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The Ukrainian Weekly 1943-35

The Ukrainian Weekly 1943-35

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www.ukrweekly.com The Ukrainian Weekly was founded in 1933 to serve the Ukrainian American community and to function as a vehicle for communication of that community's concerns to the general public in the United States. Today the English-language newspaper publishes news about Ukraine and Ukrainians around the world; its readership, though mostly North American, is worldwide. The Ukrainian Weekly's editorial offices are in Parsippany, NJ; a full-time press bureau is located in Kyiv, capital of Ukraine. It is published by the Ukrainian National Association, a fraternal benefit life insurance society, based in Parsippany, NJ. Read more at www.ukrweekly.com
www.ukrweekly.com The Ukrainian Weekly was founded in 1933 to serve the Ukrainian American community and to function as a vehicle for communication of that community's concerns to the general public in the United States. Today the English-language newspaper publishes news about Ukraine and Ukrainians around the world; its readership, though mostly North American, is worldwide. The Ukrainian Weekly's editorial offices are in Parsippany, NJ; a full-time press bureau is located in Kyiv, capital of Ukraine. It is published by the Ukrainian National Association, a fraternal benefit life insurance society, based in Parsippany, NJ. Read more at www.ukrweekly.com

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05/11/2014

SVOBODA

Український Щоденник
РІК LL Ч. 177.

Ukrainian Daily
VOL. U . N o . 177.

S E C T I O N II.

Щг ®tatman MeeMj>
Dedicated to the needs and interest of young Americans of Ukrainian descent· N o , 35 J E R S E Y CITY, N . J . , SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1043 VOL. X I

Newark Air Cadet Killed In Crash

HELP CELEBRATE WEEKLY'S 10th ANNIVERSARY

Fifty Ukrainians Shot

* T h e Germans are carrying out A v i a t i o n C a d e t W i l l i a m R . Kuzma, ·f__ ·'^ | c o n s t a n t m a s s r a i d s on t h e p o p u l a · Т 23, s o n o f M r . a n d M r s . W i l l i a m K u z - Д t h e close o f t h i s m o n t h T h e U k r a i n i a n W e e k l y will h a v e c o m p l e t e d t e n ¡ ц о п o f t h e m«¾ine, a r r e s t i n g m a n y m a o f N e w a r k , N . J . w a s k i l l e d Au-> y e a r s o f ite u n i n t e r r u p t e d e x i s t e n c e . I t s first issue a p p e a r e d o n O c t o b e r ¦ c o l l a b o r a t o r s a n d i n v e s t i g a t i n g t h e i r g u s t 28 in t h e c r a s h o f h i s a d v a n c e d ¡ в , 1933. S i n c e t h e n 515 issues o f i t h a v e appeared, replete w i t h f e a t u r e s , ¦ political a c t i v i t i e s , t h e B r i t i s h radio training plane near D o n a l d s v i l l e , ¡ articles, stories, n e w s reports, poetry, i n a w o r d w i t h p r a c t i c a l l y ¢ft >rything | reported e a r l y t h i s week, q u o t i n g a G a . , t h e N e w a r k E v e n i n g N e w s r e · ¦ o f interest t o y o u n g U k r a i n i a n A m e r i c a n s — a n d w i t h special e m p h a s i s | secret P o l i s h u n d e r g r o u n d s t a t i o n , ported. A t t h e t i m e h e w a s s t a - ¤ р о п t h e p r o b l e m s o f t h e i r a d j u s t m e n t t o their A m e r i c a n e n v i r o n m e n t a n d | " F i f t y U k r a i n i a n policemen, f o r tioned a t M a r i a n n a ( F l a . ) A r m y ; U k r a i n i a n b a c k g r o u n d . m e r l y in f a v o r o f t h e i n v a d e r s , were A i r Field. T h e young victim o f the T o properly observe t h e o c c a s i o n , t h e c o m i n g O c t o b e r 2nd n u m b e r shot recently c h a r g e d w i t h c o n s p i c u ­ a i r c r a s h h a d a m i l i t a r y escort a t o f t h e W e e k l y will be a special 1 0 t h a n n i v e r s a r y edition. W e c o r d i a l l y i n - o u s a c t i v i t i e s , " a d d e d t h e b r o a d c a s t , his f u n e r a l l a s t S a t u r d a y a t S t v i t e a l l o f o u r readers t o c o n t r i b u t e s o m e t h i n g t o it. W e a r e especially recorded b y C B S . J o h n s U k r a i n i a n C a t h o l i c C h u r c h i n interested in a r t i c l e s t e l l i n g w h a t T h e U k r a i n i a n W e e k l y h a s m e a n t t o them. | ^·-ш·г N e w a r k . R e v . M y r o n D a n i l o v i c h a n d O t h e r t o p i c s a r e w e l c o m e t o o . W r i t e w h a t a n d a s y o u please. PITTSFIELD FLYER RAISED R e v . L a z a r celebrated t h e Requiem A l l s u c h c o n t r i b u t i o n s s h o u l d be i n b y S e p t e m b e r 25th. HAVOC WITH ITALIANS і¾¾ „ ., ' і\ ~ Tech. S g t . J o h n Semeniw. son o f C a d e t K u z m a w a s t h e eldest o f : \K~> _^A \A·~H_ ^„„і,,, Р У three brothers w h o became aviation S H A M O K I N AIR CADET UKRAINIAN-OWNED PARACHUTE ¡ ¾ J ~ ¾ J ¾ ¾ £ r nt а cadets within s i x weeks o f e a c h KILLED B Y LIGHTNING j *ANT AWARDED WHITE STAR u В г а ^ Г ' ш was m a^Uber·other. H e enlisted l a s t J a n u a r y , r ^ n i e l J . Y o n k o v i g , 19, Robert P . Patterson, U n d e r - S e c - « ¿ ^ t h r e e w e e k s a f t e r h i s brother, E d U k r a i n i a n o r i g i n , s o n o f M r . a n d r e t a r y o f W a r , notified on S e p t e m b e r , w a r d E u g e n e , w h o is n o w a n a v a l ^ Y o n k o v i g o f S h a m o k i n , 1st l a s t t h e m e n a n d w o m e n e m ^ „ Ц у F o g g i a a s reported aviation cadet a t Del Monte, C a l . T h e ^ i n s t a n t l y k i l l e d last week P a y e e s o f t h e S w i t l i k P a r a c h u t e ¡ д dispatch 'sent us b y o t h e r brother, M y r o n , a n A r m y a v i a Ughtning a t N o r t h C o m p a n y of Trenton, N . J . that the l S o k o l o w s k y o f Pittefield t i o n c a d e t a t N a s h v i l l e , T e n n . , e n · C a r o l i n a S t a t e C o l l e g e , R a l e i g h , N . p i a n t h a d w o n f o r t h e second t i m S g t S e m e n i w i s a flight e n g i n e e r listed, t h r e e w e e k s earlier. w h e r e h e w a s a student c o m m a n d " t h e A r m y - N a v y production a w a r d , B-24 " N for N a n " a n d r Their father. M r . William K u z m a , ^ n d i n g o n t h e c o l l e g e t h e N e w Y o r k S u n reported. і ' се'April Is a N e w a r k a t t o r n e y a n d president airfield w h e n l i g h t n i n g s t r u c k a n d T h e o w n e r s o f t h e plant a r e U k - . . A n officer o b s e r v e r o n t h e of U · N . A . B r a n c h 76. k i l l e d h i m , a S h a m o k i n p a p e r reports, r a i n i a n A m e r i c a n s . , ^ „ C a d e t K u z m a held a c i v i l i a n p i l o t ' s y k o v i g w a s widely k n o w n W h i t e S t a r t h e c o m p a n y h a s t i m e ~ i f a n y raid c a n b e called e a s y l i c e n s e before h i s enlistment. H e і і а п a n d a s t h e s o n o f a received a s a result, h a s been p l a c e d _ . d with what some of our attended the Newark College of ^ p r o m i n e n t l y k n o w n local b u s i n e s s º n i t s A r m y - N a v y production a w a r d g _ g ^ s had to g o through on g i n e r i n g . I n school h e p l a y e d f o o t · | enlisted in t h e A r m y A v i a - ¦ ¤ e g · T h e S w i t l i k c o m p a n y w a s pre· F o g g i a mission. W e h a d a n t i ball a n d won several medals i n May. s e n t e d w i t h t h e A r m y - N a v y " E " a i r c r a f t fire b u t t h e fighters didn't track. H i s father said he w a s a before h i s p a r e n t s received t h e | a w a r d a t colorful ceremonies held , cadet lieutenant in charge o f t h e telegram i n f o r m i n g t h e m o f h i s M a s t N o v e m b e r a t t h e plant. S i n c e t h e o t h e r g r o u p s . " flight on w h i c h h e w a s killed a n d d e a t h , t h e y received a l e t t e r f r o m t h e n t h e c o m p a n y h a s m a i n t a i n e d ¦ w a s t o h a v e received h i s w i n g s i n , h e y o u t h f u l c a d e t a d v i s i n g h e h a d і t h e h i g h s t a n d a r d s o f production set CHICAGO GUNNER IN RAID five, w e e k s . ¦ been m a d e c o m m a n d e r o f - h i s t r a i n i n g ¤у t h e G o v e r n m e n t . | ON J A P BASK
P I : A i r a t o r m b e r c r e w h i c h rai8ed h a v o c o f a t e ] a s t m o n t h o n I t a l i a n a i r d r o m e 8 с п а е 1 m t h e o f n a n P w h e n 3 t r u c k b y M i c h a e e j c a D o a r d t h e e r H e 8 t a h a f l b e e n i n t h e a r m y 8 І П 1 9 4 2 s h i p w e h a d a f a i r f e a e y T h e C a d e t o n ¦ a s a т и я с c o m p a r e o t n e r m a n H e t n e ; t i o n l a s t J u s t a n h o u r c o m e a t u s i k e t h e y d i d a t s o m e o f t

¾ * * a l c a c h . 23, of T n f 5 U k r a i n i a n descent, s o n o f M r . a n d ^ _____. of C h i c a g o , ON PLOESTI S g t . P e t e r H n a t i u k o f H a z l e t o n , 111., a rear g u n n e r on a B - 1 9 L i b e r First Lieut. Joseph Tomashoshky, " m e m b e r o f U . N . A . B r a n c h 85, ¦ a t o r bomber, took part A u g u s t 17 H a n y c h o f Y o n k e r s , N . Y . w a s killed T o m a s h o s h k y . · g u n n e r o n a F l y i n g F o r t r e s s , w h o : in a raid o n B a l i k p a p a n , D u t c h B o r A u g u s t 11 last w h e n t h e plane i n L· p . d a f o r m e r record" 1 t i m e a g o h a d been reported | neo, w h i c h is reported t o h a v e left in w h i c h h e tfas p a s s e n g e r c r a s h e d . u . N . A . B r a n c h 61, m i s s i n g in a c t i o n o v e r N a n t e s , F r a n c e | t h e h u g e fuel base i n flames, t h e gecret iT n e a r ¾ort " J a c k s o n , S . C , a c c o r d i n g , N j t h U n i t e d S t a t e s ¦ s i n c e J u l y 4, i s a prisoner o f w a r in ¦ C a l u m e t I n d e x reported, t o a report received b y t h e W e e k l y і fl h bombed a n d G e r m a n y , a c c o r d i n g t o a report in j S g t . M a i c a c h ' s s q u a d r o n o f L i b e r · from R e v . Bohdan Olesh. b u r n e d t h e oil refinery i n s t a l l a t i o n s t h e H a z l e t o n P l a i n S p e a k e r , sent t o ¦ a t o r s flew m o r e t h a n 1,200 miles T h e y o u n g a r t i l l e r y officer a n d an-1 R o m a n i a , e a r l y in A u - t h e W e e k l y b y O n u f r e y K o s t i u k , ¦ t h r o u g h b a d w e a t h e r t o pound t h e oil other. h e r their n d allile u r ein ae rty wb s e r vk itµo n !¦ ?"Т*" ¿_~'_\*ZM~S n g t oL a ~ reDort in t h e B r a n c h 8 5 s e c r e t a r y . seco sm tt ll n ere a i ed . accordi center, one o f t h e world's three when -\-_: oU o « » , i l ¡ A n I 5 "º*~> T r * * * " " ¶ ~ · . ' ^ \ A c c o r d i n g A_ a t e l e g r a m received , іlargest before t h e w a r ___і__ r t h e Athird to „ , fo i t a »·ill ! a it „ : і _ _______ t_ г з plane crashed t w o miles east of a " · ^ º " · by S g t . H n a t l u k ' s m o t h e r , M r s . D o · ¡ t i m e in four d a y s . F o u r l a r g e vessels field o n the·· F o r t J a c k s o n r e s e r v a t i o n . У; r o t h y H n a t i u k , he w a s wounded a t | were blown u p o r left blazing, t w o Lieut. Telko was a graduate o f " · T o m a s h o s h k y w a s recently p r o . the time of his capture. і more ships were seriously d a m a g e d S g t . H n a t i u k h a d been decorated ¦ a n d o l d t a n k s a n d refineries were Connecticut University and was work· > ' ^ " V ? , Л "* , _ ^ T , _r . > r\ a··t і lieutenant. H e left f o r o v e r s e a s l a s t ing for his M a s t e r s Degree at Iowa\__ . . . . . . , . ... for heroism in a e r i a l a s s a u l t s on \ set afire. U n i v e r s i t v F o r t w o v e a r s before h e ! ^ * У · G e r m a n a n d G e r m a n - o c c u p i e d t e r · ¦ § g t . M a i c a c h enlisted i n t h e A r m y entereTthe service m M a y , 1 9 4 ? h e , º*en stationed in ^C a i r . , ritory in E u r o p e . H e w a s a w a r d e d a n ! o entered t h e s e r v i c e im¿, h e forces 13 m o n t h s a g o . T w o w a s e m p l o y e d in W a s h i n g t o n , D . C . ¦¦_¦__l__¦ ·u * u u T * A i r Medal. b r o t h e r s a l s o a r e in service. P v t . . . . 2. ' - . , a r d i e r on a L i b e r a t o r bomber. L a s t a s a n e c o n o m i s t in t h e D e p a r t m e n t ! , , , , .. . , H e a n d h i s m a t e s were featured in ¡ S t e p h e n , 27, i s a first cook a n d b a k e r . . . . . „ _і__ ¿Г__ л J u l y he w a s awarded an A i r Medal. a n A s s o c i a t e d P r e s s d i s p a t c h from in t h e q u a r t e r m a s t e r ' s corps a t J a m e s of A g r i c u l t u r e . H e g r a d u a t e d f r o m ¦ ^ t h e F i e l d A r t i l l e r y Officer C a n d i d a t e P H O N E S P A R E N T S F R O M H A W A I I L o n d o n , w h i c h told o f their n a r r o w burg, P a . H e h a s been in t h e A r m y e s c a p e f r o m d e a t h on o n e r e t u r n 18 m o n t h s . P v t . P e t e r , 25, in t h e S c h o o l in O k l a h o m a last F e b r u a r y . O b s e r v i n g h i s 21st b i r t h d a y a n - flight f r o m a b o m b i n g mission o v e r A r m y f o r m o n t h s , is a n anti-air­ T w o o f h i s h a l f - b r o t h e r s a r e in t h e O n t h e i r w a y back t o c r a f t g u n n e r a t C a m p H o w e , C a l . A r m y A i r Force. Corporal B o h d a n niversary, S g t . William Melnyk or G e r m a n y . H a n y c h w a s a s s i g n e d t o o v e r s e a s P l a i n s , P a . , m e m b e r Of U . N . A . B r . ¦ E n g l a n d t h e y discovered t h a t one o f d u t y i m m e d i a t e l y a f t e r t h e funeral 223, called h i s p a r e n t s M r . a n d M r s . ¡ t h e b o m b s w a s s t u c k i n t h e b o m b A s a n " i n d u c e m e n t " t o join t h e of ' h i s brother. S e r g e a n t W a l t e r J o h n M e l n y k in P l a i n s on t h e l o n g ¦ b a y r a c k but t h e y m a n a g e d t o release N i c h o l a s H a n y c h i s a n aerial g u n n e r d i s t a n c e telephone from H a w a i i , a c - ¡ it o u t o v e r t h e o c e a n in t i m e t o s a v e " v o l u n t e e r " l a b o r force being re­ ¦ c o r d i n g t o a W i l k e s - B a r r e press item ¡ t h e i r lives. T h e c o m p l e t e s t o r y o f cruited f o r N a z i benefit, 18-year-old ' s t a t i o n e d in T e x a s ration T h e body o f L t . T e l k o h a d a m i l · | s e n t t o W e e k l y b y J o h n Z w a r y c z t h e incident a p p e a r e d i n t h e J u n e 19 p e r s o n s h a v e been denied ¦ cards at Lyons, France. ita*y~ejsesrt a t t h e f u n e r a l s e r v i c e s і U . N . A . B r a n c h 157 s e c r e t a r y . |issue o f t h e Weekry. ¦ o n A u g u s t 17 a t S t . M i c h a e l ' s U k - ; S g t . M e m y l f enlisted on* J u l y 6 , ' : O f t h e З ¼ million u n m a r r i e d w o r a i n i a n C a t h o l i c C h u r c h . T h e Re-¦ 1940V H e W a s a t H i c k a m F i e l d d u r | m e n in G r e a t B r i t a i n between t h e quiem M a s s w a s c e l e b r a t e d b y t h e i n g t h e J a p srieak a t t a c k o n ^ ' " * ' · м » . » ¾ ц » SA¥SH¾ I · | a gRe s o f 18 a n d 40, nine o u t o f t e n ' V e r y ¾Rev. · M a x K i n a s h a n d R e v . b e r *7. І¦й&.^~:. \^v.. I f | IT · « P I A WAR 8DND$! ? e n g a g e d f u l l - t i m e in w a r w o r k І В о Ь | и і ь P¾gah, w h o ¾*reached t h e F r o m . H a w a i i h e t a l k e d on t h e £ | 0 | Y o r civil defense, o r m e m b e r s o f t h e - i¾nerai s e r m o n s i n U k r a i n i a n a n d ¦ phone,., w i t h h i s p a r e n t s . a n d f a m i l y armed forces. ¶ ¾ р ¾ Г respectively. · f o r ' t h r e e minutes. YONKERS LIEUTENANT KILLED IN A I R C R A S H Seeond Lieutenant Andrew R . T e l Iko, 2 5 , s o n o f M r . a n d M r s . N i c h o l a s
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ttit of the landow·ners and possess: i·. .·»v p r cent of the cultivated land. The Austrian crown is equal to about 20 ½ cents United States money.
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S u c h c o n d i t i o n s a s these were; Organizations a n d Social C u s t o m s e n o u g h - to d r i v e e v e n t h e c o n s e r v a t i v e | икгаЧп¼йде f r o m t h e i r f a t h e r l a n d , і F u r t h e r , U k r a i n i a n s h a v e o r g a n i z e d first to t r a v e r s e different c o u n t r i e s o f | societies w h i c h f o r a s m a l l m o n t h l y E u r o p e a n d t h e n t o find t h e i r w a y a m o u n t give< t o t h e i r m e m b e r s five t o t h i s h e m i s p h e r e . T h e first c o m e r s o r s i x d o l l a r s a week i n c a s e o f s i c k ­ Economic Condition* »T^HE Ruthenians or Ukrainians, who t o the U n i t e d States were probably ness o r injury while at work. Some, came to America, called also the Statistics show that a Ukrainian¡from Hungary. E^mployment w a s a l s o , p a y d e a t h benefits o f f r o m fifty " L i t t l e Russians^· o r " R u s s i a n s , " a r e f a r m e r in G a l i c i a t o d a y o w n s o n t h e | to two hundred dollars a n d these a b r a n c h o f t h e second l a r g e s t S l a v i c a v e r a g e 4.09 "mo^rgs"* o f l a n d , 3 r e a d i l y f o u n d , b u t t h e i r l o t w a s n o t societies h a v e been c o m b i n e d o f l a t e a n e n v i a b l e o n e — s e p a r a t e d f r o m their g r o u p , o c c u p y i n g a t p r e s e n t t h e s o u t h ­ " m o r g s " out o f t h e 4.09 b e i n g suitfamilies - a n d l i v i n g a m o n g a people and a i m t o p a y d e a t h benefits r a n g ­ ern pa i t of Russia, the eastern and able for cultivation; t h a t t h e net e x Whose l a n g u a g e t h e y d i d n o t under­ i n g from five t o s i x h u n d r e d d o l l a r s s o u t h w e s t e r n p a r t o f t h e province o f ¦ pected~ profit f*rom t h e s a m e i s 20.29 stand a n d who looked upon t h e m a s o n the death o f the f a t h e r o f a f a m ­ G a l i c i a , a n d p a r t o f t h e province o f · c r o w n s a n d t h a s h i s t a x e s i n p r o p o r · i n t r u d e r « , c o m e t o t a k e t h e d a i l y ily> a n d . a n a d d i t i o n a l t w o o r t h r e e B u k o v i n a , in A u s t r i a , a n d northern^ tion a r e h i g h e r t h a n t h o s e o f t b e |¡tea^l a w a y f r o m t h e m , ¯¯¯hey h a d ¦ h u n d r e d d o l l a r s o n t h e d e a t h o f h i s " p a n s ; " b e c a u s e o f h i g h e r a p p r a i s a l : ' t o suffer· m a » y h a r d s h i p s , i n c o n v e n i - · w i f e . O f s u c h U k r a i n i a n o r g a n i z a ­ Hungary. , F o r a period b e g i n n i n g w i t h t h e 46.60 p e r c e n t h a v e n o t m o r e t h a n enc e s - a n d a b u s e ; t h e y і were> held· in t i o n s t h e r e a r e f o u r , t h e l a r g e s t w i t h s i x t h c e n t u r y o f t h e C h r i s t i a n era, 1.94 '^morgs^" a n d 88-36 p e r c e n t a r e і c o n t e m p t a n d b e a t e n a n d killed, T h e a m e m b e r s h i p o f 13,000. t h e U k r a i n i a n n a t i o n w a s a p o w e r ¦ t o d a y p r a c t i c a l l y b a n k r u p t , a s t h e c o m p e n s a t i o n #or t h e n " wor~rv -how**| U k r a i n i a n m e n a n d w o m e n d r i n k · f e a r e d a n d respected e v e n ' b y t h e | land t h e y p o s s e s s is t o o s m a l l to< ever, w a s c o m p a r a t i v e l y l a r g e ; s o t h e y , H a b i t u a l d r u n k a r d s , h o w e v e r , a r e f e w rulers of the B y z a n t i n e e m p i r e . ¦ s u p p o r t t h e m . T h e i n d e b t e d n e s s o f ¡ s t a y e d , a n d in c o u r s e o f t i m e h a v e a m o n g t h e m a n d a r e b e i n g l o o k e d Wa*\kening b y i n t e r n a l dissensione U k r a i n i a n f a r m e r s i s s t e a d i l y o n «he* f o r m e d colonies o f t h e i r o w n . T o ¦ d o w n u p o n . T h i s g e n e r a l d r i n k i n g and the repeated o n s l a u g h t s " of i n c r e a s e . I n 1875, t h e t o t a l r e c o r d e d і S u p p l y t h e i r m o s t d e e p l y f e l t w a n t , ! h a b i t is d u e p a r t l y t o t h e c u s t o m of peasant l a n d s i n | in t h i s c o u n t r y , t h e ·first c h u r c h w a s і b r o u g h t h e r e f r o m a b r o a d ; p a r t l y A sin tic h o r d e s f r o m t h e E a s t , it b e · I i n d e b t e d n e s s G a l i c i a w a s 4,933,784 c r o w n s ; in o r g a n i z e d i n S h e n a n d o a h , P a . , i n | b e c a u s e t h e y h a v e m o r e m o n e y a n d camp p a r t o f L·it Іній n ін. t h e n o f P o · 144,862,870 1 8 8 5 г b y t h e R e v . V o l a n s k i , a U k ­ d r i n k s a r e c h e a p , a n d p a r t l y t o s u c h l a n d : a n d l a s t l y o f R u s s i a a n d A u s ­ 1«94, it h a d r e a c h e d c r o w n s , a n d o n e m u s t k n o w t h a t at r a i n i a n priest from G a l i c i a , a m a n c a u s e s a s t h e i n s t a b i l i t y o f t h e i m ­ tria-Hungary. least h a l f a s m u c h m o r e 1s n o t r e · ¦ of g r e a t e n e r g y , w h o w i t h i n a v e r y m i g r a n t ^ « life a n d i t s t r a g e d y , espe­ T h e ¾umber» O f U k r a i n i a n s i n E u corded; A n d n o Wonder, in t h e f a c e ' s h o r t time h a d o r g a n i s e d o t h e r con­ c i a l l y I f h e i s m a r r i e d a n d tile w i f e rope* i l l c o m p u t e d at f r o m t h i r t y t o of t h e squeezing uBuary demanded, j gregations and built several churches h a s not y e t come. A m a r k e d i m ­ thittyi·two іпіШоПв. T h e m o v e m e n t F u r t h e r m o r e , t h e r e a r e n o i n d u s - ¡ in P e n n s y l v a n i a a n d N e w J e r s e y a n d p r o v e m e n t , h o w e v e r , i s i n d i c a t e d ·by o f e m i g r a t i o n t o A m e r i c a does not the complaints o f saloonkeepers, and d a t e b a c k m u c h f u r t h e r t h a n t h i r t y t r i e s o f a n y i m p o r t a n c e i n t h e U k - o n e in M i n n e s o t a . S c h o o l s h e a l s o l o c a l m o v e m e n t s a r e o n foot t o d i s ­ y e a r s . N o s t a t i s t i c s a r e a v a i l a b l e on ¡ r a i n i a n t e r r i t o r y a n d n o w a y f o r o n e . o r g a n i z e d , a n d c o - o p e r a t i v e s t o r e s , dramatic, musical and courage drinking, especially a m o n g w h i c h ' to e s t i m a t e i t n u m e r i c a l l y , ' b u t t o e a r n a l i v i n g o u t s i d e o f h i s o w n ' beneficial, t h e y o u n g people a n d w o m e n . ··.^ t a k i n g i n t o consideration t h e ¿ e v e r a n d t h e n e i g h b o r i n g " p a n ' s " f a r m . І o t h e r s o c i e t i e s a n d p u b l i s h e d t h e first U k r a i n i a n , p a p e r in t h i s c o u n t r y . H i s The Ukrainians cling with some i n c r e a s i n g influx a n d t h e n a t u r a l in- W i t h t h e t r a n s f e r f r o m , f e u d a l c o n - ! d i t i o n s t h e " p a n s " w e r e n o t s l o w i n ¦ d e p a r t u r e f o r E u r o p e w a s a l e s s t o t e n a c i t y t o t h e i r Old c u s t o m s d e s p i t e crease i n t h e p o p u l a t i o n once h e r e , ; e v e n t h e m o s t c o n s e r v a t i v e c a n n o t ; t a k i n g a d v a n t a g e o f t h e s i t u a t i o n · ' U k r a i n i a n s here> w h i c h r e t a r d e d t h e i r t h e ¯ f a c t t h a t t h e l i f e i n t h i s c o u n t o d a y p^ace t h e n u m b e r o f U k r a i n - ' T h e a v e r a g e w a g e s p a i d to G a l i c i a ¦ f u r t h e r p r o g r e s s but did n o t s t o p it. t r y m a k e s t h e m d i s c a r d a g r e a t m a n y . They are superstitious, especially ians> in· t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s m u c h be- (Г901) t o a m a l e f a r m h a n d w e r e those coming from the C a r p a t h i a n E c o n o m i c S t a n d a r d s in A m e r i c a l o w 350,000. In addition t h e r e a r e ! 0.60 c r o w n s f o r a 13 t o 16-hour d a y , 00,000 i n C a n a d a a n d a b o u t t h e s a m e to a f e m a l e 0.36 c r o w n s a n d t o | A b o u t nine-tenths o f t h e U k r a i n ­ m o u n t a i n s . T h e y a r e d e v o u t , a t t a c h e d n u m b e r in B r a z i l · a n d o t h e r S o u t h ! y o u n g b o y s a n d g i r l s 0.28 c r o w n s . i a n s in this c o u n t r y a r e l a b o r e r s a n d t o t h e i r c h u r c h e s , a n d feel v e r y b a d A m e r i c a n republics, m a k i n g a t o t a l T h e s e a b o m i n a b l y low w a g e s a n d w o r k m e n . T h e y a r e chiefly e m p l o y e d l y i f t h e y d o n o t find one in t h e o f 470,000 o r a b o u t h a l f a m i l l i o n · l o n g h o u r s · p r e c i p i t a t e d a n a g r i c u l ­ in m i n i n g a n d affiliated - i n d u s t r i e s . p l a c e w h e r e t h e y live. R e l i g i o n , how* ever, wfth a v a s t m a j o r i t y o f them> tural strike two y e a r s a g o which U k r a i n i a n s in t h e N e w W o r l d . ended v i c t o r i o u s l y f o r t h e s t r i k e r s . ¦ T h e y m a k e g o o d w o r k i n g m e n a n d IS m o r e a m a t t e r o f c u s t o m and forg o o d union men« F a r m e r s c o n s t i t u t e ¦ m a l i t y t h a n a f o r c e r e g u l a t i n g t h e i r C a u s e s of E m i g r a t i o n T h e r e s u l t i n g s t a n d a r d o f life o f a b o u t o n e t e n t h o f their' n u m b e r ; ¦ daily conduct. T h e m a i n r e a s o n s f o r t h i s e m i g r a - U k r a i n i a n s in E u r o p e i s v e r y low. T h e b u s i n e s s a n d p r o f e s s i o n a l m e n a r e ; t i o n h a v e been e c o n o m i c ruin, politi* \ p e a s a n t s in G a l i c i a l i v e a l m o s t e x ­ c o m p a r a t i v e l y f e w i a n u m b e r . T h e ! T h e m a j o r i t y o f U k r a i n i a n s i n t h e c a l a n d n a t i o n a l o p p r e s s i o n , a n d re-, clusively o n p o t a t o e s I a n d cabbage%' U k r a i n i a n g i r l s a n d y o u n g w o m e n ¡ U n i t e d · S t a t e s a r e m e m b e r s o f t h e l i g i o u s persecution. D u r i n g t h e t i m e : l^^ift^ per cent e a t n o b r e a d t h r o u g h w o r k , a l s o , in different s h o p s a n d ; G r e e k : C a t h o l i c c h u r c h . G r e e k O r o f s e r v i t u d e , t h e U k r a i n i a n 0 0 8 8 * 0 1 0 ' s i x m o n t h s o f t h e y e a r . W i t h a n a n « factories> b u t p r e f e r d o m e s t i c s e r v - t h o d o x U k r a i n i a n s ¢ a l m o s t a l l c o n verts from t h e G r e e k Catholic reh a d to g i v e t h e i r l a n d l o r d s a v e r y ¦ n u a l i n c r e a s e i n p o p u l a t i o n o f 1.07 ice, a t w h i c h t h e y a r e efficient. ligion) are less numerous and t h e l a r g e « h a r e o f t h e profits f r o m t h e i r ¦ p e r cent t h e c o u n t r y i s o v e r c r o w d e d T h e i r s t a n d a r d . o f life h e r e i s m u c h n u m b e r o f U k r a i n i a n P r o t e s t a n t s , r e h o l d i n g s , but h i g h a s t h i s m a y h a v e a n d in G a l i c i a t o d a y t h e r e i s o n e p e a s a n t s o u l t o e v e r y 1.45 " m o r g s " h i g h e r t h a n i n E u r o p e , but it d o e s c r u i t e d f r o m R u s s i a n U k r a i n e , i s s t i l l been, t h e l a n d l o r d s h a d c e r t a i n d u t i e s і ¡ not come up to the A m e r i c a n stan- smaller. T h e r e are 83 priests a n d toword· t h e i r s e r f s , t o s u p p l y t h e m ; o f c u l t i v a t e d l a n d ! dard. T h e y , e a t s u b s t a n t i a l f o o d a n d ministers, a n d 108 U k r a i n i a n c h u r c h with provisions in c a s e o f h u n g e r ¦ T h e c o n d i t i o n o f U k r a i n i a n s livp l e n t y o f it, b u t d o n o t l i v e i n s u c h e s , 80 G r e e k C a t h o l i c , 26 G r e e k a n d t h e like. W i t h t h e a b o l i t i o n of* i n g in R u s s i a , H u n g a r y a n d Вико*· j g o o d houses,, o r w e a r such· c l o t h e s , o r O r t h o d o x a n d 2 P r o t e s t a n t , b e s i d e s serfdom·* t h i s h a s been c h a n g e d , a n d ¡ v i n a i s in some resp·ects w o r s e t h a n buy s u c h expensive furniture a s the several Protestant missions where w i t h t h e a i d o f t h e respective go\·- t h a t of t h o s e in G a l i c i a t American workingmen. T h e y con- services and prayer meetings are ··»·n m e n t s t*he g r e e d y l a n d l o r d s or¦ sider a s l u x u r i e s a g o o d m a n y o f t h e h e l d . T h e r a l l y i n g t o t h e c h u r c h h a s Political F a c t o r s "pans" h a v e t a k e n a d v a n t a g e of> t h i n g s , s u c h a s g o i n g t o t h e a t e r s been t o a c e r t a i n d e g r e e a n o b s t a c l e t h e i r j u n i o r b r e t h r e n t o p o s s e s s t h e m ¯ 1 U k r a i n i a n s a r e a d e m o c r a t i c n a ­ a n d different s o c i a l f u n c t i o n s , w h i c h t o p r o g r e s s a m o n g U k r a i n i a n e , chiefs e l v e s o f t h e g r e a t e r p a r t o f t h e c u l - ¦ t i o n ; t h e y h a v e n o n o b i l i t y o f t h e i r t h e A m e r i c a n w o r k i n g m a n t a k e s a s l y f o r t w o r e a s o n s , first> b e c a u s e o f t i v a t e d l a n d besides r e c e i v i n g ¢ i n G a - ¡ o w n ; t h e i r n o b l e m e n r e n o u n c e d t h e i r a m a t t e r o f c o u r s e . T h e y a r e , a s a p r o s e l y t i n g o n t h e p a r t o f t h e G r e e k l i c i a ) I n i n d e m n i t y f o r t h e i r f e u d a l ! t o n g u e a n d n a t i o n a l c u s t o m s in e x ­ rule, s a v i n g , a n d h a r d l y a U k r a i n i a n O r t h o d o x c h u r c h o f t h i s country p r i v i l e g e s , t h e e n o r m o u s s u m o f 180,- ¡ c h a n g e f o r p r i v i l e g e s f r o m P o l ¢ s , b u t h a s f r o m fifty t o t w o h u n d r e d w h i c h is s u p p o r t e d b y t h e R u s s i a n OOti>OOO o f A u s t r i a n c r o w n s . A . g r e a t R u s s i a n s a n d M a g y a r s . ^^^^he n a t i o n d o l l a r s a t l e a s t s a v e d a n d p u t a w a y g o v e r n m e n t f o r p o l i t i c a l r a t h e r t h a n m a s s o f t h e f o r m e r s e r f s h a v e t h u s a t present c o n s i s t s a l m o s t e x c l u s i v e - e i t h e r in s o m e hidden c o r n e r o r w i t h religious m o t i v e s , a n d i s t r y i n g ' te> been left p r a c t i c a l l y p a u p e r s . T h e ly o f p e a s a n t s , w o r k i n g a n d profes- a p r i v a t e , o r public b a n k . I n e x c e p - l e a d t h e U k r a i n i a n e b a c k i n t o t h e g r e a t e r p a r t o f t h e p a s t u r e lands> sional men·. T h e i r rights a r e n o t re- t i o n a l c a s e s , t h e i r s a v i n g s r e a c h t w o , a t m o s p h e r e o f t h e d*ark a g e s w h e n have appropriated, also, by t h e spected, not o n l y i n a u t o c r a t i c R u s - t h r e e a n d f o u r t h o u s a n d d o l l a r s . T h i s religious f a n a t i c i s m , s u p e r s t i t i o n a n d " p a n s " a n d p r a c t i c a l l y a l l o f t h e t i m - . sia w h e r e <since 1867) t h e y h a v e n o t s a v i n g h a b i t g i v e s t h e m a n a d v a n t - a d o r a t i o n o f a u t o c r a t s w e r e s u p r e m e h e r l a n d s . T h e p e a s a n t s in s o m e dis- been a l l o w e d to u s e t h e i r s p e e c h a g e o v e r t h e A m e r i c a n w o r k m e n , v i r t u e « ; second, b e c a u s e o f t h e a t t r i c t s a r e c o m p e l l e d t o u s e s t r a w a n d ¡ publicly, n o r even t o p u b l i s h o r read '¡especially in c a s e o f distress, sickr t i t u d e o f t h e R o m a n C^atholic C h u r c h » m a n u r e f o r fuel a n d t o build t h e i r і t h e B i b l e In t h e i r t o n g u e , a n d w h e r e ' n e s s , d e a t h i n t h e f a m i l y , l a c k o f w h i c h is t r y i n g t o d o m i n a t e a n d c o n h u t s o u t j o f c l a y a n d s t r a w ! T h e t h e r e is not one U k r a i n i a n ~ s c h o o l in | w o r k , o r a strike. D u r i n g t h e first trol t h e U k r a i n i a n c h u r c h p r o p e r t i e s freed ser¢e w e r e o b l i g e d t o p a y t o t h e w h o l e e m p i r e f o r 25,000,000 o f y e a r s o f i m m i g r a t i o n t h e U k r a i n i a n s a n d t h e i r c h u r c h a f f a i r s in g e n e r a l . l a n d l o r d s 132,000,000 c r o w n s f o r t h e ; t h a t people — but a l s o in constitu* і sent t h e g r e a t e r p a r t o f t h e i r s a v i n g s T h e r e s e n t m e n t r e s u l t i n g , r e l i g i o u s p r i v i l e g e o f b r e w i n g beer a n d dis- t i o n a l A u s t r i a a n d H u n g a r y w h e r e , t o E u r o p e t o p a y off d e b t s o r t o i m - dispute«> dissensions a n d l a w s u i t » tilling whiskey (an industry which! laws are enacted with the^explicit ¦ prove their farms, a n d after a few a m o n g m e m b e r « of the same colony r e m a i n e d i n t h e i r h a n d s a n y w a y ) , purpose o f ^*©Ionizing a n d R o m a n i z - ¡ y e a r s ' s t a y w o u l d g o b a c k t h e r e . a n d often o f t h e s a m e church> h a v e ing t h e m . T o p r e s e n t m o r e c l e a r l y | W i t h i n t h e l a s t t e n y e a r s , h o w e v e r , a b s o r b e d e n e r g i e s m u c h n e e d e d e l s e a n d When tbe naive peasants went; t h e c i v i l i z i n g m i s s i o n o f P o l i s h noble- ¡ t h e r e h a s been a n o t e w o r t h y c h a n g e . w h e r e . i n t o t h e c o u r t s t o g e t b a c k the. l a n d s ¦ men in their stronghold, the A u s t r i a n ¦ A great m a n y either renounced all c r i m i n a l l y t a k e n a w a y f r o m them> p r o v i n c e G a l i c i a , a mission w h i c h is | c l a i m s t o t h e i r o l d c o u n t r y posses·' Education and Literacy t h e " p a n s " w h o h a v e even t h e c o u r t s s o r e l y felt b y U k r a i n i a n s o f t h a t sions i n f a v o r o f r e l a t i v e s , or sell J u d g i n g f r o m w h a t h a s been s a i d a n d g o v e r n m e n t officials a t t h e i r disprovince, I t a k e t h e liberty o f put- | t h e m , a n d o u t o f t h e i r s a v i n g s b u y o f E u r o p e a n c o n d i t i o n s , t h e c o n c l u ­ p o s a l w o n 30,000 o u t o f 32,000 l a w · ! ting forth the following statistical sion i s n a t u r a l t h a t t h e i n t e l l e c t u a l s u i t s — f r u i t l e s s l i t i g a t i o n s Which cost d a t a : T h e r e a r e 4 p e n i t e n t i a r i e s a s life o f A m e r i c a n U k r a i n i a n s c a n n o t In some districts of Galicia 56 per t h e p e a s a n t s 40,000,000 c r o w n s . a g a i n s t 2 universities, 6 9 8 breweries cent of the villages are without public, be o f a v e r y h i g h p l a n e . Y e t , c o m i n g a n d distilleries o f w h i s k e y a g a i n s t schools', consequently there are 62.44 t o A m e r i c a , t h e U k r a i n i a n s a r e a n ­ » Ukrainians is pronounced "Oukra^n-j 40 g y m n a s i u m s , 7 9 3 · l o t t e r y a g e n c i e s p«er cent of illiterates in the province.I ian<." і t o 78 industrial, b u s i n e s s , a n d o t h e r Of the children of school a¾e from 3-6 і x i o u s a n d d o learn t h e i r n a t i v e a n d (Concluded on page 8) - In Austria-Hungary in t8·18: in Rus-¡ s c h o o l s , 22,046 s a l o o n s , i n n u m e r a b l e to 5 3 per cent are left without instruc­ tion. The percentage of illiterate in ¦ s'.» in 1861. g a m b l i n g d e n s a n d h o u s e s o f i l l - f a m e R«ssia and Hungary is still ^greater«· In j ¯^ Immigration reports for 1 9 0 2 - 1 9 0 J ' '·fans·' in Galicia constitute 5.2S per! t o 4.468 public. schoola.º · Bukovina s<»me improvement has been show АЧ per cent of il·literacy among By I V A N ARDAN E d i t OP o f "Svoboda*·> tnerk
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I r a i n i a n A s s o c i a t i o n . . were m o s t а с « live campaigning throughout Canad і r t h a t the< l a n k a n d й\е o f U k r a i n i a n | < C o n c l u d e d f r o m раде 2) Canadians ignore the Congress. T b s t h e E n g l i s h l a n g u a g e . It i s n o t a space devoted t o t h e Congress i n rare occurrence t h a t a m a n o f from B y A . ft Y A R K M O V I C H their press exceeded t h a t o f t h e U k ­ t h i r t y t o fifty y e a r s l e a r n s t o r e a d rainian press s u p p o r t i n g t h e C o m ~ f r o m a р г а у е г і ю о к a n d to w r i t e f r o m ¦ m i t t e e . A f e w w e e k s before t h e C o n a e r reeeived from t h e o¡d coun- N ¡ E G A T I V E a s t h e w a r i s in i t s es- to t h e f o r m e r m e m b e r s o f t h e U . L . "This Is O u r L a n d " b y R a y t r y · T h e " m e t h o d " i s t h i s : a t first, · s e n c e i t i s n o t t o t a l l y d e v o i d o f F . T . A . a n d since t h e outbreak, of o n d A r t h u r D a v i e s m a d e i t s a p , the* m a n t r i e s t o read o u t a p r a y e r p o s i t i v e a c c i d e n t s . T h e U k r a i n i a n ¦ R u s s o - G e r m a n war, C a n a d i a n U k - ¡ pearance. I t i s a most cunning mis'· ¶-півд. h e k n o w s b y h e a r t , u s u a l l y t h e C a n a d i a n s entered t h e w a r w i t h t h e r a i n i a n A s s o c i a t i o n , w a s a m o s t u n - representation o f f a c t s . T o c i t e am L o r d ' s P r a y e r , a n d f r o » t h i s h e b e · s a m e p e r p l e x e d f e e l i n g s a s t h e rest ¦ d e m o c r a t i c "procedure of f o w n i n g , a e x a m p l e , h e s t a t e s t h a t t h e U k r a i n i a n g h » t o d i s t i n g u i s h t h e different c h a r · e f t h e C a n a d i a n s b u t b y t h i s d a t e co-ordinating, b o d y . N o t h i n g would C a n a d i a n s h a v e t w o c h a p l a i n s i n t h e · a c t e r s T h e l e t t e r s a r e first l e a r n e d h a v e profited f r o m i t t o t h e e x t e n t ¡ s a t i s f y t h e m t h a t . t h e U k r a i n i a n Can·· | A r m e d F o r c e s , n a m e l y , t h e H / C a p t b y h e a r t , a f t e r w a r d s copied\ a n d i n t h a t t h e p o s i t i v e effects w i l l b e a p - a<han C o m m i t t e e w a s t h e d u l y q u a t f v M . T . P e l e c h a n d H / C a p t S . W . S a w t h i s w a y t h e m a n b e g i n s t o w r i t e — | p r e d a t e d f o r y e a r s t o c o m e n o t o n l y | n e d representative b o d y o f t h e U k - c h u k , b u t h e d o e s n o t s t a t e t h a t t h e a w a y of l e a r n i n g v e r y p r i m i t i v e , o f >by t h e m s e l v e s b u t b y t h e i r f e l l o w ¦ r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n s , t h o u g h t h e five or- o r g a n i z a t i o n w h i c h h e defends h a s . c o u r s e a n d laborious, a n d o n e waioh», C a n a d i a n s . P r i o r t o t h e o u t b r e a k o f g a n i z a t i o n s represent a b o u t W% o f been d e v o t i n g a l l i t s e n e r g i e s t o t h · requires a g r e a t d e a l o f p a t i e n c e on t h e present w a r t h e U k r a i n i a n C a n - ! U k r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n s . T h e leftist U k · d e s t r u c t i o n o f b o t h c h u r c h e s o f whide, t h e p e r t of o n e w h o l e a r n s . B u t i t a < h a u s were divided i n t o s i x m a j o r j r a i n i a n p a p e r s , T h e U k r a i n i a n l i f e , t h e y a r e m e m b e r s . J u s t a f e w d a y s - i e a d a t o the end D o m i n i o n - w i d e o r g a n i z a t i o n s , n a m e · j T o r o n t o , , a n d U k r a i n i a n W o r d , W i n · before t h e C o n g r e s s h a n d b i l l s a n d In towns a n d c a m p s where U k r a m · l y : t h e U k r a i n i a n Catholic Brother· j nipeg, a n d even T h e C a n a d i a n T r i b · leaflets made their appearance i n t h e « i a n s a r e more o r less numerous a n d hood - U k r a i n i a n S e l f - R e l i a n c e : u n e f o u n d it expedient, t o c o n s t a n t l y m a j o r c i t i e s o f C a n a d a a d v i s i n g t h e o r g a n i z e d t h e y h a v e t h e i r s c h o o l s i n . L e a g u e , U l r r a m i a n N a t i o n a l F e d e r a > ¡ a t t a c k t h e U k r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n C o m · U k r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n s n o t t o s e n d d e - ., w h i c h t h e a d u l t s a r e t a u g h t · t o read t¿on, U n i t e d H e t m a n O r g a n i z a t i o n s , ¡ m i t t e e . Thuv c a m p a i g n c a r r i e d o n m l e g a t e s t o t h e C o n g r e s s o r t o p a r t b a n d w r i t e t h e i r o w n a n d s o m e t i m e s . U n i o n o f U k r a i n i a n L a b o r O r g a n i z a · ¦ t h e E n g l i s h press a s wett a s t h e U k - c i p a t e i n d i v i d u a l l y .

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a c n o o t e i n t h e d a y t i m e , l e a r n t o read n a m e d five w i t h t h e i r affiliated or-· f u s i n g t h e C a n a d i a n s a s t o w h o r e · T o d a y i t i s well k n o w n t h a t a t a n d write in U k r a i n i a n . T h e s e s c h o o l s g a n i z a t i o n s t h o u g h n o t c o o p e r a t i n g ¡ Resents t h e m a j o r i t y o f t h e U k r a i n · t h e C o n g r e s s t h e r e were p r e s e n t o v e r , a v e r a g e f r o m thirty-five t o o n e h u n - b u t c o m p e t i n g w i t h e a c h other, w e r el·i a n C a n a d i a n s . T o b e a r t h i s o u t w e ' 7 0 0 d e l e g a t e s a n d g u e s t s . T h e y came <iredі D u o i l s T h i s f a l l a l s o a U k - a b l e , w h e n o c c a s i o n c a l l e d f o r , t o find¡ n e e d t o refer t o t h e M a y 8, 1S43, i s - f r o m V a n c o u v e r to M o n t r e a l . A m o n g r £ n b m b o a r d i n g sche** o n a s m a l l a c o m m o n point o f interest. T h t e w a s ¡ s u e o f T o r o n t o S a t u r d a y N i g h t w h e r e t h e m were c l e r g y m e n , p r o f e s s i o n a l . « * ¿ T h e s been e s t a b l i s h e d in ¥<*і· n o t t h e c a s e w i t h t h e U . L . F . T . A . t h e editor s t a t e s t h a t t h e U . L . F . T . A . m e n , b u s i n e s s m e n , t r a d e s m e n , farm­ e¦¡¡r. у A l s o a f u n d h a s been w h i c h since - t h e m i d d l e t w e n t i e s ¡ r e p r e s e n t e d t h e m a j o r i t y o f U k r a i n - \ ©rs, laborers, m i n e r s , a n d r a i l r o a d ¦ * * ^ w ' o f nrivftte c o l l e c t i o n s ¢ o r a d o p t e d t h e e x t r e m e leftists· a t t i t u d e , і i a n C a n a d i a n s a n d i n t h e s a m e i s s u e . T h e delegates themselves re- . · f ^ n n Z r t « f Ukrainians in h i g h e r e x c e p t i o n a l l y i n i m i c a l t o t h e p r i n · t h e editor, В . K . S a n d w e l l , i n t h e , presented a s g o o d a c r o s s - s e c t i o n of \ T L ^ L T h a s S v ^ d c ^ e s ^ e cTpleV o f p r i v a t e p r o p e r t y a n d e x - | a r t i c l e " P r o p e r t y h a s rights, even t o . " C a n a d i a n industries, a s c o u l d b e e x · Гг^і * n d ther« is much m o r e t o be c e p t i o n a l l y s y m p a t h e t i c t o w a r d s C o m - U k r a i n i a n s " g i v e s t h e i m p r e s s i o n t h e ¦ p e c t e d t o b e f o u n d i n t h e o c c u p a t i o n s A\^L^ \\Л IH\Vdirection m u n i s m . T h i s a t t i t u d e w e n t s o f a r m a j o r i t y o f U k r a i n i a n s a r e s y m n a · f a n y 305,000 C a n a d i a n s . T h i s very; - T h e r e a r e f o u r U k r a m i a n w e e k l i e s t h a t i t s m e m b e r s h i p w a s t a u g h t _that tte«e t o w a r d s C o m m u n i s m . B o t h ! f a c t a l o n e t h a t t h e C o n g r e s s w a s s o <one with a c i r c u l a t i o n of l & O O * * i t s first d u t y a n d o n e monthly p u b l i s h e d in U n i t e d m u n i s m e v e n a t T Ї___ Th*» іяН·*чг dise«ases such ada. Consequently, i,7hWtVTs T h e Interior · f r e a s o n w h y t h e five D o m i n i o n - w i d e | a r e t h e s y m p a t h i e s f o r C o m m u n i s m i n d i c a t i o n o f t h e s t r e n g t h o f t h e C a n « T I ^ R e U * f H «f A n c i e n t U k r a i n i a n Canadian organizations general among Ukrainian Canadians. ¦ adian Ukrainian Committee and whom, Р І о к Г ¾ e \\¦¦\\_Є¦^ a n d w o u l d n o t co-operate C o n s e q u e n t l y t h e e x e c u t i v e o f t h e ¦ i t r e p r e s e n t s . C e r t a i n l y , t h e large, t h ? W l T T ^ r i o d i c a l u n i a u e a m o n g ¡ w i t h i t a n d i t s subsidiaries, T h e o u t · I r a ¿ n i a n C a n a d i a n C o m m i t t e e w a s ¦ n u m b e r o f d e l e g a t e s a n d g u e s t s f r o m . ^ J ^ ^ M ^ T I ^ ^ K S o m e ¾break o f w a r placed t h e U . L . F . T . A . c o n f r o n t e d w i t h t h e clarification o f , a c r o s s C a n a d a d o e s n o t l e a v e a n y U k r m n t o b o o k s a r e p u b l i s h e d i n ¦ a n d a l l i t s affiliated o r g a n i z a t i o n s _ o n , t h e j f t u a t i o u . T h e C o n g r e s s w a s d e - r o o m f o r a n o t h e r o r g a n i z a t i o n w h i c h would b e m o r e influential a m o n g t h e this< c o u n t r y , b u t t h e m a j o r i t y — t h e list o f i l l e g a l o r g a n i z a t i o n s . T h e c i d e d u p o n . went under t h e Ukrainian C a n a d i a n s . I t would have s t e a e ¾ y o n t h e i n c r e a s e — a r e i m - five f o r m e d t h e U k r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n * T h e c o n g r e s s p o r t e d f r o m Europe. Periodicals and Committee. s l o g a n s : W A R - ^ - V I C T O R Y — F R E E ­ been m o s t g r a t i f y i n g t o s e e R a y ­ mond A r t h u r Davies at the Congress books published i n other languages, D O M — S E C U R I T Y . T o anyone w h o W h y t h e Congress W a s Called with " T h i s I s O u r L a n d " under n i t especially Slovak a n d Polish, a r e read I n N o v e m b e r , 1940 t h e five D o m i n - is n o t following t h e a c t i v i t i e s o i t h e , a r m . It i s v e r y p r o b a b l e t h a t e v e n -end- t h e · y o u n g e r g e n e r a t i o n read, a l s o , E n g l i s h b o o k s a n d n e w s p a p e r s . ion-wide U k r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n p r g a n · U k r a m i a n C a n a d i a n C o m m i t t e e t h e s e ¦ h e m i g h t h a v e g o t t i r e d o f c a r r y i n g E d u c a t i o n a m o n g U k r a i n i a n s in ¡ i z a t i o n s r e p r e s e n t i n g p r a c t i c a l l y a l l s l o g a n s a r e toe g e n e r a l t o h a v e a n y J i t a r o u n d w i t h h i m a f t e r c h e c k i n g -----~ ; JfTkrftmmn C a n a d i»a n s w-*- h t h e r i· g·hл .- ] specific m e a n i n g , c o n s e q u e n t l y i t i s ¡over t h e l i s t s o f d e l e g a t e s a n d t h e i t - —- . l < / n _ . .... _щ* J · _ _t 2 * 2 ^ ^ T h e a i m . o f ¦ d i s t r i c t s represented. P r o b a b l y h e *У « * * · * ГІГ ' 1 ; ЛІ____¦ ' f o r t s in a i d i n g C a n a d a in h i s w a r a r e t h e C o n g r e s s c o u l d b e s t a t e d a s f o b ; w o u l d h a v e e n j o y e d m e e t i n g p e r s o n c i e * » «or ^ ¯ ¾ « ^ ^ ' ^ - . ¡ П е most elective they m u s t bury | l o w s ; ( a ) Constitutionality of Uk-¦ally C a p t M . T . Pelech a n d C a p t . · t i c s a n d s i n g i n g , w h i c h are f o u n d m ¡ t o j * ^ ^ Щ ^ Щ ^ ^ ^|rainian C a n a d i a n C o m m i t t e e ; (b>¡e. W . S a w c h u k a n d R e v . B . H u p l a c e s w h e r e a priest, o r a n y P ^ * ¦ first a i m o f | c o n t r i b u t i o n o f U k r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n s » m e n i u k , w h o s e n a m e s h e m e n t i o n s i n m o r e e d u c a t e d t h a n t h e rest, g w » ^ U k r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n C o m m i t t e e ¡ t o C a n a d a ' s w a r effort; ( c ) A t t i t u d e ¡ his m o s t recent book of fiction, l e a v i n g t h S thing a start. ¡ b e c a m e t o co-ordinate a l l t h e w a r | o f t h e [ J k r a i n ian C a n a d i a n C o m m i t » ¡ t h e impreseion w i t h t h e r e a d e r t h a t T h e i r Ke wakening in America і efforts a m o n g t h e U k r a i n i a n C a n - | t e e ( I ) P o s t - w a r r e c o n s t r u o t i o a o f t h e y are m e m b e r s o f t h e C a n a d i a n ·" T h e U k r a i n i a n s o f A m e r i c a d o not a d i a n s . T h e C o m m i t t e e b e c a m e t h e ¦ t h e world, { П ) P o s t · w a r reconstruct U k r a m i a n A s s o c i a t i o n , d i f f e r m u c h i n c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s , g o o d | o n l y a u t h o r t t a t i v e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e b o d y ¦ t i o n i n ( ¾ * « d a o f s o c i a l , political a n d і H e w o u l d h a v e a l s o f o u n d t h a t o r b a d , f r o m o t h e r S l a v i c peoples. of t h e l a r g e m a j o r i t y o f Ш г а і п і а п j e c o n o m i c p r o b l e m s , < П Ь ) F u t u r e o f ¡ o v e r 4 5 0 d e l e g a t e s h a d n e x t o f k i n T h e e x c e p t i o n s a r e t h e s e : T h e y a r e C a n a d i a n s ; it felt it w a s i t s d u t y t o ¦ U k r a i n i a n c u l t u r e . A n y o r g a n i z a t i o n s e r v i n g in C a n a d a ' s A r m e d F o r c e s . not a s f a n a t i c a l a s s o r a e othersT the^y І e x p r e s s its opinions o n E u r o p e a n ¦ w h i c h m a k e s i t s position c l e a r i n r e ­ M o s t o f t h e m enlisted prior to J u n e d o n o t m o v e in a m a s s , b u t p o s s e s s | Questions o f i n t e r e s t t o U k r a i n i a n , g a r d t o t h e t o p i c s n a m e d c a n t h e n 22, 1941. T h e r e c a n n o l o n g e r be a g o o d deal of i n d i v i d u a l i t y ; t h e y I C a n a d i a n s , a n d to co-operate i n all ¡be s a f e l y , c o n d e m n e d a s anti-demo· a n y d o u b t s i n t h e m i n d s o f a n y C a n ­ a r e a s s i m i l a t e d readily a n d w i t h e x ¯ m a t t e r s o f c o m m o n interest. T h e f a c t | c r a t i c o r r e c o g n i z e d a s a n i m p o r t a n t a d i a n w h e t h e r t h e U k r a i n i a n C a n ­ сері¿ї©*> o f H u n g a r i a n U k r a i n i a n s a r e t h a t t h e U k r a i n i a n C a n a d i a n C o m · . f a c t o r in s h a p i n g the destiny of C a n - a d i a n C o m m i t t e e i s a d e m o c r a t i c a l ­ n o t ·hot-tempered o r e a s i l y i r r i t a t e d m i t t e e w a s f o r m e d b y t h e r e p r e s e n · ; a d a . I t i s n o t m y i n t e n t i o n t o j u s i f y ly o r g a n i z e d b o d y a n d w h o m it re­ presents of the Ukrainian Canadians. T h e i r p h y s i c a l e n d u r a n c e i s s u p e r b . I t a t i v e s o f t h e five D o m i n i o n - w i d e o r · t h e s t a n d t a k e n b y t h e C o n g r e s s . S p a c e does n o t permit t o present T h i s , i n brief, h a s been a s k e t c h § £ ¡ K ¾ * ¾ S f ºº"" J * . * « was, o f a race in A m e r i c a which h a d · j officia<lly a n n o u n c e d t h a t t h e U k r a i n · | e v e n a resume o f t h e speeches d e g l o r i o u s past w h e n by reason o f i t s d i s o r g a n i z e d d u e t o t h e i l l e g a l i t y o f i a n C a n a d i a n C o m m i t t e e h a d d e c i d e d » h v e r e d a t t h e C o n g r e s s , but t h e R e t e r r i t o r i a l position f o r m a n y c e n · I **** " S» c a r r i e d o n t h e ¦ t o h o l d t h e C o n g r e s s t h e leftist p r e s s ! s o l u t i o n s d u l y p r e s e n t e d a n d p a s s e d t u r i e s i t p l a y e d t h e role o f a g u a r d · P c a m p a i g n a g a i n s t · l a s h e d o u t with t h e m o s t b i t t e r a t · c o v e r a l l t h e views e x p r e s s e d . ( T e x t i a n o f E u r o p e a n civilization a g a i n s t ' ^ ^ »t. t a c k s u p o n t h e C o m m i t t e a n d t h e ¡of resolutions a p p e a r e d in J u l y 1 0 t h t h e A s i a t i c hordes, b u t w h i c h now, b y . ^ . * * t h e Itopular s u p p o r t o f s individual m e m b e r s o f t h e e x e c u t i v e , issue of U k r a i n i a n W e e k l y ) , f o r c e o f c i r c u m s t a n c e s , h a s been г*Л Г * · » * * ! C a n a d i a n s . Y e t t h e f a c t ¡ T h e m e m b e r s o f t h e C a n a d i a n U k (Ukrainian Canadian Review) , _ і · , M ^ was constantly overlooked that each i. Т Ш ¿ £ * Щ Ш <* organizations w a s holding: aJ a n a moral oegraoaaon. actions. I n A m e r i c a , a n d especially in t h e respective e x e c u t i v e s were United States, the Ukrainians w a k e i ratified b y t h e i r m e m b e r s . T h i s Tip t o a n e w life. I f t h e y s u c c e e d і _ · , , . . . within a generation or so to regain o f t h e U k r a i n i a n C e n t e r t h e i r f o r m e r e x c e l l e n c e s , a v a i l then>· w o r k , . a n d A m e r i c a n s , i n s t e a d o f : sponsor their : selves* o f w h a t is g o o d in A m e r i c a n I s t a r t i n g a m o n g Ukrainians a n d i m · c i v i l i z a t i o n a n d a v o i d w h a t i s b a d m i g r a n t s in g e n e r a l w e l l - o r g a n i z e d i n k , t h e y will s u r e l y m a k e a w o r t h y I e d u c a t i o n a l u n d e r t a k i n g s o n a l a r g e a d d i t i o n t o t h e citizenship o f t h e *scale h a v e confined t h e m s e l v e s t o AT THE U K R A I N I A N CENTER U n i t e d S t a t e s . T o h e l p t h e m t o a t · ¦local d e n o m i n a t i o n a l m i s s i o n s w h i c h 180-186 WILLIAM STREET, NEWARK« N. J . t a i n t h i s e n d . t h e e d u c a t e d people ¡ d o v e r y little g o o d a n d s o m e t i m e s o f their o w n r a c e a n d p a t r i o t i c A m e r · a r e even h a r m f u l , S A T U R D A Y . S E P T E M B R 18, 1943 i c a n s a s well, s h o u l d t a k e a livelier I hope t h e t i m e i s n e a r w h e n m e a n s i n t e r e s t m . . . f h i n f | t o e d u c a t e him, will be found a n d u s e d w i t h a l l ener·^ 2—ВАШ~~2:]MARTY km and his Orchestra and P L A B N OK AD t o lift h i m u p . t o m a k e h i m a better g y a n d persistence t o t h e b e s t a d ADMISSION ¢ 5 c·ote. UNIFORMED SERVICE MEN FREE man, ' v a n t a g e o f this great nation a n d o f S o f a r t h e U k r a i n i a n s h a v e few t h e s t r a n g e r f r o m a c r o s s t h e s e a CONTINUOUS DANCING FROM 8:30 P. M. 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U K R A I N I A N W E E K L Y . S A T U R D A Y . S V . P T K M R K R 1 1 . 1МЯ

No.

35

ON T H E THIRD WAR LOAN DRIVE
Тле T h i r d W a r L o a n Drive, which V ¶ br >ui next T h u r s d a y , S e p t e m b e r 8. h a s its g o a l the r a i s i n g of 15 tail^ T*»B d o l l a r s from individuals, c o r p o r a · t J T . S , insurance companies, and other r >n b a n k i n g s o u r c e s in a b o u t t h r e e ¼seeks. D u r i n g the t i m e t h e drive is o n , c o m m e r c i a l b a n k s will be unable t o buy W a r B o n d s . Objectives

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Fortress^ raid o v e r t h e R h i n e l a n d . *Transfer Now T o War-Useful J o b " 180 people w o u l d h a v e t o b u y President F . D . RooseveH: — McNutt o n e $100 B o n d e a c h t o finance a " I g i v e to t h e people o f the P h i l i p · single broadside f r o m t h e 16-inch A l l i e d v i c t o r i e s a n d a d v a n c e s . re-

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г г ¾ ¾ 2 people buying $100 bonds wouldnt quite pay for the equip· ment of a single soldier, the cost of which is $154.95. It would take S S f « a r B «n d s t o ^ $100 W o ¾ meet , b ¾ the $2,t a U g

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^ S ¿ ¾ 2 ; ¾ teryf т¿%и ¾ Й and stepped-up production, will call' , , „ established and DW>for large scale transfers from non· £cted The entire reWrces fa H% essential to war-essential jobs, Л я . , Г * . , thTni^^^ 4,""!'" chairman Paul V. McNutt of the War ^ „ . ? ^ " f ! « ,Y"' **»'º* " ¾ e Ta£d : º · H* s i . , keep t h « promise, just . " . ¿. .
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500.000 cost of equipping a s i n g l e | " W h i l e w e c a n be o p t i m i s t i c a b o u t У У ~ ^ ? E v e r y A m e r i c a n w h o c a n possibly d i v i s i o n - a n d W E L R E c r e a t i n g d i v i - ' t h e course" o f t h e w a r , t h e r e c a n b e A m e r i c a h a s m a d e t o t h e F U l i p m o « i f o r d it is u r g e d to b u y a t least one sions a t t h e r a t e of one a d a y . no complacency over our manpower º * º £ f ' . . . .$100 B o n d over a n d a b o v e w h a t he 1 $100 bond p u r c h a s e would k e e p s i t u a t i o n . B e t w e e n n o w a n d J u l y , . **º*У *V? S f ? , " h a s already bought or i s buying Corregridor a n d m d e e d t h r o u g h p a y r o l l s a v i n g s or o t h e r · a carrier-based N a v y p l a n e in t h e 1944 a r o c k b o t t o m m i n i m u m o f 2,a i r j u s t a little m o r e t h a n t w o a n d 600,000 persons m u s t t r a n s f e r f r o m e v e r y w h e r e in t h e P h i l i p p i n e s , will p l a n s . T h i s is a special drive, inone-quarter h o u r s . . . i f spent on less essential j o b s t o m u n i t i o n s p r o · · b e r e m e m b e r e d s o l o n g a s metf c o n t e n d e d t o a c c o m p l i s h a special pur26 life preservers, it m i g h t s a v e d u c t i o n o r j o b s i n t h e g r e a t n u m b e r j Ш^ r e s p e c t b r a v e r y a n d devotion pose—the raising of a large addition· a n e q u a l n u m b e r o f l i v e s . . . o r if o f c o m m u n i t y services t h a t a r e e s - F ? d e t e r m i n a t i o n W h e n the F]*­ al sum of money. used t o b u y .50 c a l i b e r a r m o r · s e n t i a l t o t h e h e a l t h , t r a n s p o r t a t i o n P P e o P resisted t h e J a p a n e s e A great number of Americans alpiercing bullets, it w o u l d p a y for a n d o t h e r v i t a l a c c e s s o r i e s o f civil· m v a d e r s w i t h t h e i r v e r y lives, t h e y r e a d y own one or m o r e W a r B o n d s 204 rounds. i a n life. S a v e final p r o o f t h a t h e r e w a s a n a e a c h — a c c o r d i n g t o recent s u r v e y s , A s invasion becomes a fact a n d . " I t is e a s y t o S E E w h y s u c h l a r g e ¡ * * be r e s p e c t e d a s t h e e q u a l more than two out of three urban dwellers a n d one o u t o f t w o f a r m e r s . s p r e a d s over o u r wide-flung battle s c a l e t r a n s f e r s m u s t t a k e p l a c e . T h e F * ¦ » « ¦ У o n t h e stout: h e a r t a n d n a T h u s t h e m a j o r portion o f t h e m o n e y fronts. m o r e a n d m o r e m e n a n d m i l i t a r y services p l a n t o e x p a n d ¦ ^ И * « * у " * ' T " t o be raised in t h i s T h i r d W a r L o a n e q u i p m e n t will be needed. A n d a s t h e from 9,300,000 t o 11,300,000 between m e a s u r e s of a people, ' Wendel L . \Villkie: D r i v e m u s t c o m e f r o m additional t e m p o of w a r increases, s o a l s o does ¤ ¤ w a n d J u l y o f n e x t y e a r . p u r c h a s e s b y those a l r e a d y h o l d i n g t h e cost o f t h e w a r . T h i s a l r e a d y h a s ' T h e s e m a n a n d w o m e n will be „ imagination to Bonds. been s t r i k i n g l y reflected in o u r in- d r a w n from w a r - u s e f u l j o b s a s w e U ^ t i c * ^ A S from other occupations. A t t h e r e c o g n i t i o n of. t h e However, there remain important creasing war expenditures. W h e n P r e s i d e n t R o o s e v e l t , on J a n - same> t i m e a s o u r c o m m i t m e n t s P ¾ e ¾ K ^ e l o w « in e n e m y a n d o c Jmtapped markets — new workers, c o u n t r i e s ; recognizing t h e w i s e s p e c i a l l y w o m e n , t h e 50 percent o f . u a r y 6. 1942, sent t o C o n g r e s s his t h e b a t t l e f r o n t s m u l t i p l y , t h e w a r ! !^ A ^ d a ¾ effective a n d a c t i v e t h e f a r m m a r k e t t h a t r e m a i n s t o be a n n u a l report o n t h e s t a t e o f t h e ^ u s t n e s ARE required to meet co-operation in w o r l d c o u n c i l s a n d s o l d , f a m i l i e s w i t h two, t h r e e o r m o r e U n i o n , H E a n n o u n c e d A w a r p r o g r a m m g s c h e d u l e s o f p r o d u c t i o n . c a l l i n g for production d u r i n g 1943 l· T h e y m u s t replace t h e m e n drawn> p e r s o n s w o r k i n g b e c a u s e of the war, peace· t h e one-third o f t h e u r b a n m a r k e t of 125,000 airplanes, 75,000 t a n k s , m t o w a r service, replace t h o s e t h e y ; ' i t h a t r e m a i n s t o be sold. I n o t h e r 35,000 a n t i a i r c r a f t g u n s . 10.000,000 lose f r o m a c c i d e n t s , n o r m a l d e a t h s , ^ retirements, a n d o t h e r k i n d s p f t u r n international exchange and the w o r d s , e v e r y o n e w h o c a n afford t o ¡ t o n s of m e r c h a n t s h i p p i n g . ' eceL·ry trade b u y a W a r B o n d s h o u l d b e persuaded ¦ W h a t t h a t m e a n s in d o l l a r s c a n be o v e r a n d a d d e n o u g h skilled w o r k · | . ¿ t o p u r c h a s e B o n d s t o t h e fullest e x - appreciated f r o m t h e following re· e r s TO a s s u r e t h a t production s c h e d · , presentative C O S T S : B a t t l e s h i p , $90,- ules a r e m e t within specified p e r i o d s . , enlargement of commerce t e n t o f his ability. " A n y reduction in our a b i l i t y to| ¿ ¾ / і Д Е T o raise 15 billion dollars, it w o u l d 000.000: a i r c r a f t carrier, $71,000:000; s u b m a r i n e . $7.000.000; L i b e r t y s h i p , equip o u r fighting m e n m e a n s t h a t * *~ * encoura*e¯ b e n e c e s s a r y t o sell 200 m i l l i o n $100 of £ е ^ B o n d s ( a t t h e subscription price o f $2.000.000; F l y i n g F o r t r e s s , $375,000; t h e h e a v y t a n k , $145.000; fighter plane, f e i ^ ¾ ^ ¾ ^ ¾ ^ W i e r t y throughout the world. B u t in $ 7 5 ) . A n d since o u r population, in$75.000: a n d a n t i a i r c r a f t g u n , $5,- » v e s w f f l ^ ^ ^ ¦ ; addition t o these purposes w e m u s t c l u d i n g children, is less t h a n 136 000. million, it will be n e c e s s a r y to sell ever, is o n l y p a r t o f t h e s t o r y . I n ? ¿ « * < ¾ * ·**« P a y i n g for W a r s o m e people m u c h m o r e t h a n $100 p l a c e s w h e r e t h e r e is a c o n c e n t r a t i o n * f Worth. F i n a n c i n g t h e w a r a g a i n s t the ¦ ¡ duction, itary, aeronautical and naval strength T h e size o f t h e t a s k c a n now be A x i s is A difficult a n d c o m p l e x t a s k , to implement and, if necessary proSeen. I t is t h e g r e a t e s t financing w i t h o u t precedent in h i s t o r y . T h e services' * °° У· job ever attempted. $18»a billion w h i c h we spent on the transportation. communica- William G r e e n , president of t h e l a s t w a r w o u l d c o v e r less t h a n 2 V protection, American Federation of L a b o r : Organization m o n t h s of t h i s one. T h e W a r D e p a r t · ¡___A f _ v_\_. u , , T h e drive is being h a n d l e d by W a r m e n t a p p r o p r i a t i o n for t h e fiscal y e a r ºi e s e overcrowded areas there º º 1943 alone w a s m than tnese o v e r c r o w a e a a r e a s t n e r e resolved first o f a l l t h a t F i n a n c e C o m m i t t e e s of e a c h S t a t e . l y * ¿ alone w a s m o r e t n a n o u r t o t a l ore our total shortages of Laundry work· recimtatin.>· tpachers n u r s e s d o c t o r s bus Vº ?__ ^. ^ Precipitating T h e B o n d s are being sold b y a n e s t i m - G o v e r n m e n t a p p r o p r i a t i o n s between a t e d 2 ½ million v o l u n t e e r s a l e s m e n 1789 a n d 1919 *З ¾ ^ d others , º T o raise t h e f u n d s n e c e s s a r v TO u ^ ' **\ " h a v e persecuted a n d oppressed a n d in local drives t h r o u g h the c o u n t r y . 1 0 raise t n e l u n a s n e c e s s a r y t o s e r v i c e s a r e needed b y civil· ^ innocent a n d defenseless a c c o m o d a t e no J 8 e a innocent a n a a e i e n s e i e s s F o r m a n d m e t h o d of local drives p a y f o r total w a r requires t h e use i n і n e s e a r e a s c a n a c c o m o d a t e no t ^ n g s , s h a l l be m a d e t o p a y will depend on c o m m u n i t y require- of t w o огіпсіоаі m e t h o d s ·. t a x a tи o п 01 two principal m e u i o o s іаха о e outsiders, b u t t h e y m u s t swell r ^ n o i t v #a·, tb*»it. « r ¡ m o c т and bon·owing. U n d e r existing t a x . s e f u l l a b o r forces a n d Pem¾Uy for their c r i m e s . L i k e ments. House-to-house canvassing, leeislation a little m o r e t h a n o n e · їй* и » е і ш laDor forces a n a o u r sense o f j u s t i c e d e m a n d s o r g a n i z a t i o n - t o - o r g a n i z a t i o n solicit- legislation, A n i n e m o r e t n a n o n e · n l y be a c c o m p l i s h e d b y _ *; ¿. _л а,і i n f f on local s o u r c e s of l a b o r » t t h e n a t i o n s o f E u r o p e and. A s i a ing, rallies, s a l e s t h r o u g h banks, third of Gevernment expenditures WILL РЛ«ЙГРН h v T«V«TION RUT . f º r c e s o i іаоог, ¾een i n v a d e d a n d destores, i n d u s t r i a l p l a n t s , theaters., Г º' * ^ d ^Рº о by the a x i s a n d o t h e r o u t l e t s , are s o m e o f the shice ¾ I E R E T S A limit t o t h e e x t e n " " 7 e A tne e x t e n t o t w o now · А n v__T * a f « r thni^ m e t h o d s t h a t will be used. ¡ since h t n h r et ais a t i olimita nt o be incresed e m p ld Iy e d or b sh o s e d ih e c tare usefule mo F _ . * ^? e b o" B E r restored¿ t o their to w ic x n c p ¡n i o not r lv t T h e s e 2 ½ million s a l e s m e n m a k e ! w i t h o u t p l a c i n g impossible b u r d e n s T H E W I R effort » d e p e n d e n c e a n d powers a n d remainder¡ .. , greater u p a g r e a t p a t r i o t i c civilian a r m y , on m a n y individuals, t h e ¦ f a d d i t i o n a l war-useful l a b o r " ^ * * < * n * a n d rehabilitation. f i g h t i n g t o a c c o m p l i s h a n e n d i m - ; m u s t be raised b y b o r r o w i n g . It is essential t h a t a s l a r g e A s u m u l d c o m e f r o m the c l a s s of per~^~*~ p o r t a n t t o t h e w a r effort a s a m i l itary battle. A S possible be secured f r o m m d i v i d u · . s o already accustomed to w o r k · , 3. C o n s u l t y o u r local U S E S office, . als, since it is not o n l y n e c e s s a r y t o h a v e e s t a b l i s h e d s t a b l e f o r i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t j o b s t o be C o s t of W a r p a y f o r t h e w a r b u t a l s o t o insure r k habits." filled a n d how t o a p p l y f o r t h e m , j e c o n o m i c s t a b i l i t y by h e l p i n g t o ; M a n p o w e r C o m m i s s i o n ¡ ¦ ' ^ _ . __ ' „ ___ ___ ¿ _ M o d e r n t o t a l w a r is c o s t l y because hold down prices. ¡ e m p h a s i z e s the f a c t t h a t e a c h c o m · : . ..." it is world·wide, because o u r fight· | ! m u n i t y is responsible for t h e s o l u · ¿^~ Stabilizing O u r E c o n o m y i n g forces are t h e l a r g e s t in history, j t i o n s o f i t s individual l a b o r s h o r t a g e ' A m e r i c a n s on t h e H o m e F r o n T a r e a n d a b o v e all b e c a u s e m o d e r n w a r is T h e w a r h a s created a h u g e s u p p l y ¦ p r o b l e m s . It offers t h e f o l l o w i n g being a s k e d by t h e i r g o v e r n m e n t t o a w a r of m a c h i n e s a s well a s m e n . ¦ of spendable i n c o m e in t h e h a n d s of j a d v i c e for the g u i d a n c e of i n d i v i d u a l s s u p p o r t t h e T h i r d W A R L o a n D r i v e A s i n g l e broadside from nine 16i n d i v i d u a l s a n d a t the sa*ne t i m e h a s ¡ j these c o m m u n i t i e s . w h i c h s t a r t e d last T h u r s d a y b y b u y i n c h g u n s o f a giant* b a t t l e s h i p c o s t s ' reduced t h e s u p p l y o f g o o d s a n d | Mak r m i n d w h e t h e r or S one e x t r a $100 W a r B o n d dur$13,500. E a c h time an American services a v a i l a b l e for c i v i l i a n s to b u y . o t y o u r present j o b I S d i r e c t l y u s e · & the three w e e k s OF t h e c a m p a i g n . t o r p e d o p l a n e l a u n c h e s i t s load, $11,I n 1943. e s t i m a t e d income p a y m e n t s f i to t h e prosecution o f the w a r o r T n e g o a l of t h e T h i r d W a r L o a n 000 in d e a t h g o e s s t r e a k i n g a t t h e t o i n d i v i d u a l s in t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s the m a i n t e n a n c e of essential s e r v · º r i v e is $15,000,000.000. enemy target. Our four-motored will t o t a l a p p r o x i m a t e l y $140 billion.¦ ¡ . i f ¡ doubt, t h e U . S . E m p l o y · · H e r e is w h a t one e x t r a $100 b o m b e r s burn v a s t quantities of h i g h U n d e r present t a x l a w s $15 bil· e n t S e r v i c e c a n tell y o u w h e t h e r W a r B o n d will D O for t h e w a r E F · o c t a n e g a s o l i n e . I n a s i n g l e raid of lion o f t h i s will g o f o r t a x e s , l e a v - ¦ y j o b is w a r - u s e f u l . t»o » a r t : 1,000 F l y i n g F o r t r e s s e s over the ing $125 billion to be spent for o t h e r ¦ 2. I f y o u are not in a war-usefn¶ I · I t will keep A N a v y p l a n e i n R h i n e l a n d . $375,000 w o r t h of fuel is purposes. S i n c e the v a l u e of a v a i l · ¦ j h , t h e U S E S will refer y o u t o one.· t h e a i r for m o r e t h a n t w o hours: p e r u s e d a n d a b o u t $1.000.000 w o r t h of a b l e civilian g o o d s a n d services I S і ¡ ¦ h a p s j u s t e n o u g h t i m e TO c o v e r t h e b o m b s . T w o - t o n block busters, s o m e a b o u t $80 billion, t h e r e will r e m a i n | <advance o f a l a n d i n g p a r t y a g a i n s t t i m e s r a i n i n g down at t h e r a t e o f in t h e p o c k e t s o f t h e A m e r i c a n peo-¦ Sºº<is a n d services, t h e s e u n c h a n · A x i s interference, five a m i n u t e , cost $875 apiece. A l s o . pie, o v e r a n d a b o v e the g o o d s a n d ¡ nelled billions will h a v e a d a n g e r o u s | 2. M u l t i p l i e d 11 times, a $100 W a r $375.000,000 w o r t h of planes a r e inservices t h e y c a n buy, about $45 і effect—helping t o c r e a t e a n u p w a r d B o n d will p a y a two-ton block busvolved. billion.' | s p i r a l o f prices a n d w a g e s , increas»jrter t h a t a bombardier from down the T r a n s l a t i n g s o m e of t h e c o s t s o f ; S o m e o f t h i s will find i t s w a y i n t o | J a f T t h e cost o f t h e w a r , a n d making street m a y send c r a s h i n g intotss<¾ft·· w a r i n t o t h e bonds t h a t w o u l d be res a v m ¿ a c c o u n t s a n d life i n s u r a n c e 1 t h e t a s k o f post-war a d j u s t m e n t i n - . n m n torpedo factor>'. - й¾ ^ *mired· t o p a y for t h e m , t h i s is t h e o r will be used t o p a y off old d e b t s . ¦ f i n i t e l y ·more difficult r\u_t_\\\. I t will equip 26 m e n d f A i l w a y it s t a c k s up—і A p p r o x i m a t e l y $7 billion h a s a l - [ B u t i f these dangerouB dollars a r e m i r a l H a l s e y ' s d e s t r o y e r crew*vwtth 5,000 people w o u l d h a v e t o b u y r e a d y been p u t i n t o W a r B o n d s t h i s used t o fight t h e w a r and w i n ' t h e ¡ l i f e p r e s e r v e r s — a c h e a p ins*h¯a¾ce ¾LOO W a r B o n d s (at t h e subscrip- y e a r . B u t a v e r y l a r g e p e r c e n t a g e r e · ' w a r t h r o u g h t h e p u r c h a s e o f W a r ^ n - · t h e lives o f A m e r i c a n · hew*#s. tion price o f $ 7 5 ) t o p a y f o r the m a i n s u n c h a n g e d . B o n d s , t h e y help; t o i n s u r e a sound/.. a n y o n e o f w h o m m a y be yoUr>lWb¿ g a s o l i n e u s e d o n t h e 1,000 F l y i n g ¦ I f u s e d £o c o m p e t e f o r s c a r c e s t a b l e A m e r i c a f o r t h e p e a c e t o c o m e , j ther, friend, o r r e l a t i v e .
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T H E T R E A S U R E - H O U S E O F U K R A I N I A N S st h o see om
By HONORE EWACH

¥ J K R A I N I A N S a r e b o t h p o o r a n d t h e m rich in spirit t h o u g h t h e y a r e rich a t t h e s a m e t i m e . I n m a t e r i a l p o o r in m a t e r i a l possessions. possessions t h e y are_ g e n e r a l l y poor, H o w ancient t h i s h e r i t a g e is c a n e x c e p t i n g t h o s e o f t h e m w h o e m i g ­ be j u d g e d b y t h e f a c t t h a t t h e U k rated t o A m e r i c a a n d C a n a d a , where rainians still sing songs that deal on t h e w h o l e t h e y a r e m o d e r a t e l y w i t h p r e - C h r i s t i a n deities, o r t h e w e l l off. B a c k in t h e old c o u n t r y d e a t h s o f t h e i r k i n g s a n d e m p e r o r s o f w h a t little t h e y h a d t h e y no l o n g e r l o n g a g o , o r t h a t praise t h e heroic h a v e n o w o n a c c o u n t o f t h e w a r . . deeds o f *their c h i v a l r o u s D n i e p e r K o T h o u g h n a t i v e s o f a l a n d rich i n , z a k s . U k r a i n i a n girls of modr e s o u r c e s t h e y h a v e n e v e r been a b l e ; e r n t i m e s still p l a y e d before t h e w a r t o e n j o y it, f o r t h i s l a n d a n d i t s v a r i o u s g a m e s o f p r e - C h r i s t i a n o r i g i n r e s o u r c e s h a v e a l w a y s been e x p l o i t e d a t blaster a n d o n t h e E v e o f S t . by P o l i s h a n d R u s s i a n a n d n o w G e r ­ J o h n t h e B a p t i s t . U k r a i n i a n m o t h m a n o c c u p a n t s o f U k r a i n e . T h o u g h e r s still c r o o n o v e r t h e c r a d l e s o f t h e s e o c c u p a n t s h a v e plundered t h e t h e i r b a b i e s s o n g s t h a t h a d t h e i r U k r a i n i a n s left a n d right, t h e y h a v e , o r i g i n in t h e heroic a n d t r a g i c batnevertheless, f a i l e d t o d e p r i v e t h e m t l e s o f the' K o z a k s a g a i n s t t h e T a r of one t r e a s u r e t r o v e . tars hordes. Ukrainian proverbs T h i s t r e a s u r e t r o v e o r h o u s e t h e still reflect t h e w i s d o m o f t h e K o z a k U k r a i n i a n s p o s s e s s i s t h e i r c u l t u r a l f o r e f a t h e r s o f t h e U k r a i n i a n people. h e r i t a g e , p a r t i c u l a r l y t h e i r colorful T h e i r c r o s s - s t i t c h i n g Still b e a r s t h e folk s o n g s , o r a l stories, l e g e n d s , pro­ s y m b o l s o f t h e i r p r e - C h r i s t i a n a n verbs, beliefs, d a n c e s , ' costumes', de­ c e s t o r s w h o s a w in t h e b r i g h t l i g h t licate c r o s s - s t i t c h i n g , a n d U k r a i n · of t h e s u n t h e reflected g l o r y o f ized c h u r c h service. I t i s v e r y d e a r t h e i r G o d . I n s h o r t , t h e i r h i s t o r y o f t o t h e U k r a i n i a n s , in f a c t priceless. t w o o r m o r e t h o u s a n d y e a r s i s still N e i t h e r f o r c e n o r b l a n d i s h m e n t s w i l l , v i b r a n t a n d a l i v e in t h e i r t r a d i t i o n a l s o n g s , p r o v e r b s , legends, h a b i t s a n d з>аке t h e U k r a i n i a n s g i v e it u p . I t s h o u l d not b e s u p p o s e d t h a t t h e c u s t o m s . T h e i r c u l t u r e , o r civilization, i f y o u will, i s still a l i v i n g u n i t y . U k r a i n i a n c u l t u r a l h e r i t a g e i s but a H e n c e U k r a i n i a n s a r e still v e r y rich M R S . L O U I S E T O U L M I N - R O T H E collection o r h e a p o f t h i n g s o f the s p i r i t u a l l y . T h e f o r m e r L O U I S E O . L E S A W Y E R p a s t . O n t h e c o n t r a r y it is a living, I t took long ages for the U k r a i n b r e a t h i n g o r g a n i s m , one t h a t m a k e s ian c u l t u r e t o g r o w . T o d a y it i s After graduating from Hudson a n d s o u n d . I t s development H i g h S c h o o l in 1938, M r s . T o u l i n · '^'·'* ~l·'¿>'-'V¿·'"'."· · - ' ' - ' j strong R o t h e e n t e r e d N e w Y o r k U n i v e r s i t y a first l i e u t e n a n t i n t h e U . S . A r m y , w a s not l i k e t h e m u s h r o o m i n g o f where she pursued the study of psy­ stationed in Louisiana. A n o t h e r the modern cultural values. N o w a c h o l o g y a n d social w e l f a r e , a n d in b r o t h e r . W a l t e r , a l s o in t h e a r m y , d a y s , d u e t o t h e c o n t i n u a l p r o g r e s s w h i c h c o u r s e s h e received a d e g r e e is s e r v i n g s o m e w h e r e s in the M i d d l e in t e c h n i c a l i n v e n t i o n s all t h e p h a s e s f r o m t h e U n i v e r s i t y . O n T h a n k s ­ E a s t . T h e t h i r d b r o t h e r . M i c h a e l , o f life a r e so e p h e m e r a l , s o s h o r t lived t h a t n o c u l t u r a l v a l u e s h a v e g i v i n g D a y o f 1942, s h e w a s m a r r i e d p r a c t i c e s l a w in H u d s o n . to E r i c Toulmin-Rothe at the Mt. The e n t i r e L y s o h i r ( L e s a w y e r ) t i m e t o t a k e root i n o u r m i n d s a n d F o r a few d a y s we would C a r m e l C h u r c h in t h i s c i t y . family are members o f U . N . A . B r . hearts. H e r b r o t h e r , J o s e p h L e s a w y e r , i s 477, o f w h i c h t h e f a t h e r i s s e c r e t a r y . h e a r o n e or t w o n e w s o n g s . B e f o r e
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1 І Г 8 . L o u i s e Toulmin-Rothe, t h e f o r m e r L o u i s e O . Lesawyer, d a u g h t e r o f liko a n d A n n a L y s o h i r , of H u d s o n , N . Y . was graduated from the Wash­ ington Square College of N e w Y o r k U n i v e r s i t y J u n e 9. A f t e r g r a d u a t i o n M r s . T o u l m i n - R o t h e spent a w e e k w i t h h e r p a r e n t s in H u d s o n a n d t h e n l e f t f o r S e w i c k l e y , P a . w h e r e s h e will reside with her husband, E r i c Toul­ min-Rothe, who is associated with t h e Bendix X - R a y C o m p a n y .

s o n g s t a k e root in u s we he&r more new songs. It is t h » s a m e w i t h stories, p o e m s , proverbs, j o k e s , a n d inventions. H e n c e th<» mind of the boy or girl of our a g o usually consists of many thousands of short-lived experiences. E v e r y t h i n g in t h a t m i n d h a s a s h a l l o w root. T h e r e f o r e i s it a n y w o n d e r that we have today so m a n y h u n dreds of thousands of college-educ a t e d m e n a n d w o m e n a n d y e t so> v e r y few t r u l y t a l e n t e d l e a d e r s a n d still less of g r e a t m o r a l t e a c h e r s ?

F o r one w h o i s h e a d o v e r h e e l s in t h e v o r t e x o f t h e m o d e r n t u r m o i l it a l m o s t impossible t o realize t h a t t h e r e is a n y t h i n g t h e m a t t e r w i t h him. H e simply has no time t o t h i n k d e e p l y a n d reflect. D u r i n g t h e d a y h e t o i l s a t t h e office, o r i n t h e f a c t o r y in o r d e r t o m a k e a l i v i n ¿ , while his evenings are spent at t h e t h e a t r e w i t h h i s g i r l friend, a t c a f e , or in p l a y i n g c a r d s . H e l i s t e n s t o . the radio even when he shaves a n d e a t s h i s b r e a k f a s t in t h e m o r n i n g . In short, he h a s no time to t h i n k and meditate, to come to some definite conclusions. A n d if he h e a r s any man talking about the worth of d a i l y m e d i t a t i o n h e c a l l s h i m j u s t a n old foggie. I n short, m o d e r n young men and women have no t i m e to form strong characters. They j u s t flit f r o m one t h i n g t o a n o t h e r . S t i l l even a flitting m o d e r n y o u n g m a n m a y by s o m e c h a n c e realize t h a t deep d o w n in h i s h e a r t t h e r e i s a deep-seated l o n g i n g for t h i n g s l i k o the hoary-with-age Ukrainian culture a n d tradition t h a t h o l d s v e r y dear, a b o v e a l l . t h e t h i n g s o f t h e spirit, of art. o f wisdom, a n d o f t h e h e a r t . S u c h a n interest w o u l d deepen a n d broaden his outlook on life a n d h e would s t a r t l i v i n g a fuller a n d h a p pier life. -FOR V I C T O R Y : B U Y BONDS*—

"CHORNA RADA"
( B L A C K C O U N C I L · )

A Historical Ro\mance of Turbulent Kozak Times After Death 4>f Hetman Bohdan Khmelnitsky
By P A N T E L E Y M O N K U L I S H (І819-97)
(Continued) CHAPTER XV¤I < T r a n s l a t e d by S . S h u m e y k o ) (40) not die. I t s h a l l r e m a i n f o r e v e r enshrined in the hearts and minds of their countymen, their c h r o n i c l e r s , a n d in a l l g o o d a n d wise people. T h i s w o u l d be a g o o d p l a c e f o r m e t o c o n clude this story of the black council, of this Z a p o r o z h i a n deception. B e f o r e I d o t h a t , howe v e r , let u s t a k e a look a t t h o s e w h o e m e r g e d alive from all this trouble. A f t e r he h a d b u r i e d h i s f a t h e r w i t h a p propriate ceremonies and mourned for him for a w h i l e , P e t r o d i d not t a r r y l o n g in P a v o l o c h . H e decided t o j o i n t h e r a n k s o f t h e Z a p o r o z h i a n s a n d h a d a l r e a d y disposed o f hie belongings in preparation to g o i n g down to their Sitch, when something turned his thoughts to Kiev, particularly to the Khmarische homestead o f Cherevan. A n d thus he eventually found himself approaching on horseback that homestead. D r a w i n g close he noticed that its g a t e s were not shut and that Vasile Nevolnyk was not around guarding them a s he always had done. "Probably nobody from the family managed to return h o m e / ' Petro thought, his heart s i n k i n g . H e d r e w c l o s e r t o t h e h o u s e . T h e flowe r s s u r r o u n d i n g it h a d a l l dried o u t ; n o w o n l y weeds g r e w profusely. Suddenly he heard a soft voice singing. " G o o d L o r d , w h o is t h a t ? " Petro thought. D i s m o u n t i n g h e h u r r i e d t o t h e house, flung o p e n t h e door, a n d t h e r e t h e y w e r e : h i s bel o v e d ]Lesya a n d h e r m o t h e r M r s . C h e r e v a n , busying themselves by t h e oven. "Oh, my G o d ! " the latter exclaimed, claspi n g · h e r <hands i n a m a z e m e n t . T h o u g h he h a d e n t e r e d t h e h o u s e s o p r e c i p i t a t e l y , *Petro n o w s u d d e n l y b e c a m e r o o t e d to t h e d o o r w a y . L·esya r e m a i n e d m o t i o n l e s s b y t h e table,.- s t a r i n g a t h i m . Finally her mother b r o k e t h * spell b y s t e p p i n g f o r w a r d a n d e m b r a c i n g P e t r o a s if h e w e r e h e r long-lost s o n . · E m b o l d e n e d b y t h i s w e l c o m e , s o different f r o m

the way M r s . Cherevan had treated him When she f a v o r e d S o m k o a s her d a u g h t e r ' s suitor, P e t r o stepped f o r w a r d a n d e m b r a c i n g L e s y a kissed her a s h e would his sister. L e s y a ' s e y e s welled w i t h t e a r s o f g l a d n e s s a s s h e k i s s e d h i m in r e t u r n . H o l d i n g h a n d s t i g h t l y t h e y t h e n proceeded t o a l t e r n a t e l y l a u g h a n d c r y in t h e i r j o y . a n d questioned one a n o t h e r o v e r w h a t h a d happened since t h e y h a d s e e n e a c h o t h e r last. It w a s quite a while before t h e e x c i t e m e n t subsided a little. A s h a d o w fell a c r o s s the d o o r w a y . L o o k i n g up t h e y s a w t h e p o r t l y figure >of old C h e r e v a n e n t e r i n g . S e e i n g P e t r o , t h i s old friend o f h i s deceased f a t h e r t h r e w h i m s e l f upon P e t r o w i t h o u t s t r e t c h e d a r m s , e x c l a i m i n g hoarsely, " B w o ther!'' H u g g i n g and kissing Petro he tried f r o m t i m e t o t i m e t o s a y s o m e t h i n g , but a l l t h a t e m e r g e d w a s a ha]f-incoherent " B w o t h e r ! " W h e n s o m e d e g r e e o f n o r m a l c y h a d returned, Mrs. Cherevan seated Petro by the table, with herself on one side o f h i m a n d L e s y a on t h o other, a n d b o t h o f t h e m h o l d i n g on t i g h t l y t o his h a n d s , ґ' " N o w , m y d e a r Petrus¯, tell u s e v e r y t h i n g , i n order, h o w y o u m a n a g e d t o e s c a p e d e a t h . W e h a d been told definitely t h a t y o u r soul h a d g o n e t o G o d , " s h e said. C h e r e v a n m e a n w h i l e shifted t h i s w a y a n d t h a t w a y , t r y i n g t o find a spot where he c o u l d f a c e P e t r o directly a n d h e a r h i m well. F i n a l l y h e sat d o w n o n the g r o u n d before t h e y o u n g Kozak, his legs beneath him, like a T u r k . " N o w , " h e said, " I ' m a l l set t o h e a r a b o u t a U t h a t h a d happened to you and your father." » Petro began telling his story, especially about what had transpired at Pavoloch. Several time his tale stirred all of them to tears. B u t when he came to the part where his f a t h e r h a d bidden h i m farewell j u s t b e f o r e his e x e c u t i o n , old C h e r e v a n b r o k e d o w n c o m pletely, w i t h one h a n d w i p i n g t h e t e a r s t h a t w e r e c a s c a d i n g d o w n h i s r u d d y f a c e w h i l e ·vita t h e o t h e r m o t i o n i n g t o P e t r o not t o c o n t i n u e t h e story u n t i l h i s g r i e f h a d subsided a bit. A s f o r L e s y a a n d h e r m o t h e r , it i s \\і\\ \ t o find w o r d s t o describe t h e i r reactions t o t h e story P e t r o w a s u n f o l d i n g before t h e m . S i¾ce t b s a y t h a t a l l o f t h e m were m e r g e d i n t o o n e b e i n g , o f o n e h e a r t a n d soul·, g r i e f - s t r i c k e n у¾t withal g l a d that a t least they had m a n a g e і t > s u r v i v e it a l l . ( T o be concluded)

j ^ O W w e s h o u l d follow in t h e f o o t s t e p s o f t h e priest¯ w a r r i o r S h r a a m a n d h i s s o n P e t r o a n d recount all t h a t ' t h e y e n c o u n t e r e d w h e n t h e y h a d parted w i t h K y r y l o T u r ; however, if I were t o d r a w a d e t a i l e d w o r d pict u r e o f h o w t h a t s c o u n d r e l T e t e r a besieged P a v o l o c h , h o w h e intended t o d e s t r o y t h e t o w n a n d i t s p o p u l a t i o n f o r r e b e l l i n g a g a i n s t the new H e t m a n ' s a u t h o r i t y , a n d h o w old S h r a a m h i m self m a n a g e d at the cost o f his head t o save his regimental center from annihilation, then t h i s s t o r y w o u l d h a v e t o be c o n t i n u e d f o r quite some length y e t I t is better, therefore, t o t e l l it a t s o m e o t h e r t i m e . H e r e I s h a l l m e r e l y n o t e t h a t in o r d e r t o a v e r t d i s a s t e r from overtaking Pavoloch, S h r a a m voluntarily g a v e himself up to Tetera and took all blame u p o n h i s s t u r d y s h o u l d e r s . A s c o u l d be e x pected, T e t e r a h a d n o q u a l m s a b o u t finding s u c h a r i g h t e o u s m a n g u i l t y o f i n c i t i n g t h e people t o rebellion, a n d o f h a v i n g h i s h e a d c h o p p e d off i n front o f h i s a s s e m b l e d t r o o p s . H a v i n g t h u s removed his enemy from this earth, T e tera w a s content to leave P a v o l o c h alone and return home. */v T h e s a m e y e a r , in t h e a u t u m n ; o n S t . S i mon's D a y , S o m k o and V a s i u t a were also e x e c u t e d by d e c a p i t a t i o n in t h e t o w n o f H a n c h a r i v k a . A n d t h u s B r u k h o v e t s k y finally att a i n e d his evil e n d s ; a l t h o u g h in t h e e n d h e received h i s j u s t d e s e r t s f r o m H e t m a n D o r o · shenko, by being beaten and whipped t o death like a dog. S u c h then w a s the fate of that upright K o z a k a n d priest, I v a n S h r a a m P a v o l o t s k y , a n d t h e ' f a m o u s a n d c h i v a l r o u s K o z a k leader, S o m k o Pereyaslavsky. U n a b l e t o rescue U k r a i n e f r o m h e r s o r e p l i g h t b o t h of t h e m finally> h a d t o l a y d o w n t h e i r l i v e s f o r -her. Y e t t h o u g h t h e y l a i d ·down t h e i r lives, t h o u g h t h e y s u f - > fered'a -cruel· death, ·their f a m e a n d valor did
:

'<·й

U K R A I N I A N W E E K L Y ¡ , S A T U R D A Y , S E P T E M B E R 11. 1943

N o . 35

ALEXANDER YAREMKO ** A m o n g n a t i o n a l m u s i c a l g r o u p s ¡ e l u d i n g W a r C a l l o f t h e C o s s a c k s . | i n W i n n i p e g , t h e r e i s n o n e s o a c t i v e C o n t r a l t o s w e r e e s p e c i a l l y fine, t e c h T h i s t h i r d installment of semi-V. in n u r t u r i n g t r a d i t i o n a l folk s o n g n i c a l l y , a n d often a c h i e v e d a n u n a n d n a t i v e c u l t u r e a m o n g t h e y o u n g ­ u s u a l l y , r i c h t o n e f o r so- y o u n g a¦ m o n t h l y r o u n d - u p o f r a n d o m n o t e s « T H I S I S T H E '-ARMY' on topies o f i n t e r e s t to o u r r e a d e r s er g e n e r a t i o n , a s t h e U k r a i n i a n s , " g r o u p . A f t e r eight weeks in this m a n ' s t h e W i n n i p e g *Tribune m u s i c critic L o c h L o m o n d , a r r a n g e d f o r m i x e d finds u s j u s t p a s t t h e L a b o r D a y A r m y , t h e r e is o n l y one t h i n g that ¦wrote, o p e n i n g h i s review of the c h o i r b y D r . K o s h e t z , received i t s W e e k - E n d , w h i c h , in p r e - w a r y e a r s , b o t h e r s m e . W h e n a l l o f u s t a x ­ U k r a i n i a n c o n c e r t g i v e n m W i n p r e m i e r e p e r f o r m a n c e . T h e refrain p r o v e d t o be t h e m o s t e x c i t i n g , t h e p a y e r s a r e in t h e A r m y , w h o ' s g o ­ nrpeg, S u n d a y , A u g u s t 29. " S a t u r - j w a s s u n g b y full c h o i r w i t h v e r s e s m o s t i m p o r t a n t , a n d t h e m o s t s t i m ­ i n g to s u p p o r t u s ? H o w e v e r , since ¡ d a y n i g h t in t h e P l a y h o u s e t h e a t r e , " | b y M r s . M a r y K o s h o w s k i , s o p r a n o , u l a t i n g three-day period in U k r a i n ­ I ' m here, I ' m not k i c k i n g . Г т e v e n ; h e continued, ' 4 h i s f a c t w a s a g a i n T h e s o l o i s t ' s voice h a s a n a p p e a l i n g i a n - A m e r i c a n y o u t h life. F o r i t w a s s l e e p i n g m u c h b e t t e r these n i g h t s . ¦ b r o u g h t t o l i g h t i n p r e s e n t a t i o n o f q u a l i t y a n d s h e c r e a t e d m o s t e x - on L a b o r D a y week>ends f r o m 1934 T h e y m o v e d m e i n t o a t e n t w h e r e ¡ t h e a n n u a l c o n c e r t g i v e n o n t h e o c - pressive u s e o f w o r d s , w i t h t h e s o f t · u n t i l 1941 t h a t t h e m o r e a d v a n c e d e v e r y b o d y sleeps in w a l t z t i m e ! A t '\ casion o f t h e c o n c l u s i o n of t h e f o u r t h j l y h u m m e d a e c o m p a n i m e n t p r o v i d i n g element o f o u r y o u t h f r o m t h r o u g h a n y rate, t h e soldiers a r e a l l kept s u m m e r S c h o o l c o u r s e -held -under¡ a beautiful b a c k g r o u n d . I n s i s t e n t a p - out A m e r i c a ( a n d s o m e t i m e s C a n ­ sathmed a n d c o m f o r t a b l e . W h e n t h e y a u s p i c e s o f t h e edueatfonal section j p l a u s e b r o u g h t repetition o f t h e s o n g . a d a ) t r a v e l e d a n d g a t h e r e d i n s o m e c o t o bed a t n i g h t , t h e y g e t a choice o f t h e U k r a m i a n N a t i o n a l F e d e r a t i o n I n t h e o p e n i n g m i x e d c h o r a l g r o u p , і " * У to h o M -«¦ a n n u a l jamtx>ree a n a of a n o t h e r b l a n k e t or a c o p y o f E s - o f C a n a d a , h e a d e d b y *>r. P a u l M a · ¡ O v e r the M o u n t a i n s , t h e c o n t r a l t o s | c o n v e n t i o n ІТЙЕТ THE Ф Ш В * М * * s h o w e d a d e p t u s e o f m e z z o voce t o n e j to*meiident and democratic U k quire ! I t ' s e a r l y t o b e d f o r u s c e n k o . " a n d e a r l y t o rise. T h a t will m a k e не· T h e T r i b u n e review o f t h e c o n · І a t close, fti B o n d a r i v n a , b a l l a d o f r a m i a n Y o u t h ' s L e a g u e o f N o r t h healthy but not generals! n continued a s f o l l o w s : — ¦ t h e 1 8 t h C e n t u r y , fine d r a m a t i c ef- A m e r i c a . W h a t t r a n s p i r e d , w h o w a s there, w h a t w a s s a i d a n d d o n e i s W e ' r e a w a k e n e d in t h e d a w n i n g . D r . A l e x a n d e r K o s h e t z , m o s t c e l e - | f e c t s a n d s k i l l in crescendoes were t o o m u c h t o review o r d o j u s t i c e i n by G a b r i e l : t h a t ' s the bugler. I m - : b r a t e d of living U k r a i n i a n choral j revealed. J o h n Snihura, s t u d e n t . w h o ^ ^ m e d i a t e l y I arise (it s a y s h e r e ) a n d ¡ c o n d u c t o r s , directed a m i x e d c h o i r o f c o n d u c t e d , received w a r m a p p l a u s e . . our vouth looked forward g e t u n d e r a c o l d s h o w e r . O n e o f ] 135 voices, c o m p r i s e d Of 40 s t u d e n t s P e r h a p s t h e m o s t p o p u l a r n u m b e r | ¾J" wh meet t h e s e m o r n i n g s t h e s e r g e a n t i s g o i n g ¡ a n d 90 y o u n g a m a t e u r m u s i c l o v e r s , w a s Y a h i l k a , a s o n g s u n g b y y o u n g ¦ ц га1 athletic t o m a k e m e t u r n it o n ! B e t w e e n R e - « H e a l s o c o n d u c t e d a n e w w o m e n ' s g i r l s in t h e s p r i n g . T o n a l c o n t r a s t s | ¿ * ¡ \ ¡ , o r o e r a m s a n d to t a k e a n veiUe a n d M e s s C a l l w e d o n ' t h a v e j e h o i r . R o m a h P r y d a t k e v y t c h , n o t e d w e r e * j ^ « ¡ « ^ * ¤ ^ r f t o o m u c h t i m e f o r s h a v i n g . O n e violinist - c o m p o s e r , o f N e w T o r k , t o n a l c o l o r i n g , a t c l o s e . Y v o n n e S c j i e · ! ¿ ^ Ш Е at the convention forum я m o r n i n g I s h a v e o n one side o f m y w h o h a s been t e a c h i n g to meet fellow U k r a i n · f a c e a n d t h e f o l l o w i n g m o r n i n g I i n g at the s u m m e r s c h o o l , w a s g u e s t | t h e s m g i n g o f H e R o d e A w a y , w i n · * innumerable s h a v e o n t h e o t h e r . W e h a v e one a r t i s t , w i t h J o h n M e l n y k , l o c a l p1anist- ¡ n m g a p p l a u s e a n d a h a n d - S h a k e f r o m gJJ¦ ^ fellow d o w n h e r e w h o ' s from T e x a s , composer, a t t h e p i a n o . D r . T . K · i > r . K o s h e t z . . all in o n e ph¾oe t a l k t h i n g s o v e r ! H e h a s n o t r o u b l e s h a v ! " t e v e r y P a v l y c h e n k o . professor at T h e Ц п і - ¦ Intellectual g r a s p and sound musir, ^ ^ ^ ' ^ m o r n i n g a t a l l . E v e r y m o r n i n g h e v*rsfry o f S a s k a t c h e w a n , i n t r o d u c e d c l a n s h i p ^ w e r e r e v e a l e d in t h e ^ve readers a n idea j u s t t a k e s out his pivot t o o t h a n d t h e a r t i s t s a n d p r o g r a m . of M r . P r y d a t k e v y t c h . eminent ¾ l ¿ º £ ffig e r e these annual scrapes! He's the s a m e guy who T h e soprano·section of A n * · c h o | r ¡ [ ¦ ¦ ¦ ^ ports his hair with a live porcupine! - f i n e d w i t h y o u n g g i r l s o f Ч е е п і Second* S y m p h o n y w h i l e m W i n n i p e g . | __ _ ^ . _ ^ ^ · g ____ „ .. .. ^ "let fonowing W,h e n a m a n ш_ inducted into t h e a g e s , w h o s e v o i c e s could not be e x · H i e t o n e » n o t b i g , but i s с ш р а Ь І е ¦ . º ¤ > Ч ^ . ^ / is ,,,, _ - -A r m y , he's usually given s o m e j * r t ¾ ^ c o n v e ? ^ ^ a ^ b ¾ ¦ ¦ l
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a n d s h a d ¿ s o f e x p r e s s i o n in- I ¾ S ¿ ¡ ¾ S » ¾ S ¾ S ¦ ^ ю л ¾ Й Й Ь і * * ' · * ^ ' ^Dein t h e m u s i c . T h e r e w a s W l · l ¾ ¾ f ¾ S ¾ l ^ h S troit, 1 9 3 5 ; P h i l a d e l p h i a , 1936.; G i e v e b r i g h t n e s s , c l a r i t y a n d a gl·lttering | r h y t h m i c s e n s e M r t * r y o ¾ t l ^ . brfman^^ 1939; N e w Y o r k , І 9 4 0 ; a n d > w a s not the t o n a l · b a l a n c e [ Д ¡ resiliency m D e t r o i t in 1941. P a r t i c i p a t i o n m t h e the varied tonal palette heard и » - o w d p½ee, i r y s t w u a ^ fe¿ ¦ upon f o r m e r o c c a s i o n s . T h e b a s s s e c - · · . * · , ^ Г І ^ ~ Г І t h e p r e s e n t i n a c t i v i t y o f th*e s a n g with l u s t y t o n e a n d a t , v a r i e d c o n t r a s t s m t o n e a n a e x p r e s - ¦ memш t i m e s a c h i e v e d a D o n C o s s a c k »depth, ¦»ººf J^¾ES_l ^[·огу^г¾теі^ц|ві«ів¿^ influenced resonance, e s p e c i a U y in t h e c W ¾ Ш . · Ward w i t h <Treat ¾irterest to -the evelrt. * ^ ^ of our ¦Mr. Melnyk accompanied with t h e f У º . " * * º * * Ш * Promoting , i¡ « b o u t t h e food r a t i o n i n g . R e m e m b e r , j best o f t a s t e , p l a y i n g w i t h cleaj*n c o n s c "o u s n e s s o f t h e i r a n c e s t r a l b a c k p r e t t y m u c h like t h e m o n k e y t e c h n i q u e a n d t h e - o t h e r a t t r i b u t e s o f s ' * · ¦ k i s s i n g t h e porcupine. I t ' s n o t a l l a h i g h l y t a l e n t e d pianist " ,. , ri - ··. ' S.R.M. Pleasure! K. P. D U T Y A l t h o u g h U k r a i n e h a s been a bat­ tleground of t h e Nazi and R e d Ф ^ a r m i e s f o r 27 m o n t h s ( P o l a n d f e l l i n '27 d a y s ) , a n d t h e n a m e s o f U k r a i n ­ ' m> ian t o w n s a n d cities a r e o n c e a g a i n headlining the w a r news, seldom do we· h e a r o v e r t h e radio o r r e a d i n ; t h e press o f t h e c o n t r i b u t i o n a n d · p l i g h t o f t h e 45 million U k rain­ ians in h e l p i n g t o e n d a w a r t h a t should end all wars. Despite t h e f a c t t h a t U k r a i n e a n d U k r a i n i a n s a r e suf­ fering the most a s these decisive bat¯ . ¦ t i e s a r e f o u g h t , w a r n e w s Is dressed ' t o r e p o r t t h a t ftt i s t h e " R u s s i a n s , * t h e " R u s s i a n A r m y , " a n d " R u s s i a ' i*¿hat a r e responsible in h o l d i n g off t h e i n · vading Nazis and now rolling them | b a c k t o w a r d G e r m a n y in s u c c e s s f u l s w e e p s a c r o s s U k r a i n e . A s i f b y Cons p i r a c y , a l l credit, a l l praise, a n d a l l r t a l k i s a b o u t " R u s s i a * a n d t h e **Russ i a n s , " including repeated u t t e r a n c e s of R o o s e v e l t a n d C h u r c h i l l w h o s h o u l d k n o w better. F o r t h e t r u t h o f ' t h e matter is that there is no " R u s s i a " t o d a y , l t i s t h e U S S R , or S o v i e t U n i o n , with former R u s s i a but one of the constituent communist nations b o u n d t o g e t h e r b y t h e iron l a w o f Moscow's Stalin. Ukraine happens t o be o n e o f t h e u n f o r t u n a t e m e m b e r s I h a d m y first ride in a j e e p y e s b f t h i s " u n i o n . " I t is likewise w r o n g terday. ' Y o u know w h a t a jeep is. a«¾Hnisleading t o call t h e U S S R ' S a r ' don't y o u ? I t ' s a l a w n m o w e r t h a t ' s BE THE FIRST TO OWN A COPY OF THIS ORiGLNAU-Y CREATED m y as the " R u s s i a n " army, for like ' b e e n *¯drhfted. A P F C a n d I d r o v e | WORK OF ART!—ONLY LIMITED QUANTITY REPRODUCED. the Soviet people i t is composed o f down t o t h e f r e i g h t s t a t i o n t o p i c k | [ v a r i o u s n a t i o n a l i t i e s t o o . T h e ^world up '*¾MO g a l l o n s o f m i l k . Coming ' ¡ D E A L F O R B O O K E N D S m u s t n e v e r f o r g e t but l o n g remember back the road was plenty bumpy and Made BT plaster cottpo«ition with у oar choice >el ·л< «xqn ¿site· bronze t h a t U k r a i n i a n s a r e n o w potent^*£arts now the, chef don't know what he's finish or an nntique ivory tint.—-Seven tnche* h¡ah. · o f t h e *Red· A r m y a n d t h e S o v i e t U n i o n , g o i n g t o d o w i t h a*ll t h a t *butter! w h i c h i s finally o n i t s w a y t o h e l p deCreated by the talen.ed Ukrainian arliet, МАІ¾У STADNYK E u t i t s r e a l l y not s o b a d down* f e a t N a z i G¡ermany, t h a n k s tf> i n c r e a s here·. T h e s c e n e r y is w o n d e r f u l a n d PRICED at .$4.50 each (Postage paid on *SSh·*Orders) [ i n g ' A n g l o - A m e r i c a n a id. W a r n e w s *-o*r¾ l o c a t e d n e a r a l a r g e f a k e , w h i l e s p e a k e r s a n d ·writers s h o u l d re¾·¾in f-> t.if W e s t w c h a v e a m o u n t a i n o r f r o m p o p u l a r i z i n g t h e R u s s i a n ~nhme 1WC ¾ r n a t j ¢ r ^ o f fee·t, t h e m o u n a t t h e e x p e n s e o f · Ц к т а І п і й п ej¢fepnditain t W h f g n e s t t h i n g a r o u n d here t u r e s . · iT¿*s¾iians a r e not R u s s j k n s . fir>* о " г s'>ld*cr with <: P . x ' h o u r _ ^And n e v e r call a U k r a i n i a n ¼ ¢ u s · Pfaooe: 8172 J j>asF* |·sian, 4 f - y o u w a n t t o b e hm^'rriend. T h a t ' s a h o o t a l l t h e stuff from, this µart of the country.. Don't kick - F O B VICTORY: BUY JBQNDSn ¢ r e n t i t i e 3 t n e r e n o r

« job t h a t h e p u r s u e d in civilian life. A n d i t ' s a m a z i n g h o w o u r t o p sergeant tricks the inductees into d o i n g work t h e y w o u l o V t o r d i n a r i l y v o l u n t e e r for. Y e s t e r d a y m o r n i n g nt roll call h e a s k e d i f t h e r e w e r e a n y m e n present w h o h a d p l a y e d polo r e f o r e . T w o soldiers s a i d t h e y did. bo h e h a n d e d t h e m a c o u p l e o f b r o o m s a n d sent t h e m o v e r t o c l e a n out t h e s t a b l e s ! A n o t h e r feUow used t o be a n o r c h e s t r a leader. S o when t h e t o p s e r g e a n t f o u n d out t h i s g u y usa<l to wave a baton, he g a v e him a stick t o w a v e . O f course t h e s t i c k h a d a big m o p o n t h e e n d o f i t ! T h e poor y a r d bird h a d to m o p u p the m e s s hall! I t ' s not g e n e r a l l y k n o w n but t h e t o p s e r g e a n t is supposed t o be t h e b a c k b o n e o f the A r m y . H e ' s not o n l y b a c k b o n e , b u t . he s t a n d s for m o s t of t h e ribs! T h e o n l y difference between a lieutenant and a sergeant is that a l i e u t e n a n t h a s a b a r on h i s shoulder, and a sergeant h a s a chip! F o r my p a r t t h e s e r g e a n t doesn't b e l o n g i n ' t h i s 6utfit. H e b e l o n g s w i t h t h e E n g m e e r s , t h e w a y h e ' s a l w a y s n·u¾king mountains out of molehills! Of course, every 'soldier down here has a g o o d w o r d f o r t h e ' s e r g e a n t . If he catches them using it they get KP. Y e s sir, o u r to*p s e r g e a n t i s tough! W h y , just the other d a y he put a zipper on a n incendiary 'bomb a n d n o w h e c a r r i e s it a r o u n d a s a c i g a r e t t e l i g h t e r ! I t m u s t be h i s a m b i t i o n in l i f e t o k n o c k off y o u r h e a d a n d t h r o w it in y o u r f a c e . H o w e v e r , in s p i t e o f h i s s h o r t c o m i n g s . m a n y of the soldiers a r e fond o f him· L a s t F r i d a y w a s h i s b i r t h d a y a n d t h e y s e n t h i m a present, b u t h e w a s out o f t h e t e n t w h e n it went on*!
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