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August 28, 2013

August 28, 2013

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BY NANCY SPENCER

Herald Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — “Freedom
is under attack!” U.S.
Congressman Jim Jordan said
Tuesday to a dozen concerned
Delphos Area Chamber of
Commerce members. “What
Obama and his administration
are doing — and the list is long
— is breaking down our fun-
damental liberties. From the
drones, to the NSA and phone
logs, to the Patriot Act — put it
all together and it’s scary. And
the biggest threat to freedom
right now is Obamacare.”
The Champaign County
native outlined his and his
constituents’ plan to delay
the Patient Protection and
Affordable Care Act for all,
not just “big business,” and
ultimately replace it with an
option that doesn’t “threaten
business growth.”
“Everyone knows this is
bad,” Jordan said. “Even the
president knows it’s bad. His
own hometown paper, The
Chicago Tribune, said ‘Delay
the entire bill’. His own people
— Democrats in the House
— are voting for bills to stop
Obamacare.”
Jordan said he is aware how
anxious the American people
are and how they feel about
where America is headed. He
offered words of encourage-
ment.
“We are still America,”
Jordan said. “We are still the
greatest country in the world
and we have people who care
about the country and their
communities and they are
working to make both better.”
Upfront
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
The Next Generation 4
Community 5
Sports 6
Business 7
Classifieds 8
Television 9
World briefs 10
Index
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Jays even mark at 1-1, p6 FFA officers complete training, p4
www.delphosherald.com
Delphos students back in the classroom
Tuesday morning
marked the beginning of
the 2013/14 school year
for Delphos Public and
Parochial schools. Left:
Making their way to the
entryway of Franklin
Elementary School is,
from left, first-grader
Alexis Trentman, her
father, Terry, and her
brother, Dean. Right:
St. John’s Elementary
School students Marley
Haunhorst, left, Drew
Boggs and Skylar
Zimmerman stay busy
coloring Clifford the Big
Red Dog before morning
announcements. (Delphos
Herald/Staff photos)
Getting to know ...
... the Canal Days ArtFest Chair
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS—Friday evening of Canal
Days around 7 p.m., take a walk to the
Delphos Area Art Guild located on Main
Street for the opening reception for the
ArtFest exhibit, which attracts artists from
the Delphos community, as well as from
Wapakoneta, New Knoxville, Celina and
Bowling Green.
ArtFest chair Laura Cramer became
involved with the Delphos Area Art Guild
(DAAG) in 2008 when one of the founders,
Judy Grone, introduced herself to her as they
were both volunteering for another organiza-
tion. At that time, Grone and the other mem-
bers of the group were looking for younger
members to become involved. Cramer began
attending the monthly meetings and found the
guild to be an organization she would like to
be a part of.
“It is a small organization with a powerful
mission to promote the creation and appreciation
of art in our community,” Cramer said proudly.
Since 2008, Cramer has helped DAAG
prepare for their annual ArtFest Exhibit and
during the past three years, she has been one
of the organizers for the event.
Laura Cramer, right, the 2013 Canal Days ArtFest chair, and Delphos Area Art Guild
member Judy Grone stand among the submissions for last year’s ArtFest. (Submitted
photo)
Partly
cloudy today
and hot. A
40 percent
chance of
showers
and thun-
derstorms throughout the
day. Mostly clear tonight.
Highs around 90 and lows
in the mid 60s. See page 2.
Finance Committee
plows through
department budgets
BY NANCY SPENCER
Herald Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — The Delphos City Finance Committee met
Monday under the direction of Chair Joe Martz.
Departments heads from water, sewer and maintenance
detailed their budgets line item by line item.
The majority Water Superintendent Tim Williams’ 2014
operating budget of $1,487,024 is mostly comprised of sala-
ries and benefits ($446,300), utilities ($157,000), chemicals
($105,000) and debt repayment ($600,000) for the new plant
and reservoir. Other miscellaneous costs round out his budget.
Williams did not include the reduction of personnel and
fell approximately $280,000 short of where the auditor had
targeted to have the account finish 2014 in the black. The
reduction of one employee at the plant would save approxi-
mately $26,000.
Auditor Tom Jettinghoff asked if Williams did reduce per-
sonnel at the plant, if he could still operate. Williams said he
could but there would be little room for water main repairs and
maintenance at the plant.
“We all work together,” Williams said. “If there’s a water main
break, it’s not just my guys out there. If we need to plow snow, I
have a guy who can do that. We don’t just spend our time in our
own departments; we help each other out where we’re needed.”
Councilman Rick Hanser asked if any operations at the plant
could be done more cost-effectively and Williams answered
that the plant is at bare bones and personnel is needed when
water is generated and numerous tests have to be run daily.
Wastewater Superintendent Todd Teman presented his 2014
budget of $2,949,500 including, but not limited to: salaries and
benefits ($600,000), utilities ($526,000), contractual services
($90,700), maintenance of equipment ($80,000) and chemicals
($110,000).
U.S. Rep.
Jordan:
Freedom
under attack!
U.S. Representative Jim Jordan addressed a dozen
concerned Delphos Area Chamber of Commerce mem-
bers Tuesday . (Delphos Herald./Nancy Spencer)
Diglia announces retirement
By CYNTHIA YAHNA
Herald Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com
ELIDA — The Elida Board of Education met Tuesday
evening to discuss the student achievement liaison report and
a breakdown of school expenditures by Treasurer Joel Parker.
First, they learned of Superintendent Don Diglia’s intent to
retire at the end of the current school year.
Diglia said he presented a letter of retirement to the board
of education, which will be on June 30, 2014.
“This is truly one of the hardest-working teams I have had
the privilege to work with,” he said.
In closing, he added he was deeply appreciative of all the
board members and has nothing but the highest regard for
each one.
Brenda Stocker began with a report on House Bill 59,
which is about expansion of school choice.
“They added an income voucher system,” she said. “There
are still flaws in the funding formula. Also, the state is elimi-
nating the rollbacks for the homestead tax, in which the state
kicks in 10 percent and gives another 2.5 percent; however, the
renewals will not be affected.”
Assistant Curriculum Director and Assessment Director
Faith Cummins gave a lengthy presentation on how the new
report card system works and how it is graded.
“This year, it is graded on 16 different measures,” she said.
“In simple terms, we must achieve a certain annual measur-
able achievement. It doesn’t matter what type of student; all
are included.”
Diglia talked about the report card.
Legion sets
Veteran’s
Appreciation
Festival
Delphos American
Legion Post #268 will hold
its third annual Veteran’s
Appreciation Festival on
Saturday at the post.
Opening ceremony
begins at 1 p.m.
Raffle include a Stainless
Steel Barbeque Gril (first
prize), a flat-screen TV
(second prize) and a single-
cup coffee maker (third
prize.Tickets are six for $5
or $1 each.A 50-50 draw-
ing will also be held.
Chicken or pork dinners
will be available from 4 p.m.
until sold out for $7.50.
Entertainment includes
bingo from 3-10 p.m.;
Randy Cavennof from 4-6
p.m.; and the Beer Barrel
Boys from 7-11 p.m.
Free taxi service will
be available from 10
p.m. to midnight. Local
transportation only.
For more informa-
tion, contact the Legion
at 419-692-6756.
See BUDGETS, page 10
See JORDAN, page 10
See DIGLIA, page 10
See ARTFEST, page 10
Class of ‘53 sets
65th reunion
St. John’s High School
class of 1953 will attend 4:30
p.m.Mass on Sept. 7 followed
by a 60th anniversary reunion
at The Landeck Tavern.
All classmates are
urged to attend.
Information submitted
At 7:46 p.m. Sunday, Delphos Police were
called to the 700 block of South Main Street
in reference to a theft complaint at a residence
in that area.
Upon officers’ arrival, the victim stated
that a person known to the victim had taken
money from the victim without permission
to do so.
At noon Saturday, police were called to the
800 block of East Third Street in reference to
a theft complaint. Upon officers’ arrival, the
victim stated that someone had taken personal
items from inside the residence without per-
mission to do so.
At 8:41 p.m.
Thursday, police
were called to
Waterworks Park in
reference to a fight
at that location.
Upon officers arriv-
al, the victim stated
that Rudy Nieto,
18, of Delphos had
assaulted the vic-
tim when the victim
arrived at the park
to speak with Nieto.
The victim stated that
once assaulted, he
walked away from Nieto and was leaving the
park. The victim stated that Nieto again came
from behind and assaulted him again, this
time with an object in his hand to cause more
injury to the victim. Nieto was taken into cus-
tody and transported to the Allen County Jail,
Nieto will appear in Lima Municipal Court on
the charge.
At 9:38 a.m. Thursday, police were called
to the 12000 block of South Clay Street in
reference to a theft complaint at a residence
in that area. Upon officers’ arrival, the victim
stated that someone had taken jewelry from
the residence without permission to do so.
At 9:02 a.m.
Thursday, officers
located Bradley
Kaverman, 28, of
Delphos at a busi-
ness in the 900
block of South Main
Street. Officers
arrested Kaverman
on an active warrant
issued out of Lima
Municipal Court
and the Delphos
Police Department
on the charge of
receiving stolen
property. Kaverman was transported to the
Allen County Jail and will appear in Lima
Municipal Court on the charge.
At 4:52 p.m. Wednesday, police were con-
tacted by a business in the 1400 block of
North Main Street in reference to a theft com-
plaint at the business. Upon speaking with the
business, it was found that someone had taken
gasoline from the business without permission
to do so.
At 12:17 p.m. Wednesday, police were
called to the 800 block of South Clay Street
in reference to a theft complaint at a residence
in that area. Upon officers’ arrival, the victim
stated that someone had taken scrap metal
from behind the residence without permission
to do so.
At 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, police were called
to the 600 block of South Clay Street in refer-
ence to a theft complaint. Upon officers’ arriv-
al, the victim stated that someone had taken
items from the residence without permission
to do so. The victim stated that a push mower
and a metal fire ring was taken from outside
of the residence.
At 4:26 a.m. Tuesday, police were called
to the 200 block of Maple Street in reference
to a theft from a motor vehicle complaint in
that area. Upon officers’ arrival, the victim
stated that someone had entered the unlocked
vehicle and had taken money and electronic
equipment from inside the vehicle.
At 7:44 p.m. Monday, police were called
to the 200 block of East Cleveland Street in
reference to a theft from a business in that
area. Upon officers’ arrival, the business
stated that someone had taken metal that was
stored behind the
business.
At 10:11 p.m.
Sunday, police
received a call in
reference to a sus-
pended driver
driving in the city
limits of Delphos.
A short time later,
officers located a
vehicle matching
the description of
the vehicle and the
driver, which was
previously confirmed
to having his driving privilege suspended.
As a result, officers stopped the vehicle
and located Richard Truesdale Jr., 46, of St.
Marys, operating the motor vehicle. Truesdale
was taken into custody and cited into Lima
Municipal Court on the charge.
At 6:36 p.m. Sunday, police were called
to the 300 block of North Jefferson Street
in reference to a theft from a motor vehicle
complaint. Upon officers’ arrival, the victim
stated that someone had gained entry into the
unlocked vehicle and had taken items from
inside the vehicle.
Oct. 11, 1936-Aug. 21, 2013
Charles Gordon Fullerton,
76, of Lancaster, Calif.,
passed away Aug. 21, 2013
in Lancaster.
He was born on Oct. 11,
1936, in Rochester, N.Y.,
to his parents, Mr. Charles
Fullerton and Mrs. Grace
Fullerton. Gordon was the
oldest of three children.
He married Marie J.
Buettner in Delphos, Ohio,
on July 6, 1968. They had
two children.
Gordon was an Eagle
Scout. He attended California
Institute of Technology
and graduated in 1958
with a Master’s Degree in
Mechanical Engineering. He
retired as a United States
Air Force Colonel after 30
years of service. Fullerton
flew nuclear bombers for the
Strategic Air Command dur-
ing the Cold War, joined the
astronaut corps at the end
of the Apollo program and
helped design and test the
space shuttle. He flew the
shuttle Enterprise in three of
its five test flights. Eventually,
he logged 382 hours in space
during his two shuttle flights,
STS-3 and 51-F. Gordon
later spent some 20 years as
a research pilot for NASA
Dryden Flight Research
Center at Edwards Air Force
Base, often at the controls
of the B-52 mothership and
747 shuttle carrier aircraft.
Gordon’s passions included
spending time with his five
grandchildren, hiking, long
bike rides and Saturday
morning garage sales.
Gordon will be remem-
bered by his loving wife and
their children, Molly Mansubi
and Andy (Kathleen)
Fullerton; five grandchildren,
Kobe, Cameron and Kyle
Mansubi and Keira and Elise
Fullerton. He is also survived
by his two sisters, Jeanne
Schulz and Ann Fullerton.
He was preceded in death
by his parents, Charles R. and
Grace (Sherman) Fullerton.
Relatives and friends
were invited to a Mass for
the Resurrection in celebra-
tion for Gordon at 10 a.m.
Saturday, Aug. 24 at Sacred
Heart Church, 565 West
Kettering, Lancaster, Calif.
93534. A Celebration of Life
was held at 10 a.m. Monday,
Aug. 26 at NASA Dryden,
Edwards Air Force Base.
Interment will take place at
Arlington National Cemetery,
Arlington, Va.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily has requested that dona-
tions may be sent to Dog
Tags for Military Kids, 661-
940-7624; ProCare Hospice,
1-888-573-7305 and Boy
Scouts of America.
To send condolences to
Marie Fullerton, contact
her at 44046 28th St. West,
Lancaster, CA 93536 or
mfnurse@yahoo.com.
Funeral arrangements
are being handled by Halley
Olsen Murphy, Lancaster
Chapel, www.homlancaster.
com.
A full biography of
Fullerton is available online
at www.nasa.gov/content/
retired-nasa-astronaut-test-
pilot-gordon-fullerton-dies/#.
Uhu5p7aXPvY, which
includes a video about
Gordon, and www.nasa.
gov/centers/dryden/news/
Biographies/Pilots/bd-dfrc-
p004.html.
2 – The Herald Wednesday, August 28, 2013
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARY
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN
HISTORY
FROM THE ARCHIVES
POLICE REPORT
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CORRECTIONS
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 143 No. 53
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.48 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $110 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
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Delphos, Ohio.

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POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
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C. Gordon ‘Gordo’
Fullerton
Associated Press
Today is Wednesday, Aug.
28, the 240th day of 2013. There
are 125 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On August 28, 1963, more
than 200,000 people listened as
the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.
delivered his “I Have a Dream”
speech in front of the Lincoln
Memorial in Washington, D.C.
On this date:
In 1609, English sea explorer
Henry Hudson and his ship, the
Half Moon, reached present-day
Delaware Bay.
In 1862, the Second Battle
of Bull Run (also known as
Second Manassas) began in
Prince William County, Va., dur-
ing the Civil War; the result was
a Confederate victory.
In 1922, the first-ever radio
commercial aired on station
WEAF in New York City; the
10-minute advertisement was
for the Queensboro Realty Co.,
which had paid a fee of $100.
In 1945, the Allies began
occupying Japan at the end of
World War II.
Nieto
Kaverman
Truesdale
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TODAY: Hot. Partly cloudy
with a 40 percent chance of show-
ers and thunderstorms. Highs
around 90. West winds 5 to 10
mph shifting to the north in the
afternoon.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 60s. Northeast
winds 5 to 10 mph.
THURSDAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the upper 80s. Northeast
winds 5 to 10 mph.
THURSDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 60s.
East winds around 5 mph shifting
to the southeast after midnight.
Wheat $6.34
Corn $6.31
Soybeans $14.59
One Year Ago
Hundreds gathered at Stadium Park Sunday to listen to Dan Heath with the Paradise Band, the
final offering this year of the Delphos Rotary Club’s Music in the Park series. The Rev. David
Howell, concert chair for the club, said the series has been a great success not just this year but for
the past five as well.
25 Years Ago – 1988
The 116th Pioneer Days in Kalida will host its annual car show Sept. 10, beginning at 10 a.m.
The show site will be downtown in the area adjacent to the Pioneer Days midway. Pioneer Days will
be held Sept. 8-11 and is sponsored by Kalida Lions Club and the village volunteer fire department.
Students of Klinger School, Washington Township, 1921-22, included Mary Stemen, Mildred
Lehman, Mildred Hutel, Phoebe Hutel, Helen Martz, Martha Eversole, Berniece Wells, Leota
Stemen, Jane Murphy, Rita Martz, Aileena Wiechart, Genelda Wiechart, Florence Lehman, Glen
Collins, Orvil Wagoner, Merlin Crowe, Austin Miller, John Markley, Henry Markley, Elmer Martz,
Karl Lehman, Everett McClure, Milo Eversole, Gilbert Wiechart and Anthony Wiechart.
Jefferson rolled over Coldwater in the final scrimmage for both teams before opening the season
next week. Jefferson scored on a quarterback sneak by Jon Boggs from the 1-foot line. The touch-
down was set up by a 35-yard pass from Boggs to Randy Trentman, who took the ball inside the one.
50 Years Ago – 1963
Delphos City Council accepted the application for annexation of East Ridge Subdivision – a
30.26-acre area in the northeast section of the city, which includes the homes on Carolyn Drive.
The area begins in the centerline of Fort Jennings Road on the existing corporation line of Delphos,
extends north to the north line of Niedecken Subdivision, east to the northeast corner of East Ridge
Subdivision No. 2, south to the north line of Fifth Street and west to the place of beginning.
Jennings Twirlers danced recently to the calling of Billy Bates of Anna. Hosts and hostesses
included Mr. and Mrs. Herb Wannemacher and Mr. and Mrs. John Schaffner. Ten guest couples
attended the dance. The Twirlers have planned a free street dance for all western style square dancers
on Sept. 1 at Ottoville in connection with that community’s park carnival.
Nine members of the Mary Martha Bible Class of the Christian Union Church were present at a
meeting held Tuesday evening in the home of Grace Stegeman, Jackson Street. The class president,
Dorothy Miller, called the meeting to order and the lesson was opened with a prayer by Pauline
Martin. The scriptures were read by Cora Weaver. Poems were read by members and the meeting
was closed with a prayer offered by Beatrice Patton.
See ARCHIVES, page 10
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were drawn
Tuesday:
Mega Millions
04-07-30-36-38, Mega Ball:
38
Megaplier
4
Pick 3 Evening
6-5-7
Pick 3 Midday
4-0-6
Pick 4 Evening
0-6-5-8
Pick 4 Midday
6-3-3-3
Pick 5 Evening
8-2-6-1-4
Pick 5 Midday
3-8-0-5-0
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $116 mil-
lion
Rolling Cash 5
19-27-28-30-39
Estimated jackpot: $229,000
Look online:
www.delphosherald.com.
2
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SANDUSKY — Cedar Point® amusement
park/resort, known around the world for its
record-breaking collection of rides and roller
coasters, announced several plans for the 2014
season, including intro-
ducing two new family
rides, changes to the park’s
Camp Snoopy area and
more details on a two-year
renovation project to Hotel
Breakers.
Joining Cedar Point’s
impressive lineup of
rides next summer will be Pipe Scream – a
Disk’O Coaster, and Lake Erie Eagles – a
Flying Scooters ride. Located along the Gemini
Midway, Pipe Scream is billed as “combining
the best of a roller coaster and a flat ride in one.”
Riders will spin and coast over 302 feet of track,
reaching a maximum height of 43 feet above the
midway and a top speed of 43 mph! Pipe Scream
is manufactured by Zamperla, Parsippany, N.J.
Across from Pipe Scream, Lake Erie Eagles
will also soar onto the Gemini Midway and will
treat a new generation of Cedar Point’s guests to
a classic thrill ride. Riders on Lake Erie Eagles
will sit in one of eight ride carriages that are
suspended from arms located more than 28 feet
above the ground. As the ride begins its cycle,
the carriages will swing outward simulating the
sensation of flight! A paddle on the carriages
will allow guests to alter their flight experience
from mild to wild! Lake Erie Eagles is manufac-
tured by Larson International, Inc., Plainview,
Texas.
In addition to the Gemini Midway improve-
ments, Camp Snoopy, celebrating 15 years of
family fun at Cedar Point, will also see enhance-
ments. The kid-friendly Frog Hopper ride will
be relocated to Camp Snoopy and re-themed as
Woodstock’s Airmail while the Jr. Gemini roller
coaster will be renamed Wilderness Run and
its entrance will be moved into Camp Snoopy.
These two popular rides will join other family
favorites such as the Tilt-A-Whirl, Lolli Swing
and Camp Bus and will bring Camp Snoopy’s
ride count up to an impressive nine rides, many
of which parents can ride side-by-side with their
children.
“We are excited
about these new
additions to the
park,” said Jason
McClure, incom-
ing Vice President
and General
Manager of Cedar
Point. “Following the successful introduction
of GateKeeper, we believe these new rides and
upgrades will continue to make Cedar Point the
perfect vacation destination for families of all
ages.”
The beginning of a two-year Hotel Breakers
renovation project will also commence this win-
ter. Phase one will include upgrading a portion
of the exterior of Hotel Breakers, while phase
two will take place over the 2014-2015 winter
season and will feature upgrades to both the
exterior and interior of the hotel. Conveniently
located between the sandy shore of Lake Erie
and the mountainous roller coasters of Cedar
Point, this popular family vacation destination
boasts more than 500 rooms, many of which
provide sweeping views of the Cedar Point
Beach.
While preparations are underway for the 2014
season, there is still time to enjoy all of the thrills
and chills that Cedar Point has to offer as the
park is open daily through Labor Day. Then, the
park reopens for a Bonus Weekend (Sept. 6-8),
followed by the 17th annual HalloWeekends®
event, Friday nights, Saturdays and Sundays,
Sept. 13-Oct. 27.
For more information, log on to cedarpoint.
com, like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter
and check out our YouTube channel.
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Van Wert County Fairgrounds
1055 s. Washington st., Van Wert, oh
WWW.VanWerthotairFestiVal.Com
Van
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Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are
tax-free, and distributions can be taken free of
penalties or taxes.* You may even beneft from
converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a
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under age 59½.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting
to know your goals so we can help you
reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit today.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC IRT-1845A-A
Tax-free Income Is the
Best Gift You Can Give
Yourself at Retirement.
With an Edward Jones Roth IRA, any earnings are
tax-free, and distributions can be taken free of
penalties or taxes.* You may even beneft from
converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
* Earnings distributions from a Roth IRA may be subject to taxes and a
10% penalty if the account is less than fve years old and the owner is
under age 59½.
At Edward Jones, we spend time getting
to know your goals so we can help you
reach them. To learn more about why an
Edward Jones Roth IRA can make sense
for you, call or visit today.
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 The Herald – 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Cedar Point announces plans for 2014 season
West Ohio Food
Bank receives
donation for freezer
Information submitted
LIMA — The West Ohio
Food Bank and The Market
Street Presbyterian Church
will have a check presenta-
tion at 10 a.m. today. The
Market Street Presbyterian
Church is donating $2,400
from its Wagner-Jacobs
Local Mission fund to
the “Freezer Fund” at the
West Ohio Food Bank to
aid in the complete update
of the 30-year-old indus-
trial freezer and refrigera-
tion units. The check will
be presented by the Market
Street Presbyterian Church
Mission Committee mem-
bers to WOFB CEO Gary
Bright at the West Ohio
Food Bank at 1380 E.
Kibby St., Lima.
This donation falls in line
with one of the core values
of the church: Nurturing
Families – quoting its
website. “We are called to
invest significant resources
in developing high qual-
ity ministries with children,
youth, student and adult
ministries, which helps to
strengthen families.”
The church has been
serving Lima and the sur-
rounding area for more than
175 years and continues as
a significant member of the
community. This donation
represents the Market Street
Presbyterian Church’s com-
mitment to building a bet-
ter community and stronger
families.
Currently, the West Ohio
Food Bank has raised about
$90,000 toward the goal of
$120,000 and has allowed
WOFB to begin phase one
of this project. This dona-
tion of $2,400 is the start
of the remaining $30,000
which is required for phase
two of this important freez-
er/refrigeration update.
The freezer has a capac-
ity of 11 semi truck loads
of frozen foods while the
refrigeration unit is capable
of holding about five semi
truck loads of perishable
products.
Bright says, “We are
getting excited about see-
ing the completion of this
important project as the
donations have come in.
We’re getting so close, we
just need a few more donors
to come forward and part-
ner with us.”
Donors can contact the
food bank by visiting wofb.
org or call 419-222-7946.
Bright goes on to say,
“Once this project is com-
pleted, we will focus on our
next major project, which
will allow us to replace one
of our aging fleet of trucks
and potentially add a fifth
box truck to our fleet. We
need to increase the amount
of food coming in to the
food bank and right now we
are limited by not having
enough trucks to pick up
and deliver the food.”
The West Ohio Food
Bank is seeking sustaining
partners who will share in
our pursuit of ending hun-
ger together in our region.
Auglaize Street reconstruction project ahead of schedule
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE — Village council met for its regu-
larly-scheduled monthly meeting Monday night to dis-
cuss the Auglaize Street construction project, five-year
Capital Improvement Plan, approval of an array of fiscal
matters and awarding a tree removal contract.
Brian Goubeaux of Choice One Engineering gave
an update on the Auglaize Street reconstruction project,
which is ahead of schedule. Goubeaux reported that
construction is ongoing and that sewer water laterals are
in. He said there are two pipes that need a change order
from 3/4-inch pipe to one-inch pipe, which is the exist-
ing pipe size.
Mayor Ron Miller said that the crews are all done
with the water and water pressure seems to be fine.
“Have had no complaints,” Miller said. “As far as I
know, everything’s going well without a glitch.”
“The switch over went well,” Goubeaux explained.
”Only had a few calls on Monterey Street with fiber
optics.”
The next step is to remove the curb stakes, get the
road torn out and the new curb in. The paving will fol-
low and be completed around the Oct. 1 completion
deadline.
“So far it’s been a pretty smooth job,” Goubeaux said.
“They are keeping the dust down and the area clean.”
Goubeaux also addressed the five-year Capital
Improvement Resolution which allows an Ohio Public
Works Commission (OPWC) application to be filed
by Choice One Engineering for the Village. He thought
applying for Bendle Edition improvements, which may
cost $500,000 and another smaller project—slip lining of
sanitary sewers for $50,000-$75,000—may be smaller
projects approved by the commission.
“It’s an option,” Goubeaux said. “We’re mandated
by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to make
improvements.”
Councilman Randy Altenberger asked if there would
be any additional costs associated with the applications.
“There is no additional costs,” Goubeaux explained.
“We have until the middle of September.”
Fiscal Officer Jeanne Wannemacher reported that the
Village is being audited and the auditor would like to
know the Village’s intent of using sewer and water funds
for capital payments, which would be retroactive from
July of 2011. Council voted to amend using the funds to
pay the sewer debt payment. Council also approved the
Village’s businesses’ liquor licences, Resolution 2013-06
— accepting current street, general and police protection
levy rates — and four easements for the allocation of the
four new Village signs.
Council approved getting estimates for and poten-
tially purchasing an additional 17 LED (light-emitting
diode) street lights for Main and northwest Elm Streets.
“There has been a substantial decrease in our electric
costs,” Miller said.
Council member Jerry Markward addressed the
meeting between the Utility Committee, Chad Knippen
and Treatment Plant Manager Steve Whittler.
In June, council recommended a September meeting
with BPA and the Utility Committee—comprised of
council members Jerry Markward, Karen Hoersten and
Tony Langhals—and employees Knippen and Whittler
to discuss Knippen’s interest in acquiring a wastewater
degree and license by taking classes geared toward
working at the plant.
“The schooling is drawn out over four years,”
Markward explained. “The courses start in January.”
Altenburger thought they should have another meet-
ing to finalize the plans and draw up some sort of
contract.
Wannemacher said the Utility Committee should
hold a meeting in October with Knippen and Whittler
during the normal monthly meeting in the afternoon
prior to the Village council meeting in the evening. The
committee could then give a report on the meeting to
council that night.
Board of Public Affairs officers Phil Hilvers and Dan
Honingford discussed purchasing a new handheld meter
reading gun for the village.
“It records the serial number of the meter and takes
the reading of 100 meters at a time,” Honingford
explained. “Then it’s uploaded and there’s no handwrit-
ten information.”
There are some other great benefits to utilizing the
system, which are that it won’t charge a homeowner
twice and notifies the user of missed meters and flags
high usage levels. Honingford said the handheld reader
in use now only takes eight readings and then the results
have to be handwritten.
The new hardware is sold and serviced by E. J.
Prescott and costs $13,700.
During the July 22 meeting, Ottoville resident Matt
Hilvers explained to council that he lives at 391 Sixth
St. and wanted to buy the property next to him, which
is one-half of an acre and 77 feet wide by 192 feet deep,
and build a new home. Currently, there is an extension
of Sixth Street that was never developed and he wants
council to consider vacating that portion — from the
canal to Canal Street — of the street. Council approved
vacating the street with an easement, which would
be convenient if the village needs to loop a water line
through the area.
“It has to be surveyed,” Miller said. “It will be paid
for by the owners.”
Next Village council meeting will be held at 7 p.m.
Sept. 23 in council chambers.
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news coverage is insightful and concise, to
keep you in the know without keeping you
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to stay on top of the world around you,
delivered straight to your door everyday.
If you aren't already taking advantage
of our convenient home delivery service,
please call us at 419-695-0015.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
405 N. Main St. • Delphos
PUTTING YOUR
WORLD IN
PERSPECTIVE
4 – The Herald Wednesday, August 28, 2013
www.delphosherald.com
The Next Generation
Bair receives ‘Most Valuable
Student’ scholarship
Information submitted
VAN WERT — Van Wert Elks Lodge 1197, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, has announced the awarding of
a $1,000 scholarship by the Elks National Foundation to Alex
Bair. The Elks National Foundation offers the “Most Valuable
Student” scholarships for high school seniors entering col-
lege in the fall. Mr. Bair graduated this spring from Van Wert
High School and will be entering Rose Hulman Institute of
Technology and majoring in Chemical Engineering.
During high school, Alex was a member of the Beta Club,
National Honor Society, Student Council and played soccer
and tennis.
Alex attends Trinity United Methodist Church.
Alex resides at 1151 Charlotte Circle, Van Wert, and is the
son of Phil and Shelly Bair.
Alex, along with his parents, was recognized during the Van
Wert Lodge Youth Recognition Breakfast which was held on
May 7.
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks is only second
to the United States Government in the number of scholarships
awarded each year. Van Wert Lodge is proud to have been a
sponsor for Alex during this competition.
Pictured are left to right, Alex Bair and Keith Rydell,
Lodge Scholarship Chairman. (Submitted photo)
Delphos FFA officers complete training
Information submitted
Recently, seven members of the newly-elected
Delphos FFA Officer Team traveled to 4-H Camp
Palmer in Fayette for a day of officer training.
The group spent the day doing a team challenge
course, including high-rope initiatives to develop team-
work. The second day, the chapter officers spent the day
working on plans for the upcoming year. They reviewed
policies and by-laws and drafted a new format to run
committees for the upcoming year.
During the training, the Delphos officers spent time
learning more about each other and participated in a
series of problem-solving and team building activities.
They also set goals and planned a calendar of activities
for the upcoming year.
The 2013-14 Delphos FFA officer team includes, front from left, Reporter Sophia Thompson and Treasurer Sophia
Wilson; and back, Secretary Aysa Hamilton, President Karen Cline, Sentinel Tatiana Olmeda, Vice President Kylie Fritz
and Student Advisor Halee Heising. (Submitted photo)
Information submitted
The Ohio State University
has issued the list of seniors
and graduate students who
earned degrees at spring com-
mencement exercises this
month.
In addition, the university
has issued its honor roll for
summer term 2013, listing
the names of students who
have achieved high academic
averages for their work. An
asterisk after a name indicates
a 4.0 academic performance.
Area graduates include:
Elida
Brock Best, master of arts
Timothy Alderman, bach-
elor of arts
Jordane Duffy, bachelor of
arts
Fort Jennings
Emily Erhart, bachelor of
science in health and com-
munity care
Dean’s List students
include:
Delphos
Jordan Jettinghoff
Margaret Wehri
Kalida
Michael Turnwald
Hoffman earned Girl Scout Gold Award
Delphos Girl Scout Kimberly Hoffman has earned the highest award in Girl Scouting — the Girl Scout Gold
Award. The Girl Scout Gold Award has inspired girls to become leaders and share their ideas and passions with
their communities. Recipients are part of an elite group of women who embody community leadership leaving
behind a sustainable legacy. When Juliette Gordon Low (founder of Girl Scouts) was alive, she made it a point to
present every award personally. Hoffman is the first in the Delphos community to earn the Gold Award for Girl
Scouts. To earn her award, she held Exploring Science Day at the Delphos Public Library two days in July where
children were able to come in and learn a little about science. She also is donating Exploring Science kits to the
library so children can explore science at home. (File photo)
Ohio parents reminded to
keep kids shots on schedule
By Mary Kuhlman
Ohio News Connection
COLUMBUS — With the school year beginning,
health experts have advised parents to make sure their
children’s immunizations are up to date. According to
Dr. Robert Frenck, professor of Pediatrics, Division
of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center, vaccinations are one of the most impor-
tant things done in pediatrics to prevent disease.
“Now, many diseases that were common when I was a
child are basically non-existent in the United States,” he
said, “and that’s directly related to vaccines.”
Some parts of the country have recently seen an
increase in measles and mumps, which Frenck said
appears to be from fewer people immunizing their chil-
dren. Vaccines have worked so effectively at preventing
those diseases, as well as rubella, small pox and polio,
that many people don’t realize their importance, he
explained.
“A lot of young parents have never seen the natural
disease, so they don’t know how serious and how bad
it can be, and they forget the very real problem that can
happen if children are not vaccinated,” he warned.
Dr. Frenck said vaccines have been proven to be very
safe, with little potential for major side effects. August is
National Immunization Awareness Month, and families
are encouraged to check with their doctors to ensure their
immunizations are on schedule. Ohio is ranked seventh in
the nation for immunization rates.
Besides protecting the patient, Frenck said, immuniza-
tions also provide “herd immunity.”
“By having everybody around them vaccinated, you
are actually protecting that rare child who can’t get an
immunization because of some medical condition,” he
said.
It has been shown that immunizations in childhood
also help decrease adult illnesses, particularly flu and
pneumonia, Frenck added.
Ohio State University
lists summer graduates,
honor roll
Thanks for reading
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
Nancy Spencer, editor
419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Don Hemple, advertising manager
419-695-0015 ext. 138
dhemple@delphosherald.com
News About Your Community
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4 – The Herald Wednesday, August 28, 2013
www.delphosherald.com
The Next Generation
Bair receives ‘Most Valuable
Student’ scholarship
Information submitted
VAN WERT — Van Wert Elks Lodge 1197, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, has announced the awarding of
a $1,000 scholarship by the Elks National Foundation to Alex
Bair. The Elks National Foundation offers the “Most Valuable
Student” scholarships for high school seniors entering col-
lege in the fall. Mr. Bair graduated this spring from Van Wert
High School and will be entering Rose Hulman Institute of
Technology and majoring in Chemical Engineering.
During high school, Alex was a member of the Beta Club,
National Honor Society, Student Council and played soccer
and tennis.
Alex attends Trinity United Methodist Church.
Alex resides at 1151 Charlotte Circle, Van Wert, and is the
son of Phil and Shelly Bair.
Alex, along with his parents, was recognized during the Van
Wert Lodge Youth Recognition Breakfast which was held on
May 7.
The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks is only second
to the United States Government in the number of scholarships
awarded each year. Van Wert Lodge is proud to have been a
sponsor for Alex during this competition.
Pictured are left to right, Alex Bair and Keith Rydell,
Lodge Scholarship Chairman. (Submitted photo)
Delphos FFA officers complete training
Information submitted
Recently, seven members of the newly-elected
Delphos FFA Officer Team traveled to 4-H Camp
Palmer in Fayette for a day of officer training.
The group spent the day doing a team challenge
course, including high-rope initiatives to develop team-
work. The second day, the chapter officers spent the day
working on plans for the upcoming year. They reviewed
policies and by-laws and drafted a new format to run
committees for the upcoming year.
During the training, the Delphos officers spent time
learning more about each other and participated in a
series of problem-solving and team building activities.
They also set goals and planned a calendar of activities
for the upcoming year.
The 2013-14 Delphos FFA officer team includes, front from left, Reporter Sophia Thompson and Treasurer Sophia
Wilson; and back, Secretary Aysa Hamilton, President Karen Cline, Sentinel Tatiana Olmeda, Vice President Kylie Fritz
and Student Advisor Halee Heising. (Submitted photo)
Information submitted
The Ohio State University
has issued the list of seniors
and graduate students who
earned degrees at spring com-
mencement exercises this
month.
In addition, the university
has issued its honor roll for
summer term 2013, listing
the names of students who
have achieved high academic
averages for their work. An
asterisk after a name indicates
a 4.0 academic performance.
Area graduates include:
Elida
Brock Best, master of arts
Timothy Alderman, bach-
elor of arts
Jordane Duffy, bachelor of
arts
Fort Jennings
Emily Erhart, bachelor of
science in health and com-
munity care
Dean’s List students
include:
Delphos
Jordan Jettinghoff
Margaret Wehri
Kalida
Michael Turnwald
Hoffman earned Girl Scout Gold Award
Delphos Girl Scout Kimberly Hoffman has earned the highest award in Girl Scouting — the Girl Scout Gold
Award. The Girl Scout Gold Award has inspired girls to become leaders and share their ideas and passions with
their communities. Recipients are part of an elite group of women who embody community leadership leaving
behind a sustainable legacy. When Juliette Gordon Low (founder of Girl Scouts) was alive, she made it a point to
present every award personally. Hoffman is the first in the Delphos community to earn the Gold Award for Girl
Scouts. To earn her award, she held Exploring Science Day at the Delphos Public Library two days in July where
children were able to come in and learn a little about science. She also is donating Exploring Science kits to the
library so children can explore science at home. (File photo)
Ohio parents reminded to
keep kids shots on schedule
By Mary Kuhlman
Ohio News Connection
COLUMBUS — With the school year beginning,
health experts have advised parents to make sure their
children’s immunizations are up to date. According to
Dr. Robert Frenck, professor of Pediatrics, Division
of Infectious Diseases, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
Medical Center, vaccinations are one of the most impor-
tant things done in pediatrics to prevent disease.
“Now, many diseases that were common when I was a
child are basically non-existent in the United States,” he
said, “and that’s directly related to vaccines.”
Some parts of the country have recently seen an
increase in measles and mumps, which Frenck said
appears to be from fewer people immunizing their chil-
dren. Vaccines have worked so effectively at preventing
those diseases, as well as rubella, small pox and polio,
that many people don’t realize their importance, he
explained.
“A lot of young parents have never seen the natural
disease, so they don’t know how serious and how bad
it can be, and they forget the very real problem that can
happen if children are not vaccinated,” he warned.
Dr. Frenck said vaccines have been proven to be very
safe, with little potential for major side effects. August is
National Immunization Awareness Month, and families
are encouraged to check with their doctors to ensure their
immunizations are on schedule. Ohio is ranked seventh in
the nation for immunization rates.
Besides protecting the patient, Frenck said, immuniza-
tions also provide “herd immunity.”
“By having everybody around them vaccinated, you
are actually protecting that rare child who can’t get an
immunization because of some medical condition,” he
said.
It has been shown that immunizations in childhood
also help decrease adult illnesses, particularly flu and
pneumonia, Frenck added.
Ohio State University
lists summer graduates,
honor roll
Thanks for reading
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com
Nancy Spencer, editor
419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Don Hemple, advertising manager
419-695-0015 ext. 138
dhemple@delphosherald.com
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Open 7 Days a Week
BY LOVINA EICHER
The garden is still pro-
ducing lots of vegetables.
Today, we made 18
quarts of spaghetti
sauce and another
11 quarts of toma-
to juice. While
the girls cut up all
the vegetables, I
sewed a dress and
shirt. Still need to
put button holes
and buttons on the
shirt.
Nights still
seem empty with Verena
and Loretta not home from 3
p.m. to 12:30 a.m. They are
still staying those hours with
93-year-old Vivian.
The new fence is up and
the horses and ponies are
having a blast eating all the
grass. This makes less chores
for the boys since they don’t
have to feed hay to the hors-
es mornings and evenings.
It is also a lot cheaper since
the price of hay is still quite
high.
The fence and gates were
up by 3 p.m. so everyone
went home to get cleaned up.
My husband Joe and Mose
(Susan’s boyfriend) grilled
50 pounds of
chicken and also
grilled wings to
make buffalo hot
wings.
Also on the
menu for supper
were mashed pota-
toes, gravy, dress-
ing, corn, mixed
vegetables, cole
slaw, sliced toma-
toes, bread, Swiss
roll bars, cherry pie, peach
cobbler, oatmeal cookies,
popcorn and ice cream. All
the dessert was brought in
except the ice cream.
Little Prancer is getting
fat from all the green grass.
Daughter Susan is taking
him for exercise by running
down the road with him. She
has also taught him a few
tricks. He listens very well
to her. Minnie, his mother,
has gone back to her owner.
Prancer didn’t seem to mind
much and follows his Dad,
Tiger, around everywhere in
the field. Not having Minnie
here to drive and ride has
brought a few tears from
9-year-old Lovina. She gets
so attached to these ponies.
She wants to try and ride
Tiger but he is still a little
rowdy for her. He isn’t a stal-
lion any more so he should
be settling down soon.
We received a letter from
brother Amos and Nancy last
week. They want to have
all my siblings and families
for our annual get-together.
Amos plans to have a hog
roast for us all on Labor
Day. School doors will open
the next day. The family has
grown since last year with
more babies being added and
more special friends.
Then in October, my
cousin Dave is having a
reunion at his house for my
mother’s side of the family.
This will be a huge gathering
by now.
We will have several
cousins missing since the last
time we were all together.
Also, two more of mother’s
siblings have passed since.
There are currently four of
Mom’s eight siblings still
living.
This is now Friday morn-
ing and this column is still
not out in the mail. Susan
is filling the wash machine
and rinse tubs with water
and gathering laundry. I need
to go help her. Verena and
Loretta are washing dishes.
Lovina is helping Susan. Joe
is still on a four-day work
week, so he is home today.
There is plenty to do out-
side for him and the boys.
Elizabeth is working at the
RV factory. God’s Blessings!
Try this recipe with veg-
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Fresh Corn Salsa
4 tomatoes, chopped
1 cup cooked fresh corn
kernels
1/4 cup finely-chopped
red onions
1/4 cup chopped fresh
cilantro
1 jalapeno pepper, finely
chopped
1/4 cup Zesty Italian
dressing
Combine all ingredients
except dressing in a large
bowl. Add dressing and mix
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Happy
Birthday
1
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 The Herald — 5 www.delphosherald.com
COMMUNITY
Landmark
Calendar of
Events
Allen County
Courthouse
419.238.9270 or vwfair@bright.net for more info
1055 S Washington St, Van Wert
www.vanwertcountyfair.com
157
th
YEAR
WEdnEsdAY, August 28
- MondAY, sEptEMbER 2
•Freeentertainmentnightly
beginning Thursday, August 29
•Kids’DayThursday, August 29
•SeniorCitizens/VeteransDay
Friday, August 30
•JamesOttoConcert
Opening act: Exploit | Saturday, August 31
Special thanks to our sponsors:
S&S Volvo • Statewide Ford
Lee Kinstle Sales & Service
D&D Trucking & Services • Greve
•DemolitionDerby
Sunday, September 1 at 7 p.m.
•HorseRunningRaces/Ladies’HatDay
Monday, September 2 at 1 p.m.
TODAY
9 a.m..- noon — Putnam
County Museum is open,
202 E. Main St. Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in
the St. John’s Chapel.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The
Delphos Canal Commission
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Museum of Postal History,
339 N. Main St., is open
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for
shopping.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for
shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for
shopping.
St. Vincent dePaul
Society, located at the east
edge of the St. John’s High
School parking lot, is open.
10 a.m.-2 p.m. —
Delphos Postal Museum is
open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission
Museum, 241 N. Main St.,
is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
MONDAY
Labor Day!
TUESDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
7 p.m. — Delphos Coon
and Sportsman’s Club meets.
Delphos City Council
meets at the Delphos
Municipal Building, 608 N.
Canal St.
Delphos Parks and
Recreation board meets at
the recreation building at
Stadium Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Alcoholics
Anonymous, Fi rst
Presbyterian Church, 310 W.
Second St.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St., Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club meets at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission meets at
Municipal Building.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
9 p.m. — Fort Jennings
Lions Club meets at the
Outpost Restaurant.
Aug. 29
Barb Coil
Dennis Dancer
Evan Siefker
Zachary Brown
Shelly Schoffner
Evan Siefker
Garden still producing
Prancer
Story idea...
Comments...
News releases...
email Nancy Spencer, editor
at nspencer@delphosherald.com
COLUMN
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birthday in our Happy Birthday column.
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The Delphos Herald newsroom,
405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
Please use the coupon also to make changes,
additions or to delete a name from the column.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
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6 – The Herald Wednesday, August 28, 2013
SPORTS
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• Sat., Sept. 7 &
Sept. 14...10am-4pm
or stop in anytime to sign up!
BOWLING BLAST-OFF
Saturday, Oct. 5...10am-2pm
Start bowling Oct. 12
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939 E. Fifth, Delphos 419-692-2695
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www.delphosbowlingalley.com
Jays rebound from
opening loss
By JIM METCALFE
Staff Writer
jmetcalfe@del-
phosherald.com
DELPHOS — It’s an old
maxim in sports that teams
improve the most between
their first and second games.
St. John’s came off a
season-opening loss to Van
Wert Monday as they host-
ed Spencerville Tuesday
night at Robert A. Arnzen
Gymnasium.
It took four close sets
by the Blue Jays grabbed a
25-18, 25-18, 23-25, 25-23
victory.
“We improved a lot
between last night and
tonight. Even then, we
weren’t bad last night for our
opener; we played
decent ball both
nights,” St. John’s
coach Carolyn
Dammeyer noted.
“Tonight, we had a
few too many brain
farts on our serve-
receive and missed
a few too many serves but
overall, I felt we played very
well overall. We’re young,
so this will be a learning and
growing experience.”
“We played really well
tonight and improved a
great deal from our previ-
ous match. Losing the sec-
ond set really hurt as we
were up 17-15 and then
got outscored 10-1 to fall
18-25,” Spencerville coach
Josh Early noted. “I was
really excited about how we
played following. We won
a tight third set, giving us
our first set of the season.
The fourth set was back
and forth but missing three
serves within the set was
our ultimate demise as we
fell 23-25. Overall, I am
really pleased with how we
played. We played as a team
and fought through adversi-
ty. Coming out and playing
at a high level after a loss
says a lot about our team.
Katie Merriman hit the ball
well for us tonight and did
an excellent job playing the
net. Schylar Miller had a
strong setting performance
and Maddy Hollar had a
good passing performance at
the libero position.”
All four sets took the
same pattern: neither team
could really get control and
run away with it.
The largest lead by either
team was seven — which
the Jays (1-1) held three
times.
Two of them came in the
opening set as the overall
youthful Jays had the closing
spurt, getting a hitting error
on set point to go up 1-0.
The second set was a car-
bon copy of the first, those
it was even closer most of
the way. Freshman Jessica
Geise (9 kills, 6 blocks,
15 digs) and senior Alicia
Buettner (9 kills, 4 blocks)
led the effort in the sec-
ond set, while the Bearcats
had juniors Katie Merriman
(7 kills, 4 aces, 3 blocks)
and Amanda Crider pacing
the way for their attack. A
hitting error put the Lady
Bearcats up 17-15 but soph-
omore Hayley Jettinghoff
helped the Jays retaliate —
as well as several miscues
by the visitors, including a
hitting error on set point to
put the hosts up 2 sets to
none.
Four straight aces by
junior Schylar Miller got
the Black Attack off
to a solid start in the
third set and they
never trailed, though
there were three ties,
the last at 21-21. At
times, both teams
struggled with consis-
tency; at other times,
they played solid volleyball.
In the end, junior Cierra
Adams put down a kill on
set point to get within 2-1.
The fourth set went back
and forth the entire time,
with the largest spread of
five twice by the Jays. The
set was so even that there
were a number of ties,
include at 23-23 on a Blue
Jay hitting error. Senior
Brittany Claypool (6 kills, 3
aces) put down a kill to set
up match point and a kill off
the Spencerville block by
Buettner gave the Jays the
triumph.
Other key perform-
ers for the Blue and Gold
were junior Bekah Fischer
(4 blocks), junior Haleigh
DeWyer (12 digs), junior
Colleen Schulte (5 aces, 10
assists) and freshman Maya
Gerker (9 assists, 3 aces).
Junior Schylar Miller
added nine assists and six
aces for the visitors, while
junior Chelsea Hanjora
added six kills.
The Blue Jay junior var-
sity (1-1) grabbed a 25-5,
25-13 victory.
St. John’s opens Midwest
Athletic Conference action
5:30 p.m. Thursday at Fort
Recovery.
Spencerville hosts Wayne
Trace 6 p.m. Thursday.
The night before, Van
Wert bested the Jays 25-21,
25-12, 21-25, 25-17.
Geise led the way with
nine kills and five blocks,
along with Fischer (4 kills,
3 blocks), Claypool (4 kills,
3 blocks, 17 digs), senior
Kaylie Youngpeter (3 aces),
Schulte (12 assists) and
Gerker (12 assists).
Joseph captures Wayne Trace Invitational
Information Submitted
GROVER HILL — St. John’s senior Megan Joseph
won the Wayne Trace Cross Country Invitational race
Tuesday at Grover Hill.
Joseph won the race by one minute with a time of
21:34. Also in the girls race, freshman Breece Rohr
finished 10th with a time of 23:39
In the boys race, sophomore Curtis Pohlman led
the Jays with a 15th-place finish with a time of 19:16.
Senior Aaron Hellman finished 32nd with a time of
20:35. As a team, the boys finished ninth out 13 teams.
“We had some runners that ran good but also had
some that struggled with the heat. The summer had
been cool, so we did not have a whole lot of training in
the heat and had an effect on some of the runners,” St.
John’s coach Steve Hellman noted. “Megan is running
real well right know and with the win, that should give
her even more confidence as the season goes on.”
St. John’s is in the Wapakoneta Night Meet 7:15 p.m.
Saturday.
———-
Jeffcats sweep Commodores
DELPHOS — The Jefferson volleyball crew swept
Perry 25-5, 25-13, 25-13 Tuesday night at Jefferson
High School.
Senior Rileigh Stockwell led the serving, going
10-for-13 (6 aces). Junior Brooke Culp had 11 assists.
Senior Katie Goergens led at the net, going 11-for-12
(8 kills).
“Our girls came out and fought hard tonight. We are
happy to start off our season with two wins and we plan
to continue working hard to keep our momentum going
strong,” Jefferson coach Joy Develvis noted.
Jefferson (2-0) takes on Miller City for a varsity-
only match 6:30 p.m. tonight.
Delphos (2-0) win the junior varsity match 25-8,
25-10.
The Wildcats opened Monday night with a 25-18,
25-23, 21-25, 25-15 victory over invading Waynesfield-
Goshen.
Senior Lindsay Deuel led the serving, going 14-of-16
(6 aces). Senior Kamie Pulford led digs with eight. Culp
led assists with 21. Goergens led at the net with 10 kills
and four stuff-blocks.
“I am pleased with how we played tonight and it feels
great to get our first win on our first night out. We had
some ups and downs but fought back hard when it was
needed,” Early said.
——-
Allen East bests Jefferson in NWC tri
LIMA — Host Allen East bested Jefferson and
Paulding 170-178-204 in a Northwest Conference tri-
match Tuesday at Lost Creek Golf Course.
Kayne Richardson led the Mustangs with a 39, fol-
lowed by Lucas Herrmann and Parker Frey 42, Zak
Thomas 43, Braden Goodwin 46 and Logan Ryan 47.
Zach Wannemacher was low man for the Wildcats
with a 42, followed by Nick Fitch 43, Ryan Bullinger
45, Carter Mox 48, Tyler Rice 51 and Jacob Hamilton
63.
Paulding’s low man was Ben Heilshorn with a 49,
backed by Brad Crawford 50, Kaleb Becker 52 and
Justin Adams 53.
Jefferson is in the Columbus Grove Quad 4 p.m.
Thursday.
——-
Big Green boys remain perfect
RURAL MIDDLE POINT — The Ottoville boys soc-
cer team handled Lincolnview 6-1 Tuesday afternoon at
Lincolnview High School.
Scoring for the Big Green (5-0-0) were Alex
Horstman with two goals, Brandt Landin two goals and
Lucas Maag and Jared Fanning one each.
Lincolnview’s (0-2-0) score came from Connor
McCleery.
Ottoville outshot their foe 14-5.
——-
Ottoville gets sweep versus Lancers
RURAL MIDDLE POINT — The Ottoville volley-
ball crew swept host Lincolnview 25-18, 25-17, 25-23
Tuesday night.
Taylor Mangas led the victors with 14/15 hitting (9
kills) and 12 digs, along with Nicole Kramer (11/11
serving, 3 aces) and Lexie Thorbahn (21/21 setting, 13
assists).
———
Musketeer boys pound Titans
GLANDORF — Fort Jennings went to Titan Field
Tuesday to take on Ottawa-Glandorf in boys soccer
action and came home with a 4-1 triumph.
The Musketeers went up 2-0 in the first half by scor-
ing in the fourth minutes on a Seth Ricker goal (Drew
Grone assist); and the 15th minute, Spencer Dray tallied
(Ricker and Alex Berelsman assists.
Fort Jennings went up 4-0 in the second half on a
Berelsman goal in the 54th minute (Troy Ricker, Mark
Metzger assists) and a Metzger goal in the 65th minute
(Berelsman assist).
In the 72nd minute, Brent Ellerbrock put in the only
Titan goal.
The Musketeers outshot the hosts 15-10 and lost the
corner kicks 7-6.
OG’s Jacob Ellerbrock had three saves and Brad
Nuveman one, Alex Vetter registered four saves for the
victors.
In the reserve match, O-G won 3-2.
Fort Jennings visits Kalida 7 p.m. Thursday.
———
Polar Bears outlast Lady ’Dawgs
DOLA — Elida played at Hardin Northern Tuesday
night and lost a 25-20, 19-25, 25-22, 20-25, 15-9 heart-
breaker.
Elida stat leaders: Torie McAdams (16 kills), Summer
Grogg (5 blocks), Katie Hawk (41 assists), Erika Kiel
(29 digs) and Karmyn Martinez (5 aces).
Elida (3-3) visits Defiance 5:30 p.m. Thursday.
——-
Lady Wildcats tie Miller City
FORT JENNINGS — The Lady Wildcats of Jefferson
finished in a 1-1 tie on Monday night against the visit-
ing team of Miller City.
Miller City attacked the nets with a goal early in the
first half.
The Wildcats were able to even up the score at the
end of the first half with a header by Arianna Knebel.
The Wildcats record is 1-2-1.
——-
Panthers get out the broom versus Lady Green
OTTOVILLE — Parkway’s volleyball team handed
host Ottoville a 25-18, 25-13, 25-17 loss Monday night.
Leading the Lady Green were Kara Schimmoeller
(11/11 serving, 2 aces), Nikki Burgei (10/16 hitting, 5
kills), Chelsea Boecker (21/21 setting, 7 assists) and
Lexie Thorbahn (10 digs).
The Panthers also won the junior varsity contest
25-23, 25-11.
———
Lady Lancers sweep Pirates
Lincolnview defeated Continental 25-17, 25-12,
25-16 Monday night.
Lancer Stats: Hitting: Kelsey Mohr (9/10, 5 kills),
Baylee Neate and Devann Springer (10/11, 4 kills
each); Serving: Katie McClure (13/15, 8 aces) and
Mohr (14/15, 5 aces)
Lincolnview is 2-1.
Megan Joseph dominated the competition at Tuesday’s
Wayne Trace Cross Country Invitational. (Photo submitted)
Local Round Up
Buckeyes interested in seeing Wildcats-Bears game
By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS — What’s brewing
with the 2013 Ohio State Buckeyes …
BUCKEYES BUZZ: As if Ohio
State’s coaching staff doesn’t have
enough going on with the opener coming
up Saturday (Buffalo at home, noon), the
assistants also will be keeping an eye on
other games.
One in particular.
When Northwestern travels to play
California for a 10:30 p.m. ET kickoff,
the Buckeyes can kill two scouting birds
with one video tape.
Ohio State travels to Cal on Sept.
14 — and then plays at Northwestern on
Oct. 5.
There will be other opportunities to
see the Wildcats in action and to break
them down on film. But there won’t be a
better chance to see Cal’s Golden Bears
— under new coach Sonny Dykes —
against a Big Ten opponent. The tape will
undoubtedly provide some insight.
“Absolutely, that will be a big part
of our preparation,” coach Urban Meyer
said Tuesday. “We’ll get that film imme-
diately. And we’ll have some people
working on that ASAP, not the full-time
coaches but we’ll have some graduate
assistants breaking that down and getting
it into the computer. Because that’s a new
staff, that’ll be very important for us to
get tendencies from them.”
ONE-UPMAN SHIP: Indiana, long a
doormat in the Big Ten, hopes to at least
make things interesting for fans.
No matter how the football team plays,
the school’s administration has taken
steps to enhance the experience of attend-
ing a game at Memorial Stadium. The
Hoosiers host Indiana State on Thursday
night.
Flat-screen TVs have been added to
the concourse, along with better cell-
phone reception.
The prow from the USS Indiana has
even been placed outside the stadium.
Also, IU has built the tallest flagpole
in all the Football Bowl Subdivision. Its
new flagpole will reach 154 feet — 8 feet
higher than Ohio State’s, which previ-
ously was the tallest.
COMING HOME: Buffalo has 13
players on its roster who are from Ohio.
Vikings remain unbeaten at expense of Bulldogs
By DAVE BONINSEGNA
DHI Correspondent
zsportslive@yahoo.com
COLUMBUS GROVE — The start of
any season can be a shaky one, getting
out the cobwebs, shaking off the dust and
getting in sync.
That was never more prevalent than
on Tuesday night at Columbus Grove as
the Bulldogs and Leipsic Vikings tipped
off the Putnam County League volleyball
season.
The Bulldogs (2-1, 0-1 PCL) took the
early lead in each game. In fact, in the
fourth, they had game point for eight
serves before the Vikings made a roar-
ing comeback to complete the match win
3-1.
Leipsic (5-0, 1-0 PCL) took the con-
test 25-19, 12-25, 25-23 and a come-
from-way-behind 26-24.
Grove took a 10-6 advantage in set one
before the Vikings made their comeback;
a pair of hitting errors on the part of
the Bulldogs allowed the guests to draw
closer but Leipsic returned the favor after
a serve into the net made it a 11-10 con-
test. However, the Vikings would tie the
game on a Amber Gerdeman spike and
take the lead on another Gerdeman kill.
Nonetheless, the home team was strong
at the net as well as Sammi Stechshulte
delivered a shot to the Leipsic side of the
court to tie the game at 13-13.
After a series of unforced errors on
both sides of the court, the Vikings took
the lead for good at 19-14 on the strength
of a 6-0 run despite great net play by
Stechschulte and Julia Wynn (12 kills).
The Bulldogs took early control in
game two as well, getting up by as many
as 12-2 with Briana Glass (14/15 serv-
ing, 2 aces) leading the way with a pair
of kills and
aces. The
teams trad-
ed hi t t i ng
errors again
midway in
the contest
but Kelsey
M c C l u e r
helped seal
the win late with a kill to make it 24-12
and a hitting error by the guests gave the
Bulldogs a 25-12 win.
Like the previous two sets, the
Bulldogs took control early and led for
most of the set but Amber Gerdeman and
Emily Ellerbrock helped pave the way
for the comeback. However, the catalyst
of the return came from Hailey Gerten.
Gerten had five kills late in the set as the
Vikings tied the score five times at 18,
19, 20, 21 and 22 before pulling away to
grab the 25-23 victory.
In set four … see set three, almost
exactly. However, the Vikings pulled the
proverbial rabbit out of the hat facing
a fifth set. But with the score at 24-17
in favor of Columbus Grove, the guest
slowly crept their way back, scoring nine
points in a row to stave off their hosts.
Gerdeman had back-to-back kills,
while Gerten provided a pair of aces in
the rally. With the score at 25-24 on the
side of Leipsic, it was their turn not only
at set point but match point. Fittingly
and the way the match had went for both
sides, the game would end on a hitting
error by Columbus Grove, giving the
Vikings a 3-1 match win.
Kelli Vorst added 20 digs, Hope
Schroeder 8/8 serving and Rachel
Schumacher 17 assists for the hosts.
Grove hosts Arlington 10 a.m.
Saturday.
1
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Wednesday, August 28, 2013 The Herald — 7 www.delphosherald.com
DEAR BRUCE: I have
recently inherited $50,000. I
would like to leave it to my
children and grandchildren. I
will not need this money, and
it came from my side of the
family. My husband won’t
need it if I should die before
him. How can I do this? --
J.S., via email
DEAR J.S.: You can
leave the money in your will.
However, you may not cut
your husband out of the will.
Where the money came from
is not important. Each state’s
laws vary regarding what
must be left to a spouse, but
no matter what, you will not
be able to cut your husband
out of the will concerning the
$50,000.
Since you and your hus-
band don’t need the money,
you ought to consult an attor-
ney and have an agreement
drawn up so the money would
bypass him if you pass away
before he does.
DEAR BRUCE: I always
pay my bills online through
my bank. Two weeks before
my credit card payment was
due, I made the payment.
When my statement came
the next month, I was sur-
prised there was a late fee for
the previous month. When
I called my bank, they told
me that it had been done as
I requested, two weeks in
advance. My credit card com-
pany, however, claims they
received the payment three
days late, or 17 days after I
had submitted it online.
Since I am a good custom-
er and have always paid my
bill on time, I did get them to
reimburse the late fee. I have
had this card for several years
and am planning on cancel-
ing the card. My question is,
will this affect my credit?
-- Reader, via email
DEAR READER: I am
wondering why you are can-
celing the card. Hopefully, not
because of this minor error,
which has been corrected.
Assuming you cancel the
card, it very well may reduce
your credit score a few points,
but that’s a relatively mod-
est amount and a temporary
proposition. Do you have oth-
ers to cover you if you need
such an accommodation? On
balance, if you have had the
account for a decent period
of time, I would seriously
consider not using it, if that’s
your intention, but I would
not cancel it.
DEAR BRUCE: One
of our friends came to my
house for a visit. A major
storm blew through the area
and there was quite a bit of
damage, including to his car
from falling debris from our
“healthy” trees.
I contacted my insurance
company to see about help-
ing with the damage, but they
said since it was “an act of
God,” there was no cover-
age. I don’t understand how
this could be. -- R.T., South
Carolina
DEAR R.T.: In the event
that your friend’s car was
damaged by debris from your
“healthy” trees, it’s entire-
ly possible that it would be
called “an act of God” and it
would not be covered by your
homeowner’s insurance. If
the tree was diseased in some
way, that would be anoth-
er matter. If your friend has
comprehensive insurance on
his car, that will easily take
care of the problem.
DEAR BRUCE: I have
heard you say that when buy-
ing term insurance, it should
be “renewable and convert-
ible.” Can you explain? --
Reader, via email
DEAR READER: The
answer is simple. If you
purchase term insurance, it
should be renewable without
evidence of insurability. In
other words, if it’s a 10-year
term, after the 10 years, the
policy should be renewable
in spite of any medical his-
tory the person may have.
Convertible simply means it
could be converted to whole
life if you chose to do so.
**
(Send questions to
bruce@brucewilliams.com.
Questions of general interest
will be answered in future
columns. Owing to the vol-
ume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.)
DISTRIBUTED BY
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The Delphos
Herald ... Your
No. 1 source for
local news.
Bruce Williams
Smart
Money
Inheritance earmarked for next generations
Lots of articles and even
some medical profession-
als have touted vitamin D
as the answer to all kinds of
health problems and deemed
most of us deficient, notes
ShopSmart, the shopping
magazine from the publisher
of Consumer Reports. So tak-
ing supplements seems like a
no-brainer.
Problem is, many of those
claims are overblown -- and
some calcium-vitamin D sup-
plements exceed a California
lead limit. A November
2010 report by the Institute
of Medicine (IOM), which
examined more than 1,000
studies and other reports,
concluded that although vita-
min D is essential to bone
health, evidence of other ben-
efits was inconclusive.
And what about the “defi-
ciency epidemic”? One expla-
nation is that it blossomed
almost overnight when many
testing laboratories in this
country upped the threshold
for what’s considered a nor-
mal blood level of vitamin D.
Currently, nearly 80 percent
of people are labeled defi-
cient.
So when it comes to sup-
plements, what makes sense
for you? With the help of its
medical experts, ShopSmart
waded through the hype to
answer four top questions
about vitamin D.
-- Do I need more D?
It depends. It’s a good idea
if you don’t get at least some
midday sun exposure during
the warmer months (the body
makes D from exposure to
sunlight) or regularly con-
sume vitamin D-rich foods
such as fatty fish, eggs and
fortified milk or soy products.
In those cases, a vitamin D
supplement might help.
Supplements are also rec-
ommended for people with
osteoporosis (weak bones) or
who have a condition, such
as celiac disease or Crohn’s
disease, that impairs their
ability to absorb fat-soluble
vitamins.
Being middle-aged or
older, dark-skinned or over-
weight can slightly increase
your risk of deficiency and
might tip the balance in favor
of taking supplements, partic-
ularly if your diet or lifestyle
is likely to be “D-ficient.”
If you take this supple-
ment, there’s no reason to
exceed the recommended
intake of 600 International
Unit (IU) daily for adults up
to age 70; 800 IU for those
who are older. But try to
avoid exceeding 4,000 IU
daily unless your doctor has
prescribed a higher dose to
make up for a deficiency. At
very high levels, too much
D can cause kidney dam-
age. The symptoms of toxic-
ity include nausea, vomiting,
poor appetite, constipation,
weakness, weight loss and
confusion.
-- Should I get tested?
Not unless you are at risk
for deficiency. If you do get
tested, ShopSmart says to
keep in mind that vitamin
D levels fluctuate with your
exposure to sunlight and diet
and that results can differ
from one laboratory to anoth-
er. If results are abnormal
or unexpected, you should
be retested. Results are more
likely to be accurate if you
use labs that perform high
volumes of testing -- say,
more than 50 vitamin D tests
a day.
Although in some labs
healthy blood levels of vita-
min D are considered to be at
least 30 nanograms per mil-
liliter (ng/ml), the IOM says
that levels of at least 20 ng/
ml are fine to ensure healthy
bones. If your levels are well
below 20, your doctor will
probably recommend a high
dose of D for several months
followed by a regular supple-
ment thereafter.
-- Does it matter what
form of the supplement I
take?
No, not really. The D3
form (cholecalciferol) has
a reputation for being more
potent than D2 (ergocalcif-
erol), but research suggests
that’s the case only at high
doses. At recommended dos-
es, they work equally well,
experts say.
-- Do I need to take cal-
cium with my vitamin D?
Yes, unless you meet your
recommended calcium intake
through your diet. That’s
1,200 milligrams daily for
women older than 50 and
men older than 70 and 1,000
milligrams for other adults.
In most of the clinical tri-
als linking vitamin D supple-
mentation to denser bones or
fewer fractures, the nutrient
was combined with calcium.
The few studies that exam-
ined vitamin D alone did not
find the same benefits.

DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL
UCLICK FOR UFS
How much vitamin D do we really need?
ACBSP awards accreditation to
27 institutions including UNOH
Information submitted
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah — The
Accreditation Council for Business
Schools and Programs (ACBSP)
announced that member institutions
were awarded accreditation for their
business school or programs at the
2013 ACBSP Annual Conference in
Salt Lake City June 23. This repre-
sents the 23rd annual presentation
to institutions that have achieved
accreditation since ACBSP was
founded 25 years ago.
Douglas G. Viehland, Executive
Director of ACBSP, spoke of the
accomplishment of the member
institutions: “These institutions
have shown their commitment to
teaching excellence by their partici-
pation in the accreditation process
and their achievement of accredi-
tation. ACBSP is proud to assist
these schools and programs in their
commitment to quality business
programs. We recognize their edu-
cational practices that contribute
to the continuous improvement of
business education.”
The University of Northwestern
Ohio was among the first associate
degree institutions to be granted
accreditation for its two-year pro-
grams when ACBSP was founded 25
years ago.
Since 1987, University of
Northwestern Ohio has main-
tained accreditation for all its
programs through the Higher
Learning Commission of the North
Central Association of Colleges
and Schools. With the additional
ACBSP accreditation of its four-
year baccalaureate degrees and a
graduate degree (Master of Business
Administration), granted at the
recent annual conference, UNOH
continues to provide one of the best
business educational programs in
the area.
For institutions that achieve
accreditation for their business
schools and programs, this attain-
ment certifies that the teaching and
learning processes within that insti-
tution meet the rigorous educational
standards established by ACBSP.
The ratification of accreditation by
ACBSP covers a 10-year period at
which time an institution must reaf-
firm its quality by preparing a self-
study and having another site visit.
During the accreditation period,
business programs are required to
maintain the high quality standards
of ACBSP.
Van Wert Pediatrics earns
Immunization Improvement Award
Dr. Jennifer Hohman of Van Wert Pediatrics was presented with the Immunization
Coverage Improvement Award by the Ohio Department of Health. This award is
presented to healthcare providers that achieve significant improvement in immu-
nization coverage rates as indicated by results of the most recent Assessment,
Feedback, Incentives and Exchange (AFIX). AFIX is a continuous quality improve-
ment process that requires the commitment and dedication of providers to achieve
high levels of immunization coverage for the recommended series of vaccines.
“I applaud your practice’s work to achieve excellence in immunization prac-
tices. It is through these efforts that Ohio is working toward the goal of 90-percent
immunization coverage of patients by 24 months of age. Please take the opportunity
to share your immunization strategies with fellow providers so that Ohio may con-
tinue to keep children protected against vaccine-preventable diseases,” Theodore
E. Wymyslo, M.D., director of the Ohio Department of Health, said. (Submitted
photo)
­
Description­ Last­Price­ Change
Dow­Jones­Industrial­Average­ ­14,776.13­-­ 170.33
S&P­500­­ 1,630.48­­ -26.30
NASDAQ­Composite­­ 3,578.52­­ -79.05
American­Electric­Power­Co.,­Inc.­­ 42.77­­ +0.1200
AutoZone,­Inc.­­ 419.12­­ -2.3000
Bunge­Limited­ ­75.58­ +0.1600
BP­plc­­ 41.47­­ +0.1100
Citigroup,­Inc.­­ 48.24­­ -1.3600
CenturyLink,­Inc.­­ 32.94­­ -0.2000
CVS­Caremark­Corporation­­ 57.69­­ -0.55
Dominion­Resources,­Inc.­­ 58.51­ +0.1700
Eaton­Corporation­plc­­ 64.04­­ -1.9400
Ford­Motor­Co.­­ 15.88­ -0.53
First­Defiance­Financial­Corp.­­ 25.60­­ -2.15
First­Financial­Bancorp.­­ 15.34­­ -0.59
General­Dynamics­Corp.­­ 82.91­­ -1.3300
General­Motors­Company­­ 33.69­­ -1.2300
The­Goodyear­Tire­&­Rubber­Company­­ 19.01­­ +0.37
Huntington­Bancshares­Incorporated­­ 8.18­­ -0.27
Health­Care­REIT,­Inc.­­ 61.51­­ +0.4400
The­Home­Depot,­Inc.­­ 74.12­­ -1.31
Honda­Motor­Co.,­Ltd.­­ 37.20­­ -0.4000
Johnson­&­Johnson­­ 86.17­­ -1.3600
JPMorgan­Chase­&­Co.­­ 50.60­­ -1.2000
Kohl’s­Corp.­­ 49.84­­ -0.5400
Lowe’s­Companies­Inc.­­ 46.00­­ -0.9900
McDonald’s­Corp.­­ 94.84­ ­-0.47
Microsoft­Corporation­ ­33.26­­ -0.89
Pepsico,­Inc.­­ 79.06­ -0.6300
The­Procter­&­Gamble­Company­­ 77.97­­ -0.5700
Rite­Aid­Corporation­­ 3.39­ -0.09
Sprint­Corporation­­ 6.75­­ -0.16
Time­Warner­Inc.­­ 61.51­­ -0.5800
United­Bancshares­Inc.­­ 12.41­­ .00
U.S.­Bancorp­­ 36.11­­ -0.8100
Verizon­Communications­Inc.­­ 46.95­­ +0.0100
WMT­Wal-Mart­Stores­Inc.­ 72.86­­ -0.1700
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business August 27, 2013
Missouri AG sues Walgreen Co., claims overcharging
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Missouri Attorney General
Chris Koster filed a lawsuit Tuesday against
Walgreen Co., accusing the nation’s largest phar-
macy chain of overcharging customers and using
deceptive display advertising and pricing schemes.
Koster filed the suit in Kansas City and
announced details at a news conference in St.
Louis. The suit seeks an injunction forcing the
Chicago-based chain to stop the allegedly decep-
tive practices. It also seeks unspecified fines and
damages.
“My concern is this is not sloppiness — this is
a business practice that is consciously intending to
steal from sick people that go into Walgreens, from
old people that go into Walgreens,” Koster said.
Walgreen spokesman Jim Graham said the
company has not seen the lawsuit and declined
comment.
The company settled pricing practice lawsuits
with California and Wisconsin earlier this year.
The Missouri investigation began after many
consumers complained that display tag prices
didn’t match up with what they paid at checkout,
Koster said. His office sent undercover investiga-
tors to eight Walgreen stores in five Missouri cities
— St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, Jefferson
City and Osage Beach — in June and July.
What they found, Koster said, “was appalling.”
Koster cited several ways in which consum-
ers were overcharged: outdated price displays for
sale items; confusion created by multiple prices
displayed for the same item; displays offering
discounts for rewards members, but with no dis-
count given; and full prices charged for items in
clearance bins.
Of 205 items purchased by investigators, 43
had price discrepancies ranging from a few cents
up to $15, Koster said.
Wal-Mart expands benefits
to domestic partners
NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart Stores Inc. will extend its health
care benefits to its U.S. workers’ domestic partners, including those
of the same sex, starting Jan. 1.
The nation’s largest private employer, which has been a target of
attacks by labor groups for what they criticize are skimpy wages and
benefits, said Tuesday that the changes were made so it could have
one uniform policy for all 50 states at a time when some states have
their own definitions of what constitutes domestic partnerships and
civil unions.
Employees can enroll their domestic partners from Oct. 12
through Nov. 1.
Wal-Mart defines domestic partners as spouses of the same-sex
or opposite gender, and unmarried partners who are not legally sepa-
rated who have lived together for at least 12 months, are not married
to anyone else, are in an exclusive relationship and plan to continue
sharing a household indefinitely, says Randy Hargrove, a Wal-Mart
spokesman.
“States have different definitions,” said Hargrove in a phone
interview with The Associated Press. “We are going to have our own
definition that will apply to our associates.”
The move, which was announced to Wal-Mart workers in post-
cards sent to them Monday, follows the U.S. Supreme Court decision
in June to overturn a 1996 law that denied federal benefits to legally
married same-sex couples. So the decision makes the federal govern-
ment recognize same-sex marriages in states where they are legal.
8 – The Herald Wednesday, August 28, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
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Times Bulletin Media is searching for a
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working as part of a team, enjoy working with
businesses large and small, thrive in a busy
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web and social media sites, this position may
be a perfect match for you.
Candidates who succeed in sales
possess above average written and oral
communications skills, work with multiple
deadlines and projects, and demonstrate
effective organizational, time management,
and planning skills.
The successful applicant will learn and
work with Times Bulletin Media’s many
products. Applicants must demonstrate a
working knowledge of the internet and active
participation in social networking and media.
The successful candidate will play a key role in
developing the company’s online campaigns
and social media strategies.
We pay our sales representatives using
a draw and commission plan. The parent
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including Health Insurance, 401K and Vacation.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
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how you will apply your skills and experience to
the marketplace. Incomplete applications will
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Or deliver to The Times Bulletin Media offce:
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00070858
dhi
MEDIA
dhi Media is searching for a full-time sales
representative. If you appreciate working as part
of a team, enjoy working with businesses large and
small, thrive in a busy and creative environment,
and love using the web and social media sites, this
position may be a perfect match for you.
Candidates who succeed in sales possess above
average written and oral communications skills,
work with multiple deadlines and projects and
demonstrate effective organizational, time man-
agement and planning skills.
The successful applicant will learn and work with
dhi Media’s many products. Applicants must dem-
onstrate a working knowledge of the internet and
active participation in social networking and media.
The successful candidate will play a key role in
developing the company’s online campaigns and
social media strategies.
We pay our sales representatives using a draw
and commission plan. The parent company offers
a full schedule of benefts including Health Insur-
ance, 401K and vacation. We are an equal oppor-
tunity employer.
For consideration, please forward a professional
resume and cover letter detailing how you will ap-
ply your skills and experience to the marketplace.
Incomplete applications will not be considered.
Mail to: Don Hemple, Advertising Manager
405 N. Main Street, Delphos, Ohio 45833
E-mail to dhemple@delphosherald.com
Or deliver to 405 N. Main Street, Delphos, Ohio
Sales Representative Position
105 Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU
can place a 25 word
classified ad in more
than 100 newspapers
with over one and a half
million total circulation
across Ohio for $295. It’s
easy...you place one or-
der and pay with one
check through Ohio
Scan-Ohio Advertising
Network. The Delphos
Herald advertising dept.
can set this up for you.
No other classified ad
buy is simpler or more
cost effecti ve. Cal l
419-695-0015 ext. 138
305
Apartment For
Rent
1BR APARTMENT for
rent. No pets, $325/mo
+deposit. 537 W. Third.
Call 419-692-2184 or
419-204-5924
1BR APT for rent, appli-
ances, electric heat, laun-
dry room, No pets.
$425/month, plus deposit,
water included. 320 N.
Jefferson. 419-852-0833.
325
Mobile Homes
For Rent
RENT OR Rent to Own.
1,2 or 3 bedroom mobile
home. 419-692-3951
330
Office Space For
Rent
DOWNTOWN
OFFICE SPACE
4 great large offces,
kitchen area,
conference room,
waiting room,
can be furnished.
Lots of storage,
newly remodeled.
Private entrance,
private restroom,
second foor,
utilitilies included.
$700 month.
Call Bruce at
419-236-6616 for
more information.
425 Houses For Sale
2-STORY COUNTRY
Home. 4BR, 1-1/2BA,
2 car detached garage.
Includes barn. Phone
419-812-6062 after 5pm.
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
828 LIMA Ave., Delphos
Aug. 30th & 31st
9am-5pm. Prom dresses
size 10 & 12, TV’s, bike,
misc. items.
834 SUPERIOR St.,
Thurs. 8/29, Fri. 8/30 &
Sat. 8/31 from 9am-5pm.
Miscellaneous, lots for
kitchen, RV flat screen
TV, prom dresses, etc.
LARGE SALE @ W. 6th
St, Ottoville. Thursday
(8/29) 4-7pm, Friday
(8/30) 3pm-?, Saturday
(8/31) 9am-3pm, Sunday
(9/1) 10am-1pm. Girls
clothes: 6mo-3T, crib &
dresser, crib bedding
set, travel system and
bases, toys, adult cloth-
ing, Vintage coats, win-
ter coats, treadmi l l ,
washer, dryer, library ta-
ble, large mirrors, Christ-
mas decorations, light
fixtures, Atari, glass-
ware, pick-up trailer, ma-
terial and patterns, wed-
ding flowers, house-
wares, much more!!
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
LARGE SALE @ W. 6th
St, Ottoville. Thursday
(8/29) 4-7pm, Friday
(8/30) 3pm-?, Saturday
(8/31) 9am-3pm, Sunday
(9/1) 10am-1pm. Girls
clothes: 6mo-3T, crib &
dresser, crib bedding
set, travel system and
bases, toys, adult cloth-
ing, Vintage coats, win-
ter coats, treadmi l l ,
washer, dryer, library ta-
ble, large mirrors, Christ-
mas decorations, light
fixtures, Atari, glass-
ware, pick-up trailer, ma-
terial and patterns, wed-
ding flowers, house-
wares, much more!!
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
WANTED TO Buy, Sell
or Trade - Western
paperback books.
Phone: 419-615-8891
640 Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
(419) 223-7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities,
or work at home oppor-
tunities. The BBB will as-
sist in the investigation
of these businesses.
(This notice provided as
a customer service by
The Delphos Herald.)
670 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR
Table or Floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
930 Legals
ORDINANCE #2013-18
An ordinance approving
the proposed 2014
Budget for The City of
Delphos and declaring it
as an emergency.
Passed and approved
this 1st day of July,
2013.
Kimberly Riddell,
Council Pres.
ATTEST:
Sherryl George,
Deputy Clerk
Michael H. Gallmeier,
Mayor
ORDINANCE #2013-22
An ordinance amending
Section 909.04(B) of the
Codified Ordinances of
The City of Delphos,
modifying the fee for re-
movi ng undesi rabl e
vegetation and declaring
it an emergency.
RESOLUTION #2013-6
A resolution authorizing
the Board of Control for
The City of Delphos to
donate one (1) Family
Season Swimming Pass
to the Community Health
Professionals for their
annual benefit auction.
Passed and approved
this 15th day of July,
2013.
Kimberly Riddell,
Council Pres.
ATTEST:
Sherryl George,
Deputy Clerk
Michael H. Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete text of this
legislation is on record at
the Municipal Building
and can be viewed dur-
ing regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
8/21/13 & 8/28/13
080 Help Wanted
CLASS A DRIVERS
NEEDED --DEDICATED
ROUTES THAT ARE
HOME DAILY!! Excellent
opportunity for CDL
Class A Drivers with 2
years experience and a
clean MVR. All loads are
drop & hook or no touch
freight. We reward our
drivers with excellent
benefits such as medi-
cal, dental, vision &
401K with company con-
tribution. In addition to
that we also offer quar-
terly bonuses, paid holi-
days and vacations. To
apply please contact
Dennis 419-733-0642
COOK/HOUSEKEEP-
ING. Part-time, day shift
every other weekend &
every other holiday.
Cover vacati ons as
needed. Qualified indi-
vidual to be trained to
cook for 12-bed facility &
perform light housekeep-
ing/laundry. Commercial
kitchen experience a
plus. Submit resume by
Aug. 30. Community
Health Professionals,
Van Wert Inpatient Hos-
pice Center, 1155 West-
wood Dr., Van Wert, OH
45891.
ComHealthPro.org
DANCER LOGISTICS is
in need of a Truck/Trailer
mechanic. Must have
own tools & we can help
train. •Also looking to
hire a dispatcher who
has the ability to self ini-
tiate, follow our prac-
tices, ability to multi-task,
and motivate drivers. It is
also necessary to have
good customer service
and communi cat i on
skills. Computer skills a
must. Apply at 900 Gres-
sel Drive, Delphos, Ohio.
DELPHOS TIRE ware-
house needs depend-
able 1st & 2nd shift em-
ployees to load/unload
tires. •1st shift FT,
Mon-Fri 7am-5pm. •2nd
shift FT, Sun-Thurs night
3pm-fi ni sh. Requi re-
ments include: ability to
learn tire knowledge;
heavy l i fti ng up to
100lbs; team work atti-
tude; willingness to get
the job done. Send work
experience to:
K&M Tire,
PO Box 279,
Delphos, OH 45833.
WadeW@kmtire.com
Fax: 419-695-7991
HOME HEAL T H
Aides/STNAs needed for
homecare in Delphos
and Van Wert immedi-
ately. Daytime and eve-
ni ng hour s. Cal l
419-228-2535 or stop in
to apply at Interim
Heal t hCar e, 3745
Shawnee Rd., Suite 108,
Lima, OH 45806
INCOME TAX preparer
needed. Duties include
personal income tax re-
turn preparation, spread-
sheet work and basic
bookkeeping. Must have
accounting degree or tax
preparation training and
experience and be able
to handle telephone calls
and scheduling. Season-
able full time from Janu-
ary to May, part time
avai l abl e thereafter.
Please send resume to:
Commercial Tax Re-
cords Inc., P.O. Box 85,
Fort Jenni ngs, OH
45844.
080 Help Wanted
INCOME TAX preparer
needed. Duties include
personal income tax re-
turn preparation, spread-
sheet work and basic
bookkeeping. Must have
accounting degree or tax
preparation training and
experience and be able
to handle telephone calls
and scheduling. Season-
able full time from Janu-
ary to May, part time
avai l abl e thereafter.
Please send resume to:
Commercial Tax Re-
cords Inc., P.O. Box 85,
Fort Jenni ngs, OH
45844.
OTR SEMI DRIVER
NEEDED
Benefits: Vacation,
Holiday pay, 401k.
Home weekends, & most
nights. Call Ulm’s Inc.
419-692-3951
PRN NURSES. Van
Wert Inpatient Hospice
Center. RNs/LPNs. Must
be flexible to work vari-
ous shifts on short notice
at times. Hospice experi-
ence a plus, training pro-
vided. Resume by Aug.
30. Community Health
Professi onal s, 1155
Westwood Dr., Van
Wert, OH 45891.
ComHealthPro.org
Now hiring –
at Vancrest of Delphos
Vancrest of Delphos is
a long-term care facility
providing skilled reha-
bilitation services, as-
sisted living, post acute
medical care and more.
We are looking for
caring, outgoing, en-
ergetic STNA’s to join
our team. We currently
have part time position
available for skilled
STNA’s. Nurse Aide
Classes will be offered
in September for those
who wish to begin a
rewarding career as an
STNA. Class size will
be limited. Please stop
by our Delphos location
and fill out an applica-
tion.
Vancrest of Delphos
1425 E. Fifth St.
Delphos, OH 45833
We need you...
VANCREST
Health Care Centers
TELLER: Competitive
wages for part-time posi-
tion. Computer literacy
and excellent communi-
cation skills required.
Cash handling experi-
ence preferred. Apply
online at:
www.superiorfcu.com
under the “Careers” link.
EEO/M/F/D/V
953
Free and Low Priced
Merchandise
LA-Z-BOY WALL-HUG-
GER recliner, good con-
dition, navy blue, $50.
419-692-7831
Place a
House for
Rent Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily
Herald
419 695-0015
Check The
Service
Directory
to Find A
Repairman
You Need!
in print & online
www.delphosherald.com
Call 419-695-0015
out with the old.
in with the new.
Sell it in
The Delphos Herald’s
CLASSIFIEDS
Cash in on your collectibles
with the Classifieds.
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword
Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Surf and --
5 Gridiron div.
8 Deli orders
12 Pump or loafer
13 Debtor’s note
14 Tombstone lawman
15 Striped antelope
16 Apt to blow
18 Waffed
20 Frat letter
21 Charged particle
22 Poor grade
23 “Laughing” animal
26 Sell
29 -- -ho (eager)
30 Pouches
31 Moon or eye
33 Fighter’s stat
34 Prefx with space
35 Bleach bottles
36 Overwhelms
38 -- nova
39 Whale blubber
40 Newton fruit
41 Bloodhound clues
44 Hang loose
47 Second draft
49 Thin wooden strip
51 Actor -- Baldwin
52 Soft slip-on
53 Dublin’s land
54 Jazzy -- Horne
55 Use a crowbar
56 Wineglass feature
DOWN
1 Naughty, naughty!
2 Nope (hyph.)
3 Grabbed a cab
4 At odds
5 Actor David --
6 Meat and veggies
7 -- -de-sac
8 Smiled broadly
9 Jet route
10 Math subj.
11 Pet lovers’ grp.
17 Some undergrads
19 -- -- few rounds
22 Retro art style
23 Alt.
24 Raucous laughs
25 Suffcient, in verse
26 Golf scores
27 Costello and Rawls
28 Joule fractions
30 Fall mo.
32 “Be prepared” org.
34 Gather together
35 Shakes slightly
37 “Out of --”
38 Hopper
40 Have a yen for
41 Kind of surgeon
42 Edit out
43 Kiln
44 Entrance
45 Cafe au --
46 To be, to Henri
48 Bratty kid
50 Skirt bottom
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
PUTNAM COUNTY
Michael J. Leis, Karen
Sue Wagner, Kimberly
J. Leis and Donald B.
Wagner, 1.419 acres
Monterey Township to
Glen P. Rayman.
Joseph B. Sehlhorst TR
and Helen L. Sehlhorst
TR, 40.0 acres Pleasant
Township to BHS Farms
LLC.
Patricia A. Hunt,
68.542 acres Sugar Creek
Township to Douglas
Wade Hunt.
Mary Lynne Foulkes,
2.066 acres Sugar Creek
Township to Robert M.
Ramirez and Valerie L.
Ramirez.
Fannie Mae aka
Federal National
Mortgage Association,
Lot 376 and Lot 374
Columbus Grove, to
Kayla M. King.
William J. Knippen
and Susan M. Knippen,
1.00 acre Jackson
Township to Jonathon L.
Knippen.
Roger A. Schnipke,
1.191 acres Liberty
Township to Anthony
J. Schroeder, Julie A.
Schroeder, Eric W.
Schroeder and Renee M.
Schroeder.
Todd A. Dible and
Diane S. Dible, .95 acre
Ottawa Township, to
Brian J. Fruchey and
Rebecca A. Fruchey.
Von Sossan
Contracting Inc., Lot 37
Fort Jennings, to Roger
Westbeld.
Kerry Johnson and
Joslyn Johnson, Lot 12
and Lot 13, Indian Knoll
Sub., Ottawa, to Gregory
S. Beckman.
Evelyn Brickner, Lot
28 Ottoville, to Alan
J. Kerns and Eileen L.
Kerns.
Robert G. Hazelton
LE and Joetta L. Hazelton
LE, parcel, Leipsic, to
James Hazelton and
Steven Hazelton.
Kory Maag, 2.0 acres
Ottawa Township, to
Patricia A. Maag.
Patricia A. Maag, 2.0
acres Ottawa Township to
Eric Daniel Bockrath.
Judith E. Nienberg
TR, Lot 243 and Lot 244
Glandorf, to Charles D.
Daniels.
A & P Family LLC,
parcel Union Township,
to Arthur J. Warnecke and
Patricia A. Warnecke.
Arthur J. Warnecke
LE and Patricia A.
Warnecke LE, parcel
Union Township to P & A
Family LLC.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday Evening August 28, 2013
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Middle Middle Mod Fam Neighbors ABC's The Lookout Local Jimmy Kimmel Live Nightline
WHIO/CBS Big Brother Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene Local Late Show Letterman Ferguson
WLIO/NBC America's Got Talent America's Got Talent Camp Local Tonight Show w/Leno J. Fallon
WOHL/FOX MasterChef Local
ION WWE Main Event Flashpoint Flashpoint Flashpoint Flashpoint
Cable Channels
A & E Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Duck D. Dads Dads Dads Duck D. Duck D.
AMC The Mummy Returns The Mummy Returns
ANIM Gator Boys Gator Boys Gator Boys Gator Boys Gator Boys
BET The Game The Game Scandal Scandal Sunday Best Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Million Dollar LA Million Dollar LA Top Chef Masters Million Dollar LA Top Chef Masters
CMT Wild Hogs Fat Cops Cops Rel. Cops Rel. Most Amazing Videos
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Live Anderson Cooper 360 E. B. OutFront Piers Morgan Live
COMEDY South Pk South Pk South Pk South Pk Futurama Futurama The Comedy Central Roast Futurama
DISC Jungle Gold Gold Rush Patrick Dempsey Gold Rush Patrick Dempsey
DISN Austin Austin Hannah Montana Dog Jessie Brink!
E! Who Wore Who Wore Kardashian The Soup The Soup Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN MLB Baseball Baseball Tonight SportsCenter SportsCenter
ESPN2 U.S. Open Ten. Olbermann Olbermann
FAM Melissa Daddy Spell-Mageddon Melissa Daddy The 700 Club Prince Prince
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Mystery D Mystery D Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im.
FX Iron Man The Bridge The Bridge The Bridge
HGTV Love It or List It Property Brothers Hunters Hunt Intl Brother vs. Brother Property Brothers
HIST Pawn Pawn Larry the Cable Guy Top Shot All-Stars Hatfields Hatfields Pawn Pawn
LIFE Hidden Away Gone Missing Hidden Away
MTV Catfish: The TV Show The Challenge The Challenge The Challenge Catfish: The TV Show
NICK Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Full H'se Friends Friends
SCI Paranormal Witness Paranormal Witness Joe Rogan Questions Paranormal Witness Joe Rogan Questions
SPIKE Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Cops Jail Jail Jail Jail
TBS Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan Office Conan
TCM The Music Man Carousel
TLC Honey Honey Honey Cheer Perfection Honey Cheer Perfection Honey Honey
TNT Castle Castle Castle The Mentalist The Mentalist
TOON Legends Teen King/Hill King/Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV BBQ Crawl Adam Rich RIDE. RIDE. Bikinis Bikinis Horneytow Magic Man RIDE. RIDE.
TV LAND M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Cleveland The Exes Soul Man King King King
USA NCIS Royal Pains NCIS Suits Royal Pains
VH1 Greatest Songs Greatest Songs Tough Love: Co-Ed Tough Love: Co-Ed Hollywood Exes
WGN Rules Rules Rules Rules WGN News at Nine Funniest Home Videos Rules Rules
Premium Channels
HBO Clear History The Newsroom REAL Sports Gumbel Hard Knocks Boardwalk Hangover
MAX Strike Back Man-Iron Fists Life on Top
SHOW Donovan Access Richard Pryor: Omit the Logic Access Venus and Serena
©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Wednesday, August 28, 2013 The Herald –9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013
Keep a close watch over people
with whom you conduct business in the
coming months. Someone will play on
your emotions in an attempt to make
you look bad. If you’re cautious and
independent, you’ll come out ahead.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- Put time and effort into a major
involvement, and you’ll encounter a
crackerjack financial opportunity. Trust
what you know, not what someone else
tells you. Skill development will come
in handy later.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Excess will lead to trouble. Assess your
situation and you will realize you can
make do with less. Aggressive behavior
will damage a close relationship, so put
the other party’s interests ahead of your
own.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Seek adventure and expand your
knowledge. The people and places you
encounter will feed your imagination
and contribute major improvements to
your home and work lives.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Avoid a scuffle with someone
who is in a position of authority. It
would be best for you to make personal
changes at home, where you can
remain in control and out of trouble.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- Make your point heard and your
suggestions will be considered. Keep
the competition at a distance and your
superiors well- informed. Protect your
interests and you will excel.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Share your intentions with someone
you trust. Now could be the time to
suggest some changes to your loved
ones. Opportunity will come from
an unusual source, but you must be
prepared to seize it.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Question the relevant motives before
you jump into a joint endeavor. You
and the other party probably do not
have the same purpose in mind. Going
solo may be the answer.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
You’ll be drawn to someone for what
you see as their unique qualities. Don’t
fall for big talk when you have all the
facts you need. Size up your situation
to make changes and take control.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Plan a mini vacation or visit someone
who brings you joy. Spending time
relaxing and catching up will encourage
you to make personal improvements.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- Talk less and focus on making a
difference. Don’t feel the need to pay
for others or to try to buy love. Do
something that will raise your profile
and your confidence.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- You’ve got everything you need to
reach your personal goals. Set your
sights high and reach for the stars.
You’ll learn what you need to make the
right choices.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- A
change will do you good. It could
involve travel or simply trying a
new activity or mingling with a new
group. You’ll make some long-lasting
connections if you put yourself out
there.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United
Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Husband’s lack of
inhibition may
be age related
Dear Annie: Earlier
this year, I was caught up
in a liability issue with my
high school track coach. I
had a knee injury and was
being treated by a sports
chiropractor, with the full
approval of the superintendent
of the school district. My
coach, however, rejected the
note from the chiropractor and
caused me horrible stress and
anxiety with the unnecessary
demand that I see an internist.
The principal said I had to do
it.
The internist
said that the
school and the
coach were
being ridiculous.
Several months
later, I am still
thinking about
everything that
happened, and
I sometimes
become so
obsessed with
it that I suffer
horrible anxiety. Every time
a friend asks what happened,
I become emotionally and
mentally unstable and relive
it.
This former track coach
treated my parents and me
with hostility, and I am
worried about returning to
school. How can I move on?
My mind is taking a beating.
— Still Reliving the Misery
Dear Still: Any trauma
can lead to Post-Traumatic
Stress Disorder, which causes
the sufferer to relive the event
over and over. You need to
find a way to break the loop
in your thinking. If you can do
this by imagining a different,
more empowering outcome,
great. It’s also possible that
once school starts, your
coach will simply ignore the
incident, and you can do the
same. Or you could approach
him in a mature fashion and
ask to put this behind you. If
he mistreats you, report it to
the principal. If you are still
traumatized, please consider
short-term counseling. High
school doesn’t last forever.
Dear Annie: Last week,
I walked into our computer
room to see my husband
trying desperately to hit the
delete button and get rid of an
email he did not want me to
see. I managed to glance at the
woman’s name, however, and
asked him who it was. Well,
she is the one I suspected he
hooked up with at his 50th
class reunion. There were
about five hours during the
weekend that he could not
account for.
His 95-year-old mother
knows this woman and says,
“She’s such a nice girl and
married. She would never do
such a thing.” And she says
the same about my husband.
I don’t believe this. My
husband suddenly can’t keep
his hands off of the waitresses
at our favorite restaurant, and
he ogles every woman who
walks by.
I won’t be going to my
50th class reunion. I can’t
leave him alone for a second,
and I certainly don’t want him
running off with one
of my classmates. I
don’t want to go out
of my house anymore.
What should I do? —
Humiliated Wife
Dear Wife: Your
husband is in his
late 70s. In some
instances, as a person
ages, early signs of
dementia start to
show up, and one of
them is the loss of
inhibition. Unless
your husband has exhibited
such behavior during your
entire marriage, we believe
his problem is age related.
This doesn’t make it less
irritating or worrisome, of
course, but it’s possible he
could be helped by seeing
his doctor. Insist that he
make an appointment, and
go with him. If the doctor is
not experienced in this area,
ask to be referred to someone
who is.
Dear Annie: My sympathy
for “Shady Family Business,”
who wants to change his name
because some of his family
was engaged in not quite legal
doings.
It is very likely that the
majority of us have forebears
who have engaged in activities
that would humiliate and
horrify us. Even those who
discover that they are related
to the rich and famous could
easily uncover shameful
doings in those illustrious
backgrounds.
Let the dead past lie. If
your family has done things
of which you are not proud,
your lifetime can show that
the bloodline is also capable
of good. — Life Is a Mixed
Bag
MORE
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ADVERTISING DOLLAR
CLASSIFIEDS
In Print & Online for
DELPHOS HERALD
www.DELPHOSHERALD.cOm
Trivia
Answers to Monday’s questions:
Easter Sunday always falls on the first Sunday after the first full moon after March 21, the vernal equinox. The holiday
can occur any time between March 22 and April 25.
According to Pennsylvania Dutch and French traditions, the name of Santa’s brother is Bells Nichols. He visits every
home on New Year’s Eve after the children have gone to sleep and if plates are left out for him, he fills them with cakes
and cookies.
Today’s questions:
What is the world’s deadliest mushroom?
What part of the brain is Broca’s area?
Answers in Thursday’s Herald.
Thought for the day:
You are driving along in your car on a wild, stormy night. You pass by a bus stop, and you see three people waiting
for the bus:
1. An old lady who looks as if she is about to die.
2. An old friend who once saved your life.
3. The perfect man (or) woman you have been dreaming about.
Which one would you choose to offer a ride to, knowing that there could only be one passenger in your car?
Think before you continue reading. This is a moral/ethical dilemma that was once actually used as part of a job
application.
You could pick up the old lady, because she is going to die, and thus you should save her first; or you could take
the old friend because he once saved your life, and this would be the perfect chance to pay him back. However, you
may never be able to find your perfect dream lover again.
The candidate who was hired (out of 200 applicants) had no trouble coming up with his answer.
He simply answered: “I would give the car keys to my old friend, and let him take the lady to the hospital. I would
stay behind and wait for the bus with the woman of my dreams.”
Never forget to “Think Outside of the Box.”
10 – The Herald Wednesday, August 28, 2013 www.delphosherald.com
Archives
(Continued from page 2)
75 Years Ago – 1938
A large attendance is expected Monday night when
members of the Delphos Eagles met in regular session at
their hall. John Abel, newly-elected grand worthy vice
president of the Eagles, will be the speaker. A number
of special entertainment features will also be on the
Monday night program. There will be a professional
wrestling and boxing show with Gilbert Laautzenheiser
in charge.
Fair visitors have had the privilege of seeing some
fine balloon ascensions and parachute drops this week.
The ascensions have been made by Bill Schafer of
Indianapolis, and brother Claude Shafer, who made suc-
cessful ascensions here for many years at Delphos fairs.
The Paulding High School band won first place in
the high school band contest conducted Thursday at
the annual Delphos fair. Judges awarded other places
as follows: second, Ohio City-Liberty band; third,
Continental High band; fourth, Dunkirk High School
band; fifth, Forest High band; sixth, Perry Township
School band; seventh, Middle Point High band.
Bail at $3M for 2nd teen
in veteran beating case
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Bail was set at $3 million
Tuesday for a 16-year-old boy who is charged with killing
a World War II veteran and contends the man was beaten to
death because he shorted the teen and another boy on a sale
of crack cocaine.
The allegation was sharply rebutted by friends of Delbert
Belton, the 88-year-old veteran known as “Shorty.”
“Shorty never did no drugs,” said Ted Denison, a friend
who added that the defendants were “smearing his name.”
The drug-dealing claim is in a letter police found after
they arrested Kenan Adams-Kinard early Monday morning,
Spokane County Deputy Prosecutor Larry Haskell said dur-
ing Tuesday’s court hearing.
Haskell said the letter contends that Adams-Kinard and
Demetrius L. Glenn, 16, were buying crack cocaine from
Belton when the attack occurred Aug. 21. That notion was
scoffed at by family members and friends of Belton, who was
known as Shorty because he was little more than 5 feet tall.
Haskell did not return several telephone calls seeking
additional information on the drug-dealing claim.
Both teens are charged with first-degree murder and first-
degree robbery. The charges carry a potential life sentence.
Police said Belton, who was wounded in the Battle of
Okinawa, was beaten in his vehicle as he waited for a friend
in the parking lot of an Eagles Lodge in north Spokane.
Officers found Belton with serious head injuries, and his wal-
let had been taken. He died in the hospital Thursday.
Fort Hood gunman
won’t call witnesses,
testify
FORT HOOD, Texas (AP)
— The Army psychiatrist
who fatally shot 13 people
at Fort Hood decided not to
present any evidence during
his trial’s penalty phase on
Tuesday even though jurors
are deciding whether to sen-
tence him to death.
Maj. Nidal Hasan rested
his case without calling wit-
nesses or testifying to coun-
ter the emotional testimony
from victims’ relatives, who
talked of eerily quiet homes,
lost futures, alcoholism and
the unmatched fear of hear-
ing a knock on their front
door.
Prosecutors hope the tes-
timony helps convince jurors
to hand down a rare mili-
tary death sentence against
Hasan, who was convicted
last week for the 2009 attack
that also wounded more than
30 people at the Texas mili-
tary base.
Some school districts quit
healthier lunch program
Associated Press
After just one year, some
schools around the coun-
try are dropping out of the
healthier new federal lunch
program, complaining that
so many students turned up
their noses at meals packed
with whole grains, fruits and
vegetables that the cafeterias
were losing money.
Federal officials say they
don’t have exact numbers but
have seen isolated reports of
schools cutting ties with the
$11 billion National School
Lunch Program, which reim-
burses schools for meals
served and gives them access
to lower-priced food.
Districts that rejected the
program say the reimburse-
ment was not enough to off-
set losses from students who
began avoiding the lunch line
and bringing food from home
or, in some cases, going hun-
gry.
“Some of the stuff we
had to offer, they wouldn’t
eat,” said Catlin, Ill.,
Superintendent Gary Lewis,
whose district saw a 10 to 12
percent drop in lunch sales,
translating to $30,000 lost
under the program last year.
“So you sit there and
watch the kids, and you know
they’re hungry at the end of
the day, and that led to some
behavior and some lack of
attentiveness.”
In upstate New York, a
few districts have quit the
program, including the
Schenectady-area Burnt Hills
Ballston Lake system, whose
five lunchrooms ended the
year $100,000 in the red.
Near Al bany,
Voorheesville Superintendent
Teresa Thayer Snyder said
her district lost $30,000 in
the first three months. The
program didn’t even make
it through the school year
after students repeatedly
complained about the small
portions and apples and pears
went from the tray to the
trash untouched.
Districts that leave the
program are free to devel-
op their own guidelines.
Voorheesville’s chef began
serving such dishes as salad
topped with flank steak and
crumbled cheese, pasta with
chicken and mushrooms, and
a panini with chicken, red
peppers and cheese.
In Catlin, soups and fish
sticks will return to the menu
this year, and the hamburger
lunch will come with yogurt
and a banana — not one or
the other, like last year.
(Continued from page 1)
Jordan referenced the
Strauss-Howe Generation
Theory.
“These two guys have
a theory that says every
four generations, the ‘Big
Crisis’ comes along. This
is it. It’s our turn to step
up and make sure America
stays the greatest country
in the world,” he said.
Chamber member
Dodie Seller asked if the
Republicans have a plan.
“We know Obamacare is
bad but we’ve also heard
you guys don’t have a plan
to replace it,” she said.
“That’s not true,” Jordan
said. “We just can’t get
anybody to listen to it and
cover it. Mainstream media
doesn’t want to hear about
it.
“Tom Price has a bill
that lays out a lot of the
things that need to happen:
associate health care plans,
plans that cross state lines;
health savings accounts;
and real tort reform. We
have to get a model that
encourages users to con-
sider price before making
decisions about healthcare.
I’m not talking about not
getting procedures that
are needed. I had a physi-
cal not too long ago and
they wanted me to have
a procedure that has been
suggested for a man when
he turns 50. I’m not 50.
The procedure would have
cleaned out our health
savings account. I’m not
having any problems that
would indicate I need the
procedure, so I decided to
wait until I’m 50.”
Jordan also said he as
well as others understand
there is going to be a
group of people the rest of
America is going to have
to help.
“We don’t want to leave
anyone without access to
healthcare. But before we
do good, we have to stop
the bad,” he stressed. “We
also have to take the over-
sight of healthcare away
from the IRS. Do you want
an agency that targeted
those opposed to Obama in
charge? Of course not.”
One chamber member
asked if Jordan was willing
to shut down the govern-
ment to stop Obamacare.
“No. I don’t want to
shut down the government.
We will put cuts in the
budget that won’t allow for
Obamacare but the presi-
dent will make the choice
to shut down the govern-
ment. That will be on him,”
he said.
Areas of concern also
included Benghazi and
Syrian.
“We will not stop on
finding out exactly what
happened in Benghazi.
I talked to the father of
Tyrone Woods who was
killed in Benghazi. He
told me, ‘I don’t know
any more today than I did
seven months ago. What
happened to my boy?’ We
will continue to pick away
and find the truth,” Jordan
said.
On Syria, Jordan said
some type of military
action may be necessary
but he hopes the president
will include Congress in
that decision.
“The U.S. is not respect-
ed as it should be because
of the actions and inactions
of this president,” he said.
(Continued from page 1)
Along with DAAG’s director, Shauna Turner-Smith,
and Cramer’s sidekick, Sarah Pohlman, they have been
very busy preparing for ArtFest.
“Approximately 4-6 volunteers are needed when art-
ists deliver their work to the gallery and during the judg-
ing process.” Cramer explained. “Another 2-3 volunteers
are needed to display the artwork on the walls and set-up
for the reception.”
The opening reception for the exhibit will be 7-9 p.m.
Sept. 20 at the Delphos Area Art Guild located at 201 N.
Main Street using the 2nd Street entrance. The exhibit
will be open from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sept. 21. After Canal
Days, the exhibit will remain open to the public featur-
ing the award winners. Our exhibit hours are 12-8 p.m on
Thursdays and 9 a.m.-noon on Saturdays until Oct. 12.
Cramer explained that the ArtFest Exhibit relies solely
on the generosity of our community business owners and
private citizens. Without their sponsorship donations for
facility costs, event expenses and award money, DAAG
could not continue offering this exhibit each year.
“Volunteering my time for ArtFest is a wonderful expe-
rience,” Cramer said enthusiastically. “It is a lot of work,
but well worth the effort because I am able to work closely
with DAAG’s director and other DAAG members.
She also has the opportunity to meet the talented art-
ists who enter their artwork into our annual exhibit.
Cramer says her favorite part of the festival is ArtFest!
“I am very proud to be part of such a wonderful orga-
nization that is able to bring the fine arts to the Delphos
community,” Cramer detailed. “Being an artist myself, I
feel the arts are a very important part of one’s ability to
learn and express yourself through any type of media.”
DAAG anticipates having 20-30 artists enter their
artwork and each artist is entitled to enter up to three
pieces of artwork. ArtFest is a juried exhibit, which
means a judge reviews each piece of artwork and selects
those pieces of artwork he/she feels is worthy of being
exhibited. Entry does not guarantee the artist’s work will
be exhibited. In 2012, a total of 14 artists entered their
artwork and the number of participants does vary from
year to year.
The Delphos Public Library and DAAG have teamed
up to bring the Kid’s Activity and Creativity Tent this
year. The tent will have art activities including a Messy
Zone, a Make & Take Station, Puzzle-a-rama, and an
Artful Creation for the children to take home from
11a.m-3 p.m. on Sept. 21.
Each year, Cramer enjoy DAAG’s Artist Receptions.
“It is a great time to catch up with other artists and
friends and enjoy their friendship in a wonderful atmo-
sphere,” she said.
Cramer also enjoys the presentation of awards.
“It is an honor for an artist’s artwork to be selected
into a juried show, but it is an even greater honor to
receive an award from a judge who feels your artwork
is worthy of such an award,” Cramer explained. “So it is
an incredible experience to see the expressions of those
award winning artists.”
(Continued from page 1)
Teman’s budget did include the
retirement of one Class 3 operator.
When asked the ramifications of the
reduction of an additional employee,
Teman said it would greatly affect the
maintenance of the plant, which in turn,
would cost the city money in the end.
The wastewater account will be
$389,550 in the red at the end of 2014.
Maintenance Supervisor Jeff
Rostorfer’s 2014 budget came in at
$280,401 with the reduction of one
employee. His expenses included sala-
ries and benefits ($127,700), utilities
($12,800), maintenance of equipment
($16,000), vehicle fuel, lube and repair
($21,000), equipment ($13,309), salt
($12,000) and streets, highways and
curbs ($55,000).
When asked if he could reduce
another employee, Rostorfer said
the street maintenance would suffer,
including maintenance, patching and
sign replacement.
Councilman Jim Fortener said he
wanted to see another meeting rather
quickly.
“We have to come to come conclu-
sions in the next several weeks,” he
said. “People are out there waiting on
us to do something and we have to
deliver.”
Councilman Kevin Osting agreed.
“We have to do something,” he said.
“We have to all get on the same page.”
Councilman Clement said he would
council to have a plan for if the pro-
posed .25-percent income tax fails.
“We are going to have to do what we
have to to pay the bills,” he added.
The Finance Committee will meet
again on Sept. 9 following the council
meeting. Department heads from fire
and rescue and police were asked to
attend.
(Continued from page 1)
“One particular area of concern is the mid-
dle school fifth grade, which received a grade
C,” Diglia said. “We are working hard to try
to close that gap. The problem is, the state
keeps raising the bar before we get there.”
President Dennis Fricke spoke on behalf
of the board.
“At this time,” Fricke said. “I would like
to personally thank Don Diglia for his service
to the Elida School District as he has been a
great service to the school, staff, parents and
Elida community.”
The following additional retirements/
resignations were approved: Jenny Hallard
(resignation), Elida school art teacher, effec-
tive Aug. 23; Michelle Cahill (resignation),
cook, effective July 17; and Richard Sherrick
(retirement), head custodian, effective Jan. 1,
2014.
The board also approved the following
personnel for employment pending back-
ground check and meeting the certification
requirements as determined by the Ohio
Deptartment of Education, per salary sched-
ule that is in effect.
In other business, the board approved:
• Certified personnel: Amanda Witkowski,
middle school general/vocal music teacher;
Angela Ramsdail, seventh-grade math teach-
er; Dustin Dobie, high school English teacher;
and Kelsey Greeley, long-term substitute mid-
dle school art teacher;
Non-Certified personnel: Rebekah Hunt,
cook at Elida elementary; Brenda Fetter, part-
time high school study monitor; Mike Recker,
bus driver effective; Nacoma Adcock, class-
room aide at Elida High School, 2.5 hires/
day; and Don Brecht, bus driver.
• Supplementals: Dave Evans, athletic
manager; Art Holman/Dave May, faculty man-
ager; Jason Carpenter, strength and condition-
ing coach; Missy Hyland, seventh-grade girls
basketball; Tim Folger, seventh-grade foot-
ball assistant; Amy Marshall, middle school
cross country; Carly Stiger, eighth-grade vol-
leyball; John Stetler, marching band, pep
band and jazz band; Marcia Koch, assistant
marching band; Darrell Bryan, drum instruc-
tor; Rhonda Bargerstock, drama club director;
and Nacoma Adcock, Tuesday School;
• The following volunteers are pending
completion of paperwork and other require-
ments:
Class I: Ruth Hardy, Linda Kristoff
Class II: William Kellermeyer, varsity
football volunteer; Brandon Good, girls soc-
cer volunteer;
• Approved the 2013-14 Bus Driver
Handbook as previously distributed and the
bus routes and stops for the school year as
established by the superintendent and the
director of transportation. The superintendent
was also given authority to assign additional
units to bus drivers, on an as-needed basis, to
assist in the efficient transportation of Elida
students;
• Approved the following van drivers,
pending completion of all requirements of
school policy guidelines: Kevin Bowers,
Shelby Cluts, Becky Cressman, Ashley
Edwards, Dave Evans, Cheryl Fraley, Kyle
Harmon, Barb Hawk, Kevin King, Keisha
Larimore, Jessica Lawson, Bruce Marshall,
Bill Oleson, Denny Pohlman, Missy Schultz,
Barb Schwinnen, Denny Schwinnen, Matt
Smith, Steve Smith, Trisha Smith, Laurie
Swick, Denny Thompson and Quinn Wittaker;
• Approved to hire the following for drivers
education classes and in-car phase as needed
— Randy Apple, Sam Boyer, Sandra Ebeling-
Sayger, Mary Kaple, Linda Rigali, Delbert
Shinn, Bill Vermillion and Pat Wilsey;
• Approved the school-related organiza-
tions for the 2013-14 school year
• Approved removal and disposable of
damaged and unusable equipment, such as
overheads, TVs, and record players;
• Appointed a delegate and an alternate to
attend the OSBA business meeting on Nov.
11 and 12;
• Approved the proposed sales projects by
the student activity programs;
• Approved entering into an agreement
with the Logan County Educational Service
Center for vision-impaired, orientation and
mobility services students for the 2013-14
school year, as needed; and
• Approved Nancy Bilen as teacher for
home instruction.
The next board of education meeting will
begin at 7 p.m. on Sept. 17.
Jordan
Budgets
ArtFest
Diglia

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