing.
I have found that high iron temperatures can melt or scorch
organza and tulle more quickly than other fabrics. Determine
and then use the lowest iron setting necessary to fuse. Once
these translucent pieces are in place, always use a pressing
sheet if further ironing is needed; this will prevent melting or
scorching.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
12
General Block
Directions
Materials Needed
Fabrics chosen for particular block
Fusible webbing
Nonstick appliqué pressing sheet
Sharp pair of cutting scissors
Rotary cutter
Quilting ruler
Good, clean iron
Copy machine
Tracing pad and pencil
Lightbox (helpful for tracing, but not necessary)
Sewing machine with open-toe foot
Matching threads for all elements
Tear-away stabilizer for appliqué sewing
Batting
Clean work space
Block Directions
1. Create the block background.
Cut a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ sky (or land) piece and a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ land (or
sky) piece. Use the small color graphic block on each pattern
page for your fabric choice color reference. Sew the pieces
together with a standard ¼˝ seam. These pieces do not have
fusible webbing on the back. This will make up the background
of each block. Press the seams toward the dark fabric. You will
place the fused appliqué pieces on this pieced background
to complete the block. (Refer to Creating Block Backgrounds
for All Blocks on page 8.) Note: A few blocks have solid back-
grounds, which do not require any preparation.
Tip
The background rectangles for the sky and land are
generous (6¾˝ wide) so that you can trim the block
to 6½˝ square. When trimming, be sure to position
the seamline correctly according to the layout.
2. Trace each numbered element separately onto tracing
paper. Be sure to write the number onto the traced piece
matching the pattern. (Refer to Translucent Patterning and
Tracing on page 9.) If you choose to use the CD, simply print
out pattern sheets at the desired scale. CD patterns are
prenumbered.
Tip
You might want to jot down the color of the traced
piece to help in matching fabric and assembly.
3. Rough cut out all the traced pattern pieces and separate
the individual traced pieces into piles based on the colors to
be used.
T
R
A
C
IN
G
P
A
P
E
R
A
P
E
R
Rough cut traced pattern pieces of same color.
Tip
Remember, there is no need to cut the traced or
printed CD patterns on exact lines at this time. Just
rough cut each piece.
General Block Directions
13
4. Take a pile of like-colored pattern pieces and lay them out
on the actual fabric to get a rough idea of how much fabric
you will need. Position the pieces close together, but not
overlapping, to use the fabric efficiently. With sharp scissors,
rough cut enough fabric to allow all the pieces to fit on the
chosen fabric. Set the traced pieces aside and make a pile of
“to be fused” fabrics. You will fuse all the rough cuts at one
time for efficiency.
7
7
Place same color pattern pieces
on fabric choice and rough cut
block of fabric to be fused.
Chosen fabric
5. Once you have rough cut all the fabrics, you are ready to
fuse. Lay out enough fusible webbing to accommodate all
the fabric pieces.
6. Sandwich the fabric with fusible webbing in between
nonstick appliqué pressing sheets to protect your iron and
ironing surface.
p
r
e
s
s
i
n
g
s
h
e
e
t
fabric
right side up
Fabric
right side up
right sid right sid
P
r
e
s
s
in
g
s
h
e
e
t
Top pressing sheet
protects iron.
Fabric face up
Fusible webbing
Bottom pressing
sheet protects ironing surface.
P
r
e
s
s
i
n
g
s
h
e
e
t
7. Following the manufacturer’s instructions for heat and
timing, fuse the fabric swatches to the webbing. Iron the top
of the nonstick pressing sheet sandwich; then flip and iron
the opposite side. Applying heat from both sides ensures a
good bond of the fusible webbing to the fabric.
8. Let the nonstick appliqué sandwich cool before removing
the fused fabric. Clean off any fusible webbing debris left
behind on the pressing sheets.
9. Rough cut the fused fabrics apart.
10. Rematch the rough-cut pattern pieces with the correct
fused fabric swatches.
11. Pin all rough-cut pattern pieces right side up to the
appropriate fused fabric, also right side up.
Pin rough-cut pattern pieces
to right side of chosen fabric.
Fabric has fused
webbing on back.
Right side up
Tip
Small pieces can be held in place with temporary
glue, low-adhesive tape, or a small spot of double-
sided tape.
12. With sharp scissors, carefully cut out each pattern piece
on the traced lines or on the pattern lines if the pieces were
printed from the CD. After all the patterns are cut, you will be
ready to position. Do not remove the pins or backing yet.
13. Position the pattern pieces by referring to the num-
bered translucent pattern as your guide. Remove the pins
and backing from each piece as you go. Position the pieces
numerically, starting with piece 3. (Reminder: Pieces 1 and 2
are the sky and land pieces.)
Quilt Blocks Around the World
14
Tip
Do not try to remove fused backing by picking at
the edges or corners. Simply take a pin and score
the back of the pattern piece in the middle. Gently
bend the score until the backing separates. Then
tear it away from the middle. You do not want to
fray the fabric by picking at the corners or edges.
Use pin to score fusible
release paper. Gently bend
fabric and peel backing off.
Back of cut piece
14. Once the block is in position, lay a clean appliqué
pressing sheet over the top and fuse all the elements in place,
following the manufacturer’s instructions. If the fusible you
are using requires steam for the final set, remove the pressing
sheet and steam as instructed after the block is pressed into
position. The Warm Company’s Lite Steam-A-Seam 2 pro-
duces the best results for me. Remember that steam cannot
penetrate through nonstick appliqué pressing sheets. Once
pressed, the block is complete and ready for stitching.
Tip
If your project includes organza or tulle, use a
muslin cloth barrier in those areas when fusing for
the final set. The muslin will protect the organza or
tulle but will allow steam to penetrate.
15. The steps for stitching down the fused appliqué
depend on the size of the project. I use a somewhat tight,
narrow zigzag in my raw-edge appliqué. I often describe
this stitch as a dense zigzag or an open satin stitch. Because
the density of stitching can cause the fabric to pucker, it’s
important to stabilize the block. With smaller projects, you
can stabilize with the batting; for larger projects, you can use
stabilizer, as described below.
SMALL PROJECT: If you have a small project that will be
easy to manipulate in your sewing machine, sandwich only
the top (which has appliqués that are fused but not yet
stitched) and batting at this point. Add borders to the top.
Carefully iron the border seams toward the darker fabric.
Place a layer of fusible webbing between the top and
the batting. I use Mistyfuse. Fuse the top to the batting,
ironing in the center first and moving carefully outward
toward the edges, avoiding any wrinkles. This step replaces
pinning or hand basting. Now the project is fused to the
batting, and the batting becomes the stabilizer.
Basting top to batting
Pattern top
Mistyfuse
Batting
When you are sewing, the dense zigzag stitches will be on
the back of the batting. After all the raw-edge stitching
is complete, cover the batting with the backing before
quilting the whole sandwich. You may be wondering
whether the batting will sew with ease without fabric on
the back. I have found that if you use high-quality low-loft
batting, there is no problem. The Warm Company’s Warm
& Natural needled cotton batting is excellent for this pur-
pose. You just need to clean your machine before or after
every sewing session.
General Block Directions
15
LARGE PROJECT: Larger projects are easier to handle if
you stitch down the raw-edge appliqué on each block
before adding the sashing and borders. There are many
stabilizers on the market. I use a tear-away stabilizer. You
can also use wash-away stabilizers, stay-in stabilizers, or
even freezer paper. Whichever method you choose, you
need to stabilize the block before zigging around all the
pieces with dense stitching. Once you have stitched down
the appliqué on all the blocks, you can add the sashing
and borders.
Next you will be ready to add batting. Place a layer of
Mistyfuse between the top and the batting. This method
of sandwiching will replace hand basting with thread or
pins. Then fuse the top to the batting. (Refer to the illustra-
tion on page 14.) I start ironing in the center and carefully
iron toward the edges to avoid creating wrinkles.
Tip
Be sure the top is square. Do not pull the fabric
while fusing to avoid distorting the top on the bat-
ting. Sometimes this distortion can work to your
advantage when you have an area that is warped,
but other times, pulling the top can result in
undesired effects.
16. Whether your project is small or large, you will now
apply the finished raw-edged top and batting to the backing.
Place another layer of Mistyfuse under the top / batting and
fuse it to the backing. Once again, start ironing in the center
and carefully iron toward the edges, avoiding any wrinkles.
This method is great for small or large projects in place of
basting. It will make a quilt sandwich that is as flat as a pan-
cake, with no pins, plastic, or basting stitches to avoid and
remove. The recommended fusing and batting materials will
leave the sandwich light, flexible, and easy to work with and
care for.
Basting back to batting/top
Pattern top
Batting fused to top
Mistyfuse
Backing fabric
Tip
Be sure the top is square. Do not pull the fabric
while fusing to avoid distorting the backing.
17. Quilt your project. I always start quilting by stitching the
entire quilt in-the-ditch between the blocks and borders. This
generally secures the whole quilt. Next, I quilt in-the-ditch
around the feature elements. Last, I work from the center out
with custom quilting. The fused sandwich is very stable. You
can twist and manipulate the sandwich without any worries
of wrinkles or distortion during quilting.
18. Once your whole project is quilted, you can bind and
enjoy looking at a wonderful piece that will always remind
you of “where ya been.”
Tip
Put a label on the back with the recipient’s name
and the name of the quilter, if someone quilted
it for you. Include the completion or gifting date.
Many of my students have used inkjet-printable
fabric and included a written narrative about each
block on the label.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
16
Supplies
17
Supplies
As you know, there are many brands of all quilting supplies.
I have tried many of these supplies and have come up with
the following list as my staples. Of course, as with any project,
you can use whatever you feel most comfortable with.
It is important for me to tell you that my supply preferences
have evolved over time, independent of any relationships
with the manufacturers or suppliers of these products, and
they have been chosen based on superior performance and
appearance in my projects over the past ten years.
Fabric
I try to use batiks as often as possible. I have found that batiks
are more tightly woven and typically fray less than printed
fabrics. I have always used fabrics from high-quality quilt
shops, even before any shops became customers for my pat-
terns and classes. Hoffman California Fabrics has an extensive
line of colored batiks called Bali Hand-dyed Watercolors
(Style #1895), which works very well. This Hoffman line has
hundreds of colors that are readily available at local quilt
stores. These fabrics read as solid prints, yet offer rich batik
markings.
Fusible Webbing
I use The Warm Company’s Lite Steam-A-Seam 2. This fus-
ible webbing is backed and faced with release paper. Most
other fusibles have release paper on only one side. The Lite
Steam-A-Seam 2 top sheet, when removed, exposes the
tacky fusible. The tack is great for holding fabric in position
while fusing with a hot iron. Pieces do not slide and move
into unwanted positions. This product comes in packages
and as yardage on bolts. When the front is fused to the fabric
and the back release paper is removed, the back side of the
fusible is also tacky. This is great for temporary positioning.
(Fusibles that are slick on the back make sliding pieces an
issue.) Once all the pieces are in place, you steam them. The
steam makes a permanent bond. If you try to remove the
pieces after they have been steamed, it will ruin the fabric.
This is the kind of permanent hold you want. Having an excel-
lent fuse is very important when doing raw-edge appliqué.
Appliqué Pressing Sheets
I use the Fat Goddess Sheet by the people who manufac-
ture the light, airy Mistyfuse that I recommend for basting.
The jumbo pressing sheet, which measures 21˝ × 27˝, is a
translucent tan Teflon sheet that you can see through for
positioning. This huge pressing sheet makes a sandwich
within which fusing can be done well and easily. I place
half the large sheet on my ironing surface and place my
ready-to-be-fused pieces and webbing on that half. Then I
fold the other half of the pressing sheet on top of the fabric.
The top half protects the iron from melted fusible webbing.
The bottom half provides the same protection for the ironing
surface. Even the most experienced quilter can have a brain
freeze and end up with a fused iron surface, which is a real
mess! Folding the jumbo pressing sheet in half with fabric
and fusing sandwiched in the middle guarantees no mess.
I have found that when I sandwich the appliquéd pieces in
this manner, I can conveniently and thoroughly iron both
the top and the bottom of the sandwich to evenly melt the
fusible over every inch of the pattern pieces. If I miss a spot
when fusing the top, chances are that I will get it on the back.
Ironing both the top and the bottom helps prevent peeling
due to fusible that was missed with heat.
Scissors
I use sharp, top-brand scissors. I have a large pair and a small
appliqué pair. When you are cutting out small, intricate
appliqué pieces, you do not want to be fighting with dull scis-
sors that can fray edges. I get my scissors sharpened twice a
year before they show wear.
Rotary Cutters
I use a standard rotary cutter and sharp blades. If I get a burr
in the cutting wheel, I change the blade immediately. I also
use the rotary cutters for making any straight-edged shapes.
For example, if I am cutting ten small windows that are the
same size, I will cut one long strip with the rotary cutter and
then subcut that strip into individual windows. If a building
has a square for the main part, I will measure and cut that
shape with the rotary cutter. I find it much easier to cut
straight lines in this way rather than with scissors.
Sewing Machine
For raw-edge appliqué, any machine that can sew a zigzag
and a straight stitch will do. The features that I find very
helpful are needle down and knee lift. The needle-down fea-
ture allows me to stop stitching with the needle in the down
position. This makes for easy pivoting on curves and corners.
The knee lift allows me to more quickly loosen the grab of
the presser foot for rotation and pivoting. These features are
very nice but not necessary.
I do clean my machine each time I sit down to sew. I am a
quick worker but would not skip this step. A poorly running
machine can be due to lint buildup. Good-quality thread
and cleaning will help keep the machine running well. Listen
carefully to your sewing machine. As soon as you hear your
machine sounding funny, stop. Clean the bobbin area,
rethread the top thread, rethread the bobbin, and try again.
Many times these simple steps of cleaning and rethreading
will stop a problem from developing.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
18
Open-Toe Foot
I use an open-toe foot for my appliqué because it allows me
to see the needle piercing the fabric edge with every stitch.
In my experience, clear feet distort the edge slightly, making
it hard to appliqué right on the edge. Regular feet, with the
metal piece surrounding the needle on the foot, obstruct too
much of the appliqué to see where you need to be sewing.
Threads
I use only top-quality threads. My projects use YLI, WonderFil,
or Madeira threads. These threads will not cause lint buildup
on the working parts of the machine, thus preventing inoper-
ability or, worse, damage.
Sometimes I use invisible threads from either Sew-Art
International or YLI. Invisible threads are great when they
work. In my experience, these two brands are the most reli-
able invisible threads. Using invisible threads from chain
stores will typically result in a trip to the sewing machine
repair shop!
I generally use 40-weight polyester embroidery threads in the
top, which provide luster to finished projects. I typically use a
lighter 60-weight bobbin thread, which allows the top thread
to lie on the surface better. Matching the top and bobbin
thread colors is your best bet for avoiding tension picking.
That said, to save time, I do often use white, black, medium
gray, or tan bobbin thread with a colored top thread. I match
the color value—light with white, medium with medium gray
or tan, and dark with black. Most often, I adjust the tension
so the top thread pulls down toward the back slightly. This
ensures against bobbin picking.
For embellishing, I like Kreinik’s beautiful decorative threads,
which include a wide array of metallics, blends, and twists,
which you can use to add unique hand-stitched details to
your work.
Needles
I use Microtex Sharp needles. I prefer the 80 / 12 but also use
the 90 / 14 and 70 / 10 for different threads. Using the right
needle makes a big difference in the raw-edge stitching.
Changing needles often is also important to keep stitches
looking their best.
Tear-Away Stabilizer
I use tear-away stabilizer to appliqué a block that will be in a
large quilt. I raw-edge stitch all the blocks with tear-away sta-
bilizer and then sash or join the project to make a complete
top. For small projects, I simply fuse the whole top and baste
the top to the batting with Mistyfuse. The batting acts as the
stabilizer and gives the project some dimension, even before
adding the backing and quilting it.
Mistyfuse
Basting is one of those things we all have to do but most of
us dread. I have basted with pins. However, they are tough
on your fingers, make quilts very heavy, and require putting
all the pins in and taking all the pins out. I have also used
a basting gun, which shoots plastic tacks through all three
layers of a quilt. Those tacks also have to be removed and
can leave large holes. Of course, you can hand baste, but this
takes time, and the stitches also need to be removed. I do not
use any of these methods anymore. Instead, I use Mistyfuse
as my basting. Quilter Iris Karp of Attached Inc., in Brooklyn,
New York, developed this amazing product. Mistyfuse is
a very soft, light fusible product. It is like angel hair that is
spread very thinly on a Christmas tree. The product does
not behave like paper-backed fusible webbing, which can
separate in heat and gum up in humidity. Mistyfuse comes in
black and white and will not stiffen your project.
Batting
I like The Warm Company’s Warm & Natural needled cotton
batting. It has no resins or glues. It does not beard and can
be quilted up to 10˝ apart if you want to quilt lightly. I like the
thin batting; in my experience, it sews easily. This product is
dependable and washes well.
Work Space
I believe strongly in the value of having a clean work space.
This saves time and results in the highest-quality finished
project. If your work space is cluttered and dirty, you will
spend more time looking for things and sorting than you do
creating. I make it a point to tidy up each day after I am fin-
ished working; that way, I will be ready to start again with a
clear mind the next time I get to work. Faced with a cluttered,
disorganized space, I often do not want to start the project
again. It can take a long time just to figure out where I left off.





21





I
n
t
e
r
n
a
t
i
o
n
a
l

C
i
t
y

P
a
t
t
e
r
n
s
19
Quilt Blocks Around the World
20
A
g
r
a
5
½
˝

s
k
y
2
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2 2
3
3
3
3
3
4
5
6
7 8 8 9 10
11
11
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
13
14
15 16
25
26
66
67
Agra, India
Agra is a large city on the banks of the River Yamuna in central northern India, approximately
120 miles south of New Delhi, India’s capital city. Agra has a humid subtropical climate with
long, very hot summers; dry, cool winters; and monsoon in July and August. The city is a major
tourist destination because of its many magnificent buildings, most notably the Taj Mahal,
Agra Fort, and Fatehpur Sikri. The Taj Mahal is a world-famous mausoleum built by Mughal
emperor Shah Jahan in memory of his third wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died during the birth
of their fourteenth child. Featuring Persian and Mughal architecture, it is one of the most
beautiful buildings in the world, attracting between 2 million and 4 million visitors annually,
and stands as a symbol of eternal love.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 5½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 2½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces
in place. Small windows and details can be created with embroidery or fabric
paint. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
21
A
m
s
t
e
r
d
a
m
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
10 10
11
13
14
16
18
20
22
24
27 28
31
31
29
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
36
Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Amsterdam is nicknamed the “Venice of the North” for its hundreds of miles of canals, roughly
90 islands, and more than 1,500 bridges. The three main canals, dug in the seventeenth century
and known as the Grachtengordel, form concentric beltways around the city. Amsterdam is
the capital and largest city of the Netherlands and is in the province of North Holland. Main
attractions include the historic canals, the Rijksmuseum, the Van Gogh Museum, the Stedelijk
Museum, Hermitage Amsterdam, the Anne Frank House, the red-light district, and the many
cannabis coffee shops. The North Sea and its prevailing northwesterly winds and gales influ-
ence Amsterdam’s cool oceanic climate. Mild winter temperatures and moderately warm but
rarely hot summers are common for this northern European city.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with embroidery or fabric paint.
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
22
A
t
h
e
n
s
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3
3
3
4
5 6
7
8
9
10
11 (columns)
12
13
17
19
18
26 27
21
31
31
29
28
30
30
20
15
16
22
25
233
24
29
14
29
Athens, Greece
Athens is the capital and largest city of Greece. It is one of the world’s oldest cities and is
generally considered the birthplace of Western civilization. Athens endures hot summers, with
extremely long periods of sunshine throughout the year. Winter is mild, with temperatures of
45–50˚F, and snowfall is rare. Pericles built the Parthenon and other main buildings on the
Acropolis as a monument in the fifth century B.C. The Acropolis is a flat-topped rock that rises
almost 500 feet above sea level. Greece is at the southernmost tip of Europe and has one of the
most unique geographic formations of any country in Europe.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with beading, embroidery, or
fabric paint. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
23
A
u
c
k
l
a
n
d
1
3
½
˝


s
k
y
4
½
˝

l
a
n
d
3
3 3 3 3
3
3
333333333333 333333
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11 12
13
2
2
4
17
18
19
Auckland, New Zealand
Auckland, sometimes called the “City of Sails,” is the largest city in New Zealand and is on an
isthmus between the Hauraki Gulf of the Pacific Ocean to the east and the Waitakere Ranges
to the west. The landscape boasts rich and fertile land made up of more than 40 volcanoes.
Auckland has warm, wet summers and mild, damp winters. Auckland has the largest Poly-
nesian population of any city in the world. The Sky Tower is a 1,076-foot-tall observation and
telecommunications tower and an iconic structure in Auckland’s skyline. The Sky Tower is the
tallest freestanding structure in the Southern Hemisphere. Sheep are often seen grazing in the
lush countryside and rich farmlands around the city. Beautiful landscapes and urban cultural
areas make Auckland, New Zealand, a favorite tourist stop.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with beading, embroidery, or
fabric paint. Flowers can be created with novelty buttons. After sewing the raw
edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
24
B
a
n
g
k
o
k
2
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16 17 18 19 20
21
22
29
24
25
26 26
27 27
28
23
30
35
38
32
33
36
31
34
37
40
40
39
41
Bangkok, Thailand
Bangkok, the “City of Angels,” is the capital and largest city of Thailand. This eastern city has a
hot, tropical climate with a rainy season that runs from May to October. Bangkok is known as
the “Venice of the East” because of the number of canals and passages that divide the city. The
Wat Phra Kaew, or the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, located in the Grand Palace, is revered as
the most sacred Buddhist temple in Thailand. Housed inside is the precious 26-inch green statue
that was carved from a single jade-colored precious stone. No one is allowed to touch the statue
except for the Thai king, who changes the statue’s fabric cloak three times a year.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
Small stars and details can be created with beading, embroidery, or fabric paint.
The edges of the red roofs are green. I used a 1/8˝ green ribbon for that detailing,
sewn on by couching. You could also create the edge with a thick satin-stitch
edging. You might need to sew 2 layers to get density. After sewing the raw
edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
25
B
a
r
c
e
l
o
n
a
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 8
9
9
10
11
12
13
14 14
14
15
16
17
18
19
20 21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
29
Barcelona, Spain
The “City of Counts” is an old nickname for Barcelona from Catalan history, based on the many
counts that ruled from the ninth until the seventeenth century. This European city, on the Mediter-
ranean Sea on the eastern coast of the Iberian Peninsula, has mild, humid winters and warm, dry
summers. The Atlantic west winds often grace Barcelona with low humidity and little to no rain.
Many of the buildings of this second-largest city in Spain date from medieval times. The Sagrada
Família, designed by Spanish architect Antoni Gaudí (1852–1926), is a massive, privately funded
Roman Catholic church that has been under construction since 1882, with a projected comple-
tion date as late as 2026.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
Small stars, windows, and details can be created with beading, embroidery, or
fabric paint. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
26
B
e
i
j
i
n
g
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
4
5
6
6
8
14
15
16
17
18
18
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26 27 28 29
32
33 34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
Beijing, China
Beijing, also known as Peking, is the capital of the People’s Republic of China. The city’s climate
is hot and humid in summer and generally cold, windy, and dry in winter. Erosion of deserts
results in seasonal dust storms that plague the city. Located in northern China, Beijing is
renowned for its many opulent palaces, temples, and huge stone walls with gates. The Temple
of Heaven is a complex of Taoist buildings visited over centuries by the emperors of the Ming
and Qing dynasties to pray to heaven for good harvests. The Temple of Heaven was built in
1406–1420 completely from wood without the use of a single nail. The Great Wall of China was
built across the mountains north of Beijing to guard against nomadic invasions. Beijing is one
of the few cities in the world that has served as the political and cultural center of an area as
large as China for so long.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small details can be created with beading, embroidery, or fabric paint.
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
27
B
r
u
s
s
e
l
s
1
1
1
6
5 5
4
6 7
10
11
8
8
9
9
12
13
21
22
3
15 15
16 16 17
14
2
18
19
24
24
20
23
7
½
˝

s
k
y
Brussels, Belgium
Brussels, also known as “Comic City” and “Europe’s Capital,” is Belgium’s capital city. During
World War II people turned to comic strips for relief, and thus the first nickname was born. The
second name refers to the fact that Brussels hosts many of the key institutions of the European
Union. This beautiful city is near the Atlantic Ocean and a large wetland area, which provides an
oceanic climate with approximately 200 days of rain per year. The Atomium, designed by André
Waterkeyn, is a 335-foot-tall landmark in Brussels from the World Expo of 1958. It is a replica of
an iron crystal enlarged 165 billion times. Visitors explore the unique structure, which provides
a spectacular view of the city, art and science exhibitions, and a restaurant in its nine spheres.
Brussels is renowned for its cultivation of brussels sprouts, Belgian chocolate, Belgian waffles,
and many Belgian beers.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 7½˝ square for the background (piece 1). Leave excess to square and trim
the block later. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place. Using
silver lamé will give a metallic luster to the main iconic structure. Stabilize and
use lower iron temperatures on specialty fabrics. After sewing the raw edges,
trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
28
B
u
d
a
p
e
s
t
1
5
5
7
7
2
2
4
½
˝

l
a
n
d

3
½
˝

s
k
y
3
4 4
4
6 15
15
15
11
12
13
17
Budapest, Hungary
Budapest, the “Pearl of the Danube,” is the picturesque riverside capital city of Hungary. The
Hungarian Parliament Building in Lajos Kossuth Square is a notable landmark of this European
country and a popular tourist destination. The Széchenyi Chain Bridge, the first permanent sus-
pension bridge, which opened in 1849, spans the River Danube between Buda, the western side,
and Pest, the eastern side of the city. When the bridge was built, it was among the most beautiful
industrial monuments in Europe—a symbol of advancement and the link between the eastern
and western sides of Budapest. The city has a temperate climate with mild winter weather and
equally mild summers, with average temperatures in the mid to high seventies.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Draw the bridge support wires with a fabric pen or pencil and straight
stitch those elements. Pieces 10, 16, and 19 can be made from decorative lace.
Small windows and details can be beaded, embroidered, or painted. After
sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
29
B
u
e
n
o
s

A
i
r
e
s
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
1 1
2
3 3 3
3 4
5
6 7
9
9
10
10
11
11
16
12
14
13
13
8
15
15
15
15
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Buenos Aires, the “Paris of the South,” is the capital city of Argentina. It is the second-largest city
in South America and is on the southeastern coast of the continent. Buenos Aires has a humid
subtropical climate, with January being the warmest month and July the coolest. The Obelisk
of Buenos Aires is an iconic national historic monument in the Plaza de la República. It was built
to commemorate the fourth centennial of the city’s founding. Buenos Aires boasts a wealth of
history, architecture, and culture, with particular emphasis on the art of dancing, specifically
the Argentine tango.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be beaded, embroidered, or painted. After
sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
30
C
a
i
r
o
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
4
5
7
3 3 3 3 3
6
9
8
11 10
13
12
15
14
17
16
21
26
18
19
20
22
23
24
25
27
Cairo, Egypt
The “City of a Thousand Minarets,” Cairo is Africa’s most populated city and Egypt’s capital.
Minarets are distinctive onion-shaped architectural crown features atop Islamic mosques.
They provide a visual focal point and are used for the call to prayer. The weather in this
northern African city is characterized by a desert climate but often with high humidity because
of the Nile River valley’s effects. The Great Sphinx and the pyramids in adjacent Giza are often
associated with Cairo. The Great Pyramid of Khufu is the only one of the Seven Wonders of the
Ancient World still remaining. Many believe it was a tomb built from 2584–2561 B.C. for the
fourth-dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Khufu.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. You might want to quilt or draw in the pyramid blocks. The points on the
minarets can be embroidered or stitched. After sewing the raw edges, trim and
square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
31
C
a
p
e

T
o
w
n
1
2
5
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
10
11
12
12
14
14
14
15
16
17
17
18 18
18
18
4
13
6
7
8
9
3
Cape Town, South Africa
Weary sailors needing to relax after being on a ship for months at a time coined “Tavern of the
Sea” long ago as a nickname for Cape Town. This popular tourist destination is known for its wide
diversity of cultures and languages. Cape Town enjoys a subtropical Mediterranean climate with
mild, wet winters and dry, hot summers. Table Mountain and Cape Point are the recognizable
land formations behind the City Bowl. Table Mountain is flanked by the near-vertical cliffs of
Devil’s Peak and Lion’s Head and is often draped in a narrow strip of clouds locally referred to as
the “tablecloth.” Cape Peninsula National Park is home to many African penguins, which can be
found on long stretches of rocky and sandy shorelines.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
Raw-edge appliquéing the skyline with neon green thread makes the city appear
to be lit up. Tiny windows in the skyline can be made with beads, embroidery, or
fabric paint. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
32
C
a
r
i
b
b
e
a
n
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
4
5
6
6
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
21
16
16
22 18 19 20
23
30
24
25
26
27
30
28
29
31
31
Caribbean
The West Indies, often simply called the Caribbean, is a subregion of North America in the Carib-
bean Sea, southeast of Mexico. This tropical paradise is made up of more than 7,000 islands,
islets, reefs, and cays. The largest of these islands are Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic,
Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Trinidad, Guadeloupe, and Martinique. The islands are varied geographi-
cally, with some being very flat and others quite mountainous. The year-round tropical climate
and incredible blue seas make it a popular destination for millions of tourists. The Caribbean
is directly in the weather path of many hurricanes during the summer months. The West Indies
boast of their spectacular scuba diving and snorkeling spots with vibrantly colored tropical fish.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces
in place. The small tropical cocktail can be made with fabric paint. Included on
the CD are nine alternate patterns of popular island names in the area that you
might want to use instead of “Caribbean.” After sewing the raw edges, trim and
square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
33
D
u
b
a
i
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3
3 3
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
13
14
15
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Dubai, nicknamed the “City of Gold,” is one of the seven emirates of the United Arab Emirates
(UAE). South of the Persian Gulf on the Arabian Peninsula within the Arabian Desert, Dubai is
an affluent global city built on the oil industry, banking, and tourism. Dubai has an impressive
city skyline, with the Burj Khalifa (Khalifa or Dubai Tower), which is the world’s tallest building
at 2,716.5 feet, completed in 2010. The iconic Burj Al Arab, designed to symbolize Dubai’s urban
transformation, is a deluxe luxury hotel in the shape of a sailboat that stands on an artificial
island. The city has a plethora of amazing buildings and man-made island areas.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small details and windows can be created with beading, fabric paint, or
embroidery. The striped portion of the hotel in the front can be made with striped
fabric. Sewing the raw edges around the skyline with neon green thread will make
the city look like it is lit up. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block
to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
34
D
u
b
l
i
n
30
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
4
24
24
26
27
28
41
42
43
43
29 29 29 29 29 29
37
32 32 32 32
33 33 33
34 34 34
35
36
33
31
6
9 9 7
8
8
5
14
16
18
19
20
20
23
21 22
16 17 17 17 17 17 17
15 10 10 10 10 10 10
11 11 11 11 11 11
12
13
7 7
25
38
39
40
3 3 3
3
3
3
3
Dublin, Ireland
Dublin (meaning “black pool”) is the largest and capital city of Ireland, housing almost 25 per-
cent of the nation’s population. The modern Irish name for the city is Baile Átha Cliath, meaning
“town of the hurdled ford.” It is near the midpoint of the country’s east coast, at the mouth of the
River Liffey. To the south, Dublin is bordered by a low mountain range, and to the north and west
are flat farmlands. Dublin has cool summers and mild winters, with an absence of temperature
extremes. King John of England orderd Dublin Castle built as a major defensive project in 1204
after the Norman invasion of Ireland in 1169. The castle used the River Poddle as a natural means
of defense to protect the king’s treasures. Dublin has produced many prominent literary figures,
including Yeats, Shaw, Beckett, Wilde, Joyce, Swift, and Stoker.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small details and windows can be created with beading, fabric paint, or
embroidery. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
35
E
d
i
n
b
u
r
g
h
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
4
6
7
7
7
5
9
10
18
16
19
20
21
23
24
25
26
27
28
32
36
34
33 37 35
38
40
40
40
40
41
42
43
30
29
31
38
39
44
3
3
3
3
3
22
16
Edinburgh, Scotland
Edinburgh, the “Athens of the North,” is the capital city of Scotland. It has a relatively mild climate
despite its northerly location. Winters are very mild, and summers are generally moderate.
The city’s landscape is a result of early volcanic activity and periods of intense glaciation more
than 350 million years ago. Castle Rock, located on a volcanic plug, is one of Scotland’s notable
landmarks. With a ravine to the south, this volcanic formation was an ideal natural fortress, upon
which Edinburgh Castle was built. The rugged setting and medieval and Georgian stone architec-
ture draw millions of visitors to this part of Europe.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small details and windows can be created with beading, fabric paint, or
embroidery. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
36
G
a
l
á
p
a
g
o
s

I
s
l
a
n
d
s
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3
3 3
3
4
5
6
7
8
10
9
9
11
12
13
14
17
18 19
1
3
3 3
22
20
21
23
24
25
28
28
26 27
Galápagos Islands, Ecuador
The Galápagos Islands, nicknamed the “Enchanted Islands,” are a cluster of volcanic islands
near the equator in the Pacific Ocean off the west coast of South America. There are fifteen
main islands, three smaller islands, and many small rocks and islets. The equatorial location
makes these islands quite warm year-round, with very wet conditions on volcanic mountain-
tops caused by altitude temperature changes. Pinnacle Rock is the most famous land formation
in the Galápagos. It is a large, stately, black eroded lava formation created when the magma
expelled from a volcano on Bartolomé Island reached the sea. The Galápagos’ most notable
feature, especially near Pinnacle Rock, is wildlife, including iguanas, giant tortoises, sea
cucumbers, blue-footed boobies, penguins, albatrosses, and Galápagos sea lions.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. The small details of the tortoise can be created with fabric paint or marker.
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
37
G
e
n
e
v
a
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3 3 3
3
3
4 5
6 7
8
10
11
16
16
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23 24
25
26
27
27
Geneva, Switzerland
Geneva, or the “Peace Capital,” is at the southwestern end of Lake Geneva, where the lake flows
back into the Rhône River. It is surrounded by two mountain chains, the Alps and the Jura.
Crescent-shaped Lake Geneva is central Europe’s largest freshwater lake. Located on Lake
Geneva is Chillon Castle, or Château de Chillon, one of Switzerland’s most visited destinations,
first recorded historically around 1160. Geneva is a global city recognized as a strong financial
center as well as a leader in diplomacy. Geneva enjoys a temperate climate, with winters that are
moderate (despite excellent skiing in the mountains) and summers that are warm.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and details can be created with embroidery, fabric paint, or
marker. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
38
H
o
n
g

K
o
n
g
4
½
˝

l
a
n
d

3
½
˝

s
k
y
1
2
4
5 5
6
5
6
19 19
20
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
35
36
38
39
40, 41
42
42
43
43
3
3
3
3
7
8
9
10
12
11
13
14
15
18
16
17
26
34
37
Hong Kong
Renowned for its deep natural harbor, steep mountains, and expansive skyline, Hong Kong is
often referred to as “The World’s Most Vertical City.” It has more than 7,500 skyscrapers. The
tallest building to date, at 108 stories, is the International Commerce Centre, completed in 2010,
overlooking Victoria Harbor. Located on the south coast of China, Hong Kong is known as a
“special administrative region” of the country. Seven million people make this city one of the most
densely populated in the world. Tourists visit the famous giant bronze statue of Tian Tan Buddha
on Lantau Island. It is one of the largest outdoor Buddha statues in the world. Many tourists also
stop to see Mickey Mouse in Hong Kong Disneyland on the same island. Hong Kong has a humid
subtropical climate with hot summers and very mild winters.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and details can be created with embroidery, fabric paint, or
marker. Facial features and cloth wrinkles can be stitched or drawn with fabric
marker. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
39
I
s
t
a
n
b
u
l
7
8
1
2
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
3
4
5
6
36 36
37
38
39
40
41
9
10
11
12
13
13
14
15
16
17
17
18
19
20
21
22 22
23
24
25
27
26
28
29
30
31
33 32
35
34
13
Istanbul, Turkey
Istanbul, historically known as Constantinople or Byzantium, is the largest city in Turkey and one
of the largest cities in the world, with a population of around 13 million people. It straddles two
continents, Europe and Asia. The Istanbul Strait, also known as the Bosphorus Strait, is a narrow
waterway that connects the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmara. The Golden Horn is a natural
harbor that further divides the city. One of Istanbul’s famous landmarks, the Blue Mosque, was
completed in 1616 and is known for its decorative interior of blue Byzantine tiles, although its
exterior is gray. This massive, majestic mosque has six minarets, many dome roofs, and an open
courtyard that faces the Hagia Sophia Museum. Istanbul has a Mediterranean climate with quite
a bit of morning sea fog. It has hot summers and wet, cold winters.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and star details can be created with embroidery, fabric paint,
or marker. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
40
J
e
r
u
s
a
l
e
m
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
9 9
10
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
21
21
21
21
22
23
24
25
30
32
33
36
35
38
39
39
41 43
42
41
40 46 45
47
44
34
37
29
31
26
27
28
48
Jerusalem, Israel
Jerusalem, the “City of Peace,” is the capital and largest city of Israel. In the Judean Mountains,
between the Mediterranean Sea and the northern edge of the Dead Sea, this is the holiest of cities
to the three main Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Many travel to Israel
to visit the Wailing Wall, which is and has been a famous site for Jewish prayer and pilgrimage
for centuries. The Tower of David houses archaeological artifacts dating back 2,700 years. The
Dome of the Rock is an Islamic shrine and major landmark on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.
Completed in 691–692, it is one of the oldest existing Islamic buildings in the world. The city expe-
riences hot, dry summers and mild, wet winters, with snow once or twice a winter.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. The small windows, stars, and wall details can be created with embroidery,
fabric paint, or marker. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to
6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
41
L
a
s

V
e
g
a
s
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
13 13
13
14
14
15
16
17
20 20
21
22
23
24
18
19
Las Vegas, USA
Otherwise known as “Sin City,” Las Vegas has become an international resort destination known
for gambling, shopping, fine dining, and family fun. The famous welcome sign, designed by Betty
Willis, is a Las Vegas Strip landmark. The city is more than 2,000 feet above sea level in the arid
Mojave Desert. The city enjoys an average of 300 sunny days per year. The summers are very hot,
with average daytime highs of 94°–104°F. Winters are short and warm. Millions visit each year
from all corners of the world. Of course, we all know…“What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas!”
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows, stars, and other details can be created with embroidery, fabric
paint, or marker. Stitching around the city silhouettes with neon green thread will
make the city look lit up. Using beads or fusible crystals would be fitting for this
block. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝. The Las
Vegas sign is available for photo-fabric printing on the CD.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
42
L
i
m
a
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
3
3
3
3 3
4
5
6
7
8
9
12 12
13 13
14
18 19
20
20 20
51
51
21 22
24
47
49
26
23
28
27
29
29
31
32
33
34
38
37
39
39
30
40
41
42
43
44
Lima, Peru
Lima, the “City of Kings,” is the capital and largest city of Peru. It is in a desert in the central part of
the country overlooking the Pacific Ocean. The river that feeds Lima is called Rímac, a name with
Incan roots, meaning “Talking River.” The Basilica Cathedral is in the Plaza Mayor of downtown
Lima and is one of the nation’s most important landmarks. Construction began in 1535 and was
consecrated in 1625. This national landmark was designed by Francisco Pizarro, who conquered the
Incas and founded Lima. Basilica Cathedral houses fine baroque art and contains Pizarro’s tomb.
The location on the Pacific Ocean gives Lima a comfortable subtropical climate even though the city
is in the tropics and in a desert. Temperatures range between 50°F and 85°F throughout the year.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the land
(piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land together
with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining up the
horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place. The small
windows and other details can be created with embroidery, fabric paint, or marker.
Using beads or decorative flower buttons would be very effective on this block.
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
43
L
o
n
d
o
n
4
½
˝

l
a
n
d
3
½
˝

s
k
y
21 21 21 21 21
1
2
3
5
4
7
6
8
9
10
11
12
12
13
13
14
15 16
17
18
19
20
22
21
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32 33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
47
48
49
17
50
21
London, England
“The Big Smoke” is London’s little-known nickname. London’s famed familiar fog and the Great
Smog of 1952 that killed thousands are said to be the nickname’s origin. The temperatures of
England’s capital are classified as marine climate. The summer months average 73°F, with a 10°
range up or down. Winters in London are chilly but rarely below freezing. Surprisingly, London
is considered a dry city, with regular but generally very light precipitation throughout the year.
London has a rich history going back more than 2,000 years. The British royal family, the House
of Windsor, resides in world-famous Buckingham Palace in London. Other notable landmarks are
the Tower Bridge, Tower of London, the London Eye (the world’s largest Ferris wheel), Westminster
Palace, St. Paul’s Cathedral, and the inspirational Thames River.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and other details can be created with embroidery, fabric paint,
or marker. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
44
M
a
n
i
l
a
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3 3
3
3
4
5 5
6
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
16
21
17
18 19 20
22
23
15
14
14
43
41
47
48
50
51
49 49
44
42
52 53
54
55
55
40
25
26
35
36
38
39
37
27
46 45
28
29 30 31 32 33 34
24
11
2
3
33
33
33
33
55 5
14
14
14 14
13 13
22
13
22
21
22 222 22
20 19
333 3 34 4 3 31 331 333 32 2 3 299 2 30 0 3
18
36
7 37 7 37 77 37 77 37 77 37 7
16
17
5 355 35 3555
40
41
1
4
½
˝

s
k
y
26 26 26
27 27 277 2 28 28 288 2
6
6
7
999999
88888
10 10
11
442 4
43
4
44 44 44 47 47 47
48
466 455
49 49 9 9 4 4
4
50 50 50
51
5222 52 52 52 5222 52 52 52 52 53 55
54
36
38 338 38
399
55
55
4
1
2
3
3 3
3
3
4
5 5
6
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
14
16
21
17
18 19 20
22
23
15
14
14
43
41
47
48
50
51
49 49
44
42
52 53
54
55
55
40
25
26
35
36
38
39
37
27
46 45
28
29 30 31 32 33 34
24
Manila, the Philippines
Manila, the “Pearl of the Orient,” is the capital city of the Philippines, and is located on the eastern
shores of Manila Bay. Manila has a tropical wet and dry climate with annual temperatures that
are generally quite humid and warm because of its proximity to the equator. January through
April is considered the dry season, with a lengthy wet season from May through December. Tour-
ism in Manila attracts more than 1 million visitors each year. Major destinations include the 1322
Golden Empire Tower, Intramuros, the Mendiola, Rizal Park, and the Manila Cathedral. The Manila
Cathedral, also known as the Metropolitan Cathedral-Basilica, has been damaged or destroyed
several times since the original cathedral was built in 1581. It is dedicated to the Patroness of the
Philippines, Blessed Virgin Mary, under the title Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and other details can be created with embroidery, fabric paint,
or marker. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
45
M
o
s
c
o
w
1
2 2
3
20
21
10
10
11 11
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
5
6
7
8
9
24
18b
18a
23
Moscow, Russia
At one time Moscow was referred to as “the Kremlin,” meaning fortress or castle. It is Russia’s
pulse center, housing the Russian government (and formerly the Soviet government). This
European city is on the Moskva River, west of the Ural Mountains. The city has a humid climate
with gentle, warm summers and long, cold winters. The average annual temperature in Moscow
is 42°F. The famous Russian Orthodox cathedral St. Basil’s is in Red Square. It was founded in 1555
by Ivan IV and designed by Barma and Postnik. St. Basil’s Cathedral is one of the world’s most
unique architectural structures, with its flame-shaped towers mimicking fire rising into the sky.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and other details can be created with embroidery, fabric paint,
or marker. The scalloped trim can be created using decorative lace. After sewing
the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝. This block has many
pieces. Go slow and be patient.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
46
M
u
n
i
c
h
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
2
3
3 3 3
4
5
6 7
8
9 11
12
14
13
16
15
17
17
18
10
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
80
80
46
45 47
48
49
50
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
51
60 61 62
63
64 65
66
67
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
Munich, Germany
Munich, nicknamed “Gateway of the Bavarian Alps,” is the capital city of Bavaria, Germany,
and is on the River Isar north of the Bavarian Alps. The city’s motto is “Munich likes you.”
Located at a relatively high altitude and sprawling into the foothills of the Alps, the city receives
ample precipitation from many rainstorms, which are often violent and unexpected. Munich
experiences cold winters and moderate summers with an average temperature of 73°F. Munich
is renowned for its architecture and culture. The annual Oktoberfest beer celebration is world
famous. The Hofbräuhaus am Platzl is a beer hall in the city center built in 1598 as an extension
of the original Hofbräu Brewery.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces
in place. The small windows and other details can be created with embroidery,
fabric paint, or marker. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to
6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
47
N
a
i
r
o
b
i
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
12
13
Nairobi, Kenya
Nairobi, which comes from a phrase meaning “the place of cool waters,” is the capital and largest
city of Kenya. Nairobi has two nicknames: the “Green City in the Sun,” for its foliage and warm cli-
mate, and the “Safari Capital of the World,” for its world-renowned safari vacations. The famous
Nairobi National Park is the only game reserve to border a capital city of this size. Nairobi has
a subtropical highland climate. The altitude allows Nairobi to have cool evenings, but its close
proximity to the equator makes for very warm days and little seasonal climate change. Mount
Kenya is north of Nairobi, and Mount Kilimanjaro is toward the southeast. Both mountains are
visible from Nairobi on a clear day. Kilimanjaro is an extinct volcano, formed several million years
ago; it is in Mount Kenya National Park.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The animal shadow can be created with dark tulle or organza. After sewing the
raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
48
N
e
w

Y
o
r
k

C
i
t
y
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
2
1
3
4
5
5
6
6
7 7
8
9
10
18
11
12 12
13
14
15
16
17
New York City, USA
The “Big Apple,” New York is a leading global city with powerful influence in global commerce,
culture, art, fashion, research, education, and entertainment. It is on the East Coast of the United
States of America. The city experiences four full seasons, with very warm summer temperatures
and winters that are cold and often snowy. New York Harbor’s Statue of Liberty greeted millions
of immigrants as they came to America in the late nineteenth century. The monument commem-
orates the centennial of the signing of the U.S. Declaration of Independence and was given to the
United States by the people of France. Other notable landmarks include the Brooklyn Bridge, the
Chrysler Building, the Citicorp Building, Broadway, many museums, Wall Street, Central Park, and
the former site of the World Trade Center.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and details can be created with fabric paint, embroidery, or
beading. The statue face can be drawn with fabric markers. After sewing the raw
edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
49
O
s
l
o
7
7
8 8
9
11 10
1
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3
3
3
4
5 5 5 5
6
6
16
15
14
14
15 15
15 15
15
17
33
18
20
19
30
34
35
36 37
38
39
40
41
43
44
32
3
42
40
29
Oslo, Norway
Oslo is the capital of and largest city in Norway. Oslo, meaning “the meadow at the foot of the
hill,” is surrounded by hills and mountains, with approximately 40 islands and over 300 lakes,
which are the main source of drinking water for the city. Despite its northerly location, the climate
is relatively mild because of the Gulf Stream. Oslo has gentle summers and long, cold, snowy win-
ters. The Oslo Opera House was completed in 2007 and features opera, ballet, music and dance
theater, and concerts. The angled exterior surfaces of the building are covered with Italian marble,
white granite, glass, and metal, which make it appear to rise from the water like an iceberg. The
unique Atlantic puffin, with its bright orange beak and feet, can be seen in large colonies along
Norwegian coastlines.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The shadows can be created with dark tulle or organza. The puffin eye can be
drawn with fabric markers or embroidered. After sewing the raw edges, trim and
square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
50
P
a
r
i
s
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
2
4
8 9
14
15
17
18
10*
13
13
12
12
11*
26 25
21
22
23
20
19
19
24
1
3
16
16
Paris, France
The “City of Light” is one of the most visited cities in the world. Paris is the largest city in France.
It has one of the lowest rainfall averages in France, but the city is known for its unexpected rain
showers at any time of year. Summer temperatures are warm, with occasional heat waves,
while winters are cold, with temperatures hovering around freezing. Earliest history claims Paris
was founded about 250 B.C. by a Celtic tribe called the Parisii, who fished from their dugout
canoes on the Seine River, which passes through Paris. Notable landmarks are the Louvre, the
Sacré-Cœur Basilica, Notre Dame Cathedral, and, of course, the Eiffel Tower.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. The small windows and details (#10) can be painted, beaded, or embroi-
dered. Lace is an interesting alternative for some of the building pieces (#11).
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
51
P
r
a
g
u
e
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3
3
3
4
5
7
30
31
8 9
10
11
12 13
16 17 14
18
15
20
21
19
20
22
22
22
24
23
25
26
27
28
29
39
32
34 33 38 35
36 37
40
41
42
43
44
45 45
6
Prague, the Czech Republic
Prague, nicknamed the “Mother of Cities,” is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. It is
one of Europe’s top tourist destinations. Prague is in Bohemia, a region of the Czech Republic just
west of the country’s center. The Vltava River, which runs north to south through this landlocked
country, bisects Prague and its Old Town. Some of the best-known landmarks in the city are the
Prague Castle (one of the largest castles in the world), St. Vitus cathedral, the famous Old Town
Square with the astronomical clock, and the picturesque Charles Bridge spanning the Vltava
River. Construction on the Charles Bridge, originally called the Stone Bridge, began in 1357
under King Charles IV and was not completed until 1402. Prague, also referred to as the “City
of a Hundred Spires,” has a varied climate throughout the year, with hot summers and cloudy,
cold winters.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and details can be painted, beaded, or embroidered. After
sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
52
P
u
e
r
t
o

V
a
l
l
a
r
t
a
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3 3
3 3
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
13 13
13
16 17
18 19
20
27
29 28
30
Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
Puerto Vallarta, also called “PV” or simply “Vallarta,” is a popular Mexican resort city on the
Pacific Ocean’s Bay of Banderas. Puerto Vallarta was named after Ignacio Vallarta, a former
governor of the state of Jalisco, Mexico, where PV is located. The Cathedral of Our Lady of
Guadalupe is the city’s most notable landmark. The interior of the Catholic cathedral is filled
with hand-carved columns, decorative moldings, and rich detailing. Rafael Zamarripa’s
seahorse sculpture on the popular Malecón (or boardwalk) has become the symbol of the city.
It is a nine-foot bronze statue of a naked boy riding on the sea creature’s back. The climate
in PV is tropical wet, with a very dry season in the winter. The summers can be very hot and
extremely humid.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. The small windows and details can be painted, beaded, or embroidered.
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
53
R
e
y
k
j
a
v
i
k
1
2
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
3
3
3 3
4
5
6 7
8
9
12
12
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
11
10
20 21
22
23
24
25
26
26
27 28
29 30
31
19
Reykjavik, Iceland
Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland, is in the country’s southwest, on the southern shore of Faxaflói
Bay. Steam from hot springs in the region is supposed to have inspired Reykjavik’s name, which
means “Bay of Smokes.” The city was founded in 1786 as an official trading town. The Reykjavik-
area coastline is made up of peninsulas, coves, straits, and islands. The climate is subpolar ocean-
ic, with summers that are cool and windy and winters that are cold and snowy. One of Reykjavik’s
most imposing and notable landmarks is the Church of Hallgrimur. It is a Lutheran parish church
and observatory that soars 244 feet into the Icelandic sky. After 38 years under construction, the
church was completed in 1986. It houses a massive organ with more than 5,000 pipes. The church
was designed to resemble the basalt lava flows of Iceland’s landscape.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
The small windows and details can be painted, beaded, or embroidered. The icy
spots on the type could be enhanced with opalescent fabric glitter. After sewing
the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
54
R
i
o

d
e

J
a
n
e
i
r
o
3
½
˝

s
k
y
4
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
2
3
3 3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
11
12
13
14 15
16
17
18
19
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Rio de Janeiro, nicknamed “Marvelous City,” is well known for its beautiful beaches, its carnival
celebrations, and its giant statue, Christ the Redeemer, atop Corcovado Mountain overlooking
the city and sea. This famous art deco statue soars 130 feet high in Brazil’s Tijuca Forest on the
Atlantic coast and Guanabara Bay. This iconic symbol of Rio is made from reinforced concrete
and soapstone. It took almost ten years to build and was completed in 1930. In 2007, Christ the
Redeemer was named one of the New Seven Wonders of the World. Rio enjoys a warm tropical
climate with heavy rain in the winter months. This picturesque seaside city is Brazil’s main
tourist destination and boasts many historic cathedrals and museums.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. The small windows and details can be painted, beaded, or embroidered.
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
55
R
o
m
e
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3 3
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
9
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32 33
34 35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42 43 44
54
54
45 46 47
48
49
52
51
53
5
0
2
Rome, Italy
Rome, also known as the “Eternal City,” is in the central-western portion of the Italian penin-
sula, on the Tiber River. Rome is the capital of Italy and has a history spanning more than 2,500
years. The Colosseum, with seating for 50,000, was used for gladiator contests and other public
spectacles; it is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and engineering.
Its construction started around A.D. 70 under the emperor Vespasian and was completed in
A.D. 80 under Titus. The Pantheon, the ancient temple that was initially dedicated to all the
gods, and Santa Maria Maggiore, one of the most ancient churches in the world, are must-see
tourist stops. Most of the year Rome enjoys moderate to warm weather with mild winters.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces
in place. The small windows and details can be painted or embroidered. After
sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝. Note: You could
cut all windows from piece 9 and back whole piece where windows show with
dark brown.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
56
S
a
n

F
r
a
n
c
i
s
c
o
6
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
2
3
4
5
5
5
7
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
15
26
27
28
29
31
30
32
34
33
35
36
37
38
39
40
42
43
44
45
41
San Francisco, USA
San Francisco, or the “City by the Bay,” is home to the world-famous Golden Gate Bridge,
cable cars, steep rolling hills, and Chinatown. This popular California tourist city, named after
St. Francis of Assisi, is renowned for its eclectic mix of Victorian and modern architecture. San
Francisco’s rows of “Painted Ladies,” a term used for Victorian homes that are embellished with
three or more vivid colors enhancing their architectural details, make for an enchanting sight.
The city is on the west coast of the United States and is surrounded on three sides by water. The
climate is coastal, with mild, wet winters and cool, dry summers. San Francisco’s weather is
strongly influenced by the Pacific Ocean, which produces a mild year-round climate with little
seasonal temperature variation and frequent foggy conditions on the bay.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. The small windows and details can be painted or embroidered. The cross
pieces on houses should be created with decorative lace. After sewing the raw
edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
57
S
a
n

J
u
a
n
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3 3
3
3
4
5
6
7 7
8
9
10
11
12
13 14
16
15
17
18
20
19
San Juan, Puerto Rico
San Juan, founded in 1521 by Juan Ponce de León, is the capital of Puerto Rico, an unincorpo-
rated territory of the United States. San Juan is an important seaport and financial, cultural, and
tourism center. Historically, San Juan was used as a stopover by ships traveling from Spain to the
Americas. The city is along the northeastern coast of Puerto Rico, on San Juan Bay. The garita, or
sentry box, is one of Puerto Rico’s most recognized symbols. The iconic garitas lined the Old San
Juan walls and forts that warded off enemy attacks and protected the city. San Juan enjoys a
tropical climate, with temperatures ranging from 70°F to 90°F throughout the year.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. The small windows and details can be painted or embroidered. Transfer
and stitch the dome lines to make the dome appear curved. After sewing the raw
edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
58
S
e
o
u
l
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
3
3 3
2 2
4
5 5
6
6
7
8
9
9
10
11
12 13
14
15
17 19
21
23
24
28 28
26 27
Seoul, South Korea
“Seoul” means “capital city.” It is the capital and largest city of South Korea. Namdaemun,
meaning “the south gate,” was erected in 1398 and is Seoul’s oldest wood-built structure. While
popularly called Namdaemun, the gate is officially called the “Sungnyemun” (Gate of Exalted
Ceremonies) and is a historic pagoda-style gateway in the center of Seoul. The nation has listed
Namdaemun first among the National Treasures of South Korea since 1962. The structure fell
victim to arson in 2008 and is being restored. Seoul is in northwest South Korea and is bisected
by the Han River. Eight mountains, as well as the Han River plain, border the city. Summers are
generally hot and humid, with monsoons in June and July. Winters are cold, with an average of
28 days of snow annually.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
59
S
i
n
g
a
p
o
r
e
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
20
21
22
23
24
25 26 27 28 29 30
31
32
33
43 44
45
46
47
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
Singapore
Singapore is a Southeast Asian city-state between Malaysia and Indonesia. Singapore was
founded as a British trading colony in 1819. It joined the Malaysian Federation in 1963 but then
separated two years later and became independent. It is a highly urbanized island country 85
miles north of the equator. Singapore, which is made up of 63 islands, was a notable trading hub
centuries ago and remains an important trade site today. The “Lion City” has a tropical rain-forest
climate with high humidity and abundant rainfall but does not have significant seasonal changes;
temperatures range from 75°F to 95°F year-round. The mythical symbol of Singapore is the
merlion, a cross between a fish and a lion that spouts water from its mouth. There are five official
Merlion statues in Singapore, but the original is in Merlion Park at Marina Bay.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with embroidery, fabric paint,
or beading. Lion details can be created by stitching or with fabric markers. After
sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
60
S
y
d
n
e
y
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
4
6
7
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
17
17
17
17
17
18
16
Sydney, Australia
Sydney, “Harbour City,” is the largest city in and the state capital of New South Wales, Australia.
Sydney is on the southeast coast of the Tasman Sea. Sydney has a temperate climate with warm
summers and cool winters. The warmest month is January, with an average temperature of
65–78°F. The coldest month is July, with an average temperature of 46–61°F. Snow is extremely
rare in Sydney. The iconic Sydney Opera House, designed by architect Jørn Utzon, and the
Harbour Bridge are two of the most famous “down under” landmarks. Queen Elizabeth II, queen
of Australia, opened the Opera House in 1973. The Harbour Bridge, the world’s overall largest
steel arch bridge, opened in March 1932 and is often referred to by locals as “the Coat Hanger.”
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with fabric paint, embroidery,
or beading. Sun rays are optional and can be made from tulle or organza. After
sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
61
T
o
k
y
o
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
5
6 7
7
8
9
10
10
10
2
Tokyo, Japan
Tokyo, originally known as Edo, meaning “estuary,” changed its name to Tokyo—to (“east”) +
kyo (“capital”)—when it became Japan’s capital in 1868. Tokyo is on the eastern side of the main
island, Honshu. It is the largest metropolitan area of Japan and home to the imperial family. Tokyo
has a humid subtropical climate with hot, humid summers and generally mild winters with some
cold spells. Mount Fuji, an active volcano that last erupted in 1707–1708, is just west of Tokyo and
can be seen from the city on a clear day. Tokyo’s current cityscape is one of modern and con-
temporary architecture. Older buildings are scarce because of the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake
and the subsequent extensive firebombing in World War II, which destroyed much of the historic
architecture.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with fabric paint, embroidery, or
beading. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
62
T
o
r
o
n
t
o
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
3
4
5
2
6 6
9
1
Toronto, Canada
“TO,” “Muddy York,” “T-dot,” “Hog City,” or “Queen City”—take your pick of all these nicknames
for Toronto, the capital of Ontario. TO is the largest city in Canada and is on the northwestern
shore of Lake Ontario. This urban part of southern Ontario, known as the Golden Horseshoe,
is home to approximately 25 percent of Canada’s population. The CN (Canadian National)
Tower, completed in 1976, is a communications and observation tower that is currently the
tallest structure in the Western Hemisphere. Toronto is a booming international city, with more
skyscrapers being added every year. The city has four distinct seasons, including warm, humid
summers and cold winters. Lake Ontario greatly influences the climate with lake-effect snow,
fog, and the delaying of spring- and fall-like conditions, known as seasonal lag.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with fabric paint, embroidery,
or beading. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
63
V
a
n
c
o
u
v
e
r
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3
3
3
3
4
5
6
6
7
8
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
Vancouver, Canada
Vancouver was named for British captain George Vancouver, who founded the coastal city in
British Columbia in the 1790s. Vancouver has earned the nickname “Hollywood North” because
so many U.S. movies are filmed in this beautiful Canadian city. The city is on the Burrard
Peninsula, with the North Shore Mountains as a picturesque backdrop. The Fraser River is to the
south and the Strait of Georgia is to the west, next to the Pacific Ocean. The climate is coastal
and temperate, with summers that are moderately warm and dry. Most days during late fall and
winter are rainy but with relatively little snowfall. Vancouver’s climate is one of Canada’s mildest.
The Inukshuk (a stone landmark built by Arctic-region natives of North America) at Stanley Park
has been identified with Vancouver ever since the city hosted the 2010 Olympic Games. This icon
was designated the games’ official symbol.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with fabric paint, embroidery, or
beading. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
64
V
a
t
i
c
a
n

C
i
t
y
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3 3 3 3 3
3
4
5
5
5
5
6
7
8 10
9 11
12
12
20 21
12
12 12 12
12 12
13
18 18 18 16 17
23 23 23
63
24 27 29
28
25 31
40 42 44
45 46
26
48 47
60
49 57
58 59
36 38
35 37
50 51 56
32
39 41 43
30 33 34
52 54 53 55
61
62
Vatican City
Vatican City is an ecclesiastical walled city within Rome, Italy, that covers an area of approximately
110 acres. With a population of just more than 800 residents, it is the world’s smallest country.
Italian is the country’s official language. Established in 1929 by the Lateran Treaty, this landlocked
sovereign city-state is ruled by the Bishop of Rome—the pope. Features of this religious state include
the Vatican Gardens, which make up almost half of the entire city’s area and are filled with beautiful
fountains, sculptures, and vegetation; the pope’s residence in the Apostolic Palace, near St. Peter’s
Square; St. Peter’s Basilica; and the Sistine Chapel, which houses some of the most famous art in the
world, including works by Bramante, Botticelli, Raphael, Bernini, and Michelangelo. Vatican City,
has mild, rainy winters from September to mid-May and hot, dry summers from May to August.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the land
(piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land together
with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining up the
horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place. Small
windows and details can be created with fabric paint, embroidery, or beading.
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
65
V
e
n
i
c
e
4
½
˝

s
k
y
3
½
˝

l
a
n
d
1
2
3 3
3
3
4
5 5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
14
14
15
16
16
17
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31 32 33 34 35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
29
Venice, Italy
Venice, the “Floating City,” in northern Italy is known for tourism and industry. The Rialto Bridge,
one of more than 400 bridges in the city, arches over the Grand Canal in the heart of the Rialto
area, which is famous for its popular fruit and vegetable market. The city lies across 117 small
islands in the marshy Venetian Lagoon along the Adriatic Sea. Venice has a humid subtropical
climate with cool winters and hot summers. This city offers beautiful landscapes, art, and a rich
history that draws a huge tourist population. Venice is home to St. Mark’s Basilica, the Grand
Canal, and Piazza San Marco. Transportation within the city remains, as it was in centuries past,
entirely by water or by foot. The classic Venetian boat is the gondola, which is used mostly for
tourists, weddings, funerals, or other ceremonies. The locals use water taxis or private boats.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small windows and details can be created with fabric paint, embroidery, or
beading. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
66
W
o
r
l
d

P
a
t
t
e
r
n
s
Around the World Block, 12˝ × 12˝ Bucket List Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Traveling Gabel Family Block, 12˝ × 12˝ Where We’ve Been Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Patterns
67
A
r
o
u
n
d

t
h
e

W
o
r
l
d
7
˝

b
a
c
k
g
r
o
u
n
d
1
2
3
3
4
5
6
7
Around the World
Our world is approximately 8,000 miles in diameter, with a circumference of about 24,900 miles;
oceans cover about 71 percent of the Earth’s surface. Just how many countries are in our world?
That answer is complex. Because the world is made up of states, territories, colonies, and other
nondescript geographic areas, it is difficult to determine an exact number. Some characterize a
“country” as being a defined area that is an official member of the United Nations. Based on that
criterion, there are 192 countries. Others, using a broader definition of the term, believe there are
more than 250 countries. The political climate of this world is ever changing, which makes that
an ever-changing number. Use this block to illustrate your travels—or aspirations for travel—
Around the World!
DIRECTIONS
This block has a solid 7˝ × 7˝ background, unlike most of the other blocks in this
book. Cut a square 7˝ × 7˝ for the background. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the
remaining pieces in place. The dotted airplane trail can be hand sewn with heavy
decorative or perle cotton thread. Small details can be created with fabric paint,
embroidery, or beading. After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block
to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
68
B
u
c
k
e
t

L
i
s
t

!
4
½
˝

l
a
n
d
3
½
˝

s
k
y
1
3
3
2
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
10
11
12
13
14
17
18
Bucket List
Our world is approximately 8,000 miles in diameter, with a circumference of about 24,900 miles;
oceans cover about 71 percent of the Earth’s surface. Just how many countries are in our world?
That answer is complex. Because the world is made up of states, territories, colonies, and other
nondescript geographic areas, it is difficult to determine an exact number. Some characterize
a “country” as being a defined area that is an official member of the United Nations. Based on
that criterion, there are 192 countries. Others, using a broader definition of the term, believe
there are more than 250 countries. The political climate of this world is ever changing, which
makes that an ever-changing number. We live in a big, wonderful world. We would all love to
see some of these amazing destinations. What world locations would be on you bucket list?
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by
lining up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in
place. Small details can be created with fabric paint, embroidery, or beading.
After sewing the raw edges, trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Patterns
69
T
r
a
v
e
l
i
n
g

F
a
m
i
l
y
4
½
˝

l
a
n
d
3
½
˝

s
k
y
1
2
3 3
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
4
22
Traveling Family
Our world is approximately 8,000 miles in diameter, with a circumference of about 24,900 miles;
oceans cover about 71 percent of the Earth’s surface. Just how many countries are in our world?
That answer is complex. Because the world is made up of states, territories, colonies, and other
nondescript geographic areas, it is difficult to determine an exact number. Some characterize
a “country” as being a defined area that is an official member of the United Nations. Based on
that criterion, there are 192 countries. Others, using a broader definition, believe there are more
than 250 countries. The political climate of this world is ever changing, which makes that an ever-
changing number.
DIRECTIONS
Cut a 3½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the sky (piece 1) and a 4½˝ × 6¾˝ rectangle for the
land (piece 2). Leave excess to square and trim the block later. Sew the sky / land
together with a ¼˝ seam to make the background. Position the sky / land by lining
up the horizon line. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the remaining pieces in place.
Use the alphabet on the CD to customize this block. Small details can be created
with fabric paint, embroidery, or beading. After sewing the raw edges, trim and
square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
70
W
h
e
r
e

W
e

v
e

B
e
e
n
!
7
˝

b
a
c
k
g
r
o
u
n
d
1
2
3
4
4
4
5
5
5
6
7
8
9
Where We’ve Been!
Our world is approximately 8,000 miles in diameter, with a circumference of about 24,900
miles; oceans cover about 71 percent of the Earth’s surface. Just how many countries are in our
world? That answer is complex. Because the world is made up of states, territories, colonies, and
other nondescript geographic areas, it is difficult to determine an exact number. Some char-
acterize a “country” as being a defined area that is an official member of the United Nations.
Based on that criterion, there are 192 countries. Others, using a broader definition, believe there
are more than 250 countries. The political climate of this world is ever changing, which makes
that an ever-changing number. This block is the ultimate answer in fabric to the question,
“Where ya been?”
DIRECTIONS
This block has a solid 7˝ × 7˝ background, unlike most of the other blocks in this
book. Cut a square 7˝ × 7˝ for the background. Trace, cut, position, and fuse the
remaining pieces in place. You could use decorative buttons or embroidery to
highlight your destinations instead of star patterns. After sewing the raw edges,
trim and square the block to 6½˝ × 6½˝.
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
Gallery
71
London Town, 12˝ × 12˝
by Linda K. Bernard

Munich, 15˝ × 15˝
by Linda K. Bernard

Munich, 12½˝ × 12½˝
by Linda K. Bernard

Beijing, 14˝ × 14˝
by Cynthia Porter

Prague, 17½˝ × 17½˝
by Linda K. Bernard

Amsterdam / Embroidery, 18˝ × 17˝
by Lee Hofstetter

Honeymoon, 13˝ × 47˝
by Monica Agapaloglou
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
72
Quilt Blocks Around the World

British Isles, 27˝ × 60˝
by Genie Corbin

Munich pillow, 16˝ × 11˝
by Lee Hofstetter
Vancouver wall bowl
by Mindy Williams

Beaches Around the World scrapbook cover, 8˝ × 8˝
by Lee Hofstetter
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
Gallery
73

Caribbean, 12˝ × 14˝ × 6˝
by Karen Moss

Tokyo
by Lee Hofstetter

It’s a Small World, 12˝ × 18˝ × 8˝
by Lee Hofstetter

Tokyo, 18˝ × 20˝ × 6˝
by Ruth Erickson
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
74
Quilt Blocks Around the World

London on Canvas, 20˝ × 20˝
by Amy Morusiewicz

Around the World, 47˝ × 77˝
by Misty Cole
Beijing Stamp
by Lee Zadareky

Toronto, 14˝ × 18˝
by Lee Hofstetter
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
Gallery
75
Auckland Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Buenos Aires Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Galápagos Islands Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Manila Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Moscow Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Munich Block, 12˝ × 12˝
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
76
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Oslo Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Puerto Vallarta Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Rio de Janeiro Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Seoul Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Vatican City Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Venice Block, 12˝ × 12˝
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
Gallery
77
Amsterdam Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Agra Block, 12˝ × 12˝

Hong Kong Heritage, 48˝ × 48˝
by Genie Corbin
Bangkok Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Vancouver Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Reykjavik Block, 12˝ × 12˝
Quilt Blocks Around the World
78
Supplies and Resources
Listed below are the manufacturers and sources of supplies and materials
recommended throughout the book. These are for your information in the
event that you would like to try them out.
Attached Inc. (Mistyfuse and Fat Goddess Sheets)
60 Washington Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11205
631.750.8500
www.mistyfuse.com
Hoffman California Fabrics (batiks and other fine fabrics)
25792 Obrero Drive
Mission Viejo, CA 92691
800.547.0100
www.hoffmanfabrics.com
Kiwi Quilt Studio (official Zebra Patterns sample maker)
Patti Rusk – Custom Quiltmaker
6616 Kilmarnoch Drive
Catonsville, MD 21228
plrusk@msn.com
410.852.0676
Kreinik (decorative and specialty threads)
1708 Gihon Road
Parkersburg, WV 26102
800.537.2166
www.kreinik.com
Pangor Design Quilt Studio (longarm quilting services)
Maria O’Haver
Ellicott City, MD
410.750.3866
maria@mariaohaver.com
Thread Works Studio (official Zebra Patterns sample maker)
Mindy Williams – Custom Quiltmaker
30 Saratoga Drive
New Castle, DE 19720
302.545.7859
threadworksmindy@comcast.net
The Warm Company (batting and fusible webbing)
5529 186th Place SW
Lynnwood, WA 98037
425.248.2424
www.warmcompany.com
YLI (threads)
1439 Dave Lyle Boulevard, #16C
Rock Hill, SC 29730
803.985.3100
www.ylicorp.com
Zebra Patterns (Debra Gabel’s pattern company)
Debra Gabel
13618 Meadow Glenn
Clarksville, MD 21029
410.370.3798
www.zebrapatterns.com
For a list of other fine books from C&T Publishing,
ask for a free catalog:
C&T Publishing, Inc.
P.O. Box 1456
Lafayette, CA 94549
800-284-1114
Email: ctinfo@ctpub.com
Website: www.ctpub.com
Tips and Techniques can be found at www.ctpub.com
> Consumer Resources > Quiltmaking Basics: Tips &
Techniques for Quiltmaking & More
C&T Publishing’s professional photography services are now
available to the public. Visit us at www.ctmediaservices.com.
For quilting supplies:
Cotton Patch
1025 Brown Ave.
Lafayette, CA 94549
Store: 925-284-1177
Mail order: 925-283-7883
Email: CottonPa@aol.com
Website: www.quiltusa.com
Note: Fabrics shown may not be currently available, as fabric
manufacturers keep most fabrics in print for only a short time.
79
About the Author
Born in Middletown, New York, Debra started sewing as a
child and quilting as a teen. After several professional moves
around the United States in adulthood, she finally settled in
Clarksville, Maryland, with her husband, Gary, and their three
sons, Brooks, Austin, and Cole. Armed with a bachelor of fine
arts in graphic design, Debra worked for many years as an art
director in the packaging industry, where she designed and
prepared art for paper-handled shopping bags, consumer
goods, tissue, decorative boxes, and other packaging. Debra
has also maintained her independent graphic design busi-
ness, Mixed Media, since 1988.
After rediscovering quilting in the late 1990s, Debra started
teaching quilting locally in 2000. Her classes were based on
patterns she had designed for baby quilt gifts and a simple
Christmas stocking pattern. The popularity of the classes and
the interest in the patterns were the start of a small pattern
line and additional part-time teaching opportunities.
In 2003, at age 42, Debra was shocked to be diagnosed with
non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, late stage three. It was a trying
time for the whole family. Rigorous chemotherapy began
in August, concluded in November, and was followed by an
autologous (self-donor) bone marrow stem cell transplant
on December 26. Released from Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins
Hospital in January 2004 with a new lease on life, Debra
began the slow process of an almost two-year recovery.
It was a time of deep reflection. All the time in and out of
the hospital—with endless days spent in bed and losing
friends and acquaintances met during treatments at Johns
Hopkins—gave her ample time to review her life and think
about what might be her future. Inspired by the words of
Oprah Winfrey, she decided to follow her passions—quilting
and design—and to shoot for the moon. The first goal during
that recovery period was simple: to regain the basic indepen-
dence of getting up and getting dressed by herself each day.
Over time, the plan to give serious effort to being a pattern
designer was firmly established.
Debra started thinking about a name for her new pattern
company. As a graphic designer, Debra loves bold colors and
black and white. She particularly likes black and white stripes.
Since her name is Debra, she decided to replace the “D” with
a “Z,” and Zebra Patterns was born.
Since the first few patterns designed in her precancer days,
Debra has steadily built up her quilt pattern line to include 30
beautiful florals, 12 birds, 12 butterflies, 12 Bible stories, more
than 70 signature stamps, a woven bias floral series, several
baby quilts, and many unique quilted projects and art quilts.
Debra currently teaches and lectures at guilds and quilt shops
in the United States, while regularly adding new patterns and
products to the Zebra Patterns line.
Debra also has had success entering and showing her quilts
in regional and national quilt shows; has had her quilts
appear in calendars, quilt books, and websites; and has been
featured in and authored magazine articles.
Debra intends to continue lecturing, teaching, and evolving
as a quilter, speaker, and author. She would like to travel the
world through quilting. Debra has a website that showcases
all her art quilts, her patterns, and an extensive ongoing blog
called “Shoot for the Moon.” Debra’s blog tells the stories
of her current activities—quilting and then some—and is a
resource for quilters wanting to follow their passion with a
pattern line of their own. Visit www.zebrapatterns.com for
the blog and much, much more.
Also by Debra Gabel:
Quilt Blocks Around the World
80
Great Titles & Products from C&T PUBLISHING & STASH BOOKS
Available at your local retailer or www.ctpub.com or 800-284-1114
For a list of other fine books from C&T Publishing, visit our website
to view our catalog online.
C&T PUBLISHING, INC.
P.O. Box 1456
Lafayette, CA 94549
800-284-1114
C&T Publishing’s professional photography services are now available to
the public. Visit us at www.ctmediaservices.com.
Tips and Techniques can be found at www.ctpub.com >
Consumer Resources > Quiltmaking Basics: Tips & Techniques
for Quiltmaking & More
For quilting supplies:
COTTON PATCH
1025 Brown Ave.
Lafayette, CA 94549
Store: 925-284-1177
Mail order: 925-283-7883
Note: Fabrics used in the quilts shown may not be currently
available, as fabric manufacturers keep most fabrics in print
for only a short time.
Email: ctinfo@ctpub.com
Website: www.ctpub.com
Email: CottonPa@aol.com
Website: www.quiltusa.com
3
3 3 3
3
4
5 6
9
7
8
10
Agra, India
Page 1 of 2
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.
Use ruler to measure
these inchmarks to verify that
printout is correctly sized.

Agra, India
Page 2 of 2
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.
11
11
66
67
12
13
14
15 16
25
26
26

4
5
6
9
10
13
14
15
16
18
20
22
24
27
28
31
29
36
Windows/doors:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric paint.
Amsterdam, Netherlands
3
11
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Around the World
2
3
3
4
5
6
7
7
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

4
5
6
7
8 9
10
12
14
17
18
26 27
28
11 (columns)
20
15
22
19
16
23
24
29
Small Details:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric paint.
Windows:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric paint.
Athens, Greece
30
3
13
31
21
25
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

3
3 3 3 3 3
3
5
5
5
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
Auckland, New Zealand
Small flowers
can be made with
embroidery or beading.
17 18 19
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Stars in sky
can be created
with embroidery
or fabric paint.
Bangkok, Thailand
Building rooftops are red with
green trim. Cut roof pieces on
outer edge of thick line from red
fabric, then do wide satin stitch
for green trim. Go over the wide
satin twice for density.
3
4 5 6
7 8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16 17 18 19 20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
33
32
31
30
29
35
36
34
38
37
40
39
41
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Barcelona, Spain
3
9
24
27
23
25
26
28
11
12
15
13
14 14
14
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
8
4
5
6
7
29
10
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13
Beijing, China
Page 1 of 2
30
31
10
11 11
12
14
15
16
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27 28 29
32
33 34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
A-N Windows for #18
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Beijing, China
Page 2 of 2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
17
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

6
5
4
7 7
10
11
8
8
9
9
12
13
21
22
3
15
16 17
14
2
18
19
24
24
20
23
Brussels, Belgium
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

5
3
3
3
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
17
18
Bucket List
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

3
4
4
5
7
8
Budapest, Hungary
25 26
27
28
29 30
31 32
33
9
6
Windows and other small
details can be drawn/painted
with fabric paints/markers or
embroidered.
Pieces 10, 16, 19 should
be cut in white then add
a strip of lace on top.
Bridge supports can be
drawn with fabric markers
or embroidered.
11
12
13
14
15
17
20
21
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Buenos Aires, Argentina
Page 1 of 2
3 3 3
3
4
5
6
7
8
12
13
14
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Buenos Aires, Argentina
Page 2 of 2
9
10
11
16
15
15
Small windows
can be painted or
embroidered
or beaded.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

5
19
27
3 3
26
18 20
22
23
24
21
25
11
7
6
9
8
10
13
12
15
14
17
16
4
Cairo, Egypt
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

15
17
4
4
6
7
8
9
5
16
10
11
12
14
13
Cape Town, South Africa
Penguin eye can
be created with
fabric paint/marker
or embroidered.
Raw edge stitching
with Neon Green thread
makes city look like it
is lit up.
18
3
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

SPECIFIC
Caribbean
Names
Caribbean Islands
Page 1 of 2
You can use these
patterns to make your
block more specific.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012
by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and
author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc.,
encourages you to use this book as a text
for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114
or www.ctpub.com for lesson plans and
information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

3
3
3 3 3
3
4
5
7
6
9
8
13
12
10
11
31
14
15
16
18
19 20
23
26
25
24
27
30
28
29
O
p
t
i
o
n
a
l

c
a
s
t
l
e

s
h
a
d
o
w
17
30
Caribbean Islands
Page 2 of 2
21
22
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

3
3 3 3 3
3
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
4
5
6
7
9
13
14
15
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

4
28
41
42
43
43
29
30
31
37
32
6
9
8
8
5
14
16
18
19
20
23
21
22
17 17
15
10
10
10
12
11 11 11 11 11 11
13
7
24
26
27
25
38
39
40
Windows can be
stitched or painted
Dublin, Ireland
30
3
3 3 3 3
3
3
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44
Edinburgh, Scotland
Page 1 of 2
6
5
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
30
24
25
26
27
28
29
31
32
36 34
39
38
33
37
35
38
Small windows and door
details can be drawn, painted
or embroidered.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

40
Edinburgh, Scotland
Page 2 of 2
4
O
p
t
i
o
n
a
l
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z
a
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s
Optional
Optional
O
p
t
i
o
n
a
l
Optional
Sun Rays can be made from
white tulle or organza.
41
42
43
3
3
3
3
3
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Galápagos Islands, Ecuador
4
5
6
3
3
3
3
3
7
8
10
9
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
22
20
21
23
24
25
28
28
26
27
Turtle details
can be made with
fabric marker.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

13
3 3 3
3
3
4
6
5
7
8
10
11
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
27
16
Geneva, Switzerland
Small windows
can be made with
fabric paint,
embroidery or beads.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

S
u
n
ra
y
s
O
p
tio
n
a
l - w
h
ite
o
rg
a
n
z
a
S
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s

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l

S
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a
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s

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a
l

S
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s
4
5
6
19
20
26
28
29
30
31
32
33
35
36
3
8
39
42
4
2
4
3
40, 41
Hong Kong, China
3
3
3
3
10
1
1
1
5
16
17
18
2
7
34
37
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com
for lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

33
7
8
3
4
5
6
36
36
Stars 37-41
9
10
11
12
13
14
15 15
16
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
27
26
28
29
30
31
32
17
35
34
Small windows can
be made with fabric
paint or embroidery
Istanbul, Turkey
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

3
4
5 6 7
8
9
9
10
32 33
36
35
38
34
37
29
30
31
13
15
47
42
41
14
28
12
16
17
19
18
20
26
11
27
43
44
45 46
40
39
21
Small marks on wall,
windows and other
details can be made with
fabric markers, fabric paint
or embroidery
Jerusalem, Isreal
48
22
23
24
25
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

LasVegas, USA
Page 1 of 2
The Las Vegas sign can be printed onto computer fabric instead of
made with pattern pieces if desired as sign is very detailed.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

18
12
11
3
4
5
6
7
8
9 10 12
13
14
15
16
17
19
20
21
22
23
24
LasVegas, USA
Page 2 of 2
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

51
51
47
49
29 39
12
28
27
31
32
33
34
30
38
37
40
41
42
43
44
13
18 19
14
20
21 22
14
Lima, Peru
Page 1 of 2
Windows and small pieces can be created with fabric paint or embroidery.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

3 3 3
3 3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Flowers can be created with fabric paint, embroidery or beading.
Lima, Peru
Page 2 of 2
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Details:
Can create
with markers,
embroidery or
fabric paint.
3
Windows:
Can create with
beads, embroidery
or fabric paint.
5
Ferris Wheel:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric markers.
4
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
21
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
47
48
49
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
7
6
8
9
10
12
11
13
6 & 7:
Can create with
organza or can be
ellimibated.
14
50
London, England
Q
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s

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53
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
5 5
7
8
9
10
11
41
52
54
55
55
Manila, Philippines
Page 1 of 2
6
Samll windows and
details vcan becreated with
fabric paint or markers.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

40
14
13
16
21
17
18 19 20
22
15
43
47
48
50
51
49
44
42
35
36
38
39
37
46 45
26 27 28
29 30
31 32
33 34
23 25 24
Manila, Philippines
Page 2 of 2
Samll windows and
details vcan becreated with
fabric paint or markers.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Moscow
Page 1 of 2
NOTE:
Crosses atop towers,
small windows, and roof top
decorations can be created
with fabric markers, or
embroidery.
20
21
25 24
4
26
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
3
22a
22b
22c
22e
22d
22f
22i
22j
22g
22h
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Moscow
Page 2 of 2
15c
Tower 12 - center tower
Tower 13 - on left
Tower 16 - to left of center tower
Tower 19
17- Right
Tower Top
Tower 18
Tower 15 - left most small tower
Tower 14 - on left
NOTE:
Crosses atop towers,
small windows, and roof top
decorations can be created
with fabric markers, or
embroidery.
15a
15b
15d
15e
15f
13a
13d
13e
13g
13f
13b
13c
14a
14b
14e
14f
14g
14h
14i
14j
14c
14d
16a
16c
16b
16d
16e
16f
16g
12a
12d
12e
12b
12c
12f
12k
1
2
h
12g
12i
12m
12l
12j
17
18a
18b
18c
18f
18e
18g
18d
19a
19b
12m
19d
19e
19f
19g
19h
19i
19c
Q
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Munich, Germany
Page 1 of 2
3
3 3 3
80
80
4
5
6
7
8
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Munich, Germany
Page 2 of 2
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
18
19
20
36
35
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75 76 77 78 79
21
22
23
24 25 26 27 28
29
30 31 32 33 34
Small windows and
details can be made
with embroidery or
fabric paint.
16
81
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

1
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
12 12
Nairobi, Kenya
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

New York, USA
3
5
6
7
8
9
1
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
4
4
Small windows can be made
with embroidery, fabric paint,
or beading.
Statue face
can be drawn
with fabric
markers.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

7
8
33
34
4
14
Oslo, Norway
Page 1 of 2
3
3
3
3
15
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

9
11
10
5
5 5
5
6
6
16
17
18
20
19
29
30
35
36
37
38
39
41
43
44
32
42
40
Oslo, Norway
Page 2 of 2
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

5
3
4
6 7
8
9
12
13
1
4
15
2
5
26
17
19
20
21
22
23
24
18
11
Details:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric paint.
10
Details:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric paint.
Windows:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric paint.
Paris, France
16
16
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

11
42
Prague, Czech Republic
3
3
3
3
4
5
6
7
31
8
9
10
12 13
17
14
18
15
16
1
9
21
20
22
24
23
25
26
27
28
29
39
32
34 33
38 35
36 37
4 0
41
43
4
4
30
45
45
Small windows and details
can be made with fabric paint,
embroidery, or beading.
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Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
Page 1 of 2
30
3 3 3
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
28
29
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

31
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16 17
18 19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
Page 2 of 2
Small windows and
details can be created
with fabric paint, embroidery
or hand beading.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

10
3
3
3
3
4
5
6
7
9
12
13
14
15
16
18
11
20 21
22
23
24
25
26
26
26
27
28
29 30 31
19
8
Reykjavik, Iceland
Small windows and details
can be embroidered or painted
with fabric paints.
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3
3 3
3
4
5
15
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Page 1 of 2
12
7
13
14
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

19
22
24
25
20
23
6
8
9
10
11
17
18
Rio De Janeiro, Brazil
Page 1 of 2
16
21
26
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

9
52
53
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32 33
34 35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42 43 44 45 46 47
48
5
1
5
0
Rome, Italy
Page 1 of 2
Small windows and
details can be created with
fabric paint or embroidery.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

3 3
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
54
54
49
Rome, Italy
Page 2 of 2
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

7
Small details,
windows/doors
can be created
with fabric paints
or embbroidery.
4
5
5
3
San Francisco, USA
Page 1 of 2
14
15
41 42 43 44 45
6
Bridge cabels
can be drawn or
embroidered.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

House lattice detail patterns provided, hoverer
it is recommended to use lace.
San Francisco, USA
Page 2 of 2
21
22
23 24 25
8
9 10 11 12 13
16 17 18 19 20
26
27
28
29 31
30 32
33
34
35
36 37 38 39 40
Use Lace for House Lattice
Windows for house peaks
Windows for house bays
Small details,
windows/doors
can be created
with fabric paints
or embbroidery.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

San Juan, Puerto Rico
3 3
3
3
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
16
17
18
18
19
4
15
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

1
1
3
3
3
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
0
12 13
1
4
1
5
1
7
19
2
1
23
24
26 26
26 27
Sunrays can
be made
from tulle
or organza.
Small pieces can be
painted or embroidered.
Seoul, North Korea
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

34
37
Singapore
Page 1 of 2
3
3
3
3
4
25
26 27 28
29
30
31
32
42
41
40
39
38
Lion details can
be stitched or
created with fabric
markers.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
33
43
44
45
46
47
36
35
Small windows and
details can be created with
embroidery, fabric paint,
or beading.
Singapore
Page 2 of 2
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

3
5
6
7
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14 15
16
17
18
Optional
4
Small windows and
details can be created with
embroidery, fabric paint,
or beading.
Sunrays:
Can create with
thread painting
or organza.
Sydney, Australia
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Tokyo, Japan
3 3
4
6
7
7
8
9
10
Sunrays:
Can create with
organza or tulle.
Windows:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric paint.
5
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Toronto, Canada
Small Details:
Can create with
embroidery or
fabric paint.
3
4
4
5
6 6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
23
24
25
26
30
27
28
29
Optional Sunrays: Make from white organza
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

The Traveling Family
Page 1 of 2
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
16
17
18
19
20
14
15
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

The Traveling Family
Page 2 of 2
3
4
5
6
22
21
21
21
21
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

4
Vancouver, Canada
3 3
3
3
5
6
7
8
10
11 12
13
14
15
16
17
18
1
9
9
Q
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7
Vatican City
Page 1 of 2
4
6
5
5
3
3
3 3 3 3
Sunrays can be made from organza or tulle
12
Dotted lines are quilting lines
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Vatican City
Page 2 of 2
8 10
9 11
20 21
19
13
14
15
18
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63
24 27 29
28
25 31
40
42
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45 46
26
48 47
60
49 57
58
59
36 38
35 37
50 51 56
32
55 41 43
30 33
34
52 53 39 54
61
62
22
Small pieces and windows can
be created with fabric paint or
fabric marker or embroidery.
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Venice, Italy
Page 1 of 2
4
5
5
6
7
8
10
11
12
13
9
14
31 32 33 34 35
37
38
39
40
41
30
3
6
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Venice, Italy
Page 2 of 2
3 3 3
3
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
29
42
43
44
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Where We’ve Been!
2
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
9
Quilt Blocks Around the World
Text and Artwork copyright © 2012 by Debra Gabel of Zebra Patterns
Attention Copy Shops: Publisher and author give permission to photocopy
this pattern for personal use only.
Attention Teachers: C&T Publishing, Inc., encourages you to use this book
as a text for teaching. Contact us at 800-284-1114 or www.ctpub.com for
lesson plans and information about the C&T Creative Troupe.

Quilt Blocks Around the World Download
Copyright © 2012 by C&T Publishing, Inc.
ISBN 978-1-60705-435-1
Published by C&T Publishing, Inc.,
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Qu||tmak|ng
Sew|ng
I|bet Atts 8
M|xed Med|a
Need|e Atts
Þapetctaíts
Cteate 8 1teasute
Not|ons 8
Intetíac|ng
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On||ne Þtoducts
wra www.ctpub.com n 1651 Challenge Drive, Concord, CA 94520
u.s. vott rarr 800.284.1114 n :nv’t 925.677.0377 n rnx 925.677.0373
from C&T Publishing
C&T PUBLISHING is proud to offer you innovative
books and products to inspire your creativity. Look for our products
at local quilt shops, craft and art supply stores, or fine book-sellers.
GOING GREEN
We have been working hard for the last several years to make
our operations friendlier to the environment. We were certified
as a California Bay Area Green Business in 2007. Since then, we
have taken other major steps to green our operations, most notably
by printing our catalogs and other sales materials on recycled
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Qu||tmak|ng
Sew|ng
I|bet Atts 8
M|xed Med|a
Need|e Atts
Þapetctaíts
Cteate 8 1teasute
Not|ons 8
Intetíac|ng
OVO’s
C|íts
On||ne Þtoducts
wra www.ctpub.com n 1651 Challenge Drive, Concord, CA 94520
u.s. vott rarr 800.284.1114 n :nv’t 925.677.0377 n rnx 925.677.0373
from C&T Publishing
C&T PUBLISHING is proud to offer you innovative
books and products to inspire your creativity. Look for our products
at local quilt shops, craft and art supply stores, or fine book-sellers.
GOING GREEN
We have been working hard for the last several years to make
our operations friendlier to the environment. We were certified
as a California Bay Area Green Business in 2007. Since then, we
have taken other major steps to green our operations, most notably
by printing our catalogs and other sales materials on recycled
paper. Our catalogs and many of our most popular books are
now available as downloads that you can view online. Tis is an
important part of our efforts to save natural resources and reduce
our carbon footprint.
INTERESTED IN PUBLISHING A BOOK?
Have an idea for a new product?
We are always looking for original ideas for books, DVDs, and
related products. Visit our website and click on “Submissions”
to submit your proposal.
for purchasing an eProduct from C&T Publishing!
We appreciate your business!
1ank you
1
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9
3
C
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P
U
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L
I
S
H
I
N
G
ISBN 978-1-60705-435-1
9 7 8 1 6 0 7 0 5 4 3 5 1
5 2 1 9 5
US $21.95
CRAFTS/Quilting
10832
Also available as an eBook
Fifty 6˝ × 6˝ blocks from
international cities,
including general
travel-themed designs
Pages lay flat for tracing
and color template
patterns make fabric
selection easy
CD inside has PDF files
perfect for resizing
and printing from your
computer
D
e
b
r
a

G
a
b
e
l
Picture your dream
destinations…as a quilt!
Debra Gabel

Debra Gabel

Quilt Blocks Around the World
50 Appliqué Patterns for International Cities & More Mix & Match to Create Lasting Memories

Where We’ve Been, 51˝ × 51˝, by Patti Rusk

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