UDK

the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
1
Volume 126 Issue 5 kansan.com Thursday, August 29, 2013
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2B
CROSSWORD 5A
CRYPTOQUIPS 5A
OPINION 4A
SPORTS 1B
SUDOKU 5A
Partly cloudy. Zero
percent chance of rain.
Wind S at 11 mph.
Monday is Labor Day. All classes canceled. Index Don’t
forget
Today’s
Weather
Ninety-nine problems.
HI: 99
LO: 72
WEEKEND
Home on the ‘plains’
PAGE 2A
GEORGE MUILLINIX/KANSAN
GEORGE MUILLINIX/KANSAN
Kansas voted to have worst scenery; students disagree
Professor designs potential Lamborghini museum
Driven to design
PAGE 3A
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison Kohn
Dylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
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NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
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Sports editor
Mike Vernon
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Entertainment editor
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Copy chiefs
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Elise Reuter
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Designers
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Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS
Media director and
content stategist
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N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 PAGE 2A
CONTACT US
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2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
What’s the
Friday Saturday Sunday
HI: 101
HI: 101 HI: 94
LO: 71
LO: 71 LO: 63
— weather.com
Sunny. Zero
percent chance of
rain. Wind SW at
11 mph.
Partly cloudy. Zero
percent chance of
rain. Wind SW at
6 mph.
Isolated t-storms.
30 percent
chance of rain.
Wind W at 7 mph.
I miss winter. One-oh-one, ain’t no fun. At least it’s cooling off.
Calendar
Thursday, Aug. 29 Friday, Aug. 30 Saturday, Aug. 31 Sunday, Sept. 1
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Thursday Special:
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When: 2 to 4 p.m.
Where: Front lawn of Watson Library
About: Join us for bocce, washers,
croquet and more on the lawn in front of
Watson Library. Grab some freebies and
discover all that the KU Libraries have
to offer including academic resources,
research expertise and great spaces for
both solo study and group work.
What: University Dance Company
Auditions
When: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Where: Robinson Center, 242
About: The University Dance Company is
a pre-professional performance ensem-
ble, accepting members by audition only.
Students rehearse approximately four
hours a week per piece for three months
prior to the performance. Dancers
perform at the Lied Center of Kansas, one
of the most prestigious performing arts
venues in the country. University Dance
Company concerts feature choreography
by faculty members and guest artists in
modern, ballet, jazz, tap, famenco, East
Indian and other dance forms. Occasion-
ally, outstanding student choreography is
featured in the program.
What: Last day for 90 percent tuition refund
When: All day
Where: All University
What: Frosh Frenzy
When: 4-6 p.m.
Where: Eaton Hall, Engineering Courtyard
About: A fun Amazing Race-style event to
help School of Engineering freshmen meet
their classmates and learn more about the
KU campus. Prizes, followed by free food.
Hosted by Engineering Student Council.
articipants should wear shoes they can run
in and dress for the weather.
What: Saturday Art Adventure: Travel Around
the World
When: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Where: Spencer Museum of Art
About: Experience exciting, far-away places
right here in the Museum on a tour just
for families, then create your own painted
souvenir or travel journal inspired by your
adventure. Saturday Art Adventures, themed
tours followed by art-making activities, take
place once a month and are best suited for
families with children ages 5-8.
Registration is not required.
Cost: Free
What: Boyfrndz w/ Sobriquet, Pink Royal, Alien
Jones
When: 8 p.m.
Where: Jackpot Music Hall
About: Tickets are $5 for 21+. $7 for 18+
What: Speakeasy Sunday
When: 10 p.m.
Where: Jazzhaus
About: A variety show and jam session hosted
by Funk Tank, 21+
Cost: $3
What: Karaoke Sunday
When: 11 p.m.
Where: Bottleneck
President Obama spoke from
the steps of the Lincoln Memorial
Wednesday during the 50th anni-
versary ceremonies for the March
on Washington.
Speaking from the same spot that
Dr. Martin Luther King Junior
stood while delivering his historic
“I Have a Dream” speech, Pres-
ident Obama recalled the thou-
sands of men and women of all
ages, black and white alike, who
came from across the country to
demonstrate their desire for fair-
ness and equality.
On August 28, 1963, Americans
seeking jobs and justice gathered
at the National Mall in Washing-
ton, D.C. for a political assembly
called the March on Washington
for Jobs and Freedom.
Many of these individuals had
attended segregated schools, lived
in towns in which they could not
vote, or had seen friends and fam-
ily beaten and abused, President
Obama said.
“Because they marched,” Pres-
ident Obama said, “America be-
came more free and more fair, not
just for African-Americans but for
women and Latinos, Asians and
Native Americans, for Catholics,
Jews and Muslims, for gays, for
Americans with disabilities.”
President Obama said the mea-
sure of progress since the original
March on Washington depended
on “whether this country would
admit all people who were willing
to work hard, regardless of race,
into the ranks of a middle-class
life.”
Because the economy has
changed since 1963, this progress
hasn’t been and won’t be easy,
President Obama said.
“Te twin forces of technology
and global competition have sub-
tracted those jobs that once pro-
vided a foothold into the middle
class, and reduced the bargain-
ing power of American workers,”
President Obama said.
Former President Bill Clinton
also spoke at the event, and said
Americans no longer face inequal-
ity and abuse for their political be-
liefs anymore.
“And I would respectfully suggest
that Martin Luther King did not
live and die to hear his heirs whine
about political gridlock,” President
Clinton said.
Dr. Martin Luther King Junior’s
son, Martin Luther King III, spoke
about realizing his father’s mes-
sage.
“We’ve got a lot of work to do,
but none of us should be any ways
tired,” King said. “You see, no one
ever told any of us that our roads
would be easy, but I know our
God, our God, our God did not
bring any of us this far to leave us.”
President Obama said there is
still progress to be made.
“We might not face the same
dangers as 1963,” President
Obama said, “but the ferce urgen-
cy of now remains. We may never
duplicate the swelling crowds and
dazzling processions of that day so
long ago, no one can match King's
brilliance, but the same fames that
lit the heart of all who are willing
to take a frst step for justice, I
know that fame remains.”
— Edited by Jessica Mitchell
President Obama ties speech to economy
JENNIFER SALVA
jsalva@kansan.com
NATIONAL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Barack Obama, left, and frst lady Michelle Obama wave to the crowd after a ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington Aug. 28 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washing-
ton, D.C.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3A
POLICE REPORTS
Every Thursday, at 3 p.m. in the
fourth foor lobby of the Kansas
Union, there is a program called
“Tea @ 3.” Free of charge, you can
join students, faculty and staff for
a free cup of tea and a cookie.
A 24-year-old female was
arrested yesterday on the 300
block of Stockade Street on
suspicion of domestic battery.
No bond was posted.
A 23-year-old female was
arrested yesterday on the
600 block of Kentucky Street
on suspicion of operating a
vehicle under the infuence. A
$300 bond was paid.
A 38-year-old female was
arrested Tuesday on the 1300
block of 6th Street on suspicion
of failing to appear in court,
cultivating or distributing
a controlled substance, no
drug tax stamp, possession of
drug paraphernalia, unlawful
obtaining or distribution of
prescriptions and obstruction
of legal process. A $7,820
bond was paid.
A 42-year-old female was
arrested Tuesday on the
3600 block of 25th Street on
suspicion of hosting minors
consuming alcohol. A $500
bond was paid.
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriff’s
Offce booking recap.




A few square miles of land
between the cities of Bologna and
Modena, will potentially house a
new corporate ofce and muse-
um for Lamborghini in the next
decade.
Te refecting pool in front of
the three-story glass walls will turn
the nine pristine Lamborghinis on
display into 18. Te corporate gray
granite walls will aim to embody
the luxury of the product the com-
pany produces.
Millions of people will eventually
visit the museum in Italy to marvel
at the cars. But as Erika Sander,
a junior from Lawrence, looks
from the 12-foot model to her
father, Dennis Sander, the architect
behind the project and a profes-
sor at the University, it’s neither
the building nor the cars that she
stands in awe of.
“I think he’s the most talented
person ever,” Erika said. “I think
he’s amazing.”
When Erika was in eighth
grade, her father took her out of
school for a 32-day excursion in
Europe while he presented his
museum design for the popular
European racing circuit Le Mans
to a consortium of European car
manufacturers. Ninth on the list
was Lamborghini.
Afer his presentation, the vice
president for corporate image
approached Sander and asked if
he would do something similar
for him. He wanted a singular,
corporate image.
“It’s almost like he wrote out
what he wanted for dinner,” Sander
said.
Afer the grandeur of the Le
Mans project, Erika wasn’t sur-
prised by Lamborghini’s ofer.
Sander started the project in
2010. By 2012, he and Erika were
back in Sant’agata Bolognese. She
listened on as the museum director
called her father a “genius” and
asked him not to change it.
“I’ve been doing this for over
50 years, and usually when I call
the shot it’s pretty close to home,”
Sander said.
Sander knew when he was 10
that he wanted to be an architect.
Growing up, he devoted eight
hours each Saturday to the Car-
negie-Mellon Institute of Tech-
nology’s grade-school program
learning architecture’s sister arts.
In sixth grade, Sander was fea-
tured on TV for winning a contest.
Te host asked him what he want-
ed to be when he grew up. Sander
replied that without a doubt he
would be an architect.
“I also said that, ‘but I want to
design and make some bowling
alleys because I understand that
architects don’t make much mon-
ey,’” he said.
Sander said he has been blessed
to have seen roughly 150 of his
designs manifest into buildings.
And his daugher has been with
him every step of the way for the
past 20 years.
“It obviously takes up a lot of his
time and he’s constantly working
on diferent projects and things as
long as I’ve been alive,” Erika said.
“His projects have always been a
big part of my life.”
When the two travel in Europe,
they always visit Paris because it’s
Erika’s favorite place. At the end of
the hectic Le Mans trip, they rested
for four days in the city.
Sander said they have a routine:
visit the Sacre Coeur, Eifel Tower,
Notre Dame, the Opera House and
the Louvre, and they always walk
down the Champs-Elysees at least
six times.
“At the end of every trip we do
Paris,” Sander said.
“It’s always just us,” Erika added.
Last March, the pair journeyed
to Europe again to show the muse-
um director the fnal plans.
“She said, ‘I knew you would do
this. I knew you would do it like
this.’ It made me really feel choked
up,” Sander said. “She says, “You
have a passion for this. I know that
passion. I’ve seen that passion. Our
designers have that passion.’”
It was one of those times in
Sander’s career that he truly felt
blessed.
“I said, ‘Look who I’m designing
for. Tese miraculous art objects
that you call cars, they’re works of
art,’” he said.
Te buildings her father de-
signed have always had a presence
in Erika’s life. At two years old, she
visited his aquarium in Mexi-
co. More recently, she spotted a
parking garage that he designed in
“Te Dark Knight Rises.”
“It blows my mind how he could
come up with that. He’s so cre-
ative,” Erika said. “I didn’t get any
of the creativity.”
“Oh, yes you did,” her father
replied.
Sander will travel once more to
Italy in October to discuss fnan-
cial approval of his design. To see
his model become a reality would
be a culmination of being con-
sumed with his project, of 18-hour
weekend workdays and carefully
taking more than 230 iPhone
photographs of his model.
It would be one of the proudest
moments of his daughter’s life.
“I pray that I will be able to see
this one day,” Erika said.
“Me too,” Sander said, “me too.”
— Edited by Tara Bryant
EMMA LEGAULT
elegualt@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
University professor Dennis Sander designed and built a model of a Lamborghini museum to potentially be built in Italy. Sander will travel to Italy again in October to discuss fnancial approval of his design.
ARCHITECTURE
AUTOMOBILE
ARCHITECT
Professor designs Lamborhini museum

“It obviously takes up a
lot of his time and he’s
constantly working on
different projects.”
ERIKA SANDER
Lawrence junior
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 PAGE 4A
T
he frst step is admitting
you have a problem.
Which can be a bit tricky
if you, like myself and most other
Americans of our generation, are
unaware of that problem. Our
problem is simply this: we care
about Miley Cyrus.
Don’t worry, I’m not suggesting
that you’re an avid fan or that
you drif of to sleep every night,
swaddled in Hannah Montana
bedding. I’m not even going so far
as to imply that you have any sort
of carefully developed opinion
on her, besides your slight guilt
associated with singing along to
(and thoroughly enjoying) “Party
in the USA.”
What I’m referring to is the fact
that whether or not you pored
over an issue of People magazine,
chances are you know who Billy
Ray Cyrus is and you’ve heard or
read a recent review of Miley’s
somewhat less than graceful
VMA’s performance. Chances are,
you know at least a little about
Tom Cruise’s religious antics,
Lady Gaga’s meat wardrobe or
Kanye West’s timeless, innovative
baby-name choice as well. It’s
not your fault you have a mental
corner dedicated to this stockpile
of fimsy trivia—media outlets
slam us from every angle with for-
mulaic, manufactured “scandal.”
Why are we so shocked when a
person paid millions of dollars to
be outrageous does something...
outrageous? Why do we allow
ourselves to form strong opinions
on the most recent Disney star
smoking a joint in Hawaii?
Perhaps because in an era
of 140-character news stories
and more animated gifs than
words, it’s much easier and
more satisfying to digest “Miley
Shaves Head and Twerks on a
Giant Stufed Bear” or “Gwyn-
eth Paltrow Swears By Diet
Entirely Composed of Leaves”
than “Syrian Chemical Warfare
Kills Over 1,300,” or “Califor-
nia Wildfre Fighting Funds
Exhausted.” One requires ten
seconds of attention and provides
an amused chuckle or eye-roll,
the other calls for close reading,
background knowledge and the
perspective to conceptualize the
horror and tragedy that exists in
our world but seems too distant
to fully grasp. Instead we kill free
moments between class by eating
up empty and glossy headlines
out of convenience, if nothing
more. Tey’re targeted at us,
afer all—the supposed throng
of young adults “dying” to know
more about Ke$ha’s grills and
Ryan Gosling’s abs, the generation
that doesn’t know what NASDAQ
stands for and that bases most of
its political opinions of of SNL
sketches. Tis shallow stereotype
of our generation, this imbalanced
investment of energy into petty
fuf, is our problem.
If the frst step is admitting we
have a problem, the second (or
maybe third or seventh…I’m not
up on psychological theory) is
fguring out how to fx that prob-
lem. Te pervasive media stream
of Beyonce haircut updates and
North West’s frst steps will never
cease to exist, nor should it. Viral
memes of Angelina Jolie’s leg and
TV shows dedicated to RGIII
stretching out his ACL have their
place in society, much like Ben &
Jerry’s has a place in my freezer.
What’s crucial is balance—we
cannot be taken seriously as a
healthy and enriched generation
if we subsist on pints of Real-
Housewives-of-Jersey-Shore’s-
Pretty-Little-Liars. It is in our
power to educate ourselves and
become passionate about our
communities. How? Just once,
trade your Cosmo or Sports Il-
lustrated for Time magazine. Tap
into the centuries of brilliantly
crafed literature at your disposal
(for free) at the library—challenge
yourself beyond the realm of 50
Shades of Grey. Pick a world news
story you’ve heard mentioned in
passing and go digging until you
understand the issues; read mul-
tiple opinions and perspectives.
Take a break from social media—
spend time building relationships
instead of documenting them. Get
involved: join an organization that
turns words into action and aims
to better not “the” community, but
your community. Invest your time
and energy into fewer screens and
more pages, fewer pictures and
more conversations. And then,
do your duty as a well-rounded
citizen. If you still have a spare
moment, go ahead and check out
that video of Miley on the VMA’s.
It just might spark up a conversa-
tion or two.
Erin Calhoun is a pre-med
sophomore from Naperville, Ill.
People should stop caring about Miley Cyrus
Environmental injustice goes
unnoticed in poor community
Boycotting Russian
Olympics wrong solution
POP CULTURE
ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL
I
was driving through the
fat monotony of Cherokee
County, Kansas when the
mountains of Treece – a city on
the Oklahoma border – jutted
into sight. I questioned whether
“Carmen the Garmin” had unwit-
tingly taken me to Colorado…
or maybe the moon. A small
sign welcoming me to Treece
confrmed my destination. I had
arrived in the town a mile north
of the notorious Environmental
Protection Agency Tar Creek
Superfund site—an area where
toxic waste has been dumped and
the EPA has been charged with its
removal. Although Treece is not
included within the boundaries
of the Superfund site, the Kansas
and Federal governments have
agreed that the area is impact-
ed by the same environmental
concerns.
I drove through the town sur-
veying the huge piles of fne rock
that I had mistaken for moun-
tains. It turns out the towering
mounds are made out of chat
– the gravelly byproduct of lead,
zinc and iron ore mining, which
made Treece a successful mining
town during the frst and second
World Wars. Today, piles of chat
standing hundreds of feet high
cast shadows over the skeleton of
Treece. When I visited in 2009,
Te Tar Creek Mining Company
and its many mines had been
closed for years. Te gravelly
“mountains” contain high levels
of heavy metals, enough to con-
taminate the water, air and land.
As time passed, 33 percent of
children in the area were discov-
ered to have unsafe blood-lead
levels. Te local Tar Creek ran
orange from underground trace
minerals that had seeped into
ground water from unmaintained
mining shafs, not to mention
the ground in Treece is literally
caving in. Because the mines
were abandoned afer operations
ended and many mine locations
were never documented, the
earth will topple in on itself,
leaving residents and visitors with
the unsettling knowledge that
the ground they stand on could
collapse at any minute.
So is Treece just another aban-
doned city of the 20th Century
mining boom or is there a larger
story at play here? I tend to be-
lieve the latter. Treece is a perfect
example of how environmental
injustices can be directly linked to
poverty. Te Tar Creek area was
designated as a Superfund site
in 1983, yet the Kansas Depart-
ment of Health and Environment
didn’t ofer a voluntary relocation
program for citizens until 2011—
almost three decades later. Tis
clearly indicates that the families
of Treece, the majority of whom
earn around 35 percent less than
the Kansas median income, were
not a top priority for the Kansas
government. Te lack of concern
shown by the government for 28
years could be attributed to the
fact that 15.4 percent of Cherokee
County residents live below the
poverty level. It wasn’t hard for
the Tar Creek Mining Company
to have its way with the land then
leave the earth and its residents
nursing its wounds; just like
it wasn’t difcult for the state
legislature to ignore the plight
of a few hundred people in the
sparsely populated, impover-
ished southern part of the state.
When it comes to issues of the
environment, the negative impact
is only deemed a priority if the
victimized person or community
is economically important.
I believe there is a lesson to be
learned from the city of Treece:
all people, regardless of socio-
economic status, have a right to a
safe, healthy and sustainable liv-
ing environment. Perhaps if the
government had ofered a buyout
plan to Treece citizens 28 years
ago, the safety of many people
could have been preserved. No
one should have their health and
their family’s health taken away
for decades simply because they
cannot aford to live somewhere
where the wind doesn’t carry lead
and the ground doesn’t cave in.
And no city should have its envi-
ronmental issues ignored simply
because of its low population
and/or poor economic status.
Sometimes it takes a weekend
trip to a tiny town in the middle
of nowhere to remind us that
environmental injustice isn’t just
a topic for movies – it’s just a few
miles down 69 Highway.
Gabrielle Murnan is a sophomore
majoring in Environmental Studies
from Pittsburg.
H
uman rights violations are
par for the course of the
former Soviet state, but
the recent draconian crackdown
on LGBT citizens in Russia has
put the spotlight on a new form of
retribution: boycotting the 2014
Winter Olympics. While Russia’s
treatment of its LGBT population
is truly condemnable, boycotting
the Olympics is simply the wrong
solution.
Remember when there were
calls to boycott the 2008 Chinese
Olympics because the govern-
ment authorized the killing of
thousands of stray dogs and cats
in preparation for the games?
Probably not. Tis is just one ex-
ample of a hyper-specifc pretext
for boycott. Te more universal
objection to China’s games was it’s
atrocious human rights record,
and even that failed to produce
a ground-breaking boycott. Tis
is the frst reason why boycotts
fail: they are ofen too narrow to
attract a groundswell of support.
While the LGBT rights move-
ment is far larger by comparison
(and has gained momentum as a
result of recent SCOTUS rulings),
it doesn’t garner enough sympa-
thy. People who are not personally
persecuted by Russia’s LGBT laws
don’t feel it a big enough reason to
give up their chance at the gold.
US athletes have proposed that
they show support by competing
while sporting rainbow fags and
other propaganda (even though
that violates IOC charter rule 50
against propaganda). But when
the choice boils down to the rights
of the minority over their own
chance at glory, the answer be-
comes obvious. Athletes who have
been training for 20 years don’t
want to take a back seat because
they don’t agree with the policies
of the host government. While
their hearts may be in the right
place, they will only take a stand
from a safe distance.
Diplomatic relations between
Russia and the U.S. could be
described as prickly at best. Te
Snowden scandal and Obama’s
cancellation of a summit meet-
ing with Russia has added to the
hot core of animosity between
the two nations. Additionally,
Obama has stated in reference to
Russia that he will not tolerate
any discrimination against LGBT
people. At this point, a boycott
seems woefully inappropriate, as
evidenced by Putin’s disinterest in
Obama’s attempts to strong-arm
his country.
So what is the apt approach to
Russia’s LGBT policies? Boycott
Russia from their own Olympics.
Te IOC has the power to make
this happen – and it has used it
before. Cyd Ziegler from the Huf-
ington Post pointed out that Te
IOC banned South Africa from
the 1964 Olympics because of the
Apartheid. Rhodesia was banned
from 1972 games because of racist
anti-black policies, and Afghani-
stan was banned in 2000 because
of human rights violations against
women imposed by the Taliban.
All of these bans were enforced
under the same justifcation: A
fundamental disregard for human
rights in the banned nations. It’s
about time the IOC demanded
that respect for human dignity be
extended to homosexuals as well,
or Russia can sit this one out.
Will Ashley is a sophomore majoring
in Global and International Studies
and Chinese from Topeka.
My lower half is going to start
looking like Serena Williams from the
g-damn hill I have to trek up every
morning.
It’s been like a day since “Madden
25” came out and I’ve already moved
the Jaguars to Toronto. They’re now
the Mounties.
When will freshman realize its
socially unacceptable to “look cute”
for class here at KU? I’m starting to
feel bad about myself.
Before I submit my frst FFA of each
new semester, I panic a little bit that
they changed the number, and that
I’ll be texting some random person...
EDITOR’S NOTE: Hey, this is your
mom.
I had a dream that I was late for
my class. Then I woke up, and was
late for my class. I guess dreams do
come true.
Nothing like getting told “you’re go-
ing to hell” frst thing in the morning.
I don’t know what the protocol is for
saying hi to a friend-of-a-friend’s ex
so I’m just going to pretend I didn’t
see you at all.
Accidental footsy is the worst kind
of footsy.
Syllabus week isn’t real when you’re
an engineer.
Saw a rare pack of wild shopping
carts. I wanted to take a picture but
one of them charged me.
It is illegal to go whale hunting in
Kansas, looks like the whale of Potter
Lake is safe... For now.
Zero to friend zone in 0.9 seconds.
I think that’s a new record even for
me.
I’ve decided if you’re tall dark and
a student athlete, then you get frst
dibs on women here. Who said high
school ends? Screw that guy who
said it. Screw him.
Milk was bad choice.
There should be a fre pole in Budig
from the balcony to the lobby.
No. 1 reason I hate having my
roommate back in town: pants are
required.
The frst week hasn’t even ended and
I’m ready to drop out and live in a
box under a bridge.
I’m gonna be very unhappy when I
run out of Slim Jim’s.
I saw Wiggins today and then I
needed my inhaler.
When will it get cold enough for me
to stop shaving my legs?
By Erin Calhoun
ecalhoun@kansan.com
By Gabby Murnan
gmurnan@kansan.com
By William Ashley
washley@kansan.com
Text your FFA
submissions to
785–289–8351 or
at kansan.com
What will you be replacing
your porch couch with after
the city’s ban goes into
effect?
Follow us on Twitter @Kansan_Opinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just
might publish them.
@WalterKayce
@Kansan_Opinion I heard nothing about hammocks
UDK
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Dylan Lysen, managing editor
dlysen@kansan.com
Will Webber, opinion editor
wwebber@kansan.com
Mollie Pointer, business manager
mpointer@kansan.com
Sean Powers, sales manager
spowers@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director & content strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
@mdnewton1618
@Kansan_Opinion probably a Jayhawk pillowpet
my aunt thought was a good birthday gift. #spirit
#strangerelatives
Between homework and writ-
ing papers, many students groan
at the thought of writing for fun.
However, some students dedi-
cate extra time in their schedules
to blogging. Whether they write
about their daily lives or a partic-
ular topic, blogging gives students
a platform to voice their opinions.
Even though tweets and Face-
book statuses are seemingly easier
ways to share thoughts, blogging
appears to enrich both the writ-
er and the reader in comparison
to the snap opinions ofen seen
on social media. Unlike a tweet,
students can share their opinions
without restriction of a word limit.
Liran Ziegelman, a freshman
from Overland Park, said blogging
allows her to voice her opinions
about equal rights for minorities
in an environment more tolera-
ble and accepting to her thoughts.
“I think that it is important to
blog because it is a safe way to get
your opinion out,” she said. “Liv-
ing in a mostly red state, it’s a place
where I can fnd people to under-
stand what I’m going through and
to sympathize.”
Finding an audi-
ence remains im-
portant to bloggers
who want to send a
message to readers.
Jordan McEntee, a
sophomore from
Overland Park,
shares her blog
about youth min-
istry through her
Facebook page to build an audience.
“At frst, I really just used my blog
for my own sake to write about the
awesome things Christ was doing
in my life through youth ministry,”
she said. “Ten I realized that oth-
er people might be able to connect
with my stories, so I started putting
my blog posts out on Facebook,
sow I could try to impact people’s
lives, even if it’s just in a small way.”
Whether bloggers are trying to
send a mes-
sage or are
just writing
about daily
life, blog-
ging gives
s t u d e n t s
the oppor-
tunity to
share their
t h o u g h t s
and to
form a more articulate voice.
— Edited by Hannah Barling
Follow
@UDK_Entertain
on Twitter
1
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
HOROSCOPES
CROSSWORD
Because the stars
know things we don’t.
SUDOKO
PAGE 5A
C·tl R··r Wl'H U°'

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C·×°l·×××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll×××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××××1 C 1 C 1 CC 1
CRYPTOPQUIP
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 6
It’s hard to put feelings into words.
Things fall together for you. Find
ways to cut costs, with Mercury in
Scorpio. This could turn out to be a
good thing. Maintain objectivity.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 5
Keep it in the family. Your feelings
are all over the map, and that turns
out to be a good thing. For about
a month, compromise is required.
Practice it, and build confdence.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 6
Check the exact wording before you
hit “send.” Things are starting to
make sense. For about a month,
streamline your procedures. Clean
up your work space. Talk over travel
details. Pursue a logical conclusion.
Put in corrections.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is an 8
Wait and consider. These days
could get quite proftable. You’re an
even better strategist this month.
Discuss details. Your input makes
a big difference. The piper will have
to be paid soon. Romance may be
involved.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is an 8
Watch out, world! For about a month
with Mercury in Scorpio, you’ll do
your best work at home. A change
turns out for the best. Everybody
doesn’t need to know everything yet.
Give the gift of music.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 5
Turn down a costly proposition. Get
introspective. Your ability to con-
centrate is enhanced for a month.
Test your idea on your partner. Wait
for results. Count your assets. Then
celebrate in style.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 6
Your quick wit is required. Discuss
fnances. Find more ways to increase
income for the next month. Friends
and partners help you get farther.
Request copies of missing docu-
ments. Listen carefully, and think
before speaking.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 6
Don’t take every suggestion seri-
ously. For about a month, complete
diffcult personal decisions. You’re
highly admired. Go play. Water
fgures in this scenario. Send photos
to friends by social media. They’ll be
envious.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 7
An argument intensifes. Plan a
getaway to relax. Finish up old
business. Don’t take anything for
granted. You can take new ground
with focused action.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 6
To understand a confict, shift your
perspective. Figure out your fnances.
For about a month, keep others on
course. Delegate and gain more than
expected. Work out priorities. Resolve
style issues later.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Listen carefully and compromise.
Get into the strategy. Re-affrm a
commitment. The answer will soon
be obvious. Confer with leadership.
There’s a good story here. How will
you frame it?
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is an 8
Be honest with yourself and others.
Take on more work. For the next
month with Mercury in Scorpio, travel
logistics fgure prominently. Work
out the details. Listen more than you
talk. Family comes frst.
CHECK OUT
THE ANSWERS
http://bit.ly/12MwPmg
Student blogs become
safe havens for opinions
TECHNOLOGY
MEGHAN KETCHAM
mketcham@kansan.com

“It’s a place where I can
fnd people to understand
what I’m going through
and sympathize.”
LIRAN ZIEGELMAN
Overland Park freshman
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Blogging websites such as Tumblr and WordPress allow students to express opinions and connect with like-minded individu-
als. Although tweets and Facebook statuses are easier to share, blog posts have no character limit.
See the bloggers interviewed on Page 9A
1
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7A
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LAWRENCE
Downtown Final Fridays showcase local art, history
On the last Friday of the month,
the streets of downtown Lawrence
are flled with artists, musicians
and Lawrence residents coming to
celebrate the month's Final Friday.
"It's not just for art walking, it's
also for eating great food and
getting people
downtown who
might otherwise
go out of town
on the weekend,"
Meredith Moore,
curator for the
Wonder Fair art
gallery, said.
Each month
features new art-
ists and brings
something new
and exciting to
Lawrence. Tis
month is no exception.
Te group featured this month
at Wonder Fair, located at 803 1/2
Massachusetts St. above Te Burger
Stand, is Tugboat Printshop, a print
making company from Pittsburgh,
has come all the way to Lawrence
to participate this month.
Moore said that Tugboat Print-
shop is the most well-known print-
making studio in America.
"Tey don't usually do gallery
shows, but they're making an ex-
ception to come to Lawrence this
month,” she said.
Wonder Fair isn't the only store
participating. Scott Lloyd, Final
Fridays coordinator for Au Marche,
said their featured artist this month
will be Emalee Schaumburg.
Schaumburg, a photographer
from Lawrence, is displaying her
work at two locations.
"She'll have three pictures here
and then she has an event in North
Lawrence at her studio,” Lloyd
said. “It will all be circus themed.
Tere will be cotton candy and
fre-breathing and things like that."
Final Fridays typically attract
those who are interested in art and
culture. Tis month, historical en-
thusiasts can feel
at home at Final
Fridays as well.
Abby Magariel,
education and
programs coor-
dinator for Wat-
kins Community
Museum, said
that Watkins and
Te Percolator,
another local
art gallery, are
working togeth-
er on a project to
commemorate the 150th anniver-
sary of Quantrill's Raid.
"We came up with a list of ques-
tions to pose to artists around Law-
rence and the surrounding area,”
Magariel said. "Tis is a serious day
in Lawrence's history, but it is also
the event that Lawrence recovered
from and built from, so we wanted
to think about what that means to
local residents today."
Quilts, paintings and poems em-
body the sadness for lives lost, a
love of Lawrence and a passion for
the Kansas-Missouri border war.
Students and residents can mingle
downtown to look at art, get some
deals at local stores and listen to en-
tertainment this Friday.
— Edited by Emma LeGault CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Tugboat Printshop, a printmaking company from Pittsburgh, will display their artwork at Wonder Fair, 803 1/2 Massachusetts St., as part of August’s Final Friday.

“It’s not just for art
walking, it’s also for eating
great food and getting
people downtown who
might otherwise go out of
town on the weekend.”
MEREDITH MOORE
Wonder Fair curator
KRISTINA MAUDE
kmaude@kansan.com
Te University Career Center
has launched a new and improved
website that boasts a large number
of new features. Students attempt-
ing to visit the site at the URL kuca-
reerhawk.com will fnd that the site
has moved to career.ku.edu.
Tis move was prompted by a
campus-wide initiative to univer-
salize the design of university ser-
vices and programs online. Te site
has been in the works since early
March of this year and the fnal
tweaks are currently being made.
“We hope to provide students
with comprehensive web resources
that are available 24/7 and compli-
ment the face-to-face services we
provide,” said Erin Wolfram, assis-
tant director of the UCC and head
designer of the new website.
Te new services will include
an online appointment system
through which students can sched-
ule meetings. Students can also
fnd job and internship listings that
are directly related to their respec-
tive majors. Trough the Careers
and KU Majors page, students fnd
listings that are updated in real
time so as to provide the most up-
to-date listings.
Once students fnd a listing, they
will be able to practice their inter-
view skills in the new mock inter-
view program called “Impress.”
With this program, students can
participate in practice interviews
and get feedback on their results
from a professional at the career
center.
Although the move has been
made to the new site, the ofcials
at the UCC have decided to re-
vamp the old site and convert it to
a weekly informational newsletter
focused on student career oppor-
tunities.
Wolfram and the rest of the UCC
hope that these new tools will help
to promote a more personalized
and communicable feeling when
dealing with the center.
“We’re real people that are here
to help students succeed,” Wolfram
said.
— Edited by Jessica Mitchell
New University Career Center website offers online interviews
CALEB SISK
csisk@kansan.com
CAMPUS
Recycle,
Recycle,
Recycle
1
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8A
REGIONAL
WHO SAYS KANSAS ISN’T BEAUTIFUL?
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Although Kansas lacks the mountains and forests of Colorado, geography graduate student Emily Fekete believes people’s perceptions of beautiful scenery are subjective and often affected by media portrayals.
It may not be the rudest or
have the ugliest residents, but
Kansas has the worst scen-
ery, according to 1,603 Ameri-
cans polled by Business Insider.
Te poll asked questions such
as: Which state has the weird-
est accent? Which state has the
smartest and dumbest peo-
ple? In the survey, Kansas was
named the least beautiful in
terms of scenery of all 50 states.
Emily Fekete, a geography grad-
uate student from Rochester, N.Y.,
said she had a lot of problems
with the poll, not unlike some of
her colleagues and fellow geog-
raphers she follows on Twitter.
From her background in hu-
man geography, Fekete said
that many of the people sur-
veyed may not have even been
to Kansas, but rather answered
based on their own perceptions.
“States in terms of scenery are
very much infuenced by the way
the media treats
them,” Fekete said.
Colorado was vot-
ed to have the most
beautiful scenery,
most likely because
people ofen pic-
ture the mountains
and forests instead
of the eastern side
of the state, which has geography
similar to Kansas, Fekete said.
“I think it’s the way Kansas is
p o r t r a y e d
ever since
the Wizard
of Oz,” Fe-
kete said.
Scenery is
a personal
thing, Fe-
kete said,
so the poll
became problemat-
ic from the very questions.
“In Geography we ofen talk
about how people's ideas of plac-
es can potentially be more of a
factor in what that place is like
or how it is understood than
the actual place itself,” she said.
Like many prospective out-of-
state students, Tomas Clayton,
a freshman from Plano, Texas,
was surprised to fnd that Kansas
wasn’t just full of corn and fat,
barren land like he had imagined.
Clayton said he encountered
these perceptions when he told
his friends from home that he
was going to Kansas for college.
“Go visit,” Clayton said.
“It’ll change your mind and
you’ll probably fall in love
with campus like I did.”
— Edited by Jessica Mitchell
Americans voted Kansas ‘Worst Scenery’ out of all 50 states in a recent Business Insider poll
KAITLYN KLEIN
kklein@kansan.com

“States in terms of scenery
are very much infuenced
by the way the media
treats them.”
EMILY FEKETE
Rochester, N.Y., graduate student
CAMPUS
ECONOMY
Te Student Involvement and
Leadership Center completed its
makeover in time for the start
of the fall semester. As part of
its new look, the ofce now has
desk areas and ofces for stu-
dent organizations instead of
partitioned cubicles. It also has
newly painted walls, new furni-
ture, and more storage options.
Lisa Kring, the event services di-
rector for KU Memorial Unions,
said that the ofce has a much fresh-
er look. She added that the cubicles
must have been at least 25 years
old and were in need of an update.
Te total cost of the renova-
tions ended up at around $85,000,
half of which was funded by Stu-
dent Senate, and the other half
by the KU Memorial Unions.
“Te new space lends itself to
more collaboration,” Kring said.
“Before, everybody was parti-
tioned, and you didn’t even know
if anybody was in your area. We
wanted an environment that was
conducive for involvement, in
the hope that people can see each
other, connect, and collaborate.”
Ashley Farris is a junior from
Wichita who, as the vice pres-
ident of the Society of Open
Minded Atheists and Agnos-
tics, works in the SILC. She said
the changes to the ofce sup-
port a more modern, open feel.
“Te old space was cramped
and it was a little stressful just
to be in there,” Farris said. “Te
new space is a lot more open,
which makes for a more collab-
orative environment, and I feel
like that sort of environment will
make it easier to get stuf done.”
Farris added that doing away
with the cubicles is a major ad-
vantage of the renovations.
“Tere used to be these big, blocky
type of walls, and you couldn’t real-
ly see anyone from any of the other
organizations,” Farris said. “Now,
you don’t have to go through a
maze of cubicles just to see if any-
one’s there. If you’re just in the
Union stopping by, you could fnd
someone to talk to pretty easily.”
Trough focus groups, surveys,
and other forms of feedback, the
needs and requests for the area
were determined before making
the plans, says Kring. Making the
changes was a joint efort of repre-
sentatives from student organiza-
tions and staf from both the Me-
morial Unions and the University.
“Compromises had to be
made, but hopefully the f-
nal product is able to meet ev-
eryone’s needs,” Kring said.
— Edited by Sarah Kramer
SILC offces complete summer renovations
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com
Fast-food employees stage walkouts, demand super-size paychecks
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Fast-food cus-
tomers in search of burgers and
fries on Tursday might run
into striking workers instead.
Organizers say thousands
of fast-food workers are set to
stage walkouts in dozens of cit-
ies around the country, part of a
push to get chains such as Mc-
Donald's, Taco Bell and Wendy's
to pay workers higher wages.
It's expected be the largest nation-
wide strike by fast-food workers,
according to organizers. Te biggest
efort so far was over the summer
when about 2,200 of the nation's
millions of fast-food workers staged
a one-day strike in seven cities.
Tursday's planned walkouts
follow a series of strikes that be-
gan last November in New York
City, then spread to cities includ-
ing Chicago, Detroit and Seat-
tle. Workers say they want $15
an hour, which would be about
$31,000 a year for full-time em-
ployees. Tat's more than double
the federal minimum wage, which
many fast food workers make, of
$7.25 an hour, or $15,000 a year.
Te move comes amid calls
from the White House, some
members of Congress and econ-
omists to hike the federal mini-
mum wage, which was last raised
in 2009. But most proposals seek
a far more modest increase than
the ones workers are asking for,
with President Barack Obama
wanting to boost it to $9 an hour.
Te push has brought consid-
erable media attention to a staple
of the fast-food industry — the
so-called "McJobs" that are known
for their low pay and limited pros-
pects. But the workers taking part
in the strikes still represent a tiny
fraction of the broader industry.
And it's not clear if the strikes
on Tursday will shut down any
restaurants because organizers
made their plans public earlier in a
call for workers around the country
to participate, which gave manag-
ers time to adjust their stafng lev-
els. More broadly, it's not clear how
many customers are aware of the
movement, with turnout for past
strikes relatively low in some cities.
As classes begin, so does the
hunt for textbooks. Once stu-
dents fnd their class name, they
ofentimes walk down the aisle of
the KU Bookstore to either fnd
nothing, or an overpriced book.
Te next step for most students
is to look for the book elsewhere.
Better World Books is an on-
line bookstore that promotes
social change, and may be
the solution to this problem
that many KU students face.
Better World Books currently has
a partnership with KU Libraries for
their unneeded
duplicate books
in exchange for
funds. Tey also
work with Mortar
Board, a senior
honor society on
campus who has
a book drop box
at Watson library.
For every book
purchased on-
line from Better World, the com-
pany donates a book to someone
in need. Better World Books also
helps fund high-impact litera-
cy projects around the world. If
a library or bookstore donates
a book that is unsaleable or un-
able to be donated then it is re-
cycled to reduce landfll waste.
Better World Books was orig-
inally founded by Christopher
“Kreece” Fuchs and Xavier
Helgesen, friends from South
Bend, Ind. who came up with the
idea afer graduating from college.
Afer having trouble selling
back old textbooks to the campus
bookstore the original founders
took matters into their own hands.
Tey went to a local community
center and, afer convincing the
center’s director, were able to use the
space to store the books that they
sold and bought online. Six months
later, they had raised over $10,000
collected and reselling books.
Better World Books has earned
$26 million in revenue in the past
10 years. How did they do it?
By having a compassionate mis-
sion. Tey describe themselves
as a triple bottom-line compa-
ny, saying that they “understand
that proft is not the only way
to measure business success.”
Teir triple bottom-line includes
“people,” rep-
resented by the
social impact of
donating books
and funds for lit-
eracy programs;
“planet,” repre-
sented by keep-
ing books out
of landflls (111
million books so
far); and “prof-
it,” represented
by a desire to serve all stakehold-
ers equally, which includes the
community, environment, em-
ployees and their shareholders.
“In their company values they
state, ‘We strive to do the right
thing at all times.” What type of
company has that as their mission?
No one,” Michelle Brox, a sopho-
more from Overland Park, said.
Te company collects books
from a network of more than 2,300
college campuses and has part-
nerships with over 3,000 libraries.
Better World Books also part-
ners with four major non-profts
who receive funds and/or books.
Tese partners include Books for
Africa, National Center for Fam-
ily Literacy, Room to Read and
World Fund, all of which help il-
literate children, families, or both.
When purchasing a book from
betterworldbooks.com, prices are
usually cheaper than most and in-
clude free shipping, but, carbon
balanced shipping is optional. If
customers choose this option, they
pay a few more cents at checkout to
help fght global warming. Tree
of four customers choose to do so,
John Ujda, vice president of mar-
keting for Better World Books, said.
For each library book sold, 15
percent of the sale goes to the li-
brary and 5 percent goes to a lit-
eracy partner. While the other
portion is confdential to Better
World Books partnership agree-
ments, they insure every dollar of
proft is reinvested in the company.
A ticker is located at the top of
their website that allows visitors
to witness progress as it happens.
It includes a running count of
books donated, funds raised for
literacy and libraries, and the num-
ber of books reused or recycled.
“You can literally see the difer-
ence they are making on a min-
ute-by-minute basis,” Brox said.
“When you boil it down, lit-
eracy is the foundation build-
ing block of all other learning,”
Ujda said. Better World Books
will continue to help that foun-
dation for many years to come.
— Edited by Sarah Kramer
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9A
LIED CENTER

MMO MO MO MO MMMO MO MMO MMO MO MO O MOONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&& TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTUUUE UE UUE UE UE UE UE UE &&&&&&&& 7: 7: 7: 7: 7: 7 3330 30 30 3330 30 pppp.m .m. .
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Fables on Global
Warming
ß5PhßLT 0kLhE5Tkß
Fun and radical
guerrilla-music force
FRI 7:30 p.m.
SEP 6
SAT 7:30 p.m.
SEP 28
Armitage Gone! Dance
Tony Award-winning
Broadway musical
THU 7:30 p.m.
NOV 14
Laawr wr w ence native Karole Armitage returns with

785-864-2787
KU Student–Lied Center
Performance Package
19 Performances for $125
A savings of up to $200!
WHERE HAIR GOES TO MAN UP
$9.95 with
Student ID
2500 Iowa St
Lawrence, KS 66046 (785) 841-6640
M - F 9 – 8 Sat 9 – 6:00pm
CHARITY
Students help fght illiteracy through online book vendor
ASHLEY BOOKER
abooker@kansan.com
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
The Ghana Book Trust is a nonproft that receives Books for Africa books regularly, and sells them for the absolute minimum to recover the shipping costs. Better World
Books donates books to Books for Africa.
BLOGGERS FROM PAGE 5A
Freshman from Kansas City, Missouri
Blog Column: Sporting KC
http://soccernewsday.com/colum-
nists/131/skylar-rolstad
Skylar uses the Soccer Newsday web-
site to voice his opinions on Sporting
KC. As a Journalism major, Skylar
said that he uses his column to gain
experience in his feld.
How did you get your start writing
this column?
I started writing when I had a per-
sonal sports blog and was contacted
by the editor of soccernewsday.com.
Soccer Newsday gave me credentials
to cover Sporting Kansas City games
at Sporting Park.
What is your favorite part of being a
columnist?
I’d say my favorite part is getting
access to the stadium and being able
to interview players and coaches. Also
[I like] meeting a lot of great people
that do the same thing as me.
Why is it important for students to
blog?
It’s important for students to blog be-
cause it offers a different perspective
that some other mediums or ways of
expressing yourself couldn’t.
Skylar Rolstad
Freshman from Overland Park
Blog Subject: Fandom & Equal Rights
http://harrypotterjew.tumblr.com
Liran uses Tumblr to reblog Harry Potter
related posts and to voice her opinions
on equal rights. Tumblr’s community
aspect draws many bloggers like Liran.
Describe your blog in one sentence.
My blog is a mash-up of a multitude of
fandoms and angry opinions.
What do you hope to accomplish with
your blog?
At this point, I think that my blog is
mostly for me rather than for everyone
else. I don’t expect my posts to be seen
by a lot of people. I re-blog the stuff
that I like. It’s a comforting place and
you meet people from all over the world.
Why is blogging important?
I think that blogging serves as a way to
develop another group of friends. It’s a
good way to fnd people who are inter-
ested in what you are also interested in.
It keeps me connected to a lot of clever
and talented people.
Liran Ziegelman
Sophomore from Overland Park
Blog Subject: Religion and Youth
Ministry
http://iloveyouthministry.blogspot.com/
Jordan uses her blog to record her
thoughts on youth ministry and to
explain the life lessons she learns daily
through Christ.
Why did you start writing this blog?
I started writing this blog particularly
because I want to go into youth ministry
one day, so it’s fun writing about how
Christ impacts my life in little and big
ways every single day. I’m also a journal-
ism major, so I like practicing my writing
skills and incorporating the things I
learn in my major into something that
I love.
Why is it important for students to
blog?
I think it’s important for students to
blog because we all have a story. We’re
all living for the story. And when we put
our stories out there, it’s cool to see how
many people can relate to them.
Describe your blog in one sentence.
Overall, my blog is a way to share my
story — the little stories of how Christ
impacts my life every day.
Jordan McEntee
RECYCLE

“When you boil it down,
literacy is the foundation
building block of all other
learning.”
JOHN UJDA
Vice President of Marketing
Students discuss importance, benefits of personal blogging
1
Volume 126 Issue 5 kansan.com Thursday, August 29, 2013
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Kory Carpenter
kcarpenter@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Golden opportunity
for Naadir Tharpe
T
o call junior point guard
Naadir Tarpe’s current
situation a gif would be an
insult to gifs.
He fell into a box of misft toys
and came out looking like a 14 kar-
at ring. A National Championship
ring, perhaps.
Nine months ago he couldn’t
beat out Elijah Johnson, a shooting
guard with no prior point guard
experience, for starting duties on
a team that was one good point
guard away from contending for a
national championship.
Tarpe was then recruited over
for the second straight year, as
highly-touted prep point guards
like Marcus Paige, Anthony Barber
and Demetrius Jackson as Bill Self
chased the last two seasons before
going elsewhere. When Self ’s most
talented recruiting class of his ca-
reer was complete in the spring,
there wasn’t a top-fight point
guard to be found.
Only Frank Mason, a 5-foot-10
unranked recruit whose other
scholarship ofers included Tow-
son, Tennessee State and George
Mason, according to scout.com,
was found. Mason might be a warm
body on the bench or he might
eventually contend for serious
playing time, but Tarpe will be the
starting point guard on opening
night against Louisiana-Monroe.
To go from the bench, to being
overlooked by Self, to distributing
the ball to a handful of future NBA
stars must have Tarpe believing in
a higher power. Racking up assists
this year will be as easy as handing
the ball to Andrew Wiggins — the
number one overall recruit who
many have called the best prospect
since Kevin Durant — and getting
out of the way.
When Wiggins is double-teamed,
likely one-and-done and NBA
lottery pick Wayne Selden will be
there to pick up the slack. Don’t
forget about sophomore Perry Ellis
down low. Or fve-star freshman
center Joel Embiid.
You get the point.
Te starting point guard on this
Kansas team was going to have the
best job in the country this sea-
son, and that job fell into Naadir
Tarpe’s lap.
But this season won’t be like last
season, where Self had to stick with
shoddy point guard play because
he had no better options on the
bench, ultimately costing his team
two consecutive Final Fours. Self
surely realizes he will never coach
a player as good as Wiggins, and he
likely won’t have three soon-to-be
lottery picks on his team the rest of
his career.
Te window to capitalize on the
months Self spent recruiting this
class will slam shut the second
the fnal game is over. If he thinks
that fnal game will be anywhere
but Cowboys Stadium on the frst
Monday in April, don’t expect
subpar point guard play to be his
downfall.
Naadir Tarpe could be one of
the best point guards in the coun-
try this season or he could be lef
on the side of the road. It won’t be
an easy situation to handle, but if he
wanted anything diferent he would
have gone to Minnesota instead.
— Edited by Hannah Barling
INITIAL INVITATIONAL
THE FEW-TURE
PAGE 9B
PAGE 3B
Volleyball begins nonconference season with Arizona Invitational
Eight new freshmen join the Kansas roster
immediate openings
All trademarks are property of their respective owners
An Equal Opportunity Employer © 2013 Kelly Services, Inc. Y1134
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is hiring merchandise processors and material handlers
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WANTED! Bed & Breakfast/Event site
needs p/t help with grounds & general
upkeep. Benefts include good pay,
beautiful grounds, friendly workers,
great food. Must be strong & healthy &
have some basic gardening skills. Farm
life experience a big plus. Call 843‑8530.
A FUN PLACE TO WORK!
Stepping Stones is hiring teacher’s
aides for the infant, toddler & preschool
classrooms & teachers for the elemen‑
tary after school program. Most shifts
are 1‑6pm or 3‑6pm Mon.,Wed., Fri.
&/or Tues., Thurs. Apply at 1100
Wakarusa. EOE
ATTENTION COLLEGE STUDENTS
NEED A JOB? $15 base‑appt, FT/PT
customer sales/service, no exp nec, con‑
ditions apply, all ages 17+, call now,
913‑906‑8022.
Jimmy John’s is looking to hire some
Delivery Drivers & Inshoppers. We make
delicious sub sandwiches & we make
them freaky fast. We’re loud & fast
paced. We love to train new people &
we’re hiring right now! Delivery Drivers
make a full hourly wage & also make
great tips. If you like to move fast & want
to have fun at work, this is the job for
you! Please apply in person at 1730 W
23rd St. Must be available during clos‑
ing hrs 5pm‑3am, cover all tattoos. No
gauged earrings & one piercing per ear.
Shadow Glen Golf Club, off K‑10 &
Cedar Creek Parkway, is hiring for our
waitstaff. We prefer dining room experi‑
ence, but we will train the right individu‑
als. Enjoy free meals & earn golf
privleges. Email your resume & availibity
to: barb@shadowglen.org
SEEKING THOSE WHO WANT TO
HELP OTHERS!
Trinity In‑Home Care, a local non‑proft
social service agency, is looking for peo‑
ple to assist children & young adults that
have developmental disabilities. M‑Sun.
shifts available. Typically shifts run from
3‑8pm. Send resume to scott@tihc.org.
Part‑time companion/personal care at‑
tendant for a woman w/autism in
Lawrence. Great opportunity for the stu‑
dent pursuing a career in the feld of
medicine, special ed, speech or physical
therapy, etc. Two shifts per week.
Call Carole at 785‑266‑5307.
AAAC Tutoring Services is hiring Tutors
for Fall 2013! To apply, visit www.tutor‑
ing.ku.edu 785‑864‑7733 EO/AA
LOVE THE OUTDOORS & PEOPLE?
Then you may be just who we’re looking
for! Sunfower Outdoor & Bike is cur‑
rently looking to fll full & part‑time posi‑
tions for Fall/Winter. Prior retail experi‑
ence is a plus but not mandatory. Outgo‑
ing attitude is essential. Apply in person
at 804 Massachusetts St., Downtown
Lawrence.
Part time help needed in busy doctors of‑
fce. Hours needed Monday to Friday &
2 Saturdays a month Job duties include
phone, pulling charts, assisting doctor
w/ vitals & therapies & calling patients
for appointments. We train for every‑
thing. Please call (785)749‑0130 to
come fll out an application.
NOW HIRING: friendly, professional &
hardworking individuals to become part
of our kitchen & serving team. Experi‑
ence not required but preferred. Please
apply in person at Carlos O’Kelly’s 707
W. 23rd St. (No Phone Calls)
Positions Open‑ KU Endowment is seek‑
ing KU students to work 3 nights each
week, talking with University of Kansas
alumni while earning $9/hr. Excellent
communication skills, dedication and a
desire to make KU a better university
are all a must. Email Emily at
evieux@kuendowment.org today to
learn more about this exciting opportu‑
nity to build your resume and have fun
in this professional environment.
Help Wanted!
To do odd jobs on horse farm.
15 Minutes from KU
Call 785‑766‑6836
WANTED! Prep cook for small catering
business. Great pay. Basic cooking
skills required. Must have fexible sched‑
ule. Call 785‑843‑8530.
NOW LEASING FALL 2013!
CAMPUS LOCATIONS!
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OFFICE: Chase Court Apartments
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Benefits avaiable for full-time positions.
If interested, apply with resume to:
Scott Henricks, Assistant Director
P.O. Box 647, Lawrence, KS 66044
Inquiries to (785) 843-2085
shenricks@theshelterinc.org
Positions will be open until filled.
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THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 PAGE 2B THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN

!
?
“The gap between the SEC and ev-
eryone else isn’t getting ridiculous;
it is ridiculous.”
— GREGG DOYEL
The SEC has won seven consecutive
national championships.
Q: Who was the last non-SEC team
to win a National Championship?
A: Texas in 2005.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
FACT OF THE DAY
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
SEC dominating the preseason media
This week in athletics
Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
NO SCHEDULED
EVENTS
NO SCHEDULED
EVENTS
Soccer
Purdue
1 p.m.
Lawrence
C
ollege football season is so close
every fan can taste the excitement
on the tip of their tongue. Tis
season could be unlike any other, but the
same powerhouse schools are still in the
South Eastern Conference. Te strength
of the SEC this year makes the conference
a popular conversation among the media,
but why?
Maybe because the SEC has six schools
within the preseason Associated Press Top
25 rankings: Alabama, Georgia, South Car-
olina, Texas A&M, Florida and LSU. Five of
those six schools are in the preseason top
10.
Maybe because the reigning national
champion, Alabama, will compete for a
third-straight national title. Since 1936, no
team has won three national champion-
ships, and no team has won four national
titles in fve years. Te Crimson Tide will
try to achieve those goals and continue to
complete its dynasty in 2013, and quar-
terback A.J McCarron will try to become
the frst starting quarterback to win three
straight national titles.
Maybe because reigning Heisman Trophy
winner and Texas A&M quarterback John-
ny Manziel is constantly in the media for
mishandling his fame. Currently, Manziel
is suspended for the frst half against Rice
by the NCAA for suspicion of receiving
money for autographs, reported by Tex-
asAgs.com. Manziel will attempt to be-
come the frst player to win two Heisman
Trophies since Archie Grifn in 1974 and
1975, and he’ll have to win the
Heisman with one less half under
his belt. Afer the game against
Rice, the Aggies will have to host the
defending champions.
Te media is drooling over the re-
match of Alabama and Texas A&M,
where Johnny Manziel upset the then
-No. 1 team and Alabama.
On Sept. 24, the Texas A&M Aggies will
host Alabama. Te Aggies will try to repeat
their performance from last year in Tus-
caloosa, where Heisman Trophy winner
Johnny Manziel made his name “Johnny
Football.”
College football ended the 2012 season
with an SEC team, and the 2013 season will
start with an SEC team.
Te college football season starts tonight.
University of South Carolina will battle
University of North Carolina to kick of the
2013 season. Also, this game will be the frst
time this season the public lays their eyes
on preseason Heisman Trophy candidate,
de f e n-
sive line-
man Jadeveon
Clowney.
Jadeveon Clowney,
who is prominently known
for his helmet-popping hit on Michigan
halfack Vincent Smith in last season’s
Outback Bowl, is an elite pass rusher and
one of the best players this year in college
football. Scout Inc. reported Clowney as
the number one NFL prospect for the 2014
NFL draf.
All eyes will be on Jadeveon Clowney and
No. 6 South Carolina against UNC Tar-
heels tonight at 5 p.m. on ESPN.
— Edited by Hannah Barling
By Blair Sheade
bsheade@kansan.com
Volleyball
Central Arkansas
1 p.m.
Tucson, Ariz.
Soccer
Missouri State
6 p.m.
Springfeld, Mo.
Volleyball
Morgan State
2:30 p.m.
Tucson, Ariz.
Volleyball
Arizona
9 p.m.
Tucson, Ariz.
Cross Country
Bob Timmons Classic
TBA
Lawrence
NO SCHEDULED
EVENTS
Volleyball
UMKC
7 p.m.
Kansas City
Martin homer leads
Texas past Mariners
SEATTLE — Leonys Martin hom-
ered and drove in a career-high
four runs as the Texas Rangers
roughed up Felix Hernandez and
romped past the Seattle Mariners
12-4 Tursday. Te AL West-lead-
ing Rangers tagged Hernandez
(12-8) for nine runs and 11 hits in
three-plus innings. Te former AL
Cy Young winner's ERA climbed
from 2.63 to 2.97.Martin Perez
(8-3) limited the Mariners to two
runs and fve hits in six innings.
Te rookie won his ffh straight
decision.
Adrian Beltre, who hit his 28th
homer, and Elvis Andrus each got
three of the Rangers' 17 hits. Mitch
Moreland also homered as every
Texas starter got a hit except for
Alex Rios, who chipped in with a
walk, a stolen base and a run.
Afer working out of a jam in
the frst, it looked as if Hernandez
would escape trouble yet again in
the second. Martin spoiled that
notion, though, hitting a three-run
homer with two outs.
Te Rangers added a pair of runs
in the third on a line drive by Ge-
ovany Soto that was misplayed by
lef felder Raul Ibanez. Te ball
ended up falling in front of a slid-
ing Ibanez for a two-run single.
—Associated press
MLB
Follow
@KansanSports
on Twitter
Te frst week of classes involve
thousands of freshmen wandering
campus, searching for their class-
es, adapting to the workload and
generally enjoying the sense of
freedom that comes with being a
rookie.
With a high infux of junior col-
lege transfers, the Jayhawks have 22
freshmen on their roster but eight
of them were signed this past re-
cruiting period. Te newbies have
been busy adjusting to the routine
of a college athlete, practicing time
management and fnding a mental
balance between academics, foot-
ball and social life.
“So far things are running
smoothly,” freshman linebacker
Colton Goeas said just before the
start of the school year.
Goeas has likely faced a bigger
adjustment than any other play-
er in his frst year, as he is further
from home than
anybody else. His
home town is
Mililani, Hawaii,
so Lawrence is
obviously a major
change. He said he
does occasionally
miss the beaches
and the ocean, but
he is mostly able
to focus on im-
proving his abili-
ties as a linebacker.
Teammates have provided Goeas
with a feeling of comfort and ca-
maraderie. Goeas said he spends
most of his time of the feld with
freshman teammates.
“We play video games, go out to
eat, just like typical college stuf,”
Goeas said.
For quarterback and Bishop
Miege graduate Montell Cozart,
there hasn’t been much of an ad-
justment of the feld at all. Cozart
knows receivers Tre Parmalee and
Justin McCay well from playing
with them at Miege, and ofensive
line coach Tim Grunhard spent
three years coaching Cozart at
Miege.
Cozart said that for him, having
those guys has made the transition
from high school to college an easy
one.
“It’s like having my family here,”
Cozart said.
Tere has been plenty of help ad-
justing to the diferences between
high school and college on the feld
as well, Cozart said. Quarterback
coach Ron Pawlus has worked with
both Cozart and fellow freshman
qua r t e r b a c k
Jordan Darling
to learn the
terminology of
calling plays in
the Kansas of-
fense.
Cozart went
straight to start-
ing quarterback
Jake Heaps with
questions about
the lesson, and
the junior had no problem helping
the freshman get to know the play-
book and continued to give him
advice on the practice feld.
“Tis summer I worked with him
a lot,” Cozart said. “I would go to
him two or three times per week
to help get to know the playbook.
He has a lot of coaching points for
me throwing-wise, getting my feet
right and things like that.”
Coach Charlie Weis and the team
captains agreed that last season the
team was lacking leadership and
correcting that has been a point of
emphasis throughout camp.
Freshman running back Colin
Spencer knew that he was coming
into a perfect learning situation
with the depth of talented and ex-
perienced running backs on the
team. He watches and listens to
them to pick up as much informa-
tion as he can.
“With how well they’ve played
here, if I can take some of the stuf
that they know, that’s going to help
me immensely,” Spencer said.
As a group the running backs are
fairly tight-knit, Spencer said. Just
as Cozart experienced in the quar-
terback group, Spencer never felt
like an outsider as one of the new
guys at the position. When he has a
question, Spencer feels like he can
approach any of the other backs.
“You just ask ‘em,” Spencer said.
“I had a little problem the other
day learning with some of the pro-
tections and Taylor [Cox] came
up to my room that night and we
went over all of it, we wrote all of
it down, we worked on it and got
it down.”
Weis decided to load his team
with an abundance of junior col-
lege transfers this season, so this
freshman class is smaller and will
likely not have many opportunities
to contribute to the team on the
feld, but it doesn’t hurt to be pre-
pared.
— Edited by Jessica Mitchell
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3B
FOOTBALL
Eight freshmen
join transfers
MAX GOODWIN
mgoodwin@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Freshman safety Tevin Shaw practices with junior nickelback Cassius Sendish at practice Aug. 16. Kansas’ few freshmen look to make an impact this season.

“With how well they’ve
played here, if I can take
some of the stuff that they
know, that’s going to help
immensely.”
COLIN SPENCER
Freshman running back
RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE
RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE
RECYCLE RECYCLE RECYCLE
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 4B
START YOUR JOURNEY.
START AHEAD OF THE CROWD.
START MOLDING YOUR STRENGTHS.
ST ST TT ST TTAR AR AAR A T T PUSH HHHHIN IN NN IN NNNNNNG GGGGGG YO YOURRRRSSE SE SE SE SELF LL EEEEVE VVVV N FURRRRTHERRRRR.
SSSSSST SSSS ARTTT T AA A AA AA NE NE NE EEE NN WWW WWWWWEX XPPPPE PE E PPPERI RRI RRRRRRR EEEEN EN ENCCCE C .
ST ST S ART OUT ONTOP.
STAR ARRRRTT T BU BU BUIL IL LLDI DING NG YYYOU OU O R R CA CARE RREER ER..
ST STAR A T DISCOV VEERING NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE E NE NE NE EE N W WTA TALE LEEENT NT NT T NT T NT T NTSS. S. S.
START STRONG.
SM
©2008. Paid for by the United States Army. All rights reserved.
Fcr mcre infcrmaticn emaiI çcIdbar©ku.edu
cr visit www.çcarmy.ccm/rctc/backtcschccI3
There's strcnç. Then there's Army Strcnç. Many infIuentiaI çcvernment and business Ieaders
started with the heIp cf Army R0TC. When ycu enrcII in Army R0TC at the University cf
Kansas, ycu çet hands-cn Ieadership traininç tc çive ycu a strcnç start after ccIIeçe as an
Army 0fficer. Army R0TC aIsc cffers fuII-tuiticn schcIarships tc heIp pay fcr ycur educaticn.
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Te Kansas soccer team returns
to the feld this weekend with
games against Missouri State and
Purdue. Te Jayhawks will face
Missouri State on Friday before re-
turning to Lawrence to play Purdue
on Sunday.
Kansas coach Mark Francis said
the team has been working on cre-
ating more ofense and strength-
ening the defense by continuing to
limit opponents’ opportunities to
score and keeping them out of the
back.
Te Missouri
State Bears are a
familiar opponent,
as Kansas has faced
them four out of
the last fve seasons,
earning victories in
all four games. Tis
season, the Bears
are of to a 0-2 start.
Tey lost to Tulsa
last Sunday in double overtime,
0 to 1. Francis said they received
scouting reports on the Bears from
former opponents and will try to
capitalize based on Missouri State’s
defense.
Te Bears are led by senior for-
ward Rachel Weimer and junior
forward Molly Huber. Huber had
a chance to score early in the game
against Tulsa, but her shot was
stopped. Sophomore goalkeep-
er Jessica Perry had seven saves
against Tulsa.
As for the second opponent of the
weekend, the Purdue Boilermakers
have a strong ofense, which led
them to their 1-1 start. Te Boil-
ermakers took a total of 34 shots
against Xavier last Sunday, but
lost 3 to 4. Te three Boilermaker
goals were by junior defender Mol-
lie Kuramoto, junior forward Alex
Hairston and freshman midfelder
Holly Gregory.
While the team has not turned
its attention to Purdue, which will
happen on Sunday, the coaches
have video on the Boilermakers
and have started preparing for
them, Francis said.
Te Jayhawks started the season
1-1 and look to build upon their
success from Sunday’s game against
Pacifc. Te Jayhawk ofense scored
three goals, while not allowing a
goal by Pacifc.
Te team also
had multiple
other opportu-
nities to score.
Junior goal-
keeper Kaitlyn
Stroud earned
her frst shut-
out of her ca-
reer against
Pacifc. Senior
forward Caroline Kastor had both
an assist and a goal against Pacifc.
She is now ffh on Kansas’ all-time
points list.
Sophomore midfelder Hanna
Kallmaier said there is always room
for improvement. She said in prac-
tice this week the team worked on
fnishing on ofense and the speed
of play.
“We want to be aggressive from
the frst minute of the game,” Kall-
maier said.
Kansas travels to Springfeld, Mo.,
to face Missouri State on Friday at 6
p.m. Te team comes back to Law-
rence for the game against Purdue
at noon on Sunday.
— Edited by Jessica Mitchell
SOCCER
Jayhawks to face Missouri State, Purdue this weekend
STELLA LIANG
sliang@kansan.com
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Junior forward Jamie Fletcher takes a shot on goal during the Aug. 19, 2011, game against Tennessee at the Jayhawk Soccer Sports Complex. The Jayhawks will face
Missouri State on Friday in Springfeld, Mo.

“We want to be aggressive
from the frst minute of the
game.”
HANNA KALLMAIER
Sophomore midfelder
LOS ANGELES — Ricky Nolasco
pitched eight innings of three-hit
ball, Hanley Ramirez and Andre
Ethier hit solo homers and the
Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Chi-
cago Cubs 4-0 on Wednesday.
Te frst-place Dodgers earned
their 21st victory in August, tying
the Los Angeles record for most
wins in a calendar month. Tey
avoided a second straight series
loss by taking two of three from the
last-place Cubs.
Nolasco (11-9) struck out a sea-
son high-tying 11, walked one and
permitted only one runner to get
reach third base. Acquired in a
trade with Florida in early July, the
right-hander won his sixth straight
start in August.
Dodgers rookie Yasiel Puig lef
afer four innings with no imme-
diate explanation. He didn’t slide
intosecond base to try to break up
a double play in the frst inning and
visibly reacted afer striking out in
the third.
Edwin Jackson (7-14) gave up
four runs — two earned — and six
hits against his old team. He struck
out fve and walked two.
Te Cubs have lost nine of 12, and
went 2-4 on their West Coast trip.
Manager Dale Sveum was ejected
in the bottom of the frst for argu-
ing a checked swing by Puig with
frst base umpire Lance Barksdale.
Playing their only midweek home
day game this season, the Dodgers
scored their frst two runs on the
homers by Ramirez with two outs
in the frst and Ethier in the fourth.
Te 88-degree heat and searing sun
had fans crowding under the over-
hangs in the outfeld pavilions and
upper deck.
Te Dodgers extended their lead
to 4-0 in the ffh. Afer a pair of
leadof singles, Nolasco bunted and
Jackson threw the ball past third
base. One run scored on the error
and Skip Schumaker, who replaced
Puig in right feld, hit an RBI sin-
gle.
Kenley Jansen struck out three in
a hitless ninth for the Dodgers.
Te Dodgers’ franchise record for
wins in a calendar month is 25, set
by Brooklyn in July
1947. ... Chicago fell to 9-17 in
Jackson’s 26 starts. ... Afer giving
up just 11 homers in his previous
144 innings, Jackson allowed two
in his frst four innings against the
Dodgers. ... Te Cubs concluded
their schedule against NL West
teams with their fnal road game
outside their division. Tey will
travel exclusively within the NL
Central in September for the frst
time since 1997. ... Te Cubs return
to Wrigley
Field on Friday having lost 16 of
their last 19 games at home.
MLB
Dodgers take series, shut out Cubs
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Cubs manager Dale Sveum, right, argues a call with frst base umpire
Lance Barksdale during the frst inning of their baseball game against the Los
Angeles Dodgers Wednesday in Los Angeles.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 5B
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MINNEAPOLIS — Salvador
Perez homered twice, got four hits
and sent a message to Minnesota
pitcher Andrew Albers afer a
high-and-inside fastball, leading
the Kansas City Royals over the
Twins 8-1 Wednesday night.
Danny Dufy (2-0) pitched six
2-3 shutout innings hours afer
being promoted from Triple-A.
Minnesota lost its fourth in a row.
Perez hit a two-run homer in the
fourth, a 415-foot drive into the
upper deck in lef feld of Albers
(2-2) that made it 3-0.
When Perez came up again in
the sixth, Albers threw an up-and-
in pitch that sent Perez tumbling
to the ground.
Te 23-year-old catcher, who
missed a week with a concussion
earlier this month, took his helmet
of and pointed at his side, appar-
ently telling Albers to aim lower if
he's going to throw inside. Albers
held both of his arms out and had
a few words of his own for Perez.
Home plate umpire Hunter Wen-
delstedt warned both benches.
Perez then struck back by lining
a single that whizzed over Albers'
head.
Perez hit another two-run homer
in the eighth, connecting of
reliever Casey Fien in the eighth.
Perez had his frst career multiho-
mer game. In 15 games against the
Twins this season, Perez is hitting
.410 with four doubles, three
homers and nine RBIs.
Dufy was called up from the mi-
nors and replaced the struggling
Wade Davis in the rotation. Dufy
allowed fve hits and struck out
seven in his third start with the
Royals since having elbow surgery
last June.
Dufy has shufed among Kansas
City, Triple-A Omaha and Dou-
ble-A Northwest Arkansas as he
comes back from surgery.
In three August starts with the
Royals, Dufy has a 1.10 ERA and
has struck out 17. Te tall and
thin lefy hasn't given up a run in
his last 12 2-3 innings.
Te Twins struck out 10 times
and set the club record for strike-
outs in a season with 31 games
to go.
Minnesota batters have fanned
1,127 times, breaking the previous
mark of 1,121 set in 1997.
Chris Colabello whifed on a
changeup from Dufy in the ffh
inning to set the record.
Justin Morneau hit his 16th
home run in the ninth to prevent
the Twins from being shut out.
Alex Gordon hit a solo homer
as the Royals beat Minnesota for
the eighth time in their last nine
games.
Perez homers twice,
Royals handle Twins
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kansas City Royals’ Salvador Perez trots home with a two-run home run off Minnesota Twins pitcher Andrew Albers.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO — Chris Sale struck
out 12 over eight-plus dominant
innings and Avisail Garcia hit a
three-run homer to lead the Chi-
cago White Sox to a 6-1 win over
the Houston Astros on Wednes-
day night.
Garcia fnished with three hits
for the White Sox, who have won
10 of their last 12 games. Sale
(10-12) bounced back from an
embarrassing start Friday night
against Texas in which he allowed
a career-worst four home runs.
Against Houston, he gave up only
one run on four hits and lef to
standing ovation afer allowing
his second walk of the game.
Afer posting a 1.93 ERA while
winning his previous three starts,
Sale matched a career high by
allowing eight runs over seven in-
nings in an 11-5 loss to Texas. He
said he was also embarrassed by
how he treated home plate umpire
Jerry Layne and the emotions he
displayed in the dugout.
Sale was more in control
Wednesday night. Te lef-hander
struck out the side in the frst
inning then got Robbie Grossman
looking to end the third for his
seventh strikeout. He struck out
the side in the ffh, ending the
inning by throwing a 96 mph
fastball past Jonathan Villar.
Sale had his 22 2-3 scoreless in-
nings streak snapped when Chris
Carter hit a two-out solo shot in
the seventh to tie the game 1-1. It
was Carter's 26th of the season.
Sale became the frst pitcher in
White Sox history to have 12-plus
strikeouts in four starts. He also
dropped his ERA to 2.99.
Astros starter Jarred Cosart
got by a shaky frst to pitch six
innings in a no-decision, allowing
one run. He pitched around seven
hits and fve walks with four
strikeouts.
Jef Keppinger broke a one-all tie
in the seventh with a sacrifce fy
of Astros reliever Lucas Harrell
(6-15).
Harrell then allowed back-to-
back walks and Garcia followed
with his frst home run with the
White Sox to put them up 5-1.
Garcia was acquired from the
Tigers in part of three-team deal
that sent Jake Peavy to the Red
Sox.
Te White Sox loaded the bases
against Cosart in the frst inning
with no outs. Afer Dunn struck
out, Konerko hit an RBI single.
Cosart minimized the damage by
getting Garcia to bounce into a
double play.
Astros losing ways don’t
change against White Sox
ASSOCIATED PRESS
MLB
Reds avoid sweep,
shutout Cardinals
ST. LOUIS — Jay Bruce hom-
ered and had fve RBIs and the
Cincinnati Reds got a dominant
efort from Homer Bailey to beat
the St. Louis Cardinals 10-0 on
Wednesday night and avoid a
three-game sweep.
Te Reds came out swinging a
few hours afer Brandon Phillips'
expletive-flled tirade at a Cincin-
nati Enquirer reporter sparked
by scrutiny of his .310 on-base
percentage, and afer manager
Dusty Baker criticized his team
for falling short while dropping
four of fve.
Te Cardinals lead the NL
Central by a half-game over Pitts-
burgh afer losing for the third
time in 12 games, and the Reds
are 3½ games back.
Bailey (9-10) capped a six-run
frst against Adam Wainwright
(15-8) with the Reds' sixth hit
and his frst RBI of the season. He
allowed fve hits in 7 1-3 innings
with seven strikeouts and is 4-0 in
his past six starts.
Te poor start was unusual for
Wainwright, who matched his ca-
reer worst with nine runs allowed
and lasted two innings for his
shortest outing of the year.
He had worked at least seven
innings his previous eight starts
and was coming of a complete
game against the Braves.
Phillips singled his frst two at-
bats and struck out his next two
trips while going 2 for 5.
Te Reds also got RBIs from
Ryan Ludwick and Todd Frazier
in the frst with another run scor-
ing on a wild pitch. Zack Cozart
got the frst of his three hits when
Wainwright failed to cover frst.
Phillips singled and Joey Votto
walked again to open the second,
setting the table for Bruce's 26th
homer on a 1-2 pitch. It's his
third fve-RBI game, one of them
against the Cardinals in 2009.
— Associated Press
1
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6B
UPTOWN THEATER
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TUESDAY 10/29
CROSSROADS KC
SATURDAY 9/7
LIBERTY HALL
MONDAY 10/14
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TUESDAY 10/15
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Te University of Kansas Cross
Country teams will host the Bob
Timmons Classic at Rimrock
Farm this Saturday to open the
2013 season.
Te teams are looking to get of
to a quick start in the frst meet
of the year, but most importantly,
they want to be in peak condition
when the championships come
around.
Injuries plagued the teams last
season, and coach Stanley Red-
wine said that the athletes needed
to be more patient and to pace
themselves so they could compete
well at the end of the season and
avoid injuries. Te Jayhawks saw
their poor health hurt the team at
last season’s league meet.
“We were ready to go with the
top fve, but lacked a sixth, so
if the ffh falls out, then you’re
really behind,” Redwine said.
Redwine added a large amount
of freshmen in addition to
athletes from Johnson County
Community College for depth to
combat potential injuries.
“We have 10 new people coming
in, so we need to gel as a team,”
he said.
Te men’s team is looking to
build on last year’s success in the
Big 12 Championships. Te team
placed fourth, but fell short of its
ultimate goal to make Nationals.
Expected to be in that pack of
runners is senior Josh Munsch
and juniors James Wilson, Reid
Buchanan, Conner Day and Bren-
dan Soucie.
On the women’s side, the Uni-
versity faces a loss of experience,
with only one senior lef on the
team. To fll that void, the team
is counting on the many new
freshmen.
Redwine said that he expects
the incoming freshmen to come
in and contribute to the team,
especially following the success of
last year.
Te newcomers had a lot of high
school success,
but Redwine said
that carrying that
success over to
the collegiate lev-
el on a consistent
basis is one of the
toughest things
to do. Te races
that used to hold
70-80 people now
have 300 people,
with the competition including
ffh-year seniors. Redwine said
that there is a chance for some
“shell-shock.”
“Every meet that they run in
college will be, at the minimum,
equivalent to their state meets in
high school,” Redwine said. “So
when you're talking about fresh-
men racing
against ffh-
year seniors,
we just have to
see how they
interact with
those people."
Te only
senior on the
team, Natalie
Becker, has a
lot of leading
to do for the women. Junior Mad-
dy Rich will help lead the pack
too, and sophomores Hannah
Richardson and Sara Seiwald
will be very crucial to the team’s
success, as well.
Te themes of the 2013 season
on both the men’s and women’s
side are to be patient and stay
healthy, with productivity from
the underclassmen being essen-
tial. If the Jayhawks can accom-
plish these things, it should be a
very successful season.
— Edited by Sarah Kramer
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Junior James Wilson races toward the fnish line for the the men’s 6k run at the Bob
Timmons Classic on Sept. 3, 2011. Wilson earned ffth place with a total time of
19:37.90.
CROSS COUNTRY MLB
Health becomes main focus
during season preparation
DANIEL HARMSEN
dharmsen@kansan.com
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Chris
Archer pitched seven strong in-
nings, David DeJesus scored twice
and the Tampa Bay Rays beat
the Angels 4-1 Wednesday night,
ending Los Angeles' four-game
winning streak.
Archer (8-5) allowed one run
and fve hits while striking out
fve. For the ffh time in his last
10 starts, the rookie right-hander
did not walk a batter.
Archer breezed through the
frst six innings, scattering three
singles and facing 20 batters, only
two over the minimum.
Fernando Rodney pitched the
ninth, striking out two for his 31st
save. Garrett Richards (4-6) gave
up four runs on seven hits and
three walks in 3 1-3 innings.
DeJesus, playing his ffh game
since the Rays got him in a trade
with Washington, had two of the
Rays' eight hits and drove in his
frst run. Ben Zobrist also had two
hits and an RBI.
DeJesus led of the Tampa Bay
frst with a double and scored on
Matt Joyce's sacrifce fy. In the
fourth, DeJesus hit an RBI single
of Richards' leg. Te Rays scored
three times in the inning, and an
error on shortstop Erick Aybar
put the Rays up 4-0.
Mike Trout and Josh Hamil-
ton opened the Angels seventh
with singles. Kole Calhoun hit a
sacrifce fy.
Trout had his 51st multihit game
of the season and raised his bat-
ting average against righthanded
pitchers to .332. He is hitting .333
against lefies.
Hamilton's single in the seventh
extended his road hitting streak to
a career-high 15 games.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tampa Bay Rays’ David DeJesus, right, shakes hands with on-deck batter Matt Joyce after scoring on a felding error by Los
Angeles Angels shortstop Erick Aybar on a ground ball by Rays’ Evan Longoria during the fourth inning of a baseball game
Wednesday in St. Petersburg, Fla.

“We have 10 new people
coming in, so we need to
gel as a team.”
STANLEY REDWINE
Coach
Tampa Bay snaps Angels’
four-game winning streak
Recycle,
Recycle,
Recycle,
Recycle,
Recycle,
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7B
Lots of Change
It was a fast summer. At the
KU Memorial Unions, we were
busy making lots of changes
we think you’ll love. Here are a
few things you can look for this
week at the U…
Check out “you @ the U,” our
social media outpost located
on Jayhawk Walk, 4th oor,
Kansas Union. Daily from 10:30
am-1:30 pm, students at the
outpost will be talking up all
things Union and posting your
comments on our social media
networks. Every day the
outpost will be up to some-
thing dierent: FREE KU swag,
“question of the week,” taking
photos, staging contests, and
sharing it all via social media.
Make sure you’re linked in to
our social networks so that you
never miss anything. And stop
by the outpost EVERY DAY to
check out what’s going on.
Mrs E’s, KU’s largest residen-
tial dining center, got a
complete overhaul, with new
food options oered in a very
cool setting. Don’t miss the
new BBQ…
We renovated the 4th oor
Lounge at the Kansas Union,
with new comfy chairs and
new table and chair seating for
those who like to spread out
when they study.
Like Indian food? Then you’ll
love Café Spice, at the Under-
ground at Wescoe. FREE food
samples are available all week.
From 10:30 am-2:30 pm on
Sept. 4, enjoy free food and KU
swag at Back to the Burge,
showcasing services oered at
Burge Union. Stop by…we
hear Crimson Cafe will be
passing out warm cookies.
The Unions are a gathering
place. Under our roofs, you’ll
nd your living room, your
kitchen, your media room,
your closet and your study.
Many memories you make on
campus will happen right here
at the Union.
Welcome back!
629 N. 2nd Street. Lawrence, KS
785-749-0200
www.subsonicmotors.com
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00
DETROIT — Brandon Moss
homered twice, drove in a ca-
reer-high six runs in the Oakland
Athletics' 14-4 rout of the Detroit
Tigers on Wednesday night.
Moss has three home runs in
his past two games for Oakland,
which had a season-high 21 hits
and has won the frst three games
of the four-game series by a com-
bined 28-13.
Josh Donaldson had three hits
and drove in two runs and Eric
Sogard had two RBIs for the
Athletics.
Torii Hunter homered for the
AL Central-leading Tigers. Hunt-
er and Victor Martinez each had
three hits. Oakland starter Daniel
Straily (7-7) got his frst win since
July 9. He allowed a run and eight
hits over six innings, walking two
and striking out four.
Straily had been 0-5 with a 5.20
ERA in his past seven starts, since
being recalled from Triple-A
Sacramento. He went down to the
minor league club in late June.
Lef-hander Brett Anderson
relieved Straily to start the sev-
enth and pitched the last three
innings for his frst major league
save. It was the usual starter's
frst appearance since April 29,
afer being sidelined with a stress
fracture to his right foot. He was
reinstated from the 60-day dis-
abled list earlier on Wednesday.
He allowed three runs and
fve hits and struck out a batter.
Tigers starter Doug Fister (11-7)
took the loss. He gave up seven
runs and 13 hits in fve innings.
He was followed to the mound
by Jose Alvarez, who allowed
fve runs and fve hits in 2 1/3
innings. Drew Smyly and Jeremy
Bonderman fnished the game.
Oakland used fve consecutive
singles and a sacrifce fy for three
runs in the second to take the
lead. Sogard and Kurt Suzuki had
run-scoring singles and Donald-
son hit a sacrifce fy.
Hunter put Detroit on the board
and made it 3-1 with his 15th
homer in the third. With one out,
Hunter hammered Straily's 1-1
pitch into the lef-feld stands.
Te Athletics then added four
more runs in the top of the ffh
for a 7-1 lead. Moss drove in the
frst run with a double and Yoenis
Cespedes, Alberto Callaspo and
Sogard produced RBI singles.
Oakland added three more
in the sixth on Jed Lowrie's
run-scoring double and Moss'
two-run homer of of Alvarez.
Donaldson singled in a run in
the eighth and Moss added a
three-run homer, which came of
Smyly. It was his 24th homer of
the season.
Detroit got three in the eighth
on Andy Dirks' RBI single and
Alex Avila's two-run double.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Athletics rout Tigers, Moss homers twice
MLB VOLLEYBALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oakland Athletics’ Brandon Moss watches his three-run home run against the Detroit Tigers in the eighth inning of a baseball game in Detroit on Wednesday.
Recycle, Recycle
Jarmoc named
one of 30 NCAA
award candidates
Redshirt senior Caroline
Jarmoc, a middle blocker for
the Kansas volleyball team
from Calgary, Alberta, Canada,
received recognition for her
work on the court, in the class-
room and in the community.
Jarmoc is one of 30 candidates
nationwide to be considered for
the 2013 Senior Class Award in
college volleyball.
Te award recognizes NCAA
Division I seniors who excel in
four areas: community, class-
room, character and competi-
tion. Ten of the candidates will
become fnalists for the award
midway through the season and
be placed on an ofcial ballot.
Afer voting by fans, coaches
and media, a winner will be
named along with First Team
and Second Team members.
A chemical engineering major
with a 3.23 GPA, Jarmoc has
started 93 consecutive match-
es for the
Jayhawks
dating back to
her redshirt
freshman
season. She
was named a
Second-Team
All American
by the Ameri-
can Volleyball
Coaches Association in 2012. A
member of the preseason 2013
All-Big 12 Team, Jarmoc will
look to lead a veteran Kan-
sas team to a deep run in the
NCAA Tournament.
Recent Jayhawks to be named
candi-
dates for
the Senior
Class Award
include
Jef Withey
(men’s bas-
ketball), An-
gel Goodrich
(women’s
basketball)
and Maggie Hull (sofball).
— Brian Hillix
Jarmoc
Withey
TORONTO — Edwin En-
carnacion hit a two-run home
run, rookie Todd Redmond
snapped a seven-start winless
streak and the Toronto Blue
Jays beat the New York Yan-
kees 7-2 on Wednesday night.
Te Blue Jays took two out of
three from the Yankees afer losing
12 of their frst 13 meetings this
season. Tey’re 3-3 against New
York at home and 0-10 on the road.
Redmond (2-2) lef to a stand-
ing ovation afer striking out Al-
fonso Soriano and Alex Rodri-
guez to begin the sixth inning.
He allowed two runs and three
hits, walked four and struck out
seven for his frst victory since
beating Minnesota on July 7.
Aaron Loup worked 1 1-3 in-
nings, Sergio Santos pitched
the eighth and Darren Oli-
ver fnished for the Blue Jays.
New York’s Hiroki Kuroda
(11-10) lost for the fourth time
in fve starts and gave up sev-
en runs for the second straight
outing, matching his career
high for the seventh time. Five
of the seven runs of Kuroda
were earned. He allowed nine
hits, walked one and struck out.
Kuroda came in 4-0 with a
1.60 ERA over his previous fve
starts against the Blue Jays, but-
couldn’t bring an end to his re-
cent road struggles, falling to
0-4 with a 6.94 ERA in his past
four starts away from home.
Yankees second baseman Rob-
inson Cano was held out of the
lineup, one day afer beinghit by
a pitch on the lef hand. Manag-
er Joe Girardi said Cano was still
dealing with pain and swelling,
but said he hoped to have the
fve-time All-Star back for Friday
night’s game against Baltimore.
Te Yankees are of Tursday.
New York’s Eduardo Nunez, who
lef Tuesday’s game with a sore
right knee, was scratched from the
lineup afer he felt sore during bat-
ting practice. Mark Reynolds made
his frst career start at second.
Toronto took advantage of a
throwing error by Yankees catcher
Chris Stewart in a four-run, two
out rally in the frst. Brett Lawrie
hit a two-run double and Rajai
Davis was hit by a pitch before J.P.
Arencibia reached on a two-strike
passed ball. Lawrie and Davis
both scored when Stewart’s errant
throw to frst rolled into foul ter-
ritory down the right feld line.
Te Blue Jays made it 6-0
when Encarnacion clubbed his
34th home run in the second, a
towering two-run shot to lef.
A seventh run scored on Jose
Reyes’ sacrifce fy in the third.
New York broke through against
Redmond in the fourth, when
Rodriguez hit an RBI single.
One out later, Reynolds hit
an RBI double, but Rodri-
guez was thrown out at the
plate trying to score from frst.
Rodriguez fnished 1 for
4 with three strikeouts.
1
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8B
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MLB
Blue Jays win frst series against Yankees
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Toronto Blue Jays’ Rajai Davis, left, scores behind New Yankees pitcher Hiroki Kuroda during frst-inning action in Toronto Wednesday.
Byrd hits home run in
Pirates debut
PITTSBURGH — Marlon
Byrd celebrated his arrival
in Pittsburgh with a three-
run homer, and the Pirates
beat the Milwaukee Brewers
7-1 on Wednesday night.
Byrd, acquired along
with catcher John Buck
from the New York
Mets on Tuesday, hit his
22nd homer of the sea-
son into the bushes in cen-
ter feld in the seventh in-
ning as Pittsburgh ended a
three-game losing streak.
Josh Harrison went 3
for 4 with an RBI for the
Pirates and Andrew Mc-
Cutchen and Gaby San-
chez added two hits apiece.
Charlie Morton (6-3)
scattered fve hits over 6
2-3 innings, walking three
and striking out two to
pick up his frst career
victory over the Brewers.
Milwaukee starter Tom
Gorzelanny (3-6) yield-
ed four runs on nine hits
in 5 1-3 innings, walking
one and striking out fve.
Carlos Gomez had two of
Milwaukee’s seven hits.
— Associated Press
Follow
@KansanSports
on Twitter
MLB
WANT SPORTS UPDATES ALL DAY LONG?
THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9B
Te Kansas women’s volleyball
team divides its season into three
parts: non-conference, confer-
ence and the NCAA Tournament.
Te Jayhawks play in the Arizo-
na Invitational in Tucson, Ariz.,
this weekend, which will begin
a stretch of 13 non-conference
matches (and an exhibition contest
against the Italian 23-and-under
national team). Tese matches will
be their frst of the 2013 season as
the squad prepares for conference
play and the postseason.
“We’re looking to start the season
with momentum and set a good
tone,” said Caroline Jarmoc, senior
middle blocker.
Along with Kansas, teams com-
peting in the invitational include
Arizona, Central Arkansas and
Morgan State.
Arizona is projected to fnish No.
8 in a loaded Pac 12 conference that
features 5 teams in the top 15 of the
American Volleyball Coaches As-
sociation preseason poll. Central
Arkansas is a talented mid-major
team that won its third Southland
Conference regular season title in
the last four years and made the
NCAA Tournament. Morgan State
will look to bounce back this sea-
son afer fnishing 5-21 last year.
Even with the tough matchups
ahead, Coach Bechard isn’t placing
too much of an emphasis on scout-
ing the competition.
“Te frst tournament out we’ve
got to worry about what we do on
our side of the net and focus on
what we do well,” Bechard said.
Afer an intense preseason sched-
ule that included multiple weeks of
two-a-day practices, the Jayhawks
are ready to get their season un-
derway. Freshman middle blocker
Taylor Soucie is excited to compete
in her frst collegiate match afer
a successful high school career at
Osawatomie High School. Tis
tournament will be her frst real
glimpse of the fast-paced college
matches.
“Te speed of the game is a lot
diferent from high school, espe-
cially my high school, which is in a
really small town,” Soucie said.
Te Jayhawks went 12-2 in the
non-conference schedule in 2012
and will have a chance to avenge
both losses this season. Kansas
plays two matches against Arkan-
sas—one home and one away—
and a home match against Notre
Dame.
On Saturday, Aug. 24, the play-
ers got a taste of competition as
the Crimson team defeated the
Blue team in the annual Crimson
and Blue scrimmage match. Te
team used it as an opportunity to
prepare for this weekend’s match-
es and fne-tune its mechanics and
rotations.
Te invitational will be played
using a round-robin format. In the
case of a tiebreaker, the team with
the fewest number of sets lost will
win the title. If a tie remains, the
team who surrendered the fewest
number of points wins the tie-
breaker.
Te team fnished 2nd in the
Arkansas Invitational to begin the
2012 season.
For match notes, stats and re-
sults, follow Brian Hillix (@Dou-
bleHillix) on Twitter.
— Edited by Sarah Kramer
VOLLEYBALL
BRIAN HILLIX
bhillix@kansan.com
Arizona vs. Morgan State – 8/30 @ 1:30 p.m.
Kansas vs. Central Arkansas – 8/30 @ 1 p.m.
Central Arkansas vs. Arizona – 8/31 @ 10:30 a.m.
Kansas vs. Morgan State – 8/31 @ 2:30 p.m.
Central Arkansas vs. Morgan State – 8/31 @ 4:30 p.m.
Kansas vs. Arizona – 8/31 @ 9 p.m.
2013 NCAA VOLLEYBALL
TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE
• 2012 record: 26-7
• Returns fve starters
• No. 20 ranking in AVCA preseason poll
• Three players on preseason
All-Big 12 team
KANSAS
ARIZONA
CENTRAL ARKANSAS
MORGAN STATE
• 2012 record: 16-15
• Returns six starters
• Projected 8th place fnish in Pac-12
• One player on preseason All-Pac-12
team
• 2012 record: 30-5
• Southland Conference regular season
champion
• Southland Conference tournament
champion
• Projected 1st place fnish in Southland
Conference
• 2012 NCAA Tournament appearance
• Three players on preseason All Southland
Conference team
• 2012 record: 26-7
• Returns fve starters
• No. 20 ranking in AVCA preseason poll
• Three players on preseason
All-Big 12 team
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Senior middle blocker Caroline Jarmoc prepares to serve the ball in the game against Texas on Nov. 5, 2011 in Lawrence.
Jarmoc said the team is looking to start the season off on the right foot in 2013.
1
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