PDMS DESIGN

Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model
Version 11.3

pdms1131/man30/doc2 Issue 181200

PLEASE NOTE: Cadcentre has a policy of continuing product development: therefore, the information contained in this document may be subject to change without notice. CADCENTRE MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND WITH REGARD TO THIS DOCUMENT, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. While every effort has been made to verify the accuracy of this document, Cadcentre shall not be liable for errors contained herein or direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance or use of this material.

This manual provides documentation relating to products which you may not have access to or which may not be licensed to you. For further information on which products are licensed to you please refer to your licence conditions.

Copyright 1990 through 2001 Cadcentre Limited

All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of Cadcentre. The software programs described in this document are confidential information and proprietary products of Cadcentre Ltd or its licensors.

For details of Cadcentre's worldwide sales and support offices, see our website at

http://www.cadcentre.com/location

Cadcentre Ltd, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HB, UK

Contents
1
1.1 1.2 1.3

Introduction ...................................................................................................1-1
About the DESIGN Reference Manual............................................................. 1-1 Organisation of the DESIGN Reference Manual ............................................. 1-1 Organisation of this Manual ............................................................................. 1-2

2
2.1

Equipment and Primitives ............................................................................2-1
The Primitive Modelling Attributes ................................................................. 2-1 2.1.1 Sizing Primitive Building Blocks .................................................................. 2-2 2.1.2 Choosing Nozzle Size, Rating and Height .................................................... 2-3 2.1.3 Modelling Detail Levels................................................................................. 2-3 2.1.4 Obstruction Settings ..................................................................................... 2-4 Positioning at a Known Point ........................................................................... 2-6 2.2.1 Positioning at a Coordinate........................................................................... 2-6 2.2.2 Polar Positioning from the Origin................................................................. 2-8 2.2.3 General Polar Positioning from the Origin................................................... 2-9 Orientation and Connection............................................................................ 2-10 2.3.1 Design Element Orientation ....................................................................... 2-11 2.3.2 Design Element Reorientation.................................................................... 2-12 2.3.3 Primitive Element Connection.................................................................... 2-14 Moving by a Known Distance ......................................................................... 2-16 2.4.1 Moving Along Axes ...................................................................................... 2-16 2.4.2 Moving in any Direction.............................................................................. 2-17 2.4.3 Moving in any Direction: Distance Given in Different Plane .................... 2-19 Moving Through Defined Intersection Planes................................................ 2-19 2.5.1 Moving Through an Intersection ................................................................ 2-20 2.5.2 Moving Either Side of an Intersection........................................................ 2-22 2.5.3 General Moving to an Intersection ............................................................. 2-24 Moving In Front of or Behind Items ............................................................... 2-27 2.6.1 Moving Either Side of a Fixed Object ......................................................... 2-27 2.6.2 Moving On Top of or Under a Fixed Object ................................................ 2-30 2.6.3 Moving an Item Using Reference Points .................................................... 2-33 Moving to a Specified Clearance between Items ............................................ 2-35 2.7.1 Moving to a Clearance Either Side ............................................................. 2-35 2.7.2 Moving an Object to Clear Another Object................................................. 2-38 2.7.3 Moving to a Vertical Clearance................................................................... 2-40 2.7.4 General Moving to a Clearance................................................................... 2-43 Reflecting a Position in a Plane (Mirroring)................................................... 2-44

2.2

2.3

2.4

2.5

2.6

2.7

2.8

3
3.1 3.2 3.3

Piping, Ducting and Cable Trays .................................................................3-1
Defining a Branch ............................................................................................. 3-1 Branch and Hanger Specifications ................................................................... 3-2 Connecting the Head or Tail ............................................................................. 3-3 3.3.1 The Head or Tail Connection Reference Attribute....................................... 3-5
Contents-i

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

Contents

3.3.2 Positioning Head or Tail in Free Space ........................................................ 3-6 3.3.3 Head or Tail Positioning Using End Components........................................ 3-7 3.3.4 Head and Tail Positioning by Bottom or Top of Pipe ................................... 3-9 3.3.5 Moving the Head or Tail ............................................................................. 3-11 3.3.6 Reconnecting Pipes after an Equipment Move........................................... 3-13 3.4 Selecting Component and Tube Details from Specifications ......................... 3-13 3.4.1 Choosing Components from a Displayed List............................................. 3-14 3.4.2 Selecting Components from Specifications................................................. 3-19 3.4.3 Selecting the Default Specification Component ......................................... 3-20 3.4.4 Selecting from Several Alternatives ........................................................... 3-20 3.4.5 Selecting ‘Out-of-Specification’ Components .............................................. 3-22 3.4.6 Selecting Components and Tube Separately .............................................. 3-23 3.4.7 Direct Selection by Shortcode ..................................................................... 3-24 3.5 Re-selection of Existing Components and Tube ............................................. 3-26 3.5.1 Re-selecting the New Default Component.................................................. 3-26 3.5.2 General Reselection of Components and Tube ........................................... 3-27 3.6 Standard Component Attributes .................................................................... 3-28 3.6.1 Position and Orientation Attributes ........................................................... 3-30 3.6.2 Component Arrive and Leave Attributes.................................................... 3-31 3.6.3 Swapping the Arrive and Leave P-points ................................................... 3-31 3.6.4 The Component Specification Reference Attribute .................................... 3-33 3.6.5 Variable Length Tube (and Rod) Attributes............................................... 3-33 3.6.6 Insulation Specification Attribute .............................................................. 3-35 3.6.7 Trace Heating Specification Attribute........................................................ 3-35 3.6.8 The Fabrication Flags ................................................................................. 3-36 3.6.9 Position and Orientation Status Flags ....................................................... 3-37 3.6.10Variable Component Attributes .................................................................. 3-38 3.6.11Offline/Straight-Through Component Attribute ........................................ 3-39 3.6.12Multi-Way Component Attributes .............................................................. 3-39 3.7 Orientation and Connection of Components .................................................. 3-40 3.7.1 Component Orientation............................................................................... 3-41 3.7.2 Direction-Changing Components ................................................................ 3-43 3.7.3 Component Connection ............................................................................... 3-45 3.7.4 Forced Component Connection ................................................................... 3-46 3.8 Moving by a Known Distance ......................................................................... 3-47 3.8.1 Moving Components .................................................................................... 3-47 3.8.2 General Moving of Components .................................................................. 3-48 3.9 Positioning Components using Reference Planes .......................................... 3-49 3.9.1 Positioning with respect to the Previous Component ................................ 3-49 3.9.2 Positioning the Component through an Intersection ................................. 3-51 3.9.3 Positioning with respect to an Intersection................................................ 3-53 3.9.4 General Positioning through an Intersection ............................................. 3-57 3.10 Positioning Components ‘Point-to-Surface’ .................................................... 3-58 3.10.1Positioning Components either side of an Object....................................... 3-59 3.10.2Positioning Components On Top of or Under an Object ............................ 3-62 3.10.3General Component Positioning Using Planes........................................... 3-64 3.11 Component Clearance Positioning.................................................................. 3-66 3.11.1Clearance from the Previous Component ................................................... 3-66 3.11.2Component Clearance Either Side.............................................................. 3-68 3.11.3Component Clearance Vertically ................................................................ 3-70
Contents-ii
PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

..............................2 Generic Type......................................1 4.........................5 Orientation Angle ..............12 Dragging Equipment and Piping Networks ...............3................................... 4-7 4. 4-6 4.......................................... 5-4 5...........1 Connecting Sections ................................... 4-2 4........ 5-21 Contents-iii 5..........3...............8 Start and End Releases ................2.................. 5-2 Creating and Connecting Sections Automatically........................ 4-3 4........................................... 5-4 5......6.......... 5-8 5.............11.....................................................................................................................3.................2 Automatic Pipe Routing.......................................................................................... 5-18 5...........................................1 Routing Pipes along Preferred Axes ...............................................................2................. 5-17 5................... 5-6 5................................ 5-19 5..... 4-6 4...................... 5-3 Section Attributes ..........2 Setting Routing Planes................3............2Dragging Piping................. 4-4 4..... 4-2 4.................................3............. 3-72 3............5 Positioning and Orientating Secondary Joints.......................................5................................................ 5-8 5.................1 Cross-Sectional Profile via a Specification Reference ..................................... 4-1 Pipe Routing ... 4-5 4........................................ 4-8 4...................................................................................3 5 5...................... 5-11 Creating and Positioning Joints ................................................................... 3-78 3....4 Start and End Plane Directions .6 Combined Spreading and BOP Operations ...................1 Connection Reference ...........3 Reconnecting Sections ............. 4-1 4..................... 4-5 Refining the Automatic Pipe Routes.............................................. 5-9 Creating and Positioning Secondary Nodes ..5.................................. 4-3 4......................11........ 5-21 5......5General Clearance of Components and Tube ........Contents 3...........................12...................................................................................5...3 Start and End Positions ............................3 Defining the Base Direction .......................................7 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11................5 Setting the Nozzle Offset Factor.................. 5-12 5............................2 Creating Secondary Joints ........................4 Positioning and Orientating Primary Joints .......................................................................................3 .............................7.....................4-1 Accessing the Automatic Pipe Routing Facilities.7....................2.....4 Invoking the Automatic Routing Process .......... 3-74 3..... 5-19 5......1Dragging Equipment and Nozzles ....................................1 Creating Primary Joints ......................................................................................................................... 5-15 Attributes of Connected Joints .................. 4-8 4..................................................4 5...........5-1 Creating and Positioning Primary Nodes.2........ 5-12 5.....................5...........4 Spreading Pipes about the Rack ...............................12......................6 5...................3..........................1 5..... 3-77 3.......3. 5-18 Manually Connecting Sections.........5 Setting the Bottom-of-Pipe Position ...........................2 Cutting Plane...............2 Defining the Direction of Spread ........................................3.................................................... 5-7 5...................6 Joint Start and End References ....................................................... 5-13 5...............................................................................................1 Entering and Leaving Autoroute Mode ..........................3 Setting Joint Geometry via a Specification Reference ............4Tube (Bottom of Pipe) Clearance ......................3..............................................................................................7................3...........................................3.........................................................7 Start and End Connection Types .............................. 5-5 5.......3 Structural Design Using Catalogue Components ..5 5........3 Setting Penalty Volumes...........3...2 Disconnecting Sections....................................................... 5-14 5.................................................3.5...............2......................................3. 5-13 5.......1 Defining the Rack to be Used................................................................................6..... 4-7 4.....................1..........3 Cutback Allowance ..... 3-82 4 4...................2 5............. 5-5 5................ 5-17 5..6..............

................. 5-24 5..........13.... 5-43 5..10 5............................................................10....4 Groups ........................ 5-50 5.................................... 5-39 Design........... 6-4 6.......................................13.....1 7.................................................................1 Setting Local Names .............................................2 Positioning by Using P-lines ........................................ 5-22 5.......................................................Contents 5.................3 Orientating by Using P-lines .... 5-46 5............................ 5-35 Fittings..........................................8................................................................................................................... 7-1 Accessing Groups ...............................6Generic Fixings Representing Joints and Fittings.........................8.........................14..................13... 5-48 5....9. 5-43 5...2 Moving Steelwork Elements ....................13............................13 5.............14............... 5-30 5......................................................................... 6-9 Portsets and Linksets ....6-1 The Concepts ......................................................... 5-41 Representing Curved Beams and Walls ........ 6-1 The Design Template Hierarchy................... 7-3 Index Contents-iv PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.......................................... 5-34 5...........14 Repositioning Steelwork Elements ............ Owning and Attached Parameters ...........................1Fittings and Panel Fittings ... 5-51 6 6............................................................................................................................................................................................ 5-26 Positioning and Orientating Using P-lines .. 6-5 Setting Priorities for Evaluating Rules ................................2Splitting a Panel.................................................2Setting Owning and Attached Parameters...................................................8..............................5 6...2Controlling Edge Representation in DRAFT...... 5-50 5..13....3 Modifying Lengths of Sections ........7-1 Defining Group Contents .2Structure-to-Pipework Connections.................................12....1Overview .11...................................................... 5-44 5..8 5................. 5-29 5............................4How P-lines Are Used For Generic Sections ............................................................... 6-2 Parameterisation using Design Datasets ..................................1Setting Design Parameters .......................................8 Design Templates ...............12.................................................. 6-7 Using a Design Template Item in a Design......................................12 5.......... 5-30 5...............4..................7 6..............10...................................2 7..........................................................................10............. 5-22 5.........................................9 5........13...............................1Creating a Panel..................... 5-39 5.11............................ 7-2 Deleting Groups ....... Hangers and Equipment Load Points ..........................................4 Reorientating Steelwork Elements ................................ 6-9 7 7...............................................................................8...... 7-3 Copying a Group.......... 5-34 5.....11 5............4 6...............................................1 Identifying P-lines ......... 5-38 5... 5-32 Creating and Connecting Panels ...................................9. 6-5 6.............................................................. 6-6 Adding Design Points to Template Elements................................. 5-49 Representing Building Components ...........................3Structure-to-Equipment Connections ..................................................9.................................................. 5-40 5................. 5-40 5......................................................................1 6...................................5Positioning Items Relative to Generic Sections.......................................3More About Curve Types...............2 Using Local Names in Expressions.........3Connecting Panels using Linear Joints ...................2Defining a Generic Section......1Using Element Soft Types............................... 5-25 5. 6-3 Assigning Local Names to Template Elements......................................3 ...........3 7..........6 6............................4...............................................2 6........3 6................................... 5-38 5.................. 5-34 5.................................................................................................... 5-45 5...1 Reversing Section Start and End Positions (‘Flipping’) ..............................11..........

for example. describes the commands for creating database elements and setting their attributes. This manual is written for experienced users of PDMS DESIGN who need to use commands. describes the DESIGN Utilities for data consistency checking and clash detection. check and report on the model.1 Introduction 1. General Commands. which are used. their position in the database hierarchy and their attributes. Part 4. for setting up the display.1 About the DESIGN Reference Manual The PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual describes all the DESIGN commands in detail. contains details of all the elements which can be created in the Design database. to write batch macros or to customise the GUI. you will also need to refer to the Cadcentre Software Customisation Guide and Cadcentre Software Customisation Reference Manual for information about PML. the Cadcentre programming language. Utilities. 1. Part 2. (this volume). DESIGN is normally used interactively. How to use the applications is described in user guides and on-line help. the Design database elements and their attributes. If you are going to customise the GUI. which are used to show all the options available for each command. It also describes how the Design database is structured. It also describes how to use the command syntax graphs. and for exporting DESIGN data to programs such as REVIEW.3 1-1 . • • • PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Elements and Attributes. describes general DESIGN commands.2 Organisation of the DESIGN Reference Manual The DESIGN Reference Manual has four parts: • Part 1. Part 3. for example. and querying and navigating around the Design database. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) provides discipline-based applications which help you to create.

Ducting and Cable Trays.3 . Its main focus is on structural steelwork design. 1-2 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. defined using expressions.3 Organisation of this Manual You should refer to Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual for general information about creating elements and setting the standard attributes which all Design elements have.) Chapter 5 describes Structural Design Using Catalogue Components. including positioning. Chapter 4 describes the commands for Automatic Pipe Routing. including positioning. Chapter 6 describes DESIGN Templates. orientating and connecting commands applicable to these elements. • • • • • For a comprehensive list of all PDMS attributes and pseudo-attributes. including selecting Components from the Catalogue. Users who require these facilites should enquire about Cadcentre’s Advanced Router product. Chapter 7 describes Groups. is divided into the following chapters: • Chapter 2 describes the commands for modelling Equipment and Civils. see the Cadcentre Software Customisation Reference Manual. and then inserted into a model. with extensions of the concepts to include their use for representing walls and floors in more general building design. which have now been largely replaced by Lists and Collections.Introduction 1. Part 2. Chapter 3 describes the commands for modelling Piping. (See the addresses at the end of this manual. This manual. orientating and connecting commands applicable to these elements. which are groups of elements which can be defined and stored as a single parameterised element. and positioning. orientating and connecting commands applicable to structural elements.

YLEN and ZLEN attributes are set (on creation they are zero). PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Ptrack and Substructure. orientations and dimensions.3 2-1 . which are modelled within the major hierarchical elements Equipment. for example. or moved by a given distance or clearance. the basic attribute information is the stored physical description of the designed plant.1 The Primitive Modelling Attributes The plant design hierarchy is a ‘skeleton’ structure of the elements which represent the chosen organisation of the plant model. however. The physical appearance and layout of the process items are determined by the value of each element’s attributes. These elements own primitive geometric shapes and holes which are dimensioned and assembled to form a suitable model. These include items such as pumps.2 Equipment and Primitives This chapter describes the modelling and layout of process equipment and civil items. walls and heat exchangers. The items can then be positioned and orientated as a whole by using one of the comprehensive positioning commands . to recognise that regardless of how it was input. Structure. a Box only looks like a box if its XLEN. This section describes those physical primitive element attributes that give a shape to the model. vessels. Generally. There are also a number of special plant modification facilities that are described in a later part of the manual. 2. these attributes will either be set by typing in their values directly or from macros. It is important.Design items can either be positioned at a known co-ordinate. The same commands can be used to modify existing positions.

.Equipment and Primitives 2. structural and civil items in the plant are built up by creating. a complete description of all primitive elements and their attributes can be found in Part 3 of the PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual. The following primitive shapes are available: Box Cylinder Circular Torus Cone Slope-bottomed Cylinder Rectangular Torus Dish Snout Pyramid Holes may be plunged through ‘solid’ primitives using a corresponding set of negative primitives. DIAMETER HEIGHT Figure 2-1 2-2 Dimensioning a CYLINDER primitive PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Examples: XLEN 1000 (At a Box) The xlength dimension of the box becomes 1000 DIA 3 FT (At a Cylinder) The diameter of the cylinder becomes 3 feet Command Syntax: Refer to Part 3 of the DESIGN Reference Manual. The examples given in this subsection refer to the Box and Cylinder. These commands directly set the attributes of basic modelling primitives which give them their precise dimensions.1.3 . dimensioning and assembling basic geometric elements.1 Sizing Primitive Building Blocks Keywords: XLENGTH HEIGHT XOFF DTOP XTSHEAR YLENGTH RADIUS YOFF DBOTTOM YTSHEAR ZLENGTH XTOP YTOP RINSIDE XBSHEAR DIAMETER XBOTTOM ROUTSIDE YBSHEAR YBOTTOM Description: The physical shapes of equipment.

3 Modelling Detail Levels Keywords: Description: LEVEL This command sets the attribute. The command specifies a range of modelling ‘levels’ which determine the permanent visibility characteristics of the element in DESIGN. Examples: CATR /NFAARPMM (At Nozzle) The size and rating of the Nozzle are set by naming the appropriate Catalogue choice. representing the inclusive range in which that item will be drawn. the ‘Nozzle’ is merely a hierarchical element with no geometry. The size and rating are determined by setting the CATREF (Catalogue Reference) attribute which refers to an element in the Catalogue. is determined on site by setting the corresponding Height attribute. The Nozzle height.2 Choosing Nozzle Size. In DESIGN. In this way.HEIght <uval> --> 2. If the CATREF attribute is not set. The LEVEL attribute is specified as two numbers. several graphical versions of the same object can be available for different purposes.Equipment and Primitives 2. The attribute allows plant items to be assembled from overlaid primitives representing varying levels of detail. that controls modelling detail.1. common to all primitive elements. however. For example. HEI 2’6 (At Nozzle) The Height of the Nozzle becomes 2’6.2 2-3 . it may be decided to represent an I-section beam as a single box for simple space-modelling in DESIGN. Rating and Height Keywords: Description: CATREF HEIGHT The Nozzle is the only basic equipment primitive that obtains some of its physical dimensions directly from the PDMS Catalogue.CATref name --> >-. only primitives of visible items whose LEVEL range includes the LEVEL setting specified by the REPRESENTATION command will be drawn (see Chapter 5 in Part 1 of this manual). Command Syntax: >-.1. while using its full cross-section for 2D drawing data in DRAFT. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

). the following rules apply: • • • No obstruction (internal graphical details) Soft obstruction (access volumes etc.1. SOFT or NONE. Command Syntax: >-. or alternatively they can be specified numerically as follows: For ordinary primitives.3 .Equipment and Primitives LEVEL ranges for Nozzles and piping are specified in the Catalogue.LEVel integer integer --> Figure 2-2 Some modelling detail levels for an I-section beam 2. Examples: LEVEL 6 10 The current primitive will be drawn if the operative drawing LEVEL is within the specified range.) Hard obstruction (vessel ‘envelopes’ etc. A company will usually establish rigid standards for the use of LEVELs which are defined permanently in the Catalogue and therefore must be complied with during Equipment and Civils modelling.4 Obstruction Settings Keywords: Description: OBSTRUCTION The OBSTRUCTION attribute indicates to the clash detection facility whether a primitive should be considered as a ‘Hard’ or ‘Soft’ obstruction. Obstructions can be specified as HARD. or not at all. 2-4 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

| HARD -----| | SOFT -----| | NONE -----+--> See also Chapter 5 in Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual for details of the Spatial Map which is used during clash-checking.OBStruction --+-| |-| |-| ‘-integer --.2 2-5 . Command Syntax: >-. OBSTRUCTION settings for Nozzles and Piping are given in the Catalogue. OBST HARD (At a primitive) Current Element will be considered as a ‘hard’ obstruction. Note: Examples: OBST SOFT (At a primitive) Current Element will be considered as a ‘soft’ obstruction.e. negative primitives) also have the OBSTRUCTION attribute. OBST 2 (At a primitive) Current Element will be considered as a ‘hard’ obstruction.Equipment and Primitives Holes (i. OBST NONE (At a primitive) Current Element will be ignored during clash detection. Figure 2-3 Obstruction settings for use in clash detection PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

Prompt alerts appear. POS PIN5 AT E3000 The specified PIN and Current Element will be positioned as a single rigid item. Command Syntax: >--+-.2. However options exist to allow any p-point belonging to the item to be used as the positioning reference. | | ‘----------------------+-.3 . AT@ The Current Element will be placed at the toleranced working grid position indicated by the cursor hit.1 Positioning at a Coordinate Keywords: Description: POSITION AT This command positions the Current Element directly by giving the 3D coordinates.POSition <marke> --. You can: • • • Specify explicit coordinates Specify the position of an existing p-point Cusor pick with a working grid (WGRID) position The position of the Current Element is normally defined as that of its origin. the name of another element or p-point position.2 Positioning at a Known Point These commands allow you to place the Current Element at a known position in space.Equipment and Primitives 2. and the position is generated by hits in two orthogonal views. Examples: AT E3’ N4’6 U1’ Current Element will be placed at the specified owner coordinate position (see Figure 2-4). 2. so that the PIN is at E3000 N0 U0 (see Figure 2-5). AT IDP@ Current Element will be placed at the p-point picked by the cursor. or visually by using the cursor.AT <bpos> --> 2-6 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

| | |-.Equipment and Primitives Querying: >-.Query POSition --+-.2 2-7 .<bpos> --. | | ‘------------+-.WRT --.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> Querying Examples: Q POS Gives position of Current Element origin in owner coordinates Q POS IN SITE Gives position of Current Element origin in Site Q POS IDP@ Gives position of picked p-point U N CE ORIGIN 1' OWNER ORIGIN 4' 6" 3' E AT E 3' N 4' 6" U 1' Figure 2-4 Positioning the Current Element at a known point PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

Equipment and Primitives

Figure 2-5

Positioning a PIN and the current element together at a known point

2.2.2 Polar Positioning from the Origin
Keywords: Description: POLAR DISTANCE This command is used to position the Current Element using polar coordinates. This is particularly useful for positioning Nozzles. The coordinates are relative to the owner’s origin.

Examples: POLAR E45N DIST 300 The Current Element will be placed 300 from its owner’s origin along E45N (see Figure 2-6). POLAR PIN1 DIST 3000 The Current Element will be placed 3000 from its owner’s origin along the direction of PIN1 (see Figure 2-6). POS IDP@ POLAR S1OW DIST3 The p-point hit and the current element will be moved as a rigid entity so that the p-point is the specified polar distance from the owner’s origin. Command Syntax:
>--+-- POSition <marke> --. | | ‘----------------------+-- POLar <bdir> DISTance <uval> -->

2-8

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

Equipment and Primitives

Querying:
>-- Query POSition --+-- <bpos> --. | | ‘------------+-- WRT --. | | |-- IN ---+-| ‘-->

<gid> -->

Figure 2-6

Polar positioning from the origin

2.2.3 General Polar Positioning from the Origin
Keywords: Description: POLAR PLANE DISTANCE This command differs from the basic polar option by allowing the distance from the owner’s origin to be specified more generally. The PLANE element of the command enables this distance to be given in a direction different from the polar direction. For example, an element may be placed on a line North 25 East, and at N250 from the owner’s origin.

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.2

2-9

Equipment and Primitives

Examples: POLAR N30E PLANE N DIST 1000 Positions the Current Element along the N30E line from the owner origin at N1000 (see Figure 2-7). Command Syntax:
>-+- POSition <marke> -. | | ‘--------------------+- POLar <bdir> -+- PLAne <bdir> -. | | ‘----------------+- DISTance <uval> ->

Querying:
>-- Query POSition --+-- <bpos> --. | | ‘------------+-- WRT --. | | |-- IN ---+-| ‘-->

<gid> -->

Figure 2-7

General polar positioning from the origin by specifying a plane

2.3

Orientation and Connection
These commands allow the Current Element to be rotated. In the case of connection, the item is also repositioned. For both commands, the specification of a single axial direction or p-point on the Current Element is sufficient to perform a reorientation. However, a second direction must be specified if the orientation is to be fixed in 3D space.

2-10

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

Equipment and Primitives

2.3.1 Design Element Orientation
Keywords: Description: ORIENTATE Every Design element has its own co ordinate system which consists of a right-handed set of East (X), North (Y) and Up (Z) axes. The precise orientation of an element must be given as two statements fixing the direction of two axes, e.g. ORI Y IS NORTH AND Z IS UP. When rotating symmetrical items, such as cylinders, it may be sufficient to give one axis direction only (allowing DESIGN to choose the other), e.g. ORI P1 IS N45E. Regardless of the command given, orientation always occurs about the Current Element origin.

Examples: ORI Y IS N AND Z IS UP The Current Element is rotated about its origin so that its Y axis is pointing North (in owner coordinates) and its Z axis is pointing up (see Figure 2-8a). ORI P1 IS E The Current Element is rotated so that its P1 p-point is pointing East in owner coordinates (see Figure 2-8b). Command Syntax:
>- ORIentate -+- <bdir> IS <bdir> -. | | ‘--------------------+- AND <bdir> IS <bdir> -. | | ‘------------------------+-->

Querying:
>-- Query ORIentation --+-- WRT --. | | |-- IN ---+-| ‘-->

<gid> -->

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.2

2-11

including a Group. The rotation required may be specified in any of the following ways: • As a specified angle of rotation about the element’s default axis (i.2 Design Element Reorientation Keywords: Description: ROTATE BY ABOUT THROUGH AND The ROTATE command allows you to rotate any Design element.Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-8a Design element orientation (1) Figure 2-8b Design element orientation (2) 2. the Z axis).3.e.3 . 2-12 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

since the rotation is specified as a negative angle).<bdir> TOwards <bdir> -+-> | | ‘ AND <bdir> IS <bdir> -+.<bdir> TOwards <bdir> -| | | | | ‘.Equipment and Primitives • As a specified angle of rotation about a given axis. | | | | ‘.ROTate ABOut <bdir> + THRough <bpos> -+. the latter defined by its direction and/or through point. the default through point is the Origin. ROTATE BY 45 ABOUT E Rotates by 45° about the E-W axis (clockwise when looking E). By reference to the element’s axes. Command Syntax: Rotation about a given axis: >. If the direction and/or through point are omitted.<uval> ----------------. ROTATE ABOUT E BY 45 The same as the preceding example.BY -+.AND <bdir> IS <bdir> ---------+-> | | BY -+. The rotation is 25° anticlockwise when looking S along this axis. | | | | | | ‘. the default direction is that of the Neutral Axis or Z axis.2 2-13 . • Examples: ROTATE BY -45 Rotates by 45° about the element’s Z axis (anticlockwise when looking in the +Z direction. | | ‘------------------+-> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<uval> ----------------. ROT THRO P3 ABOUT S BY -25 Rotates element about an axis which passes in the N-S direction through its p-point 3 position.THRough <bpos> -. ROTATE AND Y IS N45W25D Rotates element until the Y axis points as closely as possible to the N45W25D direction.

ROTate BY + <uval> ---------------. both the pin and Current Element move as a rigid entity. | | | | ‘------------------+-> | | THRough <bpos> -+.ABOut <bdir> -. | | | | ‘----------------+-> ‘-> 2. | | ‘ <bdir> TOwards <bdir> + ABOut <bdir> -+. in the latter. | | | | ‘--------------+-> | | ‘ AND <bdir> IS <bdir> + ABOut <bdir> -.ROTate AND <bdir> IS <bdir> -+.THRough <bpos> -.<uval> ---------------. | | | | ‘----------------+-> ‘-> Rotation to give a specified orientation: >. | | ‘----------------+-> Rotation by a specified amount: >.3 .ROTate THRough <bpos> + ABOut <bdir> + BY + <uval> ---------------.ABOut <bdir> -+.Equipment and Primitives Rotation to pass through a given point: >. The connection operation includes positioning and orientation of the Current Element so that the two specified Design Points are coincident and of opposite direction. | | | | | | ‘ <bdir> TOwards <bdir> | | | | | ‘ AND <bdir> IS <bdir> ------+-> | | BY -+. In the former case. | | | | ‘------------------+-> | |. 2-14 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Mapping pins can also be used to great effect as they can connect and be connected to. the Current Element moves to the static pin.3 Primitive Element Connection Keywords: Description: CONNECT This command allows the current primitive element to be ‘connected’ to another element or mapping pin.<bdir> TOwards <bdir> + ABOut <bdir> .3.THRough <bpos> -+.THRough <bpos> -.ABOut <bdir> -. | | | | ‘. Any p-point on the Design element may be connected to any other p-point (except p-points on the same element).

WRT --. | | ‘------------+-. The Current Element is rotated so that its X axis is North in owner coordinates (see Figure 2-10).Equipment and Primitives Examples: CONN P2 TO P1 OF /A The P2 of the Current Element is connected to the specified p-point on another element (see Figure 2-9).CONnect <marke> TO <marke> -+. | | ‘-------------------------+--> Querying: >-.2 2-15 .IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> Figure 2-9 Connecting primitives by direct specification PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. CONN PIN1 TO IDP@ The Current Element and PIN1 are moved and rotated so that PIN1 connects to the p-point hit.Query POSition --+-.Query ORIentation --+-.WRT --. | | |-.<bpos> --. Note: The first p-point in the command must belong to the Current Element.AND <bdir> IS <bdir> --. | | |-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> >-. Command Syntax: >-. CONN IDP@ TO IDP@ AND X IS N The first point hit (belonging to the Current Element) is connected to the second point (belonging to another element).

but the axial system of any element. 2.1 Moving Along Axes Keywords: Description: BY This command displaces the Current Element by given amounts along any East.) axes. can be specified if required. BY E3000 WRT SITE Moves the Current Element by the specified amount along the Site’s East axis (see Figure 2-11). such as the SITE.4 Moving by a Known Distance All the commands described in this section move the Current Element by a specified distance in a given direction. However. These are normally the axes of the owner. For instance.3 . an element may be moved ‘towards’ another item until its Easting has changed by a given amount. The simplest method is to move from the present position along an axis direction using a command such as BY EAST 1000. the command options provided enable more complex manoeuvres to be made.Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-10 Connecting primitives by using cursor selection 2. Examples: BY E300 N400 Moves the Current Element by the specified amounts along the owner’s axes (see Figure 2-11).4. North. Up (etc. 2-16 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

| | ‘------------+--> Querying: >-. 2-17 . MOVE TOW IDP@ DIST 100 The Current Element is displaced towards the picked p-point by the specified amount (see Figure 2-12b).<axes> --.4. | | ‘------------+-.2 MOVE ALONG TOWARDS DISTANCE This command displaces the Current Element in any specified direction by a given distance.Query POSition --+-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> N N BY E3000 WRT SITE CE OWNER AXES BY E3000 E SITE AXES E Figure 2-11 Moving along specified axes 2. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.2 Moving in any Direction Keywords: Description: Examples: MOVE N45E DIST 100 The Current Element is displaced along East 45 North in owner coordinates by the specified distance (see Figure 2-12a).WRT --.BY <pos> --+-.Equipment and Primitives Command Syntax: >-.<bpos> --. | | |-.

Equipment and Primitives Command Syntax: >-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> Figure 2-12a Moving a given distance in a given direction (1) Figure 2-12b 2-18 Moving a given distance in a given direction (2) PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | ‘-----------+-. | | |-.WRT --.ALOng --.<bpos> --.3 .<bdir> DISTance <uval> --> Querying: >-. | | ‘------------+-.Query POSition --+-.MOVe --+-.

The orientation of the Reference Plane defaults to perpendicular to the movement direction. This point is moved to the Reference Plane which is specified by the 3D position through which it passes. although the default is the origin. In other words. Although you do not need to know the actual distance moved. these PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.ALOng -.WRT --.<bpos> --. Examples: MOVE TOW /DATUM PLANE E DIST 1000 The Current Element is moved towards the specified design item until its Easting (in owner coordinates) has changed by 1000 (see Figure 2-13).Query POSition --+-.4.DISTance <uval> -> Querying: >-. | | |-.2 2-19 .3 Moving in any Direction: Distance Given in Different Plane Keywords: Description: MOVE ALONG TOWARDS PLANE DISTANCE This command differs from the basic option by allowing the distance moved to be specified in a different plane from the actual movement direction.5 Moving Through Defined Intersection Planes The commands described in this section move the Current Element along a given direction until it intersects with a fixed Reference Plane.MOVe --+. Command Syntax: >-.<bdir> -+-. In no case is the volumetric geometry of any of the Design model considered. | | ‘------------------+-. you must provide ‘point-to-point’ dimensions in these commands. Any p-point on the Current Element may be used for the manoeuvre. | | ‘------------+-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> Figure 2-13 Moving in a direction specified in a different plane 2. | | ‘---------+.PLAne <bdir> --.Equipment and Primitives 2.

Note: The Reference Plane is perpendicular to the movement direction. | | ‘------------+-. MOVE E THR E3000 Moves the Current Element along the given owner axis until it ‘intersects’ the Reference Plane through E3000 N0 U0 (see Figure 2-15). | | ‘-----------+-.5.Query POSition --+-.Equipment and Primitives commands cannot calculate physical clearances (see Sections 2. | | |-.WRT --. Command Syntax: >-.1 Moving Through an Intersection Keywords: Description: Examples: MOVE N30W THR /BOX Moves the Current Element along the given direction until it ‘intersects’ the Reference Plane through the origin of the named element (see Figure 2-14). 2.3 .IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> 2-20 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<bdir> THRough <bpos> --> Querying: >-. MOVE ALONG N45E THR IDP@ Moves the Current Element along the given direction until it ‘intersects’ the Reference Plane through the picked p-point (see Figure 2-16).ALOng --.<bpos> --.7 for such commands). MOVE THROUGH This command moves the Current Element until its origin intersects with the Reference Plane through a fixed 3D point.MOVe --+-.6 and 2.

2 2-21 .Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-14 Moving along a given direction through an intersection Figure 2-15 Moving to intersect a plane through a given point PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

MOVE ALONG N45E DIST 20 TO /COL8 Move the Current Element along N45E until its origin intersects a Reference Plane 20 before the origin of /COL8 (see Figure 2-18b).Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-16 Moving to intersect a plane through a given point 2. MOVE E DIST 1000 FROM /VESSEL5 Move the Current Element East until its origin intersects a Reference Plane 1000 beyond the origin of /VESSEL5 (see Figure 2-18a).3 . | | ‘-----------+-- <bdir> DISTance <uval> --+-.ALOng --.2 Moving Either Side of an Intersection Keywords: Description: Examples: MOVE N30W DIST 30 TO(or FROM) /BOX Move the Current Element N30W until its origin intersects a Reference Plane 30 before (or beyond) the origin of /BOX (see Figure 2-17). Command Syntax: >-.TO ----+-.5. MOVE DISTANCE FROM TO This command moves the Current Element until its origin intersects the Reference Plane a given distance either side of a fixed 3D point.FROm --. | | ‘-. Note: The Reference Plane is perpendicular to the movement direction.MOVe --+-.<bpos> --> 2-22 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

. DISTANCE 30 TO /BOX MOVE N30W.<bpos> --.2 2-23 ... | | ‘------------+-. DISTANCE 30 FROM /BOX 30 REFERENCE PLANES . CE (START POSITION) Figure 2-17 Moving either side of an intersection Figure 2-18a Moving either side of a plane specified relative to another element PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | |-.WRT --.Equipment and Primitives Querying: >-..Query POSition --+-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> ...

3 General Moving to an Intersection Keywords: Description: MOVE PLANE THROUGH FROM TO DISTANCE This command differs from the basic options by allowing the movement direction and Reference Plane to be specified independently. by specifying PLANE NORTH an element may be moved towards a point until a particular Northing in the Site is intersected. In addition. MOVE ALONG E PLANE N45W DIST 20 TO /TANK5 Move the Current Element East until it intersects an oblique Reference Plane 20 before the origin of /TANK5 (see Figure 2-19b). any design point on the Current Element (not only the origin) can be used as the positioning datum. the p-point on the flanged face of a nozzle. Examples: MOVE IDP@ TOW /DATUM PLANE N THROUGH N1000 Move the picked p-point (or the Current Element) towards /DATUM until it intersects N1000 (see Figure 2-19a).5. Note: DISTANCE is measured in the direction of the Reference Plane and not the movement direction. 2-24 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. for instance. For example.3 .Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-18b Moving either side of a plane specified relative to another element 2.

| | ‘---------+.Equipment and Primitives Command Syntax: >.<bdir> -.<marke> -. | | |-.ALOng -. | | ‘-------------------| | FROm ----.<bpos> --. | | ‘------------+-.<bpos> -.DISTance . | | ‘----------+. | | | TO ------| | | | THRough -+.MOVe -+. | | ‘-----------+.<bpos> ---------+-> <dist> = >.TO ---+. | | |.2 2-25 .<uval> -> Querying: >-.WRT --.FROm -.PLANe <bdir> -+| | | | | || || ‘- <dist> -+.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Query POSition --+-.

3 .Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-19(a) Moving to an intersection by separately specifying direction and plane Figure 2-19(b) Moving to an intersection by separately specifying direction and plane 2-26 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

| | |.6. the full geometry of the fixed element is taken into account. | | ‘. although the default is the origin. However. Any p-point on the Current Element may be specified as the positioning datum.2 2-27 .<gid> --. Command Syntax: >. This takes into account the volume of the referenced element but not of the Current Element. say.TO ---+.<marke> -| | | ‘.Equipment and Primitives 2.FROm -. spacing the centreline of a vessel or column a certain distance from the surface of a wall. MOVE N45E DISTANCE 20 INFRONT /EXCH5 The Current Element is moved until its origin is 20 to the near side of /EXCH5 (see Figure 2-20 and Figure 2-21).6 Moving In Front of or Behind Items The commands described in this section move the Current Element to the intersection with a Reference Plane. Although the designer does not need to know the actual distance moved.BEHind --+.MOVe -+.ALOng -.INFront -. In no case is the geometry of the Current Element considered. | | ‘. | | ‘---------+. Examples: MOVE E DIST 1000 BEH /WALL10 The Current Element is moved East until its origin is 1000 beyond the far side of /WALL10 (see Figure 2-20). he must provide a ‘point-to-surface’ dimension. Therefore it is applicable to.<bdir> DISTance <uval> -+.1 Moving Either Side of a Fixed Object Keywords: Description: MOVE DISTANCE INFRONT BEHIND This command moves the Current Element until its origin is a specified distance one side or the other of a fixed geometric object.<bpos> -+. 2. a specified distance from the surface of a fixed geometric object.<bpos> --+-> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

<bpos> --.Query POSition --+-.WRT --.IN ---+-. | | ‘------------+-. | | ‘-----------------------+--> Figure 2-20 Moving either side of a fixed object 2-28 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Equipment and Primitives Querying: >-.<gid> ---. | | |-.3 .

Equipment and Primitives

Figure 2-21

Moving either side of a fixed object in a specified direction

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.2

2-29

Equipment and Primitives

2.6.2 Moving On Top of or Under a Fixed Object
Keywords: Description: MOVE DISTANCE ONTOP UNDER This command moves the Current Element until its origin is a specified distance above or below a fixed geometric object. This takes into account the shape of the referenced object but not that of the Current Element. It is therefore applicable to, say, placing the centreline of a vessel a certain distance above the top surface of a beam.

Examples: MOVE D ONTO /BOX Moves the Current Element along a vertical line until its origin lies in the upper surface of /BOX (see Figure 2-23). MOVE ALONG E45D DISTANCE 3000 UNDER /BEAM Moves the Current Element along E45D until its origin is 3000 vertically below /BEAM (see Figure 2-22 and Figure 2-23). Note: ONTOP means above in owner co-ordinates regardless of original Current Element position. The DISTANCE is always measured vertically in owner co-ordinates.

Command Syntax:
>- MOVe -+- ALOng -. | | ‘---------+- <bdir> DISTance <uval> -+- FROm -. | | ‘- TO ---+- <bpos> -+- UNDer -. | | ‘- ONTop -+- <gid> --. | | |- <marke> -| | | ‘- <bpos> --+->

Querying:
>-- Query POSition --+-- <bpos> --. | | ‘------------+-- WRT --. | | |-- IN ---+-| ‘-->

<gid> -->

2-30

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

Equipment and Primitives

Figure 2-22

Moving above/below a fixed object in a specified direction

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.2

2-31

Equipment and Primitives

Figure 2-23

Moving above/below a fixed object

2-32

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

Examples: MOVE P1 E INFRONT /BOX The Current Element will be moved East until the specified p-point is zero distance in front of /BOX (see Figure 2-24). MOVE NOZZLE1 S DIST 200 INF /RACK (at an Equipment element) Moves the current Equipment by positioning the Nozzle at the specified location. | | |-.MOVe <marke> -+.2 2-33 .<bpos> ---+--> Querying: >-.<marke> --| | | ‘-.Equipment and Primitives 2.<bpos> --.<bpos> --> INFront --.6.Query POSition --+-. Command Syntax: >.<bdir> PLAne <bdir> DISTance <uval> <repla> -> <repla> = >--+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-- FROm --.WRT --.ALOng -. | BEHind ---| | UNDer ----| | ONTop ----+-.<gid> ---. | | ‘---------+. | TO ----+-.3 Moving an Item Using Reference Points Keywords: Description: MOVE ALONG UNDER PLANE DISTANCE INFRONT BEHIND ONTOP This command differs from the basic options by allowing any point on the Current Element to be moved to a specified distance from the surface of a fixed design item.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. In addition the distance may be specified in a direction independent of the movement direction. | | ‘------------+-. | | |-.

3 .Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-24 Moving to a point at a specified distance from a surface 2-34 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. 2.2 2-35 . MOVE E45N CLEAR 100 BEH IDP@ Move the Current Element along E45N until its volume is 100 beyond the cursor hit p-point (see Figure 2-26). Their separation takes into account both the Current Element volume and the referenced element volume.INFront -. For the basic options. | | ‘. | | ‘---------+. It is therefore important to place the Current Element at an appropriate position from which to make the clearance move.<marke> -| | | ‘. In these instances a vertical clearance can be specified directly using the ONTOP or UNDER options.MOVe <marke> -+.<bpos> --+-> MOVE CLEARANCE INFRONT BEHIND This command moves the Current Element until its geometric volume is a specified clearance from a fixed Design element. the clearance dimension is always specified in the movement direction.<gid> --. A simpler alternative is available for placing the Current Element vertically above or below the reference element independently of movement direction.7 Moving to a Specified Clearance between Items These commands allow the Current Element to be moved to a specified clearance from a fixed object or position. MOVE E CLEAR 1000 INFRONT /DATUMBOX Move the Current Element East until its volume is 1000 this side of the given fixed item (see Figure 2-26).1 Moving to a Clearance Either Side Keywords: Description: Examples: MOVE ALONG E45N CLEAR BEHIND /BOX Move the Current Element until its volume is zero clearance behind BOX (see Figure 2-25).<bdir> CLEArance <uval> -+. Point or position.7.BEHind --+. | | |.ALOng -. Command Syntax: >.Equipment and Primitives 2.

| | ‘------------+-.WRT --.3 .IN ---+-.Query POSition --+-. | | ‘----------------------+--> Figure 2-25 Moving to a given clearance in a specified direction 2-36 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<bpos> --.Equipment and Primitives Querying: >-. | | |-.<gid> --.

Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-26 Moving to a given clearance PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.2 2-37 .

| BEHind --| | UNDer ---| | ONTop ---+.WRT --.7.2 Moving an Object to Clear Another Object Keywords: Description: MOVE CLEARANCE INFRONT BEHIND ONTOP UNDER This command takes into account the geometry of both the Current and Referenced elements. Examples: MOVE E CLEARANCE 1000 BEH /WALL10 The Current Element is moved East until its entire volume is 1000 clear of the side of /WALL10 (see Figure 2-27).CLEArance <uval> -+| || || ‘- INFront -. | | ‘---------+.Equipment and Primitives 2.<gid> --. | | |. | | ‘------------+-.ALOng -. Command Syntax: >.MOVe -+. | | |-.Query POSition --+-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> 2-38 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. In this way a minimum clearance can be specified between two Design items (for example. to ensure that a walkway is a sufficient distance away from a heated autoclave).<bpos> --.<bpos> --+-> Querying: >-.3 .<marke> -| | | ‘. MOVE D CLEARANCE ONTO /BEAM The Current Element is moved down until it has a zero clearance above the element /BEAM (see Figure 2-27).

2 2-39 .Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-27 Moving to clear another object PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

| | |.UNDer -.<bpos> --.WRT --. Point or position.ALOng -.7. | | ‘. Command Syntax: >.MOVe -+.Query POSition --+-.<marke> -| | | ‘.<bpos> --+-> Querying: >-.Equipment and Primitives 2. | | ‘------------+-. | | |-.3 .<bdir> CLEArance <uval> -+. | | ‘---------+.3 Moving to a Vertical Clearance Keywords: Description: MOVE CLEARANCE ONTOP UNDER This command moves the Current Element until its volume is a specified vertical clearance above or below a fixed element.<gid> --. MOVE E60D CLEAR 1000 UNDER PIN6 The Current Element will be moved E60D until it is 1000 below the specified Design point (see Figure 2-29).ONTop -+. Examples: MOVE ALONG U30W CLEAR ONTO /BEAM The Current Element will be moved vertically until it is zero clearance above /BEAM (see Figure 2-28).IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> 2-40 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-28 Moving to a given vertical clearance in a specified direction PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.2 2-41 .

Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-29 Moving to a given vertical clearance 2-42 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3 .

| | ‘----------------+.MOVe -+.<gid> --. | | |-.--------------------------------<-------------------------------’ | ‘.WRT --.TOwards <bpos> -. Command Syntax: >.2 2-43 .INFront -.CLEARance <uval> +.7. | | ‘. | .BEHind --| |.Equipment and Primitives 2.4 General Moving to a Clearance Keywords: Description: Examples: MOVE TOWARD /TANK5 PLANE E CLEARANCE 30 INF /TANK5 The Current Element will be moved towards /TANK5 until it has 30 clearance ‘this side’ in an East/West direction (see Figure 2-30).Query POSition --+-.<bpos> --+-> MOVE PLANE CLEARANCE INFRONT BEHIND This command differs from the basic option by allowing the movement direction and clearance to be specified in different planes. | | |.<bdir> -+.PLAne <bdir> -.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | ‘------------+-.<marke> -| | | ‘.ALOng -. | | ‘---------+.<bpos> --. Querying: >-.

while reflecting and reversing the X axis. The current element and its hierarchy of members will be repositioned so as to achieve a mirror image of their initial relative positions.1. Orientations are processed such that they remain right-handed.6 of Part 1) to create a new part of the design model which is a mirror image of an existing part.5 and 8. where the p-points are used to decide the axis of greatest symmetry for the reversal. Nozzle. NCTO. all members of the group and their hierarchies of members will be reflected. Elbow. You will most likely use the mirror positioning options in conjunction with the COPY command (see Sections 8.8 Reflecting a Position in a Plane (Mirroring) The mirroring facility lets you change the position of the current element or group by reflecting it in a specified plane. RTOR. If the current element is a Group.Equipment and Primitives Figure 2-30 Moving to a given clearance relative to a specified plane 2. The exceptions to this rule are: • • Toruses (CTOR. Reducer and Flange. The values of positional attributes and directional attributes are derived by direct reflection in the plane.1. NRTO). For most elements this is achieved by reflecting the Y and Z axes directly. Coupling. 2-44 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. whose X and Y axes are reflected directly while the Z axis is reflected and reversed. For example. an ELBO with p-point directions along X and Y will be reversed in the Z direction.3 . The piping elements Tee.

<repla> -. no attempt is made to reflect catalogue geometry or to reference alternative catalogue components. | | | | ‘----------+. | | ‘----------------| | <repla> --------------------------| | THRough <bpos> -------------------| | CLEArance -+.<repla> ------. | | | | |.2 2-45 .<uval> -. Command Syntax: >-.Equipment and Primitives Note: Since mirror-image components will not always be available in the Catalogue.<planf> -| | | ‘-----------| DISTance .<repla> -| | | |.<uval> -.<plane> --> where <plane> is any of the standard ways of specifying a plane through a given point in a given direction: <plane> = >-+| | | | | | | | | | | | | | || | | | | || | | | | | | || || ‘DISTance <uval> -+.<planf> -| | | | | ‘-----------+----------------| | <repla> -------------------------------------------| | THRough <bpos> ------------------------------------| | <planf> -------------------------------------------+-> PLAne <bdir> -+| | | || || ‘- PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. MIRROR Moves the current element to a new position which is calculated by reflecting the initial position in a specified plane. Keywords: Description: Examples: MIRROR PLANE E45D THRO /TANK5 Reflects position of current element in plane which has given direction and which passes through /TANK5 (see Figure 2-31).<planf> -| | | | | ‘-----------+-------------------| | CLEArance -+.MIRRor -.<repla> -. | | | | ‘----------+. | | | | |.<uval> -+.

| | |-. | | | TO ----+-.<bpos> ------+--> >--+-.<sgid> ---.<bpos> ---| | FROm --.<bpos> ---+--> /TANK5 Plane through /TANK5 Plane direction E45D Current Element (owning three primitives) MIRROR PLANE E45D THRO /TANK5 Figure 2-31 Mirroring a position in a plane 2-46 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<marke> --| | | ‘-.ONTop --.<sgid> ---.UNDer --+-.<marke> --| | | ‘-. | | ‘-. | BEHind ---+-. | | |-.Equipment and Primitives <repla> = >--+-| |-| | | | | |-| ‘-<planf> = INFront --.3 .

The Piping Specification and Insulation Specification are defined first. Straight variable lengths of Tube are automatically routed between adjacent Components and are therefore not individual Component elements themselves. when it is determined by the Leave point of the final Component in the Branch. It is quite normal in such circumstances to route the pipe with only the HEAD attributes set up.) When a Branch is connected to another item. which can be run by the PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Where no distinction is made. 3. Note that when a Branch is connected to a Nozzle. if a Branch Head is connected to a Nozzle. a Nozzle). The Head and Tail attributes can be set either by explicit positioning or by connection to another item (e. therefore. Ducting and Cable Trays. Ducting and Cable Trays This chapter describes the commands to create Piping (including Hangers). The Branch element owns Component elements drawn from the PDMS Catalogue whose sequence and position define the centreline route. the Noxzzle may be part of a database to which the piping engineer does not have write-access. since PDMS treats them similarly. reaches the site limits. (The reverse may also apply if routing backwards. In this case.3 3-1 . The key element in these disciplines is the Branch.3 Piping. They are routed as Branches. The principles applied to ‘routing’ two-ended pipe Hangers are also identical to those used for Branches. Then the commands to position. so that all Components created within the Branch can be selected correctly. then the CREF (Connection Reference) attribute of the Nozzle is set to refer to the Branch. The Tail position may be in free space. an Inter-DB Connection Macro is created. The network can finish where a Branch is connected to an Equipment Nozzle. various preparatory steps are taken to define the Specification and the start and end points of the Branch or Hanger. the term ‘piping’ also applies to Hangers.g. to refer to pipes. or stops at a vent or drain valve. This is a two-ended entity which can be joined with other Branches to form a network. It is convenient. but with Components drawn from parts of the Catalogue dedicated to the relevant discipline. the attributes of the element that it is connected to are set to refer to the Branch. There are no special Design hierarchy elements for ducting and cable trays. ducting and cable trays collectively as ‘piping’.1 Defining a Branch Before routing takes place. orientate and connect piping components are described. For example.

For more information. 3. Command Syntax: >-. All subsequent selection commands at that Branch or one of its Components will use that Specification by default. PSPEC /A15A2 (At Branch level) The PSPE attribute of the Branch will be set to /A15A2.Piping. The PSPE attribute of a Branch controls all subsequent Component selection operations which choose a Component’s physical details from the stated Specification. Examples: PSPEC /A35B8 (At Pipe level) The PSPE attribute of the Pipe and all subsequently created Branches will be set to /A35B8. sets the CREF of a Nozzle that has been connected to by the piping designer. Ducting and Cable Trays designer who does have write access to the second database. then this will automatically be cascaded down to Branch level when it is created.PSPEcification name --> 3-2 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. for example. Note: The Specification named must be currently available to the designer.3 . This macro is a sequence of commands that. see Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual. If the Specification of the Pipe has already been set.2 Branch and Hanger Specifications PSPE HSPE Keywords: Description: On creation of a Branch (or Hanger) these are normally the first attributes to be set.

the Head and Nozzle are logically ‘tied together’ by two attributes which ‘point’ to each other .3 Connecting the Head or Tail CONNECT The CONNECT command. the CONNECT command will set all the Head attributes (HBOR. a Tee) Keywords: Description: Examples: CONN PH TO /1205-N5 (Where /1205-N5 is a Nozzle) The Head attributes of the current element (Branch or Hanger) are set to match the position. which only applies to Heads. bore and connection type of the Nozzle (see Figure 3-1). sets up the Head or Tail to match exactly the item to which it has been connected. CONN PT TO LAST MEM The Tail attributes of the current element will be set to match the Leave Point of the last Component (that is not an Attachment point). but with the Nozzle identified by cursor selection. (Where /100-A8/1 is another Branch) The Head attributes of the current element will be set to match the Tail of the specified Branch.Piping. and the Branch HREF (Head Reference) will point to the Nozzle. CONN PT TO /100-A8/T2 (Where /100-A8/T2 is a TEE) The Tail attributes of the current element will be set to match the free ppoint on the specified TEE (see Figure 3-1). Ducting and Cable Trays 3. is that the Tube (or Rod) that may be required between the Head and the first Component is automatically selected.g. In addition. CONN PT TO P4 OF /VF205 (Where /VF205 is a VFWA. HPOS and HDIR) to corresponding values. if the Head is connected to a 3-inch flangedfaced nozzle at E3000 and pointing North. orientation. CONN PH TO PT OF /100-A8/1 CONN PH TO ID NOZZ@ As in the first example. For example.3 3-3 . HCON. A Branch Head or Tail can connect to the following items: • • • A Nozzle The Head or Tail of another Branch A ‘free’ p-point of a multi-way Component in another Branch (e. when applied to Branches (or Hangers).) The Tail attributes of the current element will be set to match the specified p-point. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.the Nozzle CREF will point to the Branch. The final effect of CONNECT.

TPosition --+-.WRT --.Query --+-. | HHead --| | PTail --| | HTail --+--> >-.CONnect <marke> TO --+-.3 .<gid> ---+--> Querying: >-. Connection to elements not within the designer’s jurisdiction (Read Only) will cause an inter-DB connection macro to be created automatically (see Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual). | | ‘-.Query --+-| |-| |-| ‘-PHead --. the Branch Specification attribute must be set.HPosition --. Ducting and Cable Trays Note: Before a CONNECT command is given. | | ‘-. | | ‘-.<marke> --.Piping.IN ---+-- <gid> --> CE /1205-N5 PH CONN PH TO /1205-N5 H E A D BRANCH T A I L CONN PT TO /100-A8/T2 BRANCH CENTRELINE PT PA PL /100-A8/T2 Figure 3-1 Connecting a Branch Head or Tail 3-4 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Command Syntax: >-.

TRef --+-.Query --+-.<gid> --+-. HREF or TREF) of the item connected to is reset so as to point back to the Branch or Hanger. but they may also be set explicitly.HEAD --. disconnects Head from any other element. Examples: TREF /PIPE2 HEAD Sets TREF of current element to point to Head of /PIPE2 and setsHREF of /PIPE2 to point back to the current element. | | | | |-.e. Command Syntax: >--+-. | HEAd ----| | BRANch --| | TAIl ----+--> >-.Query --+-| |-| |-| ‘-CE ------.3.HREF --. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. They are usually set automatically as a result of a CONNECT PH (or PT) command. the corresponding attribute (CREF.NULREF -------------+--> Querying: >-. When they are set.1 The Head or Tail Connection Reference Attribute Keywords: Description: HREF TREF These attributes hold the name of the element to which the Branch or Hanger is connected.Piping. i. HREF NULREF Unsets HREF.TREF --+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.TAIL --| | | | | ‘----------+ | | ‘-.HRef --. | | ‘-. | | ‘-.3 3-5 .

3. where a Branch reaches the Battery Limits.word --> 3-6 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.TCOnn --+-.<bpos> --> >--+-.2 Positioning Head or Tail in Free Space Keywords: Description: HPOS TDIR HBOR TCON HDIR HCON TPOS TBOR It is sometimes necessary to terminate a Branch (or Hanger) in free space. VENT. HCON OPEN The Head Connection Type is set as specified.TPos --+-.TDir --+-. Where this termination ends with a length of TUBE (or ROD) and no Head or Tail connection can be made.TBore --+-. the HCONN or TCONN of a free end must be set to one of the following: OPEN. for instance.HDir --. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. Command Syntax: >--+-. DRAN (drain).Piping. | | ‘-. | | ‘-. HBOR 80 The Head Bore is set as specified. Examples: HPOS E10 N5 U5 The Head position is set as specified in owner coordinates. | | ‘-. CLOS.<bdir> --> >--+-.3 . Note: If a data consistency error is to be avoided. | | ‘-.HBOre --. it is necessary to set the Head/Tail attributes individually.HCOnn --. or NULL.HPos --. HDIR N WRT WORLD The Head direction is set as specified in World coordinates.<uval> --> >--+-.

e. | | ‘-. Command Syntax: >-. previous Component).3 3-7 .THRough <bpos> ---+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | PTail --| | HHead --| | HTail --+-.Piping. If the Head is to be positioned in this way.Query --+-| |-| |-| ‘-PHead --.DISTance <uval> --.POSition --+-| |-| |-| ‘-PHead --. | HHead --| | PTail --| | HTail --+--> 3.3 Head or Tail Positioning Using End Components Keywords: Description: POSITION PH PT THROUGH DISTANCE These commands allow the Head or Tail position to be set by using the end Component in that Branch or Hanger. Backwards Routing Mode must be in force. POS PH THROUGH E3000 (In BACKWARDS mode) The HPOS attribute will be set to the intersection between the line from the Arrive p-point of the Previous Component and the perpendicular plane through E3000 N0 U0 in owner coordinates. Examples: POS PT DISTANCE 1000 The TPOS attribute will be set to the position 1000 from the leave p-point of the last Branch member (i.3. Ducting and Cable Trays Querying: >-. This command treats the Tail position as a pseudo-Component and places it at the specified point along the previous Component’s Leave p-point direction. This will normally occur when the Tail is to finish with a piece of variable length Tube.

Piping. | PTail ------| | HTail ------| | HHead ------| | HPosition --| | TPosition --+--> LAST COMPONENT D PL D PT 1000 POS PT DISTANCE 1000 N PH D PA D 30 OWNER AXES LAST COMPONENT (BACKWARDS MODE) E POS PH THROUGH E30 Figure 3-2 Head/Tail positioning using end components 3-8 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Ducting and Cable Trays Querying: >-.Query --+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-PHead ------.3 .

Piping. (Otherwise the HPOS or TPOS will be moved to the specified clearance. as no Tube geometry is available.TOP --+-.<bpos> --> INFront --. Command Syntax: >--+-. | TO ----+-.3 3-9 .<gid> ---.4 Head and Tail Positioning by Bottom or Top of Pipe Keywords: Description: BOP TOP INFRONT BEHIND ONTOP UNDER This command allows the Head or Tail of a Branch to be moved vertically to a specified clearance above or below a Design element or Point. TOP UNDER U3000 (At the Tail) This will position the Tail under the elevation U3000 with a clearance of 0.BOP --. Note: If no Tube can be found emerging from the point specified.<bpos> ---+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. | | ‘------------+-| |-| | |-| |-| |-| ‘-- FROm --. | | ‘-. then only the point’s position can be used.<marke> --| | | ‘-. then its crosssection will be taken into account. | BEHind ---| | ONTop ----| | UNDer ----+-. | | |-.) Examples: BOP ONTO /BEAM (At the Head) This will position the Tube on top of /BEAM with a clearance of 0.3.<uval> --. If the Head or Tail Tube has been selected.

Query --+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-PHead ------.3 . | PTail ------| | HTail ------| | HHead ------| | HPosition --| | TPosition --+--> UP PH PT BOP ONTO /BEAM TOP UNDER U3000 PH PT 3000 /BEAM OWNER AXES HORIZONTAL Figure 3-3 Head/Tail positioning by Bottom/Top of pipe 3-10 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Ducting and Cable Trays Querying: >-.Piping.

Examples: MOVE PT DIST -2000 Moves the Tail by 2000 from its current position.IN ---+-| | | ‘--> | ‘-.DISTance <uval> --> <gid> --> Querying: >-.3 3-11 . relative to its current position. Alternatively. | PTail ------| | HTail ------| | HHead ------| | HPosition --| | TPosition --+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.MOVe --+-| |-| |-| ‘-PHead --. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.Query --+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-PHead ------.WRT --. it allows the Head or Tail to be moved by an amount specified in any coordinates. MOVE PT BY E2000 S500 Moves the Tail by 2000 East and 500 South from its current position Command Syntax: >-. in the direction of PH or PT. | | | | |-.3. | HHead --| | PTail --| | HTail --+-.Piping.BY <pos> --+-.5 Moving the Head or Tail Keywords: Description: MOVE BY DISTANCE This command allows the Head or Tail position to be moved by a specified distance. in the opposite direction to PT.

3 . Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-4 Moving the Head or Tail 3-12 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.

When you created a Component element (say an ELBO). In a similar manner. Of course.6 Reconnecting Pipes after an Equipment Move Note: Keywords: Description: Applicable to Nozzles that have been moved since a Branch was connected to them. RECONNECT will reconnect all the HEADS and TAILS of Branches connected to an Equipment.3. This is usually done automatically at the same time as Component Selection. each Selection would be very arduous if conducted manually. the straight TUBE between adjacent Components is Selected from a Specification. you must then give the CHOOSE (or SELECT) command to form a link from the Component to the Catalogue description of the item. in the majority of cases. via the chosen Specification. Examples: RECON Finds all Nozzle elements which are Offspring of the current element. Command Syntax: >-. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. who can fully or partially override this choice. the default Selection will be suitable. RECONNECT If an Equipment item is moved using an ordinary positioning command. so the designer only needs to be concerned with separate TUBE selection in certain special circumstances detailed in this section.4 Selecting Component and Tube Details from Specifications Selecting from Specifications in PDMS is fundamental to all Piping design work.3 3-13 . then searching for an appropriate item in the Specification. none of the Branches connected to it will move with it.Piping. However. As the correct choice of Component can involve a large number of considerations. DESIGN assists you by automatically examining the current element and its immediate neighbours for default parameters.RECOnnect --> 3. Other elements in the Branches are not affected and must be realigned using ordinary routing commands. ultimate control rests with the designer. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. For each Nozzle. moving them to new positions if necessary. any Branch Head (or Tail) which is connected to it is repositioned at the Nozzle. Largely superseded by the DRAG command.

ANGL. The CHOOSE command displays Selection options on screen forms which can be picked using the cursor.g. Component will be left at Site origin. The default state is CHOOSE FORCECONNECT ON. In order to make the correct Selections.1 Choosing Components from a Displayed List Keywords: Description: CHOOSE This is only available in DEV GRAPHICS mode. 3-14 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. If the force-connect facility is OFF. for example due to incompatible connection types. It may be that a newly selected Component is unsuitable for connection to the previous (or next) Component (or to the Pipe Head or Tail). In this case however. i. P3 of a TEE is the off-line p-point). Once an element has been created using the NEW command. Specification-dependent Design attributes (if any) will also be set. a connection attempt will still be made following component selection. 3. the Component’s attributes will remain unchanged.4. It is advisable to discuss the structure of your own company Catalogue and Specifications with your Catalogue Administrator before reading this section.3 . RADI and SHOP. (e. the new Component will be force-connected and a warning alert displayed. but Component will be left at Site origin if connection types are incompatible.e.Piping. the newly selected Component will be left at the Site origin if connection types are incompatible. Ducting and Cable Trays Most of the examples here assume that certain common PDMS conventions are followed. In such a case. CHOOSE may be used to list what is available in the Specification. This action can be turned off by giving the command CHOOSE FORCECONNECT OFF Connection attempt will still be made. you will also need a printed copy of each Specification that you wish to use. The effect of choosing from the displayed list and applying the form setting via the OK button is to set the SPREF and LSTUBE attributes of the current Component. The Component may (optionally) be positioned and connected to the previous (or next) Component (or to the pipe head or tail). taking into account the choice made and the current bore. This action can be turned off by giving the command CHOOSE AUTOCONNECT OFF No connection attempt will be made. If the Cancel button is selected. HEIG.

Piping. Ducting and Cable Trays If only one choice of Component is available. DESIGN will set SPREF and LSTUBE automatically.00 300. The CHOOSE command may be used within the same command line as a NEW command. Example form: CHOOSE Current bore 100. Examples: CHOOSE Displays a general Selection form for the current element.00 mm Forced Connections are ON RATI 150. Selection criteria displayed will depend on those available in the specification.00 OK CANCEL NEW GASK CHOOSE PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. for example there are no Components of a particular type for the specified bore. an error alert is displayed. for example flanges of only one type are valid at a particular bore. If there are no valid choices.3 3-15 .

Ducting and Cable Trays CHOOSE TEXT Displays a Selection form listing choices based on the Specification Component’s (SPCOM’s) Detail Description Text (obtained from the RTEX attribute of the relevant DTEX element) and Material Description Text (obtained from the XTEX attribute of the relevant MTEX element).00 mm Forced Connections are ON Component Description 150# RING GASKET 3MM THK 300# RING GASKET 3MM THK OK CANCEL NEW GASK CHOOSE RTEX (or STEX or TTEX) 3-16 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Example form: CHOOSE Current bore 100. STEX or TTEX attribute of the relevant DTEX element).3 .00 mm Forced Connections are ON Component Description EQUAL TEE BW SCH 40 X 40 REDUC TEE BW SCH 40 X 80 REDUC TEE BW SCH 40 X 80 Unset Unset OK CANCEL NEW TEE CHOOSE TEXT CHOOSE RTEX CHOOSE STEX CHOOSE TTEX Displays a Selection form listing choices based on the SPCOM’s Detail Description Text (obtained from the RTEX.Piping. Example form: CHOOSE Current bore 100.

YTEX. or ZTEX attribute of the relevant MTEX element).Piping. Ducting and Cable Trays CHOOSE XTEX CHOOSE YTEX CHOOSE ZTEX Displays a Selection form listing choices based on the SPCOM’s Material Description Text (obtained from the XTEX. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.00 300# RING GASKET 3MM THK SPIRAL WOUND SS ASBESTOS FILLED OK CANCEL NEW GASK CHOOSE ALL CHOOSE SPEC /RF150 As CHOOSE. Example form: CHOOSE Current bore 100.00 mm Forced Connections are ON Component Description SPIRAL WOUND SS ASBESTOS FILLED SPIRAL WOUND SS ASBESTOS FILLED OK CANCEL NEW GASK CHOOSE XTEX (or YTEX or ZTEX) CHOOSE ALL Combines the above CHOOSE and CHOOSE TEXT options.00 150# RING GASKET 3MM THK SPIRAL WOUND SS ASBESTOS FILLED 300.00 mm Forced Connections are ON RATI 150. but selections are made from the named specification rather than from that of the owning Branch.3 3-17 . Example form: CHOOSE Current bore 100.

| | ‘-----------+.TTEX -| | | |. | | |. NEW REDU CHOOSE WITH ABOR 100 LBOR 80 Choose from Reducers with specified arrive and leave bores only NEW ELBO CHOOSE WITH STYP LR Choose from long-radius Elbows only. only Concentric Reducers will be listed in the selection form. and use of the command will generate an error if this is not so: • • The first level must contain the question TYPE The second level must contain the question PBOR or BORE Command Syntax: >.RTEX -.WITH -*. The CHOOSE function assumes that the Specification hierarchy is as follows.Piping.<wivl> --| | | | | ‘.CHOOse -+.XTEX -| | | |.----<----.YTEX -| | | |. For example. if the default STYP for a Reducer is CONC.FORCEConnect -+.<wiwor> -+-> ‘-> where: 3-18 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.SPec <gid> -. Note: The Selection criteria (see syntax diagram) are independent. | | ‘--------------+. | | / | ‘--------+.ALL --| . | | |.3 .AUTOConnect --.ON --.DEFault -.STEX -| | | |.OFF -+-> | |.TEXT -| | | |.ZTEX -| | | |. Ducting and Cable Trays CHOOSE DEFAULT Default settings will be selected wherever they occur in the Specification. | | | | ‘.

Piping.PBOre integer --. and then to ask the system to select a component of the correct type from the current piping Specification.TYpe ---| | | |-.word --> | |-.2 Selecting Components from Specifications An alternative method of selecting items from a Specification is to create the piping Component.PREssure -------| | | |-.LCOnn --+-. it is sometimes necessary to specify answers to specification questions such as STYPE or BORE before the correct item is selected.word ---+--> 3.RATing ---------+-.PCOnn integer word --> | ‘-. | | ‘-.ANgle ----------| | | |-. Typical commands could be as follows: NEW ELBO SEL WITH STYP LR NEW TEE SEL WI PBOR 3 150 NEW FLAN SEL WI STYP WN NEW REDU SEL WI STYP ECC LBOR 100 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.ABOre ----------| | | |-.<uval> --> and <wiwor> is >--+-.value --. | | |-.LBOre ----------| | | |-.RAdius ---------| | | |-.STYpe --.3 3-19 .TEMperature ----| | | ‘-.ACOnn --| | | |-. Ducting and Cable Trays <wivl> is >--+-. | | |-.word --+-. If there is a choice of component during selection.4.

parameters for all the Specification Headings for that type of Component must be automatically obtained or provided by the designer.g. Obtained from the corresponding Current Element attribute. Default Selection is particularly applicable to common fittings such as FLANGEs. Obtained from the corresponding Branch attributes.4 Selecting from Several Alternatives Keywords: Description: SELECT The SELECT command chooses a Component and Leave Tube from the Specification and sets the appropriate current element attributes. socket weld. HEIGHT. After a successful SELECT command. the design attributes will be updated with the relevant values from the Specification.4. Selecting the default Specification Component allows DESIGN to choose the appropriate item. the designer must specify the relevant Headings with the required Entry as part of the SELECT command. The information automatically determined from the current element and its surroundings is as follows: SPECIFICATION (ARRIVE) BORE Obtained from the PSPE attribute of the Branch. Obtained from the (Leave) bore of the Previous element (reverse in Backwards Mode). In many cases. ELBOWs etc. This is based upon information DESIGN can obtain from the Design and from ‘default’ controls within the Specification. GASKETs.4. RADIUS SHOP TEMPERATURE.3 . In order to make a Selection from the Specification. the Leave bore of a Reducer cannot be assumed) You wish to choose a non-default item (e. This may be because: • One or more of the Specification Headings has no default parameter for that Component (e. Obtained from the corresponding Current Element attributes.g. not a weld-neck) • In both instances. PRESSURE 3. ANGLE. The relevant 3-20 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping. the default choice may not be suitable.3 Selecting the Default Specification Component Keywords: Description: SELECT The SELECT command chooses a Component and its ‘Leave’ Tube from the Branch Specification. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.

Querying: >-. Also.SElect WIth --*-.SPec <gid> --| | | |-.3 3-21 .<wivl> ------| | | |-. the ANGLE attribute of the Current Component will be set to 45. (Similar behaviour occurs with HEIGHT and RADIUS. SEL WI STYPE ECC PBOR 2 50 The current element and Leave Tube will be selected using the default choice except for the Headings specified. | | ‘-.<wiwor> -----’ | ‘--> For Selection criteria that are only in the Specification.) SEL WI LBOR 50 The current element will be selected using the default choice.) SEL WI ANGLE 45 The current element and Leave Tube will be selected using the default choice except for the ANGLE heading. Command Syntax: . This information is in the Default Line of the Specification. Examples: SELECT The default Component and Leave Tube will be selected from the Branch Specification. However the Leave p-point and Leave Tube will be selected with the specified nominal bore.TUbe ---+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.SPRef --. (If the Component LEAVE is 2.Query --+-. SEL WI STYPE BALL The current element and Leave Tube will be selected using the default choices except for the STYPE Heading which has been specified. RADIUS and SHOP.Piping. then the Leave Tube will also be 50 bore.------<-------. and HEIGHT if specified in the SELECT command. the Specification itself may also contain information to assist default Selection. The Current Element SPREF and LSTU attributes will be set to the chosen Specification Component names. Ducting and Cable Trays attributes are ANGLE. / | >-.

Piping.5 Selecting ‘Out-of-Specification’ Components Keywords: Description: SELECT SPEC If an ‘out-of-specification’ Component is required.4. This command uses the stated Specification rather than the default Specification.-----<-----. Other Headings necessary to specify which ‘out-of-specification’ item is required can be given in the same command.Q SPECification --*-. this can be Selected using the SELECT WITH SPEC command. | ANgle ----------| | RAdius ---------| | ABOre ----------| | LBOre ----------| | PREssure -------| | TEMperature ----| | RATing ---------| | STYpe ----------| | TYpe -----------| | PCOnn integer --| | ACOnn ----------| | LCOnn ----------| | word ----+--> 3. SEL WI SPEC /A3AH STYPE CTRL The current element will be Selected from the given Specification using the default choice except for STYPE. Ducting and Cable Trays . / | >-. Examples: SEL WI SPEC /A3AH The current element will be Selected from the given Specification using the default choice.3 . 3-22 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<qspci> --+--> where <qspci> is: >--+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-PBOre integer --.

Examples: SEL TUBE (At Branch) The Branch HSTU attribute (Head Specification Tube) will be Selected according to the default choice of TUBE. Querying: .SPRef --. / | >-. >-.<gid> --> | ‘--> / <wivl> and <wiwor> are explained in the section on Standard Syntax Graphs in Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual. This command enables separate Selection to occur. Command Syntax: .<qspci> --+--> <qspci> is explained in the section on Standard Syntax Graphs in Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual. SELECT TUBE is most frequently used at the HEAD of a Branch where there is Tube between the Head and the First Component.-----<-----.6 Selecting Components and Tube Separately Keywords: Description: SELECT LSROD SPREF HSROD TUBE ROD HSTUBE LSTUBE In some instances it may be necessary to Select Tube (or Rod) separately from its owning Component.TUbe ---+--> 3. Ducting and Cable Trays Note: The Leave Tube will be selected from the default (Branch) Specification in all cases.SElect WIth SPec <gid> --* | |-. | >-.3 3-23 . SEL TUBE WI STYP GLAS (At Component) The Component LSTU attribute (Leave Specification Tube) will be Selected with the default choice of TUBE except for STYPE. | | ‘-.4.Piping. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Query SPECification --*-.<wivl> ---| | | |-.-----<-----.<wiwor> --’ | |-. or vice versa.Query --+-.

Ducting and Cable Trays Command Syntax: >-.7 Direct Selection by Shortcode Keywords: Description: SHORTCODE The actual Specification Component name (SPREF for Components.SElect --+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-SPref ---. | / | ROD -----+-.WIth -. The shortcode option assumes Selection from the Current Branch Specification by automatically providing the specname part. / | >-.-----<-----. This overrides the ordinary Selection process by directly choosing the required item.3 .<qspci> --+--> >-. 3-24 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<wivl> ---| | | |-. | LStube --| | HStube --| | LSrod ---| | HSrod ---| | TUbe ----| .Piping.*-.-----<-----. | TUbe ----| | LStube --| | HStube --| | LSrod ---| | HSrod ---+--> 3. LSTU or HSTU for Tube) can be specified in order to Select a Component.<gid> --> | ‘--> Querying: .<wiwor> --’ | |-.Query --+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-SPRef ---.Query SPECification --*-. Thus it is assumed that the Specification Component name is of the form /specname/shortcode.4.

| | |-. SHOR TUB /TU50 The current element LSTU (or HSTU) attribute will be set to /specname/TU50 where /specname is obtained from the Branch.HStube --| | | |-.LStube --| | | |-.Query --+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-SPRef ---. | TUbe ----| | LStube --| | HStube --| | LSrod ---| | HSrod ---+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.LSrod ---| | | |-.Piping.SHORtcode --+-.name --> Querying: >-. Ducting and Cable Trays Examples: SHOR /EL50 The current element SPRE attribute will be set to /specname/EL50 where /specname is obtained from the Branch. Command Syntax: >-.SPRef ---.3 3-25 . Note: /specname is shown as * on PDMS Specification listings.HSrod ---| | | ‘------------+-.TUbe ----| | | |-.

3. 2. Command Syntax: >-. if the Branch Specification (PSPE attribute) was changed or the nominal bore of a group of Components had to be increased.5 Re-selection of Existing Components and Tube If a Component or Tube is required to be respecified. Note: This command only operates on Components that have already been Selected. they are obtained from the old Specification Component. you may restate any of the Selection commands described elsewhere in this manual.1 Re-selecting the New Default Component Keywords: Description: RESELECT The RESELECT command chooses a new Component and its Leave Tube from the Branch Specification. Any new Selection parameters are considered (either changed defaults or specified by the user).5.Piping. Examples: RESEL The current element and Leave Tube will be Selected from the new default choice(s). for example. each time this is done all the non-default Specification entries must be restated. they are obtained from the old Component Specification entries. The RESELECT command allows the designer to make use of the original Selection parameters for a Component to simplify the Selection of a new Component. Any parameters required that are not obtainable from defaults will be derived from the old Specification Component. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. The need to respecify is therefore reduced.3 .RESElect --> 3-26 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The RESELECT command operates as follows: 1. If any more parameters are required. If any further Selection parameters are needed. This is useful for situations where only a single change has taken place since the original Selection. even if most or all of these are identical to the old Specification Component. The default Selection parameters are obtained from the current element’s surroundings (in the same way as for SELECT). However.

/ | >-.SPRef ---. >-. they are obtained from the old Component Specification entries. Where new parameters are not stated or available through defaults.Piping..Query SPECification --*-.-----<-----. If any further parameters are necessary they will be obtained from the old Specification Component. Ducting and Cable Trays Querying: .<qspci> --+--> <qspci> is explained in the section on Standard Syntax Graphs in Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual. Examples: RESEL WITH STYPE BALL The current element and Leave Tube will be Selected using any default parameters and the STYPE specified.Query --+-.TUbe ----+--> 3. RESEL WI SPEC /NEWSPEC The current element and Leave Tube will be Selected using the new Specification and any default parameters.2 General Reselection of Components and Tube Keywords: Description: RESELECT This command allows existing Components and Tube to be Reselected according to new parameters. RESEL TUBE WI STYPE GLAS (At Branch) The current element HSTU attribute will be Selected using default parameters and the specified STYPE. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | ‘-.5.3 3-27 . Any further parameters required will be obtained from the old Specification Component. The remaining necessary parameters will be obtained from the old Specification Component.

<wiwor> -----’ | ‘--> Querying: .*-. >-.6 Standard Component Attributes This section describes the standard Component element attributes that provide their complete logical and physical descriptions. Two classes of standard attribute exist for Components: • • Those which ‘point’ to a Specification item that provides a fixed Catalogue description of the Component Those which cannot be part of the Catalogue description. Although you may set them directly.Piping.RESElect --+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-SPref ---.SPec <gid> --| | | |-.Q SPECification --*-.SPRef ---.-----<-----.3 .-------<------.<qspci> --+--> <qspci> is explained in the section on Standard syntax Graphs in Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual.Query --+-.<wivl> ------| | | |-. as they are unique to each occurrence in the Design 3-28 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.WIth -. | LStube --| | HStube --| | LSrod ---| | HSrod ---| | TUbe ----| . / | >-.TUbe ----+--> 3. many of these attributes are automatically determined when using the Specification selection and pipe routing commands described elsewhere. | / | ROD -----+-. | | ‘-. Ducting and Cable Trays Command Syntax: >-.

Management information to indicate if the item has actually been built. ISPEC TSPEC The remaining standard attributes are: POSITION The Component’s position in Zone coordinates (neither Branch nor Pipe have a POSITION.Piping.) Indicates.) Set and used automatically by PDMS to determine if the Component has been positioned. (Logical position flag. but are sufficiently common to be considered as standard: ANGLE HEIGHT RADIUS LOFFLINE The (variable) angle of a Component.3 3-29 . whether the Component breaks the Tube either side of it. ORIENTATION The following attributes do not occur in all Components. (Logical Offline flag. These point to a Specification Component that provides the complete Catalogue LSROD description of the Tube emerging from the current element Leave Point. though Branch has head and tail directions (HDIR and TDIR).) Used by ISODRAFT to determine in which material list the item is to be shown. This points to an Insulation Specification. The (variable) height of a Component. The (variable) radius of a Component. ARRIVE LEAVE BUILT SHOP ORIFLAG POSIFLAG The Catalogue p-point that is on the Arrive side of the Component.) Set and used automatically by PDMS to determine if the Component has been oriented. Ducting and Cable Trays The standard Specification attributes of a Component are: SPREF LSTUBE This points to a Specification Component that provides the complete Catalogue description of the current element. This points to a dummy Tracing Specification and is used by ISODRAFT to indicate trace heating requirements. though Branch has head and tail positions (HPOS and TPOS). (Shop fabrication flag. for reporting purposes. (Logical orientation flag. The Branch ‘TEMPERATURE’ attribute is automatically used to determine an insulation thickness from this Specification. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The Catalogue p-point that is on the Leave side of the Component. The Component’s orientation in Zone coordinates (neither Branch nor Pipe have an ORIENTATION.

(Multi-way Component Connection Reference.WRT --.ORIentation ------------+-.Query POSition --> Command Syntax: <gid> --> Gives the Component position in ZONE co-ordinates.Piping. | | |-.3 . | | | | ‘------------| | | ‘-. Querying: >-.Query ORIentation WRT SITE --> Gives the Component orientation in SITE co-ordinates. Ducting and Cable Trays CREF (3-way Component Connection Reference. Component position and orientation are established using the pipe routing or ordinary positioning commands described elsewhere.1 Position and Orientation Attributes Keywords: Description: POSITION ORIENTATION The Component position and orientation attributes describe their location with respect to Zone co-ordinates. 3-30 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.IN ---+-| ‘--> >-. CRFA 3.POSition --+-.6.Query --+-.) Indicates the element that is connected to the third (neither Arrive nor Leave) p-point of the Current Element. >-.) Indicates the elements that are connected to the free (neither Arrive nor Leave) p-points of the Current Element.<bpos> --. This is because neither Branch nor Pipe have position or orientation attributes and therefore do not have a co-ordinate system.

as the Arrive and Leave ppoint numbers are Design attributes independent of the Catalogue.6.3 3-31 . these may only be used or interrogated after Selection.6. The FLIP command can be given before Selection. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.integer --+--> 3. | | ‘-. as the p-point details for Arrive (PA) and Leave (PL) are obtained from the Catalogue. the Select mechanism needs to be told that the Arrive is at P2 by FLIP Selection.3 Swapping the Arrive and Leave P-points Keywords: Description: FLIP This command swaps the Arrive and Leave p-point numbers of a Component so that it can be ‘Flipped’. Command Syntax: >--+-. It is usual to set those attributes before Selection and Positioning as they can define: • • The automatic Selection Parameters for that item (particularly REDUCERS) The centreline Logical Route that will affect positioning and orientation of the Component. It does not actually rotate the Component until the next orientation command is given. Therefore NEW REDU FLIP SELECT WITH LBORE 100 would be a typical command for a bore increase.P --------.LEAve ---+-.ARRive --. Leave 2. However. Note: Default is Arrive 1. | | ‘-. Examples: ARR 2 LEAV 1 The Logical Route will Arrive at P2 and Leave at P1 of the Component. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.2 Component Arrive and Leave Attributes Keywords: Description: ARRIVE LEAVE This command sets the attributes that control which p-points are the Arrive and Leave for a Component. As most Specifications are organised with Reducers having PBOR1 larger than PBOR2.Piping. ARR 3 LEAV 2 The Logical Route will Arrive at P3 and Leave at P2 of the Component.

| | ‘-. Examples: FLIP Reverses the current Arrive and Leave p-point numbers for that Component.3 . Ducting and Cable Trays When working in BACKWARDS mode.the REDU need only be Flipped if a bore reduction is required. this situation reverses .LEAve ---+--> ARRIVE P1 CE PH LEAVE FLIP (ARRIVE 2 LEAVE 1) P2 PT Figure 3-5 Component Arrive and Leave attributes (standard and Flipped) 3-32 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Query --+-.ARRive --.Piping.FLIP --> Querying: >-. Command Syntax: >-.

however.SPRef name --> 3. there is no Upstream Component. for example. cable trays and pipe hangers) obtain their geometries from the PDMS Catalogue through a Specification. Generally. it is usually appropriate to create a Component FTUB element to ensure that this minimum length is adhered to. as variable length Tube is always straight.6. be set directly to the name of the required Specification Component. as it is automatically determined during the Component Selection process described elsewhere. Instead. Examples: SPREF /SPEC208/EL50BW The current element is specified by the chosen Specification Component. trays and rod) between Components are not defined as PDMS elements in the hierarchy. where Tube changes direction. At the Head of a Branch.5 Variable Length Tube (and Rod) Attributes Keywords: Description: LSTUBE LSROD HSTUBE HSROD Straight lengths of Tube (ducting. Note: This attribute is usually inserted automatically as a direct result of the CHOOSE (or SELECT) command. It can.6. is merely a hierarchical element and has no geometry. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. Command Syntax: >-.4 The Component Specification Reference Attribute Keywords: Description: SPREF All Piping Components (including ducting. The SPREF (Specification Reference) attribute of these items refers to a Specification Component in a chosen Project Specification that obtains its physical dimensions from the Catalogue.3 3-33 . Their geometric cross-section details are stored in the Catalogue and are pointed at from the Upstream Component via its LSTU attribute. you need not be concerned about specifying Tube between Components. If the SPREF is not set. a Valve. If short fixed-length stubs of Tube are required. Similarly. a Component must be inserted (usually a BEND). they are extruded from the Leave p-point of a Component to the Arrive p-point of the next. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. therefore a special Branch attribute exists to allow Tube from the Head to the first Component to be specified (HSTU).Piping.

Command Syntax: >--+-| |-| |-| ‘-LSTube --. but between the Head and Arrive of First Component (or Tail).5 As first example. | HSTube --| | LSRod ---| | HSRod ---+-. HST /SPEC502/100L (At Branch) As above.Piping. Ducting and Cable Trays Examples: LSTU /SPEC502/100L (At Branch Component) The Tube between the Leave p-point of this Component and the Arrive of the Next (or Tail) is specified by the named Specification Component. LSR /HS20/2. Note: (At Hanger Component.name ----.3 . | | ‘-.5 As second example. HSR /HS20/2.) (At Hanger Component.) These attributes are usually set automatically when the CHOOSE (or SELECT) command is used.NULREF --+--> Figure 3-6 Variable length Tube between Components 3-34 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

6. 3. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Examples: ISPE /I500-HAV The Current Component and Tube from its Leave p-point will be insulated according to the named Specification. Examples: TSPE /TR50A The Current Component will be noted by ISODRAFT with the given trace heating requirements.name ---. Note: If a whole Branch is to be insulated.) ISP NULREF The Component and Tube from its Leave p-point will be uninsulated.6 Insulation Specification Attribute Keywords: Description: ISPEC This attribute points to an insulation Specification.7 Trace Heating Specification Attribute Keywords: Description: TSPE This attribute provides ISODRAFT with trace heating information.NULREF --+--> Querying: >-. | | ‘-. having no significance other than its name. The trace heating Specification pointed to is a dummy Specification defined in SPECON. but can also be set on an individual basis.3 3-35 .ISPec --+-.Query INSUlation --> Gives the insulation thickness. It is automatically cascaded down from the Branch ISPE setting. (The temperature parameters required to determine insulation thickness will be obtained from the Branch element. Command Syntax: >-.Piping. This setting will then cascade down to all new Components. In conjunction with the Branch TEMPERATURE attribute. the Branch ISPE should be set before Components are created. the ISPE insulates the Component and the Tube from its Leave point.6. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.

BUILT FALSE Information attribute indicating that current element has not been built.6.SHOP ---. TSPE should be set at Branch level. Note: If the same trace heating is required for an entire Branch. The BUILT flag can indicate whether or not the Component has been fabricated/built during construction.TRue ---. | | ‘-. | | ‘-. | | ‘-.BUIlt --+-.FALse --+--> 3-36 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Command Syntax: >--+-.NULREF --+--> 3. Examples: SHOP TRUE The current element will be itemised as ‘SHOP FABRICATED’ in ISODRAFT.3 .name ---. Ducting and Cable Trays TSPE NULREF Trace heating is removed. from where it will cascade down to all new Components. Command Syntax: >-.Piping. The SHOP flag is used by ISODRAFT to determine in which material list the item will appear.8 The Fabrication Flags Keywords: Description: SHOP BUILT These attributes indicate the location and status of construction of each Component.TSPec --+-.

However. The Component will not be drawn in the views.6. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.POSFlag --.TRue ---. the next Component cannot be positioned using ordinary routing commands.Piping.POSFlag --+-. they can be set explicitly as follows: >--+-. ORIF TRUE POSF TRUE After the Component is oriented it will be shown in normal line type. Command Syntax: These attributes are set automatically by DESIGN when positioning and orientation takes place. They are used by DESIGN in several situations where it requires to know if a Component has been properly positioned.3 3-37 . | | ‘-.ORIFlag --. Note: If either POSFLAG or ORIFLAG remains FALSE. Examples: POSF FALSE This setting will occur if the Components have been transferred from a P&ID and not positioned. | | ‘-. ORIF FALSE POSF TRUE This setting will occur if the item has been Selected in DESIGN but not oriented. | | ‘-.9 Position and Orientation Status Flags Keywords: Description: ORIFLAG POSFLAG These attributes are automatically set to TRUE when the Component is positioned and orientated.ORIFlag --+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Query --+-.FALse --+--> Querying: >-.

HEIght <uval> --> >-. say. this dimension will alter as specified. the variable value may be difficult to determine. changing the ANGLE attribute of a 90-degree fixed-angle elbow to 45 degrees will have no effect. altering. | | ‘-.6.ANGle --+-.RADius <uval> --> >-. Once a Component has been selected from the Specification. For instance.<bdir> TOwards <bdir> --+--> >-. the ANGLE may change its physical appearance.3 . HEIGHT or RADIUS attributes or use Design Parameters. Command Syntax: >-. a BEND in a pipe may possess an angle resulting from an oblique change in direction. the DIRECTION command (described elsewhere) can be used to determine the ANGLE setting automatically. it will choose the ‘ANGLE45’ option if available in the Specification.<uval> -----------------. In some cases. In such instances. Examples: ANGL 45 (Before Selection) When the CHOOSE (or SELECT) command is given. 90-degree or 45-degree fixed-angle elbows.Piping. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. HEIGHT and RADIUS attributes can also be set before selection as a means of choosing between. HEIG 300 (After Selection) If a variable height component. For example. The ANGLE. it is the Catalogue that determines whether the value of these attributes will affect the physical Component. say.DESParameters <uval> --> 3-38 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.10 Variable Component Attributes Keywords: Description: ANGLE HEIGHT RADIUS DESPARAMETERS Some Components have variable dimensions that must be specified in situ by the designer. Although many Component elements possess the ANGLE.

If the Component is left as in-line.g.TRue ---. For three-way Components (e. TEE). This is usually set automatically as a result of a CONNECT command. but it may also be set explicitly. the reporting utility will treat it as a continuous part of the Tube either side of the Component and will only report one pipe length. the Tube will be split into two sections with no account being taken of the Arrive-to-Leave length of the Component. some Components have further p-points which can become the ends of other Branches. For Components with more than three p-points (e.6.g. OFFL TRUE In the reporting utility. | | ‘-. If it is off-line. Examples: LOFF FALSE In the reporting utility. Command Syntax: >--+-. This is useful for BENDS (bends in continuous Tube) and OLETS (which tap off the side of a piece of Tube). Ducting and Cable Trays 3. Although a Design Component element can possess a CREF or CRFA attribute.3 3-39 .LOFFline --. the attribute CRFA stores the names of up to 10 Branches which connect to this item.12 Multi-Way Component Attributes Keywords: Description: CREF CRFA In addition to Arrive and Leave p-points. | | ‘-. CROSS).FALse --+--> 3. the current element will be treated as a full Component which breaks the Tube lengths either side.11 Offline/Straight-Through Component Attribute Keywords: Description: LOFF This attribute controls whether a Component is considered to be ‘inline’ or ‘off-line’. it PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. the current element will be included as part of a single Tube length running through its Arrive-to-Leave centreline.OFFLine ---+-. Note: The default setting for this attribute is dependent upon Component type.6.Piping. the attribute CREF (Connection Reference) is used to show which Branch is connected to the free ppoint.

CREF --+-. 3-40 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. it is automatically positioned next to the adjacent Component so that it can be seen. Generally.7 Orientation and Connection of Components Orientation and Connection commands make use of the constrained centreline of a Pipe route. Examples: CREF /PIPE1 TAIL Sets CREF of current element to point to Tail of /PIPE1 and sets TREF of /PIPE1 to point back to the current element.CREf --. | | | | |-. CREF NULREF Unsets CREF.HEAD --. All the examples in this section assume Forwards routing mode is in operation. Command Syntax: >-. DESIGN insists on this minimum to ensure that each Component is deliberately manipulated by the user. Ducting and Cable Trays is the Catalogue which controls whether the item can actually be connected to by other Branches. | | ‘-. disconnects this point from any other element.Query --+-.TAIL --| | | | | ‘----------+ | | ‘-. i. However.NULREF -------------+--> Querying: >-. When a Component is Selected. if Backwards is being used. then the effect of these commands will logically reverse.e.Piping.CRFA --+--> 3.<gid> --+-.3 . it is essential in DESIGN that the item is either oriented or Connected.

1 Component Orientation Keywords: Description: ORIENTATE This command rotates the Component about its origin so that (in forwards mode) the Arrive p-point is in the opposite direction to the previous Component’s Leave p-point. This is usually done by giving the direction of an off-line p-point.-------------------<----------------.3 3-41 . | | ‘--------------------+.AND <bdir> IS <bdir> -. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. / | <marke> --*-.ORIentate -+.<gid> --’ | ‘--> >-.Piping. If the Component is not concentric. ORI AND P3 IS U As above. | | | | ‘---------------+-. | | ‘------------------------+--> Querying: .<bdir> IS <bdir> -. Examples: ORI Rotate the current element about its origin so that (in forwards mode) its Arrive Point is in the opposite direction to the previous Component’s Leave Point (see Figure 3-7). | | | | |-. of a variable Component to accommodate an oblique off-line direction. and orient the off-line p-point (P3) in the specified direction (see Figure 3-8). DESIGN will leave this off-line direction in the closest orientation to that requested.DIRection --. Command Syntax: >.Query PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Note: The ORIENTATE command will not change the ANGLE.IN ---+-.7.WRT --. it is necessary to specify the offline orientation as well. If it is not possible to achieve an orientation because of the direction of the constrained centreline. RADIUS etc.

3 3-42 . Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-7 Orienting a Concentric Component Figure 3-8 Orienting a non-concentric Component by means of an off-line ppoint PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.

a BEND). Command Syntax: >-. The ability of a Component to adjust in this way is controlled by the Catalogue. but P3 (rather than PL) is pointed to the new direction (see Figure 3-9). If this requires a change of angle and the Component has a variable ANGLE attribute. the item will be pointed in the closest direction to that specified.Query <marke> --*-.IN ---+-. Examples: DIR E Rotate the Component about its origin such that (in forwards mode) its Arrive point is in the opposite direction to the previous Component’s leave point. | | | | |-.2 Direction-Changing Components Keywords: Description: DIRECTION The DIRECTION command orients the Component along the constrained centreline and points the specified p-point in a new direction. this will automatically be adjusted. Unlike the ORI command.WRT --.g.AND <marke> IS --.-------------------<----------------. / | >-. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.<bdir> --> Querying: .DIRection --.7. then this will be altered to suit (see Figure 3-9). | | ‘--------------------+-. | | | | ‘---------------+-.3 3-43 .DIRection --+-. Note: If the new direction cannot be adopted by a fixed-angle Component. DIR AND P3 IS U45E As above. if that new direction requires a change in the ANGLE of a variable-angle Component (e.<gid> --’ | ‘--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping. and its leave point is East.

Piping.3 . Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-9 Changing the direction of variable-angle Components 3-44 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

if Connection Types or bores are incompatible.3 Component Connection Keywords: Description: CONNECT This command places a p-point on the current Component face-to-face with the p-point of an adjacent Component.------------------<----------------.TO <marke> -+. CONNECT AND P3 IS U As first example and the off-line p-point is oriented upwards (see Figure 310). | | | | |-. CONNECT TO NEXT The leave p-point of the Component is connected to the arrive p-point of the next Component (see Figure 3-10). | | | | ‘--------------+-. Note: Only adjacent Components (not Attachment Points) may be connected to. If the Connection Types or nominal bores of the Connected faces are not compatible. then an automatic FLIP takes place and CONNECT is attempted again.IN ---+-.WRT --.7.<gid> --’ | ‘--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Query <marke> --*-. / | >-. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.CONnect -+.POSition --. Command Syntax: >. DESIGN automatically Flips (reverses Arrive and Leave) the Component and tries again. Examples: CONNECT The arrive p-point of the Component is connected to the leave p-point of the Previous Component (see Figure 310).<marke> -+. If the adjacent element is an Attachment Point (ATTA) then this is ignored and Connection is attempted on the Next Component.Piping.AND <bdir> IS <bdir> -> | | | | | ‘--> | ‘--> ‘--> Querying: .3 3-45 .

but ignores Connection and Bore compatibility. Examples: FCONN The Arrive p-point of the Component is force-connected to the Leave p-point of the previous Component. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-10 Component connection 3. The Component will be shown fully positioned. FCONN TO TAIL The Leave p-point of the Component is force-connected to the Tail.Piping. FCONN AND P3 IS U As first example and the off-line p-point is oriented upwards.7.4 Forced Component Connection Keywords: Description: FCONNECT This operates exactly as the CONNECT command.3 . 3-46 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. but data consistency checking will still report incompatible connections unless the items are moved apart later.

if Backwards is being used. Ducting and Cable Trays Note: Only adjacent Components (not Attachment Points) may be forceconnected. then the effect of each command will be logically reversed. 3.8 Moving by a Known Distance These commands move the Component a specified distance along the constrained centreline.3 3-47 . All the examples in this section assume Forwards routing mode is in operation. Note: A positive dimension moves the Component away from the Previous Component.<marke> -+.AND <bdir> IS <bdir> --> | | | | | ‘--> | ‘--> ‘--> 3.MOVe DISTance <uval> --> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. All the commands move the Component from its current position. MOVE DISTANCE This command moves the Component along the constrained centreline by a specified distance. Command Syntax: >-.8.TO <marke> -+. No check on compatibility of bore or Connection Type occurs.FCONnect -+. Command Syntax: >. The distance moved may either be measured along the constrained centreline or some other planar direction.1 Moving Components Keywords: Description: Examples: MOVE DISTANCE 1000 The Current Component is moved from its present position 1000 along the constrained centreline (see Figure 3-11). Generally.Piping.

Ducting and Cable Trays Querying: >-.Query POSition <bpos> --+-.8.3 .WRT --.MOVe PLAne <bdir> DISTance <uval> --> Querying: >-.Query POSition <bpos> --+-.Piping. The distance moved may be specified either in the direction moved or another planar direction. | | |-.2 General Moving of Components Keywords: Description: MOVE PLANE DISTANCE This command moves the Component along the constrained centreline.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> 3-48 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Examples: MOVE PLANE N45E DIST 1000 The current Component is moved from its present position along the constrained centreline by 1000 along the N45E direction (see Figure 3-12).WRT --. | | |-. Command Syntax: >-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> Figure 3-11 Moving a Component by a given distance 3.

3. All the examples in this section assume Forwards routing mode.1 Positioning with respect to the Previous Component Keywords: Description: DISTANCE POSITION This command positions the Component on the constrained centreline at a specified distance from the origin of previous Component. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The orientation of the reference plane defaults to perpendicular to the constrained centreline. then the effect of each command will be logically reversed. Any p-point on the Component may be used.Piping. although the default is the origin. the default being the origin.9.3 3-49 . In no case is the volumetric geometry of the 3D model considered. Any ppoint on the current element may be used. although a different planar direction can be specified. if Backwards is being used. These commands are therefore not suitable for ‘clearance’ positioning.9 Positioning Components using Reference Planes This section describes commands that position the Component on the constrained centreline at the intersection with a fixed reference plane. This point is positioned along the constrained centreline through the reference plane which is defined by the 3D position through which it passes. Generally. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-12 Moving a Component by a distance specified in another plane 3.

Query --+-.DISTance <uval> --> Querying: >-. Command Syntax: >--+-. POS PA DIST 1000 As above.<marke> --+-.POSition <marke> --.Piping. | | ‘----------------------+-. Ducting and Cable Trays Examples: DIST 1000 The Component will be positioned on the constrained centreline 1000 from the origin of the previous Component (see Figure 3-13a).POSition --. | | ‘--------------+-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> Figure 3-13 (a) Positioning with respect to Previous Component 3-50 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. but the Arrive point of the Component is used (see Figure 3-13b).3 . | | |-.WRT --.

POS PA THR E3000 The Arrive point of the current Component will be positioned on the constrained centreline where the perpendicular reference plane through E3000 N0 U0 intersects (see Figure 3-15a). the specified Nozzle. For cursor positioning it is therefore advisable to use orthogonal views for orthogonal piping. Examples: POS THR /TANK5 The origin of the current Component will be positioned on the constrained centreline where this intersects the perpendicular reference plane through the named element (see Figure 3-14). PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. THR @ The Component will be placed on the constrained centreline where the perpendicular reference plane indicated by the cursor intersects (see Figure 3-15b).2 Positioning the Component through an Intersection Keywords: Description: THROUGH POSITION This command allows the designer to position the Component through the intersection with a fixed design element or position (say a Nozzle) or a cursor position. The Component is positioned along the constrained centreline where the reference plane intersecting.Piping.3 3-51 .9. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-13(b) Positioning with respect to Previous Component 3. cuts at right angles. say.

Query --+-. Ducting and Cable Trays NOTE: The reference plane is perpendicular to the constrained centreline. | | |-.Piping.<marke> --+-.POSition --. the position will be located on the working grid nearest to the cursor.WRT --.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> Figure 3-14 Positioning through an intersection 3-52 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | ‘----------------------+-. If the cursor is used. | | ‘--------------+-. Command Syntax: >--+-.POSition <marke> --.THRough <bpos> --> Querying: >-.3 .

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3 3-53 .9. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-15(a) Positioning through an intersection Figure 3-15(b) Positioning through an intersection 3.3 Positioning with respect to an Intersection Keywords: Description: POSITION DISTANCE FROM TO This command positions the current Component so that its origin (or specified p-point) intersects the reference plane either side of the specified fixed position.Piping.

POSition <marke> -.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> 3-54 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3 . TO means closer to the Previous Component than the reference plane. DIST 1000 TO NEXT The Component will be placed on the constrained centreline so that its origin is 1000 before of the Next Component’s origin (see Figure 3-17a). | | ‘--------------+-. | | ‘. | | |-.WRT --.DISTance <uval> -+.Piping. Note: The reference plane is perpendicular to the constrained centreline.TO ---+.POSition --. Command Syntax: >-+.Query <marke> --+-. Ducting and Cable Trays Examples: DIST 50 FROM /TANK5 The Component will be moved along the constrained centreline until its origin is 50 beyond the perpendicular plane through the named element (see Figure 3-16).FRom -. POS PA DIST 20 FROM PL OF PREV The Component will be placed on the constrained centreline so that its Arrive point is 20 from the previous Component’s Leave point (see Figure 3-17b).<bpos> -> Querying: >-. | | ‘--------------------+. FROM means further from the previous Component than the reference plane.

Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-16 Positioning with respect to an intersection Figure 3-17a Positioning with respect to an intersection PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.3 3-55 .

Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-17b Positioning with respect to an intersection 3-56 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3 .Piping.

Query <marke> --+-.4 General Positioning through an Intersection Keywords: Description: POSITION PLANE DISTANCE THROUGH FROM TO This command differs from the basic options by allowing the reference plane to be specified independently of the constrained centreline. | | ‘--------------------+. | | ‘--------------+-.9. Examples: PLANE E DIST 1000 The Component will be placed on the constrained centreline so that its origin is 1000 from the previous Component’s origin in an East/West direction (see Figure 3-18).<bpos> -> | ‘.DISTance <uval> -+.Piping. | | |-.TO ---+.POSition <marke> -. | | | | ‘.THrough <bpos> -> Querying: >-.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. This is particularly relevant for routing sloping lines where a specific Easting or Northing is to be intersected.PLANe <bdir> -+. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.3 3-57 .POSition --.FRom -. Command Syntax: >-+.WRT --.

Piping. In no case is the geometry of the current element considered.10 Positioning Components ‘Point-to-Surface’ This section describes commands which position a Component on the constrained centreline at a specified distance from the surface of a fixed design item. or is a position. 3-58 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. then its complete geometry will be considered. then the Tube cross-section at that point will be considered.e. Generally. i. the geometry of the referenced item is considered in one of three ways: • • • If the item is a Design element. Any p-point on the current element may be used for the manoeuvre. the effect of each command is logically reversed. although the default is the origin. a non-piping p-point. All the examples in this section assume Forwards mode. If the item has no geometry. if Backwards mode is being used. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-18 Positioning through an intersection defined in an independent plane 3. then only that point will be considered.3 . If the item is a Piping p-point at the Arrive or Leave of another Component. However.

Command Syntax: >-+.1 Positioning Components either side of an Object Keywords: Description: Examples: DISTANCE 30 INFRONT /WALL The Component will be placed on the Constrained Centreline so that its origin is 30 ‘this side’ of the specified object (see Figure 3-19 and Figure 320). point or position.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | |.<gid> --.INFront -. | | ‘--------------------+.Piping.POSition <marke> -. DISTANCE 125 BEHIND IDP @ The Component will be placed such that its origin is 125 the ‘other side’ of the picked p-point. POS PL INF /ACCESS The Component will be placed such that its Leave Point is zero distance ‘this side’ of the specified object (see Figure 3-20).DISTance <uval> -+.BEHind --+. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. Querying: >-.POSition --. | | |-. | | ‘--------------+-.3 3-59 . then the Tube crosssection will be taken into account (see Figure 3-20).<bpos> --+-> POSITION DISTANCE INFRONT BEHIND This command positions the Component on the constrained centreline at a specified distance from a geometric object.<marke> -| | | ‘.Query <marke> --+-.10. If this point is an Arrive or Leave. | | ‘.WRT --.

3 . Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-19 Positioning Components either side of an object 3-60 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.

Piping. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-20 Positioning Components relative to a specified object PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3 3-61 .

WRT --. If this point is an Arrive or Leave. | | ‘--------------+-.Query <marke> --+-. DISTANCE 125 UNDER IDP @ The Component will be placed on the Constrained Centreline so that its origin is 125 below the picked point.ONTop -. This takes into account the shape of the referenced object.3 .2 Positioning Components On Top of or Under an Object Keywords: Description: POSITION DISTANCE ONTOP UNDER This command positions the Component on the constrained centreline at a vertical distance above or below a fixed geometric object.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> 3-62 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.DISTance <uval> -+. | | ‘.UNDer -+.POSition --. then the Tube cross-section will be taken into account (see Figure 3-21). Command Syntax: >-+.<gid> --. | | ‘--------------------+.<bpos> --+-> Querying: >-.10.Piping. but not of the current element.POSition <marke> -. | | |.<marke> -| | | ‘. Examples: DISTANCE 35 ONTO /BEAM The Component will be placed on the Constrained Centreline so that its origin is 35 above the specified object (see Figure 3-21). Ducting and Cable Trays 3. | | |-.

3 3-63 . Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-21 Positioning above/below an object PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.

<marke> -| | | ‘.PLAne <bdir> -.IN ---+-| ‘--> <gid> --> 3-64 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.WRT --.10.<bpos> --+-> Querying: >-. | UNDer ---| | INFront -| | BEHind --+. | | ‘------------+-. | | |.<bpos> --. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.3 General Component Positioning Using Planes Keywords: Description: POSITION UNDER PLANE DISTANCE INFRONT BEHIND ONTOP This command differs from the basic options by allowing the reference plane to be specified in a different direction from that of the constrained centreline. Examples: PLANE E DIST 1000 INFRONT /WALL The Component will be placed on the constrained centreline such that its origin is 1000 ‘this side’ of /WALL.DISTance <uval> -+| || || ‘- ONTop ---. | | ‘--------------------+. measured East-West (see Figure 3-22).<gid> --.Piping.Query POSition --+-. | | ‘----------------+. Command Syntax: >-+.3 .POSition <marke> -. | | |-.

Piping. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-22 Positioning relative to an object specified in a different plane PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3 3-65 .

• A selection of Bottom of Pipe (BOP) commands are also available that provide clearance for the Tube cross-section at a Component Leave Point.Piping. or a ppoint is used that is not an Arrive or Leave. If the current element or referenced element has no geometry. or a position is used. If Backwards is in use. The whole geometry of both Components is considered. If an Arrive or Leave p-point on the current element or referenced element is used.1 Clearance from the Previous Component Keywords: Description: CLEARANCE This command places the Component at a specified clearance from the previous Component on the constrained centreline. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. then the effect of each command is logically reversed. then the Tube cross-sectional geometry at that point is considered (not the Component geometry). All the examples in this section assume Forwards routing mode. the following rules also apply: • • If the current element or referenced element is used and has a geometric shape. 3. then only the position is considered.11. Examples: CLEA 500 The Component will be placed on the constrained centreline 500 clear of the Previous Component (see Figure 3-23). The clearance specified usually takes into account both the current element and referenced element geometric shapes.CLEArance <uval> --> 3-66 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Command Syntax: >-. then this is considered.11 Component Clearance Positioning The commands in this section position the Component on the constrained centreline to give a specified clearance distance from a fixed design item. However.3 .

IN ---+-- <gid> --> Figure 3-23 Clearance from a Previous Component PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.BOP -------| | | ‘-.WRT --. | | |-. Ducting and Cable Trays Querying: >-.Piping.3 3-67 .Query <marke> --+-.POSition --. | | ‘-.TOP -------+-.

<marke> --| | | ‘-. | | ‘------------+-. Examples: CLEAR BEHIND /WALL The Component will be placed on the constrained centreline with zero clearance on the ‘far side’ of the specified element (see Figure 3-24). | | |-. | | ‘-.TOP -------+-.3 .POSition --.BEHind ---+-. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. | | |-.Piping.WRT --.CLEArance --+-. CLEAR 1200 INF PL OF NEXT The Component will be placed on the constrained centreline with 1200 clearance ‘this side’ of the Tube emerging from the Component’s Leave point (see Figure 3-24).Query <marke> --+-.BOP -------| | | ‘-.<uval> --.2 Component Clearance Either Side Keywords: Description: CLEARANCE INFRONT BEHIND This command places the current Component on the constrained centreline at a specified clearance in front of or behind a fixed design object.INFront --. If the Arrive or Leave point of the referenced object is used. Command Syntax: >-. | | ‘-.11.<gid> ---.<bpos> ---+--> Querying: >-.IN ---+-- <gid> --> 3-68 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. then the Tube cross-section at this point is considered rather than the full item geometry.

3 3-69 . Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-24 Component clearance either side of a fixed object PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.

| | |-.CLEArance --+-. If the Arrive or Leave point of the referenced object is used.3 . Ducting and Cable Trays 3.3 Component Clearance Vertically Keywords: Description: CLEARANCE ONTOP UNDER This command places the current Component on the constrained centreline at a specified vertical clearance above or below a fixed object.<bpos> ---+--> Querying: >-. | | |-. then the Tube cross-section emerging at this point is considered rather than the full item geometry.BOP -------| | | ‘-.ONTop --.<uval> --.<marke> --| | | ‘-.Query <marke> --+-. Command Syntax: >-.TOP -------+-. | | ‘-.IN ---+-- <gid> --> 3-70 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<gid> ---. | | ‘------------+-.Piping. then the Tube cross-section will be taken into account (see Figure 3-25).POSition --. CLEAR 50 ONTO IDP @ The current Component will be placed on the constrained centreline at a clearance of 50 vertically above the picked p-point.WRT --.UNDer --+-. | | ‘-.11. CLEARANCE 50 UNDER /BEAM The current Component will be placed on the constrained centreline at 50 vertical clearance below the specified object (see Figure 3-25). Examples: CLEARANCE ONTO /BEAM The current Component will be placed on the constrained centreline at zero clearance above the specified object (see Figure 3-25). If this p-point is an Arrive or Leave.

3 3-71 .Piping. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-25 Component clearance above/below a fixed object PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

The clearance can either be specified as a dimension along the constrained centreline in-frontof/behind the object or vertically on top/under it. They are merely provided to allow a sensible choice of syntax.Piping. then its Tube cross-section will also be considered. | UNDer ----| | INFront --| | BEHind ---+-.<marke> --| | | ‘-.<bpos> --> ONTop ----. Using this command.BOP --. pipes can be spaced on the beams of a rack by Tube-to-Tube clearance. | | ‘------------+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| ‘-- FROm --. Ducting and Cable Trays 3.<gid> ---. | | ‘-.<uval> --. | TO ----+-. Command Syntax: >--+-. BOP 30 BEHIND /FLAN The Component will be positioned on the constrained centreline so that the Tube emerging from its Leave point is 30 clear of the ‘far side’ of /FLAN (see Figure 3-26a).11.<bpos> ---+--> Note: The meanings of BOP and TOP in this context are identical. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. If the Arrive or Leave points of the fixed object are used. BOP 30 BEHIND PL OF /FLAN As above. Examples: BOP ONTO /BEAM The Component will be positioned on the constrained centreline so that the Tube emerging from its Leave point is zero clearance above /BEAM (see Figure 3-26a).TOP --+-. | | |-.4 Tube (Bottom of Pipe) Clearance Keywords: Description: BOP TOP ONTOP UNDER INFRONT BEHIND This command places the current Component on the constrained centreline so that the Tube cross-section at its Leave point is a specified clearance from another fixed object. but 30 to the far side of the Leave Tube of /FLAN (see Figure 326b).3 3-72 .

Query <marke> --+-.BOP -------| | | ‘-.Piping.POSition --. | | ‘-.WRT --.TOP -------+-.3 3-73 .IN ---+-- <gid> --> Figure 3-26a Tube clearance relative to a fixed object PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | |-. Ducting and Cable Trays Querying: >-.

Piping.3 .5 General Clearance of Components and Tube Keywords: Description: POSITION UNDER • • Examples: PLANE E CLEARANCE 1000 The current Component will be placed on the constrained centreline so that it is 1000 clear of the Previous Component in an East-West direction (see Figure 3-27). Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-26b Tube clearance taking into account the Tube diameter 3. POS PL CLEAR 100 ONTO /BEAM The current Component will be placed on the constrained centreline so that the Tube from its Leave Point is 100 vertically above /BEAM (same as BOP) PLANE CLEARANCE INFRONT BEHIND ONTOP This command differs from the basic options in two respects: The clearance dimension can be in an independent plane from the constrained centreline. 3-74 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.11. The current element Arrive or Leave Tube can be used (similar to BOP) rather than the whole element geometry.

Query <marke> --+-.<gid> --. | | ‘--------------------+. | | |.TOP -------+-.BOP -------| | | ‘-. Ducting and Cable Trays Command Syntax: >-+.WRT --.PLAne <bdir> -.POSition --.<bpos> --+-> Querying: >-. | | ‘-. | UNDer ---| | INFront -| | BEHind --+.IN ---+-- <gid> --> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.<marke> -| | | ‘.CLEARance <uval> -+| || || ‘- ONTop ---. | | ‘----------------+.POSition <marke> -.3 3-75 . | | |-.

Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-27 Component clearance specified relative to an independent plane 3-76 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3 .Piping.

In this case the network is formed by searching outwards in all directions from the component until a legal end is found for each ‘leg’ of the network. together with the constrained network.The DRAG command is used to move Constrained Networks of Piping.3 3-77 . How the constrained network is created depends on the direction of the dragging operation and the type of item being dragged.Piping. The piping networks connected to all Nozzles owned by the equipment are searched for legal ends. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. the current element is displayed normally. Items that can be dragged are: • Piping Components. the pipes connected to it do not automatically move with the item. the DRAG operation may fail to establish a constrained network. The piping network connected to the Nozzle is searched for legal ends. This network finishes where a legal end is found. When a DRAG command is given.12 Dragging Equipment and Piping Networks If equipment is repositioned using ordinary positioning commands. Equipment. Equipment and Nozzle elements all together. A piece of tube that can be extended parallel to the displacement A piece of tube that can be compressed parallel to the displacement without becoming negative in length A Nozzle A point between two mis-aligned components A point between two incompatibly-connected components Any component that has not yet been positioned and orientated Any element in a design area that cannot be modified due to the designer’s access rights • • A legal end for a constrained network can be: • • • • • • • In some instances. This may be because: • • The internal search limit has been reached A LOCKED element has been found in the network PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Nozzles.

etc. DRAG BY N500 U500 The current element and constrained network will be dragged by the specified amount.1 Dragging Equipment and Nozzles Keywords: Description: DRAG AT BY POSITION MOVE This command repositions the current element and constrained network to the specified position.<pppos> --. DRAG MOVE N CLEAR 1000 INF /BUILD10 The current element and constrained network are moved specified clearance in front of element /BUILD10. POS. etc.g. <relat> defines any relative positioning command.<relat> --+--> North to the where <absol> defines any absolute positioning command. MOVE.12.<bpos> ---.AT --+-. | | | | ‘-.DRAG --+-. Ducting and Cable Trays 3. AT. DRAG MOVE E2000 The current element and constrained network will be moved to the specified position. Examples: DRAG AT E3000 The current element and constrained network will be dragged to the specified position. Command Syntax: The full DRAG command syntax is extensive but may be summarised as follows: >-. e.3 . The full expanded syntax is given below for reference: <absol> = >--+-.Piping.g.<polar> --+--------+--> 3-78 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. e. | | | | ‘-. The DRAG command can be followed by any standard Equipment and Civils positioning or moving command.<absol> --.<polar> --| | | |-. BY. | | ‘-.

<polar> -----------| | | |-.3 3-79 .<uval> -+.<polar> --| | | | | ‘-.<bpos> ---.<bpos> ---. | | | | ‘----------+.<uval> -.AT --.<repla> ------.<repla> -.<planf> -| | | | | ‘-----------+-------------------| | CLEArance -+. | | | | ‘----------+.AT --+-. | | | | | | ‘-.POSition --+-.<repla> -.<planf> -| | | | | ‘-----------+----------------| | <repla> -------------------------------------------| | THRough <bpos> ------------------------------------| | <planf> -------------------------------------------+> PLAne <bdir> -+| | | || || ‘- PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<polar> --+-------------+--> <plane> = >-+| | | | | | | | | | | | | | || | | | | || | | | | | | || || ‘DISTance <uval> -+. | | ‘------------------+-. | | | | |.POLar <bdir> --.<uval> -. Ducting and Cable Trays <polar> = >--+-. | | | | |.Piping. | | | | ‘-.<marke> --+-.<plane> --> <pppos> = >-. | | ‘----------------| | <repla> --------------------------| | THRough <bpos> -------------------| | CLEArance -+.<repla> -| | | |.<planf> -| | | ‘-----------| DISTance . | | | | ‘--------+-.

Ducting and Cable Trays <repla> = >--+-| |-| | | | | |-| ‘-<planf> = INFront --.BY .<bdir> <plane> ----------------| | | |. | | | | | | ‘.<bpos> ---+--> <relat> = >--+-.MOVe -+. | | | | | | | | ‘.Piping.BY <pos> -+. | | | TO ----+-.IN --+.WRT -. | | | | |---------+.WRT -.<marke> --| | | ‘-.IN ---+-. | | | | |. | | ‘-.<pos> -+.<sgid> -----------| | | ‘-.<plane> ---------------------| | | |.BY <pos> --+-.<sgid> ---. | | | | ‘----------------------| | | ‘-.WRT --.ONTop --.IN --+.<sgid> --.ALOng -.<bpos> ------+--> >--+-. | | |-.<bpos> ---| | FROm --. | BEHind ---+-. | | |-.<plane> --------------------------------+-> 3-80 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | | | |---------+.UNDer --+-. | | | | |-.<sgid> ---.<bdir> <plane> ----.<relmo> --------------------------+--> <relmo> = >.<marke> -+.<sgid> -| | | | | ‘.<marke> --| | | ‘-.ALOng -.3 .

3 3-81 . Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-28 Dragging Equipment and Nozzles by a specified amount Figure 3-29(a) Dragging Equipment and Nozzles to a specified position PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.

DRAG MOVE S DISTANCE 1000 The current element and constrained network are moved South by the specified distance.Piping. DRAG BOP ONTO /BEAM2-1 CLEAR 150 The current (Branch) element and constrained network are dragged so that the Tube will be positioned on top of /BEAM2-1 with a clearance of 150. 3-82 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. the bottom/top of piping positioning syntax can be used. Examples: DRAG THRO @ The current element and constrained network are moved along the constrained centreline until the origin of the current element lies on a reference plane which passes through the cursor position.3 .2 Dragging Piping Keywords: Description: DRAG AT BY POSITION MOVE DISTANCE THROUGH FROM TO CLEARANCE INFRONT BEHIND ONTOP UNDER This command is identical to the DRAG command described in the previous subsection except that. if the current element is a Branch. Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-29(b) Dragging Equipment and Nozzles to a specified position 3.12. DRAG DISTANCE 1000 ONTO /GRADE The current element and constrained network are dragged so that the origin of the current element is 1000 above /GRADE.

<absol> --. Ducting and Cable Trays Note: As it changes orientation as well as position.<uval> --. Command Syntax: >-.3 3-83 .<planf> --+--> Figure 3-30(a) Dragging Piping to a specified position PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | ‘-.<repla> --.DRAG --+-.Piping.TOP --+-. | | ‘-.<relat> --| | | ‘-.<botop> --+--> <botop> = >--+-.BOP --. | | ‘------------+-. CONNECT cannot be used in conjunction with DRAG. | | |-.

Ducting and Cable Trays Figure 3-30(b) Dragging Piping to a specified position Figure 3-31 Dragging Piping to a given distance from a fixed object 3-84 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Piping.3 .

In its simplest form. 4. a number of pipes can be ordered and spread across pipe racks once the provisional routes have been determined. avoiding obstructions and following preferred paths. Ptrac. Once in autoroute mode.3 4-1 . these facilities can be used to route a complex set of pipes. Additionally. by setting the head and tail positions and using the route command. which does not allow elements to be created. a single Branch may be routed from one point to another. In a more complex role. Examples: AUTOROUTE Enters Autoroute mode EXIT Returns to the full DESIGN syntax PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Pvol and Rplane elements may be used to steer the automatic routing process along preferred areas.1 Entering and Leaving Autoroute Mode Keywords: Description: AUTOROUTE EXIT The AUTOROUTE command is used to enter the automatic piperouting facilities.4 Automatic Pipe Routing The automatic pipe-routing facilities of DESIGN enable simple orthogonal pipe routes to be generated automatically.1 Accessing the Automatic Pipe Routing Facilities The automatic pipe routing facilities are set aside from the rest of the DESIGN commands in a separate command structure called Autoroute Mode. For more complex pipe routing. 4. the EXIT command is used. These must be created and positioned before entry to automatic routing. To return to the full DESIGN syntax. the command syntax is restricted to those commands necessary for automatic routing and rack ordering.1. because the autoroute process operates with restricted command syntax.

Routing Planes are elements which are used to guide the automatic routing mechanism into preferred areas. volumes in space which can be either preferred or prohibited areas for pipe routing. • Routing Planes . or it may be precisely defined. Example: WEIGH 100 . rather than down the middle.2. you can force the automatic routing process to consider alternatives and avoid obstructions. For example. if a rack was to be positioned between two rows of vessels an RPLANE element would be created along the centreline of the proposed rack. Without the RPLANE element. The pipes to be routed must contain empty Branches whose Head and Tail references are correctly set.01 100 Indicate that the X and Z axes are prohibited and the Y axis is preferred. the autoroute process would route the two rows of pipes either side of the preferred area. low values indicate a preferred area. The simplest route is one with no constraints. Penalty Volumes . The WEIGH attribute is used to determine whether the PVOL is a prohibited or preferred area according to its value. by means of weighting factors.1 Routing Pipes along Preferred Axes The automatic pipe routing process will only route pipes orthogonally. ignoring all other elements in the database. Before any routing can take place. Penalty Volumes are created as PVOL elements in the Design database. • 4.3 . the required axis system must be defined.Denote. The constraints which can be applied are as follows: • Obstruction Elements such as Equipment items and Structures may be defined as obstructions which must be avoided by the automatic routing process. By adding constraints. according to the constraints and preferences you set.Automatic Pipe Routing 4. which will result in the shortest possible route. This may be taken as the current axes of any element in the 4-2 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Keywords: Description: AXES All pipe routing will be orthogonal to the axes defined by the AXES command. The autoroute process creates a centreline route using Elbows or Bends which are created during the autoroute operation. High values indicate prohibited areas. However it may follow an axis system other than those of the world.2 Pipe Routing Pipe routing may be simple and direct.

RPLANE The RPLANE command sets up the list of elements which are to be considered as routing planes. Example: AXES /ZONE1 The routing axes will be set to the axes of /ZONE1 Command Syntax: >-. A maximum of 150 RPLAN elements may be considered by the automatic routing process. RP Clears the list of Routing Planes. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Command Syntax: .Automatic Pipe Routing database.2. All RPLAN elements.-----<----. If the element being added is not a PVOL. in the hierarchy below /ZONE1 will be considered.RPlanes --*-. PVOL The PVOL command sets the list of penalty volumes which will be considered during the automatic routing process.3 Setting Penalty Volumes Keywords: Description: Examples: PVOL /PV1 Adds /PV1 into the list of Penalty Volumes. then all items below it in the hierarchy are scanned. / | >-.<sgid> --+--> 4.2.3 4-3 . but it must be orthogonal with the Nozzles and pipe head directions which are being considered.AXes <sgid> --> 4. RP /RP1 /RP2 Adds /RP1 and /RP2 to the list.2 Setting Routing Planes Keywords: Description: Examples: RPLANE /PTRAC1 Sets /ZONE1 as an element in the Routing Plane list.

ROUTE WITH BENDS /PIPES All of the branches belonging to /PIPES will be routed using Bends in preference to Elbows.PVolumes --+--*-.4 Invoking the Automatic Routing Process Automatic pipe routing can be invoked by issuing the ROUTE command with a list of Pipes to be routed.2.Automatic Pipe Routing PV /PZONE1 /PZONE2 Adds /PZONE1 and /PZONE2 to the list. | | | | ‘-. Each time a successful route has been found. Elbows are selected automatically from the Pipe Specification by default.3 .ROute --+-.----<-----. Command Syntax: .<sgid> --+--> 4-4 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. a message is output stating the total Pipe length and the number of Elbows used. Bends may be selected in preference to Elbows by specifying this option as part of the ROUTE command. | | / | ‘-----------------------+--*-. A maximum of 1000 PVOLS may be considered during automatic routing. Keywords: Description: ROUTE The ROUTE command begins the procedure of finding logical routes for all of the branches included in the routing list. / | >-.<sgid> --+--> | ‘--> 4. During the routing process. Command Syntax: >-.WIth --+-.-----<----. with Head and Tail references set. The Pipes to be routed must have empty Branches.BEnds ---| . PV Clears the list of Penalty Volumes. Examples: ROUTE /PIPES All of the Branches belonging to /PIPES will be routed.ELbows --.

The following section describes the rack ordering facilities which are able to refine these routes into a more acceptable form. Examples: OFFSET 5 Sets the offset to be five times the bore of its associated Nozzle. The rack ordering process works by spreading a number of pipes across a predefined rack volume.3 4-5 .3 Refining the Automatic Pipe Routes The automatic routing process often results in a set of common centreline routes down the centre of a rack. You have various options which may be set to control the spacing of pipes and the direction of spread across the rack.OFFSETfactor integer --> Querying: >-.2.5 Setting the Nozzle Offset Factor Keywords: Description: OFFSETFACTOR Branches which are routed from Nozzles have default Routing Planes a set distance away from the Nozzle.Automatic Pipe Routing 4. This is to allow a sensible pipe length between the Nozzle and the first change of direction. Command Syntax: >-. and is input in the same terms. For example. a value of 4 would mean that the offset would be four times the Nozzle bore.Query OFFSET --> 4. The default value for this offset is three times the bore of the associated nozzle. The parameters which need to be input are: • • • • The location and dimensions of the rack (the RACK command) How the pipes are to be arranged on the rack (the SDIR command) The order in which the pipes will be placed The minimum clearance between adjacent pipes PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

SDir <bdir> --+-. Examples: RACK /PVOL1 Sets /PVOL1 to be the rack. The default position from which the pipes are spread is the centre of the PVOL.3 .Automatic Pipe Routing 4. | | |-. Keywords: Description: RACK The rack is defined by the axes of a PVOL element in the database whose size should be similar to the physical rack area expected.2 Defining the Direction of Spread Keywords: Description: SDIR The spread direction is the direction in which the pipes will be spread laterally when they are ordered along the rack.FRomside -----.ABoutcentre --| | | ‘-----------------+--> 4-6 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.1 Defining the Rack to be Used. because its edges determine the position of the first pipe if the pipes are to be spread from one side of the rack. Command Syntax: >-. starting from the south side of the PVOL SD N AB As above.3. The PVOL width is important.RAck <sgid> --> 4. but pipes to be spread about centre of rack Note: If no spread direction is specified. the default is taken as the direction of the second largest side of the PVOL Command Syntax: >-. Examples: SDIR E Sets the spread direction to be East about the centre of the PVOL SD N FR Ssets the spread direction to be North.3. This may be changed to the side of the PVOL by adding the parameter FROMSIDE to the command.

Examples: BASE W Sets the base direction to be West.Automatic Pipe Routing 4. (This should always be perpendicular to the spread direction. By default.) Command Syntax: >-.3. will be a minimum of 4 inches. SP /ZONE1 FF 75 Spreads the pipes such that two opposing Flange diameters will have a minimum clearance of 75mm.4 Spreading Pipes about the Rack Keywords: Description: SPREAD SPREAD moves the pipes laterally across the rack in the SDIR direction to give the specified clearance. In this case.BAse <bdir> --> 4.3 4-7 . Examples: SPREAD /PIPES Spreads the pipes in /PIPES about the designated rack SP /PIPES WW 100 Spreads the pipes such that the wall-to-wall clearance is 100mm SP /PIPES WF 4IN Spreads the pipes such that the diameter of Flanges will be considered as part of the calculation. this is the direction of the smallest side of the PVOL.3. on a subsequent rack). The default clearance is 50mm between pipe walls on the same centreline.3 Defining the Base Direction Keywords: Description: BASE This is the direction in which the pipes will be moved in order to sit on the rack. Pipes with no Flanges would have a wall-towall clearance of 75mm. the distance between a Flange o/d and its adjacent pipe wall. SP ALL Repeat previously defined order sequence (for example. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

<sgid> --+--> 4.WF ---| | | |-. .3.-----<----.-----<----.3.ALL --| | | ‘---------+-.Automatic Pipe Routing Command Syntax: >-.<uval> --. It spreads the pipes across the rack to give the required clearances.<uval> --. 4. | | |-.6 Combined Spreading and BOP Operations Keywords: Description: ORDER The ORDER command combines both the SPREAD and BOP operations.<sgid> --+--> BOP The BOP command moves the specified pipes such that their outside diameters are resting on the rack plane in the BASE direction.BOP --+-.5 Setting the Bottom-of-Pipe Position Keywords: Description: Examples: BOP /ZONE1 Sets the BOP of all pipes in /ZONE1 to sit on the specified rack BOP ALL Repeat previously defined order sequence Command Syntax: >-. | | / | ‘------------+--*-. 4-8 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Note: No ordering takes place with the BOP command.FF ---| | | |-. | | / | ‘------------+--*-. it is expected that the BOP command is used after a spread. and then moves them into contact with the rack plane. .WW ---.SPread --+-.ALL --> | |-.3 .

WF ---| | | |-. OR ALL Repeat previously defined order sequence Command Syntax: >-. | | / | ‘------------+--*-.<sgid> --+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<uval> --. | | |-.FF ---| | | |-. and then sets the BOP positions to sit on the rack.-----<----.Automatic Pipe Routing Examples: ORDER /PIPES WW 100 Spreads the pipes such that the wall-to-wall clearance is 100mm and then sets the BOP positions to sit on the rack.WW ---.ORder --+-. OR /ZONE1 FF 75 Spreads the pipes such that the Flange-to-Flange clearances are 75mm. .3 4-9 .ALL --| | | ‘---------+-.

.

beams. Joints These are Catalogue items which represent the physical connections between structural members. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Multiple connections are represented by Primary or Secondary Compound Joints. Primary Nodes have their position defined in free space. Secondary Joints are owned by Secondary Nodes.5 Structural Design Using Catalogue Components This chapter first describes how logically connected structural steelwork may be built up in DESIGN by choosing Components from the Catalogue. whereas Secondary Nodes have their position defined relative to an owning steel Section. Linear Joints are used to connect the edges of panels to structural sections or to other panels. is particularly relevant for stress analysis of the steelwork structure. using other materials such as concrete. Primary Joints are owned by Primary Nodes. Their shape is determined by linking together a set of Panel Vertex elements to form a 2D Panel Loop. Such structures will normally exist in the Design hierarchy at Framework (FRMW) or Subframework (SBFR) level. The principal types of element involved in steelwork design are: Nodes These define the points within the 3D design model between which steel construction members are to run. Nodal data. bracing struts etc. The concepts are then extended for use in building designs. Their cross-sections are defined by reference to Catalogue 2D Profile elements.) which make up the interconnected structure. which is then extruded in the third dimension to give the required panel thickness. while their lengths are derived from the positions of the Nodes between which the Sections run. Panels Panels represent any sheet materials used to clad a structural model. Sections Sections represent the physical steel members (columns. which own a SubJoint for each connection point.3 5-1 . including the attributes of member elements of Nodes.

NEW PNOD /PNOD2 COPY PREV BY E1000 Creates a Primary Node which is displaced from the previous one in the specified way. in more complex formats they can represent curved beams. defined by a Spine element. where one or more elements pass through another element). and so on. Examples: NEW PNOD /PNOD1 AT E1000 N500 U500 (At FRMW or SBFR level) Creates a Primary Node named /PNOD1 at the specified position. respectively. PNOD elements are created. The path. GENSECs may be used instead of Sections and Panels. They may be positioned either by using a standard positioning command or by setting the NPOS (Node Position) attribute directly.3 . curved walls. such as web stiffeners. Nodes have no physical size: their positions are used to define the points in space between which steel Sections are to be positioned/strung. 5-2 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. each of which owns Subfittings. is determined by a sequence of Spine Points and Curves. then places it at the specified position. etc. Fixings Generic fixingscan represent any joint or fitting owned (indirectly) by a GENSEC. NEW PNOD /PNOD3 NPOS E2000 N1000 D500 Creates /PNOD3.1 Creating and Positioning Primary Nodes NEW PNODE NPOS Keywords: Description: The first step in creating a new piece of structural steelwork is often the creation and positioning of a network of Primary Nodes within the 3D design model. In their simplest linear format. They are owned by Sections and Panels.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Fittings Steelwork Fittings and Panel Fittings are Catalogue items which can represent any ancillary item related to. are used to represent more complex geometry (such as penetrations. by using the NEW command. as for other Design elements. but not an inherent part of. access ports. the structure. 5. Compound Fittings and Compound Panel Fittings. Generic Sections (GENSECs) GENSECs can be used to represent any structural item whose geometry can be generated by sweeping a 2D profile along a linear or curved path. lifting lugs.

both the OPDI (Origin Plane Direction) attribute and the normal to the Cutting Plane (as defined by the CUTP attribute) of each PJOI will be the same as the DRNS/DRNE attribute of the Section. It leaves you at the new Section (SCTN) level within the hierarchy.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Command Syntax: >-. STRING BEAM FROM /PNOD2 TO /SNOD3 NAME /UB80. Joint elements (PJOI or SJOI) are created at each Node and are orientated so as to be compatible with the new Section. running between two named Nodes. The order of occurrence of the named Nodes in the STRING command line is used to set the DRNS (Start Direction) and DRNE (End Direction) attributes (on the basis that the Section is strung FROM start TO end). CREF for the Joints) are set so that they are self-consistent.NPOSition -.LEV2 Strings a Section of GTYPE BEAM between the named Primary and Secondary Nodes.<bpos> --> (The standard element creation syntax is described in Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual. Thus. • • Thus the STRING command creates all new elements required to position the physical Section within the structural design model. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.) Querying: Q NPOS 5. The Section-to-Joint cross-references (JOIS/JOIE for the Section. The Node positions are used to set the Section’s POSS (Start Position) and POSE (End Position) attributes.3 5-3 . Examples: STRING /COLUMN1 FROM /PNOD1 TO /PNOD2 Strings a Section named /COLUMN1 between the specified Primary Nodes. The Beam is named separately in the second command line.2 Creating and Connecting Sections Automatically STRING FROM TO Keywords: Description: The STRING command is a very powerful multi-functional tool which performs the following operations automatically: • A Section (SCTN) element is created.

5. (The .UB suffix in the Specification Component name would normally indicate that this Profile represents a Universal Beam. that is. including uniform cross-sectional dimensions. Command Syntax: >-. tie.1 Cross-Sectional Profile via a Specification Reference Keywords: Description: SPREF The SPREF (Specification Reference) attribute of a Section must point to a valid Profile element in a Catalogue DB in order for the Section to be given a physical representation by DESIGN.) 5-4 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.word -.<gid> . | | ‘--------+.TO . Sections are assumed to be ‘prismatic’.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Note: The presence of a Section is shown on the DESIGN graphical display as a centreline-only representation (broken line) at this stage. The Section has no physical form. strut.name -. brace. Its length is derived from the separation between the points defined by its Start Position (POSS) and End Position (POSE) attributes.<gid> . other than a derived length (related to the inter-Node separation). until its cross-section has been defined by setting a reference to a Catalogue Profile element. etc.3 . This section describes the main attributes which together define a Section as a 3D physical entity within the interconnected structure.3 Section Attributes A Section is a linear structural component such as a universal beam. column. | <gid> -+--> 5. This is achieved by setting SPREF to the name of a Specification Component in a Project Specification.UB Sets the Specification Reference of the current Section to point to a Profile in the Catalogue.TO | ‘.FRom - <gid> -.FRom . they are assumed to have uniform properties throughout their length.3. | | ‘--------+. The overall dimensions of a 3D design Section are derived from two sources: • • Its cross-sectional dimensions are defined by a cross-reference to a 2D Profile element stored in the Catalogue DB. Examples: SPRE /203X203X55KG.STRIng -+.

where a Section extends into free space.3. for example.3 5-5 .3 Start and End Positions Keywords: Description: POSSTART POSEND When a Section is Strung (see Section 5.2 Generic Type Keywords: Description: GTYPE The GTYP attribute may be set to a PDMS word which indicates the purpose of the Section within the structure.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Command Syntax: SPRef name Querying: Q SPRef 5. This may be done by specifying the coordinates directly. Command Syntax: >--.7). the settings of POSS and POSE are derived from the intersections of the Jline through the End Cutting Planes of the Section and the Joints. Its setting is not obligatory. or by relating them to the position of another design element. POSS and POSE are set automatically. When a Section is manually Connected or Reconnected (see Section 5.2). It is also possible to set POSS and POSE specifically. its start and end positions (POSS and POSE) are set to the positions of the start and end Nodes.word ---> Querying: Q GTYPe 5. In either case.) Examples: GTYP BEAM Sets the GTYP of the current Section to BEAM. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. (See the PARAGON Reference Manual for a list of suggested GTYP word settings for Profile elements. with at least one end unconnected.GTYPe --.3.

The settings of the corresponding DRNS and DRNE attributes are then derived automatically from the directions of the associated Joint’s Cutting Planes. Examples: DRNS N45W Sets DRNS to the specified direction. either by Stringing (see Section 5. It is also possible to set DRNS and DRNE specifically.3.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Examples: POSE E1250 N2000 D750 Positions the Section’s end at the specified point.2) or manually (see Section 5. In this case each cutting plane direction must be in the general direction of the other end of the Section.POSStart --.4 Start and End Plane Directions Keywords: Description: DRNSTART DRNEND The directions of the start and end cutting planes of a Section (that is. for example. the directions of the perpendiculars to the planes which define the ‘cut’ ends of the Section) are usually defined automatically when the Section is connected within the structural model. Command Syntax: >--+-. regardless of the direction of the Section’s Z-axis. 5-6 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.7). where a Section extends into free space.<bpos> --> Querying: Q POSStart Q POSEnd 5.3 . POSS /PNOD1 Positions the Section’s start at the NPOS of the specified Primary Node.POSEnd ----+-. | | ‘-. with at least one end unconnected.

3. | | ‘-.DRNStart --. BANG SPREF of SCTN points to PROF in Catalogue POSS DRNS DRNE POSE NA Examples: BANG 90 Command Syntax: >-.5 Orientation Angle Keywords: Description: BANGLE The orientation of a Section about its Neutral Axis is defined in terms of an angular clockwise rotation when viewed in the POSS-to-POSE direction. The angle of rotation from the default orientation is held as the setting of the Beta Angle (BANG) attribute of the Section.BANGle value --> Querying: Q BANGle PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | ‘-.PERPendicular --+--> Querying: Q DRNStart Q DRNEnd 5.3 5-7 .<bdir> ---------.DRNEnd ----+-.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components DRNE PERP Sets DRNE so that the end cutting plane is perpendicular to the Section’s Z-axis (giving a square end as opposed to a chamfered end for a Section which has a skewed connection). Command Syntax: >--+-.

3 . These attributes are set automatically when a Section is connected and you will not usually need to set them specifically.JOIStart --. This is done by setting CTYS/CTYE to a word which matches the Joint’s CTYA attribute in the Catalogue.3. Examples: JOIE /PJOI. Command Syntax: >--+-.3. see the PARAGON Reference Manual.2 Sets logical connection from Section’s end to named Primary Joint.JOIEnd ----+-- <gid> --> Querying: Q JOIStart Q JOIEnd 5.RB. 5-8 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.) These attributes are set automatically when a Section is connected and you will not usually need to set them specifically. the CREF attribute.6 Joint Start and End References Keywords: Description: JOISTART JOIEND Section ends which have been connected in the structure have their JOIS (Joint Start) and JOIE (Joint End) attributes set such that they cross-refer to the Joints to which those ends are connected.7 Start and End Connection Types Keywords: Description: CTYSTART CTYEND Section ends which have been connected in the structure have their CTYS (Start Connection Type) and CTYE (End Connection Type) attributes set such that they match those of the Joints to which those ends are connected. | | ‘-. back to the attached Section.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. (The Joints have a similar cross-reference.

DZ) Rotation about a specific axis (RX. RY.) Command Syntax: >--+-.3 5-9 .word --> Querying: Q CTYStart Q CTYEnd 5. Linear movement along a specific axis (DX.CTYStart --.8 Start and End Releases Keywords: Description: SRELEASE ERELEASE The two Release attributes. may be used to define how the Section behaves under the effect of applied forces and moments. the Section Start Release (SREL) and the Section End Release (EREL). DY. RZ) PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | ‘-. They are relevant only for stress analysis of the structure. (The CTYA of the Joint must also be set to BOLT for a compatible connection. see Part 4 of the DESIGN Reference Manual for information about data consistency checking.CTYEnd ----+-. namely: • • Examples: SREL DX RX RY The Start of the Section is constrained such that it can move only in the X direction and can rotate only about the X and Y axes. The attribute settings allow for two types of movement of the Section ends when external forces are applied.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Examples: CTYS BOLT The Section’s start is to be connected to its attached Joint by means of bolts.3.

Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Command Syntax: >--+-.---<---.RY ---| | | |-.RZ ---| | | ‘-.DX ---| | | |-.sign --+--> Querying: Q SRELease Q ERELease 5-10 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.ERELease --+--*-. | | / | ‘-.RX ---| | | |-.DY ---| | | |-. .SRELease --.3 .DZ ---| | | |-.

This distance.33 The new Node is positioned one third of the way along the Section’s Neutral Axis.e. NEW SNODE /SNOD5 ZDIS PLANE W30N DIST 0.25 FROM END The new Node is positioned one quarter of the way along the Section’s Neutral Axis.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5.3 5-11 . and positioned relative to. Examples: NEW SNOD /SNOD1 ZDIST 1500 (At SCTN level) Creates a Secondary Node named /SNOD1 at the specified distance from the start of the Section. The Node is positioned on the Neutral Axis of the owning Section. element or plane.). NEW SNOD /SNOD3 ZDIS PROP 0. by using the NEW command. a proportion of the derived length of the Section).4 Creating and Positioning Secondary Nodes A Secondary Node is owned by. rather than having to define the position of the Attached Section in ‘free space’. as a proportion of the overall distance between POSS and POSE (i. They are positioned by specifying their distance from their owning Section’s Start Position. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. an existing Section. p-line etc. NEW SNOD /SNOD2 IS 1250 FROM END The position of the new Node is measured from the POSE position rather than from the default reference of POSS.0 The new Node is positioned at the intersection of the owning section’s neutral axis with the defined plane. which is held in the Node’s ZDIST attribute. or by reference to any marker (pin. measured from the start of the Section. may be specified as an absolute length. ppoint. measured from the end of the Section. NEW SNOD /SNOD4 ZDIS PROP . Keywords: Description: NEW SNODE ZDISTANCE SNOD elements are created. measured along the Neutral Axis towards the End Position. as for other Design elements. It enables you to position and connect another Section (an Attached Section) at any point along the length of the first Section (the Owning Section).

Its position is derived from that of its owning Node.3 . This section describes how you can carry out these operations independently and how you can modify the positions of Joints which have been created previously. in turn.value --+-. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.5.ENd ----| | | | | ‘-. A Joint is a Catalogue Component. which is selected in the design by setting its SPREF attribute to point to the required Component Specification.STart --.FRom --+-. A Compound Joint (PCOJ or SCOJ) is positioned relative to a Node. as for a PJOI or an SJOI.5 Creating and Positioning Joints Joints elements constitute the physical means by which Sections are connected together. A Secondary Joint (SJOI) is owned by a Secondary Node. You will most often create and position Joints automatically using the STRING command (see Section 5. Its position is derived from that of its owning Node. 5. A Primary Joint (PJOI) is owned by a Primary Node. | | | | |-.ZDIStance --+-| |-| | | | | | | | |-| ‘-<uval> --------------.2).Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Command Syntax: >-. but all settings which define its connections are associated with subsidiary SubJoints owned by the Compound Joint (one SubJoint for each connection). | PROPortion -. from the position of the Section which owns that Node. and thus.1 Creating Primary Joints Keywords: Description: 5-12 NEW PJOINT A new Primary Joint can only be created at PNOD level.<gid> --| | | ‘----------------------+ | | <marke> ------------------------------------| | <plane> ------------------------------------+-> Querying: Q ZDIStance 5.

The default position places the DELPOS (Delta Position) of the Joint at the NPOS of the Node.The default orientation directs the CUTP (Cutting Plane Direction) of the Joint Up. 5.2 Creating Secondary Joints Keywords: Description: Examples: NEW SJOI /SJOINT1 Creates a new SJOI with a default position and orientation.BRAK90 (The .5.) PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Command Syntax: The standard element creation syntax is described in Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual. NEW SJOINT A new Secondary Joint can only be created at SNOD level.5. Examples: SPRE /10X10. The default position places the POSL (Position Line) of the Joint through the owning SNOD.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Examples: NEW PJOI /JOINT1 Creates a new PJOI with a default position and orientation.3 5-13 .BRAK90 suffix in the Specification Component name would normally indicate that this represents a 90 degree bracket joint.3 Setting Joint Geometry via a Specification Reference Keywords: Description: SPREF Both PJOIs and SJOIs must have their geometry defined by setting their SPREF attributes to point to a valid Specification Component in a Project Specification in the Catalogue DB. Both types of Joint may point to the same Specification Component if required. The default orientation directs the OPDI (Origin Plane Direction) of the Joint UP. Command Syntax: The standard element creation syntax is described in Part 1 of the DESIGN Reference Manual. 5.

5-14 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. so that the Joint’s Origin Plane passes through the owning Node.Y.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Command Syntax: >--.Z offset relative to PNode PNode DX NPOS defines X. The Beta Angle (BANG) is the angle of rotation of the Joint about its Origin Plane Direction.4 Positioning and Orientating Primary Joints Keywords: Description: DELPOSITION OPDIRECTION BANGLE The position and orientation of a Primary Joint are defined by the settings of the following three attributes: • The Delta Position (DELP) is the offset between the Joint’s Origin Plane and the position of its owning Node (the NPOS of the PNOD). expressed in the coordinate system which applies to the FRMW or SBFR. so that the Joint’s orientation is as defined by its Catalogue representation. The Origin Plane Direction (OPDI) is the direction of the normal to the plane through the Joint’s origin.5 Offsets the Joint by 4.SPRef name ---> Querying: Q SPRef 5.Y axes • • Z Y X DY DZ DELP defines X. BANG defines orientation about Z axis OPDI defines orientation about X.Y.5 (mm) in a northerly direction.5. measured clockwise as viewed along that direction.3 . The default setting is zero.Z coords of PNode Examples: DELP N4. The default is a zero offset. as defined in the Catalogue representation of the Joint.

the Joint’s Origin is coincident with the position of its owning SNOD.BANGle ---+--.value ----------------------------.<bdir> ---+---> Querying: Q DELPosition Q OPDIrection Q BANGle 5. The Positioning Line (POSL) attribute of the SJOI itself.5 Positioning and Orientating Secondary Joints Keywords: Description: POSLINE (ZDISTANCE) BANGLE The position and orientation of a Secondary Joint are defined with respect to its owning Secondary Node. The default setting is zero. so that the Joint’s Origin (more strictly. Command Syntax: >--. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.4. The Beta Angle (BANG) specifies the angular rotation of the Joint about its Origin Plane Direction. upon the settings of two attributes: • • The Z-axis Distance (ZDIST) attribute of the owning SNOD.<bdir> --.TOwards --. | | ‘--. This defines the position of the Joint in relation to the p-line system which has been set up for the owning Section’s Profile within the Catalogue.<bdir> ---> >--.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components OPDI N Orientates the Joint so that the normal to its Origin Plane points North. The default POSL setting is NA (Neutral Axis). as described Section 5.DELPosition --. so that the Joint’s orientation is as defined by its Catalogue representation. therefore.3 5-15 . its JLIN) lies on the Section’s Neutral Axis at the position specified by the ZDIST: that is.5. The position of this Node is separately defined with respect to its owning Section. The Joint’s position with respect to the Section depends. BANG 180 Rotates the Joint about its current Origin Plane Direction by 180 degrees.OPDIrection --.<bpos> ---> >--.

BANGle --+-.<bdir> TOwards <bdir> --+--> Querying: Q POSLine Q ZDISTance Q BANGle (At the SJOI) (At the SNOD) (At the SJOI) 5-16 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.value ------------------. POSL BOS The Positioning Line of the Joint is coincident with the BOS (Bottom of Steel) p-line of the Section.POSLine word --> where word is usually one of the following: NA (Neutral Axis) TOS (Top of Steel) BOS (Bottom of Steel) >-.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components BANG defines orientation about Z axis Z Y X OPDI defines orientation about X. Command Syntax: >-. | | ‘-.3 .Y axes POSL (here set to TOS) defines position Owning Section (2D view only) SNode TOS NA BOS ZDIST defines position of SNode relative to POSS of Sectio Examples: POSL TOS The Positioning Line of the Joint is coincident with the TOS (Top of Steel) pline of the Section.

Querying: Q CREFerence PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | | | |--. CREF /COLUMN2 Sets Connection Reference to start of named Section. CREF NULREF Disconnects the Joint.<gid> --+-. 5.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. These are described in this section.ENd ----| | | | | ‘------------+ | | ‘--.CREFerence --+-. This attribute is set automatically when a Section is connected and you will not usually need to set it specifically. Command Syntax: >-. whether or not they have been connected to attached Sections. those which have both an Owning and an Attached Section) have other relevant attributes set.1 Connection Reference Keywords: Description: CREFerence The Connection Reference attribute (CREF) of a Joint points to the identifier of the Attached Section. Examples: CREF /BEAM1 START Sets Connection Reference to start of named Section. Joints which have been fully connected (that is.3 5-17 . In addition.NULref --------------+--> where <gid> identifies the Section to be connected. CREF /BEAM2 END Sets Connection Reference to end of named Section.STart* --.6 Attributes of Connected Joints The attributes and their settings described in Section 5.6.5 are applicable to any Joints.

). the distance between the Cutting Planes of the Joints at its two ends. A positive value of CUTB shortens the derived length of a Section attached to the Joint.6. | | ‘-. The default is a CUTB setting of zero. The Cutting Plane Direction. that is the direction of the normal to the Cutting Plane.PERPendicular --+--> Querying: Q CUTP 5.3 Cutback Allowance Keywords: Description: CUTBack The derived length of an attached Section is. The default direction is Up. Examples: CUTP N45D The normal to the Cutting Plane points in the specified direction.2 Cutting Plane Keywords: Description: CUTPlane The position of a Joint which has an Attached Section is derived from the intersection of the Attached Section’s Joining Line (JLIN) and the Joint’s Cutting Plane. 5-18 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The CUTB attribute allows you to specify a length by which the Section should be shortened or extended to allow for any local fitting geometry at the Joint’s attachment point (to allow for weld metal.6. CUTP PERP The normal to the Cutting Plane is set perpendicular to the Joint’s Origin Plane.3). a negative CUTB lengthens the attached Section. It is the position of the Joint’s Cutting Plane which defines the effective length of the Section (but see also Section 5.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5.<bdir> ---------. unless otherwise specified. is defined by the setting of the CUTP attribute.CUTPlane --+-.3 . Command Syntax: >-.6. packing pieces etc.

In cases of misalignment. connecting a Section will not cause the Section to move or rotate.7. This section also explains how to disconnect and reconnect Sections and Joints.CUTBack <uval> --> Querying: Q CUTBack 5. that the correct end points are on an extension of the Section’s Neutral Axis. The relevant Nodes and Joints must have been created first. the connection cross-references between the Section and the Joint are set. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. CUTB -6 An attached section will have its derived length increased by 6mm.1 Connecting Sections Keywords: Description: CONNECT START END FREE RECALCULATE When a Section is connected manually. that is. This requires that the direction and through point of the Section have been correctly specified. 5.3 5-19 . the Section’s position and orientation are given highest priority. the JOIS/JOIE of the Section and the CREF of the Joint are matched. as described in the preceding sections of this chapter. Thus.7 Manually Connecting Sections This section describes the commands which allow you to connect Sections and Joints ‘manually’. When the connection is made. the relevant Connection Type attribute of the Section (CTYS or CTYE) is set to point to the Attached Connection Type attribute (CTYA) of the Catalogue Joint. if possible (but see the FREE option. That is. the relevant End Cutting Plane of the Section (DRNS/DRNE) is superimposed on the Cutting Plane (CUTP) of the connecting Joint.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Examples: CUTB 6 An attached section will have its derived length reduced by 6mm. Further. so that you can modify existing interconnected structural designs. below). Command Syntax: >-. The Joint will be aligned with the Section. that is. without using the STRING command.

CONN WITH START OF /BEAM1 Where the current element is a Joint. Command Syntax: At Section level: >. This may cause the section to be displaced sideways. CONN START TO /PJOIN2 RECALC Connects the start of the current Section without moving the positions of any secondary elements owned by the Section.ENd ----+-.OF <gid> --> where <gid> identifies a Section.RECALCulate -.3 .STart --.TO <gid> -+. When the connection has been made. 5-20 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. | | ‘-.CONnect WITH --+-. At Joint level: >-.FREE -. | | ‘--------+. so that the SNOD remained unmoved. the corresponding Start or End Point of the Section (POSS/POSE) is calculated from the intersection of the Z axis of the Section with the new Cutting Plane which passes through the end of the Joint’s JLIN. the ZDIS defining the position of a Secondary Node would be recalculated if the POSS (from which ZDIS is measured) were moved as a result of a CONNECT command. For example.STart -. The RECALCULATE option causes the positions of elements which are members of a Section to be recalculated so that they remain in the same positions if the Section is moved.CONnect -+.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components The FREE option allows the existing joint position to remain fixed. the position of FITTINGs and SNODEs along the section are recalculated to be as close as possible to their original positions. | | ‘---------------+-> where <gid> identifies a Joint.ENd ---+. and the POSS and/or POSE of the section to be adjusted. | | ‘. It may also cause SNODEs and FITTINGs along the section to be displaced (even with RECALCULATE). Examples: CONN END TO /SJOINT3 Where the current element is a Section. or its direction to rotate. If both RECALCULATE and FREE are specified.

but the Joint (if moved during the connection operation) is returned to its default position.RECALCulate --. | | |-. For example.2 Disconnecting Sections Keywords: Description: DISCONNECT START END RECALCULATE When a Section is disconnected. 5-21 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. DISCO END RECALC Disconnects the end of the current Section.3 . Examples: DISCO START Disconnects the start of the current Section.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5.STart --.DISConnect --+-. DISCO END Disconnects the end of the current Section.CREF) are unset and the connection type crossreferences (CTYS/CTYE ) are set to Nulref. DISCO Disconnects both the start and end of the current Section. | | ‘-----------------+--> 5. the ZDIST defining the position of a Secondary Node would be recalculated if the POSS (from which ZDIST is measured) were moved as a result of a DISCONNECT command.7. The RECALCULATE option causes the positions of elements which are members of a Section to be recalculated so that they remain in the same positions if the Section is moved. but retains the positions of any secondary elements owned by the Section. the connection cross-references (JOIS/JOIE .3 Reconnecting Sections Keywords: Description: RECONNECT START END RECALCULATE The RECONNECT command would typically be used to reconnect a disconnected Section in the following circumstances: • Following the movement of a Joint: the attached Section is moved to the new Joint position.ENd ----| | | ‘-----------+-. Command Syntax: >-.7. so that the SNOD remained unmoved. The position and length of the Section are not changed.

The RECALCULATE option causes the positions of elements which are members of a Section to be recalculated so that they remain in the same positions if the Section is moved.ENd ----| | | ‘-----------+-.1 Reversing Section Start and End Positions (‘Flipping’) Keywords: Description: FLIP The FLIP command mutually exchanges references to the Start and End of a steelwork Section. Examples: RECON START Reconnects the start of the current Section. For example. Following the movement of a Primary Node which has a member Joint attached to an existing Section. | | |-. 5. RECON Command Syntax: >-.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components • Following the resetting of a cutback allowance at a Joint (see Section 5. • In each case the RECONNECT command attempts to restore the consistency of the connected model. so that the SNOD remained unmoved. This is 5-22 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.8. | | ‘-----------------+--> Reconnects both the start and end of the current Section.STart --.RECALCulate --. effectively reversing its orientation.3 .8 Repositioning Steelwork Elements The concept of connectivity in structural steelwork influences the types of repositioning operations which are allowed.6. RECON END Reconnects the end of the current Section. Repositioning operations using the standard DESIGN commands will also move items whose positions depend on those of the items being directly moved.3): the length of the Section is modified to allow for the new cutback distance.RECOnnect --+-. 5. the ZDIST defining the position of a Secondary Node would be recalculated if the POSS (from which ZDIST is measured) were moved as a result of a RECONNECT command.

however. remain the same. and vice versa). FITTINGs. the ends to which they refer have changed (since the original Start is now the End. since the positions of the corresponding SJOIs will not move to the new SNOD positions until they are Disconnected. • The Member List of the Flipped Section remains unchanged. so that their positions are now derived from the opposite end of the Section (the new Start end). their effects will be reversed in the physical model. These effects may not give the results you had intended and may therefore require further design modifications to be made: The settings of the SREL and EREL (Start and End Release) attributes are not exchanged. Flip the Section. thereby repositioning all of its SNODs and their associated SJOIs (now disconnected) in the reversed locations. Any Connected items referenced via SJOIs will not move.3 5-23 . thereby causing these member elements to move. • • • • • Examples: FLIP Reverses the Start and End attribute settings for the current element as outlined in the preceding description. Since. If you wish to reverse a Section with existing secondary connections you should. The ZDIST attributes of any SNODs. therefore. although you can do so if you fully understand the effects outlined below. use the following sequence of operations: Disconnect the Section to be Flipped from all attached Sections. Reconnect the Flipped Section to all the attached Sections.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components mainly of use for reorientating a Section with a non-symmetrical profile if you have mistakenly strung it the wrong way round. etc. so that any cross-references to member elements by list position remain correct. Reorientate all connected Sections so that they realign with the modified SJOI locations along the Flipped Section (or reset the ZDIST attributes of the SNODs so that they are repositioned where you want them). PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. It is best used before any Secondary Nodes or Fittings are placed along the Section. FLIP causes the settings of the following pairs of attributes to be exchanged: • • • Caution: POSS and POSE (Start and End Positions) DRNS and DRNE (Start and End Plane Directions) JOIS and JOIE (Start and End Joint References) It is not intended that Sections with secondary connections be Flipped.

Subframeworks. Routing Planes and Panels. BY N1000 E5000 U7000 Moves Current Element as specified relative to its current position. Frameworks. whose positions are dependent on that of a Section). in the case of a Primary Node. also applies to Structural steelwork elements. DRNS/DRNE. For checking the derived positions of SNODs and/or SJOIs. BY commands) is possible for all structural elements which have a directly defined location in the 3D model. Keywords: Description: MOVE ALONG BY AT Movement relative to a fixed starting position (MOVE. helpful in checking the precise effects of the command: Q ATT Q DER POS For checking. AT E2000 N2000 U1000 Moves the Current Element to the specified position. Primary Nodes. ALONG. used both before and after giving the FLIP command. In the case of a Section. Routing Planes.2 Moving Steelwork Elements NOTE: The positioning/moving syntax described in Chapter 2. Absolute positioning (AT command) is possible only for Sections. etc). 5-24 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. Examples: MOVE ALONG E45N DISTANCE 500 Moves Current Element in specified direction by specified distance.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Command Syntax: >--. 5. all Start and End related settings (POSS/POSE.3 . for example. in particular. POSS is set to this position. Primary Joints and Nodes (but not Secondary Joints and Nodes.FLIP ---> Querying: You may find the following querying commands. etc. Equipment and Primitives.8. NPOS is set to this position. Panels.

so that they remain unmoved.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5.8. so that the SNOD remained unmoved. but this would need prior calculation of the new positions needed to achieve the required length change. The <plane> allows you to define the amount of extension required by intersecting the neutral axis with a defined plane. (You could.25 Move POSS so as to increase the Section’s current length by 25%. EXTEND END 1750 Move POSE so as to increase the Section’s length by 1750mm (default units). This effectively lengthens or shortens the Section by a specified amount and resets its POSS and/or POSE attributes accordingly. Examples: EXTEND END BY E1000 Move POSE by 1000mm Eastward. EXTEND START BY U500 E2000 S500 Move POSS by the given amounts. EXTEND BY E1000 As above (defaults to END). as described in Section 11.) The increase or decrease in length may be specified as a direct measurement or as a proportion of the current length of the Section. EXTEND START BY W1000 RECALC Move POSS by 1000mm Westward and recalculate the positions of all member SNODs. of course. The RECALCULATE option causes the positions of elements which are members of the modified Section to be recalculated so that they remain in the same positions after the change.3. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. For example. a Section may have its ends repositioned independently by using the EXTEND command. FITTs etc. EXTEND START PROP 0. The section is extended (or shortened) to meet the plane. set POSS and/or POSE directly. the ZDIST defining the position of a Secondary Node would be recalculated if the POSS (from which ZDIST is measured) were moved by the EXTEND command.3.3 Modifying Lengths of Sections Keywords: Description: EXTEND START END PROPORTIONAL RECALCULATE Once positioned.3 5-25 . EXTEND -1750 Move POSE (defaults to END) so as to decrease the Section’s length by 1750mm (default units).

This section explains the use of the ROTATE command to achieve a greater range of reorientating effects on Sections and on other steelwork elements.3 . the default direction is that of the Neutral Axis or Z axis. This default axis is the Neutral Axis for Sections.4 Reorientating Steelwork Elements Keywords: Description: ROTATE BY ABOUT THROUGH AND The method of rotating a Section about its Neutral Axis by setting its BANG attribute was described in Section 5.EXTend --+.5. | | |-. If the direction and/or through point are omitted. Command Syntax: >-. The command allows you to specify the rotation required in any of the following ways: • As a specified angle of rotation about a default axis (similar in effect to setting the BANG attribute).STart -. | | ‘----------------+-> 5. the latter defined by its direction and/or through point. • • 5-26 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<axpos> ------| | | <plane> -------------| | <uval> --------------+.ENd* -| | | ‘---------+| || | || ‘- PROPortional . By reference to the component’s axes or p-lines. | BY --. Joints and Fittings.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components EXTEND PROP -0. As a specified angle of rotation about a given axis. EXTEND END PLANE E30N DIST 0.RECALCulate --.value -. the default through point is the Origin or Start Position (depending on the type of element involved).3.0 Moves POSE to meet the defined plane.2 Moves POSE (defaults to END) so as to decrease the Section’s length by 20%.8. and the Z axis for other elements.

<plin> -.<bdir> -+.<bpos> -+. | | | | | | ‘. | | | | | | ‘. ROTATE AND Y IS N45W25D Rotates element until the Y axis points as closely as possible to the N45W25D direction. ROT ABOUT PPLIN TOS BY 45 Rotates by 45° about the Top-of-Steel p-line (clockwise when looking in the Start to End direction).<bdir> -+.3 5-27 .<uval> --------------------. ROTATE ABOUT E BY 45 The same as the preceding example. | | ‘. since the rotation is specified as a negative angle).ROTate ABOut -+.IS .IS <bdir> ----| | | |.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Examples: ROTATE BY -45 Rotates by 45° about the element’s Neutral Axis or Z axis (anticlockwise when looking from Start to End or in the +Z direction. The rotation is 25° anticlockwise when looking S along this axis.+.BY -+.<plin> -.<bdir> ----+. ROT THRO POSE ABOUT S BY -25 Rotates a Section about an axis which passes in the N-S direction through its End position. ROT AND PPLIN BOS IS E45N Rotates element about its Neutral Axis until the Bottom-of-Steel p-line points as closely as possible to the E45N direction. ROTATE BY 45 ABOUT E Rotates by 45° about the E-W axis (clockwise when looking E).<bdir> TOwards <bdir> ---| | | | | ‘. Command Syntax: Rotation about a given axis: >.TOwards .<bdir> .<bdir> -+.<bdir> -+ | | | | ‘.AND -+. | | | | | | ‘.<uval> -------------------.AND -+.THRough <bpos> -| | | ‘------------------+--> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.BY . ROT AND PPLIN TOS IS PPLIN BOS OF /SCTN1 LEAV DIR WRT /STRU1 Rotates element until its TOS p-line points in the direction of the BOS pline of /SCTN1 in the specified coordinate system.THRough . | | | | | | ‘.<plin> -.

IS . | | | | ‘.<bdir> .BY -+.<plin> -.ABOut -+.BY -+.<uval> --------------------. | | | | | | ‘.<bdir> -+-| | | | | ‘----------------------| | | ‘-------------------------------------------+-> Rotation to give a specified orientation: >. | | | | | | | | ‘.ROTate BY . | | | | | | ‘.ABOut -+.<plin> -.ABOut -+.<plin> -.<bdir> -+.<plin> -.<bpos> ----.TOwards .<bdir> -+.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Rotation to pass through a given point: >.AND -+.<bdir>. | | | | | | | | ‘.IS .AND -+.<bpos> ---.<bpos> -+. | | | | ‘.<bpos> -+. 5-28 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.IS .<bdir> -+.<bdir> -+.TOwards .<bdir> -+.<plin> -. | | ‘.THRough .ABOut -+. | | ‘.+--| | | | | ‘-----------------------| | | ‘.-+. | | | | | | ‘. | | | | ‘-----------------------| | | |.<uval> --------------------.THRough .<uval> -----------------------.3 . | | | | ‘----------------------| | | |.<plin> -.<bdir>.ABOut -+.<plin> -.<bdir> -+.ABOut -+.<bdir> -+. | | | | | | ‘.THRough .<bdir> ----| | | | | ‘.<bdir> .<bdir> -+. | | | | ‘.<plin> -.ROTate AND -+. | | | | ‘. | | | | | | | | ‘.<bpos> -+.+----| | | ‘-------------------------+--> Rotation by a specified amount: >.ABOut -+.<bdir> -+.TOwards .ROTate THRough .<plin> -.<bdir> -+--| | | | | ‘-----------------------| | | ‘--------------------------------------------+--> Note: In each of the preceding diagrams <plin> identifies a specific p-line.<bdir> ------| | | |.<bdir> .<bdir> -+.THRough .<plin> -.

A typical configuration for an ‘extruded’ I-section component is illustrated in Figure 5-1.3 5-29 . directions may be defined in terms of a p-line’s coordinate axes (the p-line direction being. Z Y X PLIN NA POSE Y Z X SITE axes SCTN axes Y Z TOS axes X X PLIN TOS BOS axes Z POSS PLIN BOS Y Figure 5-1 Typical P-lines and Axes for a Section PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. which have associated direction vectors in the X-Y plane.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. typical p-lines associated with a wider range of profiles are illustrated in the guide Structural Design Using PDMS. along its +Z axis). by default. A p-line can provide a very convenient reference line or axis within an element’s 3D geometry (as derived in the design model) for positioning or orientating the element itself. or for defining some other geometry relative to the element.9 Positioning and Orientating Using P-lines P-lines in a 3D structure represent lines. Some examples have already been introduced in the earlier sections of this chapter. Positions may be defined along the length of a p-line. derived from points defined in the Catalogue for corresponding Profiles or Joints. This section further illustrates the possible uses of such techniques.

as defined in the Catalogue. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.2 Positioning by Using P-lines Keywords: Description: PPLINE START END OFFSET A position relative to a p-line may be specified in any of the following ways: • • • • As a specific distance along the p-line from its start (typically the POSS of a Section) or its end (typically POSE). Command Syntax: (This is the <plin> syntax referred to elsewhere in this manual. BOS (Bottom of Steel). FF (Far Face). at the p-line’s start or end. IDPLINE @ Specifies the p-line to be picked using the cursor. PPLINE BOS OF /BEAM2 Specifies the Bottom-of-Steel p-line of /BEAM2. • Examples: PPLINE TOS Specifies the Top-of-Steel p-line of the current element. that is.) >--+-. | | | | ‘---------------+ | | ‘--.3 5-30 .OF <gid> --. etc.9.word --+-.9. As an offset.1 Identifying P-lines Keywords: Description: PPLINE IDPLINE A p-line may be identified in either of the following ways: • By reference to its PKEY attribute (see the PARAGON Reference Manual for details of how this is set) and its owning element (if this is not the current element). NF (Near Face). As a proportional distance along the p-line. As one of its extremities.@ -------------------+--> where word is the setting of the p-line’s PKEY attribute. expressed as a fraction of its length (typically the distance from POSS to POSE). 5. By picking it on the display using the cursor.IDPLine -. expressed as the distance between two specified plines.PPLINe -.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. NA (Neutral Axis). for example: TOS (Top of Steel).

PROPortion . These are in addition to the positioning/moving syntax described in Chapter 2. is defined in Section 5. | | | | ‘.FROm -.sign --. POS PPLIN TOS 1000 FROM END Calculated position is on the TOS p-line. Equipment and Primitives. which also apply to Structural steelwork elements. | | | | ‘-------------------------------+. but in the opposite direction.1.25 Calculated position is on the Neutral Axis of /SCTN2.value -+----------------------.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Examples: POSITION PPLINE BOS 500 Calculated position is on the BOS p-line.OFFSet FROm <plin> --> where <plin>. but not necessarily. Defining a specific position: >. 500mm from its start (by default). 1000mm from its end. POS AT PPLIN NA OF /SCTN2 PROP . Command Syntax: Note: The following syntax describes only the p-line referencing options for defining a position. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.<uval> -------------. BY PPLIN BOS OFFSET FROM PPLIN TOS Moves the same distance as the preceding example. | | |. | | ‘----------+-. the POSE setting for /BEAM1).9.STart* -.<plin> -+. BY PPLIN TOS OFFSET FROM PPLIN BOS Moves the current element (Section or Joint) by the offset distance between its TOS and BOS p-lines.ENd ----+--+--> Defining a distance as the offset between two p-lines: >-. | | | | ‘. which identifies a specific p-line.3 5-31 . POS AT PPLIN TOS OF /BEAM1 END Position is defined as the end of the TOS p-line of /BEAM1 (probably. 25% along its length as measured from its start (by default). BY PPLIN TOS -OFFSET FROM PPLIN BOS The same effect as the preceding example.<plin> --+-. for setting a variable or for querying.

PROPortion . Q PPLIN TOS OFFS Offset distance between TOS and Neutral Axis (by default). By default. then this command line is equivalent to ORI Y IS E AND Z IS U. Q PPLIN TOS OFFS FROM PPLIN BOS Offset distance between TOS and BOS.FROm -. | | | | ‘-----------------------------------+-. | | |-. If.FROm --. | | ‘--------------------+--> Querying Examples: Q PPLIN TOS END Position of end of p-line.ENd -----+--+--> Q <plin> -.<uval> --------------. | | | | ‘-.3 Orientating by Using P-lines Keywords: Description: PPLINE DIRECTION X Y Z LEAVE You can orientate a structural element by referring its axes to the directions of one or more p-lines.OFFSet --+-. Q PPLIN BOS PROP 0.3 Position of point 30% of distance along BOS from start (by default) towards end. Q PPLIN NA PROP -1.<plin> --. Examples: ORI Y IS PPLIN TOS OF /SCTN1 X DIR AND Z IS U Orientates the current element such that its Y axis points in the X direction of the TOS p-line of /SCTN1 and its Z axis points Up. references will be taken from the Z (or LEAVE) direction.value --+--------------------------.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Querying: Q <plin> --+-.5 FROM END Position of point which is 1. 5.5 times length of Neutral Axis away from end of p-line in direction away from start. 5-32 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. the X direction of the TOS p-line of /SCTN1 points East. | | | | ‘-. for example.9.STart* --.3 .

<plin> --+-.Y ------| | | |-.LEAve --| | | ‘-----------+-.Z ------| | | |-.X ------.DIRection --> PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Z ------| | | |-.3 5-33 . | | |-.LEAve --| | | ‘-----------+-.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Command Syntax: >-.Y ------| | | |-. | | |-.X ------.DIRection --> Querying: Q <plin> --+-.

first create a PANE element (using NEW PANE etc.1 Creating a Panel A Panel (PANE) element represents any sheet material used to clad a structural model. thus: = Panel Loop (PLOO) HEIG of PLOO = Panel Vertex (PAVE) Each PAVE can have an optional fillet radius which defines a circular arc which bulges into (negative radius) or out of (positive radius) the PLOO area. The 2D shape of the Panel Loop is defined by linking together a set of Panel Vertex (PAVE) elements. it defines the Panel thickness. that is.3 . The Panel is split into two or more new Panels which have same owner as the original one. The default fillet radius of zero denotes a point.10 Creating and Connecting Panels 5. More than one new Panel may result if the original one has re-entrant vertices.) 5. they are constrained to lie in the plane of the PLOO. you must. The geometry of a Panel is defined by a subsidiary Panel Loop (PLOO) element. therefore. each of which has a specific position in the Panel’s coordinate system.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. To define a new Panel.10. (The Z co-ordinates of the PAVEs are ignored.).2 Splitting a Panel Keywords: Description: SPLIT ON You can split a Panel along its line of intersection with a given plane or Section. 5-34 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The polygon thus formed defines the shape of the Panel in the same way that a Profile defines the cross-sectional area of a Section. and then create and position as many member PAVEs as necessary to define the shape of the PLOO and thus the PANE. then create a PLOO below it in the hierarchy.10. The Height (HEIG) attribute of the PLOO defines the distance through which this 2D shape is extruded to form the 3D Panel.

FRMW or SBFR.3 5-35 . The start and end of the SELJ are defined by two Section Vertex (SEVE) points. is used to connect two Panels together. thus: PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The start and end of the PALJ are defined by two Panel Vertex (PAVE) points. owned by a Section. They effectively have linear (2D) connectivity. whereas Primary and Secondary Joints have only point (1D) connectivity (even though they have 3D geometry).10.ON <section_id> ----------------+--> 5. is used to connect a Panel to a Section. PANE1 is the Owning Panel and PANE2 is the Attached Panel.THROugh <bpos> --.3 Connecting Panels using Linear Joints Linear joints are used to connect structural items along edges or faces.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components The vertices of the original Panel are moved to the new Panel(s) as appropriate and new vertices are created where the intersection line crosses the edges of the original Panel.PLANE <dir> -. Logical connections from the attached Panel are made by setting Master Vertex (MVERT) attributes of two of the Panel’s PAVEs to point to the corresponding SEVE’s on the linear joint. A Panel Linear Joint (PALJ).SPLIT --+-. owned by a PANE. | | ‘-. A Section Linear Joint (SELJ). Logical connections from the attached Panel are made by setting Master Vertex (MVERT) attributes of two of the Panel’s PAVEs to point to the corresponding PAVEs on the linear joint. Examples: SPLIT PLANE N THRO N1000 Splits current panel along its line of intersection with the specified plane SPLIT ON /BEAM1 Splits current panel along the Neutral Axis (projected if necessary) of the named section Command Syntax: >-. thus: * * PANE1 * * PANE2 PALJ MVERT attribute of PAVE points to PAVE of PALJ * = PALJ (owned by PANE1) = PAVE (PLOO of PANE1) = PAVE (owned by PALJ) In this example.

any new panel vertices needed will be created automatically to correspond with the master vertices of the item connected to. 5-36 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components * * PANE * * SCTN SELJ MVERT attribute of PAVE points to SEVE of SELJ * = SELJ (owned by SCTN) = PAVE (PLOO of PANE) = SEVE (owned by SELJ) Keywords: Description: LINK UNLINK The LINK command lets you set up the necessary connection references for: • • • • • a vertex to another vertex an edge to an edge (an edge is the line between a pair of consecutive vertices) a panel to a joint a panel to a vertex a panel to an edge In each case. When you link a panel. while the vertices of the item linked to (which define the properties at the connection point) are defined as master vertices. one will be created automatically. If the panel has no PLOOP.3 . You can specify the position and direction of creation of the new vertices in the Panel Loop’s vertex sequence as part of the command. UNLINK unsets the connection cross-references created by a LINK command. the vertices of the item being linked are defined as slave vertices.

END .<qualifier1> -| | | |.START -| | | | |.VERTex .<vid> .<vid> -. |.EDGE . | |. The FORWARDS/BACKWARDS options specify the direction of vertices within the joint.START .AFTer <vid> ---------.JOINt .<vidlist> .TO ---+.FORWards --.<jid> ---. | | |.START -| | | | ‘---------+--| | |.<vid> -.TO .END ---| | | | ‘---------+--| | ‘---------------------------| ‘------------------------------------+.LINK -+-+----------.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Examples: LINK VERT CE TO /PAVE2 Links current vertex (slave) to vertex /PAVE2 (master).EDGE . | | |--.BETween <vid> <vid> -| ‘-----------------------+-> The FROM/TO options specify which portion of the joint is to be linked to the panel.<eidlist> .EDGE . refno.FROM -+.<eid> ---+. | | | |.TO . refno.TO -+.<qualifier2> -+--> where: <vid> is a vertex identifier (name.TO -+. treename) <vidlist> is a list of vertex identifiers <eid> is an edge identifier (pair of consecutive vids) <eidlist> is a list of edge identifiers (must be an even number of vids) <pid> is a panel identifier (name.BACKwards -+. | | | | ‘.<vid> -.PANEl . refno. LINK PANEL /PANE3 TO EDGE /PAVE5 /PAVE6 AFTER /PAVE2 Links panel /PANE3 to edge between /PAVE5 and /PAVE6 and positions any new vertices needed after /PAVE2 in the PLOOP of /PANE3.BEFore <vid> --------| |.VERTex -+. | | | |.<vid> -------------.<eid> -------------------| | | ‘--. Defaults are implied start to implied end of joint.END ---| | | ‘---------+--.<vid> -.VERTex . Command Syntax: >. ‘. treename) <qualifier1>: >-+. | | | | ‘.<pid> .3 5-37 .TO -+. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. treename) <jid> is a joint identifier (name.

but is owned by a Panel and positioned relative to the Panel’s origin. such as a pipe hanger attachment.1 Fittings and Panel Fittings A Fitting (FITT) element allows you to indicate a connected implied load.ALL ---------------------+--> Querying: Q LINKS Queries connection references between vertices 5. and selected from the Catalogue.<vid> -.BETween <vid> <vid> --| | | ‘-------------------------+-> The AFTER/BEFORE/BETWEEN options specify the position in the Panel Loop at which to create vertices corresponding to those of the master vertices. one of the Panels owns a PFIT while the others each own a COFI.BEFore <vid> ---------| | | |-. The Fitting may be geometrically modelled in the Catalogue. but not an inherent part of. Hangers and Equipment Load Points 5. the structure. A Cofitting (COFI) element is used where a fitting spans the junction betwen two or more Panels.UNLINK --+-.11. 5-38 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. the PFIT has its Cofitting Reference Array (CFRA) attribute set to point to the COFIs. | | |-.<vid> --. Each COFI has its Panel Fitting Reference (PFRE) attribute set to point to the assciated PFIT. as described in Section 5. A Panel Fitting (PFIT) element serves a similar function to a FITT. >-. | | ‘-. A Fitting is owned by a Section (SCTN) and is positioned along the Neutral Axis of the SCTN at a point defined by the ZDIST attribute (in the same way as for a SNOD).5. In the latter case. or an ancillary item related to.11 Fittings.AFTer <vid> ----------.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components The AFTER/BEFORE/BETWEEN options specify the position in the Panel Loop at which to create vertices corresponding to those of the joint (master vertices). in a similar way to a Joint. such as a web stiffener or a flange plate.3 .FRom -. <qualifier2>: >--+-.

For connection type compatibility. as the Structural equivalent of an Attachment Point (ATTA) in Pipework design. their positions being constrained by the attached Structure. A Fitting may be regarded. 5.2 Structure-to-Pipework Connections Piping models may be linked logically to the Structural model by means of cross-references between the Connection Reference (CREF) attribute of a Fitting on the Structure and the Head or Tail Reference (HREF/TREF) of a Hanger on the Pipework.3 5-39 . therefore.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. the Connection Type attribute (CTYA) of the Fitting must match the Connection Type (HCON/TCON) of the Hanger. It behaves in this respect like a Node in the Structural model.11. If an Equipment is moved. any member Load Points which point to Fittings in a Structure will not move.3 Structure-to-Equipment Connections Equipment models may be linked logically to the Structural model by means of cross-references between the Connection Reference (CREF) attribute of a Fitting on the Structure and the Connection Reference (CREF) of a Load Point (LOAP) element owned by the Equipment.11. A Load Point has a position within the Equipment model. but no size or orientation. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. so that the required setting is available within the design. Owning and Attached Parameters 5. They may be used to transfer design data to a corresponding Catalogue component. starting at parameter number 1: 5-40 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. needed to hold the co-ordinates of the defined point. Its value must be set before the corresponding component is selected from the Catalogue. As an example. DESP N3 -5. Joints.Y. DESP N3 POSS OF /SCTN1 Sets design parameters 3.3 . 4 and 5 to X. was set automatically.5 Sets third design parameter to -5. starting with the specified third parameter.5 7 Sets first two design parameters to 2.5.12. rather than from preset dimensions defined for it in the Catalogue. Note: In the last example. each of which may store up to 100 real values.12 Design. a range of three design parameters. Command Syntax: Setting parameters in default order in the array. A DESP is referenced in the design by its numbered position in the array. Examples: DESP 2. Fittings etc. or to a component’s attached or owning design element.1 Setting Design Parameters Keywords: Description: DESPARAMETERS Design parameters (DESP) are array-type attributes of any element which has a Specification Reference (Sections. this enables one or more dimensions of a Joint to be derived from the dimensions of the Section(s) to which it is attached.).5 and 7 respectively.Z coordinates (respectively) of POSS of element /SCTN1.

<uval> --------------| | | |.<expres> ------------| | | |.Number . respectively) are realarray attributes of Joints. They are set in the Catalogue.DESParameters .Structural Design Using Catalogue Components .--------------------<---------------------. FINCH DIST Q (DDESP[2]) Extracts a distance (in feet and inches) from within DESP 2.<gid> -| | | ‘--------------+-> Querying: .word --+-. 5.<uval> -------------------| | | |-.integer -+. Q (WDESP[1]) Extracts a word from within DESP 1.<expres> -----------------| | | |-.READ ---------------------| | | ‘-.--------------<------------. See the PARAGON Reference Manual for details about the setting of these arrays.--------------<-------------.DESParameters --+-.OF .READ ----------------| | | ‘.2 Setting Owning and Attached Parameters Owning and attached parameters (OPAR and APAR. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. / | Q --*-. / | >.3 5-41 .word -+. Q DESP Outputs values of all design parameters. and allow the Joint to derive data (usually dimensions) from its owning or attached Section(s) when it is introduced into the design.DESParameters -*.OF -.<gid> --| | | ‘------------------+--> Setting individually specified parameters within the array: .integer ---+---> Querying Examples: Q DESP 1 DESP 3 Outputs values of design parameters 1 and 3. / | >-.12.

an OPAR or APAR is referenced in the design by means of its numbered position in the corresponding array.3 . 5-42 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components As with the design parameters described in Section 5.1.12.

For example: End POINSP CURVE PROFILE Start POINSP CURVE = SPINE = POINSP There are six types of Curve.1 Overview Curved structural items are represented by Generic Section (GENSEC) elements. the geometry of which is defined by sweeping a 2D catalogue profile along a path. defined by setting the CURTYP (Curve Type) attribute. A fillet arc and two adjacent straights. These p-lines are referenced by attached items via Justification Line Datum (JLDATUM) and P-line Datum PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. the last POINSP defines its end position (equivalent to the POSE of the Section).13. Curves. optionally. A fillet arc and two adjacent straights. defined by a radius and a pole position. which govern the way in which the shape of the curve is specified. This path is represented by a Spine element.13 Representing Curved Beams and Walls 5. An arc passing through a specified through-point position.3 5-43 . The options are: LINE RADI THRU BULG FILL CENT A straight line (this is the default) A circular arc. Items connected to a GENSEC are positioned and orientated relative to a set of p-lines which follow the same path as that defined by the GENSEC’s Spine. An arc defined by a bulge factor and a conditioning point. The first POINSP owned by the Spine defines its start position (equivalent to the POSS of the Section).Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. that is. the p-lines may be curved. defined by a radius and a conditioning point. owned by the GENSEC. whose route is specified in terms of a sequence of member Spine Points (POINSP) and. a radius and a conditioning point. defined by a circle centre point. A Spine with only two POINSP members behaves in a similar way to a linear Section (SCTN).

(See Section 5. which define the frames of reference to be used for positioning and orientating the attached items relative to the parent GENSEC. Fittings and joints are represented by generic Fixing (FIXING) elements. the geometry of which is defined by reference to catalogue items. GENSEC now has defined cross-section. It can also own intermediate Spine Points and Curves to give a non-linear configuration.3. Examples: NEW GENSEC Creates GENSEC with no defined geometry. Fixings can own other Fixings.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components (PLDATUM) elements.13.3 .2 Defining a Generic Section Keywords: Description: GENSEC SPINE POINSP CURVE Each GENSEC. they are more versatile for representing compound fittings and joints. NEW SPINE Creates Spine with no defined path. Spine at this stage is a straight line. The Spine must own at least two Spine Points. SPREF /203X203X55KG. NEW CURVE (Created between POINSPs). NEW POINSP First Spine Point defines Start Position (POSS).13. 5. so that although they behave somewhat like the more restrictive Fitting and Joint elements. The attributes of this curve determine the shape of the Spine path between the adjacent POINSPs. NEW POINSP Last Spine Point defines End Position (POSE). must own a Spine defining its shape. but no geometry defining its path.UB Sets SpecRef of GENSEC to point to catalogue profile. defining its start and end positions.) 5-44 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. representing a linear or curved beam or wall.

The arc is defined by the POS attribute.3 More About Curve Types The ways in which the various types of Curve are specified are as follows: • CURTYP = LINE Specifies a straight line between the adjacent POINSPs. The choice of minor or major arc is governed by the arc which approaches closest to the conditioning point. the specified radius is ignored and the maximum radius is calculated to ensure that the 5-45 • • • • • PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The sign of the bulge factor determines whether the arc curves towards the conditioning point (positive bulge factor) or away from the conditioning point (negative bulge factor). The curve is defined by the RADI (radius). CURTYP = FILL Specifies a combination of an arc and up to two straights. The choice of minor or major arc is governed by the size of the bulge factor. where the POS setting is interpreted as the pole point of the arc (the intersection of the two end tangents). the specified radius is ignored and the maximum radius that will fit into the pole is calculated. CURTYP = THRU Specifies a single circular arc. The choice of minor or major arc is governed by the arc which approaches closest to the conditioning point.13. The arc is defined by the RADI (radius) and CPOS (conditioning point) attributes. CURTYP = CENT Specifies a combination of an arc and up to two straights. This is the default if curved geometry is not defined between two POINSP elements. If RADS = false.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components 5. The conditioning point and the preceding and following points define the plane of the arc. an endpoint triangle ensures that the fillet terminates on at least one of the end points.3 . If RADS = false. The conditioning point and the preceding and following points define the plane of the arc. The arc is defined by the BULG (bulge factor) and CPOS (conditioning point) attributes. The through-point and the preceding and following points define the plane of the arc. CPOS (conditioning point) and POS attributes. which is interpreted as a through-point on the curve. The pole point and the preceding and following points define the plane of the arc. the specified radius is ignored and the minimum radius is calculated such that the curve is a semicircle between the adjacent POINSPs. CURTYP = RADI Specifies a single circular arc between adjacent POINSP elements. CURTYP = BULG Specifies a single circular arc. The curve is defined by the RADI (radius) and POS attributes. The centre point and the preceding and following points define the plane of the arc. where the POS setting is interpreted as the circle centre point. the conditioning point need not lie in the plane of the arc. If RADS = false.

. PPLINE TOS OF /BEAM1 CUTBACK .2): The distance value along the p-line may be preceded by the keyword DISTANCE. It is possible to define a proportional and an absolute distance position at the same time. the p-line directions are not constant over their lengths. as detailed in Section 11.13. This sets: • the direction along which DISTANCE and PROPORTION are to be measured. Positions may be measured along the actual p-line specified.. The position along the p-line may be measured from the plane normal to the end of the GENSEC. PPLINE TOS OF /BEAM1 NOCUTBACK . or from the joint end preparation cutback. Note: Displayed GENSECs treat each segment of the Spine as a separate extrusion. For example: PPLINE TOS OF /BEAM1 NORMAL . PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The element specified by the OF keyword may be a POINSP or a CURVE. from the cutback plane. these extrusions merge together if there is a tangent continuity. rather than the current element or an element defined with the p-line choice. is extended when applied to GENSECS.. the extrusions are mitred along a plane normal to the mean of the two tangent vectors at the POINSP position. This means that. For example: PPLINE TOS DISTANCE distance FROM END . This must be taken into consideration when using them as datums referenced by attached items.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components nearest POINSP to the circle lies on the circle... The additional command options available are summarised here. If there is a tangent discontinuity... For example: PPLINE TOS distance VIA SPINE FROM END ..3 5-46 . the arc terminates on this point. 5. At the vertices between segments.e.4 How P-lines Are Used For Generic Sections P-lines defined in the Pointset of the Section Profile (as referenced by the SpecRef) follow the path defined by the GENSEC’s Spine.9.9.. The command syntax used for referencing p-lines for SCTNs. or along the Spine and then projected onto the p-line. Positions Derived From P-lines (see Section 5.. for a curved GENSEC..... This redefines the element to be the GENSEC owning the POINSP or CURVE. PPLINE TOS PROPORTION value VIA PLINE . at the POINSP positions. For example: PPLINE TOS PROPORTION value DISTANCE distance . i.

If no POINSP or CURVE is specified. the POINSP to be used as the origin from which DISTANCE and PROPORTION are measured. normal to the probe line. For example: PPLINE TOS PROPORTION 0.3): Directions and offsets derived from p-lines can have a derived position inserted after the direction/offset option and before the OF option. the point can be on the tangential extension of the p-line. This lets you specify the position along the p-line at which the direction/offset is to be calculated. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. all plines of the GENSEC will be probed and the closest p-line will be used.9. The expression returns the nearest point on PLINE pline_name. If UNBOUND is set. Directions and Offsets Derived From P-lines (see Section 5. the direction/offset is calculated using the start of the GENSEC or element specified by the OF option. the segment following the POINSP (from START). For example: PPLINE TOS X DIRECTION PROP 0.4 FROM END VIA SPINE OF /CURVE3 calculates a position 40% along /CURVE3 measured from its end. the point will not be behind the THROUGH position. The VIA SPINE/PLINE option is used if the point is to be returned with its distance along the p-line from the start of the segment. PROPORTION is calculated from the start of the GENSEC. If pline_name is specified as ANY. If BOUND is set. the point is either on the p-line or at the ends (where it intersects the NORMAL or CUTBACK end of the GENSEC). or the segment preceding the POINSP (from END). that is.3 5-47 . the segment of the GENSEC to which PROPORTION is applied as: • • • the named CURVE. The point returned will be in or above the plane through the THROUGH position.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components • • in the case of a CURVE.4 VIA PLINE FROM END OF /CURVE3 PPLINE TOS OFFSET FROM PPLINE BOS DISTANCE 200 FROM END If no position is given. Picked Positions on P-lines: The following syntax lets you derive a position on a p-line which is nearest to a probe line: PPLINE pline_name NORMAL/CUTBACK NEAR direction THROUGH position [VIA SPINE/PLINE] BOUND/UNBOUND The probe line starts at the THROUGH position and extends in the specified direction.

ONPLINE return references to the segment and p-line. positioning_command ID ONPLINE PPLINE . PPLINE.. in the direction specified in the positioning_command (FROM START or FROM END).) The following expressions use keywords analogous to the OFFSET option between the p-line specification and the subsequent positioning command: PPLINE PPLINE PPLINE PPLINE pline_name pline_name pline_name pline_name PLDIST positioning_command PLKEY positioning_command SEGMENT positioning_command ONPLINE positioning_command PPLINE.SEGMENT and PPLINE.. on which the point is specified.PLDIST returns the distance along the segment on which the point lies. Compound Fittings (CMFI)..13. Secondary Joints (SJOI) and Compound Secondary Joints (SCOJ) relative to Sections (SCTN). PPLINE..3 5-48 . but only via member Justification Line Datum and P-line Datum elements which together define the p-line configurations to be used as references for positioning and orientating the Fixings. ID ONPLINE returns the identity of the p-line on which the specified position occurs. respectively.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Identifying P-line Elements: P-line expressions can be used in any positioning command (DISTANCE. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. NEAR etc. They also provide similar functions to those used for positioning Panel Fittings (PFIT) and Compound Panel Fittings (CMPF).....5 Positioning Items Relative to Generic Sections A GENSEC cannot own Fixings directly. PROPORTION.. together with any Fixings owned by the latter. depending on the GENSEC configuration (remember that a GENSEC can model a wide range of geometries. positioning_command ID SEGMENT returns the identity of the POINSP at the start of the segment on which the specified position occurs.. each of which defines a frame of reference for its members based on a nominated pline of its owning JLDATUM. all of its member PLDATUMs can be manipulated as a group.PLKEY returns the name (the PKEY) of the p-line on which the point lies. By manipulating a JLDATUM. Note: The JLDATUM and PLDATUM elements together serve similar functions to the Secondary Nodes (SNOD) used for positioning Fittings (FITT). Each JLDATUM can own a set of P-line Datum (PLDATUM) elements. (The latter is only useful for the PPLINE ANY option. The Justification Line Datum (JLDATUM) element defines a frame of reference for its members based on the p-line system of its owning GENSEC. including structural sections and panels).. 5..) in the following way: ID SEGMENT PPLINE . otherwise it simply returns the identity of the specified pline.

The position and orientation of a Fixing attached (indirectly) to a GENSEC are specified by reference to the coordinate systems of the parent PLDATUM and JLDATUM. If PKDI is less than 0 or greater than 1. at the POS. respectively. The Y axis is in the Y direction (YDIR) of the Spine. so that it can also represent compound joints and fittings. TPREF HPREF • • ZDIST PKDI=0 PKDI=0.5 Specifying Orientation: The orientation of a JLDATUM may be queried via a pseudo-attribute (Q ORI). respectively. by reference to POINSPs of the parent GENSEC (more strictly.Structural Design Using Catalogue Components Specifying Position: The position of a JLDATUM origin may be queried via a pseudo-attribute (Q POS). the position will be on the preceding or following segment. If only one is set. but this cannot be set explicitly. ZDIST specifies the distance of the JLDATUM origin from the PKDI point. but this cannot be set explicitly. The orientation is such that its Z axis is in the direction of the Spine (i.3 5-49 . PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. It can own other Fixings. modified by the Beta Angle (BANG) setting. the other defaults to the next POINSP in the appropriate direction. the NA p-line) at the POS. PKDI specifies a point.5 PKDI=1 = Spine of GENSEC = POINSP = JLDATUM Position for PKDI=0. If both are unset. as measured along the Justification Line (JUSL) or NA p-line of the GENSEC. Its geometry is defined by a reference to a parameterised Catalogue item in the usual way. as a proportion of the distance from TPREF to HPREF.13.6 Generic Fixings Representing Joints and Fittings A Fixing can represent any type of joint or fitting attached to a Generic Section. between which interpolated positions will be calculated. The position is derived from the following attribute settings: • TPREF and HPREF specify. from which ZDIST is to be measured. TPREF defaults to start of the GENSEC and HPREF defaults to the end of the GENSEC. the start and end points.e. 5. its Spine). The default setting is 0. These can be set relative to any POINSP under the GENSEC. giving a position at TPREF. of the Spine.

Structural Design Using Catalogue Components

including a POINSP which has been specially inserted for this purpose if necessary, as summarised in Section 5.13.5. The default position and orientation of the Fixing relative to its owning PLDATUM are specified by its POS and ORI attributes, respectively. Fixings Representing Joints: The detailed position of a Fixing whose SPREF attribute points to a Catalogue Joint is specified using the Joining Line attributes of the owning and attached sections: JLNS (start) and JLNE (end). The JNLS/JNLE are related to the origin and orientation of the joint; if the attached GENSEC is curved, these plines are taken as parallel to the attached end of the GENSEC. When connected, the JLNS/JLNE line of the attached section intersects with the JLIN line of the Fixing on the Joint Origin Plane. A GENSEC attached to a joint at one end will have either its JOIS (start) or JOIE (end) attribute set to reference the Fixing; conversely, the CREF (Connection Reference) attribute of the Fixing will reference the attached GENSEC. This two-way cross-reference is used when either the Fixing or the GENSEC is modified, or when a CONNECT command is used.

5.14 Representing Building Components
The elements used to represent structural steelwork designs can also be used to represent the components involved in building design; for example, walls, floors, floor screeds, doors, windows, etc. It is recommended that such elements are created by using the DESIGN Walls & Floors applicationware rather than from the command line, since this will ensure that all relevant attributes are set in a consistent way, but the options are summarised in this section for reference purposes.

5.14.1 Using Element Soft Types
To distinguish the elements used for building representation rather than for other types of structural design, element soft types are used. These are elements which have the same attributes as standard (hard type) elements, but which have different names to identify their functions. The soft types used for building design are as follows: Compound Wall (CWALL): a soft type of Subframework (SBFR), used to hold one or more wall components representing, say, one storey of a multistorey building. Compound Floor (CFLOOR): a soft type of Subframework (SBFR), used to hold one or more floor components representing, say, one storey of a multistorey building. Compound Screed (CSCREED): a soft type of Subframework (SBFR), used to hold one or more screed components representing, say, one storey of a multi-storey building.
5-50
PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

Structural Design Using Catalogue Components

Straight Wall (STWALL): a soft type of Section (SCTN), used to represent a wall created by extruding a 2D catalogue profile from a start position to an end position. [Curved] Wall (WALL): a soft type of Generic Section (GENSEC). This can, in principle, be used to represent any shape of wall created by extruding a 2D catalogue profile along a path defined by a Spine. The Walls & Floors application for Version 11.3 restricts the use of this element to the representation of a Ring Wall, for which the Spine path is all or part of a circle. General Wall (GWALL): a soft type of a Panel (PANE), used to represent a wall created by extruding a user-defined 2D shape through a specified distance (equivalent to the Panel's height/thickness). This could be used, for example, to represent a column, where the 2D shape of the column's cross-section is extruded vertically to the required column height. Wall and Floor Fittings, such as doors, windows, manholes etc.,can be represented by Compound Fittings (CMPF), Sub-Compound Fittings (SBFI), Fittings (FITT), Panel Fittings (PFIT) or Fixings (FIXI) in the usual way.

5.14.2 Controlling Edge Representation in DRAFT
When you plot walls and floors in DRAFT, you may want to remove the lines which represent common edges between such elements (referred to as 'unioning' the elements) to give a more realistic appearance. The elements used to represent buildings have an attribute specifically for this purpose: the DRAFT Union (DUNION) attribute. The elements to which this attibute applies are: Zone, Structure, Framework, Subframework, Compound Wall, Compound Floor and Compound Screed. In each case, the DUNION attribute can take one of the following values: DUNION=0 Common edges always shown All common edges between adjoining elements will be drawn in DRAFT. DUNION=1 Common edges not shown between members Common edges between adjoining elements will be drawn in DRAFT unless a pair of such elements are both members of a common parent, in which case the edge lines will be removed. DUNION=2 Common edges not shown between members and peers Common edges between adjoining elements will be drawn in DRAFT unless a pair of such elements are either both members of a common owner or are at the same hierarchic level with a common parent, in which cases the edge lines will be removed. In the simplest cases, the effects are as shown in the following diagram:

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

5-51

Structural Design Using Catalogue Components

DUNION = 0

DUNION = 1

DUNION = 2

The overall effect in DRAFT is determined by the composite effects of the settings for all significant elements (i.e. all elements which have a DUNION attribute) above those being drawn. For example: When DUNION = 0, all members of the current element will be 'assembled' together rather than 'unioned': joint lines will therefore be shown between touching members (e.g. between adjoining Panels). When DUNION = 1 for a FRMW or SBFR (or equivalent soft types), all members will be unioned: joint lines between touching members (e.g. adjoining Panels) with the same owner will not be shown. The FRMW or SBFR will not itself be unioned with another FRMW or SBFR. When DUNION = 1 for a ZONE, STRU or FRWM, all member STRUs, FRMWs and SBFRs with DUNION = 2 will be unioned. Thus, joint lines will not be shown between adjoining Panels with different owners. The ZONE, STRU or FRMW will not itself be unioned with another ZONE, STRU or FRMW. When DUNION = 2 for any element, all members with DUNION = 2 will be unioned, and the current element will also be unioned to others which share the same owner and which have DUNION = 2 as long as the owner has DUNION = 1 or 2.

5-52

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

6

Design Templates
This chapter explains the concept of Design Templates, which let you create and store standard design configurations for subsequent use, and the Design Datasets which hold the parameterised data settings for such templates.

6.1

The Concepts
A design template is a set of design primitives, panels and nozzles that may be grouped together and then referenced from within another part of the design database as though it were a single item. In many ways, a design template behaves in a similar way to a catalogue component, except that the template items are stored in a special area of the Design DB, rather than in a separate Catalogue DB, and they can use the more powerful sets of primitives and parameterisation facilities available from within DESIGN. Unlike a catalogue component, a design template can be split down into its constituent parts for selective reporting, dimensioning, MTO, etc. A design template is used in a design by creating an instance of the template. When a design template is instanced, the template contents are copied into the design hierarchy and a reference is set to the original template definition. At this release version, a design template may only be copied under a Panel Fitting, a Section Fitting or a Primary Joint. A design element cannot own more than one design template, nor can one design template own another template. Design templates may be parameterised to allow a single template definition to be used in different circumstances. The parameterisation facilities use Design Datasets to store named parameters, which may then be referenced in geometric and p-point definitions. The value assigned to a parameter can be defined in terms of a rule by using any of the standard PDMS expression syntax. Note: The definition of Design Templates is likely to be done by the person who organises PDMS Catalogue and Specification data in a company, while the use of Design Templates for building up a design model will be carried out by a plant designer. Therefore, although both functions are carried out in DESIGN, this chapter is relevant to two different types of PDMS user.

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

6-1

2 The Design Template Hierarchy Design Template (TMPL) elements are usually stored in a separate Design DB under an administrative Template World (TPWL). could be created thus: World (/*) SITE ZONE EQUI BOX Copy NBOX NBOX TPWL TMAR TMPL BOX When this template is instanced in a design model. negative extrusions. The TMPL may then be modified by the addition of positive and/or negative primitives.3 .Design Templates 6. Each TMPL is initially created as a copy of an existing set of design elements which have been created in a part of the usual hierarchy below a SITE. say under a panel fitting. its constituent elements are copied back and all parameterisation rules are executed so that the attributes of the copy are set to suit the local design requirements. etc. a very simple template. For example. which is itself divided into administrative Template Areas (TMAR). 6-2 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. consisting of a positive box and a negative box. thus: TPWL TMAR TMPL BOX NBOX Copy and Execute Rules PFIT TMPL BOX NBOX PANE PLOO PAVEs All attributes of the copy are locked to prevent unintentional changes.

A local design dataset is owned directly by the current element. while a default value for the property (to be used if the expression cannot be evaluated for any reason) can be stored in the DDDF (Design Data Default) attribute. a reference to a design template can access more than one design dataset. which can access only a single catalogue dataset via its DTREF setting. which may then be used to define the template’s parameters. while a current design dataset is at the same level as the current element and has the same owner. a template design dataset is owned by the first template below the current element. Unlike a design reference to a catalogue component. Each property is stored in a Design Data (DDAT) element under a DDSE.Design Templates 6. The following diagram illustrates the relative positions of these types of dataset for a simple hierarchy: PFIT local TMPL current local BOX current DDSE(2) DDSE(1) template The pseudo–attributes available for accessing the properties data in the various types of dataset are as follows: Current Dataset List of property keys Real property values Text or real property values Text or real property default values Reference settings CDPL CDPR TCDP TCDD CFDP Local Dataset DEPL LDPR DEPR DEPD LFDP Template Dataset PRLS TDPR PROP PRDE TFDP PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. The property definition can be specified by an expression held in the DDPR (Design Data Property) attribute.3 6-3 . with each DDAT being identified by a keyword held in its DKEY attribute.3 Parameterisation using Design Datasets Design Datasets (DDSE) are used to store the properties of design template items.

Even if the element has a PDMS name under the Template World. rule execution errors can arise if the template instance is modified in any way which affects the ordering of the members list.. Each local name. 6. and the reference of the corresponding element. BOX 1 OF TMPL 1 OF .3 .g. The CDPR can also be used to define a property in one dataset in terms of a property in another dataset. When a CDPR is used in a rule for a component whose owner can own datasets. this name will be lost when the template is copied because an element name cannot be used more than once in a Design database. a design attribute value will be defined in terms of a design property by using the CDPR (Current Design Dataset Property) attribute. is 6-4 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.Design Templates Note: The dataset attributes PRLS. When instanced in a design. When a CDPR is used in a property expression within a dataset. a design parameter and the rule would be re–executed to give the correct XLEN.). Most commonly. For example: Q CDPL Lists all DKEYs for properties in current dataset. which are then used to evaluate expressions during the creation of a design template. say. Thus a default value for LENG in the last example would allow a sensible XLEN dimension to be evaluated from the rule for display purposes. when defining a parameterisation rule). you can assign a local name (LNAME) to a template member. the value of the LENG property would be derived from. When used in a querying command or in an expression (for example. This lets you see the template geometry in a graphical view. the current datasets will be those under the first dataset-owning element above the component. a search for a design template dataset will be made. confusion can arise in the identification of members of the template instance. the current datasets will be those at the same level as the component: otherwise. Note: Usually default values are assigned to properties. etc.4 Assigning Local Names to Template Elements When a design template is copied. To avoid these problems. If you query any of these attributes. PROP and PRDE are also used to refer to catalogue dataset properties. a search for a catalogue dataset will be made first. if this fails. If a template rule refers to an element by its hierarchic position (e. it refers to a property in the current dataset for the item at which CDPR is evaluated. at a practical scale. the attributes for a specific property are identified by the DKEY for that property. Q CDPR LENG Gives value of LENG property in current dataset. as you define it. RULE SET XLEN (CDPR LENG) Sets rule for current element’s XLEN attribute using value from LENG property in current dataset..

Design Templates stored in an array attribute of the template. even though they are stored at template level. or unset an existing local name.LNAMe ---*--.3 6-5 . Examples: LNAME /ANTHONY Sets local name for current element LNAME UNSET Unsets local name for current element Command Syntax: >--. Local names are therefore set and queried at member element level. 6.2 Using Local Names in Expressions Keywords: Description: Examples: LNID /SID Identifies element defined in current template LNID MLNID Lets you identify an element by its local name in a rule or dataset expression. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.UNSET --------+---> Querying: Q LNAMe Gives local name for current element Q LNLST Lists all local names for elements under current template Q ATT (Note that local names are stored in a compressed numeric format) 6. a maximum of 500 local names can be stored on one template.4.4. | | ‘--. The local name survives a template copy operation.1 Setting Local Names Keywords: Description: LNAME Lets you assign a local name to a template member.local_name ---. A local name can have a maximum of 20 characters. The local name cannot be modified if either the element or its owning template is locked.

local_name ---> Querying: Q LNID /SID Q MLNID /JOE For element in current template For element in member template 6.e. Each rule sequence number.3 . is stored in an array attribute of the template.5 Setting Priorities for Evaluating Rules By default. When the template rules are re-executed. Keywords: Description: RSEQNUMBER Lets you assign a rule sequence number to any design template member which has a local name. in template owned by current element) (XLEN OF LNID /SID) Uses dimension of locally named element in expression (XLEN OF MLNID /JOE) Command Syntax: >---+--.LNid ----. the rules for such elements will be executed in ascending order of their sequence numbers: the rules for elements with sequence numbers unset (or zero) will then be executed in the default order. otherwise an incorrect result will be obtained. You can control the order in which the rules for a given template will be executed by assigning a rule sequence number to any element which has a local name. and the reference of the corresponding element. | | ‘--. 6-6 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. it is important that the latter rule is executed before the former. The rule sequence number must be a positive integer (zero is equivalent to unset). even though they are stored at template level.Design Templates MLNID /JOE Identifies element defined in member template (i.MLNid ---+--. Rule sequence numbers are therefore set and queried at member element level. but this is not recommended. the rules for the member elements of a design template are executed in descending hierarchic order. The same sequence number may be assigned to more than one element. If the rule for one member element includes a reference to the result of a rule for another member.

A design pointset can store three types of p-point (note that these are not the same as those available in catalogue pointsets): • A Cartesian P-point is specified in terms of its X.3 6-7 . In a similar way.Design Templates Examples: RSEQN 3 Sets rule sequence number for current element (which must be a member of a design template and must already have a local name) RSEQN UNSET Unsets rule sequence number for current element Command Syntax: >--. approximate to the Geomset data for a catalogue component.3. as discussed in Section 6. sorted by rule sequence number.e. i. in order of rule execution priority 6.RSEQNumber ---+--.Y. which approximate to the Pointset data for a catalogue component. design templates can also own Design Pointsets (DPSE). thus: PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. to be used as references for subsequent positioning and orientating operations. These let you assign p-points to design template items.integer ---.6 Adding Design Points to Template Elements The design datasets for a template. | | ‘--.Z co-ordinates only.UNSET -----+---> Querying: Q RSEQN Gives sequence number for current element Q RSEQA Lists sequence numbers for all elements under current template (in the order in which their local names were set) Q RSEQFA Lists local names for elements under current template.

Design Templates

Z Y
Origin

Design Point

Orientation

Direction of Normal

X

A Cylindrical P-point is specified as a position on the surface of a cylinder at a given position and with given dimensions, thus:
Design Orientation Point Direction of Normal

Z Y
Origin

Angle defining point position wrt Y axis

X

Cylinder defined by its position, height and radius

A Spherical P-point is specified as a position on the surface of a sphere at a given position and with given dimensions, thus:
Design Point

Z Y
Origin

Orientation Direction of Normal Direction radius acts in, defining point position wrt sphere's centre

X

Sphere defined by its position and radius

6-8

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

Design Templates

6.7

Using a Design Template Item in a Design
To create an instance of a ‘source’ design template in a design model, you must first create a template below the owning design element and then copy into this the details of the source template (which must be in a template world) from which it is to derive its data. The commands (at the design element which is to own the instance) are: NEW TMPL COPY REXEcute template_identifier where template_identifier is the name of the source template. The effects are as follows: • • • • All elements below the original design template are copied below the new TMPL. All template rules are copied and re–executed, thus setting the attributes of the new TMPL members to suit the design data. The Origin Reference (ORRF) attributes for the new TMPL elements are set to point to their equivalents in the source template. All elements below the new TMPL are locked to prevent unintentional changes to any of their attributes.

If you want to change an attribute explicitly, thereby causing it to differ from the design as specified in the source template, you must first unset the ORRF references which point back to the source and unlock the members. To do so, use the command UNTIE template_instance where template_instance is the name of the copy TMPL in the design model hierarchy.

6.8

Portsets and Linksets
If you list the possible members of most types of design element, you will see two new elements called Portsets (PORS) and Linksets (LNKS). These have been added to the database definition to permit future developments which will allow logical connections to be made to items derived from design templates. They are not intended for general use at this release version of PDMS.

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

6-9

7

Groups
The commands described in this chapter allow you to define groups of items that can then be manipulated as a single entity. Note that these commands have largely been superceded by the use of lists and collections, defined using expressions.

7.1

Defining Group Contents
GADD GREMOVE MEMBERS ITEMS ALL OF The contents of a Group are defined by adding or removing references to or from the list part of the Group. In order to use the commands described in this section, the current element must be the Group whose member list you wish to modify. Specified elements are then added to the list part of the current element starting from the current list position or are removed from the list part of the current element such that the current list position becomes the Head position. The elements to be added to, or removed from, the Group’s member list may be specified in any of the following ways: • • Explicitly, by name or (system-assigned) reference number. As members of specified elements, where a member of an element is defined as any element immediately below it in the DB hierarchy As items of specified elements, where an item of an element is any element anywhere below it in the hierarchy which has no list part (such as a Valve, Point, Box, etc.) By type (such as Equipment, Branch, Pipe, etc.)

Keywords: Description:

• Examples:

GADD /ZONE1 /VALVE2 Adds /ZONE1 and /VALVE2 to the current Group, starting from the current list position GREMOVE /ZONE1 /BOX3 Removes /ZONE1 and /BOX3 from the current Group and moves the current list position pointer to the Head position

PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.3

7-1

GREMove --+---*-.<selatt> ---+---> 7.Groups GADD MEM OF /BRANCH1 /BRANCH2 Adds all the pipe Components in Branches /BRANCH1 and /BRANCH2 to the current Group. | | / | ‘-. the Group will be accessed.GADD -----. The items in a Group are shown as Members.2 Accessing Groups END Groups exist outside the normal design hierarchy in a Group World (GPWL). Keywords: Description: Examples: END (At a Group Member) If the current element was accessed via the Group. The available Group Worlds can be seen by querying Members at the top (WORLD) level in the hierarchy. These Members all have normal locations in the design hierarchy. Groups can be accessed either directly by name. . starting from the current list position Command Syntax: >--+-.-------------. Command Syntax: See the navigation commands described in Part 1 of the PDMS Design Reference Manual.3 . but it is important to appreciate that the Group does not actually own them. starting from the current list position GREM MEM OF /PIPE100 MEM OF /EQUI-B Removes all Branches of the Pipe /PIPE100 and all members of Equipment /EQUI-B from the current Group GREM ITEMS OF /ZONE2 Removes from the current Group all occurrences of those offspring of /ZONE2 which are items GADD ALL EQU BRAN OF /ZONE1 /ZONE2 Adds all offspring of /ZONE1 and /ZONE2 which are of types Equip or Branch to the current Group. but are also Members of a Group. Otherwise the current element’s owner will be accessed. OWNER (At a Group Member) The current element’s owner will always be accessed regardless of the method of access to the current element. 7-2 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. or by descending the hierarchy in the normal way.

only the member and any Offspring that are Groups are deleted. If the member is a Group. it is deleted with all its Offspring. COPY MEM OF /GROUP21 RENAME /MAIN /SPARE As above.DELETE <snoun> -+-.TO integer -> | | | | | ‘--> | ‘--> ‘--> 7. Keywords: Description: Examples: DELETE GROUP Only the current element and any Offspring that are Groups will be deleted. DELETE GROUP MEM The Members of the Group are deleted in the following way: • • If the member is not a Group.3 Deleting Groups DELETE The action of this command differs from normal behaviour if the current element is a Group. Keywords: Description: Examples: COPY /GROUP21 (At a Group. Command Syntax: >-. DELETE GPWLD Only the current element and any Offspring that are Groups will be deleted.3 7-3 . COPY MEM OF /GROUP21 (At a Zone.Groups 7.integer --+-.) The Current Group will contain exactly the same Members as /GROUP21.MEMbers --+-.4 Copying a Group COPY Groups may be copied with a slightly different effect to normal elements. No new elements have been created. but with renaming.) The current Zone will contain new elements which are identical to the Members of /GROUP21 provided these elements are all legal members of a Zone. PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.

| | | | | ‘-----------+--------------+.MEMbers -+.REName name name -> | ‘-> 7-4 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11.OF <sgid> -+.TO integer -.<sgid> -+.COPY -+.integer -+.ALL OF -.3 .REName name name -> | | | ‘-> |.Groups Command Syntax: >. | | ‘----------+.

5-8 Current design dataset. 3-3 Buildings. 3-66 Cofitting element. 5-14 BASE command pipe routing. 4-1 AXES command pipe routing. 5-43 Curve Type attribute. 5-4 AUTOROUTE command. 5-50 Compound joint element. 3-36 BY command. 3-45. 3-31 AT command.3 . 6-3 DDPR attribute. 6-3 DDSE element. 5-1 Compound panel fitting element. 3-9.Index <plin> syntax. 5-7. 6-4 CURTYP attribute. 5-2 Compound Screed element. 2-27. 4-2 BANGLE command. 6-4 CHOOSE command. 2-14. 5-18 Cylindrical p-point in design pointset. 5-50 CONNECT command. 2-35. 3-9. 6-3 Design Data element. 6-7 CDPR attribute. 3-3 tail. 5-45 Curve element. 2-6 Attached parameters. 5-50 BUILT flag. 2-16 Cartesian p-point in design pointset. 6-3 Current Design Dataset Property attribute. 5-7 BOP command. 5-43. 3-59 Beta angle joints. 6-8 DDAT element. 5-38 Cofitting Reference Array attribute. 4-7 BEHIND command. 5-8 CTYSTART command. 6-3 DELPOSITION command. 5-14 sections. 5-45 CUTBACK command. 2-1 sections. 5-50 Compound Wall element. 5-19 Connection forced. 5-2 Compound Floor element. 5-41 Attributes of primitives. 6-3 Index-1 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. 3-39 CTYEND command. 5-30 ALONG command. 3-72 pipe routing. 3-3. 3-14 CLEARANCE command. 5-18 CUTPLANE command. 5-38 Compound fitting element. 2-33 ARRIVE command. 3-46 CRFA attribute. 4-8 Branch head. 6-3 DDDF attribute. 5-43. 5-14 Design Data Default attribute.

3-46 Fitting element. 3-6 HREF command. 3-5 HSPE command. 5-12 secondary. 5-43. 3-49. 5-1 linear. 5-21 DISTANCE command. 5-1 primary. 3-3 HPOS command. 5-17 linear. 6-3 Design parameters. 5-49 FLIP command. 3-43 DISCONNECT command. 5-2. 5-9 EXTEND command. 3-35 ISPEC attribute. 3-9. 5-4. 7-1 HBOR command. 3-14 Forced connection. 2-11 rotating. 5-51 DRAG command. 5-2. 5-2. 6-3 DPSE element. 5-51 Elements connecting. 7-1 Index-2 Generic Fixing element. 3-6 HDIR command. 5-40 Design Pointset element. 3-59 Instance Design templates. 3-78 DRNEND command. 5-51 Edge drawing. 2-3 DIRECTION command.Index Design Data Property attribute. 5-44.3 . 3-6 Head of branch. 5-6 DRNSTART command. 3-6 HCON command. 5-25 FCONNECT command. 3-35 JLDATUM element. 3-33 HSTUBE attribute. 5-1. 3-2 HSROD attribute. 5-50 FORCECONNECT command. 5-8 Joint creating. 5-8 Justification Line Datum element. 2-14 moving. 5-49 Generic Section element. 3-53 DKEY attribute. 2-16 orientating. 6-2 DESPARAMETER command. 5-22 Floors. 5-1. 5-40 Detail level. 5-48 JOIEND command. 7-1 Group element. 3-33 IDPLINE command. 5-43. 2-12 End position (section). 3-53 GADD command. 6-7 DRAFT Union attribute. 5-6 DUNION attribute. 6-3 Design Dataset element. 5-13 Joints attributes. 3-31. 5-2 Fixing element. 5-48 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. 6-7 Design Template element. 5-2 panel. 5-43 GREMOVE command. 5-12 Joint element compound. 5-38 compound. 5-30 INFRONT command. 5-5 ERELEASE command. 5-15 JOISTART command. 5-43 GENSEC element. 6-1 Insulation specification. 2-27. 5-14 secondary. 3-46 FROM command. 5-35 primary. 5-2.

6-4 LOFF attribute. 5-1 Panel Vertex element. 2-17. 4-8 ORIENTATE command. 5-34 Parameters attached. 5-35 LINK command.Index LEAVE command. 3-9. 3-47 Node element primary. 2-6 POSLINE command. 2-8 Polar positioning. 5-41 Panel fitting element compound. 5-2 secondary. 2-45 MLNID. 4-3 PH command. 2-3 OBSTRUCTION command. 5-30 Primitives attributes. 3-41 Orientation. 4-6 Pipe routing. 3-33 MIRROR command. 2-3 Linear joint element. 5-2 POINSP element. 5-12 PLDATUM element. 3-37 POSITION command. 5-5 PPLINE command. 5-38 Panel Fitting Reference attribute. 2-11. 2-30. 5-34 splitting. 4-2. 5-1 Nodes primary. 5-5 POSFLAG attribute. 5-40 owning. 3-62 OPDIRECTION command. 5-44. 5-41 design. 2-6. 3-11. 5-38 Panel Loop element.3 Owning parameters. 5-43 POLAR command. 5-14 ORDER command pipe routing. 2-11 ORIFLAG attribute. 5-35 creating. 5-11 Nozzle offset factor pipe routing. 5-2 Panel Fitting element. 3-31 LEVEL command. 3-39 LSROD attribute. 5-15 POSSTART command. 3-37 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. 4-5 ONTOP command. 3-33 LSTUBE attribute. 2-4 Obstruction level clash detection. 5-48 PNODE command. 5-48 Pline Datum element. 5-1 Panels connecting. 2-8 POSEND command. 5-1 secondary. 6-5 MOVE command. 6-5 LNID. 4-1 PJOINT command. 6-3 Local name Design templates. 5-36 LNAME. 5-2. 5-1 Linear joints. 3-7 Pipe rack pipe routing. 5-41 Penalty volume pipe routing. 2-1 Index-3 . 3-49 Positioning. 5-44. 2-4 OFFSETFACTOR command. 4-5 Nozzles specifying. 6-5 Local design dataset.

5-2 Subjoint element. 4-2. 5-51 Rod attributes. 3-2 PT command. 5-34 SPREAD command pipe routing.3 . 5-3 disconnecting. 4-4 Routing plane pipe routing. 3-20 SHOP flag. 6-2 Template design dataset. 3-53 TOP command. 6-8 Spine element. 5-3 Subfitting element. 3-7 PVOL command. 5-2. 5-13 SNODE command. 3-35 TREF command. 5-1 Tail of branch. 5-21 RESELECT command. 5-2 fixings. 6-2 Trace specification. 6-2 TO command. 5-11 Soft types. 4-3 RPLANE command. 6-3 Template World element. 3-33 ROTATE command. 3-6 Template Area element. 3-3 TBOR command. 5-2 joints.Index Profile element. 5-4 connecting. 5-21 modifying lengths. 5-51 STRING command. 3-36 SHORTCODE command. 5-43 Index-4 Spine Point element. 3-33 SRELEASE command. 3-6 TDIR command. 5-1 Straight Wall element. 5-1 nodes. 3-51 TMAR element. 3-13. 4-3 RSEQNUMBER. 5-19 creating. 5-21 SELECT command. 3-5 TSPE attribute. 6-6 Rule sequence number Design templates. 3-72 TPOS command. 5-25 reconnecting. 5-1 sections. 5-4. 3-6 TCON command. 5-43 SPLIT command. 2-12 ROUTE command. 6-2 TMPL element. 5-9 Start position (section). 3-24 SJOINT command. 3-26 Ring Wall element. 5-5 Steelwork fittings. 5-50 Spherical p-point in design pointset. 4-3 RACK command. 5-2 generic sections. 6-2 THROUGH command. 4-7 SPREF attribute. 5-4 PSPE command. 6-6 Screeds. 5-1 panels. 3-35 Tube PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. 4-6 Sections attributes. 3-6 TPWL element. 5-50 SDIR command pipe routing. 4-6 RECONNECT command. 5-1. 3-9.

5-36 UNTIE. 3-9. 3-33 UNDER command. 5-11 PDMS DESIGN Reference Manual Part 2: Creating the Model Version 11. 5-51 UNLINK command.Index attributes. 5-51 Walls. 3-62 Unioning edges. 5-50 ZDISTANCE command.3 Index-5 . 2-30. 6-9 Wall element.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful