Lesson Plans for: 09/03/13 - 09/06/13

Standards
Spelling: Systematic Phonics (SP) High-Frequency Vocabulary (HFV) (PA,SP,HFV) RF.3.3 Know and apply grade level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. (HVF) RF.3.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension. (SP,HFV) L.3.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (HFV) L.3.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. (HFV) L.3.5 Demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings. Reading: Text Structure (TS) Comprehension (C) Literary Appreciation/Fluence (LA/F) (TS,C,LA/F) RL.3.1 & RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. (TS,C,LA/F) RL.3.2 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. (TS,C) RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. (TS,C,LA/F) RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. (C) RI.3.3 Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. (C,LA/F) RL.3.4 & RI.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text. (TS,C,LA/F) RL.3.5 Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections. (TS,C) RI.3.5 Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently. (TS,C) RL.3.6 & RI.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. (C,LA/F) RL.3.7 Explain how specific aspects of a text’s illustrations contribute to what is conveyed by the words in a story (e.g., create mood, emphasize aspects of a character or setting). (TS,C) RI.3.7 Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur). (TS) RI.3.8 Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence). Writing: RL.3.3 Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. RL.3.6 Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. RF.3.4 Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support

Teacher: Andersen Grade: 3
Activities
Spelling: (SP) Incorporate phonemic awareness training in spelling dictation. Continuously review 70 phonograms. Read (say) 30 of 70 phonograms daily (OPR). Say/write 20 of 70 phonograms daily (WPR). Analyze/evaluate handwriting for straight lines that begin at the midpoint and extend the same distance below the baseline. (HFV) Read, segment, write, blend, and explain syllable division, pronunciation, spelling, & markings for section O in the spelling lists eight - whether. Explain a syllable that ends in one or more consonants is a closed syllable type, vowels usually say the first sound when followed by consonants. Explain/Analyze/Apply concepts of syllabication, pronunciation, spelling, markings, rules, and/or syllable type of example words. Explain after c we use ei. If we say a, we use ei. In the list of exceptions, we use ei. In all other words, the phonogram ie is used. Explain words are usually divided between double consonants within a base word. Reading: (TS) Explain the author’s purpose and the elements of informative-narratives. Listen to informative-narrative text structure using “The Great Kapok Tree” by Lynne Cherry; identify (on an informative-narrative organizer) the author’s purpose, the narrative and informative elements, and the point of view; cite evidence to support thinking; use completed organizer to retell information that supports the topic. Listen to informative text structure using “Hurricanes” by Gail Gibbons; identify (on an informative organizer) author’s purpose, basic elements of the type of writing, and point of view; identify and use text features to locate key facts. Listen to a narrative text structure using “Elmer” by david McKee; identify (on a narrative organizer) author’s purpose, basic elements of the type of writing and point of view. Listen to informative text structure using “Sea Turtles” by Julie Murray; identify (on an informative organizer) author’s purpose, basic elements of the type of writing, and point of view; identify and use text features to locate facts. Explain that one type of narrative is a fable; explain that a favle includes a moral or message usually delivered by animal characters. Listen to a narrative text structure in a fable using “Fox Tales: Four Fables from Aesop” by Amy Lowry; identify (on a narrative organizer) author’s purpose, basic elements of the type of writing, and point of view; identify moral of the fable. (LA/F) Read “Sarah, Plain, & Tall” by Patricia MacLachlan aloud daily to demonstrate fluent and expressive reading; identify examples of precise language (word choice) and emotional appeal; identify and describe the plot (sequence of events) including key details. Explain main characters are fully described – their appearance, speech, actions, thoughts – through what others in the story or the author says about them. Describe Sarah as a main character in “Sarah, Plain & Tall”; cite evidence from the story. Explain an integral setting; identify in the story and cite evidence to support thinking. Explain that what a main character says and does in a story helps the reader understand there are rewards and consequences for different behaviors (insight). Listen to excerpts of “Fox Tales: Four Fables from Aesop”; explain how the author’s use of insight into fox’s character adds enjoyment or understanding; identify examples from the text.

Writing: Compose oral/written sentences that demonstrate usage and meaning of unfamiliar words using a variety of the four types of simple sentences (Declarative, Interrogative, Exclamatory, Imperative). Explain words ending with a silent final e are written without the e when adding a suffix that begins with a vowel; read sentence patterns that use helping verbs. Explain a conjunction may connect compound nouns and adverbs; identify conjunctions in

comprehension. W.3.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. W.3.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. W.3.4 With guidance and support from adults, produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above) W.3.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grade 3 on pages 28 and 29.) W.3.6 With guidance and support from adults, use technology to produce and publish writing (using keyboarding skills) as well as to interact and collaborate with others. W.3.10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of disciplinespecific tasks, purposes, and audiences. Math: OA.3.1 Interpret products of whole numbers. 3.5 Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide. 3.3 Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities. 3.4 Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. Mathematical Practices 1-8. By Unit Science & Social Studies (Each is taught 2 afternoons per week): 3 Weeks SS-P-G-U-1 Students will understand that the use of geographic tools (e.g., maps, globes, charts, graphs) and mental maps help to locate places, recognize patterns and identify geographic features.

sentences and identify nouns/verbs they connect; compose oral/written sentences using conjunctions to connect nouns or verbs. Alphabetize to the second letter; compose oral sentences that use any of these words. Explain that in writing, the author sees the story from a specific point of view; in a first-person narrative, the author participates in the story and uses pronouns known as first-person pronouns; compose oral/written sentences using first-person pronouns. Explain that in writing, the author sees the story from a specific point of view; in a third-person narrative, the author does not participate in the story but describes actions, thoughts, and feelings, and uses pronouns known as third-person pronouns; compose oral/written sentences using third-person pronouns. Explain a compound sentence is two independent sentences related to the same thought and joined with a connecting word (conjunction); compose oral/written sentences that use one to connect two independent sentences with a comma. Explain related sentences are about one topic; use the book “Elmer” by David McKee and the narrative organizer to write related sentences about a good time you had with someone. Explain persuasion is meant to change the way someone thinks or acts; identify and list on the board some of the animals and their reasons for persuading the man not to chop down the Kapok tree; use the book “The Great Kapok Tree” by Lynne Cherry; compose sentences that identify three reasons the animals gave that persuaded the man to leave the forest. Math: Lessons 7-8: Demonstrate the commutativity of multiplication and practice related facts by skip-counting objects in array models. Lesson 9: Find related multiplication facts by adding and subtracting equal groups in array models. Lesson 10: Model the distributive property with arrays to decompose units as a strategy to multiply.

By Unit Science & Social Studies (Each is taught 2 afternoons per week): 3 Weeks SS Alive – Chapter 1, Locate key geographic features on a map, Identify countries on a map of North America, Identify states and communities on a map of the southeastern U.S., Research role of explorers in preparing the way for the founding of new communities in North America. Chapter Discussion/Review/Assessment.

SC-EP-3.4.1 Science – Chapter 1, Lesson 1 – Living Things and Their Needs, Students will explain the basic needs of organisms. compare and contrast living/nonliving things. Describe what living Organisms have basic needs. For example, animals need air, things need to survive. Chapter 1, Lesson 2 – Relate plant structures water and food; plants need air, water, nutrients and light. to their functions. Describe how plants are classified. Lesson 3 – Organisms can survive only in environments in which their needs Animals and their parts. Describe what an animal needs to survive and can be met. SC-EP-3.4.2 Students will understand that relate how an animal meets its needs. Lesson 3 – Animals and their things in the environment are classified as living, nonliving parts. Describe what an animal needs to survive and relate how an and once living. Living things differ from nonliving things. animal meets its needs. Lesson 4 – Classifying animals. Identify two Organisms are classified into groups by using various major groups of animals and classify animals into groups based on characteristics (e.g., body coverings, body structures). their structures. Chapter discussion/Review/Assessment. Other Language Arts Standards Consistently Integrated throughout all areas: RF.3.4, SL.3.1, SL.3.2, SL.3.3, SL.3.4, SL.3.6, L.3.1, L.3.2, L.3.3, L.3.4, L.3.5, & L.3.6

Subject: Math Science Language Arts Social Studies Music Practical Living Physical Education Art Media Grouping Arrangements: Whole Group Small Group Individual Lesson Activities: Lecture Hands-On Multimedia Student Demonstrations Reading Seatwork Discussion Assessment Other

Materials: Textbook Paper/Pencil Handouts/Worksheets Manipulatives Calculator Lab Equipment Overhead Projector Computers LCD Projector/AverKey Charts/Posters Assessment: Teacher Made Tests Quiz Open Response On-Demand/Portfolio Class Discussion Homework Project Presentation Teacher Observation Class Assignment Other

Differentiated Strategies: Readiness/Ability Adjusting Questions Compacting Curriculum Tiered Assignments Acceleration/Deceleration Flexible Grouping Peer Teaching Student Interest Reading Buddies Independent Study Projects Buddy Stories Learning Outcomes Anchoring Activities Use of Computer Programs Group Investigation Other Learning Styles Addressed: Verbal/Linguistic Logical/Mathematical Visual/Spatial/Nature Bodily/Kinesthetic Interpersonal/Intrapersonal