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Times Leader 09-06-2013

Times Leader 09-06-2013

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WILKES-BARRE, PA FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 50¢
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NEWS
Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 8A
INSIDE
Birthdays 10A
Editorials 11A
Weather 12A
SPORTS: 1B
BUSINESS: 10B
CLASSIFIED: 1C
Comics 10C
THE GUIDE
Television
Movies
Puzzles
HANOVER TWP. — Former
Wyoming Valley Sanitary
Authority executive director
Fred DeSanto is expected to sur-
render today on a charge he used
authority employees to do work
at his Pittston Township home.
Luzerne County detectives
Thursday filed a felony charge
of diversion of services against
DeSanto, 63, with District Judge
Joseph Halesey in Hanover
Township, where the sanitary
authority central office is locat-
ed.
DeSanto allegedly had employ-
ees work on his home and per-
form tasks for the District 16
Little League. DeSanto has been
involved with District 16
for decades, most recent-
ly as district director.
DeSanto served as
executive director of
WVSA since 1998 until
he abruptly retired on
Aug. 27, 2012, shortly
before he was scheduled
to be interviewed by the author-
ity’s board regarding the allega-
tions. He previously served in
other capacities in the author-
ity’s administration for 18 years.
DeSanto did not return a mes-
sage for comment on Thursday.
District Attorney
Stefanie Salavantis in
September 2012 assigned
a detective to investigate
allegations of wrongdoing
made against DeSanto by
authority employees.
A news release issued
by WVSA Executive
Director James T. Tomaine stat-
ed the charges “stem from an
internal investigation conducted
by the WVSA, which reported
its findings to law enforcement
Ex-WVSAboss charged in felony
Fred DeSanto accused of using authority
employees to do work on his home
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
DURYEA — Matthew Echalk
was taking a walk in the field
behind his house when he heard
people shouting, telling him to
get out of the way.
Echalk, who has Down syn-
drome, had finished his shift at
Pittston Area High School cafete-
ria, was walking in a field behind
the Germania Volunteer Fire
Company on Foote Avenue when
he spotted the UH-60 Blackhawk
helicopter approaching to land.
At that point, Echalk ran as fast
as he could to escape the 95 to
120 mph winds generated by the
helicopter’s blades.
It was a simulated rescue train-
ing session, conducted by the
Pennsylvania Helicopter Aquatic
Rescue Team — PA HART —
WASHINGTON — A study of a
dozen of 2012’s wildest weather events
found that man-made global warming
increased the likelihood of about half
of them, including Superstorm Sandy’s
devastating surge and the blistering
U.S. summer heat.
The other half — including a record
wet British summer and the U.S.
drought last year — simply reflected the
random freakiness of weather, research-
ers with the U.S. National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration and the
British meteorological office concluded
in a report issued Thursday.
The scientists conducted thousands
of runs of different computer simula-
tions that looked at various factors,
such as moisture in the air, atmospheric
flow, and sea temperature and level.
The approach represents an evolution
in the field. Scientists used to say that
individual weather events — a specific
hurricane or flood, for example — can-
not be attributed to climate change. But
recently, researchers have used comput-
er simulations to look at extreme events
in a more nuanced way and measure
the influence of climate change on their
likelihood and magnitude.
WILKES-BARRE —
New security measures
are reportedly set to go
into place at the Sherman
Hills where two young
girls were shot in the latest
case of violent crime at the
apartment complex.
An e-mail outlining
some of the rules to go
into effect on Oct. 1 was
sent to The Times Leader
Wednesday, but they were
not able to be confirmed.
According to the e-mail,
among the steps to be
taken are: tenants must
provide a driver’s license
and paperwork to receive
a parking sticker; vehicles
must be registered to ten-
ants; visitors must receive
a pass issued by the office
in order to park in the
visitors’ lot; visitors must
present photo identifica-
tion to obtain a pass; busi-
nesses delivering grocer-
ies, food or prescriptions
must have two people in
the delivery vehicle so one
can stay in it to prevent it
from being towed.
Residents say they
received flyers on their
doors informing them
of their new rules, TV
reports state.
Park Management LLC
of Brooklyn, N.Y. the
owner of the property,
was unavailable for com-
ment until Monday in
observance of the Rosh
Hashana, the Jewish New
Year.
Wilkes-Barre spokes-
woman Liza Prokop said
the city was unable to
comment on the e-mail
and referred questions
to the management of
Sherman Hills.
Lisa Wolfe, a spokes-
woman for the U.S.
Department of Housing
and Urban Development
in Philadelphia, also said
the agency was unable to
confirm the contents of
the e-mail.
However, Wolfe said the
agency was in telephone
contact with manage-
ment Tuesday. HUD held
a separate phone meeting
with the city afterward,
she said.
The agency was aware
something would be done
after the Aug. 24 shooting
that injured the girls, ages
2 and 5. Police have been
called to the complex bor-
dered by North Sherman
and Coal streets numerous
Newrules put
in place at
Sherman Hills?
Reported measures
appear to be aimed
at limiting access
to the complex
JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
AP photo
Superstorm
Sandy left
destroyed and
damaged homes
in Ortley Beach,
N.J. in its wake.
Researchers with
the United States
and British
governments
concluded
Thursday that
climate change
had made events
of this type more
likely.
Extreme weather: Study says we are partly to blame
SETH BORENSTEIN
AP Science Writer
Aimee Dilger photos | The Times Leader
Firefighters and emergency personel watch a rescue drill performed by the PA-HART unit in the Susquehanna River off of Scovell Island. The Blackhawk helicopter and
special team came to the Germania Volunteer Fire Company drill with local water rescue teams.
Dropping in for a river rescue
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
A Dallas Middle School
student has been disci-
plined after black foot-
ball players from Meyers
High School in Wilkes-
Barre said they were
subjected to racial slurs
during a junior varsity
scrimmage in August,
Dallas Superintendent
Frank Galicki confirmed
Thursday.
Galicki, who said he
could not release the stu-
dent’s name, said Middle
School Principal Thomas
Duffy and Athletic
Director Nancy Roberts
met with the youth’s par-
ents and “appropriate
action has been taken.”
He did not elaborate.
For the parents of one
Meyers student — who
said he was the target of
abuse not only by one but
by two Dallas players —
the incident has left them
shaken.
“The game was going
well, then all of a sudden,
we saw a shift in the atti-
tude of the Meyers boys,”
said Ronald Shivers, who
asked that his 15-year-old
son’s name not be used in
this article. “They were
definitely subdued.”
Shivers said his son
and another student told
him and his wife Carissa
that two Dallas players
responded with racial
slurs and profanity fol-
lowing a tackle. In a brief
Slur results in discipline
for Dallas student
Superintendent:
‘Appropriate action’
taken afer bad
behavior at junior
varsity football game
ROGER DUPUIS
rdupuis@citivasmedia.com
Farmfun is
the life for me
(and you)
THE GUIDE
We’re headed
back to the moon
And you may be able to see the fight
NATION & WORLD, 5A
DeSanto
State’s helicopter rescue squad holds
training exercise on Susquehanna
See DESANTO | 12A
A mock victim is rescued and lifted into a helicopter during a river rescue drill in
the Susquehanna River on Thursday afternoon. See RESCUE | 12A
See RULES | 12A
See SLUR | 12A
See WEATHER | 12A
PAGE 2A Friday, September 6, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
DETAILS
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
Daily Number - 6-2-4
Big Four - 0-1-7-6
Quinto - 6-9-4-9-3
Treasure Hunt
20-23-26-27-28
EVENING DRAWING
Daily Number - 9-4-3
Big Four - 7-2-4-1
Quinto - 2-3-3-4-3
Cash 5
03-10-13-34-40
Match 6
02-04-10-21-26-49
No player matched
all fve numbers in
Thursday’s“Cash 5”
jackpot drawing. Today’s
jackpot will be worth
$500,000.
Lottery ofcials report-
ed 67 players matched
four numbers, winning
$327 each; 3,042 players
matched three numbers,
winning $12 each; and
38,971 players matched
two numbers, winning $1
each.
No player matched
all six numbers in
Thursday’s“Match
6”jackpot drawing.
Monday’s jackpot will be
worth $5,300,000.
Lottery ofcials report-
ed 40 players matched
fve numbers, winning
$1,000 each; 2,160
players matched four
numbers, winning $20
each; and 39,827 players
matched three numbers,
winning $2 each.
OBITUARIES
Condusta, Samuel
Holt, Sheila St.
James
Humenanski,
Leocadia
Kozemko, Dolores
Martin, Florence
Munley, James Jr.
Reakes, Bettie
Rhoads, Dorene
Zibuck, Arlene
Pages 8A
WHO TO CONTACT
Missed Paper .................... 829-5000
Obituaries ........................... 970-7224
Advertising .......................... 970-7101
Advertising Billing ............. 970-7328
Classifed Ads ..................... 970-7130
Newsroom........................... 970-7242
City Editor
Daniel Burnett ................................ 970-7180
Sports Editor
John Medeiros ............................... 970-7143
Features Editor
Sandra Snyder ................................. 970-7383
Photo Editor
Clark Van Orden ............................. 970-7175
E-MAIL ......... tlnews@timesleader.com
BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information to
help us correct an inaccuracy or
cover an issue more thoroughly,
call the newsroom at 829-7242.
THE TIMES LEADER ACIVITAS MEDIAcompany
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE —
Cellphone records from a
woman who allegedly planned to
meet William “Chilly” Uggiano
to smoke marijuana revealed
“numerous calls and texts” to
the cell number of Andre Fuller,
according to a search warrant
filed on Thursday.
Fuller, 22, of John Street,
Kingston, was charged last
week with shooting Uggiano
multiple times on South Grant
and Wayne streets on Aug. 3.
Uggiano, 19, survived gun-
shot wounds to his head, hand,
leg and buttocks. He remains
hospitalized at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center. He identified Fuller
as the alleged gunman from
a photo array, noting Fuller
“grinned” before firing multiple
rounds from a .45 caliber hand-
gun, police said.
After Fuller was arrested
on Aug. 24 and charged with
criminal attempt to commit
homicide, aggravated assault,
carrying an unlicensed firearm
and reckless endangerment, he
allegedly gave police his cell-
phone number.
Investigators believe Fuller
was in possession of his cell-
phone at the time of the shoot-
ing. Cellphone records of the
woman who planned to meet
Uggiano the night he was shot
revealed numerous calls and
texts to Fuller’s cellphone, the
affidavit states.
The search warrant seeks
incoming and outgoing phone
calls, including texts and
emails.
Fuller’s preliminary hear-
ing that was scheduled for
Thursday was continued
until Sept. 27. He remains
jailed at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for lack of
$250,000 bail.
According to the criminal
complaint:
Uggiano said a female friend,
who is not named, called him to
make arrangements to smoke
marijuana on Aug. 3. Uggiano
felt this was “odd” because he
had been asking the girl to meet
him on numerous occasions but
she would always say no.
As Uggiano approached the
area of South Grant and Wayne
streets where he was supposed
to meet the girl, he observed
another man identified as Fuller
approach him with a gun, the
complaint states. Uggiano told
police Fuller “only grinned” at
him and began to shoot him
multiple times, according to the
complaint.
Search warrant fled in attempted homicide case
Police pursue cellphone records of Andre Fuller, who is charged in Aug. 3 shooting in Wilkes-Barre
Dorrance Township approves subdivision
DORRANCE TWP. —
A subdivision involving
94 acres off Hollow Road
received the approval of the
township supervisors on
Wednesday night.
The plot is known as
the Robert and Melanie
Davis Minor subdivision,
and according to township
officials the parcel will be
divided into three tracts.
Six requests for zoning code
waivers also were accepted
by both the supervisors and
the township’s planning
commission. The waivers
involve wetlands, contour
intervals, stormwater con-
trol, utility services, scale
requirements and soil test-
ing for lot three.
The supervisors and plan-
ning board, however, stipu-
lated that approval from
the state Department of
Environmental Protection is
required for a sewage plan-
ning module.
In a lingering issue involv-
ing Keith Hazlak of Stairville
Road and the Mountain
Express Trucking Co.,
Hazlak was told by solicitor
William Karpowich that the
officials of the trucking firm
have yet to file an appeal of
alleged code violations that
include the lack of a zoning
permit, lack of an occupancy
permit and failure to submit
a land development plan.
The firmhas until Sept. 14
to register an official appeal,
Karpowich said. Otherwise,
he said, an enforcement
action against the company
can be filed before a district
judge.
Hazlak has made three
appearances at the supervi-
sors’ meetings in order to
present issues related to
what has been described
as excessive noise, traffic,
harassment and alleged zon-
ing violations.
In other matters:
• DEEB Enterprises of
Hazleton, owned by Dr.
Bassar Bittar, has offered to
sell to the township a tract
of land off St. Mary’s Road
for $1, Karpowich said. The
land was purchased at a
Luzerne County tax sale for
$500, he said.
• The supervisors
approved the September
financial report, which
includes a $16,000 dona-
tion to the township’s vol-
unteer fire department, a
$9,125 payment to Yenason
Mechanical for furnace
installation work and a
$4,931 payment to Pennsy
Supply for anti-skid mate-
rial.
• An executive session
was conducted prior to
the regular meeting to dis-
cuss pending litigation,
Karpowich said.
The next public meeting
has been scheduled for 7
p.m. Oct. 7.
Project involves nearly 100
acres of Hollow Road,
supervisors say
TOM HUNTINGTON
Times Leader Correspondent
Trustees authorize new employees, discuss charter renewal at Thursday’s session
For the first time in many meet-
ings, plans for the new Bear Creek
Community Charter School were on
the back burner at the meeting of the
school’s board of trustees.
With the school year in its third
week, the board heard updates on
several programs, discussed reautho-
rization of the charter and addressed
a number of personnel issues before a
brief discussion about the new school.
School CEO Jim Smith noted that the
building design plan is mostly refined
and they are now awaiting a second
cost estimate for construction.
In the meantime, Smith said, he
is working on budgets for furniture,
technology and other related items
for the new school. Plans are still on
course for construction bids to go out
in January and a groundbreaking in
March, Smith said.
But the majority of the meeting
involved academic and operational
updates for the existing school. The
board heard about benchmark testing
being done using a system based on
the new Common Core test standards.
Administrator Brian Dugas reported
that staff and students are comment-
ing on how different the questions are
from what they have been accustomed.
The board also discussed ways
to enhance the science curriculum,
including incorporating science into
the writing class curriculum and
the enrichment program. Smith also
reported that he is beginning the reau-
thorization process for the school’s
charter, which expires in August 2014.
In personnel matters, the board:
• Accepted the resignation of a kin-
dergarten aide.
• Ratifed the hiring of Kelly Burtch
as a part-time kindergarten aide.
• Ratifed a reduction in force mov-
ing Kimberly Charney from full-time
special education paraprofessional to
part time, 25 hours per week while
school is in session.
• Ratifed the hiring of Cherly
Cardillo as a part-time special educa-
tion paraprofessional for 20 hours per
week at $12.50 per hour.
• Ratifed the hiring of Marlene
Stempien as part-time cafeteria aide at
$8.50 per hour for 25 hours per week.
• Ratifed the appointment of Bryan
Benkoski as head soccer coach at a sti-
pend of $1,500 and Stephen Forney as
assistant soccer coach at a stipend of
$1,000 for the fall season.
• Approved the hiring of Leah
Zelinka as a long-term substitute
through Nov. 7 at a rate of $153.85 per
day.
• Approved the addition of Karen
Laskowski, Matthew Ide, Michael
Gross, Christian Wilson, Amanda
Belfore, Carolyn Kaminski and Emily
Esenberg to the substitute list at a rate
of $100 per day.
Charter school tackles personnel matters
JANINE UNGVARSKY
Times Leader Correspondent
Jewelry store
robber found
guilty by court
STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
SCRANTON—ANewYork man who robbed
a Wilkes-Barre jewelry store in 2008 was sen-
tenced Wednesday to more than a decade in
prison, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced on
Thursday.
Senior U.S. District Court Judge James M.
Munley sentenced Huby Ramkissoon, 38, of
New York City, to 11 years in prison for the May
14, 2008, robbery of Dunay Jewelers on Hazle
Street.
Munley also ordered that Ramkissoon be
placed on supervised release for three years fol-
lowing his release from prison and that he pay
$89,285 in restitution, representing the value
of money and jewelry stolen during the Dunay
Jewelers robbery.
Ramkissoon’s sentence is the result of an
investigation into a 2008 scheme to rob multiple
Luzerne County jewelry stores, according to
U.S. Attorney Peter J. Smith. To date, four other
individuals have been charged in connection
with that scheme in either federal or state court.
Devon Nash and Jerry Smith were charged
and convicted in federal court in connection with
the May 5, 2008, robbery of the Steve Hydock
Diamonds in Kingston. Smith and Jason Soto
were charged and convicted in connection with
the May 14, 2008, robbery of Dunay Jewelers.
Smith was convicted in federal court, and Soto
was convicted in state court.
Kirk Robinson is awaiting trial on charges of
conspiracy to use firearms in connection with
both robberies.
Prosecutors had alleged that Nash and
Smith both pointed guns at Steve and Barbara
Hydock during the Kingston robbery while
Ramkissoon waited outside. They also alleged
that Ramkissoon and Smith held Dunay Jewelers
operators David and Nancy Pavlick and Deana
Morgan at gunpoint and restrained them with
flex ties before fleeing the store.
Ramkissoon was originally charged with the
robbery in 2008 by Wilkes-Barre police. At the
time the complaint was filed, Ramkissoon was
a fugitive. A federal grand jury in Scranton
returned an indictment against Ramkissoon on
Oct. 16, 2012, charging him with the robbery
scheme. The Federal Bureau of Investigation
located and arrested Ramkissoon in New York
City on Dec. 18.
On May 30, Ramkissoon pleaded guilty to two
counts associated with the Dunay Jewelers rob-
bery: interference with commerce by robbery,
and using and brandishing a firearm in further-
ance of the robbery.
Thecasewas investigatedbytheFBI, Kingston
police and Wilkes-Barre police. Assistant U.S.
Attorney John C. Gurganus prosecuted the case.
Huby Ramkissoon, 38,
sentenced to 11 years for
his role in incident at Dunay
Jewelers, Wilkes-Barre
JIMMcCABE
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DENISE SELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Ofcer
(570) 970-7203
dsellers@civitasmedia.com
Newsroom
829-7242
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Circulation
Jim McCabe – 829-5000
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Issue No. 2013-170
2013-249
Wilkes-Barre Publishing, LLC
Uggiano Fuller
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
Dana Jolley, left, reacts as her friend Kaitlin Kean tries to overcome her fear of heights as the Dallas residents ride the Ferris wheel
Thursday evening at the Luzerne County Fair in Lehman Township. The 51st annual edition of the fair continues through Sunday.
County fair ofers thrills …and chills
DALLAS — The Committee to Elect Eugene
Kelleher, a candidate for Luzerne County Council,
will hold a campaign kick-off and breakfast fund-
raiser at 9 a.m. Sept. 7 at the IremCountry Club.
Tickets are $25 per person. Contact Phil Brown
at 696-3385.
PLAINS TWP. — The campaign commit-
tee for Luzerne County Council candidate
Paul DeFabo is holding a meet-the-candidate
brunch from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday at Isabella
Restaurant and Bar.
Tickets are $40 per person and available by con-
tacting committee director Joe Zak at 262-1030.
PLAINS TWP. — Luzerne County Council
candidate Eileen Sorokas will hold a fall campaign
kick-off and rally from 5 to 7 p.m. Sept. 13 at the
Polish American Club, 97 Martin St. The rally is
free, and food and refreshments will be served.
POLITICAL BRIEFS
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 3A
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE – William
Gronosky said Thursday he’s
not guilty of robbing a Plymouth
Township strip club and getting
away with $3,500.
A Luzerne County jury said
otherwise.
After deliberating for about
25 minutes Thursday morning,
a jury convicted Gronosky, 30,
of all six charges stemming from
the Carousel Lounge robbery in
March 2012.
Gronosky faces a maximum
of 20 years in prison on two of
the charges, including robbery,
and up to seven years on the
remaining charges when he is
sentenced on Nov. 6.
Assistant District Attorney
Frank McCabe made a request
to revoke Gronosky’s $1.4 mil-
lion bail based on the conviction
and that Gronosky is a threat to
society.
County Judge Michael Vough
granted that request and said
Gronosky is again slated to
stand trial in his courtroom on
Monday.
McCabe said those charges
relate to a burglary of a Laflin
home eight days after the strip
club robbery.
“I’m not guilty,” Gronosky
said Thursday while leaving the
courthouse after the verdict.
Gronosky testifiedWednesday
that the woman who claims she
was driving the getaway car after
the robbery is lying.
Gronosky said Courtney
Sadusky, 24, fabricated the
story about the robbery because
Gronosky did not want to be her
boyfriend.
Sadusky framed him, he said,
and stole the BBguns and a pair
of gloves from his home to do
so.
He admitted he was at the
Carousel Lounge the day of the
robbery, but not until much later
in the day when he went there
to purchase drugs.
He said he visited the strip
club three to four times a week
and even played pool with
owner Julius Greenberg.
Sadusky, a prosecution wit-
ness, told a different story earli-
er Wednesday, saying she drove
Gronosky and Kevin Williams
to the Carousel Lounge around
9 a.m. on March 15, 2012.
Gronosky and Williams had ski
masks on, Sadusky testified,
and she said they wore gloves
and were armed with guns.
About 15 minutes later,
Gronosky allegedly told
Sadusky they pushed the owner
of the strip club to the floor and
took about $3,500.
Sadusky pleaded guilty
Wednesday morning to a crimi-
nal conspiracy charge relating
to the robbery before also tes-
tifying in an unrelated criminal
conspiracy charge in the Laflin
home burglary she participated
in with Gronosky.
In that case, police say
Sadusky helped Gronosky take
several items from the home of
a Pennsylvania state trooper,
whom Sadusky had dated for
some time.
Police said guns, electronics,
jewelry and loose change were
taken from the residence.
Judge Michael Vough said
Sadusky will be sentenced on
Nov. 7.
Williams was convicted in
related charges in May and sen-
tenced in July to 10 to 20 years
in prison.
BERWICK
Are you winner
of $1 million?
Before the Powerball jackpot rolled to
$203 million for this Saturday’s draw-
ing, two Pennsylvania Lottery Powerball
tickets worth $1 million each from
Wednesday’s drawing were sold. One of
them was purchased at the Fresh N Quik,
906 Market St., Berwick. The other
ticket was sold in Braddock, Allegheny
County.
The two tickets correctly matched all
five white balls, 02-09-26-45-47, but not
the red Powerball 11, to win individual
prizes of $1 million, less 25 percent fed-
eral withholding. The retailers will each
receive a $5,000 bonus for selling a win-
ning ticket.
The lottery encourages winning ticket
holders to sign the back of the ticket,
call the Lottery at 717-702-8146 and
file a claim at Lottery headquarters in
Middletown or at any of lottery’s seven
area offices, including the one in Wilkes-
Barre.
SCRANTON
Ex-bank employee
accepts plea deal
A Kingston woman who formerly
worked at M&T Bank in the government
loan department has agreed to plead
guilty to embezzling nearly $63,000 from
April 2011 to April 2012, according to
prosecutors.
Patricia Tokash, 42, was employed
at the M&T Bank branch on South
Franklin Street, Wilkes-Barre, and was
responsible for administering and pro-
cessing applications for loans to counties
and municipalities, court records state.
She allegedly stole bank funds from fees
paid in connection with loan applications
and from accounts at M&T Bank and
converted the funds for personal use.
A U.S. District Court judge must
accept Tokash’s guilty plea before she
is scheduled to be sentenced. She could
face up to 30 years in prison, according
to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.
WEST PITTSTON
Family programs
ofered at WVW
The Penn State Extension, in connec-
tion with Prosper Partnerships, is hold-
ing two free parent/child programs this
fall for students in the Wyoming Valley
West School District.
Lifestyle Triple P, centered around
maintaining a healthy lifestyle, will be
held Tuesdays and Wednesdays from
Sept. 24 through Dec. 11 and is open
to children in first through fifth grades.
To register, contact Melissa Tomascik
via mail c/o Penn State Extension, 16
Luzerne Ave., Suite 200, West Pittston,
PA 18643; call 570-825-1701; or email
luzerneext@psu.edu.
The Strengthening Families Program
is for parents and children in fifth or
sixth grade and runs on Tuesdays and
Wednesdays from Oct. 1 through Nov.
13. It includes a free dinner and free
child care for younger family members.
To register, call Debbie Kester at 570-
287-2131 or email dkester@wvwsd.org.
Or contact Tomascik.
SCRANTON
Mass to focus on
immigration
Diocese of Scranton Bishop Joseph
C. Bambera will celebrate a Mass for
the well being and ethical treatment of
immigrants at 11:30 a.m. Sunday at St.
John Neumann Parish at the Nativity
of Our Lord Church, 633 Orchard St.,
Scranton. Catholic Television will tape
the Mass and broadcast it at 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, 8 p.m. Monday and 10 a.m.
Tuesday.
The bishop encourages parish com-
munities, particularly those with signifi-
cant immigrant populations, to join him
in praying for the enactment of compre-
hensive immigration
reform legislation.
He has issued a
pastoral letter on
immigration reform.
The diocese also has
provided parishes with
materials to help pro-
mote such legislation,
including background
on the church’s teaching on immigra-
tion, liturgy and prayer resources, bulle-
tin inserts that highlight the issues, and
means through which legislative action
may be taken.
In addition, the Bishops of
Pennsylvania have issued a statement
titled “A Call for Fair and Realistic
Immigration Reform.”
All of the resources are available on
a “Justice for Immigrants” page of the
diocesan website at www.dioceseofs-
cranton.org.
Sheena Delazio | The Times Leader
William Gronosky leaves the Luzerne County Courthouse Thursday after
being convicted of robbing a Plymouth Township strip club.
Gronosky guilty in strip club robbery
Nuclear
plant faces
further
inspection
ROGER DUPUIS
rdupuis@civitasmedia.com
SALEM TWP. — Unit 2 at
PPL’s Susquehanna nuclear power
plant will be subject to a supple-
mental inspection by the Nuclear
Regulatory Commission later this
month as the facility remains under
enhanced NRC oversight in the
wake of two unplanned shutdowns
in late 2012.
Additional scrutiny will continue
“until the NRC is satisfied the rel-
evant issues have been properly
evaluated and satisfactory correc-
tive actions have been developed
and implemented,” NRCspokesman
Neil Sheehan said in a statement
released Thursday.
During a Dec. 19 shutdown, the
reactor was operating at 18 percent
power as it was returning to ser-
vice from an automatic shutdown
on Dec. 16. The NRC reported that
all feed-water flow was temporarily
lost when a valve failed to open as
expected during plant startup.
On Nov. 9, Unit 2 operators manu-
ally shut down the reactor due to a
failure of the integrated control sys-
tem, which controls the reactor feed
and reactor recirculation systems,
according to the NRC.
“There were no health and safety
consequences for the public or plant
employees as a result,” Sheehan said
in an email to The Times Leader.
“The reactor was safely shut down
in both cases and safety systems per-
formed as designed.”
On Aug. 13, the NRC completed
its midyear assessment for the
plant, finding that Unit 1 met all
health and safety requirements and
remained subject to the normal level
of oversight. The issues at Unit 2
are described by the NRC as being
of “low to moderate safety signifi-
cance.”
Sheehan has said corrective
actions can take a number of forms,
including changes to operator train-
ing, revisions to plant procedures
and equipment repairs or modifi-
cations. In January, NRC Region
I Administrator Bill Dean said the
shutdowns “raise questions regard-
ing operator performance, equip-
ment reliability and, in the most
recent event, decision-making.”
PPL spokesman Joe Scopelliti
said Thursday the utility company
has been working with the NRC to
implement required changes, which
he said are primarily related to poli-
cies and procedures, as opposed to
mechanical issues. The upcoming
inspection will assess the changes
that have been made, and what fur-
ther action, if any, needs to be taken,
Scopelliti explained.
“Some of them are in progress,
some of them have been complet-
ed,” Scopelliti said.
The plant generates enough elec-
tricity to power between 1 million
and 2 million homes.
Centre County senior judge
to hear arguments on Oct. 21
regarding collectors’ status
-
SHEENA DELAZIO
sdelazio@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE — Attorneys
involved in a lawsuit filed by the
Luzerne County Tax Collectors
Association against the county alleg-
ing that an ordinance eliminating
their positions is illegal agreed to a
number of facts Thursday, but a rul-
ing likely will not come for several
more weeks.
Attorney Michael Savona, who
represents the association and the
county’s 69 tax collectors, said after
a meeting with Centre
County Senior Judge
David Grine and attor-
ney Matthew Carmody,
who represents the
county, several facts of
the case were agreed to
Thursday.
Several county tax col-
lectors, elected county
council members and
those seeking office for
county council and coun-
ty controller appeared in
court.
Savona emerged from
the judge’s chambers
after a meeting, notifying everyone
present that stipulations were made
to facts that are not disputed and the
judge said additional court papers
outlining the attorneys’ arguments
should be filed by Oct. 7.
Grine, appointed by the
Administrative Office of Pennsylvania
Courts to oversee the case after
county judges recused themselves,
then scheduled a hearing for attor-
neys to make those arguments on
Oct. 21. The judge will then make a
ruling.
Savona said testimony is not need-
ed in the case because it
surrounds matters of what
is legal and not legal, a
decision that needs to be
made by a judge.
In the suit, the tax
collectors association
contends an ordinance
by the county abolish-
ing their positions is
invalid because it vio-
lates the state’s Local Tax
Collection Law, which the
suit calls a “statute of uni-
form, statewide applica-
bility.”
The ordinance is not
authorized by the county’s Home
Rule Charter and violates the charter
in that it attempts to exercise pow-
ers not granted to the county under
state law, the suit says.
The associations asks for an injunc-
tion to suspend the ordinance until
the lawsuit is sorted out.
All 69 tax collectors are on this
year’s election ballot.
In recent weeks, the county
announced proposed plans for the
collection of county taxes by the
Luzerne County Treasurer’s Office.
A council majority supported the
switch to in-house collection, argu-
ing the county will save an estimated
$300,000 and have greater control
over receipts by ending reliance on
the elected collectors. The tax col-
lectors have taken issue with the
council’s decision.
In the proposed plans, the treasur-
er’s office is developing a system to
allow property owners to pay taxes
online with a credit card, debit card
or electronic check and will provide
evening hours at least one day per
week during the rebate and face peri-
ods and at the end of December.
The office will accept payment
at the Luzerne County Courthouse
office, as well as at senior centers
outside the Wilkes-Barre area and a
satellite office in Hazleton.
The office will also have Saturday
hours in Wilkes-Barre, as well as a
drop box, according to the plan.
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
Emma Broda, 9, expresses her affinity for her teachers while walking Thursday afternoon near picketing Wyoming Area School District
employees outside of the Montgomery Avenue school. The teachers were on strike for a third consecutive day.
These lessons learned on the street
Ruling on tax collectors weeks away
IN BRIEF
K
LOCAL
Bambera
In the suit, the tax collectors association contends an ordinance
by the county abolishing their positions is invalid because it vio-
lates the state’s Local Tax Collection Law, which the suit calls a
“statute of uniform, statewide applicability. The ordinance is not
authorized by the county’s Home Rule Charter and violates the
charter in that it attempts to exercise powers not granted to the
county under state law, the suit says.
PAGE 4A Friday, September 6, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER NATION & WORLD Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 5A
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia
— President Barack Obama
pressed fellow world leaders
on Thursday to support a U.S.-
led strike on Syria, but he ran
into opposition from Russia,
China and even the European
Union — which condemned
the deadly recent chemical
weapons attack in Bashar
Assad’s country but declared
it too soon for military action.
“The use of chemical
weapons in Syria is not only
a tragedy but also a viola-
tion of international law that
must be addressed,” Obama
insisted during a meeting
with Japanese Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe on the sidelines
of the Group of 20 economic
summit, where he mostly
made his case behind the
scenes.
China’s G-20 delegation
spokesman, Qin Gang, was
among those who countered,
saying: “War isn’t the funda-
mental way to solve problems
in Syria.”
Obama’s public and private
diplomatic wrangling partly
was intended to ratchet up
pressure on lawmakers back
in Washington as they debate
authorizing military action.
The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee passed a use-of-
force resolution this week, but
the measure’s prospects in the
full Senate and the House of
Representatives are uncertain.
The prospect of military
action against Syria overshad-
owed the global growth agen-
da at the two-day G-20 sum-
mit, which opened Thursday
in this historic Russian city
on the Baltic Sea. Leaders
did, however, discuss the cri-
sis during a dinner hosted by
Russian President Vladimir
Putin, one of the Syrian gov-
ernment’s strongest support-
ers.
White House advisers said
Obama was seeking “political
and diplomatic” support from
his international counterparts,
not necessarily military coop-
eration. And Ben Rhodes,
Obama’s deputy national secu-
rity adviser, said the type of
action the U.S. is contemplat-
ing “does not come with sig-
nificant requirements of inter-
national participation.”
While Obama has long
called for the ouster of Assad,
a deadly chemical weapons
attack near Damascus two
weeks ago pushed the U.S. to
the brink of military action for
the first time during Syria’s
civil war. The U.S. position on
Syria has increased tensions
with Putin, one of Assad’s
most important economic and
military backers. Putin has
blocked efforts at the United
Nations to take action and
has questioned intelligence
reports American officials
say link the chemical weapon
deployment to the Syrian
leader.
British Prime Minister
David Cameron said Thursday
that the United Kingdom had
fresh evidence that was being
examined at British laborato-
ries.
SACRAMENTO, CAlif.
USFS: Hunter
caused Yosemite fre
A gigantic wildfire in and around
Yosemite National Park was caused by
an illegal fire set by a hunter, the U.S.
Forest Service said Thursday.
The agency said there is no indica-
tion the hunter was involved with ille-
gal marijuana cultivation, which a local
fire chief had speculated as the possible
cause of the blaze.
No arrests have been made, and the
hunter’s name was being withheld pend-
ing further investigation, according to
the Forest Service. The only legal hunt-
ing allowed at the time the fire started
Aug. 17 was archery for bear and deer.
HARTfORD, CONN.
Sandy Hook
memorial in works
Newtown is taking its first steps
toward deciding howto memorialize the
victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary
School massacre, setting up a commis-
sion to help guide a process that the
town’s leader says will likely take years.
Ideas for a permanent memorial have
been coming in since shortly after the
Dec. 14 shootings, in which a gunman
killed 20 children and six women. First
Selectwoman Pat Llodra said Thursday
the suggestions have included groves,
parks and a carousel or playground that
would honor the memories of the chil-
dren.
“They’re very interesting, compelling,
sensitive and beautiful suggestions,”
Llodra said.
MANCHESTER, N.H.
Patients informed
of infection risk
Eight patients who may have been
exposed to an always-fatal brain disease
at New Hampshire’s Catholic Medical
Center are getting personal attention
from the hospital’s president, who says
they aren’t panicking over what they’ve
been told.
Dr. Joseph Pepe called the patients
Thursday, a day after health officials
announced that they may have been
exposed to Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.
Officials believe it caused the death of
a patient who had brain surgery in May
and say there’s a remote chance it was
transmitted to others who had surgery
later because it can survive standard
sterilization practices.
HARRiSBURG
Gov. Corbett hires
big gun for lawsuit
Republican Gov. Tom Corbett’s office
announced Thursday it has hired a well-
known lawyer from outside the govern-
ment to lead his defense of the state’s
same-sex marriage ban in a federal law-
suit.
The Office of General Counsel said
West Chester lawyer Bill Lamb, a former
state Supreme Court justice, was hired to
be lead counsel at a rate of $400 an hour.
His associates will be paid $325 an hour.
The federal case, filed two months ago,
seeks to overturn the state’s 1996 ban on
gay marriage. It was brought by a group
that includes the widow of a woman who
died in May after they were legally mar-
ried in Massachusetts, 10 couples and
one of the couples’ two teenage daugh-
ters.
The defendants are Corbett,
Democratic Attorney General Kathleen
Kane, the state health secretary and
two county officials involved with the
issuance of marriage licenses. A legal
response by the state is due Sept. 16.
AP photo
President Barack Obama walks away after shaking hands with Russia’s
President Vladimir Putin during arrivals Thursday for the G-20 summit at
the Konstantin Palace in St. Petersburg, Russia.
AP photo
“Mayor” contemplating new dog laws?
Stubbs the cat, the honorary mayor of
Talkeetna, Alaska, is sedated and under
veterinary care after he was badly injured
in a vicious dog attack Saturday. The quirky
community of 900 elected himin a write-in
campaign 15 years ago. The attack by the
loose dog left Stubbs with a punctured lung,
bruised hips, a long deep gash on his side
and a sternumfractured to the point it might
need to be repaired with a plate.
Obama’s Syria plan tough sell at G-20
President seeks
support for attack,
but Russia, China
and European Union
cool to the idea
By JULIE PACE
APWhite House Correspondent
Castro’s
suicide
triggers
review
COLUMBUS, Ohio —The fam-
ily of Cleveland kidnapper Ariel
Castro planned to claim his body
Thursday as investigations sought
to determine how a man who was
perhaps Ohio’s most notorious
prisoner managed to hang himself
with a bedsheet while in protec-
tive custody.
Castro was a month into his life
sentence for holding three women
captive in his home for a decade
when he committed suicide
Tuesday night.
Ohio prisons spokeswoman
JoEllen Smith said two reviews
ordered Wednesday by Ohio
Department of Rehabilitation and
Correction Director Gary Mohr
were underway. One inquiry will
look into the suicide itself, and
the other is examining whether
Castro received proper medical
and mental health care leading up
the suicide.
Castro, 53, had been taken off
suicide watch while in county jail
and was in protective custody
in prison, which involves checks
every 30 minutes.
He had been sentenced Aug. 1
to life in prison plus 1,000 years
after pleadingguilty to937counts,
including kidnapping and rape, in
a deal to avoid the death penalty.
“I’m not a monster. I’m sick,” he
told the judge at sentencing.
Castro’s captives — Amanda
Berry, Gina DeJesus and Michelle
Knight — disappeared separately
between 2002 and 2004, when
they were 14, 16 and 20. They
were rescued from Castro’s run-
down house May 6 when Berry
broke through a screen door.
Elation over the women’s res-
cue turned to shock as details
emerged about their captivity.
Castro fathered a child with Berry
while she was being held. The girl
was 6 when she was freed.
Investigators said the women
were bound, repeatedly raped and
deprived of food and bathroom
facilities.
Berry’s cousin Tina Miller said
Thursday the suicide showed
Castro was not as strong as the
three women he kidnapped, raped
and imprisoned. “Killing yourself,
that’s not strength. Surviving it
is strength, and that’s what them
girls did — they survived it for
11, 10 and 9 years,” said Miller, of
Lorain in northeast Ohio.
Tito DeJesus, who knew Castro
for two decades and often played
in bands with him, said he wasn’t
shocked by the suicide, especially
given Castro’s reference to taking
his life in a 2004 note police found
when they searched the house.
“It was either he killed himself
or somebody was going to do it,”
DeJesus, 39, of Cleveland, said
Thursday. “He wasn’t going to last
long in prison.”
Authorities to investigate
convicted kidnapper’s mental
health care during incarceration
JULIE CARR SMYTH
Associated Press
The local proposal roiled conservatives nationwide, including U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz
SAN ANTONIO — Anti-bias protec-
tions for gay and transgender citizens in
San Antonio passed Thursday over the
disapproval of top Republicans in Texas
and religious conservatives who packed
the City Council chamber and some-
times shamed supporters for comparing
the issue to the civil rights movement.
Steering the City Council to an 8-3
vote was Democratic Mayor Julian
Castro, a top surrogate of President
Barack Obama. Castro has called the
ordinance overdue in the nation’s sev-
enth-largest city, where there is a stron-
ger current of traditionalism and con-
servatism than other major Texas cities
that already have similar gay rights pro-
tections.
Nearly 180 U.S. cities have nondis-
crimination ordinances that prohibit
bias based on sexual orientation or gen-
der identity, according to the Human
Rights Campaign.
Supporters in red shirts and oppo-
nents in blue sat on opposite sides and
packed the ornate council chamber.
Church leaders vowed petitions to recall
council members, and the shouts of pro-
testers outside City Hall often carried
through the stone walls of the century-
old building.
The local proposal roiled conserva-
tives nationwide and was opposed by
big-name Republicans, including U.S.
Sen. Ted Cruz and Texas Attorney
General Greg Abbott. Abbott, who is
running for governor, predicted a law-
suit over religious freedoms but has not
said the state will challenge the ordi-
nance.
San Antonio City Attorney Michael
Bernard told the council the ordinance
would apply to most city contracts and
contractors. It prohibits council mem-
bers from discriminating in their official
capacity and forbids workers in public
accommodation jobs, such as at restau-
rants or hotels, from refusing to serve
customers because of their sexual orien-
tation or gender identity.
Opponents say the ordinance would
stifle religious expression and does not
have the support of most city residents.
The measure passed by the council
amends protections already in place for
discrimination based on race or gender.
Dallas, Houston, Austin, Fort Worth
and El Paso are among the Texas cities
that already have expanded anti-bias
ordinances.
AP photo
Opponents and supporters of an ordinance prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity gather Thursday outside
the city council chambers in San Antonio.
Anti-bias lawadopted in SanAntonio
PAUL J. WEBER
Associated Press
NASAtaking another small step to the moon
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.
— NASA is headed back to
the moon, this time to explore
its thin atmosphere and rough
dust.
The robotic spacecraft
LADEE, will fly to the moon
by way of Virginia’s Eastern
Shore.
Liftoff is set for late tonight
from NASA’s Wallops Flight
Facility.
Weather permitting, the
soaring Minotaur rocket
should be visible along much
of the East Coast — as far
south as South Carolina, as far
north as Maine and as far west
as Pittsburgh.
LADEE — short for
Lunar Atmosphere and Dust
Environment Explorer —
will be the first spacecraft to
be launched into outer space
from Wallops. And it will be
the first moonshot ever from
Virginia in 54 years of lunar
missions.
The unmanned Minotaur
rocket consists of converted
intercontinental ballistic mis-
sile motors. A peace treaty
between the United States and
Russia specifies the acceptable
launch sites for those missile
parts; Wallops is on that short
list.
All but one of NASA’s
approximately 40 moon mis-
sions — most memorably the
manned Apollo flights of the
late 1960s and early 1970s
— originated from Cape
Canaveral. The most recent
were the twin Grail spacecraft
launched two years ago this
weekend. The lone exception,
Clementine, a military-NASA
venture, rocketed away from
Southern California in 1994.
Scientists involved in the
$280 million, moon-orbiting
mission want to examine the
lunar atmosphere —yes, that’s
right, the moon’s atmosphere.
“Sometimes, people are a lit-
tle taken aback when we start
talking about the lunar atmo-
sphere because, right, we were
told in school that the moon
doesn’t have an atmosphere,”
said Sarah Noble, NASA pro-
gram scientist. “It does. It’s
just really, really thin.”
The atmosphere is so thin
and delicate, in fact, that
spacecraft landings can dis-
turb it. So now is the time to
go, Noble said, before other
countries and even private
companies start bombarding
the moon and fouling up the
atmosphere.
MARCIA DUNN
APAerospace Writer
AP photo
The Minotaur V rocket carrying
the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust
Environment Explorer sits on the
launch pad Thursday at NASA’s
Wallops Island test flight facility
in Virginia.
IN BRIEF
Tonight’s launch from Virginia
should be visible along East Coast
PAGE 6A Friday, September 6, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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WILKES-BARRE —
A Kingston man who
authorities allege used
a 4-year-old boy to gain
the trust of two women
he sexually assaulted
might face more
charges.
Athird woman
came forward
with allega-
tions she was
assaulted by
William Esser,
prosecutors said
on Thursday.
I nves t i gat ors
questioned the
woman and might file
additional charges at a
later date. It remained
unknown Thursday if
Esser had the boy with
him during this alleged
incident.
Authorities in Wilkes-
Barre and Hanover
Township allege Esser,
27, was caring for the
boy when he raped a
woman on the top floor
of the James F. Coughlin
Intermodal Parking
Garage on South
Washington Street on
June 24, and had the boy
in a rear car seat when
he drove another woman
to a secluded area on
Great Valley Boulevard
and forced her to per-
form a lewd sex act on
July 1, according to
arrest records.
E s s e r
appeared in
ma g i s t e r i a l
district court
Thursday and
waived his right
to a prelimi-
nary hearing,
sending felony
charges of rape
and sexual
assault filed by
city police to Luzerne
County Court. He pre-
viously waived a single
felony count of sexual
assault filed by township
police to county court.
Esser’s attorney,
county Public Defender
Mark Singer, told him
that something might be
filed “down the road and
we’ll deal with it then.”
Esser remains jailed
at the county correc-
tional facility for lack of
$70,000 bail.
Rape suspect
could face
more charges
Esser
HAZLETON — City
police reported the follow-
ing:
• Property was sto-
len during a burglary at
a house on East Green
Street Monday.
• A white mailbox was
stolen from a residence in
the 300 block of Cranberry
Road Sunday or Monday.
• Anthony Vetter III,
28, of West Hazleton, was
cited with criminal mis-
chief after police investi-
gated a report of a man
breaking a window in the
800 block of West 15th
Street early Sunday morn-
ing.
• A man reported on
Tuesday that someone
punctured the gas tank
and cut the brake line to
one of his business’s vehi-
cles while it was parked
in the 700 block of South
Poplar Street between 1:30
p.m. Monday and 7 a.m.
Tuesday.
• Elvis Rodriguez-
Sanchez reported on
Tuesday his 2007 Ford
Escape was struck by
another vehicle while it
was parked in the 100
block of West Broad Street.
• Newall Paulino-Feliz,
18, of Hazleton, reported
on Tuesday someone stole
money, a pair of Air Jordan
shoes, an iPhone 3 cell
phone and an iPhone 4 cell
phone case from a home
in the 300 block of East
Broad Street.
• Jose Gonzalez, 30, of
Bronx, N.Y., and Antonio
Torres-Torres, 21, of
Hanover Township, were
arrested and charged with
carrying a firearm with-
out a license, loitering
and prowling at nighttime
after an incident in the
400 block of West Chapel
Street at about 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday.
• Someone stole a
silver necklace from a
home in the 800 block of
Carson Street sometime
between 12:30 and 9 a.m.
Wednesday.
• Someone stole several
items from a home in the
500 block of East Diamond
Avenue sometime between
6 p.m. Tuesday and 7 a.m.
Wednesday.
• Stacy DeBalso, of
Hazle Township, reported
just before 5 p.m. Tuesday
a vehicle struck her 2001
Saturn while it was parked
near 100 E. Diamond Ave.
• Someone scratched,
spray painted, broke two
windows and cut the inte-
rior seats of a 2002 GMC
Envoy while it was parked
overnight Tuesday into
Wednesday in the rear of
the 700 block of McNair
Street.
Anyone with informa-
tion about any of these
incidents should contact
city police via dialing 911.
Police said all information
received will be kept confi-
dential.
• Jonathan Ruiz, 23,
was cited with disorder-
ly conduct after police
responded to a noise com-
plaint at 636 Carson St. at
about 7:40 p.m. Tuesday,
police said.
• Carlos Martinez-
Rodriguez, of East
Hemlock Street, Hazleton,
was cited with public
drunkenness after police
received a report of an
intoxicated male in the
area of East Diamond
Avenue and Hayes streets
at about 7 p.m. Tuesday,
police said.
• Jeremy Rivera, 24, of
Hazleton, was cited with
harassment after an inci-
dent in the 300 block of
East Mine Street at about
5:20 a.m. Wednesday,
police said.
• Two women were
taken to a hospital after a
crash at South Poplar and
Noble streets Tuesday
afternoon.
Police said Mildred
Leonard, of Hazleton
was attempting to turn
left off Poplar Street onto
Noble Street at about 4:45
p.m. when a 2012 Jeep
Compass being driven by
Nicole Petrushka, of Hazle
Township, struck the rear
of Leonard’s 2004 Toyota
Camry.
Leonard and her pas-
senger, Mary Caso, of
Hazleton, were transport-
ed to a hospital by ambu-
lance for treatment and
evaluation of their injuries.
The crash remains under
investigation, police said.
• Two women were
cited after a two-vehicle
crash Tuesday afternoon.
PolicesaidSandraGliem,
30, of West Hazleton, was
stopped for a traffic light
at 18th and Church streets
at about 5:15 p.m. when
Courtney Adomshick, 23,
of Freeland, rear-ended
Gliem’s 2013 Jeep with her
2000 Chevrolet.
Adomshick was cited
with careless driving and
Gliem was cited with
driving with a suspended
license, police said. No
injuries were reported.
NANTICOKE — State
police Bureau of Liquor
Control Enforcement
recently cited Fraternal
Order of Eagles, Nanticoke
Aerie 835, 48 E. Ridge St.,
with possessing or operat-
ing gambling devices or
permitted gambling or lot-
teries.
HAZLE TWP. — State
police in Hazleton report-
ed the following:
• Sharon Patricia
Kukowski, 50, of Four
Seasons Court, reported
someone entered her resi-
dence sometime between
10 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday and rummaged
through her and her fam-
ily’s belongings. No prop-
erty was reported stolen.
• Thomas Christopher
Cangialosi, of 1143
Harwood Road, reported
someone stole his .380
caliber pistol sometime
between 2 a.m. Sunday
and 4 p.m. Monday.
Anyone with informa-
tion on either incident
should call state police at
459-3890.
BUTLER TWP. —
Township police reported
the following:
• Someone stole a
cement angel that had
been placed on a grave at
Calvary Cemetery. The
theft occurred sometime
between 8:45 p.m. Aug. 27
and 6:30 p.m. Aug. 28.
• Two people tried to
force their way into the
International Union of
Painters and Allied Trades
building on Azalea Drive
in the CAN DO Corporate
Center at about 8:30 p.m.
on Aug. 29. The suspects
fled after an intrusion
alarm sounded.
• Someone stole a three-
dimensional turkey target
from the Hazleton Archery
Club on Woodside Drive.
• Within the past few
weeks, someone broke into
a vacant home on North
Biesels Road and stole cop-
per piping from the resi-
dence.
Anyone with infor-
mation on any of these
incidents should contact
police at 570-788-3230 or
via dialing 911.
• Timothy J. Burger,
of Drums, was cited with
accidents involving dam-
age to an unattended
vehicle or property after
he allegedly lost control
of his vehicle in the 1000
block of St. Johns Road at
about 12:30 a.m. Aug. 25,
sheered off a utility pole
and left the scene with his
vehicle badly damaged,
police said.
• Anna Hale, 80, of
Drums, lost control of her
vehicle while driving on
South Old Turnpike Road
near Foothills Drive at
about 4:50 p.m. Aug. 30,
and her vehicle crossed the
roadway and struck trees.
Hale was uninjured but her
vehicle was towed, police
said.
• A vehicle driven
by John Wentz, 42, of
Tamaqua, went off the
road in the 100 block of
South Old Turnpike Road
at about 9:30 a.m. Monday
and struck a utility pole.
Wentz was uninjured but
his vehicle was towed,
police said.
EATON TWP. —
Someone stole catalytic
converters from 11 Dodge
Ram 2500 pick-up trucks
at Tunkhannock Auto Mart
onstate Route 29 sometime
between 6 p.m. Saturday
and 6 a.m. Tuesday.
Anyone with information
should call state police in
Tunkhannock at 570-836-
2141.
MOOSIC — A trucker
from Kentucky was to be
cited after he allegedly fell
asleep at the wheel in a
construction zone and his
rig struck another vehicle,
state police in Dunmore
said.
Police said Teddy J.
Watkins, 50, of Stanton,
Ky., was driving south
on Interstate 81 at about
10:20 p.m. Tuesday near
mile marker 181 when he
apparently fell asleep and
his truck nearly struck a
construction roller in a
closed lane, knocked over
orange traffic cones and
nearly struck two other
construction workers.
David Stiles, 33, of
Dunmore, was driving a
Dodge Ram pickup in front
of Watkins, noticed the
rig approaching him from
behind and accelerated in
an attempt to get out of the
way, but the front bumper
grill of the rig struck the
back of the pickup and
both vehicles traveled off
the roadway and came to
rest on the shoulder of the
road.
Stiles was transported
to Geisinger Community
Medical Center in
Scranton by Lackawanna
Ambulance. His passenger,
William Lukashewski, 56,
of Hazleton, suffered minor
injuries and told police he
would seek treatment at
a later time. Watkins was
uninjured.
HOLLENBACK TWP.
— Shanna Murphy, 29,
of Wapwallopen, failed to
negotiate a curve while
driving a 2000 Jeep on
Kingsberry Road at about
4 a.m. Monday. The vehi-
cle left the roadway and
struck two trees, state
police in Hazleton said.
Murphy allegedly left
the scene and went home.
Prior to first responders
arriving, she also allegedly
fled into a wooded area
and hid; she was located
just after sunrise, police
said.
Police said Murphy was
charged with driving under
the influence and several
traffic violations.
PLAINS TWP. —
Township police reported
the following:
• Police said they
observed two suspicious
persons walking on First
Street at about 2 a.m.
Tuesday and identified
them as Patricia Faltz and
David Hughes, both 19 and
both fromPlains Township.
Police said both exhibited
signs of alcohol impair-
ment and will be cited with
underage drinking.
• Police said two people
will be cited with harass-
ment and disorderly con-
duct after a reported dis-
turbance at the Luzerne
County Housing Authority
at 188 Second St. about 5
p.m. Monday.
Police spoke with Joshua
Henrie and Ciera Welch,
both of Wilkes-Barre.
Henrie told police he was
inside the apartment when
Welch arrived with Jasmine
Rivera, and Welch punched
him in the mouth, causing
him to bleed. Welch told
police she was six months
pregnant and that Henrie
pushed and shoved and spit
blood at her.
PoLIcE bLottER
couRt bRIEfS
WILKES-BARRE — A
county senior judge has
scheduled a Sept. 11 hear-
ing to consider a number
of requests in the fatal
hit-and-run case of Megan
Panowicz.
Senior Judge Charles
Brown scheduled the hear-
ing to consider a mental
infirmity defense filed by
Panowicz’s attorneys and
a request by prosecutors
to hire their own doctor
to examine Panowicz.
Brown also allowed
prosecutors to have an
additional 30 days to file
court papers.
Panowicz, of Forty Fort,
is charged in the August
2008 death of Sharon
Shaughnessy, who was
killed on Wyoming Avenue
in Kingston when she was
reportedly struck by three
vehicles.
Panowicz’s attorneys
recently said she suffers
from post-traumatic stress
disorder and they are seek-
ing to use that defense at
her Sept. 23 trial.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 7A
END OF
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PAGE 8A Friday, September 6, 2013 OBITUARIES www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Estate & Medicaid Planning; Wills; Revocable and Irrevocable Trusts: Estate
Probate and Administration; Guardianships; and Special Needs Trusts.
Attorney DAviD r. LipkA
Certifed As an Elder Law Attorney by the National Elder Law Foundation
50 East Main Street, Plymouth, PA (570) 779-5353
IF NURSING HOME PLACEMENT BECOMES
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when you, your spouse or a loved one are either in or about to enter a
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• Can you save your residence?
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• How can annuities help?
• Can more income be protected for the spouse at home?
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DOLORES (TOSLIN)
KOZEMKO, 82, a resident of
Wilkes-Barre and formerly of
both the Miners Mills section of
Wilkes-Barre and Swoyersville,
passed away peacefully on
Thursday morning at Timber
Ridge Health Care Center,
Wilkes-Barre, following a brief
illness. Her husband was the
late Andrew M. Kozemko, who
passed away on Jan. 16, 2006.
Together, Andrew and Dolores
shared 53 years of marriage.
Funeral arrangements
are pending and have been
entrusted to the care of the
Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc.,
1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort. A complete obituary will
appear in Saturday’s edition of
the newspaper.
SAMUEL S. CONDUSTA,
85, formerly of New Grove
Street, Wilkes-Barre, died
Tuesday. Born in Pittston to
the late Dominic and Mary
Pachushka Condusta, he
worked for Luzerne County
News, Northeastern News,
Harrisburg News and Tom
Harper. Preceding him in death
were his wife, Blodwen Shovlin
Condusta; brothers, Frank and
Michael; sisters, Rose Mary
and Catherine. Surviving
are daughter, Robin Mikolon
(Brian), Nanticoke; brother,
Albert; sisters, Angie Barns
and Josephine Condusta; and
grandchildren, Lexey and
Lacey Mikolon.
Funeral services 2:30 p.m.
Saturday at Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains
Township. Friends may call
1 p.m. to services. Memorial
donations may be made to a
charity of the donor’s choosing.
Arlene Zibuck
Sept. 4, 2013
Arlene Zibuck, 80, of Dallas,
beloved mother, grandmoth-
er and great-grandmother,
passed away on Wednesday
at Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center, Plains
Township. Her last few days
were spent surrounded by her
loving family.
Born in Plymouth on Sept.
26, 1932, to the late Jacob
and Anna Dunavus Corney,
she attended Larksville High
School, where she was recog-
nized for her outstanding dedi-
cation in collecting items for
the war effort. Later, she was
employed by the VA Medical
Center in nursing, General
Cigar Co. and several dress
factories where she worked as a
seamstress.
Arlene greatly enjoyed cook-
ing and entertaining for her
family and friends, sewing,
traveling and watching clas-
sic movies. She took pride in
sharing her vast knowledge of
cooking and sewing with her
children and grandchildren.
Despite all her accomplish-
ments, Arlene was proudest of
her adoring family.
She was a member of Holy
Family Parish, Luzerne.
She was preceded in death by
her granddaughters, Christine
Smith and Alexandra Humko;
great-grandson, Ebon; brother,
Joseph Corney; and brother-in-
law, Martin Papula.
Surviving are her daughters,
Kathy Smith, Sandy Humko
and her husband, John III;
sons, Frank Hodle and his wife,
Charlene, Daniel Hodle Sr. and
his wife, Audrey, Richard Hodle
and his wife, Karen, John Hodle
Sr. and his wife, Michelle;
17 grandchildren; 24 great-
grandchildren; sisters, Vera
Papula, Evelyn Bowen and her
husband, John; brother, Jacob
Corney; sister-in-law, Nancy
Corney; and numerous nieces
and nephews.
The Hodle family thanks Dr.
Michael Kovalick of Geisinger
Dallas for his years of compas-
sion while caring for Arlene.
Funeral services will be held
at 9:30 a.m. Saturday from the
Andrew Strish Funeral Home,
11 Wilson St., Larksville. A
Mass of Christian Burial will
be at 10 a.m. in Holy Family
Parish, Luzerne. Interment will
follow in Carverton Cemetery,
Kingston Township. Family
and friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today and 8:30 a.m. until ser-
vices Saturday.
Memorial donations can be
made in Arlene’s memory to the
charity of the donor’s choice.
Florence c. SAlwoSki MArtin
Aug. 28, 2013
Our mom had wings long
before she ever became an angel
in heaven. She was an angel
on Earth and now she will be
an angel forever. Florence C.
Salwoski Martin was given her
wings on Aug. 28, 2013. Our
mother, grandmother and great-
grandmother joined the love of
her life 20 days after he left this
earth for his next journey.
Florence was born Florence
Constance Salwoski on June
29, 1931, to Con and Isabelle
Salwoski. She graduated from
Coughlin High School in 1949.
She married our dad, Edward
Martin, on Feb. 14, 1953. They
celebrated their 60th wedding
anniversary this year and they
will continue their love and
friendship with God.
Florence worked as a book-
keeper until she became a stay-
at-home mom in 1956, which
led her to her later career as a
stay-at-home grandmother and
an ear to talk to on Tuesdays
and Thursdays at the Ed Martin
School of Self-Defense.
Our mom loved nothing more
than spending time with her
family, going for a ride every
night, shopping and stopping
at McDonald’s for a nightcap
of vanilla ice cream, coffee and
conversations with friends. She
enjoyed the family gatherings at
her home, and when it became
too much for her, she appreci-
ated when her children began
hosting the gatherings for her.
There was only one condition
— that she would be in charge
of bringing the desserts.
Our mom’s heart was bigger
than anyone we knew. She spent
her life giving to people, even
when she didn’t have any more
to give. She was the heart, soul
and foundation of this family.
She raised three children and
then she proceeded to raise six
grandchildren.
She gave her home and love
everyday so her daughters,
Joyce and Carol, could continue
in their professional careers. It
wasn’t unwarranted, because
the love she gave to our children
will always be remembered and
stories will always be told. Our
children had the opportunity
to grow up with one of the best
women they will ever get to
know in a lifetime. She left an
indelible mark on their hearts,
just as she did with everyone
she came to know. She was the
heart and soul of the family and
she was the foundation that kept
all of the pieces held steadfastly
to the ground.
Florence was loved dearly by
her family and friends. She was
witty, loving, generous, gentle
and thoughtful, and her loss
leaves a void in all of us that
can never be filled. Throughout
our mom’s life, she maintained a
soft-hearted and simple demean-
or that won the trust and hearts
of many, who even now are
being changed by her endless
nurturing of love and faith. She
helped to make the life of some-
one else go a little easier in spite
of making hers go a little harder.
This beautiful woman will be
remembered and missed by
everyone who knew her.
Like our dad, our mom was
an avid Philadelphia Phillies fan.
She was also a Den Mother for
the Cub Scouts and worked reg-
istration for the Luzerne County
Elections Office. In addition,
she was everyone’s mother.
She was preceded in death by
her mother, Isabelle Adamski
Salwoski; her father, Con
“Firpo” Salwoski; her husband,
Edward D. Martin; and her son,
Thomas Martin.
She leaves behind three chil-
dren, Joyce Mock and her hus-
band, Robert Mock, Raymond
Martin and his wife, Denise
Martin, Carol McGrane and
her husband, Paul McGrane;
seven grandchildren, Natalie
Benjamin and her husband, SR
Benjamin, Robyn Weisser and
her husband, Mike Weisser,
Bryan Mock, Nicole Borden
and her husband, Mike Borden,
Kylee McGrane, Rosie McGrane
and Danielle McGrane; four
great-grandchildren, Nathan and
Skyler Benjamin and Zachary
and Lucas Borden; brother-in-
law, Jim Martin and his wife,
Pat; sister-in-law, Ellen Martin;
her nephew, Jim Martin and his
wife, Donna, and their children,
Jimmy and Katie.
Celebration of Florence’s life
will be held 8:30 a.m. Saturday
from McLaughlin’s – The
Family Funeral Service, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre,
with funeral Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
the Church of the Maternity of
the Blessed Virgin Mary on Park
Avenue. Interment will be in
St. Mary’s Maternity Cemetery,
West Wyoming. Visitation will
be held 6 to 8 p.m. today at
McLaughlin’s.
Memorial donations are
preferred and may be made to
the Edward D. Martin Student
Athlete Scholarship Award, in
care of the Wilkes-Barre Career
Technical Center.
Permanent messages and
memories can be shared with
Florence’s family at www.cel-
ebrateherlife.com.
leocAdiA HuMenAnSki
Sept. 3, 2013
Leocadia Humenanski, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013, at
Gracedale Nursing Center,
Nazareth.
Born Dec. 3, 1923, in
Wilkes-Barre, she was a daugh-
ter of the late Valentine and
Tekla Dziedzic. Leocadia was
a 1941 graduate of GAR High
School, Wilkes-Barre.
She was employed for
many years in the area gar-
ment industry as a seamstress
and was a member of the
International Ladies’ Garment
Workers’ Union.
She was a member of Our
Lady of Hope Parish, Wilkes-
Barre, where she enjoyed vol-
unteering at all church dinners
and festivals. Years ago, she
did sewing for the nuns at
Marymount.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, John, in 2008;
sisters Adela Sobieski, Helen
Conti, Mildred Slowikowski
and infant sister, Stasia; and
infant brother, Stanislaus.
Surviving are her daughters,
Jane Loquasto and her hus-
band, Fred, Northampton, and
Dr. Judith Fumanti and her
husband, Dave, Williamsport;
grandchildren, Fred Loquasto
III and Jonathan Loquasto; and
sister Josephine Gorka and her
husband, Albin, Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral services will be held
at 11:30 a.m. Saturday from
the Jendrzejewski Funeral
Home, 21 N. Meade St.,
Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass
of Christian Burial at noon
at Our Lady of Hope Parish,
Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre.
The Rev. John S. Terry, pastor,
will be celebrant. Interment
will be in St. Mary’s Maternity
Cemetery, West Wyoming.
Friends may call 10 a.m. until
time of services.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rial donations may be made
to Magnolia Brittany’s, C/O
NBRAN, P.O. Box 3258,
Pittsburgh, PA 15230-3258.
JAMeS J. ‘JiMMy’ MunleyJr.
Sept. 4, 2013
James J. ‘Jimmy’ Munley
Jr., 81, of Wilkes-Barre, died
Wednesday at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center.
Born March 8, 1932, in
Wilkes-Barre, he was a son of
the late James J. Munley Sr.
and Catherine Carey Munley.
James was a 1952 gradu-
ate of GAR Memorial High
School and earned a degree in
accounting from Wilkes-Barre
Business College.
Upon graduation Jimmy
worked for Bache and
Company (Prudential
Bache) in Wilkes-Barre as
a stockbroker. He ended
his career working for the
Department of Transportation
for the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania, guiding it
through budget cuts and
improvements.
James was also a veteran of
the Korean War, serving in the
28th Division, 1st Battalion,
109th Field Artillery.
Jimmy was past commander
of the former Christian E.
Stegmaier Post 50 Veterans of
Foreign Wars and a Democratic
candidate for mayor of Wilkes-
Barre in 1976. He was actively
involved in local and state poli-
tics his entire life.
James stayed actively
involved with the law enforce-
ment communities of Luzerne
and Lackawanna counties. He
was also involved in support-
ing local organizations such as
the Catholic Youth Center and
American Legion swim clubs.
A brother, John P. “Jackie”
Munley, preceded him in death.
He will be greatly missed
by his sisters, Barbara and her
husband, David M. Cooney Sr.,
and Kathleen and her husband,
Francis T. Klinges; sister-in-
law, Regina “Jeannie” O’Day
Munley; as well as countless
nieces and nephews.
Celebration of
Jimmy’s life will be
held Saturday with a
funeral Mass at 9:30
a.m. in the Church of St.
Patrick on Parrish Street in
Wilkes-Barre. Graveside ser-
vices with military honors will
be in St. Mary’s Cemetery in
Hanover Township.
May you have been in heav-
en a half an hour before the
Devil knew you were dead.
God rest.
McLaughlin’s – The Family
Funeral Service assisted James’
family with arrangements.
Permanent messages and
memories can be shared
with Jimmy’s family at www.
celebratehislife.com.
bettie reAkeS
Sept. 5, 2013
Bettie Reakes was called to
heaven on Sept. 5, 2013.
Bettie was born June 22,
1928, a daughter of the late
Frank and Anna Fink Wolfe. She
was always smiling, even before
retiring from Frye Boots, in
Hanover Township.
She loved to dance and was
an excellent seamstress. Bettie
single-handedly created a beau-
tiful wardrobe for her own doll
collection, as well as outfitted
her granddaughters’ Barbie
dolls in the latest fashions.
With such a warm and out-
going personality, Bettie made
friends wherever she went. She
will be sadly missed by all who
knew her.
Bettie had two daughters,
Cheryl Zweig and her husband,
Harry, and Mary Ann Yamelski
and her husband, Gerald, all of
Hunlock Creek.
She had one son, Emory A.
Reakes Jr., who preceded her in
death.
Bettie was also preceded in
death by her siblings, Ray Carl,
Geraldine, Franklin, Bobby
Wolfe, Mildred Purcell, Thelma
Wolfe, Leonard Sheldon Wolfe,
Isabell Caporaletti, Francis
Thomas, Martha Bird, William
Wolfe, Anna Mae Hankey,
George Franklin Wolfe, Janet,
Genevive and Harold; her hus-
band, Emory Reakes; and her
long-time companion, Albert
Picotti.
In addition to her daugh-
ters, she is also survived by her
granddaughters, Kelly Zweig,
Wyckoff, N.J., and Dr. Shari
Zweig, Philadelphia; and grand-
son, Jerry Yamelski, Kingston.
Bettie had an extensive family,
with many nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
at 10 a.m. Saturday at Clarke
Piatt Funeral Home, 6 Sunset
Lake Road, Hunlock Creek.
Friends may call 6 to 9 p.m.
today. Interment will be at
Maple Grove Cemetery, Sweet
Valley.
dorene b.
rHoAdS
Aug. 27, 2013
Dorene B. Rhoads, 69, of
Dallas, passed away from ovar-
ian cancer on Tuesday, Aug. 27,
2013, at her residence.
Born in Berkeley, Calif.,
she was a daughter of the late
Paul and Ada Bernece Russell
Lindstrom. She was a gradu-
ate of Berkeley High School
and attended Westmont
College. She was a graduate of
Chico State University with a
Bachelor of Science in nursing.
Dorene worked in San
Francisco, Berkeley and
Pittsburgh hospitals, in the
U.S. Army hospital in Bad
Canstatt, Germany, and finally
at Hershey Medical Center.
Dorene was a member of the
Trucksville United Methodist
Church.
Dorene’s faith was para-
mount. She attended Bible
studies with friends, taught
Sunday school and vaca-
tion Bible school in Berkeley,
Pittsburgh, Annville, Pa., and
Trucksville.
Her family, travel, photog-
raphy, cooking, music, flow-
ers and birds were among her
lifelong interests. She was an
artist by avocation, especially
fond of watercolor painting
and papercutting art. She was
among the charter members
and was active in The Guild of
American Papercutters for 25
years.
In 2006, she went to
Mississippi as a Salvation Army
disaster volunteer post-Hur-
ricane Katrina. Shortly there-
after, she was diagnosed with
cancer. She was a 7 1/2-year
survivor, always with courage
and determination.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Dr. John M. Rhoads,
Dallas; sons, Jonathan and
his wife, Virginia, Pittsburgh,
and Christopher, Portland,
Ore.; sisters, Donna and her
husband, Wayne Anderson,
Colorado Springs, Colo., and
Doris and her husband, Grant
Morgan, Sacramento, Calif.;
sister-in-law, Gerry Rhoads,
Pittsburgh; and several nieces
and nephews.
Memorial services will
be held 11:15 a.m. Sept. 28
from the Trucksville United
Methodist Church. Friends
may call 10 a.m. until time of
service.
Donations in Dorene’s name
may be made to the donor’s
local chapter of the American
Cancer Society.
Arrangements are under the
direction of the Richard H.
Disque Funeral Home, 2940
Memorial Highway, Dallas.
SHeilA St. JAMeS Holt
Sept. 4, 2013
Sheila St. James Holt, of
Swoyersville, passed away
Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013, at
Kingston Health Care.
Born in Pittsfield, Mass.,
she was a daughter of the late
Clement and Lucille Duggan St.
James.
Sheila attended Pittsfield
schools. For the last 28 years,
she resided in Pennsylvania.
Prior to that, she resided in
Melrose Park, Fort Lauderdale,
Fla.
Prior to retirement, Sheila
was a legal secretary for 33 years
in Florida and Pennsylvania.
Surviving are her children,
Michelle Archambeault Holt
McIntyre and Lance Holt and
his wife, Rosie; grandchildren,
Diana Bergman, John McIntyre
and his wife, Angela, Antonette
Smigel, Lindsy Smigel, Chelsea
Holt and Lori Barahona; 11
great-grandchildren; and one
great-great-grandchild.
Private funeral services will
be held at the convenience of
Sheila’s family. There will be no
calling hours.
Arrangements have been
entrusted to the Lehman-
Gregory Funeral Home Inc.,
281 Chapel St., Swoyersville.
Messages of condolence can be
sent to the funeral home.
obituAry policy
The Times Leader publishes free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. Afuneral home representative can
call the obituary desk at 570-829-7224, send a fax to
570-829-5537 or email to ttlobits@civitasmedia.com.
If you fax or email, please call to confrm. Obituaries
must be submitted by 7:30 p.m. for publication in
the next edition. Obituaries must be sent by a funeral
home or crematory, or must name who is handling
arrangements, with address and phone number.
AndrewS - Joan, funeral 11
a.m. today at Louis V. Ciuccio
Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road,
Old Forge. Friends may call 9
a.m. to services.
AnGelellA - Magdalene,
funeral Mass 11 a.m. Sept. 21
in Prince of Peace Parish, St.
Mary’s Church, West Grace
Street, Old Forge. Friends may
call 10:30 a.m. until Mass.
blASZcZAk - Mary, funeral
services 9:30 a.m. today at Earl
W. Lohman Funeral Home Inc.,
14 W. Green St., Nanticoke. Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. in St.
Mary’s Church, Nanticoke.
boroSki - Leonard, graveside
burial service 1 p.m. today in St.
Joseph Cemetery, Hudson.
buFF - Franklin Jr., memorial
service 11 a.m. Saturday in St.
Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran
Church, Mountain Top.
donAHoe - Dr. Francis, funeral
noon Saturday in Gate of Heaven
Church, 40 Machell Ave., Dallas.
Green- Charles, funeral
services noon Saturday in
Lord-Bixler Funeral Home, 1818
Mahantongo St., Pottsville.
Viewing 11 a.m. to services.
HowArd - Dorothy, celebration
of life service 11 a.m. Saturday at
Knifen O’Malley Funeral Home,
465 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 10 a.m. to
service.
HuMenAnSki - Leocadia,
funeral services 11:30 a.m.
Saturday at Jendrzejewski
Funeral Home, 21 N. Meade St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial noon in Our Lady of Hope
Parish, Park Avenue, Wilkes-
Barre. Friends may call 10 a.m.
to services.
JAckSon- Dawn, celebration
of life, 2 p.m. Saturday at 879 St.
Johns Road, Drums.
keiper-Quinn- Linda,
memorial service 1 p.m.
Saturday in Faith Lutheran
Church, 550 Route 940,
Blakeslee. Friends may call noon
to service.
kotZ - Florence, funeral
services 10 a.m. Saturday at
Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C.,
51-53 W. Green St., Nanticoke.
Mass of Christian Burial 10:30
a.m. in St. Faustina Parish, Holy
Trinity Worship Site, 520 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
koVAcH- Elizabeth, Panachida
10:30 a.m. today at Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main
St., Plains Township. Ofce
of Christian Burial 11 a.m. in
St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic
Church. Friends may call 9 a.m.
to service.
pArker - Charles, celebration
of life noon Saturday in Bethel
African Methodist Episcopal
Church, 716 N. Washington Ave.,
Scranton.
pAtriciAn- Zachry, memorial
Mass 11 a.m. Saturday at
Holy Name of Jesus Church,
Nanticoke.
preVuZnAk - Bernard, Mass
of Christian Burial 10 a.m. today
in St. Benedict’s Parish, St.
Dominic’s Church, 155 Austin
Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
SiMkulAk - Brian, memorial
service 10 a.m. Saturday in St.
John the Evangelist Church,
Pittston.
Sitler - Lemuel, funeral
services 2 p.m. today at James L.
Hinckley Jr. Funeral Home, 1024
Market St., Berwick. Friends may
call 12:30 p.m. to services.
SlAtky - Edward Sr., funeral
9:30 a.m. today at Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea. Services 10
a.m. in Brick United Methodist
Church, Duryea.
StepAnSki - Stephen, visitation
2 to 4 p.m. Saturday at E. Blake
Collins Funeral Home, 159
George Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
troJnAcki - Ronald Sr., funeral
services 9:30 a.m. today at
Lokuta-Zawacki Funeral Home,
200Wyoming Ave., Dupont.
Mass of Christian Burial 10 a.m.
in St. Mary’s Church, Queen
of the Apostles Parish, 715
Hawthorn St., Avoca.
wAGner - Albert, memorial
service noon Saturday in Trinity
Lutheran Church, 205 W. Grove
St., Clarks Summit. Friends may
call 10 a.m. to service. All are
invited to a luncheon to followin
the church’s banquet hall.
wAll - Harold Jr., memorial
service 4 p.m. Sunday in
Centermoreland United
Methodist Church, 17 Creamery
Road, Centermoreland. Friends
may call 3 p.m. to service.
yAniello- Evelyn, memorial
service and celebration of life
Saturday in St. Joseph Marello
Church, WilliamStreet, Pittston.
Gathering 9 to 11 a.m. with
Christian Mass following.
coMinG FunerAlS
WASHINGTON — Call
it a hidden ally: The right
germs just might be able
to help fight fat.
Different kinds of bac-
teria that live inside the
gut can help spur obesity
or protect against it, say
scientists at Washington
University in St. Louis
who transplanted intes-
tinal germs from fat or
lean people into mice
and watched the rodents
change.
And what they ate deter-
mined whether the good
germs could move in and
do their job.
Thursday’s report raises
the possibility of one day
turning gut bacteria into
personalized fat-fighting
therapies, and it may help
explain why some people
have a harder time losing
weight than others do.
“It’s an important play-
er,” said Dr. David Relman
of Stanford University,
who also studies how gut
bacteria influence health
but wasn’t involved in the
new research. “This paper
says that diet and microbes
are necessary companions
in all of this. They literally
and figuratively feed each
other.”
The research was report-
ed in the journal Science.
We all develop with an
essentially sterile diges-
tive tract. Bacteria rapidly
move in starting at birth
— bugs that we pick up
from mom and dad, the
environment, first foods.
Ultimately, the intestine
teems with hundreds of
species, populations that
differ in people with vary-
ing health. Overweight
people harbor different
types and amounts of gut
bacteria than lean people,
for example. The gut bac-
teria we pick up as chil-
dren can stick with us for
decades, although their
makeup changes when
people lose weight, previ-
ous studies have shown.
Clearly, what you eat
and how much you move
are key to how much you
weigh. But are those bac-
terial differences a con-
tributing cause of obesity,
rather than simply the
result of it? If so, which
bugs are to blame, and
might it be possible to
switch out the bad actors?
To start finding out,
Washington University
graduate student Vanessa
Ridaura took gut bacteria
from eight people — four
pairs of twins that each
included one obese sibling
and one lean sibling. One
pair of twins was identi-
cal, ruling out an inher-
ited explanation for their
different weights. Using
twins also guaranteed
similar childhood environ-
ments and diets.
She transplanted the
human microbes into the
intestines of young mice
that had been raised germ-
free.
The mice who received
gut bacteria from the
obese people gained more
weight — and experi-
enced unhealthy metabol-
ic changes — even though
they didn’t eat more than
the mice who received
germs from the lean
twins, said study senior
author Dr. Jeffrey Gordon,
director of Washington
University’s Center of
Genome Sciences and
Systems Biology.
‘Belly bugs’
may help fght
fat, study fnds
lAurAn neerGAArd
AP Medical Writer
Te kinds of bacteria
that live inside the
human gut can help
spur obesity or
protect against it
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FINAL DAYS
Townsfolk fghting to keepJimThorpe inJimThorpe
KEITH COLLINS and
MICHAEL RUBINKAM
Associated Press
JIM THORPE — The
hand-lettered dona-
tion jar on Anne Marie
Fitzpatrick’s store counter
says what many residents
of this well-preserved
Victorian-era town are
thinking and feeling lately:
“Keep Jim Thorpe in Jim
Thorpe.”
The surviving sons of
the famous American
Indian athlete have long
fought to get the remains
of their father moved from
Jim Thorpe to tribal lands
in Oklahoma, where he
was born, and they recent-
ly won a crucial legal vic-
tory that put them close to
their goal.
But Jim Thorpe isn’t let-
ting its Olympian name-
sake go without a fight.
Residents and business
owners are helping to
raise money for the town’s
appeal — to be filed this
month — saying they
have honored, appreciated
and respected a man long
considered one of the 20th
century’s best athletes.
Hence the donation
jar on the counter of
Fitzpatrick’s gift shop,
prominently displayed
between the cash register
and a rack of cat figurines.
“We have no intention
of letting him go,” said
Fitzpatrick, an organizer
of the town’s annual Jim
Thorpe birthday bash.
“There is a pride, and
many, many people that
you speak to as you go
through the town share
that pride.”
Thorpe was a football,
baseball and track star
who won the decathlon
and pentathlon in the
1912 Olympics, then later
starred as the Indian in
B-movies and struggled
financially toward the end
of his life. He died without
a will in 1953 at age 64.
After Oklahoma’s gov-
ernor balked at the cost
of a planned monument
to the athlete, third wife
Patricia had Thorpe’s body
removed in the midst of
his funeral service and
sent it to northeastern
Pennsylvania, where she
struck a deal with two
merging towns — Mauch
Chunk and East Mauch
Chunk — to build a memo-
rial and name the newtown
after him. His remains are
kept in a mausoleum sur-
rounded by statues and
interpretive signage.
Thorpe’s son, Bill
Thorpe, of Arlington,
Texas, said his father
expressed a desire to be
buried in Oklahoma.
“All this time we’ve
wanted his body back
because of the way that it
was taken away from us,”
he said. “And we had no
authority.”
His sons want to bury
him on Sac and Fox land
near Stroud, Okla., about
15 miles north of where
he grew up in Prague.
In April, U.S. District
Judge Richard Caputo
ruled in favor of Thorpe,
his brother Richard, and
the Sac and Fox tribe
to which their father
belonged, saying the town
of Jim Thorpe amounts
to a museum under the
1990 Native American
Graves Protection and
Repatriation Act.
The borough council
voted to appeal the rul-
ing to the Philadelphia-
based 3rd U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals, and
written arguments are
due Sept. 23. The town
has found support from
Jim Thorpe’s grandsons,
who say it has done right
by him.
“The town has done
nothing but honor and
respect and love my grand-
pa,” said John Thorpe, of
Lake Tahoe, Calif. “The
state of Oklahoma did not
want to erect a mausoleum
or do anything to honor
him. They weren’t willing
to do what the town of Jim
Thorpe did.”
Thorpe said he was tak-
ing part in a sweat lodge
ceremony in Texas three
years ago when, unbidden,
a medicine man told him
his grandfather had made
contact and said, “I am at
peace, and I want no more
pain created in my name.”
He said that helped
confirm his belief that
his grandfather’s tomb
should remain where it is.
AP file photo
The town of Jim Thorpe is fighting to keep the famed American
Indian athlete’s remains. His tomb is pictured in 2010.
Sandy stole precious reminders of 9/11
JAKE PEARSON
Associated Press
NEW YORK — The
letters and photos were
beyond value — some of
the mementos Joe Quinn
still had to remember his
older brother Jimmy, who
died in the World Trade
Center on 9/11.
Now they are gone, sul-
lied by floodwaters and
charred by fires that tore
through the Queens com-
munity of Breezy Point last
October during Superstorm
Sandy.
From photos and letters
to coffin liners and actual
memorials, scores of fami-
lies from Breezy Point and
Rockaway, two Queens
beachside neighborhoods
hit particularly hard by
both events, lost cherished
reminders of loved ones
taken by one tragedy that
were then swept away by
another.
“Stuff is just stuff, but the
mementos, they hurt you
a bit more,” said Quinn,
a 33-year-old Army vet-
eran who remembers one
photo in particular that
is now gone, taken of the
two brothers arm in arm
in a bar, smiling, only two
weeks before the 2001
attacks.
“Six months later, it sort
of sunk in,” Quinn said.
“Once a week my wife and I
would say, ‘Hey, this picture
or that letter is gone.’”
Home to firefighters,
police officers and other
first responders, everyone
in Breezy and Rockaway,
it seemed, knew someone
killed on 9/11. Of the more
than 2,700 who died that
day in New York, about 80
were residents of the two
neighborhoods, including
almost 30 firefighters.
Rockaway also suffered
at least five deaths from
Superstorm Sandy, and the
toll in property damage was
devastating.
About 150 Breezy Point
homes burned to the
ground in a single night
from fires apparently
sparked when floodwaters
hit electrical lines.
As the 12th anniversary
of the Sept. 11 attacks
approaches, families from
the two neighborhoods are
still recovering. In Breezy
Point and Rockaway, few
homes have been rebuilt as
neighbors fight with insur-
ance companies, banks and
the federal government
for permits and funds. But
what hurts the most are the
things they can’t rebuild.
Patrick Dowdell, whose
firefighter father, Lt. Kevin
Dowdell, was killed in the
south tower, said there was
an eerie similarity between
the two events.
Kevin Dowdell’s remains
were never recovered.
The only identifiable item
found was a red Halligan,
a fireman’s tool used to
break through windows
and doors, engraved with
the elder Dowdell’s initials,
given to him after his pro-
motion.
It was in the basement.
The basement flooded dur-
ing Sandy. The Halligan was
recovered — for a second
time — after the storm.
“I’m a new father, and I
realize the importance of
having these mementos to
look back on for my chil-
dren when I’m not here,”
said Patrick Dowdell.
AP photo
Joe Quinn and his wife Melanie visit the remnants of his parents’ home in Queens, N.Y., that was
destroyed in October by Superstorm Sandy; the storm also swept away mementos of Joe’s older
brother Jimmy, a victim of the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER COMMUNITY NEWS Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 10A
BIRTHDAYS POLICY
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge.
Photographs and information must be received two full weeks
before your child’s birthday.
Your information must be typed or computer-generated. Include
your name and your relationship to the child (parent, grandparent
or legal guardians only, please), your child’s name, age and
birthday, parents’, grandparents’ and great-grandparents’ names
and their towns of residence, any siblings and their ages. Don’t
forget to include a daytime contact phone number. Without one,
we may be unable to publish a birthday announcement on time.
We cannot guarantee return of birthday or occasions photos and
do not return community-news or publicity photos. Please do
not submit precious or original professional photographs that
require return because such photos can become damaged, or
occasionally lost, in the production process.
Email your birthday announcement to people@timesleader.com
or send it to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15 North Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA18711-0250. You also may use the formunder the People
tab on www.timesleader.com.
HAPPY
BIRTHDAY!
Elijah Eugene Evans,
son of Neil and Elizabeth
Evans, Stillwater, is cel-
ebrating his second birth-
day today, Sept. 6. Elijah
is a grandson of John and
Diane Goss, Plymouth,
and Kevin and Ann Evans,
Orangeville. He is a great-
grandson of Robert and
Mildred Smith, Larksville;
Roxy Goss and the late
Glen Goss, Hunlock
Creek; the late Verna and
Clark Evans, Bloomsburg;
and the late Allen and
Alma Hess, Orangeville.
Elijah has three sisters,
Norah Beth, 7, Hannah
Alley, 6, and the late
Michaela Belle Goss.
Jake Wienckoski, son of
Mia and Ray Wienckoski,
Franklin Township, is cel-
ebrating his 11th birth-
day today, Sept. 6. Jake
is a grandson of John
and Gerry Hovan and
Eleanor Wienckoski, all of
Swoyersville.
Elijah E. Evans
Jake Wienckoski
Monday
PLAINS TWP.: The
Plains Parks and Recreation
Board, 6:30 p.m., at the
Birchwood Hills Park office,
Birchwood Hills.
Sept. 14
ECKLEY: Eckley
Miners’ Village volunteers,
10 a.m., at the village.
MEETINGS
OLD FORGE: The
Felittese Association
of Old Forge is host-
ing its second annual
Race for Our Lady of
Constantinople at 9
a.m. on Sunday at the
Old Forge High School
football field, 301 First
Street.
Registration begins at
8 a.m. The 5K race and
fun walk will benefit
victims of the Boston
Marathon bombing, Our
Lady of Constantinople
Chapel, Prince of Peace
Parish and other local
charities.
There will also be a
10 a.m. Mass on Sunday
to honor Our Lady of
Constantinople followed
by a procession of the
statue ending at Our
Lady of Constantinople
Chapel at the Felittese
fairgrounds, 145 Third
Street.
For a race application,
or more information, con-
tact LTerruso@comcast.
net, call 489-0178, or
visit www.facebook.com/
Felittese Association.
PITTSTON: The pub-
lic is invited to a social
event from 10 a.m. to
noon on Saturday at St.
John’s Lutheran Church,
7 Wood Street.
Muffins, Makeovers
and Mimosas will include
Merle Norman skin care
and cosmetics, Advocare
health and wellness prod-
ucts and Cuddle Crafts.
There will also be door
prizes and raffles. No
purchase necessary.
For more information
contact Marcia Colleran
at marcia.colleran@hot-
mail.com or 479-9213.
WAVERLY: The
Waverly Community
House, 1115 N. Abington
Road, will hold a commu-
nity Pledge of Allegiance
in honor of the victims of
the 9-11 attacks at 9:30
a.m. on Wednesday at
the flagpole on the front
lawn of the house.
IN BRIEF
The Luzerne Merchants Association is planning its 18th annual
Fall Pumpkin Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sept. 14. Members
are selling ‘pumpkins’ for the pumpkin derby to be held during
the festival. The proceeds will benefit the Luzerne food pantries.
Several merchants will have pumpkins available for sponsorship.
For a list contact Barbara at 287-6226 or Chuck at 718-4545.
Organizing the derby are merchant members, from left, Barbara
Gavlick, Costumes by Barbara, and Chuck Dekmar, Chuck’s Main
Street Diner.
Pumpkin derby to be
held at fall festival
The Northeast Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association sponsored the inaugural Anne Vanko Liva
Piano Competition on June 8-9 at The Great Hall at Wyoming Seminary. Anne Liva was a nationally
prominent piano teacher and clinician who promoted the arts in northeast Pennsylvania for over 60
years. She resided in Scranton and taught at Wilkes College and in Scranton. The competition com-
mittee was chaired by Michael Popick and committee members were Andrea Bogusko, Ray Cramer,
Thomas Hrynkiw and Michele Malinko, all former students of Liva. Judges were Michael Borthwick,
Erica Castaldo and John Zinsky. Competitors study piano under Bogusko, Pamela Carroll, Cramer,
Cynthia D’Alessandro, Roger Hayden, Hrynkiw, Christine Leandri, Michele Millington, Popick, and
Diane Shuleski. Winners of the competition, who received a monetary gift, certificates and performed
at a winners’ recital, from left: Stephen Murphy, first place, college level, student of Popick; Donna
Yocum, third place, college level, student of Hrynkiw; Eric Peterson, second place, college level,
student of Hrynkiw; Sienna Tabron, first place, grades 9-10, student of Carroll; Dominic Cristofori
D’Alessandro, first place, grades 7-8, student of Cynthia D’Alessandro; Kevin Hu, second place,
grades 7-8, student of Cramer; Sophia Rinaldi, second place, grades 9-10, student of Popick; Kanak
Chattopadhyay, second place, grades 11-12, student of Popick; and Matthew Huertas, first place,
grades 11-12, student of Cramer.
Winners of Anne Vanko Liva
piano competition announced
The Dietrich Theater recently received a check from Perkins
Restaurant in Tunkhannock from the July fundraiser that was held
at the restaurant. The funds will support free children’s program-
ming at the Dietrich Theater. At the check presentation, from left:
Jim Roman, Perkins Restaurant; Patty Holdredge, chair of fund-
raiser event; and Sarah Sidorek, manager, Dietrich Theater.
Perkins supports
Dietrich Theater
Students from the YOUniversal Suzuki Strings recently performed at the Wilkes-Barre Farmers
Market. The YOUniversal Suzuki Strings are under the direction of Mary Ann Saylor, who teaches violin
and viola to students of all ages. It is located at the Art SEEN Gallery on Public Square. Performers,
from left, first row, are Ella Lowe. Second row: Richard Sarker, Sarah Newman, Christina Schuler and
Rebekah Fodale. Third row: Saylor.
YOUniversal Suzuki Strings
students play at farmers market
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because you
want to...
...not because
you feel you
have to.
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Diana Nyad swam from Havana,
Cuba, to Key West, Fla., on the strength
of her spirit. At the age of 64 and on her
fifth attempt, she knew she would have
to.
After staggering ashore Monday,
her body spent and her mouth swollen
by injuries and salt water, she said, “I
have three messages. One is: We should
never, ever give up. Two is: You’re never
too old to chase your dream. Three is:
It looks like a solitary sport, but it’s a
team.”
With the mantra “Find a Way,” Nyad
rhythmically stroked and rocked for 53
hours through the dangerous Florida
Straits. On Monday, she became the
first person to swim from Cuba to
Florida without the benefit of a shark
cage. A day later, she reflected on
the cheers that greeted her arrival at
Smathers Beach in Key West.
“It wasn’t an athletic event,” she
told ABC-TV. “It was a moment of the
human spirit.”
Anyone who has struggled and suf-
fered can relate.
“If something is important to you,
and it looks impossible, and you’re
up against it, just step back a minute
and say, ‘Really, do I have the resolve
to think of every nth degree to get
through this?’” she said. “Most times,
we do. People give up too quickly.”
Not Nyad. She tried unsuccessfully
in 1978 and then, decades later, three
more times in 2011 and 2012, but
couldn’t complete the 110-mile journey.
She said she saw her age as an asset,
however, because her powers of “con-
centration and perspective” were great-
er than when she was a faster swimmer
in her twenties. She was also well-pre-
pared, with a crew of 35 who followed
her in boats, swam ahead warding off
sharks, fed her and checked her condi-
tion every 30 or so minutes.
Nyad wore a full body suit, gloves,
booties and a fitted silicone mask over
her face to protect her from the pain-
ful, debilitating stings of box jelly fish at
night, when the creatures swim to the
surface.
Another endurance swimmer made
the same trek in 1997, but in a shark
cage that protected her from the sea’s
dominant predator as well as water
resistance. Nyad and her team out-
smarted the sharks by surrounding her
with an electrical field strong enough to
repulse them.
Luck was on Nyad’s side as well. The
sea was calm except for a 90-minute
Sunday night squall, which she swam
through.
Diana Nyad did indeed find a way.
And she generously shared it as an
encouraging message for all those seek-
ing a will to fight and win.
Philadelphia Inquirer
OTHER OPINION: SUPER SWIM
Diana Nyad’s lesson?
Simple: ‘Find a way’
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
Policymakers and others agree that
America’s economic growth rate is
anemic. Our current annual growth
rate of only 1.5 percent is far from real-
izing its full potential. We understand
that fact in Northeastern Pennsylvania
better than most. It remains one of the
key reasons why we continue to worry
about our future, as Pennsylvania’s
unemployment rate is above the nation-
al average of 7.4 percent and our region
surpasses the Keystone State’s overall
unemployment rate.
Northeastern Pennsylvania’s 9.4
percent unemployment rate might be
artificially high for structural reasons,
namely the historic inability of our
regional economy to respond as quickly
to national employment trends both on
the downside of the business cycle and
the upside as well.
The unemployment rate for the
country is influenced not only by the
number of people employed, but by
the number of people looking for work.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
counts only people working or look-
ing for work in calculating the number
of unemployed. Real unemployment,
therefore, is higher than reported
because there are people not looking
for work who are not counted as unem-
ployed.
One group that boosts the number
of unemployed not looking for work
is those people on Social Security
Disability. Between December 2007
and March 2013, the number of
Americans on disability swelled from
7.1 million to 8.9 million — a 5.4 per-
cent increase. This places an inordinate
burden on the shrinking Social Security
Trust Fund.
The rapidly growing number of indi-
viduals “stuck in disability” has had,
and might continue to have, a negative
impact on economic growth and the
recovery, according to the Wall Street
Journal. In early April, the national
labor participation rate — the number
of people working or seeking work
— fell to its lowest level since 1979,
a period of rapid inflation and little
economic growth. This is certainly the
wrong direction for what is supposed to
be today’s recovering economy.
A major culprit for this economic
anomaly seems to be the number
of people “stuck” in
the Social Security
Administration’s dis-
ability programs. “Few
people are willing to
trade their disability
checks for paychecks,
in part because the
program doesn’t give
much incentive to leave,”
according to the Wall
Street Journal.
This reality is often
exacerbated by the spe-
cific circumstances of the
unemployed individual. For instance,
if an unemployed parent on disability
decides to take a job that requires work
outside the home, then the cost of child
care must be deducted from their poten-
tial earned income. The added expense
makes taking a job even less desirable.
MIT economist David Autor suggests
the economy “has a case of hysteresis”
created by the transfer of workers who
are unwilling to “forfeit economic
security for a precarious job market.”
These people are not necessarily slack-
ers. They are, however, individuals
who can average about $13,560 a year
on unemployment benefits alone or
about $2,000 less than full-time wages
at the federal minimum wage of $7.25
an hour. Furthermore, after two years
on disability, people are eligible for
Medicare health insurance — another
program that was designed to help the
unemployed, but one that also encour-
ages the status quo among recipients
How do we as a nation respond to
this policy-inflicted unemployment
problem? The solution is not obvious
nor is it easy, especially for a caring
society that sincerely wants to help
those in need.
The answer seems to lie in solv-
ing two key issues: Giving people an
incentive to return to the workforce by
adjusting disability payments and other
government programs, and secondly,
enhancing the capabilities of people
receiving disability payments so they
can learn the skills necessary to re-enter
the job market regardless of their dis-
ability.
The first solution will allow people
who are currently unemployed to
receive some payments even after find-
ing a job. The payments will be reduced
as an individual’s income continues
to increase. Some state and federal
programs are beginning to do this now.
The second initiative helps people
improve their skills and their employ-
ability.
As a truck driver with herniated
discs in his back said to the Wall Street
Journal, “Just because my body is broke
doesn’t mean my mind is.”
It will not be easy to initiate either
of these two suggested cures. What is
clear, however, is that many people on
disability want to work, but they find
too many disincentives to do so. The
myriad of overlapping programs when
combined with the new health care
legislation might actually exacerbate the
problem.
In the 1960s, liberal Democratic New
York Sen. Patrick Moynihan served on
a federal commission to examine the
social and economic issues associated
with programs that incentivize rather
than address unemployment. His semi-
nal report indicated the problem was a
significant one and that federal welfare
programs needed to be adjusted to
address it.
Sen. Moynihan was right more than
50 years ago. Unfortunately, we con-
tinue to lack the political will to deal
with these issues forthrightly. Until we
address the real problems behind unem-
ployment, it will be a continuing issue
for our nation and for our region.
Michael A. MacDowell, of Harveys Lake, is a
former economics professor and the retired presi-
dent of Misericordia University in Dallas Township.
He also is the managing director of the Calvin K.
Kazanjian Economics Foundation.
COMMENTARY: MICHAEL A. MACDOWELL
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 11A
Editorial
When British journalist and broad-
caster Sir David Frost died at 74 of a
heart attack on the cruise ship Queen
Elizabeth last week, it was a sad but
weirdly appropriate end to an eclectic
career.
Frost rose to prominence not as a
Fleet Street reporter biding his time
until a big story about corrupt officials
came along, but as a humorist who
turned the news of the day into sketch-
worthy comedy. In 1962 and 1963 as
the Cold War escalated, Frost was the
epitome of droll sophistication and
skepticism on the BBC program “That
Was the Week That Was.”
After the satiric show was canceled,
Frost decided to break with comedy
and move toward conventional news
and opinion, with celebrity interviews
thrown into the mix. He became the
host of “The David Frost Show” in
1969 and burnished his reputation as
a quick-witted and tenacious inter-
viewer. His American fans found his
approach engaging.
Three years after resigning the presi-
dency in disgrace, Richard M. Nixon
agreed to a series of interviews with
Frost for $600,000. U.S. broadcasters
lamented the fact that a British “celeb-
rity interviewer” had landed such
a coveted subject and worried that
“checkbook journalism” would become
the norm.
Meanwhile, Frost patiently laid
the groundwork for Nixon’s unprec-
edented admission that he had “let the
American people down.” If it wasn’t
the full-throated confession many
wanted, it was a tacit admission that
Nixon hadn’t simply been hounded
from office by political enemies.
Frost continued to be a pillar of TV
journalism in England long after his
star dimmed in the United States. In
recent years, he’d begun reporting for
Al Jazeera English and was scheduled
to interview the British prime minis-
ter. With David Frost’s passing, howev-
er, there is a hole in British broadcast
journalism.
Pittsburgh Post Gazette
OTHER OPINION: DAVID FROST
From satire to Nixon,
journalist was class act
King’s College
reaction too slow
As an alumnus of King’s College,
I read with great interest the report
of Travelers Casualty & Surety Co. fil-
ing suit against Erin Savitski trying to
recoup the $57,399 she allegedly took
from the college while employed as
director of human resources.
It was not that long ago the newspa-
per reported Father John Ryan’s efforts
at cost-cutting measures taken to get the
college back on a solid financial footing
and the successful completion of that
task. Savitski’s alleged actions would
contradict the mission of the entire col-
lege community.
I’m glad King’s apparently had the
proper insurance protection and suf-
fered no monetary loss. I am, however,
embarrassed the college seemingly
lacked the fortitude to pursue the legal
system for more than a year.
Perhaps a fervent act of contrition
and 10 Hail Marys is all the college
requires.
Such a deal!
Joseph C. Giunta
Class of 1970
Dallas
YOUR OPINION: LETTERS TOTHE EDITOR
SEND US YOUR OPINION
Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and daytime phone
number for verifcation. Letters should be no more than 250 words. We reserve
the right to edit and limit writers to one published letter every 30 days.
• Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
• Fax: 570-829-5537
• Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Fixing persistent unemployment
Michael A.
MacDowell
Contributing
Columnist
AP photo
Diana Nyad nears completion Monday of her 111-mile swim from Cuba to the Florida Keys.
interview with The Times
Leader, the teenager said
he was shocked and humil-
iated to hear the words.
“I felt basically like noth-
ing,” he said.
“We don’t see color,
and he shouldn’t have to
be subjected to that,” said
Carissa Shivers. “We don’t
teach that. We don’t teach
hate.”
Ronald Shivers con-
tacted Dallas officials on
the Monday following
that Saturday scrimmage
in Wilkes-Barre and spoke
with Roberts, who, he said,
told him that one Dallas
student had admitted to
using epithets toward the
Meyers students.
Shivers said he was told
the student would be made
to sit out a game. He and
his wife don’t feel that is
adequate.
“He should sit out the
year,” Carissa Shivers said.
“But hopefully he’ll learn,
this is not what you do.”
Galicki reiterated that
his district took the
incident seriously and
responded appropriately.
“We will not tolerate this
type of behavior,” he said.
Carissa Shivers said she
hopes the encounter won’t
have a long-term impact
on her son, who has been
playing football for about
eight years. “He’s good
at it. I don’t want this to
knock him out of it or dis-
courage him,” she said.
The young man seemed
not to have lost his passion
for football as he spoke to
a reporter before heading
out to practice.
“I want to make it my
career,” he said.
assisted by the Germania
SCUBA & Water Rescue
Team. The team would
demonstrate a hoist res-
cue operation in the field
and then a training mis-
sion near Scovell Island in
the Exeter section of the
Susquehanna River.
“Wow, that was neat,”
Echalk said.
Neighbors came out
of their homes to check
out the impressive 16-ton
helicopter and to ask why
it was there on an oth-
erwise quiet and sunny
September day.
The PA HART team is
a specialized aerial search
and rescue team available
to respond to disasters.
Team members receive
technical training that
prepares them to engage
in hostile environmental
conditions in both urban
and wilderness settings.
Len Basara, a res-
cue technician with PA
HART and captain of
the Germania SCUBA
Rescue Team, coordinated
the exercise to help train
county emergency person-
nel. Basara said there are
20 to 25 water rescues
conducted each year in
Luzerne County.
We go to ice rescues in
Hazleton to flipped canoes
in Harding,” Basara said.
“Today’s exercise will
train everybody on events
that would require an air
asset.”
Steve Bekanich,
Luzerne County emergen-
cy management director,
said two rescue boats —
one from Harding and one
from Germania — were
used to simulate a river
rescue. He said the train-
ing session re-enacted an
actual 911 call that would
dispatch the nearest res-
cue boats and then deter-
mine if additional units
would be needed, such as
the PA HART helicopter
unit.
“This exercise will give
us the opportunity to
train with a live air asset,”
Bekanich said.
Scott Grahn, command-
er of the 20-member PA
HART team, conducted
an emergency briefing
that provided details to
the responding units. The
pilot of the helicopter and
the crew were not aware
of where they would
be dispatched until the
exact time that the first
responders determined
the need.
“We will proceed as if
this is an actual rescue,”
Grahn said.
All members of the PA
HART team are volun-
teers, each having jobs
in varying areas. He said
all members have mutual
aid agreements with their
employers to allow them
to be dispatched when an
emergency occurs.
The team members all
wore T-shirts with the
phrase: “When all else
fails, we drop in.”
“This training makes
your county better and
it makes the state of
Pennsylvania better —
and safer,” Grahn said.
Grahn said two hoist
devices were brought
for the training session
— a Strop and a Jungle
Penetrator — that can be
used in open areas or in
wooded areas.
All members of all units
were provided an Incident
Action Plan that detailed
all objectives of the train-
ing mission. It included
names and assigned duties
of all involved, radio com-
munication frequencies, a
medical plan, an activity
log and maps of the rescue
area.
The Blackhawk heli-
copter performed two
simulated rescues in
the Susquehanna River
between Scovell Island
and the former railroad
bridge now owned by
Leo A. Glodzik of LAG
Towing.
To see more of PA
HART’s previous training
exercises, go to the PA
HART YouTube channel at
http://www.youtube.com/
user/PennsylvaniaHART.
In addition to Grahn,
PA HART members par-
ticipating were Ryan
Walt, Mike Kurtz, Chris
Calhoun, Bud Kaufman
and Basara. John Fefolt,
chief warrant officer and
assistant PA HART com-
mander, represented the
Pennsylvania National
Guard. Jason Murtha
piloted the helicopter.
PAGE 12A Friday, September 6, 2013 NEWS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Monterrey
88/72
Chihuahua
81/57
Los Angeles
92/69
Washington
75/55
New York
73/58
Miami
90/79
Atlanta
88/71
Detroit
76/60
Houston
94/74
Kansas City
92/68
Chicago
83/68
Minneapolis
90/70
El Paso
90/70
Denver
94/64
Billings
94/64
San Francisco
76/58
Seattle
66/58
Toronto
72/59
Montreal
68/59
Winnipeg
86/56
SEVEN-DAY FORECAST
HIGH
LOW
TEMPERATURES
ALMANAC NATIONAL FORECAST
PRECIPITATION
Lehigh
Delaware
Sunrise Sunset
Moonrise Moonset
Today Today
Today Today
Susquehanna Stage Chg Fld Stg
RIVER LEVELS
ACROSS THE REGION TODAY
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation today. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Shown is
today’s weather.
Temperatures are
today’s highs and
tonight’s lows.
SUN & MOON
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Wilkes-Barre
Scranton
Philadelphia
Reading
Pottsville
Allentown
Harrisburg
State College
Williamsport
Towanda
Binghamton
Syracuse
Albany
Poughkeepsie
New York
PHILADELPHIA
THE JERSEY SHORE
SAT MON
TUE WED
SUN
THU
TODAY
73°
45°
Partly
sunny and
nice
79° 58°
Sunny and
pleasant
74° 52°
Sunshine
and more
humid
80° 63°
A p.m.
thunder-
storm
85° 64°
Partly
sunny, a
shower
78° 47°
A thun-
derstorm
around
81° 52°
Fog in
the a.m.;
mostly
sunny
COOLING DEGREE DAYS
Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the
total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.
Yesterday 2
Month to date 31
Year to date 733
Last year to date 836
Normal year to date 537
Anchorage 56/52/r 58/52/r
Baltimore 76/53/s 82/62/s
Boston 67/57/s 76/61/s
Buffalo 70/57/s 78/61/t
Charlotte 86/63/pc 84/64/s
Chicago 83/68/s 87/64/t
Cleveland 73/55/s 83/65/pc
Dallas 98/75/s 98/77/s
Denver 94/64/pc 93/63/pc
Honolulu 89/74/s 89/77/pc
Indianapolis 84/62/s 86/67/pc
Las Vegas 100/82/t 98/83/pc
Milwaukee 82/66/s 84/63/pc
New Orleans 90/75/t 92/75/pc
Norfolk 76/59/pc 76/66/s
Okla. City 96/71/s 97/71/s
Orlando 90/74/t 90/74/t
Phoenix 106/86/s 104/87/t
Pittsburgh 73/47/s 81/61/pc
Portland, ME 68/49/s 72/56/pc
St. Louis 90/69/s 91/70/s
San Francisco 76/58/pc 81/57/s
Seattle 66/58/r 73/56/pc
Wash., DC 75/55/s 81/66/s
Bethlehem 2.16 -0.10 16
Wilkes-Barre 5.15 +2.55 22
Towanda 4.36 +0.49 16
Port Jervis 3.49 -0.68 18
In feet as of 7 a.m. Thursday.
Today Sat Today Sat Today Sat
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
Sept 12 Sept 19
Sept 26
First Full
Last New
Oct 4
6:35 a.m.
7:46 a.m.
7:28 p.m.
7:49 p.m.
THE POCONOS
Highs: 65-71. Lows: 39-45. Mostly sunny today; fog in the morning
and cool, then pleasant in the afternoon. Clear tonight.
Highs: 68-74. Lows: 53-59. Mostly sunny and cooler but pleasant
today. Clear tonight. Mostly sunny and pleasant tomorrow.
THE FINGER LAKES
Highs: 66-72. Lows: 49-55. Cool in the morning; otherwise, mostly
sunny and pleasant today. Mainly clear tonight.
NEW YORK CITY
High: 73. Low: 58. Cool during the morning; otherwise, mostly sunny
and pleasant today. Clear tonight.
High: 74. Low: 55. Cool in the morning; otherwise, sunny much of the
time and pleasant today. Clear tonight.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport
through 7 p.m. Thursday
High/low 73°/61°
Normal high/low 76°/56°
Record high 90° (1985)
Record low 42° (1896)
24 hrs ending 7 p.m. 0.00"
Month to date 0.10"
Normal m-t-d 0.63"
Year to date 18.47"
Normal y-t-d 25.66"
73/45
70/48
74/55
73/48
70/47
72/47
72/46
70/46
72/47
69/45
66/50
69/52
68/47
68/44
73/58
Summary: Sunshine is in store from the Plains to the Northeast today. Spotty
storms will affect the Deep South, the upper Great Lakes and interior Southwest.
Showers and storms will drench parts of the Northwest.
Aimee Dilger | The Times Leader
A mock victim is rescued and lifted into a helicopter during a river rescue drill in the Susquehanna
River on Thursday afternoon.
authorities, who then con-
ducted a comprehensive
criminal investigation.”
After DeSanto retired,
WVSA froze his accrued
benefits they say they
were legally permitted to
withhold.
“These monies are
being held and will be
applied towards any res-
titution which is due to
the WVSA. If there is a
shortfall in restitution,
the WVSA will pursue
recouping the balance of
restitution, if any, through
the recently filed criminal
case,” the release states.
WVSA retained DeHey
McAndrew, an indepen-
dent human resourc-
es company based in
Scranton, to identify cor-
rective measures to pre-
vent similar abuse.
“The abuses that have
been reported obviously
cannot be tolerated in any
segment of business but
this is especially the case
where the public trust
is involved,” the release
states.
The sanitary authority’s
service area includes 35
municipalities in Luzerne
County from Newport
Township to the Pittston
area.
From page 1A
DeSanto
From page 1A
Rescue
times in response to
shootings, assaults and
robberies.
“What is being
described is something
that is not unusual,”
she said after being
informed of the rules.
Typically, management
notifies tenants 30 days
in advance of the mea-
sures going into effect.
“The goal is to try and
manage who is coming
on and off the property
so its safer,” Wolfe said
of the 344-unit complex
where nearly all of the
residents received HUD
subsidies for rent.
HUD will follow up
with the management
to obtain copies of the
security measures,
Wolfe said.
“It’s their role to set
policy and enforce pol-
icy in order to secure
the end goal of safe and
affordable housing for
residents,” she said.
The complex will
undergo two inspec-
tions this year. A man-
agement review will
“take a look at every-
thing,” Wolfe said.
The other review will
be conducted by the
agency’s Real Estate
Assessment Center and
looks at the physical
conditions of the build-
ings, she said.
From page 1A
Rules
WILKES-BARRE —
Taleek Sistrunk, 21, of 308 N.
Empire Court, Wilkes-Barre,
swatted microphones and
threatened to spit saliva at
reporters as he was escorted
by city police from district
court on Thursday.
“Everybody better get out
of my face before you all get
spit in your face. Move!” a
shackled Sistrunk bellowed
to reporters who followed
him to a city police prisoner
transport van. Sistrunk made
a noise with his throat, sug-
gesting he was about to
launch saliva from his mouth.
An area TV reporter jumped
out of the way, and Sistrunk,
jailed for lack of $50,000 bail,
was returned to Luzerne
County jail.
Sistrunk was in district
court for a preliminary hear-
ing that was continued until
Sept. 12. City police allege
Sistrunk was one of three
people arrested on simple
assault charges after officers
investigated a fight at 91 N.
Empire Court on Aug. 24.
That incident occurred
about four hours after a
shooting at the Sherman Hills
apartment complex left two
girls injured with gunshot
wounds. Authorities said
they are trying to determine
if there is any connection
between the two incidents.
Authorities have not iden-
tified the shooter.
Investigators believe one
of the shooting suspects
attempted to leave town in
a 1999 Dodge minivan with
a tire on the roof. The vehi-
cle was seized in the area of
510 S. Empire St. after the
shooting and fight on North
Empire Court.
Police allege Sistrunk,
Jevaun Brown, 24, of 19 S.
Empire Court, and Trevor
Whitaker, 266, of Brooklyn,
N.Y., assaulted two people
over a missing bank card,
according to arrest records.
No charges have been filed
related to the shooting.
Assault suspect tosses words, not phlegm, at media
EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Taleek Sistrunk arrives at a Wilkes-Barre magistrates office for a
preliminary hearing on simple assault charges.
For video, go to
timesleader.com.
Clark Van Orden | The Times Leader
Ronald Shivers, of Wilkes-Barre, talks about howhis son and anoth-
er Meyers High School football player reported being subjected to
racial slurs by Dallas players during a recent junior varsity scrim-
mage. A Dallas student has been disciplined.
From page 1A
Slur
This is the second year
that NOAA and the British
meteorology office have
teamed up to look at the
greenhouse gas connection
to the previous year’s unusu-
al events.
“We’ve got some new
evidence that human influ-
ence has changed the risk
and has changed it enough
that we can detect it,” study
lead author Peter Stott, head
of climate monitoring and
attribution for the British
meteorological office, said at
a news conference.
The researchers said cli-
mate change had made these
2012 events more likely:
U.S. heat waves, Superstorm
Sandy flooding, shrink-
ing Arctic sea ice, drought
in Europe’s Iberian penin-
sula, and extreme rainfall in
Australia and NewZealand.
The 78 international
researchers, however,
found no global warming
connection for the U.S.
drought, Europe’s summer
extremes, a cold spell in
the Netherlands, drought in
eastern Kenya and Somalia,
floods in northern China
and heavy rain in southwest-
ern Japan.
That doesn’t mean that
there weren’t climate change
factors involved, just that
researchers couldn’t find or
prove them, said the authors
of the 84-page study, pub-
lished in the Bulletin of the
American Meteorological
Society.
From page 1A
Weather
K
sports
timesleader.com
THETIMES LEADER Friday, September 6, 2013
SECTION B
GAR trying to avoid 0-2 start
JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
GAR knows that losing its first
two football games of the season
isn’t terminal. The Grenadiers
did just that last year, then went
on a victory binge to qualify for
the District 2 Class 2A playoffs.
And while GAR coach Paul
Wiedlich Jr. commended last
year’s team for its mettle, he
would prefer this year’s bunch
doesn’t perform the same high-
wire act.
That could be very difficult as
the Grenadiers (0-1) will be on
a thin line between victory and
defeat when they host Dunmore
(1-0) at 7 p.m. Saturday at
Wilkes-Barre Memorial Stadium.
“Last year was really tough,
especially coming off two seasons
where we kind of ran the table,”
said Wiedlich, whose team won
the D2-2A titles in 2010 and
2011. “But our kids really showed
a lot of determination and a nev-
er-say-die attitude each week. We
took one game at a time.”
While GAR’s 2012 campaign
ended with a district semifinal
loss to Lakeland, Dunmore con-
tinued playing right to the very
end.
The Bucks advanced all the
way to the PIAA Class A state
championship game, falling to
perennial powerhouse Clairton
20-0. Many faces that led to the
title contest are back, and they
didn’t miss a step in trouncing
North Pocono 48-13 in their
opener.
The two biggest names are in
the backfield. Senior running
back Daiqwon Buckley is closing
in on 4,000 career rushing yards.
He’s a big guy at 225 pounds.
Senior quarterback Brandon
Kujawski passes sparingly, but
when he does he is usually very
effective.
It’s a formula that coach Jack
Henzes has used throughout
his 47 years as a head coach.
Establish the run, sneak in the
pass, win the game. Henzes, who
was Wyoming Area’s first coach
in 1966, has walked off the field a
winner 372 times.
Fred Adams file photo | For The Times Leader
GAR, shown here scrimmaging against Dallas in the preseason,
has rallied from rough starts before. The Grenadiers have another
tough test Saturday against Dunmore.
WEEK 2 SCHEDULE
TODAY’S GAMES
(7 p.m.)
Berwick at Pottsville
Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech at
Nanticoke
Crestwood at North Pocono
Delaware Valley at Wyoming
Valley West
Hazleton Area at Coughlin
Lackawanna Trail at Hanover
Area
Lake-Lehman at Montrose
Meyers at Old Forge
Mid Valley at Wyoming Area
Mifin County at Williamsport
Scranton at Pittston Area
Tunkhannock at West Scranton
SATURDAY’S GAMES
Dallas at Abington Heights, 1
p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Holy Cross,
1 p.m.
Northwest at Susquehanna, 1
p.m.
Dunmore at GAR, 7 p.m.
See GAR | 4B
Out of high
school and
into the fre for
PSU freshmen
DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com
It’s not a typo, and the numbers
aren’t some aberration. More than 40
percent of Penn State’s travel roster
for the opener against Syracuse (31-
of-74) was made up of players with
freshman eligibility.
Sixteen true freshmen. Fifteen red-
shirt freshmen. It’s something the
Nittany Lions are going to have to get
used to as they deal with depth issues
stemming from NCAA sanctions.
Many were there to play. Christian
Hackenberg, Adam Breneman, Richy
Anderson, Jordan Smith, Anthony
Smith and Von Walker all got in the
game as true freshmen. Eugene Lewis,
Akeel Lynch, Austin Johnson, Brian
Gaia, Malik Golden and Adam Cole
made their Penn State debuts as red-
shirt freshmen.
Others came just to get a gameday
experience. Some were even chosen
for strategic purposes.
“You want to bring guys that deserve
to go,” Lions coach Bill O’Brien said.
“Certain guys came that have roles,
like (true freshman quarterback)
Austin Whipple came on the trip
because he was signaling (plays on the
sideline). And then you have young
guys that we felt deserved to go and
would be future players for us — this
year or maybe this week or down the
road.
“It’s important for those guys to get
used to getting on a plane and under-
standing the routine and how serious
it is. The meetings at the hotel. How
you warm up before the game. How
intense the locker room is. How alert
you have to be during the game and
how into the game you’ve got to be.
Because it’s next man up and you have
to be ready to go in.”
And more freshmen could be going
in soon, possibly in Saturday’s home
opener against Eastern Michigan.
In its media guide, Penn State
only lists bios of true freshmen who
enrolled early and have already spent a
semester on campus. But each fall the
program distributes a handful of bios
See FRESHMEN | 4B
Eagles’ Cooper in practice scufe
ROB MAADDI
AP Pro Football Writer
PHILADELPHIA — The first
punch thrown at Riley Cooper
since it became known he made a
racial remark didn’t come from an
opponent, but a teammate.
Cooper, who left the Philadelphia
Eagles for three days in training
camp after a video of him using the
N-word surfaced on the Internet,
found himself in a scuffle with
defensive back Cary Williams at
practice Thursday. Cooper, a wide
receiver, said afterward it had
nothing to do with his comment at
a Kenny Chesney concert in June.
And Williams declined to speak to
reporters.
“Both being super competitive,
going for the ball,” Cooper said.
“We had a tangle-up at the ball,
we both went to the ground. There
was a lot of contact at the top of
the route.
“It was nothing.”
Williams was covering Cooper,
broke up a pass from quarterback
Michael Vick and both players went
down. Cooper stood up and shoved
Williams first. Williams responded
with a couple punches and had to
be forcibly restrained by team-
mates, including Vick.
Cooper walked away after cor-
nerback Brandon Boykin stepped
in to separate the players. Williams
then took his helmet off, screamed
at Cooper and started walking
toward him before Vick stepped in
and grabbed the fiery cornerback
by his jersey. Williams yelled at
Vick, and an assistant coach led the
quarterback away.
“Our maturity level has to be on
a whole different plane,” Vick said.
“Regardless of who the catalyst was
for the whole fight, that doesn’t
matter. We have to be men. We’re
not guys who are out on the street,
fighting one another. We’re team-
mates. It’s game week. We don’t
have time for that. I don’t.
“It’s a distraction.”
The Eagles open their season
against the Redskins in Washington
on Monday night.
DeSean Jackson eventually
calmed Williams, who is no stranger
to fights. Williams found himself in
a scuffle against an opponent when
the Eagles and the New England
Patriots held a joint scrimmage last
month and was pulled from prac-
tice. He fought Jackson during a
game last year when he played for
See COOPER | 8B
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
AP photo
New York shortstop Derek Jeter, top, jumps to avoid Boston’s Mike Napoli’s takeout slide at second base during the fifth inning of
Thursday’s game at Yankee Stadium.
AP photo
Baltimore strong safety James Ihedigbo (32)
breaks up a pass intended for Denver tight end
Julius Thomas (80).
Ravens, Broncos providing the lightning
EDITOR’S NOTE: At press time, Denver
led Baltimore 35-17 early in the third quar-
ter. For full results fromthe NFL opener, visit
timesleader.com.
PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer
DENVER — Justin Tucker hit a 25-yard
field goal and the Super Bowl champion
Baltimore Ravens led the Denver Broncos
17-14 at halftime Thursday night in the
season opener that started 33 minutes late
because of lightning.
Ray Rice also had a 1-yard TD run for
Baltimore in the second quarter.
Peyton Manning had a big first half, find-
ing tight end Julius Thomas for two touch-
downs. Thomas entered the game with no
career TDs and just one catch. He had three
receptions for 97 yards in the first half.
Rice scampered in for a 1-yard touchdown
early in the second quarter to give the Ravens
a 14-7 lead. Rice’s short TD score was set up
when Wes Welker muffed a punt near the
goal line, the ball slipping through his hands
on a fair catch. Morgan Cox pounced on the
ball as Welker tried to haul it back in.
In the opening quarter, Joe Flacco threw a
2-yard TD pass to fullback Vonta Leach.
Late night
in the
Bronx
Stafandwire reports
NEW YORK — If it’s September, the
Yankees and Red Sox must be headed to
extra innings.
After New York rallied from five runs
down to take a late lead over Boston, the
Sox fired back, manufacturing a run with
two outs in the top of the ninth to send
Thursday night’s AL East showdown
into extras.
At press time, the teams were tied at
8-8 in the 10th inning.
Mariano Rivera came on to close out
an 8-7 lead for the Yankees, who have
surged back into the postseason picture.
He got the first two outs with little prob-
lem but hit some trouble from there.
Mike Napoli singled to give Boston
some life. Pinch-runner Quintin Berry
came on and really caused some havoc.
Berry went to steal second and ended
up taking third on a throwing error by
Yankees catcher Austin Romine.
Stephen Drew stepped up from there,
singling home Berry to tie things up,
much to the displeasure of the Yankee
Stadium crowd.
New York had trailed 7-2 before piec-
ing together a huge seventh inning.
Ichiro Suzuki and Vernon Wells both
reached to leadoff the frame and chase
Sox starter Jake Peavy.
Brett Gardner singled in one
run. Robinson Cano brought home
another on a fielder’s choice. Alfonso
Soriano’s RBI single made it 7-5. Curtis
Granderson then struck with a double to
deep right that brought home Cano.
Lyle Overbay then came throught with
the biggest hit, knocking in two runs
on a single to right to put the Yankees
ahead.
Tensions already tight
Major League Baseball has sent a
“heads-up” notice to the umpires work-
ing the series between the Boston Red
Sox and New York Yankees, reminding
the crewthat the teams had a dustup the
last time they played.
The Red Sox visited Yankee Stadium
on Thursday night in their first game
since Boston’s Ryan Dempster hit Alex
Rodriguez with a pitch on Aug. 18. That
caused the teams to tussle at Fenway
Park, and Dempster was suspended for
five games.
Umpire crew chief Joe West says it’s
been standard protocol for MLB for a
decade or so to give advance notice to
crews when clubs are meeting for the
first time since having trouble. West said
the umpires were recently sent an email
advising them that there was a “heads-
up” for this series.
“It’s good that they let the crews know,
not just for this series but for anytime
there have been problems,” he said. “All
of the umpires are aware there was a
throwing incident involving the Red Sox
and Yankees.”
Asked whether he would issue a warn-
ing to both teams prior to the first pitch,
West said: “Everyone is aware of what
happened.”
Boston manager John Farrell said he
didn’t think there would be any retali-
ation for Dempster’s pitch during the
four-game series. He said he hadn’t
heard anything from MLB regarding the
previous ruckus.
PAGE 2B Friday, September 6, 2013 SCOREBOARD www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
local calendar
what’ s on tv
transacti ons
CAMPS/CLINICS
SemCradle Lacrosse is ofering
a clinic for boys and girls ages 4
to 8at Wyoming Seminary Upper
School in Kingston. Program
sessions will be held Saturdays from
noon to 1 p.m. at Klassner Field
on North Maple Street beginning
Saturday, Sept. 21 and continuing
through Nov. 2. Cost is $120. The
programprovides all necessary
equipment with no additional feel.
The curriculumis designed to
teach the basics of lacrosse. It will
be directed by Semcoach Catie
Kersey. For more information or to
register, contact Kersey at ckersey@
wyomingseminary.org.
LEAGUES
Kingston Recreation Center is
nowaccepting teams for its fall
softball leagues. League fees for
men’s teams playing Monday,
Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday as
well as Sunday Co-Ed are $125 per
team. Sunday men’s leagues are
$75 per team. Please call for more
information at 287-1106.
Wilkes-Barre Recreation League
fall softball season will run from
September through November. All
games will be played at Kirby Field
#1 andWolsiefer Field located
at the Coal Street Park. Divisions
include women, co-ed and three
men’s divisions. Teams interested in
playing softball in the divisions listed
above should to call 208-4126for
schedule and fees.
MEETINGS
Back Mountain Little League will
hold a board meeting Monday, Sept.
9at 7 p.m. at the Daddow-Isaacs
American Legion located on Route
415 in Dallas. General meeting, open
to the public, will be held at 8p.m.
Berwick Boys Basketball
Boosters, 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 9in
the varsity gymlobby.
Crestwood Boys Basketball
Booster Clubwill hold its next
meeting at 7 p.m., Monday, Sept. 9
at Cavanaugh’s Grille.
Hughestown Sports Clubwill
have a meeting at 2:30p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 18, at Granteed’s, Parsonage
St. in Pittston. Game tickets and
season tickets are available and
can be purchased at the meeting
or by contacting any club member.
For more information, call Barbara
Kapish at 457-5705.
Nanticoke Area Little League will
meet Sept. 11 at 7 p.m. Location will
be announced soon. Elections for
all positions will take place at end of
meeting.
Plains Yankees Football and
Cheerleading Organizationwill
have its monthly meeting Monday,
Sept. 9, at 8p.m. at the PAVin
Hudson. All are welcome to attend.
WyomingArea Boys Soccer
Parents will hold a meeting Sunday
Sept. 8at 6p.m. for the parents of
the boys soccer team. The meeting
will be held at Butler Street Park in
Wyoming.
UPCOMINGEVENTS/OTHER
Assembly 59will have a golf
tournament Saturday, Sept. 21
at the Hollenback Golf Course on
NorthWashington Street inWilkes-
Barre. The tournament begins at 9
a.m. The cost is $40per person. For
more information, call Butch at 829-
3398or 825-3584. Refreshments
will be served afterwards at the
North End Slovak Club.
Bass FishingTournament will be
held Sept. 21 at Blytheburn Lake
on Blytheburn Rd. in MountainTop.
Boats in the water at 6:30a.m. and
out at 11 a.m. The fee is $40per
team. The tournament is limited
to 10boats. Reserve early. This is a
fundraiser for the Blytheburn Lake
Association. For more information,
call 868-6895 or 678-5261.
Commonwealth Medical
College will have its ffth annual
golf tournament Monday, Sept.
30, at Huntsville Golf Course in
Shavertown. Registration is at 9
a.m. and the tournament begins
at 10a.m. All proceeds beneft The
Commonwealth Medical College
scholarships. For more information,
call 504-9619.
Dallas Rotary Club’s 30thAnnual
Golf Classic, to support Dallas
Rotary charities, will be held at the
IremCountry Club on Monday, Sept.
23. The tournament starts at 12:30
p.m. The sponsorship donation is
$100and the player entry fee is
$110. The format is captain and
crew. Individuals are welcome and
will be teamed up with others in a
group. For more information or an
entry form, call Kevin Smith at 696-
5420. Sponsors and players should
respond by Sept. 12.
Greater Pittston Friendly Sons
of St. Patrick will have its Black
Shamrock Open Saturday, Sept.
7, at Blue RidgeTrail Golf Course.
The format will be captain and
crewand cost is $75 per golfer.
The tournament begins at 1:30
p.m. There will be refreshments
at the course, and a bufet meal
following the tournament at the
golf course. To register or for more
information, call Jimmy Clancy at
881-4176or any active member of
the G.P. Friendly Sons of St. Patrick.
Registration should be completed
as soon as possible. Sponsorships
are also available at several diferent
levels. The proceeds will beneft the
Greater Pittston Friendly Sons of St.
Patrick Scholarship Program.
HazletonArea Football is selling
season tickets. Reserved seating are
$25. Adult general admission tickets
are $15, and HazletonArea students
can purchase tickets for $5. Season
tickets are on sale in theAthletic
Ofce fromMonday through Friday
10a.m. to 4p.m.
Holy Rosary Golf Tournament is
set for Sept. 15 at Pine Hills Country
Club inTaylor. Registration is at
noon for a 1 p.m. shotgun start.
Cost is $90per player, $360for a
foursome, and includes lunch and
dinner. Contact Debbie at 451-1762
or Holy Rosary School at 457-2553
for information, registrations and
sponsorships.
Kingston/Forty Fort Little
League Board of Directors has
nominations for all positions. In
order to submit your name for
nomination, please email bbordow@
ptd.net indicating your interest.
Nominations for all positions will be
submitted at the KFFBoard meeting
on Monday, Sept. 16. Adetailed
description of these positions are
available on our website- www.kfl.
org.
Knights of Columbus Pittston
Council #372local level 2013
soccer challenge will be held at
noon Sept. 22 at theJames Clark
Park located along Curry Street
in Pittston for all area boys and
girls ages 10-14. Winners progress
through local, district and state
competitions. Participants will
compete in their respective
age groups. There is no cost for
admission. Participants are required
to have proof of age and written
parental consent to compete. For
more information, call Don Mac Rae
at 815-4454or Mitch Megliola at
335-3002.
Luzerne County Special
Olympics Golf Tournament will
be held Sunday, Sept. 22 with a
noon check-in and a 1 p.m. shotgun
start at Four Seasons Golf Course in
Exeter. The tournament will beneft
Luzerne County Special Olympians’
fall/winter/spring training. To
register or to donate, please email
Frank at fvt315@netzero.comor call
510-5600.
Milton Brown Memorial Golf
Tournament will be held Sept.
9at Fox Hill Country Club. The
tournament starts at 1 p.m. and
the format is captain and crew.
The tournament supports theJCC
day camp. The day includes golf,
dinner, prizes, pot of gold, mulligans,
whiskey tasting, a cigar smoker and
a $15,000hole-in-one give away.
Newport Township Democrats
will have their 3rd annual golf
tournament Saturday, Sept. 7, at
Edgewood in the Pines. It will be
a four-man scramble format with
a shotgun start at 9:00a.m. The
cost is $340per teamor $85 per
person. This includes 18holes
of golf, carts, prizes and skins.
Clambake and refreshments will
be served at Holy Child Gove in
Sheatown immediately following
golf. Entertainment will be provided
by DJ Fran. Clambake tickets may
be purchased separately for $25 per
person. For more information, call
Paul Czapracki at 736-6859or Alan
Yendrzeiwski at 735-3831.
BULLETIN BOARD
LATEST LINE
Major League Baseball
FAVORITE LINE UNDERDOG LINE
National League
at Cincinnati -135 St. Louis +125
at San Francisco -110 Arizona +100
American League
at Kansas City -165 Seattle +155
at NewYork -110 Boston +100
at Baltimore -160 Chicago +150
Tampa Bay -180 at Los Angeles +170
at Oakland -250 Houston +220
NCAAFootball
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Today
at Boston College 3½ 3 (48½) Wake Forest
UCF 23 24½ (53) at FIU
Saturday
Florida 3 3 (49) at Miami
at Kentucky 13½ 17 (56) Miami
(Ohio) at Michigan St. 22 23½ (44) South Florida
Oklahoma St. 31½ 26 (60) at UTSA
Houston 2 3 (67½) at Temple
at Ohio 6½ 4½ (58½) NorthTexas
at North Carolina 21½ 18 (66) Middle Tenn.
Cincinnati 16 8 (54½) at Illinois
at Oklahoma 18 21 (58) West Virginia
at Georgia 5 3 (56) S. Carolina
at Ohio St. 24 28 (55) San Diego St.
Utah St. 9½ 9½ (60) at Air Force
at Tulane 7 7 (51) S. Alabama
Oregon 26 22½ (61) at Virginia
Duke 7½ 6 (51) at Memphis
at Northwestern 9½ 17 (53) Syracuse
at Indiana 4 13 (67½) Navy
at Nebraska 30 28½ (59½) Southern Miss.
Texas 3½ 7 (57) at BYU
at LSU 34 34½ (61) UAB
at Missouri 12½ 17 (65½) Toledo
at Tulsa 10 10½ (53½) Colorado St.
at Auburn 4 12 (62) Arkansas St.
at Ball St. 11 7½ (61) Army
at Penn St. 28 24 (48½) E. Michigan
at Baylor 24½ 27½ (67) Bufalo
Bowling Green 2½ 7½ (45) at Kent St.
at Tennessee 13 13 (55½) W. Kentucky
at Kansas St. 16 10½ (59) La.-Lafayette
at Michigan Pk 4 (51) Notre Dame
at Oregon St. 28 27 (52½) Hawaii
Minnesota 21 15½ (51½) at N. Mex. St.
at Wyoming 22 28 (65) Idaho
at UTEP 8 6 (52) NewMexico
at Southern Cal 20½ 15½ (53½) Wash. St.
Arizona 17½ 10½ (61) at UNLV
at Stanford 18½ 26½ (48½) SanJose St.
NFL
FAVORITE OPEN TODAY O/U UNDERDOG
Sunday
NewEngland 6½ 9½ (51) at Bufalo
at Pittsburgh 6½ 7 (42) Tennessee
at NewOrleans 3 3 (54) Atlanta
Tampa Bay 2½ 3½ (40) at N.Y. Jets
Kansas City 2½ 4 (41)at Jacksonville
at Chicago 3 3 (42) Cincinnati
at Cleveland Pk Pk (41) Miami
Seattle 3½ 3½ (45) at Carolina
at Detroit 3 5 (46½) Minnesota
at Indianapolis 6½ 9½ (47) Oakland
at St. Louis 5½ 4½ (41) Arizona
at San Francisco 5½ 4½ (48½) Green Bay
at Dallas 3 3½ (48½) N.Y. Giants
Monday
at Washington 4½ 3½ (51½) Philadelphia
Houston 2½ 4 (44) at San Diego
baseball
INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
First Round Playofs
(Best-of-5)
Durham1, Indianapolis 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Durham2, Indianapolis 0
Thursday, Sep. 5: Durham6, Indianapolis 5
Friday, Sep. 6: Durhamat Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Durham at Indianapolis, 7:05
p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Durham at Indianapolis, 7:05
p.m.
Rochester vs. Pawtucket
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Rochester 7, Pawtucket 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Pawtucket 7, at Rochester 2
Friday, Sep. 6: Rochester at Pawtucket, 7:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Rochester at Pawtucket, TBA
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Rochester at Pawtucket, TBA
(x-if necessary)
EASTERN LEAGUE
Wild-Card
(Best-of-5)
Trenton vs. Binghamton
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Trenton 6, Binghamton 5, 10
innings
Thursday, Sep. 5: Trenton 2, Binghamton 1
Friday, Sep. 6: Trenton at Binghamton,
7:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Trenton at Binghamton, 7:05
p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Trenton at Binghamton, 1:05
p.m.
(x-if necessary)
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Harrisburg 1, Erie 0
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Harrisburg 5, Erie 4
Thursday, Sep. 5: Erie 2, Harrisburg 1.
Friday, Sep. 6: Erie at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Erie at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Erie at Harrisburg, 2 p.m.
(x-if necessary)
NEWYORK - PENN LEAGUE
McNamara Division
W L Pct. GB
z-Aberdeen (Orioles) 40 32 .556 —
Brooklyn (Mets) 38 37 .507 3½
HudsonValley (Rays) 38 37 .507 3½
Staten Island (Yankees) 34 41 .453 7½
Pinckney Division
W L Pct. GB
z-State College (Cardinals) 47 27 .635 —
z-Jamestown (Pirates) 43 31 .581 4
Batavia (Marlins) 39 36 .520 8½
Williamsport (Phillies) 37 38 .493 10½
MahoningValley (Indians) 30 44 .405 17
Auburn (Nationals) 26 49 .347 21½
Stedler Division
W L Pct. GB
z-Tri-City (Astros) 44 32 .579 —
Lowell (Red Sox) 40 33 .548 2½
Connecticut (Tigers) 33 42 .440 10½
Vermont (Athletics) 33 43 .434 11
z-clinched playof spot
Wednesday’s Games
Brooklyn 4, Tri-City 2
Jamestown 9, State College 4
Williamsport 6, Batavia 3
HudsonValley 4, Connecticut 1
Aberdeen 5, Lowell 4
Staten Island 5, Vermont 2, 5 innings
MahoningValley 2, Auburn 0
Thursday’s Games
No games scheduled
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
First Round
(Best-of-5)
Las Vegas vs. Salt Lake
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Salt Lake 4, Las Vegas 3
Thursday, Sep. 5: Las Vegas at Salt Lake, 8:35
p.m.
Friday, Sep. 6: Salt Lake at Las Vegas, 10:05 p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Salt Lake at Las Vegas, 3:05
p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Salt Lake at Las Vegas, 3:05
p.m.
(x-if necessary)
Oklahoma City vs. Omaha
Wednesday, Sep. 4: Omaha 3, Oklahoma City 1
Thursday, Sep. 5: Omaha at Oklahoma City, 8:05
p.m.
Friday, Sep. 6: Oklahoma City at Omaha, 8:05
p.m.
x-Saturday, Sep. 7: Oklahoma City at Omaha,
8:05 p.m.
x-Sunday, Sep. 8: Oklahoma City at Omaha, 3:05
p.m.
MAjOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
WEDNESDAY’S LATE GAMES
Rays 3, Angels 1
Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
DeJesus lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .278
Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .275
Longoria 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .266
Joyce rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Fuld rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203
Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .303
De.Jennings cf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .249
W.Myers dh 4 2 3 3 0 0 .291
J.Molina c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .238
Y.Escobar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .267
Totals 33 3 7 3 3 4
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Shuck lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .290
Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .271
Trout cf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .335
J.Hamilton dh 3 0 1 0 1 1 .236
Calhoun rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .267
Trumbo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .233
Conger c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .259
a-Iannetta ph-c 2 1 1 1 0 1 .212
L.Jimenez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .253
G.Green 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .245
Totals 32 1 7 1 2 7
Tampa Bay 010 000 200—3 7 0
Los Angeles 000 000 100—1 7 1
a-homered for Conger in the 7th.
E—L.Jimenez (3). LOB—Tampa Bay 6, Los An-
geles 7. 2B—Zobrist (34), Y.Escobar (23), Trout
(36). HR—W.Myers 2 (11), of Weaver 2; Iannetta
(8), of McGee. RBIs—W.Myers 3 (42), Iannetta
(32). SB—DeJesus (1), De.Jennings (20). CS—
De.Jennings (8).
Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 4
(Loney, Joyce, DeJesus, Y.Escobar); LosAngeles 3
(L.Jimenez, J.Hamilton, Trumbo). RISP—Tampa
Bay 2 for 9; Los Angeles 0 for 6.
Runners moved up—Longoria, J.Hamilton,
Trumbo. GIDP—DeJesus, Shuck, G.Green.
DP—Tampa Bay 2 (Hellickson, Y.Escobar,
Loney), (Y.Escobar, Zobrist, Loney); Los Angeles
1 (Trumbo, Aybar, Trumbo).
Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
HellicksonW, 11-8 5 1-3 4 0 0 2 4 71 5.04
Al.Torres H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 12 1.29
McGee H, 25 1 2 1 1 0 0 13 4.19
Jo.Peralta H, 35 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 2.90
Rodney S, 32-40 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.65
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Weaver L, 9-8 7 6 3 3 1 3 95 3.33
Kohn 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 3.35
D.De La Rosa 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 3.27
Inherited runners-scored—Al.Torres 1-0. HBP—
by Al.Torres (Calhoun).
Umpires—Home, ToddTichenor; First, CBBuc-
knor; Second, Dale Scott; Third, Lance Barrett.
T—2:54. A—34,025 (45,483).
Rockies 7, Dodgers 5
Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
HairstonJr. lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .232
f-Puig ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .350
P.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
B.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Punto 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .259
H.Ramirez ss 5 1 2 0 0 0 .337
M.Young 1b 5 1 3 2 0 1 .278
Van Slyke rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .245
d-Ethier ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279
A.Ellis c 4 1 0 0 0 1 .241
Uribe 3b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .276
Schumaker cf-rf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .273
Volquez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .114
a-Federowicz ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .244
League p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
b-Ad.Gonzalez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .289
Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-C.Crawford ph-lf1 0 0 0 0 1 .294
Totals 37 5 11 4 3 7
Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Fowler cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .260
Rutledge 2b 4 3 3 1 0 0 .228
Tulowitzki ss 3 1 1 2 0 0 .314
Cuddyer rf 2 0 2 2 1 0 .331
W.Rosario c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .292
Helton 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .249
Arenado 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .271
LeMahieu 3b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .282
Blackmon lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .279
Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
J.De La Rosa p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .039
Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111
Outman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-Co.Dickerson ph1 1 1 0 0 0 .298
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Corpas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
g-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .220
C.Gonzalez lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .302
Totals 33 7 11 6 1 10
Los Angeles 100 001 030—5 11 1
Colorado 211 000 30x—7 11 2
a-singled for Volquez in the 5th. b-struck out
for Howell in the 7th. c-singled for W.Lopez in the
7th. d-fied out for Van Slyke in the 8th. e-struck
out for Marmol in the 8th. f-struck out for Hair-
ston Jr. in the 8th. g-grounded into a felder’s
choice for Corpas in the 8th.
E—Schumaker (7), Arenado (10), Rutledge (6).
LOB—Los Angeles 8, Colorado 6. 2B—Uribe (17),
Tulowitzki (24). 3B—Rutledge (1). HR—Helton
(12), of Volquez. RBIs—M.Young 2 (44), Uribe
(40), Schumaker (29), Rutledge (19), Tulowitzki 2
(71), Cuddyer 2 (74), Helton (50). SB—Rutledge
(10). S—J.De La Rosa. SF—Tulowitzki, Cuddyer.
Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles
3 (A.Ellis, Punto, Puig); Colorado 4 (Fowler, Are-
nado, W.Rosario, Helton). RISP—Los Angeles 5 for
13; Colorado 3 for 11.
Runners moved up—Punto. GIDP—M.Young,
Van Slyke, Schumaker.
DP—Colorado 3 (Tulowitzki, Helton), (Tulow-
itzki, Rutledge, Helton), (Tulowitzki, Rutledge,
Helton).
Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Volquez L, 9-11 4 6 4 4 0 4 75 6.05
League 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 5.33
Howell 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 2.24
Marmol 1 3 3 2 1 2 26 5.27
P.Rodriguez 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 2.01
B.Wilson 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00
Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.De La Rosa W, 16-6 6 6 2 2 1 4 95 3.31
Ottavino 0 1 0 0 1 0 11 2.79
Outman H, 13 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 4.14
W.Lopez H, 8 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.05
Belisle 1-3 4 3 2 0 0 18 4.43
Corpas H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 12 4.36
Brothers S, 15-16 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 1.52
Ottavino pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Inherited runners-scored—B.Wilson 1-0, Out-
man 2-0, W.Lopez 2-0, Corpas 2-0. IBB—of Mar-
mol (Cuddyer). WP—Volquez, League 2, Belisle.
PB—A.Ellis. Balk—Marmol.
Umpires—Home, Brian Gorman; First, Tony
Randazzo; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Manny
Gonzalez.
T—3:35. A—28,439 (50,398).
Brewers 9, Pirates 3
Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Tabata lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .274
N.Walker 2b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .262
McCutchen cf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .320
Morneau 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .462
Byrd rf 5 0 3 1 0 1 .292
P.Alvarez 3b 4 1 0 0 0 2 .230
Buck c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .222
Mercer ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .271
Liriano p 0 0 0 0 1 0 .073
a-Lambo ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200
J.Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .077
b-Pie ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .235
Pimentel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
J.Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-Snider ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .224
Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Totals 38 3 12 3 2 8
Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Aoki rf 5 1 3 0 0 1 .290
C.Gomez cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .283
Lucroy 1b 5 2 2 1 0 1 .288
Halton 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .218
Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 3 2 2 1 0 .267
Wooten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
f-Gindl ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250
Badenhop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
K.Davis lf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .279
Y.Betancourt 2b-3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .210
Bianchi ss 3 0 1 2 0 0 .244
Maldonado c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .174
W.Peralta p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .156
c-J.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238
Mic.Gonzalez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
D.Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091
d-Gennett ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .328
Totals 37 9 13 8 2 8
Pittsburgh 011 010 000—3 12 1
Milwaukee 025 000 20x—9 13 0
a-struck out for Liriano in the 4th. b-struck out
for J.Gomez in the 6th. c-struck out for W.Peralta
in the 6th. d-grounded out for D.Hand in the 7th.
e-singled for J.Hughes in the 8th. f-struck out for
Wooten in the 8th.
E—N.Walker (7). LOB—Pittsburgh 12, Milwau-
kee 7. 2B—N.Walker (23), Morneau (1), Byrd (31),
Lucroy (21), Ar.Ramirez (15). HR—McCutchen
(19), ofW.Peralta; K.Davis (9), of Liriano. RBIs—
McCutchen (76), Byrd (79), Mercer (23), Lucroy
(76), Ar.Ramirez 2 (39), K.Davis 2 (21), Bianchi 2
(20), Maldonado (20). SF—Bianchi.
Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh
6 (Tabata 2, Buck 4); Milwaukee 3 (W.Peralta,
K.Davis, Gennett). RISP—Pittsburgh 2 for 10;
Milwaukee 5 for 11.
Runners moved up—Bianchi.
Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Liriano L, 15-7 3 7 7 7 2 4 73 2.98
J.Gomez 2 2 0 0 0 0 23 3.03
Pimentel 1 2-3 3 2 0 0 2 29 0.00
J.Hughes 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.39
Grilli 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 2.28
Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
W.Peralta W, 9-14 6 9 3 3 1 6 101 4.51
Mic.Gonzalez 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 10 4.47
D.Hand H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.62
Wooten 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 3.32
Badenhop 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 3.62
Inherited runners-scored—J.Hughes 2-0,
D.Hand 2-0. HBP—by W.Peralta (Morneau), by
D.Hand (P.Alvarez). WP—Liriano 2.
Umpires—Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Bob
Davidson; Second, Quinn Wolcott; Third, James
Hoye.
T—3:22. A—29,041 (41,900).
Mariners 6, Royals 4
Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Miller ss 4 0 0 1 0 0 .261
F.Gutierrez rf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .247
Seager 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .282
K.Morales dh 5 1 2 2 0 1 .279
Ibanez lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .254
M.Saunders lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233
Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .250
1-A.Almonte pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235
Ackley cf-1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .252
Zunino c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .239
Franklin 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .223
Totals 36 6 11 5 4 4
Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266
Bonifacio 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .230
Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .299
B.Butler dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .285
Moustakas 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238
S.Perez c 2 0 0 1 1 0 .281
Lough rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .284
J.Dyson cf 3 0 1 2 0 0 .266
A.Escobar ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .235
Totals 29 4 4 4 3 3
Seattle 002 200 002—6 11 0
Kansas City 000 400 000—4 4 1
1-ran for Smoak in the 8th.
E—Moustakas (14). LOB—Seattle 8, Kansas
City 2. 2B—K.Morales (31), Ibanez 2 (18), Smoak
(18), Franklin (15), Lough (15). HR—K.Morales
(18), of Crow. RBIs—B.Miller (29), F.Gutierrez
(15), K.Morales 2 (71), Franklin (42), B.Butler (71),
S.Perez (63), J.Dyson 2 (15). CS—F.Gutierrez (1),
J.Dyson (5). SF—B.Miller, S.Perez.
Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 6
(F.Gutierrez 4, Smoak, Franklin). RISP—Seattle 2
for 12; Kansas City 2 for 3.
Runners moved up—B.Miller, Moustakas.
Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
T.Walker 5 4 4 4 2 2 79 3.60
Capps 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 5.15
Luetge W, 1-2 2 0 0 0 0 0 20 4.66
Farquhar S, 12-15 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 4.37
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
E.Santana 3 1-3 7 4 4 3 0 71 3.33
W.Davis 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 18 5.61
Bueno 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 0.00
K.Herrera 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.54
Collins 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.70
D.Joseph 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 9 0.00
Hochevar 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 9 1.79
CrowL, 7-5 1 1 2 2 1 0 17 3.43
Inherited runners-scored—W.Davis 3-1, Bueno
1-0, K.Herrera 2-0, Hochevar 1-0. WP—W.Davis,
Hochevar.
Umpires—Home, Gary Cederstrom; First,
Angel Hernandez; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third,
Lance Barksdale.
T—3:02. A—13,621 (37,903).
Cardinals 5, Reds 4, 16 innings,
St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
M.Carpenter 3b 6 2 3 0 1 2 .315
Beltran rf 7 1 2 1 0 1 .308
Holliday lf 5 0 1 1 1 1 .284
Craig 1b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .315
Ma.Adams 1b 5 2 2 2 0 1 .269
Y.Molina c 7 0 1 0 0 1 .322
Jay cf 7 0 0 0 0 3 .262
Descalso ss 6 0 1 0 0 0 .237
Wong 2b 6 0 1 0 0 1 .167
S.Miller p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .085
Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Siegrist p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
a-Chambers ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143
Rosenthal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
d-Freese ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .261
S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
e-B.Peterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133
Lyons p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182
Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
h-Kozma ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .212
Ca.Martinez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals 56 5 12 4 2 12
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 6 0 2 1 1 1 .285
B.Phillips 2b 6 1 2 1 0 1 .268
Votto 1b 7 0 0 0 0 3 .301
Bruce rf 5 0 0 0 2 1 .265
Heisey lf 7 0 0 0 0 1 .239
Frazier 3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .233
Simon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143
g-Ludwick ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286
1-B.Hamilton pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 ---
Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
i-H.Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Cozart ss 7 1 2 1 0 1 .252
Hanigan c 1 1 1 0 2 0 .217
b-Paul ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .234
C.Miller c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .219
f-N.Soto ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Mesoraco c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245
Arroyo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .080
LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
A.Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
c-D.Robinson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .251
Hoover p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Hannahan 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .220
Totals 52 4 10 3 5 10
St. Louis 000 201 000 000 010 1—5 12 0
Cincinnati 020 010 000 000 010 0—410 1
a-lined out for Siegrist in the 8th. b-struck out
for Hanigan in the 9th. c-lined out for A.Chapman
in the 9th. d-fouled out for Rosenthal in the 10th.
e-grounded out for Axford in the 12th. f-struck out
for C.Miller in the 12th. g-singled for Simon in the
14th. h-sacrifced for Mujica in the 15th. i-fied out
for Ondrusek in the 16th.
1-ran for Ludwick in the 14th.
E—Votto (13). LOB—St. Louis 7, Cincinnati
9. 2B—M.Carpenter (46), B.Phillips (23). HR—
Ma.Adams (10), of Simon; Ma.Adams (11), of
Ondrusek; B.Phillips (18), of S.Miller. RBIs—Bel-
tran (72), Holliday (75), Ma.Adams 2 (38), Choo
(47), B.Phillips (100), Cozart (53). SB—B.Hamil-
ton (2). CS—Choo (11). S—Kozma, B.Phillips, Ar-
royo 3. SF—Holliday.
Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 3
(Ma.Adams, Jay, Beltran); Cincinnati 6 (Frazier 2,
Choo 4). RISP—St. Louis 2for 6; Cincinnati 1 for 8.
Runners moved up—Choo, Votto. GIDP—Bel-
tran, Hannahan.
DP—St. Louis 1 (Wong, Descalso, Ma.Adams);
Cincinnati 1 (Cozart, Votto).
St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
S.Miller 5 2-3 6 3 3 4 3 95 3.19
Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.67
Siegrist 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.58
Rosenthal 2 0 0 0 0 2 19 2.34
S.Freeman 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00
Axford 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.40
Lyons 2 1 0 0 0 4 27 4.53
Mujica BS, 3-38 1 2 1 1 0 0 14 1.97
Ca.Martinez W, 2-12 1 0 0 1 1 25 5.40
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Arroyo 7 7 3 2 0 4 92 3.62
LeCure 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 15 2.89
Duke 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 7.94
A.Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 2.77
Hoover 2 1 0 0 1 1 39 2.93
Simon 3 1 1 1 0 1 30 3.33
Ondrusek L, 3-1 2 2 1 1 0 3 29 4.47
Inherited runners-scored—Choate 2-0, Duke
2-0. IBB—of Ca.Martinez (Bruce). WP—S.Miller.
Umpires—Home, Tim Timmons; First, Laz
Diaz; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Cory Blaser.
T—4:50. A—23,894 (42,319).
NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Thursday’s Game
Baltimore at Denver (n)
Sunday’s Games
Atlanta at NewOrleans, 1 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago, 1 p.m.
NewEngland at Bufalo, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Kansas City at Jacksonville, 1 p.m.
Seattle at Carolina, 1 p.m.
Miami at Cleveland, 1 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 1 p.m.
Oakland at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Green Bay at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Arizona at St. Louis, 4:25 p.m.
N.Y. Giants at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Monday’s Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at San Diego, 10:20 p.m.
Football
TODAY’S EVENTS
HIGHSCHOOLFOOTBALL
(7 p.m.)
Berwick at Pottsville
Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech at Nanticoke
Crestwood at North Pocono
DelawareValley at WyomingValleyWest
HazletonArea at Coughlin
LackawannaTrail at Hanover Area
Lake-Lehman at Montrose
Meyers at Old Forge
MidValley at WyomingArea
Mifin County at Williamsport
Scranton at PittstonArea
Tunkhannock at West Scranton
HIGHSCHOOLFIELDHOCKEY
Berwick at GAR
Hanover Area at Elk Lake
Northwest at Meyers
Tunkhannock at Montrose
HIGHSCHOOLGOLF
Hanover Area at GAR
Lake-Lehman at Holy Redeemer, 4p.m.
MMI Prep at WyomingArea
Nanticoke at Wyoming Seminary
HIGHSCHOOLGIRLSTENNIS
WyomingValleyWest at Holy Redeemer
HIGHSCHOOLGIRLSVOLLEYBALL
DelawareValley at Crestwood, 4:30p.m.
GARat HazletonArea
Hanover Area at Lake-Lehman
Holy Redeemer at WyomingArea
North Pocono at Meyers
COLLEGE FIELDHOCKEY
Juniata at Misericordia, 3 p.m.
Keystone vs. King’s at Misericordia, 5:15 p.m.
COLLEGE CO-EDSOCCER
PSUWilkes-Barre at Davis College, 4p.m.
COLLEGEWOMEN’S SOCCER
Elmira at King’s, 7 p.m.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 7
HIGHSCHOOLFOOTBALL
Dallas at Abington Heights, 1 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Holy Cross, 1 p.m.
Northwest at Susquehanna, 1 p.m.
Dunmore at GAR, 7 p.m.
HIGHSCHOOLFIELDHOCKEY
Crestwood at Selinsgrove, 11 a.m.
Crestwood vs. Mifin County at Selinsgrove, 1:15
p.m.
HIGHSCHOOLBOYS SOCCER
Abington Heights at Crestwood
Coughlin at HazletonArea, 11 a.m.
GARat Holy Redeemer
MMI Prep at Tunkhannock
Wyoming Seminary at WyomingArea, 11 a.m.
HIGHSCHOOLGIRLS SOCCER
Crestwood at WyomingValleyWest
Dallas at PittstonArea
Nanticoke at Hanover Area
Tunkhannock at MMI Prep
WyomingArea at Wyoming Seminary
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Gettysburg at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
WilliamPaterson at King’s, 1 p.m.
Morrisville State at Wilkes, Noon
COLLEGE CROSS COUNTRY
Misericordia, King’s at LebanonValley, 10:15 a.m.
COLLEGE FIELDHOCKEY
Juniata vs. King’s at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
Wilkes at Salisbury, 1 p.m.
Keystone at Misericordia, 5 p.m.
COLLEGE MEN’S SOCCER
PSUHazleton at at PSUAllegheny, 1 p.m.
Stevenson at Wilkes, 4p.m.
Baptist Bible at Misericordia, 7:30p.m.
COLLEGEWOMEN’S SOCCER
Wilkes vs. Richard Stockton at Catholic, 2:30p.m.
Susquehanna at Misericordia, 5 p.m.
COLLEGEWOMEN’STENNIS
Keystone, Rosemont at Wilkes, 11 a.m.
PSUMont Alto at PSUHazleton, noon
COLLEGEWOMEN’SVOLLEYBALL
King’s at PSU-Harrisburg, noon
King’s vs. Penn College at PSU-Harrisburg, 2 p.m.
Misericordia vs. Allegheny at Susquehanna, 11 a.m.
Misericordia vs. SUNY-Morrisville at Susquehanna,
1 p.m.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 8
COLLEGE FIELDHOCKEY
Wilkes vs. Wesley at Salisbury, 1 p.m.
COLLEGE MEN’S SOCCER
Widener at Wilkes, 2 p.m.
King’s vs. Sage at Rensselaer, 3 p.m.
COLLEGE MEN’STENNIS
Wilkes at MuhlenburgTournament
COLLEGEWOMEN’S SOCCER
Wilkes vs. Mount St. Mary at Catholic, Noon
COLLEGEWOMEN’SVOLLEYBALL
Misericordia at Susquehanna, 10a.m.
Misericordia vs. Haverford at Susquehanna, Noon
FRIDAY, SEPT. 6
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL
7 p.m.
SE19 —Lackawanna Trail at Hanover Area
WYLN—HazletonArea at Coughlin
MLB
7 p.m.
CSN—Atlanta at Philadelphia
SNY—N.Y. Mets at Cleveland
YES —Boston at N.Y. Yankees
8 p.m.
ROOT—Pittsburgh at St. Louis
POCONO DOWNS RESULTS
Wednesday Sep 04, 2013
First - $13,000Trot 1:56.1
5-Raven De Vie (Ma Kakaley) 5.80 3.60 2.60
7-Bullish (Ho Parker) 4.80 3.40
9-Dreams Of Thunder (Ty Buter) 4.40
EXACTA(5-7) $20.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-7-9) $147.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $36.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-7-9-1) $369.20
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $18.46
Second - $8,500 Pace 1:53.0
2-BJ’s Skye (Er Carlson) 11.80 4.60 3.00
5-Picked By AnAngel (An McCarthy) 3.80 3.20
6-Riverdancer (Ro Pierce) 2.60
EXACTA(2-5) $44.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(2-5-6) $151.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $37.75
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(2-5-6-1) $1,341.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $67.07
DAILYDOUBLE (5-2) $26.80
Third - $13,000Trot 2:00.1
3-Jetta Liner (Si Allard) 5.20 2.60 2.20
6-Cabo San Lukas (Mi Simons) 6.40 3.80
5-PhantomPhoto (To Schadel) 2.40
EXACTA(3-6) $26.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(3-6-5) $48.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $12.20
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(3-6-5-9) $851.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $42.55
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(5-2-3) $114.60
Fourth - $4,500 Pace 1:53.3
5-Liqueur (Ma Kakaley) 4.40 2.60 2.10
1-Princess Mcardle N(An McCarthy) 2.80 2.20
2-Sequoia Seelster (Ke Wallis) 2.20
EXACTA(5-1) $14.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-1-2) $25.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $6.45
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-1-2-9) $217.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $10.87
Fifth - $13,000Trot 1:57.2
7-Outburst (An McCarthy) 10.00 4.40 2.60
5-Sj’s Encore (Ho Parker) 3.00 2.20
3-Lightning Force (Ty Buter) 2.80
EXACTA(7-5) $28.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(7-5-3) $83.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $20.75
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(7-5-3-1) $392.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $19.64
Scratched: Justin On Broadway, Schwanzstucker
Sixth - $12,000 Pace 1:50.3
4-CruisingYankee (Ma Kakaley) 7.80 3.40 2.60
8-Machman (Ge NapolitanoJr) 3.40 2.20
2-Alexa’s Jackpot (Ty Buter) 4.00
EXACTA(4-8) $37.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(4-8-2) $105.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $26.35
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(4-8-2-6) $394.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $19.73
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(5-7-4) $189.60
Seventh - $13,000Trot 1:57.3
1-Home Turf (An McCarthy) 2.80 3.00 2.20
8-Gliding Boy (Ma Miller) 34.20 17.80
7-Ballagio Hanover (Mi Simons) 4.00
EXACTA(1-8) $218.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-8-7) $473.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $118.35
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-8-7-2) $8,111.20
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $405.56
Eighth - $12,000 Pace 1:51.0
3-Wildfre Osborne (Ma Kakaley) 7.40 5.00 4.60
2-Jinglejanglejingle (Ty Buter) 5.00 3.60
1-Perfectly Royal (An Napolitano) 2.80
EXACTA(3-2) $32.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(3-2-1) $126.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $31.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(3-2-1-7) $250.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $12.54
Ninth - $15,000Trot 1:55.0
5-Boadicea Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 5.002.602.40
6-Celebrity Stimulus (ThJackson) 3.80 3.40
1-Whole Lotta Nasty (Ke Wallis) 10.00
EXACTA(5-6) $14.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-6-1) $136.20
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $34.05
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-6-1-4) $680.60
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $34.03
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(1-3-5) $48.60
Tenth - $15,000 Pace 1:52.3
7-Franciegirl (Ke Wallis) 13.20 4.00 3.60
4-I Got To Boogie (Ma Kakaley) 3.80 3.20
5-Benearthebeach (An McCarthy) 9.80
EXACTA(7-4) $77.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(7-4-5) $529.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $132.25
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(7-4-5-2) $2,759.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $137.99
Eleventh - $13,000 Pace 1:53.4
1-Take IntoAccount (Ro Pierce) 6.60 4.40 3.40
7-Heavenly Way (Ty Buter) 27.60 8.20
2-Moonless Night (Ge NapolitanoJr) 2.40
EXACTA(1-7) $138.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-7-2) $828.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $207.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-7-2-8) $10,650.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $532.52
Twelfth - $13,000 Pace 1:50.2
4-Bullet Speed (Ge NapolitanoJr) 5.40 2.80 2.40
2-TouchThe Rock (Ty Buter) 3.20 2.40
3-GdAirliner (Si Allard) 3.00
EXACTA(4-2) $17.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(4-2-3) $52.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $13.15
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(4-2-3-1) $170.00
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $8.50
PICK3 - 15%TAKEOUT(7-1-4) $428.60
Scratched: Blue Claw
Thirteenth - $13,000Trot 1:55.3
5-Lovely Vacation (Ma Miller) 6.20 4.40 3.60
9-Checknyouout (Ro Pierce) 20.60 11.20
2-Like AHush (Ma Kakaley) 9.40
EXACTA(5-9) $168.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-9-2) $2,069.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $517.35
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-9-2-3) $24,207.80
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $1,210.39
Fourteenth - $12,000 Pace 1:52.1
1-Highland Bogart (An McCarthy) 8.80 5.60 3.80
3-J J SJet (Ma Kakaley) 12.60 12.00
2-Well Done Hanover (Ge NapolitanoJr) 4.40
EXACTA(1-3) $121.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-3-2) $361.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $90.35
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-3-2-6) $1,871.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $93.57
Fifteenth - $13,000 Pace 1:55.1
1-Ofcial Liberty (An McCarthy) 9.00 4.40 3.40
4-Casiano (An Napolitano) 5.60 3.60
3-Myplaceonthebeach (Ji Takter) 4.80
EXACTA(1-4) $53.60
50 CENTTRIFECTA(1-4-3) $311.00
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $77.75
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(1-4-3-2) $523.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $26.17
Sixteenth - $13,000 Pace 1:54.0
5-The Beach Nextdoor (Ho Parker) 8.40 4.00
2.40
4-Mysticity (Ke Wallis) 8.00 3.60
7-Anegada (An McCarthy) 2.20
EXACTA(5-4) $46.40
50 CENTTRIFECTA(5-4-7) $136.80
50 CENTTRIFECTA(50 Cent) $34.20
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(5-4-7-1) $531.40
10 CENTSUPERFECTA(10 Cent) $26.57
LATE DOUBLE (1-5) $43.60
Scratched: I PleadThe Fifth
Total Handle-$498,389
harness raci ng
POCONO DOWNS ENTRIES
Friday Sep 06, 2013 Post Time:6:30 PM
First nw6000L5 $11,000Trot
1. MCFelix (Ge NapolitanoJr) 7-2
2. Paisley (Ho Parker) 4-1
3. Il Mago (Ma Kakaley) 3-1
4. Illusionsndreams (An Santeramo) 6-1
5. Casanova Lindy (Ke Wallis) 10-1
6. Epic Tale (An McCarthy) 8-1
7. April Sunshine (Si Allard) 9-2
8. Opinion Hanover (Ma Romano) 20-1
9. Hold OnTightly (Ch Norris) 15-1
Second 7500CL $6,000 Pace
1. Hedges Lane (Ge NapolitanoJr) 4-1
2. Dragon’s Blood (Ty Buter) 9-2
3. Mcmarvel (Jo Pavia Jr) 3-1
4. Seawind Dropper (Ma Kakaley) 6-1
5. Needles And Pins (An McCarthy) 10-1
6. Western Guy (Si Allard) 8-1
7. Lucky Land (Da Rawlings) 7-2
8. Mr Thompson (Ke Wallis) 15-1
9. My Masterpiece (An Napolitano) 20-1
Third nw4000L5 $9,000Trot
1. Third Mortgage (ThJackson) 7-2
2. Er Mr T(Si Allard) 9-2
3. Spectator K(An McCarthy) 6-1
4. Smok’n Muscles (Ja BaucomJr) 15-1
5. Berkshire (Ma Kakaley) 3-1
6. The BigThea Thea (Mi Simons) 20-1
7. Keystone Cheyenne (Ge NapolitanoJr) 4-1
8. Shanty Irish (To Schadel) 8-1
9. Red Zeppelin (Ma Romano) 10-1
Fourth nw3PMCLCD $9,000 Pace
1. Mr Bricks (An McCarthy) 4-1
2. Balboa Hanover (Ma Miller) 10-1
3. Easton Bound (Ma Kakaley) 3-1
4. Wheelaway (Mi Simons) 9-2
5. Pistol Petesdragon (Ro Pierce) 6-1
6. Jack NWater (Le Miller) 15-1
7. Bettortobealive (Ge NapolitanoJr) 8-1
8. Padre Manuel (Ty Buter) 7-2
9. Sawbuck (JoAntonelli) 20-1
Fifth 7500CL $6,000Trot
1. Streetwise Hall (An McCarthy) 7-2
2. Captain Brady (Ch Norris) 10-1
3. Chiselled (ThJackson) 20-1
4. QuantumLightning (Ge NapolitanoJr) 3-1
5. Trickledowntheory (Ro Pierce) 15-1
6. Divas Photo (Si Allard) 4-1
7. Irish Express (An Napolitano) 6-1
8. Pembroke Big Bo (Ke Wallis) 9-2
9. Nordic Venture (Mi Simons) 8-1
Sixth 12500CL FM$10,000 Pace
1. Blissfull Dreamer (Ro Pierce) 5-2
2. Notorius Terror (Ma Kakaley) 5-1
3. Express Jet (Jo Pavia Jr) 7-2
4. Lil Miss Snowfake (An McCarthy) 8-1
5. Jets Are On (Ke Wallis) 6-1
6. Twin B Roxy (An Napolitano) 4-1
7. Shes Lovin It (Da Miller) 20-1
8. American Shuttle (Ma Miller) 15-1
9. Fire InThe Night (Ge NapolitanoJr) 12-1
Seventh nw11000L5 $15,000Trot
1. Turtle Express (Jo Pavia Jr) 8-1
2. House On Fire (ThJackson) 9-2
3. Keystone Tempo (An McCarthy) 10-1
4. Dc’s Piggy Bank (Ro Pierce) 6-1
5. Upfrontstrikesgold (Ge NapolitanoJr) 3-1
6. OnThe Tab (Ma Kakaley) 7-2
7. Baby Blaze (Da Miller) 20-1
8. Vacation Day (Jo Drury) 15-1
9. All About Justice (Mi Simons) 4-1
Eighth Mnw3PMCLCD $9,000 Pace
1. Twisted Sis (Ma Kakaley) 6-1
2. Stirling Bella (An McCarthy) 3-1
3. Rag Doll (Jo Pavia Jr) 4-1
4. Dvc Itsanattitude (JoAntonelli) 20-1
5. Carlina Hanover (Wi Mullin) 9-2
6. Lady Alice (Ho Parker) 8-1
7. Pura Vida (Ro Pierce) 10-1
8. AFiesty XAmple (Si Allard) 7-2
9. Tiger Kitty (Ge NapolitanoJr) 15-1
Ninth nw11000L5 $15,000Trot
1. Dr Cal (Ge NapolitanoJr) 5-1
2. Commander K(Ma Kakaley) 6-1
3. Keystone Thomas (Jo Pavia Jr) 3-1
4. Guiltywithanexcuse (Ho Parker) 10-1
5. Tui (ThJackson) 5-2
6. DreamLake (Ma Romano) 15-1
7. Macs Bad Boy (Mi Simons) 4-1
8. Westside Lindy (An McCarthy) 20-1
9. Sassy Syrinx (Ca Conte Jr) 12-1
Tenth MPref Hc $25,000 Pace
1. Fashion Mystery (Da Palone) 12-1
2. SouthwindJazmin (Ro Pierce) 10-1
3. Lightning Paige (An McCarthy) 6-1
4. FeelingYou (Ty Buter) 5-1
5. Anndrovette (Ge NapolitanoJr) 7-2
6. Camille (Ma Kakaley) 3-1
7. DropThe Ball (Jo Pavia Jr) 2-1
Eleventh nw16000L5 $19,000Trot
1. Marion Monaco (Ge NapolitanoJr) 8-1
2. Princetonian (An McCarthy) 9-2
3. Nightime Flash (Ch Norris) 4-1
4. SandWyndham(Si Allard) 7-2
5. Twin B Spike Man (Mi Simons) 15-1
6. CanadianWildcat (Da Palone) 20-1
7. War Cry Hall (Ho Parker) 3-1
8. Julians Caesar (Ma Kakaley) 6-1
9. Harbor Point (Ro Pierce) 10-1
Twelfth TSS2yrCG F $40,000 Pace
1. Jack Attack (Ge NapolitanoJr) 5-2
2. Here Comes William(Da Palone) 3-1
3. Leyden (Da Miller) 10-1
4. AOk Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 9-2
5. Superfcial (Ro Pierce) 15-1
6. So Surreal (Ra Schnittker) 4-1
7. Finley Hanover (An McCarthy) 12-1
8. Dontmeswiththebest (Ma Miller) 6-1
Thirteenth TSS2yrCG F $40,000Trot
1. WhoWants Soup (Ro Pierce) 5-2
2. Faust (Ho Parker) 5-1
3. Poppy Sydney Ridge (Mi Simons) 10-1
4. Broadway Phantom(Da Miller) 8-1
5. GForce Hanover (Ma Romano) 12-1
6. Yankee Fashion (Ma Kakaley) 4-1
7. DominumDeo (Ge NapolitanoJr) 6-1
8. Monkey Man (Da Palone) 7-2
Fourteenth Mnw23000L5 $21,000 Pace
1. Stacked Deck (Ke Wallis) 3-1
2. Charisma Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 5-2
3. Janie Bay (Jo Drury) 6-1
4. Persistent (Ro Pierce) 9-2
5. Momma Rock (Ge NapolitanoJr) 12-1
6. Up Front Cruiser (Da Rawlings) 8-1
7. Four Starz Roe (Da Palone) 7-2
Fifteenth TSS 2yrF F $40,000Trot
1A. Miss Geneva (An McCarthy) 3-1
1. Outsourced Hanover (Ma Kakaley) 3-1
2. Nitro Nittany (Ho Parker) 7-2
3. Minerva Bi (Ro Pierce) 6-1
4. Winky Dink (ThJackson) 12-1
5. Fay (Ra Schnittker) 9-2
6. Tweet Me (Ty Buter) 5-2
7. Sally Savannah (Mi Simons) 8-1
Sixteenth TSS 2yrF F $40,000 Pace
1. Mayabelle (Mi Simons) 3-1
1A. Mcvita Bella (Ma Miller) 3-1
2. South Beach Babe (Ge NapolitanoJr) 8-1
3. Lucy’s Pearl (Ma Kakaley) 7-2
4. DragonTown (Ro Pierce) 9-2
5. Shutthefrontdoor (Fe Paquet Jr) 6-1
6. Weeper (Da Palone) 5-2
7. SouthwindJumanji (Ty Buter) 12-1
BASEBALL
National League
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Claimed 1B-3B
Mauro Gomez ofwaivers fromToronto.
Can-AmLeague
ROCKLANDBOULDERS—Exercised the 2014
contract options C Billy Alvino, RHP Bo Budkev-
ics, LHP Adam Brown, RHP Min Hur, RHP Fray
Martinez, RHP Pat Moran, LHP Nick Serino, C
Nick Bunce, INFSteve Cardullo, INFMatt Nandin,
INF Carlos Rivera, OF Jerod Edmondson and OF
Angel Molina.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
SACRAMENTO KINGS — Named Chris Mullin
as an adviser to the owner and general manager.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALO BILLS — Reached an injury settle-
ment withRBDrewSmithandreleasedhimfrom
injured reserve.
DALLAS COWBOYS — Reached an injury set-
tlement with DT Travis Chappelear and G Nate
Livings and released themfrominjured reserve.
NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Released OL
Braxston Cave andTE MatthewMulligan.
Canadian Football League
CFL — Fined Edmonton coach Kavis Reed
$2,500 for inappropriate comments made di-
rectly towards the ofciating crew following the
Sept. 2 game against Calgary.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Signed LB-
SAaron Rouse and OL Colt Schulte to the
practice roster.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CALGARY FLAMES — Named Brian Burke
president of hockey operations.
ECHL
IDAHO STEELHEADS — Agreed to terms
with F David deKastrozza.
STOCKTON THUNDER — Named Dennis
Brogna athletic trainer and Corby Antropik
equipment manager.
UTAH GRIZZLIES — Agreed to terms with
D Derick Martin, D Channing Boe and F Dylen
McKinlay for the 2013-2014 season.
COLLEGE
COKER — Named Daniel Allen men’s and
women’s golf coach.
COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON —
Named Henry Smart men’s assistant golf
coach.
MIAMI — Signed men’s basketball coach
Jim Larranaga to a three-year contract ex-
tension through May 31, 2022.
MOUNT ST. MARY’S — Named Katie
Schwarzmann women’s assistant lacrosse
coach and Alexandra Burns women’s volun-
teer assistant lacrosse coach.
RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE — Named Kim
Dweck and Rachel Ferri women’s assistant
basketball coaches and Andrew Cass wom-
en’s assistant volleyball coach.
WASHINGTON & JEFFERSON — Named
Cody Hartzler men’s assistant basketball
coach.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 3B
Jay
Monahan
Correspondent
John
Medeiros
Sports Editor
John
Erzar
Football Writer
Paul
Sokoloski
Sports Columnist
Derek
Levarse
Sports Writer
Dave
Rosengrant
Sports Writer
Joe
Soprano
Content
Coordinator
Nick
Wagner
Pittston
Dispatch
Tom
Robinson
Correspondent TEAM TI MES LEADER
Our team picks the weekend’s winners
in high school and college football:
Chris
Kucharski
NPF Network
Radio Host
FRIDAY
HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL (7p.m.)
Berwick at Pottsville
Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech at Nanticoke
Crestwood at North Pocono
Delaware Valley at Wyoming Valley West
Hazleton Area at Coughlin
Lackawanna Trail at Hanover Area
Lake-Lehman at Montrose
Meyers at Old Forge
Mid Valley at Wyoming Area
Mifflin County at Williamsport
Scranton at Pittston Area
Tunkhannock at West Scranton
SATURDAY
HIGH SCHOOL
Holy Redeemer at Holy Cross, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Abington Heights, 1 p.m.
Northwest at Susquehanna, 1 p.m.
Dunmore at GAR, 7 p.m.
COLLEGE
Morrisville St. at Wilkes, noon
Gettysburg at Misericordia, 1 p.m.
William Patterson at King’s, 1 p.m.
Eastern Michigan at Penn State, noon
Notre Dame at Michigan, 8 p.m.
SUNDAY
NFL
Titans at Steelers, 1 p.m.
Buccaneers at Jets, 1 p.m.
Giants at Cowboys, 8:30 p.m.
MONDAY
NFL
Eagles at Redskins, 7:10 p.m.
RECORD:
Berwick, 43-13
Nanticoke, 28-8
Crestwood, 33-20
Valley West, 28-27
Hazleton Area, 28-26
Lackawanna Trail, 28-14
Lake-Lehman, 35-10
Meyers, 17-16
Wyoming Area, 20-16
Mifflin County, 34-24
Scranton, 27-10
West Scranton, 20-7
Holy Redeemer, 45-7
Abington Hts., 28-10
Northwest, 30-6
Dunmore, 27-25
Wilkes,19-15
Gettysburg, 35-15
King’s, 20-18
Penn State, 33-26
Michigan, 29-20
Steelers,30-20
Buccaneers, 19-3
Cowboys, 24-9
Redskins, 30-10
12 - 3
Berwick, 28-6
Nanticoke, 20-8
Crestwood, 28-13
Valley West, 32-13
Coughlin, 16-10
Lackawanna Trail, 34-20
Lake-Lehman, 28-8
Meyers, 35-14
Wyoming Area, 17-10
Williamsport, 21-3
Scranton, 30-12
West Scranton, 28-7
Holy Redeemer, 37-12
Abington Hts.,44-20
Northwest, 14-0
Dunmore, 35-17
Morrisville St., 28-21
Gettysburg, 35-6
King’s, 17-10
Penn State, 34-7
Michigan, 27-7
Steelers, 17-10
Buccaneers, 35-3
Cowboys, 31-28
Redskins, 24-17
9 - 6
Berwick, 42-12
Nanticoke, 21-6
Crestwood, 21-14
Valley West, 28-13
Hazleton Area, 21-19
Trail, 30-14
Lake-Lehman, 35-6
Old Forge, 21-6
Mid Valley, 14-12
Mifflin County, 35-14
Scranton, 35-13
West Scranton, 28-15
Holy Redeemer, 28-7
Abington Hts., 28-20
Northwest, 24-16
Dunmore, 34-16
Wilkes, 28-24
Gettysburg, 33-10
King's, 28-21
Penn State, 35-13
Michigan, 28-27
Steelers, 21-16
Bucs, 17-3
Giants, 28-24
Eagles, 24-21
12 - 3
Berwick, 34-12
Nanticoke, 43-6
North Pocono, 23-15
Valley West, 23-22
Coughlin, 22-17
Lackawanna Trail, 32-12
Lake-Lehman, 42-0
Old Forge, 32-10
Wyoming Area, 33-8
Mifflin County, 26-10
Scranton, 32-18
West Scranton, 43-7
Holy Redeemer, 39-24
Abington Hts., 35-6
Susquehanna, 22-15
Dunmore, 28-13
Wilkes, 16-6
Gettysburg, 45-14
King’s, 15-13
Penn State, 34-10
Michigan, 17-10
Steelers, 28-18
Buccaneers, 21-20
Giants, 27-26
Redskins, 29-20
12 - 3
Berwick, 34-6
Nanticoke, 13-7
Crestwood, 24-10
Delaware Valley, 23-20
Coughlin, 7-0
Lackawanna Trail, 28-9
Lake-Lehman, 39-3
Old Forge, 30-28
Wyoming Area, 13-10
Mifflin County, 34-28
Scranton, 40-17
West Scranton, 20-10
Holy Redeemer, 47-7
Abington Hts., 21-0
Northwest, 28-15
Dunmore, 33-23
Wilkes, 9-7
Gettysburg, 45-12
William Paterson, 23-12
Penn State, 42-9
Michigan, 23-21
Steelers, 26-12
Buccaneers, 52-8
Giants, 14-12
Eagles, 23-13
12 - 3
Berwick, 35-7
Nanticoke, 33-12
Crestwood, 35-24
Valley West, 21-13
Coughlin, 26-20
Lackawanna Trail, 28-25
Lake-Lehman, 41-20
Meyers, 14-13
Wyoming Area, 31-23
Williamsport, 18-16
Scranton, 27-20
West Scranton, 44-30
Holy Redeemer, 45-8
Abington Hts., 28-20
Northwest, 32-12
Dunmore, 22-19
Wilkes, 24-21
Gettysburg, 48-14
King’s, 20-17
Penn State, 31-21
Notre Dame 7-6
Steelers, 24-14
Buccaneers, 28-7
Cowboys, 34-33
Redskins, 31-27
12 - 3
Berwick, 36-14
Nanticoke, 26-13
Crestwood, 28-13
Valley West, 33-14
Coughlin, 30-21
Lackawanna Trail, 28-6
Lake-Lehman, 42-8
Old Forge, 28-14
Wyoming Area, 20-6
Williamsport, 27-22
Scranton, 30-20
West Scranton, 28-14
Holy Redeemer, 40-6
Abington Hts., 32-14
Northwest, 34-14
Dunmore, 28-14
Wilkes, 31-10
Gettysburg, 55-6
William Patterson, 34-13
Penn State, 35-14
Michigan, 27-24
Steelers, 24-17
Buccaneers, 21-14
Giants, 28-24
Redskins, 31-14
12 - 3
Berwick, 42-7
Nanticoke, 24-6
Crestwood, 20-14
Valley West, 40-14
Hazleton Area, 27-21
Hanover Area, 21-20
Lake-Lehman, 52-7
Old Forge, 35-13
Wyoming Area, 13-12
Williamsport, 22-13
Scranton, 45-14
West Scranton, 21-7
Holy Redeemer, 35-20
Abington Hts, 31-7
Northwest, 35-31
Dunmore, 28-20
Wilkes, 23-17
Gettysburg, 49-17
William Patterson, 42-16
Penn State, 65-12
Michigan, 30-28
Steelers, 27-17
Buccaneers, 23-10
Cowboys, 34-20
Redskins, 37-17
12 - 3
Berwick, 41-14
Nanticoke, 28-21
Crestwood, 27-14
Valley West, 33-13
Coughlin, 21-20
Lackawanna Trail, 34-21
Lake-Lehman, 44-14
Old Forge, 34-27
Mid Valley, 28-27
Mifflin County, 27-21
Scranton, 35-17
West Scranton, 27-19
Holy Redeemer, 35-21
Abington Hts,, 21-13
Northwest, 34-14
Dunmore, 33-27
Wilkes, 24-21
Gettysburg, 42-7
William Paterson, 27-17
Penn State, 34-10
Michigan, 27-23
Steelers, 17-14
Buccaneers, 27-20
Cowboys, 24-21
Redskins, 27-10
13 -2
Berwick, 42-6
Nanticoke, 34-13
Crestwood, 24-20
Valley West, 27-24
Hazleton Area, 22-20
Lackawanna Trail, 35-12
Lake-Lehman, 45-6
Old Forge, 41-19
Mid Valley, 19-14
Mifflin County, 21-20
Scranton, 34-24
West Scranton, 50-18
Holy Redeemer, 48-12
Abington Hts., 35-7
Northwest, 52-14
Dunmore, 35-13
Wilkes, 24-13
Gettysburg, 42-14
William Patterson, 24-23
Penn State, 38-13
Notre Dame, 21-20
Titans, 16-13
Buccaneers, 23-17
Cowboys, 30-26
Redskins, 34-31
13 - 2
Berwick (1-0)
at
Pottsville (1-0)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Berwick’s George Curry (424-92-5, 44th year); Pottsville’s
TomMcGeoy (1-0, 1st year)
Last Meeting: Berwick 41-0 in 2012
All-Time Series: Berwick leads 28-11-3
Quick Fact: Berwick QB C.J. Curry threwfor three TDs in last year’s game.
Scouting Berwick: QB C.J. Curry is coming of the game of his career
as he threwfor 337 yards and four TDs in a 41-7 victory over Crestwood.
WRAndrewForce continues to put up Tecmo Bowl statistics. He had fve
receptions for 193 yards and three touchdowns. The Dawgs didn’t really
fre up the ground game, but Central Columbia transfer Dain Kowalski is
expected to be a force this year.
Scouting Pottsville: Pottsville was married to the Wing-T ofense under
former coach Kevin Keating. Not so under McGeoy, who is using multiple
formations. That showed in the Crimson Tide’s 41-13 victory to open the
season vs. Shamokin. Senior QBTyler Moser was 7-of-10 for 202 yards and
three TDs. Freshman RB Darion Jacoby (86 yards) and junior RB Carey
Bostick (78 yards) made the run ofense steady, although neither broke of
long, game-changing runs.
What To Expect: Berwick has too many skill guys who can make big plays
in an instant. Pottsville can’t and won’t match that frepower tonight.
- John Erzar
Col-Mont. Vo-Tech
(0-1)
at
Nanticoke (0-1)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Vo-Tech’s Mark Varner (36-49, 9th year); Nanticoke’s Ron
Bruza (11-19, 4th year)
Last Meeting: Nanticoke 36-0 in 2012
All-Time Series: Nanticoke leads 3-1
Quick Fact: Pat Hempel returned a free kick for a TD after Nanticoke
posted a safety in last year’s game.
Scouting Vo-Tech: The Rams opened their season with a 34-14 loss to
Sayre. Sayre’s running game posted over 300 yards, leading to a 34-0 lead
in the third quarter. Vo-Tech did have a couple bright spots on ofense – RB
Chris Zanolini and QB Dylan Larkin. They combined for most of the Rams’
yardage.
Scouting Nanticoke: Nanticoke got of to a good start in its opener as RB
Pat Hempel zipped 65 yards for a touchdown on the game’s second play.
Then it was all downhill as Lackawanna Trail piled up 503 yards in its 39-7
victory. Hempel cracked 100 yards rushing for the third time in his last fve
games, but very little worked well when the Trojans had the ball.
What To Expect: Nanticoke can run the ball and will have the best player
on the feld in Hempel. That should be enough to get past Vo-Tech.
- John Erzar
Crestwood (0-1)
at
North Pocono (0-1)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Crestwood’s Greg Myers (48-49, 8th year); North Pocono’s
Greg Dohlon (0-11, 2nd year)
Last Meeting: Crestwood 21-20 in 2012
All-Time Series: North Pocono leads 6-2
Quick Fact: Crestwood stopped North Pocono on a two-point conversion
try with 1:03 remaining to preserve last year’s win.
Scouting Crestwood: The Comets entered the season with big
aspirations, but like many teams in the past had themtoned down at
Crispin Field. The Dawgs carved up Crestwood’s secondary for 337 yards
and four TDs in winning 41-7. The ofense was shut down as starting RB
Frank Aigeldinger had just 55 yards. There were fve fumbles and three
botched snaps. Not what was expected fromthe Comets.
Scouting North Pocono: North Pocono, coached by former Wyoming
Area QB Greg Dohlon, lost its 23rd consecutive game, falling 48-13 to
Dunmore in its opener. North Pocono trailed 13-6 late in the second
quarter before Dunmore scored fve consecutive touchdowns to pull away.
North Pocono kept the ball on the ground for the most part with middling
success.
What To Expect: The pressure is squarely on Crestwood. The Comets
wanted this season to be a statement year and losing to a teamthat hasn’t
won since 2010 could be crushing. Crestwood won’t let that happen.
- John Erzar
Delaware Valley (0-1)
at
Wyoming Valley West
(1-0)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: DelVal’s Keith Olsommer (87-68, 14th year); Valley West’s
Pat Keating (32-14, 5th year)
Last Meeting: DelVal 35-14 in 2012
All-Time Series: Valley West leads 5-1
Quick Fact: Valley West’s defense surrendered 445 yards in the loss to
DelVal last year.
Scouting Valley West: The Spartans did what was predicted Week 1,
tearing through an inexperienced Dallas team40-0. QB Mike Baur threw
a TD pass, ran for a TD and had a touchdown reception. RB Eric Acosta
fnished a fewyards short of 100, while the Spartans defense held Dallas
to 104 yards and 2.3 yards per rush.
Scouting DelVal: DelVal played Parkland last Friday in a rematch of the
D2/4-11 Class 4Atitle game. It was a rematch in name only as Parkland
came in loaded while DelVal was stripped by graduation. It showed as
Parkland rolled 50-8. DelVal surrendered nearly 500 yards on defense.
As for the ofense, nobody did anything noteworthy. The Warriors need to
regroup quickly.
What To Expect: This is a key game for Valley West in that its performance
might give an indication of where it stacks up with Parkland. Of course,
winning is foremost and style points should be secondary. ASpartans’
loss, although unlikely, could be a psychological setback.
- John Erzar
Hazleton Area (0-1)
at
Coughlin (1-0)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Hazleton Area’s JimDrumheller (5-16, 3rd year); Coughlin’s
Ciro Cinti (41-37, 8th year)
Last Meeting: Coughlin 17-0 in 2012
All-Time Series: Coughlin leads 26-17-1
Quick Fact: Hazleton Area had 1 yard rushing and 34 yards of ofense in
last year’s game.
Scouting Hazleton Area: The Cougars dropped their seventh in a rowlast
Friday, losing 45-29 to Scranton. They were down 32-7 late in the second
quarter before scoring twice before halftime. QBJulius Ward put up solid
numbers passing and running, but the defense was again bad vs. the run.
Scouting Coughlin: The Crusaders jumped out to an 18-point lead and
hung on to defeat Tunkhannock 18-13 in Week 1. QBTimPilch (169 yards)
and RB Paul Cole (101) had big days as Coughlin ran for nearly 300 yards.
Although the Crusaders were planning to throwmore this season, they
attempted just seven passes in keeping with past strategy.
What To Expect: Coughlin won’t likely be throwing again, especially
after the way Scranton tore through Hazleton Area’s run defense. The
Crusaders’ ground game will be too much for the Cougars.
- John Erzar
Lackawanna Trail (1-0)
at
Hanover Area (1-0)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Trail’s Steve Jervis (45-60, 11th year); Hanover Area’s Ron
Hummer (35-43, 8th year)
Last Meeting: Trail 51-12 in 2012
All-Time Series: Trail leads 1-0
Quick Fact: Hanover Area surrendered a TD on the opening kickof for the
second consecutive game when the teams played last season.
Scouting Trail: After giving up a long TD run on the second play of the
game, Trail clamped down on Nanticoke for a 39-7 victory. The Lions had
both phases of ofense clicking. RB Cooper Rosiak rushed for 152 yards
and RBJared Phillips fell just short of 100. QBVic Mallory had a nice debut
as the starter, throwing for 183 yards. Take away the long TD run and Trail
allowed just 2.9 per carry.
Scouting Hanover Area: The Hawkeyes snapped a 12-game losing streak
by defeating Mid Valley 12-7 in their frst game. RB Brian Belcher churned
out 117 rushing yards. Sophomore QBJake Peters was pressed into action
due to an injury and threwa TD pass. The defense looking nothing like the
group that was stampeded last year as it held the Spartans to 94 yards
and no touchdowns on ofense. Overall, a surprising performance.
What To Expect: Trail is quite a diferent animal than Mid Valley. But if
Hanover Area builds on the confdence fromlast week, it could make
things interesting. The Lions, though, probably will have too much bite for
the Hawkeyes.
- John Erzar
Lake-Lehman (0-1)
at
Montrose (0-1)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Lehman’s Jerry Gilsky (18-15, 4th year); Montrose’s Russ
Canevari (2-19, 3rd year)
Last Meeting: Lehman 49-0 in 2012
All-Time Series: Lehman leads 2-1
Quick Fact: In last year’s meeting, Lehman rushed for over 300 yards for
the frst of three times in 2012.
Scouting Lehman: The Black Knights lost their fourth consecutive
opener to Old Forge 13-7. They scored on their opening drive and then
other scoring opportunities were feeting. RB Dustin Jones (43 yds.)
was among those sufering fromheat-related leg cramps and never got
moving. WBJoey Vigil had a strong game, while the defense pitched a
shutout in the second half.
Scouting Montrose: The Meteors lost 34-0 to Carbondale in their
opening, doing little to think they can be much of a force this season. The
ofense turned over the ball six times, barely had a recognizable running
game and was shut out for the fourth time in 10 games. The defense didn’t
play badly froma statistical standpoint.
What To Expect: Agame much like last year. Lehman will probably win
comfortably. If Montrose couldn’t generate ofense against Carbondale, it
won’t vs. the Black Knights.
- John Erzar
Meyers (1-0)
at
Old Forge (1-0)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Meyers’ Corry Hanson (9-13, 3rd year); Old Forge’s Mike
Schuback (90-40, 12th year)
Last Meeting: Old Forge 42-7 in 2012
All-Time Series: Tied 1-1
Quick Fact: Old Forge had three scoring plays of 50 yards or more in last
year’s victory.
Scouting Meyers: Not sure howmuch could be culled fromMeyers’
57-7 obliteration of Holy Cross, one of District 2’s weakest teams. QB
Matt DeMarco ran for 194 yards and four TDs. He didn’t really crank up
his passing arm. Three other guys rushed for 75 yards or more, and the
Mohawks piled up 425 yards on the ground. The defense, a sore spot in
2012, barely broke a sweat. But it certainly will tonight.
Scouting Old Forge: After surrendering an opening-drive touchdown, Old
Forge played well defensively in its 13-7 victory over Lake-Lehman. It had
two interceptions, including one in the fnal minute to preserve the win. RB
Brandon Yescavage rushed for 137 yards on 23 carries. The Blue Devils,
though, were penalized so much that the school’s maintenance crewis
probably still fnding fags on the feld the ofcials forgot to pick up.
What To Expect: Meyers had the perfect opponent in its opener where
any mistakes running the newofense wouldn’t be catastrophic. Not
so tonight. Old Forge is the type of teamthat makes opponents pay for
blunders.
- John Erzar
Mid Valley (0-1)
at
Wyoming Area (0-1)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Mid Valley’s Dave Rebar (19-25, 5th year); Wyoming Area’s
Randy Spencer (31-26, 6th year)
Last Meeting: Wyoming Area 28-12 in 2012
All-Time Series: Wyoming Area leads 2-0
Quick Fact: Wyoming Area recorded three interceptions in defeating the
Spartans last year.
Scouting Mid Valley: Afourth-quarter fumble at the Hanover Area 1-yard
line was costly for Mid Valley in its opener as the Spartans fell 12-7 to the
Hawkeyes, who had lost 12 in a row. RBTyler Collins, who was coming of a
strong junior year, was bottled up and fnished with 31 yards. Mid Valley’s
only score came on a kick return to start the third quarter. Otherwise,
most was forgettable.
Scouting Wyoming Area: The defending D2-2Achampion showed
just howhard it’s going to be to replace those departed seniors. The
Warriors looked sluggish on ofense in their 35-7 loss to Scranton Prep.
The blocking was particularly poor at times. The defense was passable,
allowing just two touchdowns. Prep had a pair of Pick-6s and blocked a
punt for another score.
What To Expect: Based on howboth teams played the frst week, the
game could be an ofensive struggle disguised as a defensive battle.
Mistakes haunted both teams in their openers and could again tonight.
- John Erzar
Williamsport (1-0)
at
Mifin County (1-0)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Williamsport’s Kevin Choate (1-10, 2nd year); Mifin
County’s George Miskinis (5-8, 3rd year)
Last Meeting: Mifin County 41-13 in 2012
All-Time Series: Mifin County leads 1-0
Quick Fact: Last year’s game was suspended by lightning and resumed
on Monday.
Scouting Williamsport: Looked like the same old, same old for
Williamsport in its opener as it fell behind 10-3 at halftime. Then RB Isaac
Foust (186 yds. 2 TDs) ignited the ofense for a 24-21 victory over Central
Mountain, snapping a 12-game losing streak.
Scouting Mifin County: The Huskies gutted out a 21-17 victory over
Dubois Area in their opener. The ofense managed just 200 yards, with
77 coming fromRB Heath Hidlay. The defense, though, created three
turnovers.
What To Expect: If Foust can repeat his opening-day performance, the
Millionaires could make it two in a row.
- John Erzar
Scranton (1-0)
at
Pittston Area (0-1)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Scranton’s Mike Marichak (33-22, 6th year); Pittston Area’s
Mike Barrett (6-15, 3rd year)
Last Meeting: Scranton 43-0 in 2012
All-Time Series: Tied 10-10
Quick Fact: Scranton held Pittston Area to just six frst downs in last
year’s win.
Scouting Scranton: The Knights rolled Hazleton Area 45-29 in Week
1. The score wasn’t as close as it appeared as they led 32-7 late in the
second quarter. RBJake McCarthy rushed for 232 yards and three TDs.
That’s not news; McCarthy is lightning quick and among the best backs in
District 2. The eyebrowraiser was newstarting QB Kyle Pieczynski, who
was 10-of-19 for 167 yards and two TDs. If he could add balance, Scranton
will prove to be tough.
Scouting Pittston Area: The Patriots lost their season opener 28-0 to
Abington Heights, a game that was 7-0 midway through the third quarter.
The Comets’ running game fnally broke it open. As for Pittston Area, it
didn’t play as badly as the fnal score indicated. But the Patriots were
susceptible to big plays and the ofense once again failed to score against
a quality opponent.
What To Expect: Like Hazleton Area a week before, if the Patriots don’t
shut down or at least limit McCarthy’s big plays the Knights will run away
with a victory.
- John Erzar
Tunkhannock (0-1)
at
West Scranton (1-0)
7 p.m. today
The Coaches: Tunkhannock’s Rod Azar (3-18, 3rd year); West Scranton’s
Joe Gerek (20-22, 5th year)
Last Meeting: West Scranton 38-6 in 2012
All-Time Series: West Scranton leads 14-6
Quick Fact: In last year’s contest, Tunkhannock trailed 14-6 midway
through the third quarter.
Scouting Tunkhannock: The Tigers got their ofense going a little too late
vs. Coughlin last Friday, resulting in a 18-13 loss. QB Brian Beauchemin
had his best rushing game of his career with 131 yards. RB Ryan Cywinski
had 53 more on 10 carries, but will probably tote the ball more tonight.
The Tigers fell into an 18-0 hole and aren’t the type of teamcapable of
climbing out. They can’t fall behind by much tonight.
Scouting West Scranton: The Invaders (the best nickname in District 2)
steamrolled Riverside 54-12 in their opener. That would be very impressive
in past years when Riverside was a Class Apower. But with Riverside
undergoing a major rebuilding, we’ll reserve judgment. Still, the running
game was very strong and Tunkhannock had trouble stopping Coughlin
runners last week.
What To Expect: West Scranton’s running attack will eventually wear on
Tunkhannock in the second half like in last year’s matchup.
- John Erzar
Dallas (0-1)
at
Abington Heights
(1-0)
1 p.m. Saturday
The Coaches: Dallas’ Bob Zaruta (7-5, 2nd year); Abington’s Joe Repshis
(73-23, 9th year)
Last Meeting: Abington 28-7 in 2012
All-Time Series: Abington leads 2-0
Quick Fact: Dallas rushed for just 26 yards on 35 carries in last season’s
loss.
Scouting Dallas: It was a rough start for the inexperienced Mountaineers
as they were throttled 40-0 by Wyoming Valley West. The defense, chock
full of newstarters, surrendered nearly 400 yards. The ofense, likewise
young, barely cracked 100 yards. One of the fewbright spots was newQB
Justin Mucha running tough.
Scouting Abington: The defending D2-3Achampion started this season
like last season, with a shutout of Pittston Area. RB Sean Rock looked like
he is ready to join a long line of quality runners at the school, piling up 208
yards. His two fourth-quarter TDs allowed the Comets to pull away. The
defense kept Pittston Area under 200 yards of total ofense.
What To Expect: Abington’s stadium– aka The Pit – is a tough place for
good opponents. For ones struggling like Dallas, it can be a nightmare …
and it just might be Saturday.
- John Erzar
Holy Redeemer (0-1)
at
Holy Cross (0-1)
1 p.m. Saturday
The Coaches: Redeemer’s Pat Reece (3-8, 2nd year); Holy Cross’ Josh
Watters (0-1, 1st year)
Last Meeting: Redeemer 33-21 in 2012
All-Time Series: Redeemer leads 3-2
Quick Fact: Redeemer snapped a 22-game losing streak with last year’s
victory.
Scouting Redeemer: The Royals nearly pulled of the biggest upset of
the opening weekend before falling 28-24 to Northwest. Ago-ahead TD
pass with 4:23 to play was negated by a penalty. Still, Redeemer showed it
might be a better teamthan last year. QBJimmy Strickland threwfor three
touchdowns, but had two dropped throws that would have been TDs. RB
Pat Villani (51 yards) gave the running game some punch, something that
has been lacking since the school was formed in 2007.
Scouting Holy Cross: The Crusaders lost their 12th in a rowas they were
fattened by Meyers 57-7. Meyers ran roughshod over the defense for eight
rushing touchdowns. QB Eric Gatto threwa touchdown pass with 1:21 to
play to avoid a shutout. There was no running game to speak of. Snapping
the losing streak looks unlikely based on the opening night performance.
What To Expect: It’s ftting Holy Cross plays its home games at St.
Anthony Playground because Redeemer’s recess-like ofense of throwing
a lot will ft right in. The Royals should roll.
- John Erzar
Northwest (1-0)
at
Susquehanna (0-1)
1 p.m. Saturday
The Coaches: Northwest’s Carl Majer (34-23, 6th year); Susquehanna’s
Kyle Cook (0-1, 1st year)
Last Meeting: Susquehanna 16-14 in 2012
All-Time Series: Susquehanna leads 4-1
Quick Fact: Susquehanna won last year’s game with a safety with 6:10
left to play.
Scouting Northwest: The Rangers got into a tussle – and marathon
– last Saturday before outlasting Holy Redeemer 28-24. Because of a
lightning delay, the game ended about 11:30 p.m. RBAustin Mazonkey (86
yards) was on his way to a 100-yard performance before he and others
were slowed by the heat. RBTyler Burger stepped in with a surprising 136-
yard performance, so it looks like Northwest will have a solid 1-2 punch
going forward. But 15 penalties were a no-no.
Scouting Susquehanna: The Sabers enter of a 25-20 loss to Western
Wayne. They scored late, but couldn’t continue the rally attempt. That
wasn’t surprising since Susquehanna isn’t a quick strike gang. Its veer
ofense is more suited for chewing up time and yardage at a steady pace
when it can. The backfeld returns fromlast season, so the ofense is
expected to run smoother.
What To Expect: Once again Majer will have a seat in the bleachers as
he fnishes out his suspension. The viewthis Saturday should be more
pleasing than last Saturday.
- John Erzar
Dunmore (1-0)
at
GAR (0-1)
7 p.m. Saturday
The Coaches: Dunmore’s Jack Henzes (372-153-8, 47th year); GAR’s Paul
Wiedlich Jr. (29-9, 4th year)
Last Meeting: Dunmore 29-0 in 2012
All-Time Series: Dunmore leads 4-2
Quick Fact: GAR turned over the ball seven times in the last meeting.
Scouting Dunmore: Dunmore lost in the Class Astate title game last
year, but picked up where it left of. The Bucks fattened North Pocono 48-
13, with star RB Daiqwon Buckley rushing for 186 yards and four TDs. QB
Brandon Kujawski gives the teamone of the more experienced backfelds
in District 2. OLJames McHale has made a verbal commitment to Temple.
Scouting GAR: The Grenadiers fell 27-19 to long-distance nemesis
Lakeland in their opener. RB Rich Sickler had 158 yards on the ground and
QB Rashaun Mathis was solid in his debut. The defense kept Lakeland’s
ground game in check, but was torched through the air. It probably won’t
be tested via pass much vs. Dunmore.
What To Expect: GAR is going to need to bring its A-game to defeat
Dunmore, which is stoked to make another deep run in the state playofs.
- John Erzar
PAGE 4B Friday, September 6, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
Something should give in Giants-Cowboys opener
SCHUYLER DIXON
AP Sports Writer
ARLINGTON, Texas
— Eli Manning has
never lost to the Dallas
Cowboys in their fancy
$1.2 billion stadium.
Tony Romo is perfect
in two season openers
against the New York
Giants.
Something figures to
give Sunday night.
“I don’t think there’s
anything to it,” Manning
said of his 4-0 record in
Arlington, which alleg-
edly included the Giants
quarterback scribbling
his name, the score, the
date and the words “First
Win in the New Stadium”
on a concrete column in
the visitors’ locker room
after a 33-31 victory in
2009. “We’ve had some
tight games. Hopefully
we can just find a way
to hang in there and put
ourselves in a situation to
win the game at the end.”
The Giants are try-
ing to bounce back from
missing the playoffs a
season after Manning
won his second Super
Bowl. The Cowboys are
trying to bounce out of
an 8-8 rut in coach Jason
Garrett’s two full seasons
and a three-year postsea-
son drought.
Dallas’ dominance over
New York in season open-
ers predates Romo by
quite a few years. The
Cowboys are 6-0 all-time
in openers against the
Giants, including the last
time they started the sea-
son at home in 2007 —
Romo’s first full season
as the starter.
“More than anything,
we need to make sure
that we create a home-
field advantage,” Romo
said. “Our fans have done
a great job. We need them
to be at their best on
Sunday night. When they
are, they’re very tough to
deal with here in Dallas.”
Here are five things to
know heading into the
102nd regular-season
meeting between the
Giants and Cowboys:
D E F E N S I V E
CHANGES: The
Cowboys decided to
switch to a simpler four-
man front after failing to
stop the Saints’ passing
attack and the Redskins’
running game in season-
ending losses that kept
Dallas out of the playoffs.
The change will highlight
DeMarcus Ware’s pass-
rushing skills and could
lead to big years for Sean
Lee and Bruce Carter if
they stay healthy. “It’s
still a matter of execu-
tion and blocking up
DeMarcus Ware and
running good routes off
of their cornerbacks,”
Manning said.
The Giants released
linebacker Michael
Boley and tackle Chris
Canty and signed tackle
Cullen Jenkins after fin-
ishing 31st in defense.
End Jason Pierre-Paul
needed back surgery and
missed the preseason,
and there are other ques-
tions with cornerback
Corey Webster coming
off a sub-par season.
“Who won’t be anxious?
I’m just coming off back
surgery and I just want to
be out there,” Pierre-Paul
said.
JUGGLING LINES:
Injuries have led to
uncertainty for both
offensive lines. Giants
center David Baas has
been battling a sprained
knee, and tackle David
Diehl is out with a thumb
injury. First-round pick
Justin Pugh is starting at
right tackle. “You’d like to
think that you’re going to
be able to put that same
group together with a
year’s experience and
what they’ve learned and
the way they communi-
cate with each other, but
it doesn’t always happen
that way,” Giants coach
Tom Coughlin said.
The Cowboys have a
first-round pick start-
ing at center in Travis
Frederick and have had
injury problems at guard
all of training camp.
This week, Dallas finally
signed 11-year veteran
Brian Waters, who is
unlikely to play in the
opener. Ron Leary is
another potential first-
time starter at guard.
“I have a tremendous
amount of faith in them,”
Cowboys running back
DeMarco Murray said.
“One of the hardest work-
ing groups on our team.”
ON THE RUN: Murray
is trying to make it
through a full season
without getting hurt and
wants to revive a running
game that had the worst
per-game average in fran-
chise history last year.
The new starter for the
Giants is 2012 first-round
pick David Wilson. The
importance of Wilson
grew with Andre Brown
going down with a broken
leg in the preseason for
the second straight year.
The Giants cut Ahmad
Bradshaw after a pair of
1,000-yard seasons in the
past three years.
THE DEZ FACTOR:
Dez Bryant nearly beat
the Giants with a miracle
catch late in last year’s
29-24 Giants victory, and
he followed that with a
wildly productive second
half. Romo says the loss
to the Giants was some-
thing of a tipping point
for Bryant, who also ran
an imprecise route that
led to an interception.
Bryant has looked strong
throughout training camp
and seems ready to sur-
pass last season’s career
bests of 1,382 yards and
12 touchdowns. “There
are no expectations for
Dez,” Romo said. “He can
be as good as he wants to
be.”
CRUZ CONTROL:
Victor Cruz has been
out with a heel injury
but should be ready to
go after a third straight
1,000-yard season. He
had 1,536 yards in a
breakout 2011, includ-
ing a season-high 178
yards and a touchdown
in a 31-14 win over the
Cowboys in the finale
with a playoff berth on
the line. He dropped off
to 1,092 yards last year
but still led the team and
set a career high with 10
touchdowns. “My heel
has been feeling right
and now I’m just worried
about getting the timing
down with Eli, getting
my tempo back,” Cruz
said.
AP file photo
Giants top receiver Victor Cruz (80) had another big season in 2012. Depsite a heel injury that has
slowed him in preseason, Cruz seemingly is a go for the opener at Dallas.
NewYork group paying for
radio ads urging NFL to
remove‘Redskins’ from its
vocabulary.
MICHAEL HILL
ASSOCIATEDPRESS
ALBANY, N.Y. — An
American Indian tribe in
upstate New York said
Thursday it will launch a
radio ad campaign pressing
for the Washington Redskins
to shed a name often criti-
cized as offensive.
The Oneida Indian Nation
said the first ad will run on
radio stations in Washington
before the team hosts the
Philadelphia Eagles in its sea-
son opener Monday night.
In the ad, Oneida Nation
RepresentativeRayHalbritter
says NFL Commissioner
Roger Goodell should “stand
up to bigotry” by denouncing
“the racial slur” in the team’s
name.
“We do not deserve to be
called redskins,” the Oneida
leader says in the ad. “We
deserve to be treated as what
we are —Americans.”
The radio ad said Goodell
had rightly been critical this
summer after an Eagles wide
receiver was caught on video
making a racial slur against
African-Americans.
The ads launch as the
Washington Redskins this
year face a fresh barrage of
criticism over their nick-
name, with local leaders and
pundits calling for a name
change.
In May, 10 members of
Congress sent letters to
Redskins owner Dan Snyder
and Goodell urging the team
to change the name.
Snyder has vowed to never
change the name.
League spokesman Brian
McCarthy, in an email to The
Associated Press, said they
“respect that reasonable peo-
ple may have differing views.”
“The name from its ori-
gin has always intended to
be positive and has always
been used by the team in a
highly respectful manner,”
McCarthy wrote.
There was no immediate
response fromthe Redskins.
The Oneidas have been
vocal opponents of the
Redskins nickname — be it
for NFLor highschool teams.
The tribe, which runs a casi-
no and resort in central New
York, this year gave $10,000
toward newjerseys to an area
high school that changed its
nickname from the Redskins
to the Hawkeyes.
The Oneida said the first
ad will run Sunday and
Monday on several stations
in Washington.
Subsequent ads will run
in Washington during home
games and in the cities host-
ing the teamwhen it is away.
A spokesman for the
Oneidas would not say how
much the campaign would
cost beyond “multiple thou-
sands.”
Halbritter said that fans
also are being urged to lobby
the NFL in support of the
name change at www.chan-
gethemascot.org, a website
that debuted Thursday.
”We believe that with the
helpof our fellowprofessional
football fans, we can get the
NFL to realize the error of its
ways and make a very simple
change,” Halbritter said in a
prepared statement.
To American Indians, the
name of the game is change
CHARLES ODUM
AP Sports Writer
FLOWERY BRANCH,
Ga. — Roddy White isn’t
promising he’ll be 100 per-
cent for the Falcons’ open-
er at the Saints on Sunday.
White did guarantee
he’ll be on the field —
just like every game of his
career.
“Come Sunday I’ll be
ready to go,” White said
Thursday. “My adrenalin
will be pumping and once
you get out there you’ve
got to just go play.”
His streak of 128 con-
secutive games played
— every regular-season
game for eight seasons
— appeared to be at risk
when White sprained his
right ankle in Atlanta’s
second preseason game
at Baltimore. He was held
out of the Falcons’ last
two preseason games and
returned to practice on a
limited basis Wednesday
and Thursday.
Falcons coach Mike
Smith said White always
finds a way to play, even
when slowed by injuries.
“Eight years. It says a
lot about the type of play-
er Roddy White is,” Smith
said after Thursday’s
practice. “Since we’ve
been here he is undoubt-
edly the toughest player
on our team. There have
been times he’s had to
fight through things to
get there on the field and
I don’t know if there’s any-
one quite like him on our
roster.”
That’s why Smith said
he always was confident
White, 31, would over-
come his latest injury.
“I think we’ve said from
the very beginning after
the Baltimore game that
we had no doubt Roddy
White was going to be
prepared and ready to go
for our opener, and bar-
ring any setbacks that’s
what is going to happen
on Sunday,” Smith said.
White will carry other
streaks into the season.
He had 92 catches for
1,353 yards in 2012,
becoming only the fifth
player in NFL history with
three consecutive seasons
of at least 90 receptions
and 1,200 yards.
He also has a streak of
six straight seasons with
1,000 yards receiving, the
longest in team history.
The Saints have seen
enough of White to
include him in their scout-
ing report, despite seeing
his name on the injury
list.
“We know that ultimate-
ly those reports mean
nothing when big games
are at hand,” Saints cor-
nerback Jabari Greer said
Thursday. “So we’re pre-
paring as if he’s going to
be out there full speed,
100 percent and we’re not
going to be surprised by
anything.
“He’s a receiver that can
present problems, so we
just have to make sure we
respectfully prepare for
him.”
White, Julio Jones and
tight end Tony Gonzalez
are Matt Ryan’s top
three targets. Running
back Steven Jackson, the
team’s top offseason addi-
tion, also is a threat as a
receiver.
White’s durability has
helped him take control of
the Falcons’ record book.
He has team records for
yards receiving in a game,
season and career as well
as most catches in a sea-
son and career.
He said he doesn’t
spend much time thinking
about the fact he’s never
missed a game.
“I never thought about
it really,” he said. “You
just go out there and foot-
ball players play football.
You never thought about
if you’re going to miss a
game or not play. If you
have the opportunity to
go out there and play, you
just play.
“I never really thought
about the streak until
everybody else started
saying something about
it. You know, you’ve just
got to do what you’ve got
to do. You’ve got to get
yourself ready to play.”
Former longtime center
Jeff Van Note played in a
team-record 155 consecu-
tive games from 1976-86.
Center Todd McClure,
who retired after last sea-
son, had a streak of 144
games played end in 2010.
Linebacker Keith
Brooking (130) and offen-
sive tackle Bob Whitfield
(129) are the only other
players in Atlanta history
with streaks longer than
White’s.
Falcons’ White vows to play against Saints
AP file photo
It’s difficult to imagine Atlanta receiver Roddy White missing the Falcons’ opening game against the Saints —mainly because he’s never
missed a game.
“They have a lefty quarterback who can
sling the ball,” Wiedlich said. “They like
throw the quick out or mid-range slant
pattern. But they’re going to line up, try
to out-formation you with a heavy look.
Either a guard-tackle-tackle look or a
four-man over to one side, what we call
a loaded look.
“They are going to try to jam the ball
down your throat.”
Dunmore won last year’s game 29-0.
Very little went right for GAR in that
game. The Grenadiers turned over the
ball seven times. Starting quarterback
Corey Moore was sidelined with an
injury, throwing inexperienced Rashaun
Mathis behind center. The results were
predictable.
Moore has graduated and Mathis
has assumed the role as the starter.
Wiedlich liked what he saw from him
in the 27-19 season-opening loss to
Lakeland. Mathis brings a running
element to the position, something
that can be traced throughout GAR’s
quarterback history.
Senior running back Rich Sickler has
always been a lunchpail guy. He rushed
for 158 yards on 15 carries against
Lakeland.
“I thought Rashaun played a heck of
a game,” Wiedlich said. “He really had
control of our offense and showed great
leadership. And Rich Sickler, I can’t say
enough about him. He’s a horse for us.
For the last three years, he has been step-
ping up. Our offensive line did a nice job
and opened some nice holes.”
GAR’s defense contained Lakeland’s
running game for the most part, limit-
ing the Chiefs to 135 yards on 35 carries.
The Grenadiers held Chris Roche, a top-
notch runner, to 45 yards on 20 carries.
However, they were torched by the pass
for 244 yards.
“Our pass coverage was a little off,”
Wiedlich said. “They were throwing
those 20-yard patterns and our kids were
getting a little confused with their depth
in the zone. Our run defense played really
well. We had some kids step up we really
didn’t expect to.”
From page 1B
GAR
for freshmen who arrived in the sum-
mer if they have a reasonable shot of
seeing the field.
On Saturday, six such rookies were
highlighted. Hackenberg and Walker
both played against the Orange with
Hackenberg obviously starting at
quarterback and Walker as a punt
returner.
The other four to watch out for
are linebacker Brandon Bell, kicker
Chris Gulla, tackle Andrew Nelson
and defensive end Garrett Sickels.
Nelson worked a bit on the two-
deep during training camp but was
slowed by injury. Bell could see the
field given the team’s lack of depth
at linebacker. Sickels was one of
the Lions’ highest-rated recruits in
February’s class. Gulla would step in
if anything were to happen to Sam
Ficken.
Regardless of who does see the
field in 2013, all of the freshmen
have a special importance to the pro-
gram.
“A lot of these guys in the fresh-
man class could have gone any-
where,” O’Brien said. “(Hackenberg)
had scholarships to over 50 schools.
He committed to us before the sanc-
tions came out, and he stuck with us
when the sanctions came out.
“No matter what happens in his
career, 10 years down the road — all
of these guys that did that, because
there is more than just him — they’re
better men for having done that.”
Halftime ceremony scheduled
Penn State will honor the 40th
anniversary of its undefeated
1973 team at halftime of Saturday’s
game.
More than 50 players are expected
to attend, including All-Americans
Mark Markovich, Dan Natale, Ed
O’Neil and Heisman Trophy winner
John Cappelletti.
“We can’t wait to welcome those
guys back,” O’Brien said. “They
have an open invitation to come give
us advice over at the Lasch Building,
I can tell you that. That’s a great
football team. Anytime you go 12-0,
that’s a fantastic accomplishment.
They’re up on the stadium wall here
and it will be great to have them
back.”
From page 1B
Freshmen
EDDIE PELLS
AP National Writer
NEW YORK — After one
set, Andy Murray slammed
his racket into the court,
then mangled it once he
reached his chair on the
sideline. After the second, he
gestured over to his coach,
Ivan Lendl, and let out a frus-
trated scream.
Stanislas Wawrinka had
the U.S. Open defending
champion in knots all day,
and when the surprisingly
short, less-than-compet-
itive match was finished
Thursday, Murray was a
6-4, 6-3, 6-2 upset loser in
the quarterfinals at Flushing
Meadows.
“I would have liked to
have played a little bit bet-
ter,” Murray said after rush-
ing off the court and into the
interview room to explain
the loss. “I’ve had a good run
the last couple of years. It’s
a shame I had to play a bad
match today.”
Ninth-seeded Wawrinka
made his first Grand Slam
semifinal, earning a spot in
the final four for Switzerland
that for so long felt like Roger
Federer’s birthright.
“It feels amazing for
sure, especially here,” said
Wawrinka, who didn’t face a
break point over his 14 ser-
vice games. “Especially after
that match. He’s the defend-
ing champion, He’s a tough
opponent.”
Wawrinka will play the
winner of Thursday’s late
quarterfinal between No. 1
Novak Djokovic and No. 21
Mikhail Youzhny.
After years of close calls
and deep trips into majors,
the third-seeded Murray
finally won his first Grand
Slam title at Flushing
Meadows last year, then his
second at Wimbledon this
July.
But the straight-set loss
to Wawrinka ended a stay
in New York during which
he never got completely
comfortable — not when
he had to wait until the
first Wednesday to begin
defense of the title, not
when he struggled in a
four-set victory over Denis
Istomen in the fourth round
and certainly not Thursday.
This was Murray’s earli-
est exit from the U.S. Open
since 2010, when Wawrinka
also did the honors — that
year in the third round.
Murray conceded it’s
been a long road since he
broke into the top, first at
the Olympics on home turf
last year, then with the two
major titles.
“When you work hard
at something for a lot of
years, it’s going to take
time to fire yourself up and
get to training 110 per-
cent,” Murray said about
his preparation for the
year’s final Grand Slam.
“That’s something kind
of natural after what hap-
pened at Wimbledon.”
An amazing letdown,
especially considering the
numbers he has been put-
ting up of late.
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SPORTS Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 5B
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 84 57 .596 — — 8-2 W-2 47-25 37-32
Tampa Bay 77 61 .558 5½ — 3-7 W-2 44-26 33-35
NewYork 75 64 .540 8 2½ 7-3 W-3 43-28 32-36
Baltimore 74 65 .532 9 3½ 4-6 W-1 39-29 35-36
Toronto 64 76 .457 19½ 14 7-3 L-1 35-34 29-42
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 81 59 .579 — — 4-6 L-2 44-27 37-32
Cleveland 74 65 .532 6½ 3½ 4-6 W-2 42-27 32-38
Kansas City 73 67 .521 8 5 7-3 W-1 38-34 35-33
Minnesota 61 77 .442 19 16 4-6 L-1 28-36 33-41
Chicago 56 83 .403 24½ 21½ 2-8 L-7 32-34 24-49
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 80 59 .576 — — 8-2 W-1 44-26 36-33
Texas 80 59 .576 — — 5-5 L-1 39-29 41-30
Los Angeles 64 74 .464 15½ 13 7-3 L-2 32-39 32-35
Seattle 63 77 .450 17½ 15 4-6 L-1 31-38 32-39
Houston 46 93 .331 34 31½ 3-7 W-1 23-49 23-44
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 85 54 .612 — — 8-2 L-1 51-20 34-34
Washington 71 68 .511 14 6½ 6-4 W-2 40-31 31-37
NewYork 63 75 .457 21½ 14 5-5 W-1 28-38 35-37
Philadelphia 63 77 .450 22½ 15 4-6 L-2 36-33 27-44
Miami 52 86 .377 32½ 25 3-7 L-1 29-39 23-47
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh 81 58 .583 — — 5-5 L-1 45-25 36-33
St. Louis 80 60 .571 1½ — 4-6 L-1 41-25 39-35
Cincinnati 79 62 .560 3 — 5-5 W-1 44-24 35-38
Milwaukee 60 79 .432 21 18 4-6 W-1 31-40 29-39
Chicago 59 80 .424 22 19 4-6 W-1 28-44 31-36
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 83 56 .597 — — 7-3 L-1 43-28 40-28
Arizona 70 68 .507 12½ 7 4-6 W-1 40-31 30-37
Colorado 66 75 .468 18 12½ 6-4 W-1 41-31 25-44
San Diego 62 77 .446 21 15½ 4-6 L-1 38-33 24-44
San Francisco 62 77 .446 21 15½ 5-5 W-1 34-35 28-42
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Wednesday’s Games
Houston 6, Minnesota 5
Oakland 11, Texas 4
Arizona 4, Toronto 3, 10 innings
Cleveland 6, Baltimore 4
N.Y. Yankees 6, ChicagoWhite Sox 5
Boston 20, Detroit 4
Seattle 6, Kansas City 4
Tampa Bay 3, L.A. Angels 1
Thursday’s Games
Kansas City 7, Seattle 6, 13 innings
Baltimore 3, ChicagoWhite Sox 1
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Boston (Doubront 10-6) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte
10-9), 7:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 4-11) at Baltimore
(Feldman 4-4), 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 7-3) at Cleveland (Kazmir
7-7), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 12-7) at Kansas City
(Shields 10-8), 8:10 p.m.
Toronto (Dickey 11-12) at Minnesota (Pelfrey
5-10), 8:10 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 5-8) at Oakland (Grifn 12-9),
10:05 p.m.
Texas (Garza 3-2) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 14-6),
10:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 8-3) at Seattle (Iwakuma 12-6),
10:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Boston at N.Y. Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
ChicagoWhite Sox at Baltimore, 1:05 p.m.
Houston at Oakland, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m.
Detroit at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Toronto at Minnesota, 7:10 p.m.
Texas at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Wednesday’s Games
N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 2
Chicago Cubs 9, Miami 7
Arizona 4, Toronto 3, 10 innings
San Francisco 13, San Diego 5
Washington 3, Philadelphia 2
St. Louis 5, Cincinnati 4, 16 innings
Milwaukee 9, Pittsburgh 3
Colorado 7, L.A. Dodgers 5
Thursday’s Games
Cincinnati 6, St. Louis 2
Arizona at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Milwaukee (Lohse 9-8) at Chicago Cubs (Rusin
2-3), 2:20 p.m.
Atlanta (Minor 13-5) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 11-6),
7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 7-3) at Cleveland (Kazmir
7-7), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 4-7) at Cincinnati (Leake
11-6), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Haren 8-12) at Miami (Fernandez
10-6), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 7-9) at St. Louis (J.Kelly
7-3), 8:15 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 8-7) at San Diego (B.Smith
0-1), 10:10 p.m.
Arizona (Corbin 13-5) at San Francisco (Petit
2-0), 10:15 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m.
Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Washington at Miami, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 8:40 p.m.
Arizona at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.
MLB STANDINGS • STATS
Royals 7, Mariners 6, 13 innings,
Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Miller ss 5 0 0 1 0 1 .256
A.Almonte cf 5 1 1 0 1 1 .227
Seager 3b 6 1 2 0 0 2 .283
K.Morales dh 6 1 2 1 0 1 .280
Smoak 1b 6 1 2 2 0 0 .251
3-En.Chavez pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .271
Ackley lf-1b 4 0 2 0 1 1 .255
Franklin 2b 5 0 0 0 1 1 .219
M.Saunders rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .233
e-F.Gutierrez ph-rf2 0 0 0 0 1 .242
H.Blanco c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .145
c-Ibanez ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .256
Zunino c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .236
Totals 48 6 11 5 3 10
Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
A.Gordon lf 6 1 2 2 0 1 .267
Bonifacio cf-2b 6 2 4 0 0 2 .238
Hosmer 1b 6 1 2 1 0 1 .300
B.Butler dh 5 1 5 1 0 0 .292
2-Ciriaco pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .212
S.Perez c 3 0 3 1 0 0 .286
1-Hayes pr-c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .286
Maxwell rf 2 0 0 1 1 1 .256
L.Cain rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261
d-Lough ph-rf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .283
Giavotella 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .194
a-C.Pena ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .209
J.Dyson cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .262
A.Escobar ss 6 0 0 0 0 1 .232
Carroll 3b 2 1 1 0 0 0 .211
b-Moustaks ph-3b4 1 1 1 0 1 .238
Totals 51 7 19 7 2 12
Seattle 301 100 001 0000—6 11 0
Kansas City 000 030 300 0001—7 19 1
No outs when winning run scored.
a-struck out for Giavotella in the 5th. b-
grounded out for Carroll in the 6th. c-homered for
H.Blancointhe 9th. d-walkedfor L.Caininthe 9th.
e-struck out for M.Saunders in the 11th.
1-ranfor S.Perez inthe 5th. 2-ranfor B.Butler in
the 9th. 3-ran for Smoak in the 13th.
E_Hosmer (7). LOB_Seattle 8, Kansas City
11. 2B_A.Almonte (2), Seager (30), Ackley (17),
M.Saunders (17), Hosmer (29), S.Perez (22),
Hayes (3), Carroll (8). HR_Smoak (15), of Guth-
rie; Ibanez (26), of G.Holland; A.Gordon (17), of
J.Saunders; Moustakas (11), of Rufn. RBIs_B.
Miller (30), K.Morales (72), Smoak 2 (37), Ibanez
(61), A.Gordon 2 (75), Hosmer (70), B.Butler (72),
S.Perez (64), Maxwell (20), Moustakas (36).
SB_Bonifacio (25), Ciriaco (3). S_Ackley. SF_B.
Miller, Maxwell.
Runners left in scoring position_Seattle 5
NATIONAL ROUNDUP
MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP
(Franklin 2, Zunino, K.Morales, F.Gutierrez); Kan-
sas City 8 (A.Escobar 3, Giavotella, C.Pena 2,
Hosmer, J.Dyson). RISP_Seattle 1 for 10; Kansas
City 3 for 13.
Runners moved up_H.Blanco. GIDP_Hosmer,
Maxwell, J.Dyson.
DP_Seattle 3 (Seager, B.Miller, Smoak),
(J.Saunders, B.Miller, Smoak), (Luetge, Franklin,
B.Miller, Smoak).
Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
J.Saunders 42-3 11 3 3 1 3 103 4.95
Maurer 11-3 4 3 3 0 1 28 6.85
Furbush 2 1 0 0 0 3 26 3.16
Wilhelmsen 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 4.31
Luetge 2 1 0 0 1 2 27 4.35
Rufn L, 0-1 12-3 1 1 1 0 3 23 5.40
Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Guthrie 6 7 5 5 2 1 96 4.19
Bueno 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00
W.Smith H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.48
G.Holland BS, 3-411 1 1 1 0 1 16 1.45
Collins 11-3 1 0 0 1 1 35 3.60
K.Herrera 11-3 1 0 0 0 3 20 3.46
D.Joseph 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 0.00
ColemanW, 3-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.38
Maurer pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
Rufn pitched to 1 batter in the 13th.
Inherited runners-scored_Maurer 3-0, Fur-
bush 2-1, Luetge 1-0, Rufn 1-0, K.Herrera 2-0,
D.Joseph 1-0, Coleman 1-0.
Umpires_Home, Angel Hernandez; First, Ker-
win Danley; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, Gary
Cederstrom.
T—4:17. A—14,004 (37,903).
Orioles 3, White Sox 1
Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
De Aza cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .269
Beckham2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282
Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .283
A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .226
Konerko 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .242
A.Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .291
Gillaspie 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .243
Viciedo lf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .259
Bry.Anderson c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000
Totals 31 1 5 0 1 9
Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
B.Roberts 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .243
Machado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .294
A.Jones cf 3 1 2 1 1 1 .295
C.Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .294
Wieters c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .233
Morse rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .229
AP phoio
Andy Murray reacts during a break between sets after losing the
first two sets to Stanislas Wawrinka, of Switzerland, during the
quarterfinals of the 2013 U.S. Open on Thursday in New York.
Murray
makes
unexpected
exit at US
Open
The Associated Press
CALGARY, Alberta —
The Calgary Flames are
looking to Brian Burke to
help with their rebuilding
effort.
The longtime hockey
executive has been hired
as president of hockey
operations, a new posi-
tion that puts Burke in
charge of what President
Ken King termed the
“sports side of the
Calgary Flames.”
The Flames are in
rebuilding mode after
missing the playoffs for a
fourth straight season.
Burke will report
directly to King and gen-
eral manager Jay Feaster
will now report to Burke.
While it’s not a nor-
mal arrangement in the
NHL, it’s common in
other sports, Burke said
at a news conference
Thursday.
“This is a relatively new
structure in professional
hockey,” he said. “There
are two teams in the
NHL that have this type
of management struc-
ture. There are a number
of teams in the National
Football League that do, a
number of teams in Major
League Baseball that do
and a number of teams in
the NBA that do. And it
works effectively. And it’s
going to work here.”
Burke won the Stanley
Cup as GM of the
Anaheim Mighty Ducks
in the 2006-2007 season.
He was fired as president
and general manager of
the Toronto Maple Leafs
in January. The 58-year-
old Burke had been work-
ing as a part-time scout
with the Anaheim Ducks
since February.
He stressed that he will
not be taking on the role
of general manager.
“I’m not the general
manager of the Calgary
Flames, Jay Feaster is,”
Burke said. “Jay and I
have been friends a long
time, we met this morn-
ing, we talked about how
to make this work, we’re
both committed to win-
ning.”
Burke likes the changes
Feaster has made so far.
“I think I can provide
some help, but I think
Jay’s got great ability,”
Burke said. “He’s already
made some important
steps towards fixing
things here and it’s my
pleasure and honor to be
able to work with him.”
King said the hiring of
Burke in the works for
many months.
“Both Jay and I feel
very strongly that Brian
will bring an added
dimension of experience,
guidance and mentorship
that will add greatly to
the progress that Jay has
already made to improve
our team,” said King,
adding Feaster has been
involved in the process
from the start.
Burke has had a
lengthy career behind
the scenes in the NHL.
Flames hire Burke to head hockey operations
The Associated Press
DAVIDSON, N.C. —
Hudson Swafford, Nick
O’Hern, Edward Loar
and Ben Kohles shared
the lead in the Chiquita
Classic, shooting 5-under
67 on Thursday in the
first round of the Web.com
Tour Finals event.
The tournament at
River Run Country Club
is the second in the four-
event series that will
determine 25 PGA Tour
cards for the 2013-14 sea-
son.
The bulk of the field is
made up of players in the
top 75 on the Web.com
Tour money list and Nos.
126-200 in the PGA Tour’s
FedEx Cup standings. The
top 25 on the Web.com
money list are assured
PGA Tour cards, while the
other players are fighting
for 25 additional cards.
Loar was fourth on the
Web.com Tour money
list, and Swafford finished
61st. Kohles was 148th
on FedEx Cup list, and
O’Hern was 176th.
Swafford missed the
cut last week in the series
opener in Fort Wayne, Ind.
O’Hern said River
Run is comparable to
Sedgefield, the site if the
PGA Tour’s Greensboro
event.
“It’s nice to play a golf
course where you have
to be in the fairway,” the
Australian said.
Only 45 players finished
under par.
“The rough is all you
want,” Loar said. “You’ve
definitely got to golf your
ball around here.”
Troy Merritt, D.J.
Brigman, Peter Tomasulo
and Matt Davidson shot
68, and Web.com money
champion Michael Putnam
was another stroke back
along with Jeff Klauk,
Bronson La’Cassie, Tim
Petrovic, Will MacKenzie
and Michael Putnam.
Japan’s Ryo Ishikawa had
a 70 after missing the cut
last week in Fort Wayne.
South Africa’s Trevor
Immelman, the winner in
Fort Wayne, opened with
a 73.
EUROPEAN MASTERS
Lahiri shoots 8-under for
lead
CRANS-SUR-SIERRE,
Switzerland — Anirban
Lahiri of India shot
8-under 63 Thursday for
a two-stroke lead at the
European Masters, while
13-year-old Ye Wo-cheng
of China finished with a 78.
Four share lead at Web.com fnals
AP photo
Thomas Bjoern of Denmark hits a ball out of a bunker during the
first round of the Omega European Masters Golf Tournament in
Crans Montana, Switzerland on Thursday.
The Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. —
Mike Moustakas homered
to lead off the 13th inning,
lifting the Kansas City
Royals to a 7-6 victory over
the Seattle Mariners on
Thursday.
Moustakas homered to
right on an 0-2 pitch from
Chance Ruffin (0-1), who
had not pitched in the
majors since 2011.
Louis Coleman (3-0), the
eighth Kansas City pitcher,
retired the only batter he
faced in the top of the 13th.
Kansas City rallied from
five runs downandled6-5 in
the ninth inning before Raul
Ibanez homered off Greg
Holland into the Mariners’
bullpen with two outs to tie
the score. It was Holland’s
first blown save since May 6
to end his streak of 31 con-
secutive saves.
Billy Butler went 5 for 5,
matching his career high in
hits for the Royals, while
Emilo Bonifacio went 4 for
6 for his first four-hit game
since July 4, 2009.
Orioles 3, White Sox 1
BALTIMORE — Miguel
Gonzalez allowed one run
over seven innings and
Baltimore hit three solo
home runs in a victory over
skidding Chicago.
Adam Jones, J.J. Hardy
and Brian Roberts homered
off Jose Quintana (7-6) to
provide Baltimore with
a much-needed win. The
Orioles were coming off a
3-6 road trip that dropped
them four games off the
pace in the AL wild-card
hunt.
Gonzalez (9-7) gave up
four hits, all singles, walked
one and struck out six to
earn his first win in seven
starts since July 20. He was
0-4 in that span.
Tommy Hunter allowed a
single in the eighth and Jim
Johnson worked a perfect
ninth for his 42nd save.
Reds 6, Cardinals 2
CINCINNATI — Todd
Frazier hit two hom-
ers, including the first
of Cincinnati’s three off
Lance Lynn, and the Reds
recovered from a 16-inning
loss by overpowering St.
Louis, taking three of four
in their final series of the
season.
Jay Bruce and Shin-Soo
Choo also hit solo homers
off Lynn (13-10), who last-
ed five innings and gave up
three homers for only the
second time in his career.
Frazier also connected off
Seth Maness for the third
multihomer game of his
career. Left-hander Tony
Cingrani (7-3) returned
from a sore back and did
a little bit of everything.
He pitched into the sixth
inning, gave up two runs,
bunted for a hit, stole a
base and scored. David
Freese homered for the
Cardinals, who have lost
six of eight.
Solo shot in 13th
inning lifts Royals
AP photo
Kansas City’s Mike Moustakas, center, celebrates with his team-
mates after hitting a solo home run to win the game during the
13th inning of Thursday’s game against Seattle.
Markakis rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .270
Hardy ss 3 1 2 1 0 0 .261
Valencia dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .284
McLouth lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .267
Totals 29 3 7 3 1 7
Chicago 001 000 000—1 5 0
Baltimore 100 020 00x—3 7 0
LOB_Chicago 4, Baltimore 3. 2B_Wieters (24).
HR_A.Jones (30), of Quintana; Hardy (25), of
Quintana; B.Roberts (4), of Quintana. RBIs_B.
Roberts (32), A.Jones (100), Hardy (71).
Runners left in scoring position_Chicago 1
(Beckham); Baltimore 1 (Valencia). RISP_Chi-
cago 0 for 2; Baltimore 0 for 4.
GIDP_De Aza, Morse, McLouth.
DP_Chicago 2 (Gillaspie, Konerko), (Al.
Ramirez, Konerko); Baltimore 1 (Hardy, C.Davis).
Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Quintana L, 7-6 7 7 3 3 1 4 102 3.70
A.Reed 1 0 0 0 0 3 12 3.22
Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Mig.Gonzalez W, 9-77 4 1 1 1 6 100 3.98
Tom.Hunter H, 18 1 1 0 0 0 1 26 2.69
Ji.Johnson S, 42-511 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.34
Umpires_Home, Bob Davidson; First, John
Hirschbeck; Second, James Hoye; Third, Jim
Reynolds.
T—2:34. A—17,383 (45,971).
Reds 6, Cardinals 2
St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
M.Carpenter 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .315
S.Robinson cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .280
Holliday lf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .284
Beltran rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .306
Freese 3b 3 1 2 1 1 1 .264
Ma.Adams 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .265
g-Y.Molina ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .321
T.Cruz c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .206
R.Jackson ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
e-Jay ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .262
Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Lynn p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .087
a-B.Peterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125
S.Freeman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
Maness p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200
f-Descalso ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .236
Totals 28 2 5 1 5 10
Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg.
Choo cf 3 2 2 1 2 0 .287
B.Phillips 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .267
d-C.Izturis ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .178
Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .300
Bruce rf 4 1 2 2 1 2 .267
Ludwick lf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .269
A.Chapman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Frazier 3b 4 2 3 2 0 1 .237
Cozart ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252
Hanigan c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .212
Cingrani p 2 1 1 0 0 0 .250
Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
b-N.Soto ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
M.Parra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500
c-H.Rodriguez ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .000
LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---
D.Robinson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .251
Totals 34 6 10 6 7 9
St. Louis 000 011 000—2 5 0
Cincinnati 011 111 10x—6 10 0
a-struck out for Lynn in the 6th. b-struck
out for Duke in the 6th. c-walked for M.Parra in
the 7th. d-grounded into a felder’s choice for
B.Phillips in the 7th. e-struck out for R.Jackson in
the 8th. f-fied out for Maness in the 8th. g-struck
out for Ma.Adams in the 9th.
LOB_St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 11. 3B_M.Carpen-
ter (6). HR_Freese (7), of Cingrani; Frazier (14),
ofLynn; Choo(20), ofLynn; Bruce(27), ofLynn;
Frazier (15), of Maness. RBIs_Freese (51), Choo
(48), B.Phillips (101), Bruce 2 (90), Frazier 2 (64).
SB_Cingrani (1). CS_S.Robinson (1).
Runners left in scoring position_St. Louis 2
(Beltran, Y.Molina); Cincinnati 5 (Frazier 2, Votto,
Ludwick, C.Izturis). RISP_St. Louis 0for 2; Cincin-
nati 2 for 6.
GIDP_Beltran 2, Ma.Adams.
DP_Cincinnati 3 (Cozart, B.Phillips, Votto),
(Frazier, B.Phillips, Votto), (B.Phillips, Cozart,
Votto).
St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Lynn L, 13-10 5 7 4 4 4 6 102 4.37
S.Freeman 2-3 2 1 1 1 1 22 1.08
Maness 11-3 1 1 1 2 1 24 2.29
Choate 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.61
Salas 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.38
Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA
Cingrani W, 7-3 51-3 4 2 2 3 7 79 2.80
Duke H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 7.71
M.Parra H, 15 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.46
LeCure 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.83
A.Chapman 1 1 0 0 1 1 20 2.72
Inherited runners-scored_Maness 2-0, Duke
2-0. WP_Lynn, Maness, Cingrani.
Umpires_Home, Laz Diaz; First, Mark Wegner;
Second, Cory Blaser; Third, TimTimmons.
T—3:04. A—21,418 (42,319).
TOM COYNE
Associated Press
SOUTH BEND, Ind. —
Notre Dame coach Brian
Kelly believes receiver TJ
Jones can be a whole lot
more than an outstanding
route runner.
Kelly raised eyebrows
with bold statements about
Jones during training camp,
predicting he would not
only emerge as the go-to
guy for the 14th-ranked
Fighting Irish (1-0), but
predicting the 5-11, 194-
pound senior will follow in
the footsteps of Tyler Eifert
and Michael Floyd and be a
first-round NFL draft pick.
Jones made his coach’s
predictions look good in
the opener against Temple,
showing a burst of speed
he hasn’t shown previously.
It started on Notre Dame’s
second possession, when
Jones caught a screen pass
in the backfield at his own
10-yard line, took advantage
of a two key blocks, broke a
tackle at the 30, avoided a
lunging defender 5 yards
later, then raced up the
sideline before finally being
knocked out of bounds at
the Temple 36-yard line.
The 51-yard gain set up
the second touchdown for
Notre Dame and was the
start of the best game of
Jones’ career as he broke
the 100-yard receiving
mark for the first time, fin-
ishing with 138 yards on six
catches. It’s the kind of per-
formance Kelly hopes to see
again this week against No.
17 Michigan (1-0).
“He caught the ball, and
then he was dynamic after
the catch. That’s what we’re
looking for from him,” Kelly
said. “He is going to be in
the mix every single week
because he’s one of the best
receivers in the country.”
The game is the final
scheduled trip for the Irish
to Ann Arbor before the
series ends next season
after Notre Dame decided
last year to cancel the last
three games.
Jones, a team captain
from Roswell, Ga., attri-
butes his strong start
to simply feeling more
comfortable this season.
Football hasn’t always been
his focus, especially his
sophomore season, after his
father Andre Jones, a mem-
ber of Notre Dame’s 1988
national championship
team, died unexpectedly at
age 42 of brain aneurysm.
“This past year is the first
time I’ve been able to focus
on football, my responsi-
bilities, becoming a man.
It’s weird to see how much
I’ve grown. I came in as a
17-year-old kid and now I’m
a 21-year-old man about to
graduate and leading as a
senior captain,” he said.
His goal is to make it to
the NFL so he can help his
mother, Michele, and his
five siblings, the youngest
who is 11 years old.
“It’s not all about TJ any-
more. It’s about my family,”
he said.
Jones said he worked
hard during the offseason
on improving his speed,
saying he’s heard that there
was a concern about him
playing in the NFL because
he didn’t have a “second
gear.” So he focused on
working on speed through
weightlifting, plyometrics
and other conditioning
drills. Kelly said he believes
the reason Jones looks
improved is his passion
to get better. “He clearly
wants to be the best and, I
think, leave a legacy here at
Notre Dame,” he said.
Jones living up to Kelly’s
preseason expectations
PAGE 6B Friday, September 6, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER

Defensive
standcut
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0ffensive
standcut
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seosororc|ocl0l orctWo
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71 · N! (c·c, cì8)
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88 · \·!| (c·1, c4c)
0ffensive
standcut
Jy how|e
c0 · C (c·0, c71)
Jesse 0e||a Va||e
17 · |k (c·l, l70)
k|ex 8utterworth
4a · | (a·l0, c0c)
8||| 8e|toa
l · Kk (a·l0, c0a)
Samf|c|ea
7ì · K (c·1, lìc)
k||ea kob|asoa
8 · Wk (c·1, cl0)
Zach Zw|aa|
c8 · k3 (c·l, c40)
Joha 0rsche|
c4 · kC (c·1, 10l)
0oaovaa Sm|th
ìc · |! (c·a, 1cc)
0arry 0||||am
ìì · k! (c·c, 101)
0hr|st|aa hac|eaberç
l4 · O3 (c·4, cc0)
M||es 0|effeabach
ca · |C (c·1, c7a)
ky|e 0arter
8ì · |·!| (c·1, c41)
8raadoa fe|der
8a · Wk (c·c, c00)
0hr|st|aa hac|eaberç
t|reWfor cì8 ]orcs ir
|is ce|ut, secorc rost
|] or] |SU fres|ror.
Jordaa Lucas
7 · C3 (c·0, l71)
kdr|aa kmos
4 · SS (c·0, c07)
Jrevor R||||ams
l0 · C3 (c·l, l8ì)
ky|e 8aub||tz
84 · ù! (c·a, c8l)
0a0uaa Joaes
7l · ù! (c·1, 1l8)
0.J. 0|aa|yaa
8c · ù| (c·1, c44)
0|eaa 0arsoa
40 · ||3 (c·1, c1a)
Ma|co|mR||||s
l · |S (a·ll, cla)
NyeemRartmaa
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0e|oa 8araes
l8 · ù| (c·4, c4a)
M||e hu||
41 · O|3 (c0c, ccì)
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coreer·|iç|s |ost Wee|
Wit| rire toc||es orc
1.0 toc|es for |oss.
Jay Joaes
7 · H·Wk (a·l0, l8l)
Jesse James
l8 · \·!| (c·ì, caì)
Auq. 3¹ vs. Syracuse W, 23-17
Sept. 7 Eastern Mich. Noon
Sept. ¹^ UCF 6 p.m.
Sept. 2¹ Kent State 1BA
Oct. 5 at !ndiana 1BA
Oct. ¹2 Michiçan 5 p.m.
Oct. 26 at 0hic State 8 p.m.
Nov. 2 !IIincis 1BA
Nov. 9 at Minnescta 1BA
Nov. ¹6 Purdue 1BA
Nov. 23 Nebraska 1BA
Nov. 30 at Wisccnsin 1BA
MATCHUP
Eastern Michiçan
Eaçles
Neen, Saturday
Beaver Stadium(¹06,572), State Colleqe
Penn State
Nittany Liens
0AME 0UI0E
BI0 TEN STAN0IN0S
B!C TEN 0VERALL
BI0 TEN
Cincinnati at lllinois, noon (LSPN2)
South Florida at Michiqan State, noon (LSPNU)
Lastern Michiqan at Penn State, noon (B1N)
1ennessee 1ech at No. 2¹ Wisconsin, noon (B1N)
Missouri State at lowa, noon (B1N)
lndiana State at Purdue, noon (B1N)
San Dieqo State at No. 3 Ohio State, 3:30 p.m. (ABC)
Syracuse at No. ¹9 Northwestern, 6 p.m. (B1N)
Southern Miss at No. 22 Nebraska, 6 p.m. (B1N)
Navy at lndiana, 6 p.m. (B1N)
No. ¹^ Notre Dame at No. ¹7 Michiqan, 8 p.m. (LSPN)
Minnesota at New Mexico State, 8 p.m. (No 1V)
AR0UN0 THE C0UNTRY
No. ¹2 Florida at Miami, noon (LSPN)
No. 2 Oreqon at Virqinia, 3:30 p.m. (LSPN2)
No. 6 South Carolina at No. ¹¹ Ceorqia, ^:30 p.m. (LSPN)
West Virqinia at No. ¹6 Oklahoma, 7 p.m. (FOX)
No. ¹5 1exas at BYU, 7 p.m. (LSPN2)
WHAT T0 WATCH: SATUR0AY
Auq. 3¹ Hcward W, 34-24
Sept. 7 at Penn State Noon
Sept. ¹^ at Rutçers ¹ p.m.
Sept. 2¹ BaII State ¹ p.m.
Oct. 5 at BuffaIc Noon
Oct. ¹2 at Army Noon
Oct. ¹9 0hic ¹ p.m.
Oct. 26 at Ncrth. !IIincis 3:30 p.m.
Nov. 2 at TcIedc 7 p.m.
Nov. 9 Western Mich. ¹ p.m.
Nov. 23 BcwIinç Creen ¹ p.m.
Nov. 29 at CentraI Mich. 1BA
TV: Biq 1enNetwork (Scott Craham, Chuck Lonq)
RA0I0: WlLK·FM(¹03.¹), WlLK·AM(980), WKZN·AM(¹300),
WBZU·AM(9¹0), (Steve Jones, Jack Ham, LorenCrispell)
WEB: www.qopsusports.com
LINE: PennState by 23
REC0R0S: PennState (¹·0, 0·0Biq 1en), LMU(¹·0, 0·0MAC)
SERIES: 3rd meetinq, PSUleads, ¹·0(¹ PSUwinvacated)
LAST 0AME: 20¹¹, PSUwon3^·6inState Colleqe (vacated)
KEY MATCHUP: LasternMichiqancoachRonLnqlishsaid he
wasn't happy withhowhis delensive line qot pushed around last
week, surrenderinq 202rushinq yards. 1hat was aqainst FCS
Howard. PennState should be able to do the same, lookinq to
improve onlast week's sub·par rushinq stats aqainst Syracuse.
PLAYER T0 WATCH: StephenObenq·Aqyaponq llashed his
versatility last week, playinqmostly at linebacker inplace ol the
in|ured Mike Hull. WithHull considered day·to·day, it wouldn't be a
a surprise to see Bill O'Brienrest him, qiventhe opponent.
Obenq·Aqyaponq could line up |ust about anywhere this week.
TELLIN0 NUMBERS: PennState brouqht ¹6true lreshmen
and ¹5redshirt lreshmento last week's qame aqainst Syracuse.
1hat accounted lor ^2percent (3¹ ol 7^) ol the travel roster.
0I0 Y0U KN0W: More than50members ol PennState's
undeleated ¹973 squad will be inattendance onSaturday to
celebrate the team's ^0thanniversary at halltime.
0UTL00K: PennState is already banqed up, but lortunately
lor the Lions, they lace what is expected to be the weakest
opponent onthe schedule. 1hat qives Bill O'Brienthe optionol
restinqplayers like Mike Hull and Kyle Carter without too much
concern. 1he Lions still have plenty ol kinks to work out, withball
security, the runninq qame and third·downconversions (¹·ol·¹6)
all needinq improvement. Facinq the Laqles should help matters.
PRE0ICTI0N: PennState, 3^·¹0
Z013 SCHE0ULE
Leaders 0ivisien W L W L
Ohio State 0 0 1 0
Wisconsin 0 0 1 0
Penn State 0 0 1 0
lndiana 0 0 1 0
lllinois 0 0 1 0
Purdue 0 0 0 1
Leçends 0ivisien W L W L
Michiqan 0 0 1 0
Nebraska 0 0 1 0
Northwestern 0 0 1 0
Michiqan State 0 0 1 0
Minnesota 0 0 1 0
lowa 0 0 0 1
WHEN EASTERN MICHI0AN HAS THE BALL
SpeciaI
teams
Prcjected
starters
WHEN PENN STATE HAS THE BALL
Penn State will win if...
0EFENSE
0FFENSE
Bill 0'Brien
RIN JI£ P0J. L0SS
2nd season at Penn State
0·0vs. Lastern Michiqan
Alma mater: Brown (¹992)
C0ACH REC0R0S
ùesµite µ|o]irç just ore |o|f
|ost Wee|, A||er ko|irsor
o|reoc] |eocs t|e 3iç !er
Wit| l11 receivirç ]orcs.
Key stat
.t|e Nittor] |iors cor |reo| just o feWof t|eir |oc |o|its
frort|e oµerer. Crortec, if t|e] cor |roc| off S]rocuse W|i|e
corrittirç four turrovers, t|e] s|ou|c |e o||e to overcore
t|ose risto|es oçoirst t|e |oç|es os We||. 3ut t|e] cor't Wort
to firc out if t|ot's true. S|ort of |oo|irç o|eoc to reit Wee|'s
µriretire çore vs. UC|, t|e |iors s|ou|c sto] ir cortro|.
.69Z 0 4 9
SpeciaI
teams
0EFENSE
0FFENSE
Eastern Michiçan will win if...
... t|e |oç|es cor sore|oWcuµ|icote t|e forru|o t|ot O|io
usec ir |err Stote's |ost |ore oµerer. |ro||eris t|ot
|osterr's roir iterir corror Wit| O|io is o co|or sc|ere.
Arc t|e |iors orer't |eorrirç o reWs]stert|is ]eor. !|e
|oç|es ceferse rust force turrovers |] corfusirç C|ristior
Hoc|er|erç Wit| e|o|orote coveroçes os S]rocuse cic.
|osterr |ic|içor |os rever
|eoter o 3iç !er oµµorert,
çoirç 0·1l, irc|ucirç tWo
|osses ir Hoµµ] Vo||e].
Key stat
1HL 1lMLS LLADLR S1AFF
L0SS RIN JI£ P0J.
5th season at Lastern Mich.
0·¹ vs. Penn State
Alma mater: Calilornia (¹990)
C0ACH REC0R0S
Ren Ençlish
.ZZ4 0 38 11
Prcjected
starters
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SPORTS Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 7B
Early season showdown ends in stalemate
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
WILKES-BARRE —Last year, the Dallas
and Coughlin boys had to play three games
to decide the Wyoming Valley Conference
Division I championship.
If the rest of the season goes like it did on
Thursday at the Bog for both teams, the same
thing may occur again this season.
The Mountaineers and Crusaders battled
for 100 minutes without a decisive outcome,
as the early-season showdown ended in a 1-1
stalemate.
Both coaches were content coming away
with a tie, especially since numerous injuries
occurred, stopping play in the match half a
dozen times to swell the game time to nearly
two-and-a-half hours.
Dallas played half of the second half and the
two overtime periods without offensive stars
A.J. Nardone, Blake Pertl and Nate Wood.
Nardone, who is the reigning top scorer in the
division, had to get help walking off the field
and didn’t return. Pertl also was out the rest of
the game, while Nadone saw time in the sec-
ond overtime.
But Dallas substitutes Connor McCarthy,
Brian Butler, Donald Michalisin and Christian
Kimmerle stepped up in big ways.
“Kudos to my subs. My subs played really,
really good today. They’ve been struggling a
little bit,” Dallas coach Chris Scharff said. “I
don’t have a lot of depth. But they really helped
us out. Everybody played good, but my subs
are the reason we tied this game today because
they held on the last 20 minutes and in over-
time.”
According to Coughlin coach Rob Havard,
his team’s injuries were mostly cramps.
Normally when these two rivals meet, rough
play could be the reason for injuries, but not
this time. There wasn’t any foul play on either
side, just some freak plays that happen in
sports.
“There were some bangs, but you’re gonna
get that whether it’s a JV game or a varsity
game,” Havard said. “I thought up and down
the board you play hard, you fight hard and I
thought it was even. And I thought the sports-
manship was great.”
Dallas took a 1-0 lead in the first half when
Matt Saba broke through a pair of Coughlin
defenders, Bobby Hawkins and Brandon Butry,
to get a breakaway and beat Coughlin keeper
Steve Johnson with 11:29 remaining on the
clock.
After the rest of the first half was scoreless, it
didn’t take long for the Crusaders to get on the
board in the second half. They took the opening
kick down for a score with Junior Martinez net-
ting the goal off an assist from Dave Marriggi.
Dallas defender Brandon Scharff leaped to
head the ball from Marriggi but just missed it.
The ball sailed to Martinez and into the net to
even the contest at 1-1 just 41 seconds into the
half.
Both teams didn’t have too many chances the
rest of the match as the defenses played superb-
ly over the final 60 minutes. Offenses also bat-
tled running into the brutal sun at times, while
the same side of the field also featured clouds
of dust whipping up when the wind gusted.
“We’re thrilled with the game. Both teams
played really, really hard like we knew they
would,” Scharff said. “But we took a shellack-
ing from Valley West the other day. Where we
have four, five guys that probably shouldn’t have
even played today, but they wanted to play this
game. This is the big game and they’re going to
rest next week no matter who we play.”
Dallas doesn’t play until Tuesday, while
the Crusaders have a match in Hazleton
Saturday morning. The second time the
squads meet is Friday, Oct. 11 at Dallas.
Dallas 1, Coughlin 1
Dallas 1 0 0 0 — 1
Coughlin 0 1 0 0 — 1
First half —1. DAL, Matt Saba 11:29. Second half —2. COU, Junior Martinez (Dave
Marriggi), 39:19.
Shots —DAL12; COU13. Saves —DAL7 (Blake Williams); COU8 (Steve Johnson).
Corners kicks —DAL3; COU4.
Nanticoke 4, Hanover Area 0
Mike Mihneski, Rees Roberts and Aaron
Kreitzer each tallied a goal and an assist to
help the Trojans, who scored all four goals in
the second half.
Wiston Godoy also scored for Nanticoke.
Wyoming Area 3, GAR 0
Ryan Schuleski scored twice to help the
Warriors to the win on the road, while David
Klaproth also found the back of the net.
Berwick 2, MMI Prep 1
The Preppers took a 1-0 lead into halftime,
but the Bulldogs answered with two in the
final 40 minutes. Junior Ramos tied the score
with an unassisted goal, while Josh Mason
netted the game-winner off a pass from Jose
Umana.
Crestwood 3, Hazleton Area 0
Matt Wimpfheimer scored two first-half
goals, while Alex Buchholz notched a goal
and an assist as the Comets got the shutout
victory on the road.
Wyoming Valley West 4, Meyers 2
The Mohawks jumped out to a 2-0 lead just
a little over 5 minutes into the match, but the
Spartans rebounded for four second-half tal-
lies to pull out the win.
Eddie Thomas scored a hat trick with all
three assists from Nick Singer, while Brian
Novitsky also scored.
Cal Lisman and Excel Mendoza struck the
back of the net for the Mohawks.
Coughlin 1, Crestwood 0
In a match played Wednesday, the
Crusaders scored the lone goal, an unassist-
ed tally by Henry Sanchez in the second half
to post the win.
Nanticoke 4, Hanover Area 0
Hanover Area 0 0 — 0
Nanticoke 0 4 — 4
Second half —1. NAN, Mike Mihneski 45th minute; 2. NAN, Rees Roberts (Aaron
Kreitzer) 61st; 3. NAN, Kreitzer (Roberts) 61st; 4. NAN, Wiston Godoy (Mihneski)
63rd.
Shots —HAN10; NAN21. Saves —HAN14 (Joe Gagliardi); NAN7 (Carmelo Pio-
quinto). Corners kicks —HAN4; NAN5.
Wyoming Area 3, GAR 0
Wyoming Area 1 2 — 3
GAR 0 0 — 0
First half —1. WA, Ryan Schuleski; Second half —1. WA, Schuleski; 2. WA, David
Klaproth (Mark O’Malley)
Berwick 2, MMI 1
MMI 1 0 — 1
Berwick 0 2 — 2
First half — 1. MMI, Mitch Muir (Jay Saigemat), 24:16. Second half — 2. BER,
Junior Ramos 27:40; 3. BER, Josh Mason (Jose Umana) 34:45
Shots — MMI 15, BER 27. Saves — MMI 11 (Devon Saul); BER 6 (Erickson
Vasquez). Corners kicks —MMI 1, BER 1.
Crestwood 3, Hazleton Area 0
Crestwood 2 1 — 3
Hazleton Area 0 0 — 0
First half — 1. CRE, Matt Wimpfheimer (Alex Buchholz) 36:37; 2. CRE, Wimpf-
heimer (AustinWood) 30:16. Second half —1. CRE Buchholz, 20:45.
Shots —CRE31, HAZ9; Saves —CRE4(Nicolas Ruiz); HAZ24(CalebAncharski).
Corners kicks —CRE 3, HAZ2.
Wyoming Valley West 4, Meyers 2
Wyoming Valley West 0 4 — 4
Meyers 2 0 — 2
First half — 1. MEY, Cal Lisman (Excel Mendoza) 4:32; 2. MEY, Mendoza (Jarek
Hernandez) 5:36; Second half — 1. WVW, Eddie Thomas (Nick Singer) 44:27; 2.
Thomas (Singer) 45:00; 3. Thomas (Singer) 52:46; 4. Brian Novitsky (Andrew Ker-
rigan) 58:07
Shots —WVW12, MEY 5; Saves —WVW6 (Derrick Denman); MEY 8 (David Tor-
res, AdamCasey 0). Corners kicks —WVW8, MEY0.
Coughlin 1, Crestwood 0 (Wednesday)
Coughlin 0 1 — 1
Crestwood 0 0 — 0
Second half —1. COU, Henry Sanchez 18:24.
Shots —COU9; CRE 10. Saves —COU7; CRE 6. Corners kicks —COU3, CRE 5.
Bill Tarutis | For The Times Leader
Coughlin’s Tommy Sebia, left, and Dallas’ Eric Pincofski go to head the ball in a WVC Division 1 soccer match in Wilkes-Barre on Thursday afternoon.
Redeemer
golf team
tops feld in
tri-match
The Times Leader staf
Holy Redeemer’s Ryan
Crossin shot under par
with a 35 and Mariano
Medico and Chase
Makowski weren’t far
away from that feat as the
Royals roared to victory
in a three-team match on
Thursday at Wyoming
Valley Country Club.
The Royals finished
with a team score of 146
to beat Wyoming Area
(181) and Hanover Area
(189).
Medico was par for the
course with a 36, while
Makowski shot 37 and
Mike Boland finished
with a 38.
Mike Steve’s 40 led
Hanover Area, and
Wyoming Area had three
players shoot 45.
Crestwood 163, Dallas 167
Joe Hurn was the
medal winner with a
two-over par (36) as
Crestwood edged Dallas
by four strokes at Blue
Ridge. Billy Dombroski
finished with a 39. Jason
Dotzel and Seth Korch
both contributed 43s.
Dallas was led by
Ryan Georgetti’s 40.
Justin Brojakowski and
Brendan Balod pro-
duced a pair of 41s.
Jon Wilson rounded the
Mountaineer golfers
with a 45.
Lake-Lehman 179,
Meyers 247
The Black Knights’
Nick Egan medaled with
a 43 at Huntsville. Adam
Motovilak hit a 44, and
Ben Pilch scored a 45.
Grant Calkins contrib-
uted a 47.
Meyers’ Lee Falzone
posted a 57.
Nanticoke 187, GAR 246
Mike Malshefski was
the medalist at 3-over
39, while Joe Olszyk
(46) and Brinton Ball
(49) were the only other
golfers under 50 to help
the Trojans to victory.
Sean-Paul Williamson’s
54 led the Grenadiers.
Holy Redeemer 146, Wyoming Area 181,
Hanover Area 189
at Wyoming Valley Country Club, par 36
HR (146) — Ryan Crossin 35; Mariano Medico
36; Chase Makowski 37; Mike Boland 38.
WA(181) —Courtney Melvin45; MaddyWarton
45; Gavin Kress 45; RyanWrobel 47.
HAN(181) —Mike Steve 40; FredSheil 42; Matt
Kuhl 43; Tyler Demko 54.
Crestwood 163, Dallas 167
at Blue Ridge, par 36
DAL (167) — Ryan Georgetti 40, Justin Broja-
kowski 41, Brendan Baloh 41, JonWilson 45
CRE (163) —Joe Hurn 38, Billy Dombroski 39,
Jason Dotzel 43, Seth Korch 43
Lake-Lehman 179, Meyers 247
at Huntsville, par 36
MEY (247) —Lee Falzone 57, Paul Fox 60, Billy
Norton 63, Al Bonk 67
LL (179) — Nick Egan 43, Adam Motovilak 44,
Ben Pilch 45, Grant Calkins 47
Nanticoke 187, GAR 246
at Edgewood in the Pines Golf Course, par 36
GNA (187) — Mike Malshefski 39; Joe Olszyk
46; Brinton Ball 49; Eric Grodzicki 53.
GAR (246) — Sean-Paul Williamson 54; Mi-
chael Bodosky 61; Steven Tyson 65; Mike Roe 66;
Angelo Najera 66.
Ryan leads
the way
with a 35
Dallas girls blank Coughlin in soccer action
The Times Leader staf
DALLAS TWP. — Ruby Mattson
scored both goals, set up each time
by Talia Szatkowski to lead Dallas to
a 2-0 victory over Coughlin Thursday
in a rematch of last year’s District 2
Class 2A girls soccer playoffs.
Sydney Emershaw earned the shut-
out, making five saves.
Berwick 16, MMI Prep 0
Berwick’s Brianna Floryshak
scored two goals and three assists.
Abby Kemp provided four goals and
an assist. Gabby Kishbaugh netted
three goals and four assists.
Crestwood 3, Hazleton Area 1
The Comets broke the game open
in the second half with two goals.
Morgan Kile scored the go-ahead off
Olivia Termini’s second assist. Gabby
Termini and Rachael Velehoski also
produced a goal for Crestwood.
Hazleton Area’s Josie Zapotski
scored in the 7th minute to give the
Cougars a lead. Hayley Wilkinson
made 16 saves.
Pittston Area 8, Wyoming Seminary 1
Allie Barber manufactured four
goals and an assist to push the
Patriots to a victory.
Maddy Mimnaugh scored a goal
and three assists. Sara Ruby found
net twice.
Bethany Carpenter scored
Wyoming Seminary’s lone goal with
four seconds remaining in the first
half.
Hanover Area 5, Meyers 1
Larissa Bannon played a hand
in each of the Hawkeyes’ first four
goals. Kim Pericci put Hanover Area
ahead with a goal in the 36th minute.
Michelle McNair made eight saves
for the win.
Elise Fellerman booted a goal for
the Mohawks in the 77th minute. Gia
Skaff also made eight saves.
Pittston Area 8, Wyoming Seminary 1
Wyoming Seminary 1 0 — 1
Pittston Area 5 3 — 8
First half — 1. PA Maddy Mimnaugh, 4th minute; 2. PAAllie Barber
(Mimnaugh), 6th; 3. PA Barber, 22nd; 4. PA Barber 24th; 5. PA Sara
Ruby (Barber), 25th; 6. SEM Bethany Carpenter (Jamila Wemple)
40th
Second half — 7. PA Katelyn Pugliese (penalty), 48th; 8. PA Ruby
(Mimnaugh) 50th; 9. PABarber (Mimnaugh) 53rd
Shots —W3; P 27. Saves —W18 (Victoria Morrison); P 2 (Mindina
Lieback). Corners kicks —W1, P3
Dallas 2, Coughlin 0
Coughlin 0 0 — 0
Dallas 2 0 — 2
First half —1. DAL, Ruby Mattson (Talia Szatkowski), 13th minute;
2. DAL, Mattson (Szatkowski) 36th.
Shots — COU 10; DAL 16. Saves — COU 7 (Paige Davis); DAL 6
(Sydney Emershaw). Corner kicks —COU2; DAL5.
Berwick 16, MMI Prep 0
Berwick 10 6 — 16
MMI Prep 0 0 — 0
First half — 1. BER Carly Montecalvo (Brianna Floryshak), 1st
minute; 2. BER Floryshak (Gabby Kishbaugh), 2nd minute; 3. BER
Floryshak, 15th; 4. BER Kishbaugh (Montecalvo), 16th; 5. BER Em-
ily Wynings, 18th; 6. BER Amanda O’Kane (Kishbaugh), 20th; 7. BER
Kishbaugh (Abby Kemp), 24th; 8. Olivia Conklin (Kishbaugh), 31st; 9.
BERO’Kane(Montecalvo), 34th; 10. BERKarenBoone(Mitchell), 37th.
Second half — 11. BER Wynings, 60th; 12. BER Kemp (Floryshak),
67th; 13. BERKishbaugh (Floryshak), 68th; 14. BERKemp(Floryshak),
70th; 15. BER Kemp (Kishbaugh), 74th; 16. BER Kemp, 75th
Shots —B 47; M1. Saves —B 1 (Allison Rinehimer); M15 (Sammy
Cattone). Corners kicks —B 7, M0.
Crestwood 3, Hazleton Area 1
Hazleton Area 1 0 — 1
Crestwood 1 2 — 3
First half —1. HAZJosie Zapotosky, 7th minute; 2. CRE Gabby Ter-
mini (Olivia Termini), 39th. Second half — 3. CRE Morgan Kile (Ter-
mini), 58th; 4. CRE Rachael Velehoski (Harley Langford), 63rd
Shots — H 4; C 36. Saves — H 16 (Hayley Wilkinson); C 4 (Meg
White). Corners kicks —H0, C9
Pittston Area 8, Wyoming Seminary 1
Wyoming Seminary 1 0 — 1
Pittston Area 5 3 — 8
First half —1. PAMaddy Mimnaugh, 4th minute; 2. PAAllie Barber
(Mimnaugh), 6th; 3. PA Barber, 22nd; 4. PA Barber 24th; 5. PA Sara
Ruby (Barber), 25th; 6. SEM Bethany Carpenter (Jamila Wemple)
40th
Second half — 7. PA Katelyn Pugliese (penalty), 48th; 8. PA Ruby
(Mimnaugh) 50th; 9. PABarber (Mimnaugh) 53rd
Shots —W3; P27. Saves —W18 (Victoria Morrison); P2 (Mindina
Lieback). Corners kicks —W1, P3
Hanover Area 5, Meyers 1
Hanover Area 1 4 — 5
Meyers 0 1 — 1
First half — 1. HAN Kim Pericci ( Larissa Bannon), 36th minute.
Second half —2. HANLarissa Bannon, 62nd; 3. HANLarissa Bannon,
65th; 4. HAN Amelia Hossage, 70th; 5. MEY Elise Fellerman, 77th; 6.
HANLarissa Bannon, 80th
Shots —H13; M9. Saves —H8(Michelle McNair); M8(Gia Skaf).
Corners kicks —H3, M4
Mattson scores both goals in victory
Comets
streak to
victory
The Times Leader staf
HUGHESTOWN — Kristi
Bowman, Brittan Stanton and
Jennie Snyder all won their
matches Thursday to give
Crestwood a singles sweep, lead-
ing the Comets past Pittston
Area 4-1 in a high school girls
tennis match. Bowman took
the top singles match, 6-1, 6-0,
while Crestwood’s Stephanie
and Christine Maichin teamed
up to post a 6-4, 6-2 win at No.
1 doubles. Pittston Area’s No. 2
doubles teamof Kristen Capitano
and Sara O’Hop produced the
team’s lone victory, 6-3, 1-6, 6-4.
Holy Redeemer 5, GAR 0
The Royals won all five match-
es in straight sets with Megan
McGraw winning at first singles
without dropping a game. GAR’s
Vanessa Castillo pushed Hannah
Thorntonto a second-set tiebreak
at No. 3 singles.
Coughlin 5, Tunkhannock 0
Coughlin had no problems
on the road, sweeping the host
Tigers without losing a set.
Dana Schneider (No. 1
singles) won 6-0, 6-0 while the
team of Erin O’Day and Teagan
Bigelow(No. 2 doubles) won 6-1,
6-0.
Wyoming Seminary 5, Berwick 0
Megan Obeid and Chloe Xing
led Wyoming Seminary with
a 6-1, 6-1 in the first doubles.
Christina Regi and Charlotte Lin
also recorded a 6-1, 6-1 at No. 2
doubles. Wyoming Seminary lost
just one set in singles play.
Dallas 3, MMI Prep 2
Dallas narrowly escaped MMI
Prep with victories at second and
third singles. Lauren Butruce
punched the Mountaineer win
with a 6-2, 4-6, 6-4 at No. 3 singles
over Claire Sheen. MMI Prep’s
Stephanie Pudish won 4-6, 6-2,
6-3 in the first singles over Haley
Wilcox.
WyomingArea 4, Wyoming
Valley West 1
Wyoming Area’s Kierstin
Grillo won the second singles
by a 6-1, 6-2 score. Laura Perry
and Julia Banas earned a 6-0,
6-0 sweep at first doubles.
Wyoming Valley West received
a match win at first singles from
Laura Monto (6-1, 6-1).
Crestwood 4, Pittston Area 1
SINGLES—1. Kristi Bowman (Cres) d. Haleigh
Zurek 6-1, 6-0; 2. Brittany Stanton (Cres) d. Elaina
Menichelli 6-0, 6-0; 3. Jennie Snyder (Cres) d.
Claudia Shandra 6-1, 6-7 (3-7), 6-1.
DOUBLES — 1. Stephanie Maichin/Christine
Maichin (Cres) d. Tatiana Supinski/Kari Scull 6-4,
6-2; 2. Kristen Capitano/Sara O’Hop (PA) d. Re-
becca Price/Stacie Snyder 6-3, 1-6, 6-4.
Holy Redeemer 5, GAR 0
SINGLES — 1. Megan McGraw (HR) d. Raquel
Sosa 6-0, 6-0; 2. Emily Kavalka (HR) d. Leticia
Izagaurie 6-1, 6-1; 3. Hannah Thornton (HR) d.
Vanessa Castillo 6-2, 7-6 (7-2)
DOUBLES — 1. Natalie Cofee/Angela Mali-
novich (HR) d. Diane Lopez/Josmaslin Rivas 6-2,
6-3; 2. Annie Cosgrove/Jessica Fu (HR) d. Jessica
Valencia/Gisele Huerlero 6-1, 6-0
Coughlin 5, Tunkhannock 0
SINGLES — 1. Dana Schneider (COU) d. Jill
Patton 6-0, 6-0; 2. Alia Sod (COU) d. Haley Puter-
baugh 6-3, 6-0; 3. Kristi Pearage (COU) d. Brianna
Grey 6-2, 6-0
DOUBLES — 1. Kassie Cebula/Jade Matusick
(COU) d. Natalie Markovitz/Stephanie Seward
6-2, 6-0; 2. Erin O’Day/Teagan Bigelow (COU) d.
Miranda Dorova/Ellie Kuzma 6-1, 6-0
Wyoming Seminary 5, Berwick 0
SINGLES — 1. Nathalie Joanlanne (SEM) d.
Xiomara Salazar 6-0, 6-0; 2. Madison Nardone
(SEM) d. Kayla Davis 6-0, 6-1; 3. Jacqui Meuser
(SEM) d. Linda Thelemaque 6-0, 6-0
DOUBLES — 1. Megan Obeid/Chloe Xing
(SEM) d. Zoe Zajack/Mary Kramer 6-1, 6-1; 2.
Christina Regi/Charlotte Lin (SEM) d. Felicia Ca-
nouse/Gabi Popko 6-1, 6-1
Dallas 3, MMI Prep 2
SINGLES —1. Stephanie Pudish (MMI) d. Hal-
ey Wilcox 4-6, 6-2, 6-3; 2. Kajal Patel (D) d. Gaby
Becker 6-1, 6-4; 3. Lauren Butruce (D) def Claire
Sheen 6-2, 4-6, 6-4
DOUBLES — 1. Jessica Smith/Kelsey Donald-
son (MMI) d. Maddie Jones/Caitlyn Landau 4-6,
6-4, 6-2; 2. Maddie Ross/ Emily Heltzel (D) d.
Haylee Kirschner/Soprina Guarneri 6-0, 6-0
Wyoming Area 4, Wyoming Valley West 1
SINGLES — 1. Laura Monto (WVW) d. Anna
Thomas 6-1, 6-1; 2. Kierstin Grillo (WA) d. Em-
ily Coslett 6-1, 6-2; 3. Julia Gober (WA) d. Laura
Thompson 6-3, 6-1
DOUBLES — 1. Laura Perry/Julia Banas (WA)
d. Bryden Peters/Alyssa Stelmack 6-0, 6-0; 2.
Maddie Ambruso/Sam William (WA) def. Maria
Carey/Nada Elbattah 6-0, 6-0
PAGE 8B Friday, September 6, 2013 SPORTS www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
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From page 1B
Cooper
Baltimore. He also shoved
a referee during the Ravens’
win over San Francisco in the
Super Bowl.
“He’s just one of those
guys, he’s a nagging person
some times,” Jackson said of
Williams. “You get himon the
field, he tries to be overag-
gressive, he tries to do things
to intimidate receivers. Some
people might back down
from that. When you’re deal-
ing with people like myself,
Riley, professional athletes,
we all think we’re as tough as
each other.
“I think he’s a good player,
he’s a competitive player.”
Williams, signed as a free
agent in the offseason, was
a key part of Philadelphia’s
secondary overhaul. High-
priced cornerbacks Nnamdi
Asomugha and Dominique
Rodgers-Cromartie were let
go, replaced by Williams and
Bradley Fletcher. The Eagles
welcome Williams’ physical
play, though coach Chip Kelly
warned him during training
camp to avoid penalties and
stay in games. The Eagles
immediately fined Cooper
after the incident, which
happened in June, and went
public on July 31. A few days
later, he left the team for sen-
sitivity training. At that time,
Williams said he had a prob-
lemnot only withCooper, but
anyone who uses the word.
“Nobody should say it,”
Williams said. “I don’t care if
you white, black, blue, green
or purple. The hip-hop cul-
ture uses the word and has
de-emphasized it.
You need to go back and
see what our ancestors did to
try and rid themselves of that
word.”
Colonels hoping to start of consistently
DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
If you look at last year’s records, it
appears that Wilkes should have no prob-
lem in Saturday’s season-opening game
against Morrisville State.
Wilkes won five games a year ago,
while the Mustangs won just once. The
Colonels averaged 21.3 points per game,
while Morrisville posted a weak 11.7.
The list can go on with stats that favor
Wilkes. But somehow the team struggled
against this week’s opponent in last sea-
son’s opener winning by just two points
and not finding the end zone, settling for
three field goals.
Plus the Colonels are facing another
obstacle as the Mustangs changed coach-
es in the offseason to former Utica coach
Curt Fitzpatrick.
“There was a lot of uncertainty last year
when we played Morrisville we didn’t
know anything about them,” Colonels
coach Frank Sheptock said. “Then you
play them and get a sense of what they
are physically then they make a coaching
change in the summer so we’re back to
the uncertainty part.”
TheColonels’ offensivestruggles inthat
game a year ago didn’t seem so far away
at the end of last season when they put up
44 points in a win over King’s. Sheptock
is hoping that consistency remains not
only this week, but for the entire season.
But he also pointed to a recent scrimmage
for reference of howthe unit has been per-
forming so far. Andthe exhibitionshowed
the team still is making small mistakes
such as penalties, which was a detriment
to the squad last season racking up 775
yards in penalties. Turnovers were also an
issue last season as the Colonels turned
the ball over 18 times in the 10 games.
“We needto be more efficient incertain
areas because we have opportunities but
we’re still doing some things that will hurt
you in first games,” he said.”We need to
clean those things up to be more efficient.
Whenever we’re standing in our own
way (we’re) making things harder than
it needs to be. We’ve definitely struggled
fromthat standpoint offensively.”
Morrisville St. at Wilkes
When: Noon Saturday at Schmidt
Stadium, Edwardsville
Last year’s records: Wilkes 5-5;
Morrisville St. 1-9
Last meeting: Wilkes won last year’s
matchup, 9-7
Wilkes player to watch: New tight
end Alex George, who is a converted
quarterback. Sheptock said the senior will
see plenty of snaps. He could be a huge
weapon due to his 6- foot-2, 221-pound
frame.
Morrisville St. player to watch:
Senior offensive lineman Nate Ryan is a
preseason All-American selection. If the
6-1, 275-pounder can help contain the
Wilkes rush, the score will be very close.
Colonel’s 2012 returning team lead-
ers: RB Pat Inguilli 619 yards, 6 TD; QB
Tyler Bernsten917yards, 6TD, 6int; WR
Jon Conklin 18 rec, 294 yards, 2 TD; DB
Marcus Leaf 4 int, 1 TD; LB Tate Moore-
Jacobs 105 tackles, 2 int; DL Jason Ugwu
42 tackles, 6 sacks
Mustangs 2012 returning teamlead-
ers: WR Robert Clarke 25 rec, 311 yards,
2 TD; DB Travis French 3 sacks; DB
Jeremy Stewart 1 int; DT David Williams
19 tackles, 2 sacks
Wilkes will win if: The offense can
maintain the consistency it did at the of
the last season when it scored 44 in a sea-
son-ending win against rival King’s.
Morrisville St. will win if: Wilkes’
secondary doesn’t show improvement
fromlast season when they allowed 235.6
passing yards per game.
What to know: Morrisville St. head
coach Curt Fitzpatrick is in his first year
with the team. He previously coached
at Utica. The last time Sheptock and
Fitzpatrick squared off was in 2010 when
Utica won 24-10.
Eric Seidle | For The Times Leader
Quarterback Tyler Bernsten is the Colonels’ leading returning passer headed into Saturday’s opener against Morrisville State.
The Times Leader staf reports
WEST PITTSTON —
Danielle Grega provided a
game-winning goal in overtime
to lift Wyoming Valley West to
a 2-1 victory over Wyoming
Area Thursday in Wyoming
Valley Conference field hockey
action. Grega scored with 4:31
remaining in overtime off a
Julia Usefara assist.
Usefara sent the game into
overtime with 1:56 remaining
in regulation from a Megan
Kane pass. The Spartans’ Alicia
Moore picked up the victory
with eight saves.
Emile Wanko scored the lone
goal for Wyoming Area. Bree
Bednarski earned an assist,
and Christina Granteed had six
saves.
Lake-Lehman 2, Delaware Valley 0
Lake-Lehman broke a score-
less tie with two goals in the
second half to topple Delaware
Valley. The Black Knights out-
shot the Warriors by an 18-1
margin.
Korri Wandel hit the back of
the cage off a Sarah Sabaluski
feed with 26:28 remaining in
the first half. Kirsten Cope
added an insurance goal for
Lake-Lehman from Taylor Alba
at the 10:33 mark.
Tiffany Malinowski made
one save in net for the Black
Knight shutout.
Crestwood 7, Dallas 1
Crestwood’s Ashley Thomas
scored three goals. Daniella
Callaghan added a goal and an
assist, and Morgan Kile pitched
in two assists. Dallas Kendra
made five saves for the Comets.
Dallas’ Kami McGee scored
a goal off an Vanessa Parsons
assist in the second half.
Holy Redeemer 6, Nanticoke 0
Holy Redeemer’s Melanie
Kusakavitch garnered two
goals and two assists to lead
the Royals to a shutout. Greta
Ell had two goals and an assist.
Maddy O’Donahue made 13
saves for the Trojans.
Wyoming Seminary 6, Hazleton
Area 0
Mallory Lefkowitz netted
three goals and an assist to
pace the Blue Knights. Alexis
Quick had two points (goal,
assist), and Morgan Malone
scored on a penalty shot.
Caitlyn McHugh stopped 19
shots for Hazleton Area.
Coughlin 6, Abington Heights 1
Coughlin defeated the
Comets by scoring on half of its
12 shots. Goalkeeper Mikensie
Lee made five saves for the
Crusaders.
Wyoming Valley West 2, Wyoming Area 1 (OT)
Wyoming Valley West 0 1 1 —
2
Wyoming Area 1 0 0 —
1
First half —1. WAEmilieWanko (Bree Bednarski), 22:10.
Second half — 1. WVW Julia Usefara (Megan Kane), 1:56;
Overtime —1. WVWDanielle Grega (Usefara), 4:31
Shots —WVW10, WA11. Saves —WVW8 (Alicia Moore),
WA 6 (Christina Granteed). Penalty corners — WVW 7,
WA7
Lake-Lehman 2, Delaware Valley 0
Delaware Valley 0 0 — 0
Lake-Lehman 0 2 — 2
First half —No scoring. Second half —1. LLKorri Wan-
del (Sarah Sabaluski), 26:28; 2. LL Kirsten Cope (Taylor
Alba), 10:33.
Shots — D 1, L 18. Saves — D 15 (D’Auria), L 1 (Tifany
Malinowski). Penalty corners —D4, L15
Crestwood 7, Dallas 1
Dallas 0 1 — 1
Crestwood 4 3 — 7
First half — 1. CRE Ashley Thomas (Hannah Ackers),
23:25; 2. CRE Daniella Callaghan, 20:47; 3. CRE Maury Cro-
nauer (Morgan Kile), 19:57; 4. CRE Thomas (Kile), 19:08.
Second half — 5. DAL Kami McGee (Vanessa Parsons),
17:04; 6. CRE Hunter Pitman (Callaghan), 13:02; 7. CRE
Thomas, 11:26
Shots — D 5; C 17. Saves — D 9; C 5 (Dallas Kendra).
Penalty corners —D4, C8
Holy Redeemer 6, Nanticoke 0
Nanticoke 0 0 — 0
Holy Redeemer 4 2 — 6
First half — 1. HR Greta Ell (Melanie Kusakavitch),
27:00; 2. HR Kusakavitch, 14:25; 3. HR Kusakavitch (Ell),
13:00; 4. HR Abby Stucker (Elena Martin), 1:45. Second
half — 5. HR Ell (Rachel Platko), 24:23; 6. HR Martin (Ku-
sakavitch), 16:45
Shots — N 1; H 22. Saves — N 13 (Maddy O’Donahue).
Penalty corners —N2, H6
Wyoming Seminary 6, Hazleton Area 0
Hazleton Area 0 0 — 0
Wyoming Seminary 3 3 — 6
First half — 1. SEM Mallory Lefkowitz, 8:43; 2. SEM
Lefkowitz (Alexis Quick), 10:03; 3. SEM Morgan Malone
(penalty), :20. Second half —4. SEMQuick (Tali Dressler),
6:00; 5. SEM Lefkowitz, 20:00; 6. SEM Gabby Grossman
(Lefkowitz), :46.
Shots —H5, W35. Saves —H19(Caitlyn McHugh), W4
(Makenzie Gagliardi). Penalty corners —H4, W12
WVWfeld hockey prevails in OT
The Times Leader staf
PLYMOUTH —
Nanticoke needed five
sets to defeat Wyoming
Valley West by scores
of 25-13, 15-25, 22-25,
25-21, 15-9. The
Troj ans bounced back
from a 2-1 deficit to
win the last two sets.
Lauren Rinehimer
totaled eight kills
and 15 assists for
Nanticoke. Deanna
Thomas had six aces,
and Abbie Zaykowski
made 11 kills.
Wyoming Valley
West’s Gavyn Giva
made 11 kills and seven
blocks.
Berwick 3, Coughlin 0
Alex Walton had
11 kills to lead the
Bulldogs, who held on
for a tight win in game
2 before pulling away
in game 3 for a 25-12,
25-22, 25-3 sweep.
Courtney Soboleski
had 12 aces for Berwick.
Coughlin’s Carmen
Garcia had four kills.
MMI Prep 3, Dallas 1
MMI Prep held on
to a win in the fourth
set in a 25-14, 25-14,
14-25, 26-24. Paige
Darrow had 12 kills,
and Amber Ferry pro-
vided 26 assists for the
Preppers.
Taylor Kelley scooped
eight digs for the
Mountaineers.
Tunkhannock 3, Pittston
Area 0
Tunkhannock handed
the Patriots a loss by
scores of 25-8, 25-11,
25-18. Amanda Hardy
notched eight kills.
The Tigers’ Erin Smith
had an all-around effort
with 21 assists, 12 ser-
vice points and five
aces. Pittston Area’s
Marley O’Brien tallied
four kills and eight
digs.
Lake-Lehman 3,
Hanover Area 0
Lexi Oplinger gath-
ered 10 aces, 17 service
points to lead Lake-
Lehman to a 25-10,
25-16, 25-8 victory over
the Hawkeyes. Maria
Chinikaylo made 10
assists. Hanover Area’s
Shalianna Rios picked
up 10 digs.
COLLEGES
MEN’S SOCCER
King’s 3, Keystone 0
The Monarchs (1-1-
1) picked up their first
victory of the season
thanks to a goal and an
assist from Niall Croke.
Erik Foster gave King’s
an insurance goal 39
seconds into the second
half, and Matt Cossari
scored his first colle-
giate goal.
King’s starting goalie
Mark Labbadia made
one save to earn a win.
WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL
King’s 3, Baptist Bible 1
King’s (2-0) rebound-
ed from a first set loss
to defeat the Defenders
by scores of 25-27,
25-14, 27-25, 25-20.
Holy Redeemer grad
Mary Loughran dished
out 33 assists and 18
digs. Emily Heimbecker
had 16 kills and 13
digs for the Monarchs.
Eboni Chase chipped in
with 11 digs.
Berwick 3, Coughlin 0
Berwick 25 25 25
Coughlin 12 22 3
BER:Courtney Soboleski 4 digs, 19 as-
sists, 12 aces, 14 service points; Nicoll
Donayre 4 aces, 12 service points; Syd-
ney Reigel 3 kills, 4 aces, 10 service
points; Alex Waltoin 11 kills, 4 aces, 13
service points
COU: Carmen Garcia 3 digs, 4 kills;
Nykia Taylor 3 digs, 1 kill, 1 assist, 3
service points; Nat Bordeau 1 dig, 1 kill,
5 assists
Nanticoke 3, Wyoming Valley West 2
Nanticoke 25 15 22 25 15
WVW 13 25 25 21 9
NAN: Lauren Rinehimer 8 kills, 15 as-
sists, 3 aces; Deanna Thomas 7 kills, 6
aces, 3 assists; Abbie Zaykoski 11 kills.
WVW: Trudi Casier 12 service points,
4 aces, 12 digs; Gavyn Giva 11 kills, 7
blocks; Savannah Piazza 16 assists, 8
service points
MMI Prep 3, Dallas 1
Dallas 14 14 25 24
MMI Prep 25 25 14 26
DAL: Taylor Kelley 8 digs, 5 service
points, 2 aces; Mallory Faux 2 kills, 2
blocks, 2 digs, 10 service points, 6 aces;
Amanda Kus 10 assists, 2 digs.
MMI: Hannah Lesitski 10 service
points, 8 digs; Amber Ferry 26 assists,
3 kills, 7 service points, 1 ace; Kristen
Purcell 15 kills, 3 blocks, 11 digs, 4 ser-
vice points, 1 ace; Paige Darrow 12 kills,
1 assist, 2 blocks, 6 service points, 1 ace.
Tunkhannock 3, Pittston Area 0
Tunkhannock 25 25 25
Pittston Area 8 11 18
TUN: Amanda Hardy: 8 kills; Kayla
Dobrinski 8 service points, 3 aces; Erin
Smith 21 assists, 12 service points, 5
aces.
PA: Marley O’Brien 2 blocks, 4 kills, 8
digs; Kaitlyn Simiyan 3 blocks, 3 aces..
Lake-Lehman 3, Hanover Area 0
Hanover Area 10 16 8
Lake-Lehman 25 25 25
HAN: Shalianna Rios 10 digs, 1 ace;
Emily Fagami 2 kills, 2 digs
LL: Maria Chinikaylo 1 ace, 3 service
pts., 10 assists, 1 kill; Lexi Oplinger 10
Aces, 17 service pts, 3 assists
Trojans volleyball wins in fve sets
www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER SPORTS Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 9B
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PAGE 10B Friday, September 6, 2013 www.timesleader.com THE TIMES LEADER
BUSINESS
IN BRIEF
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on 7/17/2008
Protest in NYC
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Several people have been taken
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activities.
The company issued a statement
calling the protest “a show” put on by
union activists fromother states. It said
the “vast majority” of its workers do not
share the protesters’ opinions.
Retailer to drop
Martha Stewart?
J.C. Penney may be ending the tug-of-
war with its nemesis Martha Stewart.
The chain is reportedly dumping the
Martha Stewart brand, after sales of the
home maven’s goods failed to live up to
expectations. The move, reported by the
NewYork Post on Thursday, comes as
a judge is expected to rule in a lengthy
court battle between J.C. Penney Co. and
rival Macy’s Inc. over whether Macy’s
has an exclusive right to sell some of her
products.
The Post cited unidentified sources
as saying that Mike Ullman, a former
Penney CEOwho returned to the top
job this year, made the decision to drop
Martha Stewart because of poor sales.
CNBChas reported that Martha Stewart
is saying that her company has no inten-
tions of ending her deal with Penney.
Meanwhile, emails seeking comment
fromMartha Stewart and Penney on the
newspaper report were not immediately
returned.
Productivity edges
higher for quarter
U.S. workers were more productive
fromApril through June than previ-
ously estimated while labor costs were
unchanged.
Productivity grewat an annual rate of
2.3 percent in the April-June quarter, up
froman initial estimate of 0.9 percent
growth, the Labor Department said
Thursday. Unit labor costs were flat in
the second quarter, less than the 1.4
percent rise the government had initially
estimated.
The combination of stronger productiv-
ity and less of an increase in wages should
provide assurances to the Federal Reserve
that inflation is not a threat.
TAMARA LUSH
Associated Press
ORLANDO, Fla. — Visitors
to Orlando often try newthings
while on vacation: thrilling
roller coasters, luxury hotels,
different cuisines.
Now they can try out a fully
electric car — and not have to
pay for gas during their vaca-
tion.
Under a new program
announced Thursday called
Drive Electric Orlando, anyone
who rents one of 15 Nissan
Leaf cars fromEnterprise Rent-
A-Car will be able to charge the
car for free. There are about
300 charging stations in the
greater Orlando area, with
many located at hotels, near
theme parks and even down-
town outside of City Hall.
“This is a first of its kind.
This is groundbreaking,” said
Robbie Diamond, the president
and CEO of the Washington,
D.C.-based Electrification
Coalition, a group that worked
with Enterprise, several hotels,
corporations and local officials
to organize the program.
The group, whose aim is to
get more people behind the
wheel of electric cars, is made
up of business executives,
including some from Nissan
— which means they have an
interest in marketing the rental
cars in hopes of courting future
buyers.
“Our hope is that it’s a revo-
lutionary project — once we
get people in the car, we’re con-
fident that the technology will
sell itself,” Diamond said.
Here’s how it works: Once a
driver rents the Leaf (at a cost
of about $30 a day or less) at
the Enterprise counter at the
Orlando International Airport,
they can stop at any of the
kiosks in the area when the car
has a low charge. More than 25
hotels, including The Peabody
Orlando and Renaissance
Orlando, have charging sta-
tions, and valets will charge the
cars overnight.
Other large public plac-
es, such as the Orlando
Convention Center, have
charging stations in the park-
ing lot.
There are no charging sta-
tions inside the area’s theme
parks, but there are many
nearby — and organizers say
more charging stations are “in
the works.”
Renters are more likely to
charge their vehicles at hotels
overnight, they said.
If the car runs low on power
while on the road, its dash-
board screen displays the
nearest charging stations.
If the vehicle’s battery dies
entirely, then AAA will come
to charge the car for free, said
Lisa Martini, a spokeswoman
for Enterprise Rent-A-Car.
Thecarshavearangeof about
80 to 100 miles on a full charge.
All of the details, including
howtoplugthe car intoa charg-
ing station, are fully explained
to the renter at the Enterprise
counter, said Martini.
Orlando’s car rental deal is electric
AP photo
Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer connects a cable to a new electric rental car in Orlando, Fla., while promoting an offer intended to introduce more people
to electric cars.
RICARDO
ALONSO-ZALDIVAR
Associated Press
W A S H I N G T O N
— Coverage under
President Barack
Obama’s health care law
won’t be cheap, but cost-
conscious consumers
hunting for lower pre-
miums will have plenty
of options, according to
two independent private
studies.
A study released
Thursday by the non-
profit Kaiser Family
Foundation found that
government tax credits
would lower the sticker
price on a benchmark
“silver” policy to a little
over $190 a month for
single people making
about $29,000, regard-
less of their age.
By pairing their tax
credit with a stripped-
down “bronze” policy,
some younger consumers
can bring their premi-
ums down to the range
of $100 to $140 a month,
while older people can
drive their monthly cost
even lower — well below
$100 — if they are will-
ing to take a chance with
higher deductibles and
copays.
A separate study
released Wednesday from
Avalere Health, a private
data analysis firm, took a
wide-angle view, averag-
ing the sticker prices of
policies at different cov-
erage levels.
Before tax credits
that act like a discount,
premiums for a 21-year-
old buying a mid-range
“silver” policy would
be about $270 a month,
the Avalere study found.
List-price premiums for
a 40-year-old buying a
mid-range plan will aver-
age close to $330. For a
60-year-old, they were
nearly double that at
$615 a month.
Starting Oct. 1, those
who don’t have health
care coverage on the job
can go to new online
insurance markets in
their states to shop for
a private plan and find
out if they qualify for a
tax credit. An estimated
4 out 5 consumers in the
new markets will be eli-
gible for some level of tax
credit.
Come Jan. 1, virtu-
ally all Americans will
be required to have cov-
erage, or face fines. At
the same time, insurance
companies will no lon-
ger be able to turn away
people in poor health.
Price of health law’s premiums estimated
CHRISTOPHER S.
RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON —
The economy is showing
strength as summer nears
a close — a trend that’s
raising the likelihood that
the Federal Reserve will
slowits bond buying later
this month.
The steady improve-
ment is also lifting hopes
for today’s report on job
growth last month. The
August gain is expected
to nearly match the
year’s monthly average of
192,000 jobs.
On Thursday, reports
showed that services
companies are stepping
up hiring and that a dwin-
dling number of people
are losing jobs. Those
figures follow reports of
stronger auto sales and
faster expansion by U.S.
factories.
This year’s solid job
growth, along with a
sharp drop in layoffs, has
helped lower the unem-
ployment rate to 7.4 per-
cent from 7.9 percent in
January.
It also means more
Americans are earning
paychecks and will likely
boost consumer spend-
ing in coming months.
Analysts predict that
employers added 177,000
jobs in August.
“People are finding
work, and they have more
money to spend,” said
Drew Matus, an econo-
mist at UBS.
The improved jobs pic-
ture is a key reason most
economists expect the
Fed to announce later
this month that it will
scale back its bond buy-
ing. The Fed’s $85 bil-
lion a month in Treasury
and mortgage bond pur-
chases have helped keep
home-loan and other bor-
rowing rates ultra-low to
encourage consumers
and businesses to bor-
row and spend more.
Chairman Ben Bernanke
has said the Fed could
begin slowing its bond
purchases by year’s end
if the economy contin-
ued to strengthen and
end the purchases by
mid-2014.
At its policy meeting
Sept. 17-18, the Fed will
debate whether to taper
its monthly purchases
and, if so, by how much.
Still, more than four
years after the reces-
sion officially ended,
the economy has a long
way to go return to full
health.
Economy heating up as summer wanes?
IntPap 47.65 -.15 +19.6
JPMorgCh 52.11 +.24 +19.3
JacobsEng 59.02 -.22 +38.6
JohnJn 87.04 +.14 +24.2
JohnsnCtl 41.37 -.02 +34.9
Kellogg 60.42 -.37 +8.2
Keycorp 11.84 +.16 +40.6
KimbClk 92.27 -.22 +9.3
KindME 79.94 +.88 +.2
Kroger 37.35 +.01 +43.5
Kulicke 11.37 +.05 -5.2
L Brands 56.90 -1.24 +20.9
LancastrC 71.75 +.28 +3.7
Lee Ent 2.98 +.09+161.4
LillyEli 52.21 +.03 +5.9
LincNat 43.85 +.03 +69.3
LockhdM 124.14 -.13 +34.5
Loews 44.81 -.16 +10.0
LaPac 16.95 +1.69 -12.3
MDU Res 26.39 -.21 +24.2
MarathnO 35.89 +.39 +17.1
MarIntA 40.77 -.16 +9.4
Masco 19.22 +.16 +15.9
McDrmInt 7.76 +.31 -29.6
McGrwH 59.85 +.05 +9.5
McKesson 122.94 -.06 +26.8
Merck 47.51 -.17 +16.0
MetLife 48.40 +.02 +46.9
Microsoft 31.24 +.04 +16.9
MorgStan 26.65 +.14 +39.4
NCR Corp 36.64 +.54 +43.8
NatFuGas 65.72 -.37 +29.7
NatGrid 57.37 -.34 -.1
NY Times 11.18 +.01 +31.1
NewellRub 25.92 -.10 +16.4
NewmtM 30.30 -1.32 -34.8
NextEraEn 79.96 -.14 +15.6
NiSource 29.01 -.16 +16.6
NikeB s 65.38 +.25 +26.7
NorflkSo 74.13 +.19 +19.9
NoestUt 40.26 -.25 +3.0
NorthropG 93.56 ... +38.4
Nucor 46.60 +.25 +8.0
NustarEn 40.84 -.16 -3.9
NvMAd 12.10 -.07 -20.4
OGE Egy s 34.81 -.35 +23.6
OcciPet 89.74 -.03 +17.1
OfficeMax 11.20 -.05 +30.0
Olin 23.06 -.05 +6.8
ONEOK 51.17 -.33 +19.7
PG&E Cp 40.85 -.05 +1.7
PPL Corp 30.48 -.24 +6.5
PVR Ptrs 23.30 +.16 -10.3
Pfizer 28.27 -.10 +12.7
PinWst 52.27 -.55 +2.5
PitnyBw 16.65 -.01 +56.5
Praxair 117.92 +.13 +7.7
PSEG 31.97 -.10 +4.5
PulteGrp 15.25 -.07 -16.0
Questar 21.80 -.02 +10.3
RadioShk 3.49 +.12 +64.6
RLauren 166.00 -.67 +10.7
Raytheon 75.80 -.28 +31.7
ReynAmer 47.88 +.14 +15.6
RockwlAut 99.77 +.69 +18.8
Rowan 37.18 +1.26 +18.9
RoyDShllB 67.32 -.16 -5.0
RoyDShllA 64.70 -.09 -6.2
Ryder 56.50 +.26 +13.2
Safeway 25.93 +.08 +43.3
Schlmbrg 84.22 +1.36 +21.5
Sherwin 174.36 +2.01 +13.4
SilvWhtn g 25.75 -.88 -28.6
SiriusXM 3.80 +.11 +31.5
SonyCp 21.09 +.28 +88.3
SouthnCo 40.75 -.14 -4.8
SwstAirl 13.09 +.08 +27.8
SpectraEn 32.58 -.27 +19.0
Sysco 32.10 -.04 +2.3
TECO 16.55 +.22 -1.3
Target 63.46 -.09 +7.3
TenetHlt rs 40.68 +1.30 +25.3
Tenneco 49.02 +1.11 +39.6
Tesoro 46.40 -.36 +5.3
Textron 28.06 +.51 +13.2
3M Co 114.87 +.32 +23.7
TimeWarn 61.58 -.41 +28.7
Timken 60.26 +1.79 +26.0
Titan Intl 15.89 -.13 -26.8
UnilevNV 37.28 -.08 -2.7
UnionPac 156.12 +.81 +24.2
UPS B 86.81 +.26 +17.7
USSteel 18.72 +.35 -21.5
UtdTech 103.68 +.32 +26.4
VarianMed 71.89 +.10 +2.3
VectorGp 16.52 -.06 +11.1
ViacomB 79.91 -.19 +51.5
WestarEn 30.01 -.35 +4.9
Weyerhsr 27.76 +.66 -.2
Whrlpl 129.48 -2.28 +27.3
WmsCos 35.13 -.01 +7.3
Wynn 142.69 +1.31 +26.8
XcelEngy 27.27 -.07 +2.1
Xerox 10.06 +.05 +47.5
YumBrnds 69.84 +.21 +5.2
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
CoreOppA m 16.68 +.03 +19.3
GlblRskAllB m14.64 -.04 -4.6
American Cent
IncGroA m 32.46 +.03 +20.0
American Century
ValueInv 7.54 +.02 +19.2
American Funds
AMCAPA m 25.83 +.07 +21.7
BalA m 22.35 ... +10.5
BondA m 12.25 -.06 -4.0
CapIncBuA m55.23 -.03 +6.5
CpWldGrIA m41.04 +.07 +12.0
EurPacGrA m43.89 +.12 +6.5
FnInvA m 46.99 +.06 +15.9
GrthAmA m 40.74 +.10 +18.6
HiIncA m 11.14 -.02 +2.3
IncAmerA m 19.26 -.02 +8.5
InvCoAmA m 35.23 +.07 +17.8
MutualA m 32.45 +.03 +15.6
NewPerspA m35.05 +.04 +12.1
NwWrldA m 54.89 +.22 +0.7
SmCpWldA m46.62 +.07 +16.8
WAMutInvA m36.26 ... +17.4
Baron
Asset b 59.26 +.27 +21.2
BlackRock
EqDivI 22.02 ... +11.6
GlobAlcA m 20.94 +.01 +6.8
GlobAlcC m 19.46 +.01 +6.2
GlobAlcI 21.04 +.01 +6.9
CGM
Focus 35.41 +.19 +20.9
Mutual 30.82 +.03 +8.4
Realty 28.27 -.20 -3.2
Columbia
AcornZ 35.27 +.13 +17.3
DFA
EmMkCrEqI 18.54 +.13 -8.4
EmMktValI 27.03 +.24 -8.6
USLgValI 28.14 +.06 +23.8
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.17 -.04 -8.8
HlthCareS d 34.10 +.10 +30.8
LAEqS d 28.30 +.44 -13.4
Davis
NYVentA m 38.63 +.14 +20.0
NYVentC m 37.06 +.14 +19.4
Dodge & Cox
Bal 89.66 +.11 +16.0
Income 13.38 -.04 -2.0
IntlStk 38.67 +.17 +11.6
Stock 148.23 +.50 +22.7
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 39.66 +.24 +15.0
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.53 ... +3.6
HiIncOppB m 4.53 -.01 +2.9
NatlMuniA m 8.75 -.02 -11.9
NatlMuniB m 8.75 -.02 -12.4
PAMuniA m 8.57 +.01 -4.4
FPA
Cres d 31.71 +.04 +13.1
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.21 -.03 +1.4
Bal 22.04 -.01 +10.0
BlChGrow 60.29 +.14 +22.9
Contra 90.52 +.25 +17.8
DivrIntl d 32.95 +.06 +10.1
ExpMulNat d 24.83 +.04 +13.4
Free2020 15.04 -.01 +5.8
Free2030 15.41 ... +8.5
GrowCo 114.93 +.29 +23.3
LatinAm d 37.61 +.62 -18.8
LowPriStk d 47.61 +.15 +20.5
Magellan 87.19 +.16 +19.6
Overseas d 36.07 -.03 +11.6
Puritan 21.20 +.01 +10.1
TotalBd 10.37 -.05 -3.5
Value 92.78 +.25 +21.5
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 34.43 +.25 +17.0
Fidelity Select
Gold d 23.08 -.76 -37.6
Pharm d 18.22 -.01 +23.2
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 58.87 +.07 +17.7
500IdxInstl 58.87 +.07 +17.7
500IdxInv 58.87 +.08 +17.7
TotMktIdAg d 48.74 +.08 +18.6
First Eagle
GlbA m 52.42 -.01 +7.9
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 6.77 -.01 -7.3
Income C m 2.32 ... +6.7
IncomeA m 2.29 -.01 +6.7
FrankTemp-Mutual
Discov Z 33.17 +.16 +15.8
Euro Z 24.40 +.18 +15.4
Shares Z 26.43 +.10 +17.6
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBondA m 12.77 -.04 -2.2
GlBondAdv 12.72 -.05 -2.2
GrowthA m 22.51 +.09 +15.9
GMO
IntItVlIV 22.95 +.06 +10.5
Harbor
CapApInst 50.36 +.19 +18.4
IntlInstl 65.95 -.11 +6.2
INVESCO
ConstellB m 25.31 +.08 +19.3
GlobQuantvCoreA m13.34-.03+17.2
PacGrowB m 20.87 -.01 +2.9
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 58.92 -.03 +10.9
AT&T Inc 33.34 -.40 -1.1
AbtLab s 33.74 +.28 +7.7
AMD 3.41 +.10 +42.1
AlaskaAir 57.96 -.01 +34.5
Alcoa 7.87 +.03 -9.3
Allstate 48.48 +.24 +20.7
Altria 34.25 +.08 +8.9
AEP 42.14 -.07 -1.3
AmExp 73.80 +.66 +28.8
AmIntlGrp 48.67 +.38 +37.9
Amgen 112.93 -.09 +31.0
Anadarko 92.75 +.59 +24.8
Annaly 11.48 -.12 -18.2
Apple Inc 495.27 -3.42 -6.9
AutoData 72.34 +.29 +27.1
AveryD 43.16 +.16 +23.6
Avnet 39.37 -.30 +28.6
Avon 19.80 -.04 +37.9
BP PLC 41.55 +.14 -.2
BakrHu 48.43 +.70 +18.6
BallardPw 1.65 +.03+169.2
BarnesNob 13.38 -.05 -11.3
Baxter 69.78 +.08 +4.7
Beam Inc 63.32 +.76 +3.7
BerkH B 112.27 +.19 +25.2
BlockHR 27.04 -.66 +45.6
Boeing 106.65 +.28 +41.5
BrMySq 41.72 -.27 +29.4
Brunswick 38.18 +.54 +31.2
Buckeye 69.06 -.43 +52.1
CBS B 53.94 -.66 +41.8
CMS Eng 25.86 -.14 +6.1
CSX 25.43 +.14 +28.9
CampSp 41.88 -1.04 +20.0
Carnival 35.94 +.06 -2.3
Caterpillar 82.95 -.59 -7.4
CenterPnt 22.76 -.17 +18.2
CntryLink 32.13 -.37 -17.9
Chevron 121.37 +.51 +12.2
Cisco 23.69 -.08 +20.6
Citigroup 49.86 +.26 +26.0
Clorox 82.34 -.63 +12.5
ColgPalm s 57.53 -.27 +10.1
ConAgra 33.82 -.04 +14.6
ConocoPhil 67.77 +.11 +16.9
ConEd 55.15 -.44 -.7
Corning 14.45 +.27 +14.5
CrownHold 43.62 -.50 +18.5
Cummins 127.11 +.11 +17.3
DTE 65.00 -.74 +8.2
Deere 82.55 -1.93 -4.5
Diebold 28.60 +.03 -6.6
Disney 61.30 +.19 +23.1
DomRescs 57.51 -.11 +11.0
Dover 87.51 +.63 +33.2
DowChm 38.41 +.63 +18.8
DryShips 2.77 +.28 +72.8
DuPont 57.61 +.38 +28.1
DukeEngy 64.80 +.11 +1.6
EMC Cp 26.32 +.11 +4.0
Eaton 65.44 +.45 +20.8
EdisonInt 44.36 -.58 -1.8
EmersonEl 61.67 +.34 +16.4
EnbrdgEPt 29.75 +.22 +6.6
Energen 67.75 ... +50.3
Entergy 62.04 -.11 -2.7
EntPrPt 58.54 +.24 +16.9
Ericsson 12.54 -.18 +24.2
Exelon 30.05 -.04 +1.0
ExxonMbl 87.35 -.41 +.9
FMC Corp 67.34 -.01 +15.1
Fastenal 48.60 +2.76 +4.2
FedExCp 109.05 +1.44 +18.9
Fifth&Pac 24.36 -.07 +95.7
FirstEngy 36.56 -.22 -12.5
Fonar 5.26 +.14 +21.5
FootLockr 32.84 -.02 +2.2
FordM 17.30 +.39 +33.6
Gannett 24.84 -.03 +37.9
Gap 40.65 -.16 +31.0
GenDynam 84.99 ... +22.7
GenElec 23.16 -.01 +10.3
GenMills 49.10 ... +21.5
GileadSci s 61.07 -.04 +66.3
GlaxoSKln 51.43 -.53 +18.3
Hallibrtn 49.77 +.69 +43.5
HarleyD 62.28 +.13 +27.5
HarrisCorp 58.43 +.21 +19.3
HartfdFn 30.74 +.18 +37.0
HawaiiEl 24.54 +.17 -2.4
HeclaM 3.35 -.11 -42.5
Heico 62.97 +.02 +40.7
Hess 76.53 +.38 +44.5
HewlettP 22.12 -.15 +55.2
HomeDp 72.99 -1.15 +18.0
HonwllIntl 81.39 +.43 +28.2
Hormel 41.81 -.12 +34.0
Humana 96.26 +1.56 +40.3
INTL FCSt 19.62 +.19 +12.7
ITT Corp 33.96 +.40 +44.8
Idacorp 46.09 -.37 +6.3
ITW 72.57 -.25 +19.3
IngerRd 61.64 +.08 +28.5
IBM 184.15 +1.02 -3.9
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
111.00 76.78 AirProd APD 2.84 103.84 -.03 +23.6
43.72 35.50 AmWtrWks AWK 1.12 39.33 -.43 +5.9
50.45 37.63 Amerigas APU 3.36 42.65 -.34 +10.1
28.12 19.25 AquaAm s WTR .61 24.31 -.25 +19.5
38.81 24.38 ArchDan ADM .76 36.19 +.09 +32.1
452.19 341.98 AutoZone AZO ... 420.10 -2.71 +18.5
15.03 7.93 BkofAm BAC .04 14.37 +.05 +23.8
32.36 22.27 BkNYMel BK .60 30.66 +.27 +19.3
22.68 9.34 BonTon BONT .20 11.11 -.08 -8.6
62.36 44.33 CVS Care CVS .90 58.46 -.16 +20.9
80.45 45.16 Cigna CI .04 81.25 +.91 +52.0
43.43 35.58 CocaCola KO 1.12 38.24 -.30 +5.5
46.33 33.42 Comcast CMCSA .78 42.54 -.52 +13.9
34.85 25.50 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.12 33.66 +.29 +23.0
51.29 26.33 CmtyHlt CYH .25 39.28 +.41 +27.8
68.00 40.06 CoreMark CORE .76 65.07 +.79 +37.4
62.91 47.10 EmersonEl EMR 1.64 61.67 +.34 +16.4
68.39 41.72 EngyTEq ETE 2.62 63.00 -.63 +38.5
11.00 5.98 Entercom ETM ... 8.00 +.06 +14.6
15.75 11.14 FairchldS FCS ... 12.86 +.09 -10.7
5.15 3.71 FrontierCm FTR .40 4.36 +.01 +1.9
21.30 15.09 Genpact G .18 19.53 -.06 +26.0
10.12 5.14 HarteHnk HHS .34 8.34 +.06 +41.4
98.00 68.09 Hershey HSY 1.94 90.19 -.80 +24.9
47.51 27.81 Lowes LOW .72 45.86 -.11 +29.1
119.54 86.34 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 115.91 +.39 +17.7
103.70 83.31 McDnlds MCD 3.08 95.66 +.50 +8.4
32.91 24.50 Mondelez MDLZ .56 30.74 -.14 +20.8
23.25 18.92 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 21.42 +.21 +5.7
39.75 8.70 NexstarB NXST .48 33.98 -.34 +220.9
77.93 53.36 PNC PNC 1.76 73.35 +.81 +25.8
33.55 27.74 PPL Corp PPL 1.47 30.48 -.24 +6.5
22.54 13.25 PennaRE PEI .72 17.91 -.49 +1.5
87.06 67.39 PepsiCo PEP 2.27 79.07 -.46 +15.5
96.73 82.10 PhilipMor PM 3.40 84.10 +.25 +.5
82.54 65.83 ProctGam PG 2.41 77.14 -.35 +13.6
83.67 48.17 Prudentl PRU 1.60 78.05 -.14 +46.4
3.62 .95 RiteAid RAD ... 3.51 +.05 +158.1
26.17 15.33 SLM Cp SLM .60 24.17 -.03 +41.1
74.46 46.87 SLM pfB SLMBP 2.07 70.70 ... +33.4
54.66 40.08 TJX TJX .58 54.12 +.25 +27.5
43.24 30.15 UGI Corp UGI 1.13 38.38 -.07 +17.3
54.31 40.51 VerizonCm VZ 2.12 46.64 -.14 +7.8
79.96 67.37 WalMart WMT 1.88 72.67 -.24 +6.5
51.92 37.65 WeisMk WMK 1.20 46.77 +.34 +19.4
44.79 31.25 WellsFargo WFC 1.20 41.82 +.32 +22.4
USD per British Pound 1.5591 -.0032 -.21% 1.5115 1.5904
Canadian Dollar 1.0503 +.0007 +.07% 1.0277 .9906
USD per Euro 1.3120 -.0088 -.67% 1.3040 1.2599
Japanese Yen 100.13 +.38 +.38% 93.29 78.41
Mexican Peso 13.3913 +.0728 +.54% 12.7066 13.1061
6MO. 1YR.
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
Copper 3.24 3.24 +0.14 -7.31 -8.02
Gold 1373.10 1389.90 -1.21 -12.80 -19.35
Platinum 1482.10 1494.70 -0.84 -6.53 -6.57
Silver 23.21 23.37 -0.70 -18.76 -28.86
Palladium 685.80 696.60 -1.55 -6.39 +6.00
Foreign Exchange & Metals
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.46 -.04 -3.3
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 14.52 +.01 +7.8
LifGr1 b 15.03 +.03 +11.6
RegBankA m 17.61 +.11 +24.0
SovInvA m 17.96 ... +12.7
TaxFBdA m 9.43 -.01 -7.6
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 18.00 +.14 -7.9
Loomis Sayles
BdInstl 14.77 -.04 +0.8
Lord Abbett
ShDurIncA m 4.53 -.01 -0.1
MFS
MAInvA m 25.06 +.03 +16.9
MAInvC m 24.14 +.03 +16.3
ValueI 30.40 +.06 +20.5
Merger
Merger b 16.10 +.01 +1.7
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.42 -.04 -2.2
Mutual Series
Beacon Z 15.79 +.06 +18.2
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 24.69 +.11 +28.5
Oakmark
EqIncI 32.39 +.13 +13.6
Intl I 24.72 +.08 +18.1
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 48.06 +.03 +13.5
DevMktA m 34.75 +.37 -1.5
DevMktY 34.42 +.37 -1.3
PIMCO
AllAssetI 11.92 -.03 -3.8
AllAuthIn 10.02 -.05 -8.1
ComRlRStI 5.67 -.06 -13.6
HiYldIs 9.41 -.02 +1.6
LowDrIs 10.16 -.03 -2.0
TotRetA m 10.53 -.06 -4.9
TotRetAdm b 10.53 -.06 -4.8
TotRetIs 10.53 -.06 -4.7
TotRetrnD b 10.53 -.06 -4.9
Permanent
Portfolio 47.08 -.22 -3.2
Principal
SAMConGrB m15.95+.02 +10.8
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 36.05 +.04 +15.4
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 18.53 +.08 +19.6
BlendA m 22.09 +.09 +19.8
EqOppA m 19.31 +.09 +21.8
HiYieldA m 5.59 -.01 +2.3
IntlEqtyA m 6.80 ... +8.3
IntlValA m 21.48 +.02 +7.8
JennGrA m 24.66 +.09 +18.1
NaturResA m 47.69 +.25 +5.8
SmallCoA m 26.91 +.10 +20.0
UtilityA m 13.17 -.03 +12.9
ValueA m 19.02 +.07 +21.8
Putnam
GrowIncB m 17.57 ... +20.6
IncomeA m 7.03 -.02 -1.2
Royce
LowStkSer m 14.80 +.03 +6.9
OpportInv d 14.92 +.08 +24.9
ValPlSvc m 16.31 +.06 +17.9
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 26.11 +.03 +17.7
Scout
Interntl 34.29 -.04 +3.8
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 55.03 +.11 +20.6
CapApprec 25.28 +.01 +13.6
DivGrow 30.51 +.07 +16.6
DivrSmCap d 22.08 +.11 +26.6
EmMktStk d 30.36 +.35 -10.9
EqIndex d 44.74 +.05 +17.6
EqtyInc 30.78 +.09 +17.4
FinSer 18.15 +.06 +21.5
GrowStk 44.96 +.09 +19.0
HealthSci 55.88 +.15 +35.6
HiYield d 6.96 ... +4.0
IntlDisc d 50.93 -.05 +10.5
IntlStk d 15.00 +.04 +4.2
IntlStkAd m 14.93 +.05 +4.0
LatinAm d 31.18 +.53 -18.0
MediaTele 64.79 +.07 +21.6
MidCpGr 69.55 +.33 +23.2
NewAmGro 42.58 +.06 +18.5
NewAsia d 15.44 +.07 -8.1
NewEra 45.15 +.09 +7.7
NewHoriz 43.63 +.16 +31.5
NewIncome 9.25 -.05 -4.4
Rtmt2020 19.37 ... +8.3
Rtmt2030 21.04 +.02 +11.2
ShTmBond 4.77 ... -0.6
SmCpVal d 45.41 +.13 +15.9
TaxFHiYld d 10.66 -.02 -7.9
Value 32.25 +.05 +22.3
ValueAd b 31.89 +.05 +22.1
Thornburg
IntlValI 29.62 +.07 +6.5
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 26.00 +.10 +11.9
Vanguard
500Adml 153.16 +.19 +17.7
500Inv 153.13 +.19 +17.6
CapOp 43.48 +.19 +29.3
CapVal 14.23 +.11 +28.3
Convrt 14.12 +.03 +12.7
DevMktIdx 10.71 -.02 +9.8
DivGr 19.45 +.01 +18.0
EnergyInv 65.14 +.28 +10.3
EurIdxAdm 65.00 +.02 +10.0
Explr 100.90 +.50 +27.0
GNMA 10.26 -.07 -4.5
GNMAAdml 10.26 -.07 -4.4
GlbEq 21.16 +.04 +13.3
GrowthEq 14.54 +.05 +18.4
HYCor 5.89 -.01 +0.2
HYCorAdml 5.89 -.01 +0.3
HltCrAdml 74.72 +.11 +26.7
HlthCare 177.07 +.26 +26.7
ITGradeAd 9.61 -.04 -4.0
InfPrtAdm 25.56 -.20 -10.0
InflaPro 13.02 -.10 -10.0
InstIdxI 152.15 +.18 +17.7
InstPlus 152.16 +.18 +17.7
InstTStPl 37.97 +.06 +18.7
IntlExpIn 16.89 -.02 +14.8
IntlGrAdm 66.56 +.17 +8.6
IntlStkIdxAdm 25.85 +.03 +4.8
IntlStkIdxIPls 103.38 +.12 +4.8
LTInvGr 9.45 -.12 -9.7
MidCapGr 24.59 +.09 +20.7
MidCp 27.17 +.08 +20.9
MidCpAdml 123.39 +.35 +21.0
MidCpIst 27.26 +.08 +21.1
MuIntAdml 13.48 -.02 -4.3
MuLtdAdml 10.95 ... -0.6
PrecMtls 11.16 -.14 -30.0
Prmcp 85.44 +.13 +23.0
PrmcpAdml 88.68 +.15 +23.0
PrmcpCorI 18.26 +.03 +22.3
REITIdx 21.19 -.23 -1.4
REITIdxAd 90.42 -1.00 -1.3
STCor 10.61 -.02 -0.7
STGradeAd 10.61 -.02 -0.6
SelValu 26.22 +.06 +25.0
SmGthIdx 30.86 +.10 +23.3
SmGthIst 30.94 +.11 +23.4
StSmCpEq 26.73 +.09 +23.1
Star 22.35 -.02 +8.2
StratgcEq 26.24 +.06 +22.3
TgtRe2015 14.15 -.02 +5.8
TgtRe2020 25.60 -.01 +7.4
TgtRe2030 25.76 +.01 +10.2
TgtRe2035 15.72 +.01 +11.6
TgtRe2040 26.05 +.03 +12.4
TgtRe2045 16.35 +.01 +12.4
Tgtet2025 14.79 ... +8.8
TotBdAdml 10.47 -.05 -3.9
TotBdInst 10.47 -.05 -3.9
TotBdMkSig 10.47 -.05 -3.9
TotIntl 15.45 +.02 +4.7
TotStIAdm 41.90 +.06 +18.6
TotStIIns 41.91 +.07 +18.6
TotStISig 40.44 +.06 +18.6
TotStIdx 41.88 +.07 +18.5
TxMIntlAdm 12.15 -.02 +10.1
TxMSCAdm 38.24 +.11 +22.8
USGro 25.07 +.02 +17.9
USValue 14.22 +.01 +19.9
WellsI 24.50 -.09 +3.1
WellsIAdm 59.37 -.22 +3.2
Welltn 36.97 -.03 +10.6
WelltnAdm 63.85 -.05 +10.7
WndsIIAdm 60.90 +.13 +18.1
WndsrII 34.32 +.08 +18.0
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 7.75 +.01 +11.5
DOW
14,937.48
+6.61
NASDAQ
3,658.78
+9.74
S&P 500
1,655.08
+2.00
RUSSELL 2000
1,028.69
+3.11
6-MO T-BILLS
.06%
+.01
10-YR T-NOTE
2.99%
+.09
CRUDE OIL
$108.37
+1.14
p p p p p p q q
p p p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$3.58
-.10
6MO. 1YR.
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. AGO AGO
MARKETPLACE
570. 829. 7130
800. 273. 7130
PLACE YOUR AD 24/7 AT TIMESLEADER.COM
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 1D
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Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ZONING HEARING BOARD
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
BEFORE THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE
ZONING HEARING BOARD
A public hearing will be held in City Council Chambers,
Fourth Floor, City Hall, 40 East Market Street, Wilkes-Barre,
Pennsylvania, on Wednesday, September 18, 2013, at 4:30
p.m., Daylight Savings Time, relative to the following zoning
appeal applications:
a) Continued Hearing: Nabil Abualburack for the property loc-
ated within a C-1 zone at 219-225 South Main Street for a spe-
cial exception under Uses Not Addressed Within Ordinance (sec-
tion 324) to establish a 6,656 square foot area Hooka Lounge. A
special exception request to permit parking at another location
and shared parking for 33 vehicles at 249 South Main Street rel-
evant to the proposed 6,656 square foot area Hooka Lounge
b) Coal Street Redevelopment, Inc. for the property located
within an Open Space Zone (OSP) at Coal Street Park for a
special exception under Uses Not Addressed Within Ordinance
((Section 324) to install a 10ʼ x 12ʼ freestanding business sign. A
variance to include a 4ʼ x 8ʼ electronic message board sign. A
variance to waive the front yard setback from the required 10 feet
down to 42 inches and to waive the maximum allowable height
from 15 feet increased to 25 feet pertaining to the proposed
freestanding sign.
c) Ignatius Rutkowski for the property located within an R-1
zone at 125 Austin Avenue for variances to waive side yard set-
backs of a corner lot from the required 10 feet down to 4 feet for
the placement of a 10ʼ x 12ʼ shed and down to 7 feet for the
placement of a 22ʼ x 24ʼ garage.
d) John Reese for the property located within an R-1 zone at
207 Mill Street for a special exception to change a nonconform-
ing use from three (3) dwelling units to three (3) dwelling units
with a business office for sales and installation of a school fur-
niture & equipment with the use of 378 square feet of an existing
garage for storage of business support items. Requesting to in-
crease the width of a previously approved 39 foot wide driveway
to a 65 foot wide driveway relevant to a variance waiving the
maximum allowable 20 foot width for driveways within an R-1
zone.
e) Joseph Mirin, M M Mirco Winery Inc. for the property loc-
ated within an R-1 zone at 373 High Street for a special excep-
tion to change a nonconforming use from a commercial sheet
metal fabrication ( plumbing and HVAC) business with offices to
include a 2300 square foot Winery as a use for a vintner to bottle
wine.
f) David Chiverrlla for the property containing an existing single
family home located within a C-4 zone at 157 North Diamond
Street for variances pertaining to a minor subdivision to: a)
waive the minimum lot area from the required 10,000 square feet
down to 6,335.8 square feet; b) waive the minimum lot width
from the required 100 feet down to 88 feet and c) waive the min-
imum lot depth from the required 100 feet down to 72 feet.
g) Dorothy Grilli for the property located within a C-N zone at
201 Old River Road for a special exception for a change in non-
conforming use from a 5 unit apartment building and a single
family home to a 4 unit apartment building with a 1000 square
foot real estate office and a single family home. A variance to
waive one parking space for the proposed office. A variance to
waive the required front yard setback from the required 10 feet
down to 5 feet in order to install a 6ʼ x 8ʼ business sign.
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS MAY APPEAR AT SUCH HEAR-
ING. CASES WILL NOT NECESSARILY BE CALLED IN THE
ORDER LISTED ABOVE. DISABILITIES NOTICE: This Hear-
ing is being held at a facility which is accessible to persons with
disabilities. Please notify Ms. Melissa Schatzel, Human Re-
sources Director, if special accommodations are required. Such
notification should be made within one (1) week prior to the date
of this hearing. Ms. Schatzel can be reached at (570) 208-4194
or by FAX at (570) 208-4124 or by e-mail at mschatzel@wilkes-
barre.pa.us
By Order of the Zoning Hearing Board of the City of Wilkes-
Barre
William C. Harris, Director of Planning & Zoning/Zoning Officer
THE CITY OF WILKES-BARRE IS AN EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
THOMAS M. LEIGHTON, MAYOR
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Notice is hereby given that on September 18, 2013, at or after
(see times below) U-Haul will hold a public sale for the purpose
of satisfying a landlordʼs lien on self-service storage room. The
goods to be sold are described, generally as household, the
terms of the sale will be cash or certified funds. Any and all pub-
lic sale advertised by U-Haul are subject to change or cancella-
tion without notice.
LOCATION OF SALES
11:30 AM U-Haul Center of Wyoming Valley
231 Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
ROOM NAME
1104 Philip Margallis
1142 Mary Ellen Smith
1151 Matthew Cunningham
1163 Darrell Grayson
1319 Judith Smith
1322 Jeffrey Henderson
1421 Charles Gaillard
1427 Noel Horwath
1435 Adam Wampole
1443 Zaid Altarifi
1445 Linda Penko c/o Hands of Hope
1454 Linda Penko c/o Hands of Hope
1502 Mark Splett
1628 Judith Smith
2002 Carmen Davila
2021 Sh'Vonne Stephens
2032 Amanda Poole
2037 Watkeen Gumbs
2067 Liz Daniely
2071 Catherine Petrella
B102 Shannon Moyer
B122 Frank Shimko
B220-31 James Artis-Bryan
B235 Odetta Todd
B304 Debra Nordheim
B311 Thomasina Meeks
B312 Laura Kilheeney-Kittrick
B337 Jennifer Shinko
B443 Christina Velquez
B817 Eric Morales
B835 Jim Brown
B910-33 John Kistner
10:30 AM U-Haul center of Kingston
714-716 Wyoming Avenue
Kingston, PA 18704
ROOM NAME
0920 Henry Rodriguez
1022 Anthony Dzubiak
1311 Mary Purnell
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ADVERTISEMENT FOR REBID
WEST PITTSTON BOROUGH
2013-2014 Fuel Supply
Sealed bids will be received at the West Pittston Borough (“the
Borough”) Municipal Building, Borough Managerʼs Office, loc-
ated at 555 Exeter Avenue, West Pittston, Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, 18643 until 3:45 p.m. prevailing time, on Septem-
ber 24, 2013 and then publicly opened and read aloud in West
Pittston Borough Council meeting room at 6:30 p.m. on Septem-
ber 24, 2013. The Bid will be awarded at the regular monthly
meeting of the West Pittston Borough Council on October 1,
2013 at 6:30 p.m.
Briefly, bids are invited for furnishing and delivery of diesel fuel
and unleaded gasoline to the Borough. The Borough has no fuel
storage facility so delivery must be made to a local dealer.
Contract documents and technical specifications are on file and
may be obtained at the office of the Borough Manager between
the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Prospective bidders are urged to familiarize themselves with the
specifications and contract documents. Any contractor who does
not do so and submits a bid does so at his own risk.
Bid proposals must be on the forms provided by the Borough.
Bid security in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total
bid shall be submitted with each bid in accordance with the in-
structions to bidders.
The Borough reserves the right to reject any or all bids or portion
thereof or to waive informalities in the bidding.
The Borough does not discriminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age, disability, or familial status in
the provision of services.
The Borough is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employ-
er.
Bids may be held by the Borough for a period not to exceed Sixty
(60) days from the date of opening of the bids for the purpose of
reviewing the bids prior to awarding the contract. In this period of
time, no bidder may withdraw their bid.
By: Mark W. Bufalino, Esquire
Solicitor, West Pittston Borough
39 Public Square, Suite 1000
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL NOTICE
Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business
as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) proposes to build a
155-foot Monopole Communications Tower. Anticipated light-
ing application is medium intensity dual red/white strobes. The
Site location is W. 23rd St. and Peace St, Hazelton, Luzerne
Co, PA 18202 (40 58 28.81, -75 59 16.47). The Federal Com-
munications Commission (FCC) Antenna Structure Registra-
tion (ASR, Form 854) filing number is A0856412.
ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS – Interested persons may re-
view the application (www.fcc.gov/asr/applications) by entering
the filing number. Environmental concerns may be raised by fil-
ing a Request for Environmental Review (www.fcc.gov/asr/en-
vironmentalrequest) and online filings are strongly encouraged.
The mailing address to file a paper copy is: FCC Requests for
Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street
SW, Washington, DC 20554. HISTORIC PROPERTIES EF-
FECTS ? Public comments regarding potential effects on his-
toric properties may be submitted within 30 days from the date
of this publication to: Project 61126809-SLG, c/o EBI Consult-
i ng, 6876 Susquehanna Trai l S, York, PA 17403 or
sgraulty@ebiconsulting.com, via telephone at 207-210-2535.
Auctions
AUCTION
SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 7 @ 4:45PM
ROUTE 924 SHEPPTON PA (868 Center st.)
Marble top Bombeʼ chest; stain glass windows & lamps; an-
tique metal & glass doctors cabinet; Pressenda violin 1840;
Provincial bombeʼ bedroom set by White; dark pine & Drexel
Bedroom sets; new- Carterʼs crib, chest & changing dresser;
Rattan table & chairs; Rattan sofa, loveseat & chair; oak 4
door barrister cabinet; Sterling silver; oak Hoosier; kitchen
sets; Watt; 40ʼs tablecloths; Wurlitzer 3 keyboard organ; brand
new mahogany paneled queen bed; safe; ornate Victorian fire-
place insert; new white sofa & loveseat; leather re-
cliner; jewelry; antique toys; G. I. Joeʼs; kitchen gad-
gets; glassware; collectables;
Very full auction. AU1839-L
J & J AUCTION 570-384-4041
Note. Check web site jandjauction.net for pictures and listing.
Special Notices
ADOPTION
Amazing family for your
baby! Loving married
couple long to adopt 1st
child and provide all the
love & opportunities that life
has to offer. Expenses Paid
1-800-359-6937
LizAnthonyAdopt.com
The wedding ring is worn on
the third finger of the left hand
because it is believed that a
vein in that finger runs dir-
ectly to the heart.
bridezella.net
NANTICOKE
AN OPEN HOUSE
Celebrate the New Begin-
nings of the Calvary United
Methodist Church, West
Nanticoke, that was dam-
aged in the Sept. 2011 flood
DATE: Sat., Sept. 7, 2013
TIME: 2:00- 4:00 P.M
WHERE: Calvary United
Methodist Church
39 East Poplar Street
West Nanticoke, PA
Refreshments will be Served
Everyone is Welcome!
ADOPT:
A teacher hopes to adopt a
baby! I promise to provide a
lifetime of unconditional
love & opportunities.
Expenses paid.
1-866-408-1543
www.AdeleAdopts.info
Anyone who says he can see
through a women is
missing a lot.
oysterrestaurant.com
570-820-0990
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
PICK UP
570-301-3602
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS!
CA$H PAID
FAST, FREE
PICK UP
570-301-3602
Miscellaneous
BUSINESS FOR SALE
COMPUTER
SALES & SERVICE
Established 10 years
Owner retiring
Asking $125,000. Good
location in Pocono Lake, PA.
Call after 6pm
570-646-5100
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
LEGAL
NOTICES
DEADLINES
Saturday
2:30 pm on Friday
Sunday
2:30 pm on Friday
Monday
2:30 pm on Friday
Tuesday
3:30 pm on Monday
Wednesday
3:30 pm on Tuesday
Thursday
3:30 pm on Wednesday
Friday
3:30 pm on Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
Larger notices
please call 570-829-7130
You may email your
notices to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or ques-
tions regarding legal
notices you may call
or 570-829-7130
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted to Mary Ann
Stubbs, Executrix of the Es-
tate of Thomas Michael Curry
a/k/a Thomas M. Curry a/k/a
Thomas Curry, late of the Bor-
ough of Hughestown, Luzerne
County, Pennsyl vani a who
died on June 13, 2013. All per-
sons indebted to said Estate
are required to make payment
and those having claims or de-
mands to present the same
without delay to the Executrix
in c/o Gregory S. Skibitsky, Jr.,
Esquire, Skibitsky & Molino,
457 North Main Street, Suite
101, Pittston, PA 18640.
ESTATE NOTICE
LETTERS TESTAMENTARY
have been granted to Ralph
Yanuzzi of 336 West Maple
Street, Hazleton, PA 18201,
Execut or of t he Est at e of
Joseph Medvitz also known as
Joseph Ralph Medvitz, late of
209 East Di amond Ave,
Hazleton, Pennsylvania, who
died August 22, 2013. All per-
sons indebted to said estate
pl ease make payment and
those having claims present
the same to:
ATTORNEY RICHARD I.
BERNSTEIN
GIULIANI & BERNSTEIN
101 W. Broad St. -Suite 301
Hazleton, PA 18201-6328
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that Letters Testamentary have
been granted in the Estate of
John F. Wierbowski, late of
West Pittston, Luzerne County
Pennsylvania, who died on
May 21, 2013. All persons in-
debted to said estate are re-
quired to make payment and
those having claims or de-
mands to present the same
wi t hout del ay t o Vi r gi ni a
Clarke, Executrix, c/o Joseph
G. Albert.
JOSEPH G. ALBERT,
ESQUIRE
458 Wyoming Ave., Suite 201
Kingston, PA 18704
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
IN THE COURT OF
COMMON PLEAS OF
LUZERNE COUNTY,
PENNSYLVANIA,
ORPHANS' DIVISION
NO.115
ESTATE OF
RICHARD F. HOWATCH,
a Presumed Decedent.
NOTICE
To RICHARD F. HOWATCH,
late of 4 Dilley Street, Forty
Fort, Pennsylvania, and to his
heirs, next of kin and all per-
sons interested in his estate:
NOTICE is hereby given that a
petition wis filed in the above-
named Court to establish the
legal presumption of the death
of RICHARD F. HOWATCH.
The Court will hear evidence
concerning the alleged ab-
s enc e of RI CHARD F.
HOWATCH and i t s ci rcm-
stances and duration on Octo-
ber 31, 2013, at 9:00 A.M.,
o'clock in Courtroom C, Third
Floor, Penn Place, 20 North
Pennsylvania Avenue, luzerne
County Court House, Wilkes-
Barre, Pennsylvania so that his
estate may be distributed as in
the case of his actual death. All
persons havi ng any know-
ledge of the whereabouts of
RICHARD F. HOWATCH ae
requested to attend the hear-
ing or contact the undersigned.
Sidney D. May, Esquire
MAY LAW
Attorney for the Petitioner
480 Pierce Street, Suite 211
Kingston, PA 18704
(570) 287-7332
Legal Notices / Notices To Creditors
ESTATE NOTICE
Judith N. Schellenberg of 139
Orchard East, Newberry Es-
tate, Dallas, Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania, died on
September 30, 2012.
Letters of Administration have
been granted to:
Executor: Mr. Gary Ide
c/o Bernard Walter, Esq.
1674 Memorial Highway
Shavertown, PA 18708
570-674-9000
Lost & Found
FOUND. White binder, con-
t e n t s s e e m i mp o r t a n t .
Tunkhannock Ave, Exeter. on
8.5.13. Call 332-2786
Notices
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Gino’s
570-288-8995
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Gino’s
570-288-8995
Wanted
LOKUTA'S GARAGE CORP.
818 Suscon Road
Pittston, PA 18640
570-655-3488
PAYING TOP DOLLAR FOR
JUNK CARS!
Authorized to tow
abandoned vehicles
Attorney
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult-Payment Plan!
Atty Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
BANKRUPTCY
DUI-ARD
Social Security-Disability
Free Consultation
Attorney
Joseph M. Blazosek
570-655-4410 or 570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans. Carol Baltimore
570-283-1626
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty.
Sherry Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Child / Elderly Care
COMPANION/CARE GIVER
Reliable, Pleasant, Experi-
enced Woman seeking posi-
tion as companion. Appts, er-
rands, etc. 570-823-8636.
Travel Entertainment
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy great fish-
ing & tranquility at itʼs finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water with all
the amenities of home.
Need A Vacation? Call Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
Travel Entertainment
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
KINKY BOOTS
WED. NOV. 6TH
$165. (MID MEZZ SEATS)
CINDERELLA
WED., NOV 6TH
$159 (ORCHESTRA SEATS)
JERSEY BOYS
WED., OCT 16TH
$129 (FRONT MEZZ
SEATS)
RADIO CITY
CHRISTMAS SHOW
MON DEC. 2ND
$99 (Orchestra Seats)
A CHRISTMAS STORY
SAT., DEC. 14TH
$165 (FRONT MESS SEATS)
Pick Ups from Pittston &
Wilkes-Barre Park & Rides
CALL ROSEANN @ 655-4247
To Reserve Your Seats
PAGE 2D Friday, September 6, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Accounting /Financial
Car-Lotta Credit Car Sales is looking for an experienced
Collector in their Kingston, PA Customer Service Center.
Full-time with benefits and bonus programs. Pension
program, paid vacation, health benefits, paid sick
days. 2-Years experience making daily collection calls
required. NO phone calls! Go to Our Website...
www.carlottacredit.com, click on “Career Opportunities”
and submit your “On-line Employment Application”.
EXPERIENCED COLLECTIONS
ASSOCIATE
Clerical
Customer Service / Sales Associate
Our company currently has an opening at our Forty Fort loca-
tion. We are a small business that sells and repairs telephone
systems and parts to our customers located throughout the
USA.
Job Description:
Chosen candidate will address the needs of customers via
telephone, email and fax. Duties will include issuing price
quotes, entering sales orders, researching past orders, provid-
ing reports, and processing product returns. During peak hours
individual will be challenged with managing and prioritizing
many customer requests within a short period of time. Individu-
al will be required to develop a thorough understanding of
products as to effectively address customer requests. Periodic-
ally, individual will reach out to client base regarding current
promotions.
Details:
• Monday through Friday - 8:30am-5:00pm
• Benefits package offered.
Requirements:
• 3+ years customer service experience.
• Proficiency working with multiple programs and windows on
a Microsoft Windows XP, Vista or 7 computer.
• Interest in and working knowledge of consumer electronics,
smartphones and computer devices preferred, but not
required.
• Excellent written communication skills. Concise and friendly
oral communication skills.
• Must be able to work effectively in a fast-paced environment
and possess ability to multi-task.
Email your resume and salary requirements to:
nepajob@gmail.com
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Help Wanted General
INVENTORY
CONTROL COORDINATOR
Emery Waterhouse is an independent wholesale distributor
that services Hardware stores, Home Centers and Lumber
Yards in the Northeast has an opening for an Inventory Con-
trol Coordinator in their Pittston Pennsylvania Distribution
Center. This individual must be detail oriented and have past
inventory management experience. This position requires a
high level of accuracy and efficiency at all times.
Primary Responsibilities:
• Performs daily cycle counts
• Identifies and corrects discrepancies found in inventory
• Identifies reason for discrepancies to insure errors are not
duplicated
• Conducts daily audits to verify bin labels and product
locations are accurate
• Conducts audits to identify discrepancies with product
locations and takes steps to determine
reason for error.
• Assists in maintaining a shrink percentage
relative to sales in accordance with company
standards
Skills/Experience:
• WMS and Cycle counting experience
• Experience in high sku environment
• Understanding of inventory from an accounting and financial
level.
• High School diploma or equivalent
• 3 years related experience
• Operate forklift, high lift and order picker
• Experience with hand held Telxon unit
• Proficiency in Microsoft Office applications (excel, word)
• Problem solving using analytical data to determine root cause
Emery Waterhouse offers competitive wages and
excellent benefits.
Apply by attaching your resume to an email to
knason@emeryonline.com
Mechanics
EQUIPMENT MECHANIC
Permanent full time position for repairing and installing of
automotive equipment, includes A/C lifts equipment, brake
lathes, tire changers and wheel balancers.
Experience as a automotive technician would be helpful.
Full benefits program.
To apply please send your resume to:
PANZITTA SALES AND SERVICE
72 George Ave, Wilkes Barre, PA 18705
or email bwas@panzittasales.com
Sales / Business Development
SALES
CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXPERIENCED COMMISSION
SALES PERSONS
WANTED TO SERVICE NEW AND EXISTING
ACCOUNTS. COMPANY BENEFITS,
VACATION AND PAID TRAINING.
IF YOU WANT A CAREER AND NOT A JOB
CALL RICK AT 675-3283
TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW MON-FRI
OR VISIT WWW.CMSEAST.COM
Travel Entertainment
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
OCT. 5 & 6 SAT/SUN
CALL NOW LIMITED
SEATING AVAILABLE
F.L. Wright's
Fallingwater /Clayton/911
Memorial @ Shanksvillle
NOV.. 3 SUN
Chocolate World Expo
White Plains,
Lyndhurst Castle,
Tarrytown
Empire City Casino, Yonkers
NOV. 14 THURS. NYC
Vermeer Exhibit
@ the Frick
Dinner @ Four Seasons
Restaurant
570-655-3420
anne.cameo@verizon.net
cameohousebustours.com
FUN GETAWAYS!
1,000 Islands
Sept 16-19
Meals, Cruises,
Wine Tasting
Yankees/Orioles 9/1
White Sox 9/2 & 9/4
Giants Broncos 9/15
Eagles 10/6
Sight & Sound
"Noah" 9/7
Broadway:
"Newsies" 9/14
Matilda 9/14
1-800-432-8069
NEW
NONSTOP
FLIGHTS
Philadelphia to
Puerto Vallarta
Jan. 25 to Jan. 31, 2014
From only $1378.00
per person
All Inclusive Package
CALL
TENENBAUMS
TRAVEL
TODAY!
Other dates and rates
available, call for details
Phone: 570-288-8747
All rates are per person,
subject to Change and
Money To Lend
“We can erase your bad credit -
100% GUARANTEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal Trade Commission
say theyʼve never seen a legitim-
ate credit repair operation. No one
can legally remove accurate and
timely information from your credit
report. Itʼs a process that starts with
you and involves time and a con-
scious effort to pay your debts.
Learn about managing credit and
debt at ftc. gov/credit. A message
from The Times Leader and the
FTC.
Child/Elderly Care
CHILD CARE AIDE
Part time position for after
school program avai l abl e.
Pl ease cal l 570-735-9290
Clerical
Administrative/
Personal
Assistant
Multi-Corporation CEO seeks
qualified individual to assist
on a number of tasks related
to said corporations and oth-
er duties. These duties in-
clude but are not limited to:
- Appointment setting
- Phone/E-mail
correspondence
- Clerical tasks
- Minor accounting work
- Errands
Position will begin as part-
time and will develop into full-
time as candidate acclimates
themself into role. Qualified
candidate must possess a
warm and charming person-
ality, be able to speak in front
of a group, must dress for
success, be able to type 40+
wpm, must be proficient in
Microsoft Office suite + Apple
computers and must have a
val i d dri vers l i cense and
automobile. Please submit
resume to sherry@posi t-
i veresul tsmarketi ng.com.
Automotive
Claims
Assistant
The Claims Team Leader is
responsible for directing a
team of claims assistants.
The Team Lead delegates
and distributes claims to the
team. They provide guid-
ance and training to assist-
ants during the claims pro-
cess. They assist with escal-
ated calls and customer is-
sues and works to resolve
problem situations. The posi-
tion requires extensive auto-
motive service experience
and superior customer ser-
vice skills.
Applicant must be well or-
gani zed, have excel l ent
phone skills, able to commu-
nicate effectively. Basic typ-
ing skills preferable. Full
time position Monday – Fri-
day. E-mail resumes to
jennifer.davailus@
pennwarrantycorp.com
Drivers & Delivery
CLASS B DRIVER
FULL TIME
A Growing Family Business!
Municipal waste hauling.
Rear Load & Roll-Off
Experience a plus,
but not necessary!
Call 570.868.6462
Education
HOLY REDEEMER
HIGH SCHOOL
159 S. Pennsylvania Blvd W-B
Accepting applications for
(1) Boys Swim Coach
(2) FT Housekeepers
Phone: 570-829-2424
HOLY REDEEMER
HIGH SCHOOL
159 S. Pennsylvania Blvd W-B
Accepting applications for
(1) Boys Swim Coach
(2) FT Housekeepers
Phone: 570-829-2424
Help Wanted General
WAREHOUSE/
DISTRIBUTION
CENTER
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
Job duties may include: order
picking/packing, inventory of
incoming merchandise, and
shipping. Must be able to stand
and/or walk for extended peri-
ods of time. Lifting up to 45 lbs
may be required. Applicants
must possess a strong work
ethic, sharp attention to detail,
and be reliable. Employees
must work quickly and
efficiently with a high level of
accuracy.
vkasha@hillcorporation.com
Human Resources
HUMAN RESOURCES
ASSISTANT
Full Time
Northeast Counseling Ser-
vices is currently looking for a
motivated individual to join
their Human Resource Team,
providing services to Center
employees. This is a full time
(40 hour work week) position.
The position requires a
Bachelor's Degree or 2 years'
experience in the Human
Resource field. Must have ex-
cellent computer skills and be
proficient in Microsoft Office,
Microsoft Word and Windows
and have good typing and
organization skills. Benefited
position includes health insur-
ance, life insurance, pension
and leave time.
Please send resume via email
to ncsjobs@ptd.net
OR via postal mail:
Northeast Counseling
Services, H.R Dept.
130 W. Washington Street,
Nanticoke, PA 18634.
www.northeastcounseling.org
EOE
Installation / Maintenace / Repair
MAINTENANCE
Full time.
Knowledge of general
maintenance, painting,
plumbing, and electrical.
Must have PA Operator
License. Apply at:
The Meadows Manor
200 Lake Street
Dallas,Pa 18612
EOE
IT/Software Development
WORDPRESS
WEB
DESIGNER
PRM, Inc. l ocated i n Ol d
Forge, PA is looking for a
qualified individual to assist
in Web Design and creation
using Wordpress. This indi-
vidual will create 5-10 page
websites for clients using a
Wordpress template or cus-
tom design. Full-Time with
benefits. Please e-mail re-
sume to Sherry@positiveres-
ultsmarketing.com.
Legal
LEGAL
ASSISTANT
to (1) assist clients with loan
modifications, (ii) conduct
legal research, and (iii) draft
court filings. Degree in busi-
ness and prior experience
required. MS Word & Excel a
must. Email resume to:
essexfells@hotmail.com
Logistics/Transportation
ASSISTANT
DISPATCHER
Trucking Company with 24/7
operation seeks individual to
assist Dispatch office in fast
paced environment with
scheduling assignments,
drivers, etc. Exprience help-
ful, but will train the right can-
didate. Health & Life Insur-
ance, 401(k), plus. Reply to
hr@nichlostrucking.com
CLASS A CDL
DRIVER
Small trucking company
looking for qualified drivers to
run Regional and OTR. Must
be at least 24 yrs of age & a
minimum of 2 yrs experience,
with clean driving record.
Average over $1,000 a week.
Interested drivers can call
Howard at 570-417-4722
Maintenance / Domestic
MAINTENANCE
PERSON
PRM, Inc. located at 102 N.
Main St., Old Forge, is look-
ing for a part time mainten-
ance person to handle main-
tenance in and around our
7,500 sq. ft. building. Can-
didate must have reliable
transportation and be willing
to work a flexible “on-call”
schedule as an independent
contractor. Please contact
Sherry @570-457-7020 for
more details and to set up
an interview. Wage is $10
per hour. 1099 issued at
year end.
Medical/Health
A/R ANALYST
Physician Billing Office
seeking an experienced
insurance A/R Analyst for a
full time position. Candidate
must have experience in all
aspects of medical
insurance billing, CPT and
ICD-9 coding, problem
solving skills, and be able to
work in a fast paced
environment. We offer a
competitive salary and
benefit package.
Email resumes to:
hr@ihgltd.com or fax to
(570) 552-8876
MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
Part time 20-24 hours per
week. Computer ski l l s a
must. Send resume to:
POSITION # 4510
c/o Times Leader
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 1871
RSA's
Cook
Dishwasher
LPN, Part-time 11-7
Apply in Person
No Phone Calls.
TIFFANY COURT
700 Northampton St.
Kingston, PA
Commercial
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Hanover Twp
Parkway Plaza
Sans Souci Parkway
Commercial Space For
Lease 1,200 sq. ft. store-
front starting at $700/
month. Plenty of parking.
Central heat & air. Call
570-991-0706
BEST $1 SQ. FT.
LEASES
YOUʼLL EVER SEE!
WILKES-BARRE
Warehouse, light manufactur-
ing distribution. Gas heat,
sprinklers, overhead doors,
parking. We have 27,000
sq.ft., and 32,000 sq. ft.
There is nothing this good!
Sale or Lease
Call Larry @ 570-696-4000
or 570-430-1565
Commercial
HUNLOCK CREEK
Turn Key and come to this
beautiful quiet area with a
stream that runs between the
properties. Great yard for sit-
ting on the deck & watching
nature all for a great price.
This place has been remodel
and updated. A great place to
live. Do not let this house
pass you by. This is by ap-
pointment only. 24 Hour no-
tice.
MLS# 13 2668
$82,000
Please call Pat Doty
394-6901
696-2468
Looking for a Place
to do Business?
A place to start Fresh?
This Could Be Your Answer!
Two homes, side–by-side; In-
cludes a 3 bedroom home to
live in, a store to work out of,
an income generating apart-
ment to rent, a two car gar-
age, a product-prep area,
and four walk-in coolers/
freezers to maintain product.
Perfect for any small busi-
ness where refrigeration is
required. Quiet residential
area in Hanover
Section of Nanticoke.
Priced Right! 301-642-3838
& ask for Russ.
LUZERNE
95 Kelly Street
Business Opportunity for this
5000 sq.ft. professional build-
ing in high traffic area.
Unlimited potential. Includes
offices and plenty of show
room space. Ample Parking.
Call Joe 570-574-5956
MOUNTAIN TOP
VACANT LAND
487-489 Mountain Top Blvd.
Commercial property, Great
traffic location on Rt. 309
between Church Rd. and
Walden Park on R.
MLS#13-3194. $80,000
Call Vieve
570-474-6307, ex. 2772
Commercial
PITTSTON
$99,900
37-39 & 45 Cliff St.
Multi family, 5 units! Great in-
vestment opportunity.Duplex
and 3 unit sold together. Plenty
of off street parking. Directions:
Traveling North on Main St.,
Pittston, R onto Chapel St., L
onto Cliff. Property is on the
right. www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 13-2970
Keri Best - 570-885-5082
SWOYERSVILLE
Great i nvestment property. On
corner lot. Close to all major high-
ways & conveniences. Bring all of-
fers. 1 unit needs to be updated &
you are all done. MLS #13-1983.
$155,900
Call Pat Doty at
570-394-6901 or 696-2468
For Sale By Owner
BACK MOUNTIAN
AREA
MOBILE HOME
with addition on 4+ acres. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath, nice deck,
enclosed heated sun porch. All
appliances and washer & dry-
er included. Private peaceful
set t i ng. Locat ed hal f way
between Dal l as & Harveys
Lake. $75,000. Must sell look-
ing for offers. 570-499-4150
DALLAS
For Sale By Owner
41 Pine Crest
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath ranch,
Large living and family
rooms, 2 car garage. Large
lot on quiet street. $139,900.
Call 570-675-0937
EXETER
39 Memorial Street
Great location near schools,
nice yard, 10 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 2 bath, gas heat,
private driveway. Detached
2 car garage. Walk-up attic,
f ul l basement . As I s.
$69, 900. 570- 474- 0340
ORANGEVILLE
1900's Farmhouse
3 bedrooms, 2 baths, on
twelve acres, with 5 stall run
in and fenced pasture.
Many up grades. Move in
condition. $180,000
570-394-6835
PITTSTON
251 Broad Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath. Cape Cod
Home. With many upgrades,
finished basement, 2 fire-
places, sun room, pool and
deck, 2 car garage. $176,500
570-883-0412
PLAINS TWP.
29 Jay Drive
2 story, 4 bedroom, 2.5
baths, on half acre. Fenced
yard with heated in ground
pool. $250,000.
570-235-1624
For Sale By Owner
SHAVERTOWN
4 Marilyn Drive
OPEN HOUSE
Thurs., 9/5 4pm-7pm
Sun, 9/8 10am-3pm
Well-maintained 2,450 sq. ft.
home with 4 bedrooms, 1.75
baths, attached 2 car garage
on 1.09 acre. Finished base-
ment with laundry room.
Hardwood floors and
carpeting. New roof, Guardi-
an backup generator, large
wrap-around deck. Located
on a quiet cul-de-sac with
wooded surroundings.
PRICED REDUCED!
Asking $230,000
Call 570-357-8126
WILKES-BARRE
8 Mill St. (Parsons)
**REDUCED**
3 bedroom, 2 bath home.
Large yard with 2 tier deck.
Spacious driveway, garage,
and storage shed. Conveni-
ent location for shopping,
casino, hospital, school bus
stops. Asking $90,000
(NEG.) Call: 570-824-8665
Houses For Sale
S. WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED $99,900
43 Richmont Ave.
Near Riverside Park. Motiv-
ated seller, make reasonable
offer. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Cape
Cod, central air, hardwood
f l oor, above ground pool ,
f enced yard.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-789
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
ASHLEY
8-10 E. Hartford Street
Well cared for home/invest-
ment property. Move in
ready. 2 spacious bedrooms
on each side with additional
3rd floor living/storage space.
Full basement, large back-
yard. Quiet area on
dead end street.
Pre-qualified Buyers
/Principal Only
$56,500
Call 570-287-2073
EXETER
13 Thomas Street
Handicap accessible. 2 bedroom
rancher with vinyl siding. Modern
kitchen and walk-in shower. Cent-
ral air conditioning. One car gar-
age. 3 season porch. Nice fenced
rear yard. MLS # 13-2428.
$87,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
Houses For Sale
BEAR CREEK
Spaciously satisfying from the
open kitchen/eating area, im-
pressive. Fireplace in great
room to an expanded family
room, you will enjoy life more
in this picturesque 4 bedroom
in Laurel Brook Estates.
MLS 13 1587
$372,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
DALLAS
VIEWMONT ACRES
All this 2.8+ acre lot needs is
your vision for your dream
home. Located i n a qui et
country setting, this partially
cleared lot has a great view of
t he mount ai ns. Sept i c i s
already on site and ready for
building.
MLS #13-1705
Only $65,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
DALLAS
Newberry Estate
The Greens
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., August 18, 1-4
4,000 sq. ft. condo with view
of ponds & golf course. Three
bedrooms on 2 floors. 5 1/2
baths, 2 car garage & more.
New Price $399,000.
MLS# 12-1480
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
TO SETTLE ESTATE
Two family, with garage, large
fenced yard, needs some
updating, new boiler,
water heaters & roof.
570-735-1058
570-704-8099
FORTY FORT
30 Bedford Street
Duplex, 1st floor, 2 bedroom
1 bath. 2nd floor, 3 bedroom
& 1 bath. Two car off street
parking. $68,000
570-406-2333
timesleader.com
Get news when
it happens.
Get all the
advertising
inserts
with the
latest sales.
Call
829-5000
to start your
home delivery.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 3D
Building / Construction / Skilled
The Township of Plains requires professional service and advice for the following:
INSPECTION SERVICES FOR THE UNIFORM
CONSTRUCTION CODE.
The Township of Plains is pleased to invite you or your firm to prepare a written qualification and
types of licenses that you or your firm possess under UCC (Universal Construction Code) Act 45.
A municipal code official is an individual employed by a municipality and certified by the
Pennsylvania Dept. of Labor and Industry under Act 45 to perform plan review of construction
documents, inspect construction or administer and enforce codes and regulations under this act
or related acts.
The Township of Plains shall negotiate with the highest qualified firm or individual for necessary
services, at compensation which the Township determines to be fair and reasonable. Should the
Township be unable to negotiate satisfactory compensation with the firm or individual considered
to be the most qualified, the Township shall then undertake negotiations with the next most quali-
fied firm or individual.
Information shall include at minimum the following:
1. The firm or individuals method of approach for furnishing the required services
2. The firm or individuals statement of qualifications, profile, performance or any other pertinent
information that will be utilized to increase their opportunities for this position
Interested firms or individuals shall address and submit their intent to:
Patty Sluhocki- Secretary, Plains Township Board of Commissioners 126 North Main Street,
Plains, PA 18705 clearly marked on the envelope ʻFIRM OR INDIVIDUAL INTERESTED IN
PLAINS TOWNSHIP UCC INSPECTORʼ to be received by September 19, 2013 at 11:00A.M. If
firm has submitted proposal within the last 60 days, kindly send a cover letter that you have
submitted, are still interested and your pricing is still valid.
The Township of Plains will negotiate your attached fee schedule for all services to be provided in
regards to this service. Firms or individuals, who have submitted a fee schedule, shall have valid
pricing for 90 days. It is expressly understood that failure to negotiate for services as established
above will disqualify the firm or individual.
The Township of Plains is an Affirmative Action Equal Employment Opportunity Employer.
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
If you are looking for privacy
yet close to everything this is
the house. Situated on .93
acres the home has a newly
remodeled kitchen and bath
with granite counter tops. 24
hour notice to show owner oc-
cupied.
MLS #13-3407
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
40 CLAUDE ST.
5 year “young” ranch home in
the Dallas Sch. Dist. Conveni-
ent 1-floor living includes
large modern kitchen with tile
floor & countertops, dining
area, LR, 3BRs & 2 full BAs.
For additional living space,
the LL is finished with a fam-
ily room & space for a gym,
playroom hobby room, etc. An
attached deck & a large level
yard provides ample space
for outdoor cooking & activit-
ies. OSP. For more details &
to view the photos online go
to: www.prudentialrealestate.com
and enter PRU9Y5P8 in the
Home Search. This home is
also for rent. #13-3371.
$199,900
Mary Ellen or Walter
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
45 OLD GRANDVIEW AVE.
Make your new home a me-
ticulously maintained bi-level
in the Dallas Sch. Dist. This
property offers 3BRS, 2 mod-
ern baths, modern kitchen,
LR, and formal DR. For relax-
ation and entertaining there is
a 3-season room off the kit-
chen and a large FR in the LL
wi th Berber carpet and a
wood-burning fireplace. All
appliances and window treat-
ments remain, so it is truly
“move-in ready”. Call today
for your private showing.or
more details and to view the
phot os onl i ne, go t o:
www.prudenti al real estate.com
and enter PRU3J2D2 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3552
$196,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
DALLAS
Cozy, comfortable home with
3 bedrooms, living room with
cathedral ceiling & fireplace,
formal dining room, eat-in kit-
chen, screened in porch &
laundry room. Includes lovely
studio apartment with deck,
perfect for family member. 2
car garage.
$239,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
DALLAS TWP.
Convenient location for your
business in high traffic area.
MLS 13 645
$169,900
Jennifer Atherholt
903-5107
718-4959
Houses For Sale
DALLAS
20 Westminster Drive
Attractive brick ranch in good
location, close to schools and
shopping. 9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 2 baths, 3 season
porch overlooking large level
rear yard. Hardwood and wall
to wall carpeting. Gas heat.
Two car garage. New roof.
MLS#13-3473
$179,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
570-696-1195
DRUMS
Bright, sunny raised ranch with
beautifully landscaped yard. Cul-
de-sac location. Large oak kitchen
with skylights and beamed ceiling
in dining area. Wood burning fire-
place in the living room. Large Mas-
ter bedroom suite. Family room,
hobby room, huge garage and
deck.
MLS#13-1638
$164,900
Call Mary Ann Desiderio
570-715-7733
Mountain Top
570-474-6307
DUPONT
Very nice 2 story, move in con-
di t i on. Ori gi nal woodwork,
stained glass windows, hard-
wood under carpet, fenced
yard on corner lot.
MLS#13-2310
$95,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
DUPONT
7 Sky Top Drive
$234,900
Immaculate condition & move
in ready! 3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath, raised ranch. In ground
pool. Modern kitchen, tile &
hardwood floors, 2 gas fire-
places, security system, cent-
ral air.
www.atlasrealty.com
MLS 13 3437
Call Brian Harashinski
570-237-0689
DURYEA
$73,500
Commercial/Residential
Wonderful opportunity to live
and have your business on the
same property! Many uses for
t h i s s t o r e f r o n t / w a r e
h o u s e / s h o p / g a r a g e .
Call Christine Kutz
(570)332-8832
for more information.
570-613-9080
DURYEA
REDUCED
$79,900
226 Church St.
Large 2 story with 3 bedrooms and
2 full baths. Extra large room sizes,
stained glass and natural woodo-
work. Not flooded in 2011. MLS
#13-190. For more information and
photos visit atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Charlie
Houses For Sale
EXETER
206 Cedar Street
$88,900
Neat & tidy low maintenance
home with three bedrooms,
large unfinished basement,
rear carport. No grass to cut.
MLS #13-1914
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
FORTY FORT
REDUCED 10K!
56 Oak Street
A Lovely Single family house
with hardwood floors,
throughout. 3 season side
porch, large closets in all 3
bedrooms. Walk-up attic for
additional storage space, and
so much more. Check it out!
MLS# 13-3149. $135,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
1426 Wyoming Ave.
REDUCED $189,900
You will fall in love with the grand
Victorian with magnificent entry
foyer, modern kitchen with new
counter tops, enclosed 3 season
side and rear porch. Renovated
large front porch, off street park-
ing and so much more! Property
could also be Professional office
in home use.
MUST SEE. MLS 12-3604
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
75 Filbert Street.
Wonderfully maintained 3
bedroom Cape Cod
with a modern eat-in kitchen.
First floor family room, Large
master bedroom (15x16) with
lots of closet space.
Aluminum siding.
Replacement windows.
Fenced rear yard. Gas heat.
Corner lot. MLS # 13-3247.
$117,500
Ask for Bob Kopec
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126.
FORTY FORT
52 Ransom Street
Recently renovated and up-
dated this double block is cur-
rently 100% occupied. Little
exterior maintenance or yard-
work for landlord. Current
rents $700 and $750 per
month plus utilities. Corner
lot. Off street parking for each
tenant. Granite kitchens,
hardwood floors, Living
Room, Dining Room, 3 Bed-
rooms and bath in each unit.
MLS# 13-809.
$114,900
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
GLEN LYON
70 W Enterprise
Large 5 bdrm, 2-1/2 bath
move-in condition home with
Home Warranty included. 3rd
floor has separate heat, small
kitchen and can greatly en-
hance home as bonus area or
rental income. Zoning is R-2.
MLS# 13-2241
$59,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
INVESTOR
SPECIAL
Must Sell 3BR/2BA, Cheap.
As Is, Handiman's Special.
516-523-3925
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
7 ALLENBERRY DR.
Ready to move in this 3 bed-
room town house in Allen-
berry is also the most afford-
able unit currently for sale.
New hardwood floors & in-
cluded LG washer & dryer.
Over sized lot with patio &
private wooded surroundings.
Convenient location. One of
the first units in Allenberry.
Easy in & out.
MLS#13 403
$98,900
Call Paul at 760-8143
or Gail at 760-8145
to schedule your
appointment.
696-2600
HANOVER TWP
Affordable 2 story home fea-
turing nice size living room,
dining room, eat-in kitchen,
1/2 bath on 1st floor, 3 rooms
on 2nd floor with full tile bath.
Updated gas heating system.
Off street parking for 2 cars.
Little grass to cut! Mortgage
payment will be less than
most rents.
MLS #13 2100
$44,900
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, Sept. 8th 1-3 P.M.
3 Prince St.,
Hanover Green
Great Location, near schools,
Industrial Park, I-81.
Quality-Construction
3 BR, 2+ Bath, Ranch Home.
Immaculate, Move in immedi-
ately. Freshly-Painted Interi-
or & Exterior. Features:
Large Eat-In Kitchen with
New Flooring, plenty of stor-
age, Plaster Walls, Hard-
wood Floors, Refurbished
Tile Baths. Newer Roof, Gut-
ters, Windows, Doors.
Covered Patio, Finished
Basement with Laundry
Room, Workshop & Outside
Entrance. Plenty Off street
parking Lot 100' X 150' Level
& Fenced with Stucco Shed.
Economical 2-Zone Gas
Heat, inc. all gas appliances.
Reasonable Taxes.
One owner,
Selling to settle estate.
Reduced for quick sale:
$143,300Call/Text for
details 570-466-9843.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
$269,900
Meticulously maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 story, vinyl sided, 5
year old home situated on a
generous lot. Large, modern
kitchen, 3 baths, 1st floor fam-
ily room, 2 car garage, deck
and soooo much mor e!
MLS#11- 2429
Call Florence Keplinger @
715-7737
CENTURY 21
Smith Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
5 Highland Drive
(Hanover Hills)
$128,000
Spotless 3 bedroom -1 bath in
Quiet neighborhood. Newer
roof, freshly painted interior
with neutral colors, new floor-
ing in kitchen & dining room,
new carpeting in living room
and lower level family room. 1
car garage with plenty of stor-
age. back yard is fenced in
with a 2 tier deck overlooking
a 24ft above ground pool.
property backs up to the
woods. all appliances stay!
Call for a showing
570-779-3747.
Please leave message.
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP
Newer construction offers open
concept between ultra-modern
kitchen, eat-in area w/sliders &
FR; light & bright throughout!
Formal LR & office or den. 2nd
fl r l ends to MBR w/WIC &
MBA, 3 additional BRs & 2nd
fl r bath. Rear deck, huge
fenced yard, gas FWA & cent-
ral A/C, 2 car garage. Con-
venient to shopping, bus stop,
walking path, restaurants.
MLS# 13-3541
$260,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
Nice bungalow ranch style
home containing (6) rooms, 3
bedrooms. Rooms in lower
level. New bath, upgraded ap-
pliances, new parquet & car-
peted floors, new windows.
Close to grade school & high
school. Property is close to all
amenities. Nice view from up-
per deck. Home is next to 501
High St. which can be pur-
chased as a package deal.
DIR: From W-B to San Souci
Parkway, left on Willow, right
on High.
#13-697
$67,500
Your Host: Louise Laine
283-9100 x. 20
283-9100
HANOVER TWP.
227 Red Coat Lane
Liberty Hills
An absolutely wonderful, must
see, home with many desirable
features including hardwood, tile &
Pergo style flooring, oak wood
trim throughout, master bath with
garden tub & 1st floor laundry,
Lower level is A-1 grade including
family room with fantastic gas fire
place, wet bar, 3/4 bath & addi-
tional 4th bedroom. The original
owners enjoyed this home for 13
years and now it's your chance.
MLS# 13-2335
$265,000
Call Jim Banos
570-991-1883
For appointment
Town & Country
Real Estate
570-474-2340
KINGSTON
$139,900
129 S. Dawes Ave.
Three bedroom, 2 bath cape cod
wi th central ai r, new wi ndows,
doors, carpets and tile floor. Full
concrete basement with 9' ceilings.
Walking distance to Wilkes Barre.
Electric and Oil heat. MLS #12-
3283. For more information and
photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Very neat & clean 2 story
single family home with 3
bedrooms, 1st floor bath, eat-
in kitchen, pantry, & formal
DR. Fenced yard. Gas
f orced ai r heat .
$59,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
HANOVER TWP.
Looking for an affordable home
in excellent condition, close to
grade school and high school,
this is the home for you! Re-
modeled throughout, private
driveway, fenced-in yard, new
ki t chen, f r eshl y pai nt ed
throughout, new windows, new
parquet floors and carpeting.
Property at 503 High St. also
for sal e. Sel l er wi l l accept
package deal. DIR: From WB
to San Souci Parkway, left on
Willow, right on High.
#13-691
$74,500
Louise Laine
283-9100, x 20
283-9100
HANOVER TWP.
Maintenance free townhome
in Ledgewood Estates. 2
story great room, hardwood
floors, maple glazed kitchen
wi th grani te counters and
stainless steel appliances.
gas fireplace. 3 BRs on 2nd
floor with 2 full tiled baths.
Master boasts a separate
shower & Jacuzzi tub. Laun-
dry on 2nd floor. Full base-
ment, gas heat & central air.
nice deck, 2 car garage. Loc-
ation near all interstates & the
Hanover Industrial Park.
MLS 13 1960
$245,000
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
PITTSTON
MLS 13-3293
$79.900
This cozy and quaint home
awaits you! Quiet neighbor-
hood, yet walking distance to
the revitalized downtown. Adja-
cent property (fixer-upper) also
available. Can be purchased
together.
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Call Jullio Caprari
570 592 3966
Houses For Sale
HUNLOCK CREEK
Commercial - Residential -
Land
All for One Price
$259,900
40' x 60' clear span pole barn
with concrete floor, 19.5 acres,
two story, 12 year new resid-
ential home featuring 1st floor
master bedroom & bath, Jac-
uzzi tub & separate shower in
master bath. Great room with
floor to ceiling stone fireplace.
Large eat-in kitchen, 2 BRs
and Jack & Jill Bath on 2nd fl.
finished lower level - walk out!
Half bath in lower level & 1st
floor. Large rear deck. Work,
live & enjoy your land without
leaving home!
MLS# 13 1591 & 13 1607
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
HUNTINGTON MILLS
2 story home in Huntington
Mills offers quiet country liv-
i ng. Features l i vi ng room,
den, dining room, eat in kit-
chen. 3 bedrooms, bonus
room, full bath. 2 car garage.
All situated on 1.12 acres.
MLS #13-2799
$105,900
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
BERWICK
Lovely 2-Story Home in Nice
Residential Neighborhood!
Features Living Room, Din-
ing Room, Kitchen/Adjacent
Family Room, 3 Bedrooms,
2.5 Baths with Gas Heat &
Central Air + 2-Car Attached
Garage.
MLS 20 52633
Price: $210,000
Call Patsy @ 570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
HUNTINGTON TWP.
Looking for that country living
while your still close to town?
Only 25 minutes from town.
Come live in this cozy 2 story
Cape Cod nestled in a coun-
try setting on a .99 acre lot.
Very well maintained, move in
condition, with lots of closet
space, a 11' x 21' deck and a
Florida room with a knotty
pine ceiling. Don't worry about
losing power, home comes
w/a portable generator w/its
own transfer box.
MLS 13 3364
$149,000
Call Michael Nocera
696-5412
696-1195
timesleader.com
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PAGE 4D Friday, September 6, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Commercial
THE OFFICE CENTERS
5 Kingston Locations
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovation • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information call 570-287-1161
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
Great location - This 3 bed-
room 2 bath home is waiting
for i ts new owners. Entry
opens to living room/dining
room combo – lovely large
rear yard – garage with lots of
storage.
MLS #13-2659
$124,000
Call Rhea for details
570-696-6677
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room & re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
counter tops. Tile floor in foy-
er and kitchen, master bed-
room and master bath with a
whirlpool tub. The home has
Pella windows throughout.
MLS#13 3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
KINGSTON
Beautifully maintained home
which features 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, family room and re-
cently remodeled kitchen with
cherry cabinets and granite
countertops. Tile floor in foyer
and kitchen, master bedroom
and master bath with a whirl-
pool tub. The home has Pella
windows throughout.
MLS#13-3309
$189,000
Everett Davis
417-8733
696-2600
KINGSTON
283 REYNOLDS ST.
Spacious four bedroom home
with plenty of charm. Hard-
wood floors, leaded windows,
accent fireplace and built-in
bookshelves. First floor laun-
dry/power room, three-sea-
son porch and a 16x32 in-
ground pool. Move-in condi-
tion with newer roof, siding
and windows, ductless air, all
appliances and alarm system.
#13-3406
$189,900
Carole Poggi
283-9100 x19
KINGSTON TWP.
Bodle Road
2 story older home with up-
graded kitchen & bath, Large
l i vi ng room, formal di ni ng
room, lower level family room.
Hot water heat, garage & car-
port. 1.1 acre lot.
MLS #13-2320
$150,000
Besecker Realty
675-3611
PLAINS
REDUCED
$189,900
4 Spruce Ave.
BIRCHWOOD HILLS
3 bedrooms, 3 baths. Hardwood
floors, central air. Finished base-
ment with fireplace, great yard, su-
per location. MLS 13-1251
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
Houses For Sale
KINGSTON
REDUCED!
80 James St.
This stately 4 bedroom, 1.5
bath Kingston home has the
WOW factor! Meti culousl y
well cared for with old world
touches throughout. Like a
stained glass window, built
ins and tiled fireplace in living
room. Kitchen is modern eat
in with washer/dryer closet for
conveni ence. Large f ront
porch, rear deck and de-
tached garage.
MLS 13-1761
$268,500
Jay A. Crossin
Extension #23
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LAFLIN
130 HAVERFORD DRIVE
SELLER SAYS SELL!
Come take a look at this 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome.
It has been freshly painted
and carpet, sports a new kit-
chen gas range. The lower
level is finished. Great rear
deck for entertaining, nicely
landscaped.
GREAT BUY! PRICE HAS
BEEN REDUCED!
MLS#12-2801
$92,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 ext. 21
283-9100
LAFLIN
New Price
$119,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath Split
Level home with hardwood
fl oors, 1 car garage, l arge
yard and covered patio in very
convenient location. Great curb
appeal and plenty of off street
parking. Rt. 315 to light @
Laflin Rd. Turn west onto Laflin
Rd. Home is on left.
For more info and photos
visit: www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-3229
Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
20 OLD MILL ROAD
Spacious Modern Tri-Level,
4 bedroom with 3.5 bath,
Large Kitchen, family room
with fireplace, dining room
and living room. Attached 3
car garage, gas heat, cent-
ral air, central vac-system.
Closet and Storage Space.
Second lot included. Minutes
from I-81 and Pennsylvania
Turn pike. $374,900.
570-237-0101
SWEET VALLEY
Lake Lehman Schools
2 Story on 4 Acres. 4
bedrooms with wrap around
porch and large deck.
Call Joe Humphrey
Century 21 Mertz & Assoc.
Cell 570-259-7547,
Office 570-275-2121
LARKSVILLE
$145,900
511 E. State St.
Everythi ng you need i s i n thi s
house. 4 bedrooms, lower level
family room, den open, living/din-
ing room, nice yard with above
ground pool and covered patio, ex-
tra parking. 1 car garage. Very well
maintained home. Move right in!
MLS 13-2432
CALL COLLEEN
570-237-0415
Houses For Sale
LARKSVILLE
MOTIVATED SELLER
$54,900
Three bedroom, 1 bath, 6
rooms, plus laundry room on
first floor, new pool & shed.
New tilt out windows, gas fur-
nace 6 years old, new screen
doors 7 doors, newer roof
MLS#13-2900
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LEHMAN TWP
Don't miss out on this 2 story
country home situated on 2.15
acres w/above ground pool
that has 2 decks attached &
fl ower beds al l around the
grounds. Mod. kitchen and
open floor plan. 24 hour notice
required. Owner occupied.
MLS#13-3343
$184,900
Call Brenda Pugh
760-7999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
288-1444
MOUNTAIN TOP
A 1.17 acre serene setting &
a l arge pi cni c grove wi th
stream makes this move in
ready 3 BR bi level a must
see property! Thereʼs an eat
in kitchen with breakfast bar,
a formal DR with sliders to a
private deck, ample LR with
picture window, Master BR
suite, 25ʼ LL Rec Room with
¾ bath, oversized 2 car gar-
age with large paved drive.
MLS 13 3516
$259,000
Call Pat today @
570-287-1196
570-287-1196
MOUNTAIN TOP
Immaculate 3/4 bedroom bi-
level on half acre lot offers
privacy & outdoor beauty.
Convenient U shaped kit-
chen opens to dining area.
Hardwood floors in much of
house. Family room in lower
level has tile floor & brick
mantle ready for wood burn-
er. Office can be 4th bed-
room. Perennials comprise
extensive outdoor landscap-
ing, along with a 10x17 deck,
15x 16 pat i o & 20x 12
Studi o/offi ce. Home War-
ranty.
MLS#13 2914
$189,000
Call Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
MOUNTAINTOP
OPEN HOUSE
Sun., Sept 1st , 1-3 PM.
Beautifully maintained 4 bed-
room, 2 bathroom stream
front home on cul-de-sac end
of Oak Drive, oak kitchen
cabinets with tile counter-
tops. Four zone heating &
cent ral AC, l arge f ormal
sunken living room with step
up to dining room, oak hard-
wood floors throughout, tile in
bathrooms wi th sun-room
overlooking stream. Enorm-
ous backyard framed by bab-
bl i ng brook. Suspensi on
bridge overlooks stream with
access to naturally wooded
playground.
42oakdrive.2seeit.com
570 510-5452
Penn Lake
Lakefront Cottage
(pennlake.org).
3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom,
large living room, large en-
closed heated porch, eat-in
kitchen, laundry room, at-
tached shed, wood burning
stove, electric baseboard
heat, 1300 sq. feet, public
sewer. Beautiful views and
wonderful lake community.
Some furniture negotiable.
No realtors please.
Call 856-217-9531
or 610-357-3338
or email preedys@aol.com
Houses For Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Well cared for 2 story on quiet
street. Eat in kitchen, dining
room, living room along with
sun room comprise the first
floor. 2 generous bedrooms w/
closets and full bath on 2nd
floor. Walk up attic provides
easy storage. Hardwood floors
and beautiful wood. 2 addition-
al buildings on lot offer many
possibilities and Storage! 1
year Home Warranty to buyer.
MLS 13 2817
$124,900
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
NANTICOKE
Premier property in the city of
Nanti coke. Corner Lot--E.
Nobl e and Col l ege. Very
large, well kept home. Nice
yard. Detached garage. Large
rooms wi th mother-i n-l aw
sui te...separate uti l i ti es.
MLS#13-614
$154,900
Call Charles Boyek
430-8487
675-5100
NANTICOKE
38 E. Union Street
Nice single, 3 bedrooms, gas
heat, large yard. Central location.
REDUCED TO $49,500
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE
Call 570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
1472 S. HANOVER ST.
Well maintained bi-level, re-
cently painted & move-in
ready. This 2BR, 1 and
3/4BA gem is a great starter
home or a convenient downs-
ize with most living space on
one floor. The modern kit-
chen has an eat-in area plus
an addition off the kitchen
currently used as a large DR.
This could be a den, play-
room or office with its own en-
trance. Finished basement
with free-standing propane
stove and a walk-out to the 3-
season room. 1-car garage,
level lot & storage shed.
Make your dream of home
ownership a reality! For more
details and to view the pho-
tos online, go to.
www.
prudentialrealestate.com &
enter PRU7R4L5 in the
Home Search.
MLS #13-3363
$142,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
NANTICOKE
Rear 395 E.
Washington St.
Double Block Home,
Each Side:
Large Living Rm., Kitchen, 2
Bedrooms, 1 Bath, Vinyl Sid-
ing, Brand New Roof New:
Berber Carpets, Paint, Floor-
ing, With Backyard Deck
length of House Have In-
come Tomorrow or Live for
Free! Appraised at $65,000
listing at $47,950 or
BEST OFFER!!!
570-916-2043
NANTICOKE
101 Honey Pot St.
$72,000
Well cared for and desirable
corner lot with replacement
windows, private driveway in-
cluding a carport, and recent
updates to the kitchen and
bath. MLS #13-3243
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
Houses For Sale
PENN LAKE
1529 Lakeview Drive
Cozy 2 bedroom cottage on
the lake! Open living area, 3/4
bath, large deck facing lake.
Double patio doors from kit-
chen and l i vi ng area al l ow
great lake views! Move in and
relax!
MLS#13-2286
Linda Gavio
474-2231, ext 19
TOWN & COUNTRY
PROPERTIES
474-2340
PITTSTON
47 Wine St.
Calling all investors and
handy-people! Endless poten-
tial. Great neighborhood. Ad-
jacent property also available.
Call Julio Caprari
MLS#13-3287
570-592-3966
$24,900
PITTSTON
REDUCED $99,900
25 Swallow St.
Grand 2 story home with Vic-
torial features, large eat in kit-
chen with laundry, 3/4 bath on
first floor, 2nd bath with claw
foot tub, lots of closet space.
Move in ready, off street park-
ing in rear. MLS 12-3926
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
90 River Street
$57,900
This traditional 2-story prop-
erty features a large fenced in
yard, private driveway, re-
placement windows, large
laundry room and an eat-in
kitchen. MLS#13-3269
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
WARRIOR RUN
2 story, 2 bedroom with fenced in
yard, all appliances included.
REDUCED TO $47,000. Call Ed
Appnel. 570-817-2500
WALSH REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
PLYMOUTH
28 E. Railroad Street
Single home, fenced yard. Oil
baseboard, aluminum siding.
Asking $29,000, negotiable.
570-574-8957
Houses For Sale
PLAINS
''Busy People Compatible''.
Enjoy the daily convenience of
living in the vicinity of what's
happeni ng ' ' Woodcrest Es-
tates''. Move in ready, finished
lower level, relax on rear deck
with view of Mohegan Sun.
MLS 13 1110
$115,000
Arlene Warunek
570-714-6112
570-696-1195
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
75 Main St.
Nice 2 story. Family room
with brick fireplace. Modern
eat-in kitchen with tile floor.
Modern baths. Natural wood
work with French doors. Re-
placement windows and new-
er roof. Gas heat and central
air, Fully insulated. Double
deck. Level rear yard. Fire-
place is gas with triple wall
pipe that can be used for
wood, coal or pellets.
MLS#13-3378
$125,000
Call Sandra Gorman
570-696-5408
Smith Hourigan Group
570-696-1195
PLAINS TWP
$189,900
20 Nittany Lane
Affordable 3 level townhome fea-
tures 2 car garage, 3 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, lower level patio and up-
per level deck, gas fireplace, cent-
ral air and vac and stereo system
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 13-871
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto Gir-
ard Ave; home is on the left.
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
$49,900
65 Girard Ave
Neat and clean. Move right in-
to this freshly painted 3 bed-
room, 1 bathroom home with
new flooring in the kitchen and
bathroom.
MLS 13 3555
Call Keri Best
(570)885-5082
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
Directions: Rt 11 South Main
Street Plymouth; right onto
Girard Ave; home is on the left.
PLYMOUTH
Classic 3 story brick home of-
fers spacious living on 3 floors.
Many areas nicely detailed
w/HW floors. Professional use
possible as separate entrance
leads to FR which could be an
office. New roof & soffets done
in 2011. 4 ductless heat/air
uni ts i mprove effi ci ency of
house. 2nd floor bedroom con-
verted to large laundry - easily
converted back. Large WI attic.
MLS 13 893
$125,000
Call Lynda Rowinski
262-1196
696-1195
PLYMOUTH
PRICE REDUCED!
Large home with many pos-
sibilities. 3 bedrooms, 1 full
bath and laundry room on first
floor.
MLS #13-2814
New Price $45,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
SHAVERTOWN
2103 Hillside Road
Recently renovated two story
on large lot features modern
kitchen with granite counters,
Living room and Dining room
with hardwood floors, large
treated deck overlooking level
yard. 3 Bedrooms, one on
first floor. Master Bedroom
upstairs with full master bath.
Oversized Detached 2 car
garage. Gas heat. Well water
and public sewers.
Great opportunity.
MLS#13-27
$157,500
Call Kevin Smith
696-5420
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 5D
Other
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Call Terry to make an appointment
at 570-829-7138
• KINGSTON
• SWOYERSVILLE
• WILKES-BARRE
• LEE PARK
• PLYMOUTH
• WAPWALLOPEN
• SWEET HUNLOCK CREEK
• TRUCKSVILLE
Call Jim McCabe to make an appointment
at 570-970-7450
• Trucksville
• Shavertown
• Lehman/Harveys Lake
• Lee Park
• Hilldale
• Wyoming
• Glen Lyon
• South Wilkes-Barre
Houses For Sale
PLYMOUTH
NEW LISTING!
22 BLAIR ST.
An i mpeccabl y mai ntai ned
town home inside & out. Three
bedrooms, 1.5 baths, living,
dining & family rooms, galley
kitchen. 3-season sun room
over l ooks a l evel yar d
bordered by flowering bushes.
Many upgrades include ceram-
ic flooring, new kitchen coun-
ters & several new appliances.
Private off-street parking. This
home is move-in ready & you
can probably own it for less
than your current rent. Now is
a good ti me to make your
dream of home ownership a
reality! For more details and to
view the photos online, go to:
www.prudentialrealestate.com
& enter PRU2A8T2 i n the
Home Search. Call today to
schedule a private showing.
#13-3274
$94,500
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick 696-6566
696-2600
PLYMOUTH
Ready to move in 2 story.
Very nice neutral décor, new
flooring, new roof, all appli-
ances are included, private
driveway. Neat as a pin!
MLS #13-3086
$69,000
Call Tracy Zarola
696-0723
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained Home, Great
location in Dallas School Dis-
trict. 4 bedrooms, 2.75 baths,
vaulted ceilings, finished base-
ment with wood burning fire
place. Over sized 2 car gar-
age. Gas heat, mature land-
scaping. Must see. $259,000.
All buyers agents welcome.
Call for App. 704-906-6165
SUGAR NOTCH
127 Hemlock Street
Amazing, well maintained.
Hardwood throughout. Pocket
doors. Deep lot extends to
street in back. Newer roof and
siding. MLS# 12-3049.
$59,000
Vieve 570-474-6307, ext.
2772
474-6307
SUGAR NOTCH
113 Hemlock Street
Move right in! Spacious
rooms. Kitchen features
breakfast counter and tile
floors. Deck off Kitchen. Ceil-
ing fans throughout the home.
Modern Baths. Off street park-
ing in the rear of this corner
lot. Two gas heat wall units.
MLS#13-2630. $72,772
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
WILKES-BARRE
HOUSE FOR SALE.
Wyoming St.
6 rooms, off street parking,
fenced in yard.
$65,000
Call 570-487-4377
SYOYERSVILLE
Handyman's Income
Producer
1233 Main Street
$48,900. 570-650-0014
Houses For Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
221 Kossack St.
Beautifully kept 2 story in a
very nice neighborhood. This
home features 3 bedrooms, 1
3/4 baths w/Jacuzzi tub and a
modern kitchen with ceramic
tile & under cabinet heating
vents. Many recent upgrades
throughout!! An over sized,
fully heated & insulated 2 car
garage, on a LARGE 50 x
188 lot. Take a look today.
MLS#13-3088
$141,500
Debbie McGuire
852-3220
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
Qui et area, covered rear
deck, family room could be
bedroom #3. Modern eat-in
kitchen w/DW, carpeted, in-
sulated windows, slate foyer
w/guest closet, pull down at-
tic-floored & insulated, large
basement f ami l y r oom
w/ bui l t - i n bar .
MLS# 13-1733
New Price $82,000
Carl Georinger
696-5429
696-1195
WEST WYOMING
Delightful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath
Cape Cod in charming neigh-
borhood i s yours for onl y
$115,000. Offers oversized
living room, modern kitchen
with breakfast room, and 1st
floor den/office.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #13-2722
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
570-696-3801
WAPWALLOPEN
895 Hobbie Road
Wonderful Country Living de-
scribes the location of this
Well-Maintained 2-Story
Home. Features Remodeled
Kicthen, LR/DR Combo,
Den/Office, 3 Bdrms., 1.75
Baths, Enclosed Sunroom +
4-Car Detached Garage.
MLS# 13-2816.
$149,900.
Patsy Bowers
570-204-0983
Strausser
Real Estate
570-759-3300
WEST PITTSTON
Great value in this totally ren-
ovated 2 story, spacious living
room with brick fireplace and
hardwood floors. Beautiful kit-
chen and very nice size dining
room. Pl enty of storage i n
wal k-up atti c.
MLS# 13-2116
REDUCED TO $90,000
Arlene Warunek
714-6112
696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
276 High Street
Very Affordable property lov-
ingly cared for and ready for
you to move in! Heat-a-lator
fireplace provides cozy win-
ters and you can enjoy the
patio in the summer. Newer
kitchen, replacement win-
dows, new 200 amp electric
and low taxes. MLS#13-3212
$38,500
Call Connie
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL ESTATE
570-821-7022
Houses For Sale
WEST PITTSTON
PRICE REDUCED!
Mt. Zion Road. Single family
two story - a place for kids!
Four bedrooms & bath up-
stairs. 1st floor has formal din-
ing room, living room, family
room & laundry room. Master
bedroom & bath added to the
1st floor. Good sized kitchen.
2,126 sq. ft. total on 1 acre.
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict.
$115,000
Call Ruth K. Smith
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
WEST PITTSTON
It's all about location. 2 story
home featuring living & family
rooms, eat-in kitchen, laun-
dry on 1st floor & updated 3/4
bath. 2nd floor has 3 bed-
rooms, full bath. gas hot air
heat & central air on the 1st
floor. Fenced rear yard.
MLS# 13 2586
$59,900
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-0882
WEST PITTSTON
218 Warren St.
$159,900
Move in ready and wonder-
fully renovated. Hardwoods,
Granite, Stainless and char-
acter- this corner lot in West
Pittston has it all!
MLS# 13-3310
Carmen Winters 650-8673
www.atlasrealty.com
WHITE HAVEN
178 West Woodhaven Drive
Relax on deck watching sun
rise over Woodheaven Lake -
- Home has 4 bedroom, 2 1/2
baths, living room with fire-
place, dining room with split
system wall A/C. And spiral
stair to 4th bedroom or office
& walk-in huge attic, family
room great stone fireplace
leads to patio, pool
room/game room features
split system in wall AC, Over-
size garage, with workshop,
matching shed, double lot 1/2
acre, Two paved driveways
one on each side of home.
Basketball court (26x40)
paved with Lights and ad-
justable basket, shared Dock,
and small helicopter pad
presently covered by double
swing facing lake. Appoint-
ment only.
MLS#13-3189
$314,000
Call Vieve Zaroda
570-715-7742.
WHITE HAVEN
178 Woodhaven Drive
Relaxing views on 200 ft.
lakefront, 2 fireplaces, 2 split
system A/Cs, 2 driveways.
Whole house generator. Over-
size garage with workshop.
Shed, paved and lit basketball
court. Walk in attic. Don't
Miss! 13-3189. $314,900
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 ex. 2772
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED
$49,900
735 N. Washington Street
Spacious 2 story, 3 bedrooms with
2 car detached garage, good
starter home, needs TLC. MLS
#12-3887. For more information
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealtyinc.com.
Call Tom 570-262-7716
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED PRICE
$232,00
75 Mercedes Drive
Beautifully kept split level in
desirable Barney Farms. 3 car
attached garage, fin- ished
basement & at t i c. Land-
scaped lot, covered deck with
custom pul l down shades.
Hard- wood living room, form-
al dining room both freshly
painted, cathedral ceilings in
living room & kitchen. Full wet
bar in fin- ished basement,
walk out patio for your
parties/cookouts.
Option to Rent to Buy
MLS#12-1874
Ann Devereaux
570-212-2038
570-587-7000
790 Northern Blvd.
Clarks Summit, PA 18411
WILKES-BARRE
83 Lawrence Street
Looking for your new home at
a good price? Move-in condi-
tion and priced to sell! 4 bed-
room home in a quiet South
Wilkes-Barre neighborhood.
Open floor plan with large liv-
ing & dining rooms. Newer
appl i ances and gas heat.
Nice level backyard and off-
st reet parki ng. Mot i vat ed
sel l er!
MLS #13 2980
$62,000
Carol Holton
814-2116
283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
Two story home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths & modern eat-
in kitchen. Double lot with
fenced in yard with flowers &
off street parking for 3-5 cars.
Gas heat. Near bus stops,
churches & schools. Small
12 X 16 house in rear with 2
picnic tables for entertaining.
$69,900
Call RUTH K. SMITH
570-696-5411
570-696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
PRICE REDUCED!
$99,900
Spacious brick ranch home boasts
3 large bedrooms, 1.5 baths. New
car- pet in bedrooms & living room.
New flooring in kitchen. Large deck
with above ground pool. Recently
installed new roof, furnace & water
heater.
MLS# 13-1887
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
696-2600
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
NORTH RIVER ST.
Modern 1 or 2 bedroom
home. Locat ed cl ose t o
Luzerne County Courthouse
and Kingʼs College. Great
rental property potential New
carpeti ng throughout. 2nd
floor bath with laundry area.
Freshly painted. Walk-out to
backyard. Call to set-up an
appointment!
MLS #13- 2849
$39,900
Craig Yarrish
696-6554
696-2600
WILKES-BARRE
Located on Madison St.
between Linden & Maple.
This Stately & Well Main-
tained home has a detached
3 CAR GARAGE with Full
Concrete basement Long
spacious driveway. Home has
3 Bedrooms 2.5 Baths. Enter-
taining Finished Basement
has Knotty Pine Walls. Walk-
up Attic. CENTRAL AIR, Gas
& Electric Heat. New Deck,
Lots of Closets. A Must See.
MLS# 13-2431
REDUCED TO $84,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
PLYMOUTH
308 Stephanie Drive
Attractive Brick Front Ranch
with 3 Bedrooms, gas heat,
Sunroom (heated), attached
garage, large yard, 8x10
shed. Hardwood floors under
rugs. Great location. Most
windows on main floor are
Newer Triple Pane & double
pane in basement. Basement
can easily be finished (some
areas already sheet rocked &
electric installed)
Well-Maintained. $115,000.
MLS#12-1911
call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240 direct
WILKES-BARRE
486 Main Street N.
Nice, spacious 3 bedroom
with large walk-up attic. One
full and one half bath, large
bedrooms with closets, gas
heat, central air on first floor,
nice fenced yard,
3 season porch.
MLS#13-3324
$49,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
Houses For Sale
WILKES-BARRE
55 Nicholson Street
Enclosed rear porch 22x10,
and side enclosed porch
5x11. A very nice large yard.
Large walk-in hall closet.
Nice clean home.
MLS 12-3899 $40,000
Castrignano Real Estate
570-824-9991
WILKES-BARRE
589 Franklin Street N.
Nice residential home across
from Wilkes-Barre General
emergency room. Quiet zone.
Two parking permits. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 baths, good
room sizes, fenced yard,
North End. of Wilkes-Barre.
MLS# 13-3115.
$49,900
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-228-1444
WYOMING
This charming 3 bedroom of-
fers Hardwood floors in the
dining room, an eat in kitchen,
gas heat & an enclosed front
porch. Nicely landscaped &
conveniently located.
PRICED TO SELL $51,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-288-6654 Office
570-760-6769 Cell
WYOMING/FRANKLIN TWP.
PRICE REDUCED!
1705 W. 8TH ST.
This charming home in the
Dallas Sch. Dist. is waiting for
new owners to settle in and
celebrate the upcoming holi-
days with family and friends.
Relax on the deck and watch
t he l eaves change col or
around your large country lot.
Plan for great times next sum-
mer in your 40x20 heated in-
ground pool. This well main-
tai ned 2-story has 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 modern baths, a
modern kitchen with break-
fast nook, formal DR, large
LR and an added FR with
vaulted ceiling and fireplace.
2-car detached garage. De-
t a i l s a n d p h o t o s a t :
www.pruentialrealestate.com.
Ent er PRU7W7A3 i n t he
SEARCH f i el d.
MLS#13-2539
$227,900
Walter or Mary Ellen
Belchick
696-6566
696-2600
Houses For Sale
WYOMING
Completely redone 3 bed-
room Cape Cod in lovely
neighborhood. Beautiful
woodwork throughout. Cent-
ral air, new windows,new car-
pet with hardwood floors un-
derneath, new electrical, new
hot water heater, the list goes
on! Nothing to do but
move in and enjoy.
$135,000
Call Christine
(570) 332-8832
570-613-9080
YATESVILLE
$159,900
12 Reid St.
Spacious Bi-level home in semi
private location with private back
yard, 3 season room, gas fireplace
in lower level family room. Re-
cently updated kitchen, 4 bed-
r ooms, 1 3/ 4 bat hs, gar age.
www. at l asr eal t yi nc. com
MLS 13-1949
Call Charlie
Land (Acreage)
DALLAS
Bui l d your dream home i n
Goodleigh Manor. Beautiful
Views - Your choice of builder
– All underground utilities. 2.02
acre corner lot - MLS #13-2090
priced at $152,500 or 2.06
acre lot MLS 13-2088 priced at
$135,000 The neighborhood
has over 2 acres of walking
trails – Great place to live. Call
Rhea Simms at 570-696-6677.
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
63 acres with about 5,000ʼ
roadf ront on 2 roads. Al l
Wooded. $385, 000. Cal l
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Earth Conservancy
Land For Sale
Price Reduction
• 61 +/- Acres Nuangola
$88,000
• 46 +/- Acres Hanover Twp.
$69,000
• Highway Commercial KOZ
Hanover Twp. 3+/-
Acres 11 +/- Acres
• Wilkes-Barre Twp. Acreage
Zoned R-3
• Sugar Notch Lot $11,800
See Additional Land for Sale
at:
www.earthconservancy.org
Call: 570-823-3445
HUNLOCK CREEK
297 MIZDAIL Road
6 ACRES
Septic, well, electric, 2 story
barn, carport & shed. $60,000.
570-506-5986
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS - LOTS-LOTS
1 mile south of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished development with under-
ground utilities including gas.
Cleared lot. 100ʼ frontage x
158. $30,500.
Lot 210 ʻ frontage 158ʼ deep on
hill with great view $30,500.
Call 570-736-6881
GET ALL THE
ADVERTISING INSERTS
WITH THE LATEST SALES.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
PAGE 6D Friday, September 6, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Apartments /Townhouses
Immediate efficiency occupancy
Located near shopping & transportation. Temple Apartments
offers efficiencies & one bedroom apartments for income quali-
fied individuals ages 62 or older and/or needing the features of
a mobility impaired unit.
Apartment amenities include:
Accessible features-fully equipped kitchen-Wall to wall carpet-
ing-Ceramic tiled baths-On-site management-On-site mainten-
ance with 24-hour emergency response-On-site laundry-Inter-
com entry system-Social services coordinator on-site
Leasing office located at:
5 Heisz Street- Edwardsville, PA 18704
T: 570-283-2275-TDD 1.800.545.1833 x646
PENNROSE
Apartments /Townhouses
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
ApArtments
Gateway
Land (Acreage)
LAKE
NUANGOLA LAND
FOR SALE
(#3 Summit Street and
2 adjacent lots):
Half acre of ideally located
mountaintop corner lots w/
lake views and shared dock.
Asking $74.9k;
no reasonable offer refused.
Call Jennifer at
570-760-1622
for serious offers only.
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Seneca Drive
Central water, Prime Loca-
tion. 100 Feet of Lake Front!
Great view!
MLS# 11-1269
$159,900
Call Dale Williams
Five Mountains Realty
570-256-3343
WHITE HAVEN
Middleburg Road
Fabulous 5 acre flat wooded
lot. Public sewer. Old rock
wall along south property line.
Zoned rural agriculture.
MLS#12-3503. $57,900
Call Dana Distasio
474-9801
Lots
ACREAGE FOR SALE
No Closing Costs
No Time Frame to Build
Dallas School District
10% Down Financing
Lots of Elbow Room for Privacy
3ac 425 ft. rd. Frontage $49,900
7ac 700 ft. rd. Frontage $89,900
Call 570-245-6288
EAGLE ROCK RESORT/
NEAR CHOCTAW LAKE
99 Chestnut Drive
Wooded level buildable lot in
Four Seasons resort. All amen-
ities are transferred with deed.
Amenities include, golf, eques-
trian, etc. Within walking dis-
tance of Choctow Lake. An
amazing quick sale price of
$11,500. MLS#13-1426.
Call Vieve
570-474-6307 Ext. 2772
HANOVER TWP
Slope St.
Nice building lot with utilities
available. Ideal home site. Af-
fordable at $10,900
TOWNE & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
Lot For Sale
PLAINS TWP.
(Behind VA Hospital) Iroquois
Ave. 80-150 Cleared Lot,
Ready to Build. Asking
24,900. Assessed at $26,000
570-472-7243
Apartments /Townhouses
ASHLEY
Modern 2 bedroom, 2nd floor
apartment. Appl i ances, off
street parking. Close to I81.
$575 + utilities. 1st, last & se-
curity. No pets. Available
9/1/13. Water & sewer i n-
cl uded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
DALLAS
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the elderly &
mobility impaired; all utilities
included. Federally subsid-
ized program. Extremely low
i ncome persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450. 570-675-6936
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
DALLAS
Townhouse
3 bedroom, 3 1/2 baths in a
quiet country setting. Central
air and vacuum, 2 car garage.
Includes range, water, trash &
al l ext er i or mai nt enance.
Ameni t i es i ncl ude gol f i ng,
s w i m m i n g & t e n n i s .
$1, 475/ mont h + ut i l i t i es.
Call Bernie
655-4815
ROTHSTEIN
REALTORS
888-244-2714
DUPONT
4 room apartment for rent.
$450+utilities, No Pets. Refer-
ences required. Available Oct. 1.
570-241-6038
DURYEA
2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, newly
remodeled. Refrigerator &
stove. Big yard.
$700 month + utilities.
570-842-0740 before 8 pm
FORTY FORT
Very nice 2
nd
floor 2 bdrm, 5
room apt. on River St. In-
cludes stove, frig, washer/dry-
er hook-up in basement, off-
street parking. $595/mo + util-
ities. 1 mo security deposit re-
quired. No Pets. Non-
smoking. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LARKSVILLE
1 bedroom end unit apt. Wash-
er/dryer hookup. No pets. Se-
curity & lease required $450
month. 570-288-7753
Apartments /Townhouses
FORTY FORT
BEDFORD ST.
Nice 1st floor. Off street park-
ing. $700 month + utilities &
lease. Call 570-814-8876
GLEN LYON
KEN POLLOCK APARTMENTS
41 Depot Street
Low and Moderate Income Eld-
erly Rentals Include:
* Electric Range &
Refrigerator
* Off Street Parking
* Community Room
* Coin Operated
Laundry
* Elevator
* Video Surveilance
Applications Accepted
by Appointment
570-736-6965
8:00 a.m. - 4 p.m.
TDD Only,
1-800-654-5984
Voice Only,
1-800-654-5988
Handicap Accessible
Equal Housing Opportunity
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Immaculate, 1st and 2nd floor
efficiency apartments. 1 bed-
room, living room, kitchen, tile
bath and laundry room. New
wall to wall carpet. appliances
include stove, refrigerator,
washer/ dryer. No Smoking.
No Pets. Security, Reference
and Lease. $550/month, ten-
ant pays electric and gas.
570-313-9955
Hanover Township
West End Road
One bedr oom. Heat , wat er ,
garbage sewer & appliances in-
cluded. Off street parking. No pets,
non smoking, not Section 8 ap-
proved. References, security, 1st &
last. $550/month. 570-852-0252
HANOVER TWP.
3029 South Main st.
2nd floor very large 3 bed-
rooms, wall to wall carpeting
central air, eat in kitchen with
appliances. Off street parking.
Washer & dryer hookup. Heat
& cooking gas included. Ten-
ant pays electric & water. $695
plus security. No Pets.
570-814-1356
HANOVER TWP.
LEE PARK
3 bedroom, 2nd floor, appli-
ances & washer/dryer hook-up
in kitchen, new carpeting, no
pets. $575/month + utilities.
1st, last & security. Available
Now! Garbage & sewer in-
cluded.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
HARVEYS LAKE
1 & 2 bedroom , wall to wall
carpet, appliances, Lake rights.
Off street parking. No pets.
Lease, security and refer-
ences. 570-639-5920
HUGHESTOWN
Immaculate 4 room, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath 1st floor apart-
ment overlooking park. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up. Stove &
fridge included. No pets. Non
smoking. $575/ month +
utilities & security. Call
(570) 457-2227
KINGSTON
1st floor, 2 bedroom. Off
street parking, freshly
painted, new carpet, bath-
room & kitchen. Water &
Sewer included. No pets.
$650/month, 1st month &
security. 570-332-4400
KINGSTON
287 Pierce Street
Corner of Pierce & Warren
1 bedroom, ki tchen, l i vi ng
room, bath, cl oset storage
area. Refrigerator & stove in-
cluded, off street parking. Ref-
erences, no pets. $400/month
+ security. Call 570-655-6743
KINGSTON
Deluxe, quiet, airy 3 bedroom, 2nd
floor, 1.5 baths & office. All appli-
ances, washer/dryer in unit. Wall-to-
wall, C/A, garage, attic,
no pets/no smoking, lease.
570-287-1733
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, elevator,
carpeted, entry system.
Garage. Extra storage &
cable TV included. Laundry
facilities. Air Conditioned.
Fine neighborhood. Con-
venient to bus & stores. No
pets. References. Security.
Lease. No smokers please.
$785 + utilities.
Call 570-287-0900
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean furnished room, starting at
$340. Efficiency at $450 month fur-
nished with all utilities included. Off
street parking. 570-718-0331
KINGSTON
Nice neighborhood, close to
schools, shopping & parks. One
modern 5 room, 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Dining & living rooms,
ample closets, front & back porch
and yard. Washer/dryer hookup.
$575, includes fridge, stove water
& sewer. Non smoker preferred.
570-545-6057
KINGSTON
Prime location, Poplar Street,
near Nesbitt Hospital. Modern
2nd floor, 1 bedroom/den,
open design. Dishwasher,
washer/dryer. No Pets. No
Smoking. References.
$650+utilities. 570-709-4360
KINGSTON
69 Price St.
Nice and cozy 3rd floor. 1
bedroom living room and kit-
chen. lots of closets, and 2
enclosed porches. Includes
heat, hot water, stove, fridge
and off street parking. no
pets, non smoker. $495/mo
security deposit. 1 year lease.
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
PITTSTON
2 bedroom apartment, 1st
floor, eat-in kitchen. Tenant
pays electric, heat, propane for
cooking & water. Includes
sewer, trash, washer/dryer
hook up & exterior mainten-
ance.
Call Bernie
655-4815
Rothstein Realtors
888-244-2714
Apartments /Townhouses
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES
HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
“A Place To Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom
Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
“A Place To Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts.
Gas heat included
FREE
24 hr. on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
570-288-9019
www.sdkgreen acres.com
Call today for
move-in specials.
KINGSTON
Newly Remodeled 2 bed-
room. Living & dining rooms.
Off street parking. Gas heat.
All new appliances. Water &
sewer included. $570
+ utilities, security &
references. No pets.
Call 570-239-7770
KINGSTON TOWNSHIP
1605 West 8th Street
1 bedroom over a garage, Kit-
chen, Living room, Bathroom,
closed in porch. Stove, refri-
gerator, washer/dryer in-
cluded. Newly Remodeled.
$575+Security. No Pets.
570-333-4005
Kingston
West Bennett St.
Twinkle in Kingstonʼs Eye, 2nd
floor, 1000 sq. ft. 2 bed, Cent-
ral Air, washer/dryer and
appliances. No pets. Non-
smoking. 1 car off street park-
ing. $750/month + gas, elec-
tric, 1 year lease & security.
570-814-1356
KINGSTON
NEW
1 bedroom apt. 1st floor. Ar-
chitecturally designed. Cent-
ral air. Off street parking.
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
LUZERNE COUNTY
RENTALS
Available Now!
2 bed and 3 bed
$550, $650, $675 and $850.
Call 570-901-1020
DALLAS
Meadows
Senior Living
Community
200 Lake Street
Dallas, PA 18612
570-675-9336
One Bedroom
Apartment Available!
Included: All utilities, air
conditioning, maintenance,
and free parking.
Restaurant and Beauty Shop
on site.
Office Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 4:30 pm
MOUNTAIN TOP
IMMEDIATELY
AVAILABLE 2ND
FLOOR UNIT!
1 bedroom apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessible.
Equal Housing Opportunity.
TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an equal
opportunity provider & employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
OAK RIDGE
IMMEDIATELY AVAILABLE
2ND FLOOR UNIT! 1 bed-
room apartments for elderly,
disabled. Rents based on 30%
of ADJ gross income. Handi-
cap Accessible. Equal Hous-
ing Opportunity. TTY711 or
570-474-5010 This institution
is an equal opportunity pro-
vider & employer.
NANTICOKE
S. Hanover Street
1.5 bedrooms, 2nd floor, no
pets, washer/dryer hook-ups,
attic. $469 mo. 2 Car Garage,
$159 mo. INCLUDES HEAT,
WATER. 570-824-8786
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, washer/dryer hook
up. No pets. $475/month + se-
curity & utilities. 822-7657
NANTICOKE
2 males looking for 3rd room-
mat e t o share 3 bedroom
apartment. $85/week. Call
570-578-2644.
NANTICOKE
EFFICIENCY
1 bedroom. $325 month.
Tenant pays electric.
570-735-2516
Apartments /Townhouses
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom Eat-in kitchen,
living room, full bath, stove
/fridge, washer/dryer, $500. +
utilities. No Pets. 570-760-
3637 or 570-477-3839
NANTICOKE
Quiet east side neighborhood.
Large kitchen, pantry, modern
bath, bedroom, large sitting
room, wall to wall carpeting,
st ove, ref ri gerat or, wat er,
garbage, sewer. References,
credit check, one year lease.
No pets. $430 + security.
570-735-6241
NOXEN
2 bedroom 1/2 double block.
Wall to wall carpeting, electric
heat. Includes gas stove. Off
street parking. No pets. $430
month & 1 month security re-
quired.
570-466-8811 570-639-5882
PITTSTON
3 room apartment, 2nd floor,
wall to wall carpet, off street
parking. Enclosed porch.
$450/month + electric heat &
security. No pets.
570-655-1222
Pittston
AVAILABLE NOW!
Newly renovated 1 bedroom, 2
story apartment. New appli-
ances, washer & dryer
included, large fenced yard.
No pets. $525/month.
Call 570-407-0874
PLAINS
Modern 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
2nd floor apartment. Kitchen
with appliances. New carpet.
Conveni ent l y l ocat ed. No
smoki ng - no pet s.
$600 PER MONTH.
Call Rae
570-899-1209
LEWITH & FREEMAN
288-9371
PLYMOUTH
Clean & inviting 2nd floor, 2
bedroom apartment. Recently
renovated with new, modern
kitchen & bath, carpeting &
windows. Features bright liv-
ing room, small fenced back
yard & shed. $550/month +
utilities & security. Call Lynda
at 262-1196
PLYMOUTH
CLEAN LIVING
SPACE APT
3 bedroom, 1 bath....tenant
pays utilities..very affordable.. ,
new appliances, off street
parking & sewer included. No
smoking inddoors. CLOSE TO
WYOMING VALLEY WEST
HIGH SCHOOL. AVAILABLE
SEPT 1. 570-855-3329.
SUGAR NOTCH
2nd floor contains 1,215 sq. ft.
of very spacious & sprawling
living space. 6 rooms. Numer-
ous closets. Bathroom is a
generous 10' x 11'. Gas heat,
water, sewer bill & cooking gas
- all included. Has washer/dry-
er hook ups. Only 2 miles to
Wilkes-Barre & close to I-81 &
Wyoming Valley Mall. Lease.
Credit & background checked.
$685 monthly .
570-650-3803
WEST PITTSTON
GARDEN
VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St., Housing for
the elderly & mobility im-
paired; all utilities included.
Federally subsidized pro-
gram. Extremely
low income persons encour-
aged to apply. Income less
than $12,450.
570-655-6555
TDD 800-654-5984
8 am-4 pm
Monday-Friday.
Equal Housing Opportunity
Handicap Accessible
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom efficiency apart-
ment. No pets. $325 + utilities
& security deposit. Call
570-333-5499
WEST PITTSTON
Boston Ave
Spacious, private 2 bedroom
apartment on 2nd floor with en-
closed porch. Refrigerator,
stove, dishwasher, washer/dry-
er, off street parking, air condi-
tioning & gas heat, storage
space. Water & sewer in-
cluded in rent. No pets, no
smoking. $550/month + secur-
ity. Available immediately.
417-2775 or 954-1746
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright open
floor plans
- All major appliances
included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term leases
available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflowercrossing.com
Certain Restrictions Apply*
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
ROOM
FOR RENT
1 room. Back ground check.
$350 month plus security de-
posit. 347-693-4156
WILKES-BARRE
WILKES UNIV
CAMPUS
1, 2, 3, or 4 bedrooms. Wood
floors, no pets, starting $450.
all utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
-1 bedroom
water included
-2 bedroom
water included
-3 bedroom,
single
HANOVER
-1 bedroom
LUZERNE
-1 bedroom,
water included.
PITTSTON
-Large 1 bed
room water
included
OLD FORGE
-2 bedroom,
water included
PLAINS
-1 bedroom,
water included
McDermott & McDermott
Real Estate Inc. Property
Management
570-675-4025
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE
/KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2 bedrooms. In-
cludes all utilities, parking, laundry.
No pets. From $390 to $675.
Lease, securi ty & references.
570-970-0847
Wilkes-Barre
2 bedroom townhouse, end
unit. Near VA, 1.5 baths, all
appliances, sewer, water &
garbage included. $800/
month + security.
570-817-4475
WILKES-BARRE
2 BEDROOMS
Heat & hot water included,
$625./month + Security re-
quired. 973-879-4730
WILKES-BARRE
425 S. Franklin St.
APTS FOR RENT!
For lease. Available immedi-
ately, washer/dryer on
premises, no pets. We have
studio, 1 & 2 bedroom apart-
ments. On site parking. Fridge
& stove provided. 24/7 secur-
ity camera presence & all
doors electronically locked.
1 bedroom - $450. 2 bedroom
- $550. Water & sewer paid 1
month security deposit. Email
obscuroknows@hotmail.com
or Call 570-208-9301
after 9:00 a.m. to schedule an
appointment
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with study, off street
parking, laundry facility. Includes
heat and hot water, hardwood
floors, appliances, Trash removal.
$580/month. Call (570) 821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
63 ELIZABETH ST.
Remodeled 1st floor apt.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath, rear
porch. Gas heat, washer/dryer
hook- up, fridge, stove & dish-
washer. Absolutely no pets.
$600/month
+ utilities & 1 month security.
Reference check.
570-472-9453
WILKES-BARRE
BEAUTIFUL 6 ROOM
1st floor, 1-2 bedrooms, living
room with wall to wall carpet
thru-out, modern bath & kit-
chen with electric stove, laun-
dry room with gas or electric
dryer hookups, private porch,
off street parking, no pets, no
smokers, lease, security de-
posi t, references, credi t &
background check, utilities by
tenant. $595/ month.
570-824-4884
WILKES-BARRE
Large 3 bedroom apartment on
two floors IN GOOD CONDI-
TION.Section 8 welcome. No
pets. $525 + utilities & security.
606-9917
WILKES-BARRE
HISTORIC WHEELMAN
439 S. Franklin St.
Two apartments available.
(1) 1 bedroom, hardwood floors,
A/C, marble bath. security system,
laundry, off street parking. $675
(1) Unique studio. Sun porch, hard-
wood floor, security system and
laundry. Off street parking. $550
570-821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
Wi l kes-Barre near General
Hospital. Freshly painted 3
room apartment. Spacious eat-
in kitchen includes stove and
refrigerator. Bedroom fea-
tures 2 full size closets. Large
13ʼ x 21ʼ living room. Water
and sewer included. Electri-
city by tenant. Washer and
dryer available in laundry area.
Off street parking in private lot.
No pets. Security, application,
lease required. $485.00 per
month. Call 814-9574.
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Starting at $440 and up. Ref-
erences required. Section 8
OK. 570-357-0712
Apartments /Townhouses
WILKES-BARRE
STUDIO near WILKES
Wood floors, parking, no pets,
short term OK. $425, all utilit-
ies included. 570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE
KIDDER STREET
2 bedroom balcony apt., living
room, kitchen, bath, new car-
peting, freshly painted. $600
month + uti l i ti es. Cl ose to
Home Depot. 570-540-5312.
Wilkeswood
Apartments
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
WYOMING
2 bedrooms, 2nd floor, very
clean, recently remodeled.
Washer & dryer hookup. Off
st r eet par ki ng. No pet s.
$550/mo. includes water &
sewer. 570-714-7272
Commercial
PLAZA 315
ROUTE 315 - PLAINS
1,750 SQ. FT. & 2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL, 2,000 FT.
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Route 315 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Up to 10,000 sq. ft.
Will build to suite
Call 570-829-1206
EDWARDSVILLE
35-37 Rice Ave.
Double block in very good
condition. Live in one side
and let the other side pay the
mortgage. Newer roof and
furnace, 3 years old. Very
clean and in move-in
condition. A Must See!
MLS#13-2618. $79,000
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
PITTSTON TWP.
$1,750/MONTH
3002 N. Twp Blvd.
Medical office for rent on the
Pittston By-Pass. Highly vis-
i bl e l ocati on wi th pl enty of
parking. $1,800 sq. ft. of beau-
tifully finished space can be
used for any type office use.
$1,750/ mo. plus utilities.
MLS 13-098
Call Charlie
PITTSTON
108 S. Main Street
3,000 square feet. Suitable for
many businesses. Plenty of
parking. $600/month +
security. 570-540-0746.
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space Available.
Light manufacturing, ware-
house, office, includes all
utilities with free parking.
I will save you money!
ATLAS REALTY
829-6200
WEST PITTSTON
1 CAR
GARAGE/STORAGE
FOR RENT
$55/month. Call Natalie
570-357-1138
Condominiums
DALLAS
Private Senior Community,
1st floor, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths,
attached garage, window treat-
ments & appliances included.
C/A, deck, snow removal &
lawn care included. No pets.
References. $1,200 + utilities &
security. 570-371-8666
Houses For Rent
HARVEYS LAKE
Furnished Home. 3 bedroom, liv-
ing room, kitchen, bath, Wi-fi, Dir-
ect TV, lake rights, washer/dryer.
$1,200/month + utilities. Students
Welcome. 570-639-5041
Houses For Rent
BEAR CREEK
2 bedroom ranch, hardwood
floors, great sun room, 1,400
sq. ft. fireplace & wood burner,
grat deck. county setting. 2
car attached garage. No pets.
Al l ut i l i t i es by t enant .
$970/ mont h 760- 5095
DALLAS/LEHMAN TWP.
Lovely 2 bedroom, one bath
house in the country. Spa-
cious kitchen/living/dining room
combination. No smoking, no
exceptions. One small pet
considered. References, se-
curity deposit & credit check
required. $1,250/month + utilit-
ies. 570-889-8432
HUNLOCK CREEK
3 bedroom, 2 bath, $1,000
month. Month to month lease.
Not section 8 approved. Non
smokers. No pets. 2 car gar-
age. Outdoor woodburner for
heat & hot water.
570-506-5986
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
Charming, spacious 7 room
totally renovated rental. In-
cludes 1 1/2 baths, 2 1/2-3
bedrooms, den, parlor with
brand new wall to wall
carpeting/flooring. Draperies
/blinds/windows & doors. Gas
heat. Kitchen and laundry
room with brand new gas
range/fridge/washer/dryer.
Full basement with outside
entrance. Terrace backyard,
Tranquil neighborhood, off
street parking, easy access to
I-81/airport/casino. Great
schools, exterior still under
renovation. No Smoking.
$900+security+utilities.
Call 570-762-8265
KINGSTON
15 South Thomas Ave.
3 bedroom, single home in a
ni ce nei ghborhood, l i vi ng
r oom, di ni ng r oom, l ar ge
house, new wall to wall carpet-
ing. New interior and exterior
doors, deadbolt locks, smoke
det ect or s, f r ont and r ear
covered porch. Nice yard. Full
attic and basement storage.
E x c e l l e n t c o n d i t i o n .
$800/month+utilities and se-
curity deposit. No Pets.
570-574-9257
LARKSVILLE
Pace Street
5 room single family home with
2 + b e d r o o ms , 1 b a t h,
washer/dryer, deck & yard.
$760/month + utilities.
Call Barbara Mark
570-696-5414
696-1195
LEHMAN
3 bedrooms, 2 full baths,
$800/month.
570-477-3827
LEHMAN
IDETOWN ROAD
2 bedrooms, laundry facilities
on site. No pets. $900 month.
1st month & security required.
Available now. 570-639-0967
or 570-574-6974
LUZERNE
392 Bennett St.
2 BEDROOM
HOUSE
Gas heat. Washer/ dryer hook-
up, dish-washer, stove & refri-
gerator. Fenced in yard, par-
tially new carpet. Off-street
parking, yard. $680 + utilities.
(570) 288-3438
EXETER TWP.
Single family home. Mount
Zion Rd. 6 rooms & bath. No
pets/no smoking. $700/month
+ utilities & security.
570-388-2675 570-388-6860
NANTICOKE
6 room house for rent call for
details.(570)735-2236
PITTSTON
Single home sale or rent. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath, move in
condition, nice yard.
570-540-0198
SHAVERTOWN
Immaculate, 2 bedroom Cape
Cod with eat-in kitchen, hard-
wood floors, gas heat and de-
tached garage. $950/
month+utilities and security
deposit. 570-675-3178
WILKES-BARRE
40 Dexter Street
3 bedroom, 2 bath single
home. $600 + utilities & se-
curity. Section 8 Approved.
Call
357-2809 or 826-1795
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom, duplex.
Stove, hookups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking. $475 +
utilities. 570-868-4444
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com Friday, September 6, 2013 PAGE 7D
Autos For Sale
VALLEY CHEVROLET
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
821-2772 • 1-800-444-7172
SHOWROOM HOURS: MONDAY-THURSDAY 8:30-8:00pm; FRIDAY 8:30-7:00PM; SATURDAY 8:30-5:00pm
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
WE’VE GOT TOYOTAS!!!
#13842A,
2.7L 4 Cylinder Manual
Transmission,
Bedliner, Dual Airbags,
Tilt Steering Wheel
$
24,980
#13557A,
4.0L V6 Automatic, Air, PW, PDL, Cruise Control,
Tow & Package,
Sliding Rear
Windows, Tonneau Cover, Alloy Wheels
2008TOYOTA
REGULAR CAB
4X4
2012TOYOTA
TACOMA
ACCESS CAB
V6
OnLY
13 K Miles
OnLY
41 K Miles
2010TOYOTA
TACOMA
DOUBLE CAB
4x4
#13753A,
4.0 L, 6- Cyl., Automatic, AC, TRKSPORT PACKAGE,
Alloy Wheels,
Hill Start Assist
Control, Bedliner
$
26,950
*Tax and tags additional, not responsible for typographical errors.
$
13,999
2011TOYOTA
TACOMA
REGULAR CAB
4x4
#13851A,
4 Cylinder Automatic
Transmission,
Air Conditioning,
Tonneau Cover
$
19,950
OnLY
16 K Miles
2012TOYOTA
TACOMAACCESS CAB
4x4
#13621A,
V6 Automatic
Transmission, Air
Conditioning, Power Windows,
Power Door Locks, LEER CAP, TRD
OFF ROAD PACKAGE
$
24,980
AUTO
Autos For Sale
PRE-OWNED
USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
ONLINE AT BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
*Tax & Tags Additional. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.
2006 CHEVY EXPRESS
COMMERCIAL CUT AWAY
Stk #12834A, Rare Find! Tommy Liftgate, V-8, Auto, A/C,
Dual Rear Wheels, 139”WB C64 SRW, Don’t Pass This Up!
Reduced
$
9,999
*
2012 GMC Arcadia
All Wheel Drive
2,969 Miles • 1-Owner • Special Crystal Red Paint
2.49%
Financing
available
$28,500
• Front and rear A/C
• XM/Sirius radio
• 8 passenger seating
• telescopic steering
• side impact airbags
Autos For Sale
PRE-OWNED
USED CAR 662 WYOMING AVE., KINGSTON 288-0319
ONLINE AT BONNERCHEVROLET.COM
*Tax & Tags Additional. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.
2006 CHEVY EXPRESS
COMMERCIAL CUT AWAY
Stk #12834A, Rare Find! Tommy Liftgate, V-8, Auto, A/C,
Dual Rear Wheels, 139”WB C64 SRW, Don’t Pass This Up!
Reduced
$
9,999
*
SPECIAL PURCHASE
2
T
O
C
H
O
O
S
E
Dodge Challenger R/T’s
2010-Blue
• Hemi
• 6 Speed
• 2 Tone htd/leather
• 20”Wheels
• Spoiler
$26,999
21KMiles 1-owner
2009-Black
• Hemi
• Leather
• Roof
• Auto
$24,999
31K
M
iles
1-ow
ner
Houses For Rent
WILKES-BARRE
Wyoming Street
Unfurnished house for rent.
$750 + utilities,
security required
570-961-3162
Storage
FORTY FORT
GARAGE FOR RENT
11ft. 6"x 23 ft. Cinder block
walls, interior walls, steel studs
with sheet rock. Concrete floor,
Steel overhead door with lock,
overhead lighting. $110/month.
1 year lease and security.
570-655-0530
PLAINS TWP.
2 GARAGE/STORAGE UNITS
14ʼ x 24ʼ
Automatic overhead door.
Heat & electric included.
$205/month each.
Available separate or together.
Call 570-823-1466
Half Doubles
GLEN LYON
15 minutes from Power Plant
or W-B. 2 bedroom, appli-
ances, washer/dryer hook up,
electric heat, new paint & car-
pet, non smoker. $625/month
+ security, references & 1 year
lease. Pet on approval.
570-218-2320
GLEN LYON
3 BR RENOVATED
1/2 double, off street park-
ing, 2 porches, oil / electric
heat. NO DOGS. Refer-
ences & application re-
quired. $500 month +
security. 570-714-1296
GOOSE ISLAND
2 bedrooms, 1 bath, tenant
pays all utilities, 1st and last
months rent and security.
$550. 570-823-2902
KINGSTON
59 North Welles Ave.
Eat-in kitchen with refrigerat-
or and stove, 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, off-street parking. No
Smoking, No Pets. $650+
utilities & security.
570-639-1796
FORTY FORT 1/2 DOUBLE
3 bedrooms, remodeled, living
room, dining room, appliances,
off street parking. $725/mo +
utilities. 570-814-0843
KINGSTON
PROPERTIES
Currently Available
LARGE 1/2 DOUBLE
Completely renovated, full
kitchen, living room,
formal dining room & study.
4 bedrooms, 1.5 baths.
****************
1/2 DOUBLE
Completely remodeled older
charm, stained glass win-
dows, front & rear porches,
Living /dining room combo,
eat-in kitchen with laundry
alcove, 3 bedrooms, 1 bath
****************
Quiet residential neighbor-
hoods, utilities & heat by ten-
ant, no pets, no smoking. 1
month security, 1 year lease.
Call Rosewood Realty
570-287-6822
WILKES-BARRE/
PARSONS
3 b e d r o o m, 1 . 5 b a t h ,
$700/month, security, utilities &
lease. No Pets. 570-288-7753
PITTSTON
1 bedroom, stove & refrigerat-
or, washer/dryer hook up. heat
& water included. $575/month
+ security. 570-906-7614
PITTSTON
Half-Double, freshly painted,
2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath,
washer/dryer hookup, cable
& satellite ready, enclosed
back porch & yard. Private
parking. $650 + utilities, se-
curity & references. No pets
or smoking. 570-239-4293
PITTSTON
2 bedroom. 1.5 baths, eat in
kitchen with appliances, living
room, office/den, laundry in
unit, garage parking. $575 +
security & references.
570-702-3538
PLAINS
HALF-DOUBLE
2 bedrooms, all gas. No dogs.
$495/month. 570-417-5441
PLAINS
Spacious, modern, 4 bdrm,
wall to wall carpeting. 1.5 bath,
living room, kitchen w/all appli-
ances, off street parking. $800
+ utilities, 1st & last months
rent + security. Absolutely NO
Pets or Smoking.
570-823-4116
570-417-7745
570-417-2737
Half Doubles
SHAVERTOWN
3 BEDROOMS
Gas heat, Living room, dining
room, off-street parking.
Security and Lease. No Pets.
$700 a month.
Includes Sewer and Trash.
570-675-4424
TRUCKSVILLE
1/2 RANCH
2 bedrooms, living & dining
rooms, kitchen, washer/dry-
er, basement, yard, Security,
references & lease. No Pets.
$700/month. Sewer & trash in-
cluded.
Call 570-474-9321
or 570-690-4877
WEST WYOMING
3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, quiet
area, off street parking. ABSO-
LUTELY NO PETS. $650/mo +
security and references. Utilit-
ies by tenant. 570-430-3851
leave message.
WILKES-BARRE
1/2 DOUBLE
135 Garden ave.
6 rooms. $650/plus utilities.
No pets. 570-855-8405
Sales
DALLAS
1995 Redman Trailer, 56'x14',
Located in park. 4 rooms,
2 bedrooms, 1.5 bath.
Screened in porch. $15,500.
Very Good Condition
570-706-5201
PITTSTON TWP.
RENT TO OWN
2 bedroom, clean, needs no
work. remodeled throughout.
Minutes from I- 81 & PA Turn-
pike. $550/month.
570-212-8663
610-767-9456
Resort Property For Rent
CANCUN MEXICO
ROYAL SANDS RESORT
TIMESHARE VILLA
2 bedrooms, 2 bath, week
16, 2nd floor ocean view,
overlooks pool. See
www.royalresorts.com
for general info.
Call 570-674-8927
for details.
Horses
HORSE BOARDING
Full care or Field board, Lay-
ups, rehab, retirement, local
transport. Springdale Farms
925-5323 or 441-2288
Redrock Area
Pets
BEAGLE PUPPIES
AKC registered. Males and
Females, Tri-color, shots,
wormed and vet checked.
$250 each. 570-467-3683
CATS 2 beautiful big eyed
healthy cats, loving, needs a
good home, About 5 yrs. old,
shots up to date. Free. Owner
cannot keep. 570-851-0436
CHOCOLATE LAB
PUPPIES
12, registered, both parents
on site. Males $400, Females
$450.. Contact Ang at
570-441-7826 or
accolie@yahoo.com.
Huskies, Poms,
Yorkies, Chihuahuas,
German Shephards & More.
Bloomsburg 389-7877
Hazleton 453-6900
Hanover 829-1922
PARAKEET green with large
cage & accessories $40.
570-771-6025
SHELTIE PUPPIES
2 males, ready to go, 1st
shots, dewormed, papers.
$400 each. 570-899-9723
YORKIE PUPPY
Female, AKC. champion
bloodlines. Dew claws done,
wormed, 1st shots.
570-332-4739
Autos Under $5000
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '95 RAM 1500
X-CAB 4X4
GOOD WORK TRUCK!
$1,295
Call for details 570-696-4377
Autos For Sale
BUICK '10 ENCLAVE
45k mi l es, si l ver/ l eat her,
captains seats, rear back up
camera, third row. $25,200.
570-814-0749
Autos For Sale
ACME AUTO
SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD CREDIT,
NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
AUTOS
11 AUDI S5 CONVERTIBLE
SPRINT blue/ black / brown
leather interior, navigation,
7 spd auto turbo, AWD
10 CHEVY IMPALA LT silver
59k miles
07 BUICK LUCERNE CXL silver,
grey leather
06 CADILLAC DTS silver, black
leather, chrome alloys
06 AUDI A8L grey, black leather,
navigation, AWD
06 VW JETTA GLS blue, auto,
sunroof
06 HYUNDAI SONATA GLS grey,
auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
white V6
05 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LS
gold
02 VW BEETLE GLS lime green
5 speed, 4 cylinder
01 HONDA CIVIC green 5 speed
73 PORSCHE 914 green & black,
5 speed, 62k miles.
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 CHRYSLER T&C TOURING
Blue, entertainment center
7 passenger mini van
08 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT blue, tan
leather, sunroof, 4x4
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT black,
4 cylinder, 5 speed 4x4
08 FORD EDGE SE white V6 AWD
07 CHRYSLER ASPEN LTD
dark grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
07 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
LAREDO green, grey leather,
sunroof, 4x4
07 DODGE CARAVAN SXT green,
07 GMC YUKON DENALI
electric blue, black leather,
navigation 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
blue3, V6, 4x4
06 SUBARU FORESTER
silver, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD
CAB TRUCK
silver, 4 door, V6, 4x4
06 FORD EXPLORER XLT
blue, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY EQUINOX LT
grey, V6, AWD
06 NISSAN MURANO SE
white AWD
06 MERCURY MARINER silver,
V6, AWD
06 HONDA PILOT EX silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO REG
CAB truck red, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB
Black, V8, 4x4 truck
05 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE
off road, grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
05 BUICK RENZVOUS CXL
Light grey, tan leather AWD
05 NISSAN XTERRA
black, V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER white,
V6, 4x4
05 CHEVY COLORADO CLUB
CAB grey 4x4 truck
05 CHRYSLER TOWN &
COUNTRY TOURING blue,
7 passenger mini van
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT Red,
V6 4x4
05 HYUNDAI TUSCON LX green
auto, AWD
04 FORD EXPLORER XLT
silver, grey, leather, 3rd seat,
4x4
04 CHEVY 1500 SILVERADO
CREW CAB white, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT
QUAD CAB black
4 door 4x4 truyck
04 GMC ENVOY
black, V6, 4x4
04 FORD EXPLORER XLS
gold V6 4x4
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE LT
green, grey leather, 4 door
4x4 truck
03 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
grey black leather sunroof 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION XLT silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 NISSAN PATHFINDER black
V6 4x4
03 MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER XLX
red, V6, 4x4
02 FORD F150 SUPER CREW
red & tan 4 door. 4x4 truck
01 DODGE DAKOTA CLUB CAB
SPORT blue, V6, 4x4 truck
01 FORD EXPLORER SPORT
silver, 2 door, 4x4
99 FORD F 150 SUPER CAB
silver 4x4 truck
97 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LTD
4x4
CHEVY '00 MAILBU
Dark blue. Automatic, loaded,
power sun roof, V6, new tires.
Very good condition. 106k.
$3,200, OBO. 570-822-0832
Saturn `99 SL
Engine rebuilt, new radiator &
hoses. 4 new tires. Inspected
through 11/13. $1,000
570-472-1149
Autos For Sale
Chevrolet Impala LT 13'
25K, USA
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY 08 COLORADO
5 cyl., auto, air, power steer-
ing, power brakes, AM/FM,
bedliner & fiberglass
bed cover.SPECIAL $7,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
CHEVY ʻ10 MALIBU LS
Air, all power, cruise, tilt, CD.
Very economical..like
new..Sporty. Balance GM
warranty. SALE PRICE
$11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
DODGE '10 JOURNEY
Light grey, 4 cylinder, all
power, cruise, tilt, alloys,
Sirius radio, 56k. Balance of
factory warranty. Very
clean..very economical.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
FORD F150 04'
4X2. Nice Truck!
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
FORD ‘12
FUSION SE
Auto, all power, cruise, tilt,
alloys. Black. Economical.
Like new. Sporty.
SALE PRICE $12,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
HONDA ACCORD
EXL 10' 31,000K
Leather and well Equipped.
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
HONDA CRV 10'
Low Miles, AWD.
2 Available, starting at
$17,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
LINCOLN '06
ZEPHER
Silver. Only 23,000 miles.
One Owner. Garage kept.
4 door, auto, all power
including sun roof.
4 new tires. $11,500.
714-833-8021
CADILLAC '07 DTS
Pearl white/tan leather,
heated & cooled seats.
43k miles. Warranty.
$17,997
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
Autos For Sale
CHRYSLER '05
PT CRUISER
Purple, good condition.
Warranty
$4,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
VW '10 BEETLE GLS
Red/black leather, heated
seats, moon roof. 19k
miles. Factory Warranty.
$15,900
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
VW '10 JETTA
LIMITED
Red/black leather,
heated seats, 31k miles.
Warranty.
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDA '12 ACCORD
SPECIAL EDITION
Grey/black leather, heated
seats. 15k miles.
Factory Warranty
$19,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
HONDA '11 CIVIC LX
Burgundy/grey cloth,
4 new tires, 23k miles.
Factory Warranty.
$14,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
LEXUS '06 ES 330
Silver/grey leather, moon
roof, heated seats. Excel-
lent condition. 82k miles.
Extended Warranty
$13,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
CADILLAC '00
SEVILLE
Grey/beige leather, heated
seats. 70k miles.
Two owners, local trade.
Excellent Condition
Extended Warranty
$5,995
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
NISSAN '11
ALTIMA
Auto, air, power steering,
power brakes, ABS, cruise,
tilt, power cloth seats. CD.
Much More! Like New!
Special $13,995.
Full Notary Service Tags &
Title Transfers
PONTIAC GRAND AM
02' $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Volvo 98' V70 Wagon
Turbo, 4 Wheel drive, Leather
interior. Good condition in and
out! $5,000. 347-693-4156
Autos For Sale
1553 Main Street, Peckville, PA 18452
Prestige
One AutO
WE BUY
VEHICLES!
Call Dan Lane @ 570-489-0000
*Tax, tags & license fees not included.
2004 VENTURE LS Ext. MiniVan 90840 ..................................................... $4,500
2004 CORVETTE 17167 .................................................................................. $26,986
2006 COBALT 68286........................................................................................... $6,900
2005 CROSS FIRE SRT-6 59014.................................................................. $17,999
2005 RAM 1500 QUAD 79407.................................................................... $16,999
2005 MUSTANG GT Convertible 32500 ................................................. $18,999
2007 E350 Passenger 56256....................................................................... $13,999
2007 MUSTANG GT Coupe 32569.............................................................. $17,495
2008 Ford KingRanch CREW 50457 .......................................................... $28,896
2010 MUSTANG V6 Convertible 40332................................................... $17,999
2009 CR-V EX SUV 42978.............................................................................. $17,990
2011 CRZ EX 6M Coupe 5870...................................................................... $15,999
2006 Hummer H3 50591 ............................................................................... $20,989
2011 SONATA SE 51600................................................................................. $15,999
2011 Mazda3 SPORT gt 49212................................................................... $16,990
2007 Mini COOPER S k 46153.................................................................. $13,999
2006 Nissan 350Z Convertible 22128 ..................................................... $20,980
2009 Nissan 370Z SPORT PKG 11575..................................................... $26,789
2003 Porsche BOXTER S 26998 ................................................................. $23,999
2004 Subaru WRX STI 60325...................................................................... $18,799
2010 Subaru Outbac SPORT 25683.......................................................... $19,890
2012 Subaru IMPREZA AWD 33059......................................................... $17,980
2009 Suzuki AWD SUV 30482 ..................................................................... $12,999
2006 RAV 4Limited SUV 123109 ................................................................. $11,990
2010 Toyota RAV4 I4 SUV 34739............................................................... $16,999
2007 TOYOYA FJ CRUZER 65231................................................................. $21,990
2010 Volkswagen SE SUV 22065................................................................ $17,499
2012 Volkswagen SE Sedan 32392............................................................ $14,999
2012 Volkswagen 2.5L Hatchback 30751 ............................................... $14,999
8
0
0
0
2
1
1
6
2002 Z06 Coupe 13295 ........................................$27,778
2003 BMW Z43.0i ConvertiBle 53232 ...............$13,999
2003 SilverADo XCAB 4X4 lt eXt. 46582 ..............$15,999
2004 S2000 roADSt ConvertiBle 87617 ..........$16,495
2004 venture lS eXt. 97840 ............................$4,500
2004 Corvette Coupe 17167 .............................$26,986
2005 MuSt Gt ConvertiBle 32500 ...................$18,999
2005 tACoMA 4X4 CreW 87132 ........................$18,898
2006 F150XCAB 4X4 Xl 62084 .........................$15,999
2006 HuMMer H3 Suv 50591 ...........................$18,999
2006 350Z tourinG ConvertiBle 22128 ...........$19,495
2007 MuSt Gt Coupe 32569 ........................$16,999
2007 GXp v8 SeDAn 82306 ...............................$11,495
2007 MerC C350 SeDAn 59231 ........................$16,990
2007 HArley 883 SportSter 5353 ......................$6,000
2007 F350 XCAB 4X4 lAriAt 91235 .................$21,999
2008 MuSt Gt Coupe 3012 ..........................$23,898
2008 F150 KinG rAnCH CreW 50457 ..................$27,980
2008 SilverrADo lt2 74414 ..............................$18,999
2009 Cr-v eX Suv 42978 .................................$16,990
2009 HonDA Si SeDAn 45585 .............................$17,495
2010 MuSt v6 ConvertiBle 40332 .................$15,999
2010 tiGuAn Se Suv 22065 ...........................$17,499
2011 ForD FuSion i4 Se 82321 .........................$10,989
2011 MitSu outlAnDer 4X4 Se Suv ...................18124
2012 vW Gti 4 Door 12199 ...........................$21,999
2012 JettA Se SeDAn 32392 ............................$14,999
2012 Beetle 2.5l 30751 ...................................$14,999
2012 iMpreZA SeDAn 33059 .............................$17,495
2012 SCion tC 7.0 21125 ................................$19,898
We Buy CArS
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
SATURN '07 ION
4 cylinder. 5 speed. REAL
SHARP CAR! $3,995.
570-696-4377
SUBARU OUTBACK 11'
Station Wagon, AWD.
43K Miles!
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOTOTA '11
CAMRY LE
4 door, auto, dark bl ue
metallic color. Original own-
er . Onl y 18, 900 mi l es!
Looks and drives like a new
car! ! ! Pri ce reduced t o
$14,400 for quick sale. Loc-
ated in the Back Mtn. Call
570-674-5673
to schedule an appointment.
TOYOTA
'12 SCION
TC COUPE
Dual sun roofs, 6 speed auto,
too many options to mention.
Asking $17,000. 570-472-1149
TOYOTA COROLLA 03'
5-Speed. $3,499
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
Autos For Sale
TOYOTA '06 COROLLA LE
Power windows, locks, air,
65k. EXCELLENT! $9,550.
570-825-7577
State inspected & warrantied.
Financing available.
CAR FAX 1 Owner
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '02 BLAZER
4X4. V6. BARGAIN PRICE
$3,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
CHEVY '06
TRAILBLAZER
4X4. V6. EXTRA SHARP!
$5,995.
570-696-4377
LEO'S AUTO
SALES
93 Butler Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
CHEVY '93 BLAZER
2 door, 6 cylinder auto, 4x4,
new tires, radiator, tune-up,
& oil change.
$1,450
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
DODGE '06 DAKOTA
CLUB CAB
6 speed. EXTRA SHARP!
$4495. 570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘00
WINDSTAR SEL
Leather, LIKE NEW! $2,495.
570-696-4377
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Laredo 2005
PRICE REDUCED!
82,000 miles, Well main-
tained, excellent condition.
Beige in color, $10,500. 570-
654-7451 or 570-466-4669
PAGE 8D Friday, September 6, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Get news
when it
happens.
Air Conditioning & Heating
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
Appliances
A.R.T.
APPLIANCE
REPAIR
We service all major
brands.
570-639-3001
EDKIN
APPLIANCE REPAIR
Serving NEPA
Credit Cards Accepted
Repairs Guaranteed
570-606-4323
Building & Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding, gutters,
insulation, decks, additions,
windows, doors, masonry &
concrete. Ins. & Bonded. Sr.
Citizens Discount! State Lic.
# PA057320 570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES SPECIALIST
570-825-4268.
Windows, Doors and Roof
Home Repair
HOME SHOW
March 7, 8 & 9
at the
New Mohegan Sun
Hotel and
Convention Center
At Pocono Downs
Call for Details and
Reservations.
Building Industry
Association Of NEPA
411 MAIN ST.,
KINGSTON, PA 18704
Contact:
Janet Campis
www.bianepa.com
570-287-3331
Building & Remodeling
SHEDLARSKI
CONSTRUCTION
Home Improvement Specialist
Licensed, insured & PA
registered. Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & railings, replace-
ment windows & doors, addi-
tions, garages, all phases of
home renovations. Free Est.
570-287-4067
Chimney Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair Chimneys. All
types of Masonry. Liners In-
stalled, Brick & Block, Roofs &
Gutters. Licensed & Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Springhill Chimney Service
Parging, Brick Work, Stainless
Steel Chimney Liners,
Chimney Sweep.
New Location!
296 Main Street, Dupont.
570-471-3742
CHRIS MOLESKY
Chimney Specialist
New, repair, rebuild, liners installed.
Cleaning. Concrete & metal caps.
Small masonry jobs. 570-328-6257
Cleaning & Maintenance
CONNIE'S CLEANING
15 Years Experience
Bonded & Insured-Residential
Cleaning-Gift Certificates
Available-570-430-3743
Connie does the cleaning!
DEB & PATʼS
CLEANING SERVICE
We Are Bonded & Insured
Free Estimates
570-793-4773
EcoHousekeeping
Residential & Commercial
All Natural Products Included
Experienced, Reliable, Insured
570-878-3188
Lacy Rice Owner/Operator
Concrete & Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Specializing in All Types of
Masonry. Stone, Concrete
Licensed & Insured Free
Estimates Senior Discount
PA094695-570-702-3225
Concrete & Masonry
D. PUGH CONCRETE
All phases of masonry &
concrete. Small jobs welcome.
Senior discount. Free est.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
NEPA Masonry, Inc.
Stonework - stucco -
concrete - patios - pavers -
brick - block - chimneys
www.nepamasonryinc.com
570-466-2916
570-954-8308
STESNEY CONCRETE
& MASONRY
Brick, Block, Stucco, Stone,
Steps, Sidewalks, Driveways,
Foundations, Floors, Chim-
neys etc. Lic. & Ins. Call 570-
328-1830 or 570-283-1245
Construction & Building
FLOORING
INSTALLATION
PROFESSIONALS
15 years experience. Carpet,
vinyl, tile, wood, laminate in-
stallation & repairs. If you walk
on it, we know how to install it!
All Work Guaranteed
Fully Insured. 574-8953
Kenzie Construction
Licensed & Insured. PA# 087026
Roof & Siding, Bathrooms,
Kitchens and Remodeling.
FREE ESTIMATES!
570-793-1391
Landlords, Realtors,
Homeowners
Do yourself a favor
call us first!
Construction Cost Cutters
570-709-4060
Electrical
RNI ELECTRIC, LLC
Licensed & Insured
Retired Veteran.
Panel upgrades.
New & old work.
25 Years Experience
570-814-8979
Electrical
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes & Replacements.
Generator Installs.
570-868-4469
Gutter Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure Washing.
Insured. 570-288-6794
Handyman
DAVE'S HANDY MAN
SERVICES
30 years experience
Full-Time-Affordable quality repairs,
Remodeling and Painting.
570-299-1127
Hauling & Trucking
ALL KINDS OF HAULING
& JUNK REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB REMOVAL
Demolition - Estate Cleanout
Attics, Basements, Yards, etc.
Free Estimates 24 hour service
Small and large jobs!
570-823-1811 570-239-0484
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars, Garages.
Free Estimates, Same Day!
570-855-4588
AA CLEANING
A1 Always hauling, cleaning
attics, cellar, garage, one piece
or whole Estate, also available
10 & 20 yard dumpsters. 655-
0695 592-1813 or 287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 General Hauling
Cleaning attics, cellars, garages,
Demolitions, Roofing & Tree
Removal. Free Est. 779-0918 or
542-5821; 814-8299
BOB & RAY'S HAULING
We Haul Everything!
Cheap, fast, clean & respectful
Free Estimates.
570-655-7458
570-604-5224
Hauling & Trucking
BUYING
JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
Vito & Gino’s
570-288-8995
Will Haul Anything
Clean cellars, attics, yards & metal
removal. Call Jeff
570-735-3330 or 570-762-4438
Landscaping
PA Landscaping &
Lawn Service Inc.
•Lawn Cutting
•Shrub Trimming, •Mulching
•Landscaping Services
25+ Years Exp. 570-287-4780
palandscaping@verizon.net
Tough Brush & Tall Grass
Mowi ng, edgi ng, mul chi ng,
shrubs, hedge shaping. Tree
pruning. Fall cleanup. Weekly,
bi-weekly lawn care. Fully Ins.
Free Est. 570-829-3261
Miscellaneous
Painting & Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
SUMMER SPECIAL
TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO
SCHEDULE YOUR
EXTERIOR WORK.
18 years exp. Exterior
Painting, Power Washing,
Deck Staining.
570-820-7832
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Canʼt Lose! 570-822-3943
Painting & Wallpaper
ATTENTION
Serra Painting
Book Now For Fall & Save.
All Work Guaranteed Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience. Powerwash &
Paint Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum. Free Estimates!
You Canʼt Lose! 570-822-3943
Danielʼs Paint and Wall Covering
Lic. PA100671 & Ins.
20 YEARS EXP.
570-604-2961
danielspaintandwallcovering.com
JACOBOSKY
PAINTING
We Are An Expert Building
Restoration Company.
High end painting, Power Washing
& Masonry. Please Call Only The
Best! 570-328-5083
JOHN’S PAINTING
Reliable, Neat, Honest,
Working with Pride. Insured.
570-735-8101
M. PARALIS PAINTING
Int/ Ext. painting, Power
washing. Professional work at
affordable rates. Free estimates.
570-288-0733
MARTY'S INTERIOR
PAINTING
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
Paving & Excavating
EDWARD'S
ALL
COUNTY
PAVING
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured.
Call Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Pressure Washing
PJʼs Window Cleaning &
Janitorial Services
Windows, Gutters, Carpets,
Power washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
pjswindowcleaning.com
570-283-9840
Roofng & Siding
CORNERSTONE
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Siding Carpentry
40 yrs. experience
Licensed & Insured
PA026102
Call Dan: 570-881-1131
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs & Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate, Gutters,
Chimney Repairs.
Credit Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
JO Home Improvement
Roofing over the top, rip-off,
repairs, siding painting gut-
ters int & ext remodeling. Fully
Ins. Free Est. PA100512. 570-
829-3261 or 817-2548
SPRING ROOFING
McManus Construction
Licensed, Insured. Everyday
Low Prices. 3,000 satisfied
customers. 570-735-0846
Tree Service
TOM'S AFFORDABLE
Tree & Shrub Trimming
& Removal. Chipper service.
Gutter Cleaning
References available.
Free estimates. 570-814-9132
Trucks / SUVs / Vans
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '04 F150 X CAB
4X4 with cap. 1 owner. Clean,
Clean truck. $6,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
FORD '05 ESCAPE
4X4. Leather. Sunroof.
CLEAN SUV! $5,995.
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
GMC ENVOY 03’
4X4, 3rd row Seat, SHARP
SUV!
$5,995. 570-696-4377
TOYOTA '06 HIGHLANDER
V6, 4X4, silver/grey cloth,
moon roof, 3rd row seats.
90k miles.
Extended Warranty.
$13,300
MAFFEI
Auto Sales
570-288-6227
444 Market Street
Kingston
1518 8th Street, Carverton
Near Francis Slocum St. Park
MAZDA '03 TRIBUTE
Leather, sunroof, 4x4. Good
Miles! $4,995
570-696-4377
BEN'S AUTO
SALES
RT. 309 W-B TWP
Near Wegman's
570-822-7359
SUZUKI ʻ12 SX4
5 door AWD, 6 speed, black,
all power, cruise, tilt, CD, al-
loys. Like new. Balance of
factory warranty. Sporty.
SPECIAL PRICE $11,995.
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
Auto Services
WANTED
Cars & Full Size Trucks.
For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto Parts 477-2562
Truck / SUV / Van Accessories
CHRYSLER '04
TOWN & COUNTRY
TOURING VAN
Power windows, locks, seats,
air, 55K. MUST SEE &
DRIVE! $7,975.
570-825-7577
Freshl y state i nspected &
warrantied. Financing avail-
able. CAR FAX available.
Air Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER Hampton
Bay, 10,000 BTU $100. cash
only. 570-823-3045
Antiques & Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES $
$ BUYING $
Old Toys, Model Kits,
Bikes, Dolls, Guns,
Mining Items, Trains
& Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
ANTIQUE BEDROOM SET 4
pi ece, bed, wardrobe, & 2
dressers with round mirrors.
Selling for $275.
570-288-2458
LI ONEL TRAI N ENGI NE
#1684 & coal tender plus met-
al cars & transformer $350.
570-735-2236
Appliances
REFRI GERATOR whi t e
double door, frost free $150.
570-771-6025
TELEVISION, 19" with DVD
p l a y e r . P O R T A B L E
WASHER/DRYER with attach-
ment s, Mi cr owave oven.
Ever yt hi ng i s $200.
215-224-2913.
Baby Items
CRIB BEDDING by Pottery
Barns, boys blue, includes,
sheets, dust ruffle, bumpers,
seldom used, like new $70.
Also included 3 crib rail pro-
tectors. 570-287-9701.
Exercise Equipment
TREADMILL Expanse 600,
Space saver design. Excellent
condition $100. 570-654-5141
Furnances & Heaters
HEAT YOUR ENTIRE
HOME water, and more
wi t h a n OUTDOOR
WOOD FURNACE from
Central Boiler. B & C Out-
door Wood Furnace, LLC.
570-477-569
KI TCHEN TABLE wooden,
mapl e col or, 4 chai rs $75.
Rear bumper for ' 01 Grand
Cherokee Laredo $50. 4x4
ceramic tiles (477) off white
speckled $50. White bathroom
sink with Delta faucets $75.
570-288-1319
Furniture & Accessories
BAR STOOLS 4, excel l ent
condi ti on. $20. each.
570-675-2907
BEDROOM SUITE dark pine,
night stand, dresser with hutch,
mirror, 5 drawer chest, good
condition $100. Emerson moist
air humidifier, 15 gallon, works
well $50. 570-283-5654
Furniture & Accessories
DRESSERS (2) 1 tall, 1 short
from IKEA asking $200 ea. or
$350. f or bot h. Comput er
desk/armoire from Raymour &
Flanigan, great shape, origin-
ally $1200 sacrifice for $500
obo. text 484-223-6453
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
50.5lx48.5hx15.5d, cherry col-
or, lots of space plus bottom
storage $25. Wrought iron rail-
ings 2" from wall, small piece
39" rail to go down steps 42"
covers 6 steps asking $150. for
all. 570-881-3455
HEADBOARD (solid brass)
for single bed complete with
metal rails excellent condition
$175. Men's grey trenchcoat
with zip out lining 44 reg. $40.
2 mi rrored bar si ghns Bud
Light & Michelob light $25.
570-474-6442
HOPE CHEST beautiful cedar
lined, 2 jewelry drawers & in-
ser t s t o st or e val uabl es.
Smoke free home $100. Oak
kitchen table & chairs, round
without leaf, oval with leaf, 4
hairs $150. 570-696-5204
KI TCHEN TABLE wi t h 4
chairs, beige leather seats
$100. Round walnut table $75.
Solid white storage cabinet
$30. 570-675-2879
SOFA & love seat with floral
pattern & pillow bac, good con-
dition. $100. Full bedroom set
with 2 dressers, nightstand
$100. 570-674-9716
SOFA floral 81" $110. Sharp
audio system, 4 features re-
mote & speakers $55. Polar-
oi d retro 60' s camera $20.
Juicer veg & fruit Omega $30.
Wesl o treadmi l l heart rate
sensor, $135. 570-740-1392
WOW! Beautiful Sealy & Serta
Mattress box-spring sets
W/Warranty in plastic bags,
cost over $900 each sell for
only $75 for full, All Sizes avail-
able. Pillow tops just $25 extra,
We Deliver
570-614-3877
Medical Equipment
ROLLATOR & transport chair
2-i n-1 Mobi l i ty, l i ghtwei ght,
folds easily,adj. foot rest & flip
down arm rests, large under-
seat pouch, lightly used $135.
3 wheel rollator, lightweight,
Adj. brakes & handle height
$75. 570-287-4173
Miscellaneous
ANNUITY.COM
Guaranteed Income For Your
Retirement
Avoid market risk & get guar-
anteed income for retirement!
Call for FREE copy of our
SAFE MONEY GUIDE Plus
Annuity
Quotes from A-Rated
companies! 800-423-0676
CAMPI NG TENT Hi l l ar y,
sleeps 6, 2 camping cots, met-
al frames $60. Metal ham-
mock frame $10. Carpet power
stretcher with case $150. Car-
pet seaming iron with case.
$50. 570-824-0591
CANADA DRUGS:
Canada Drug Center is your
choice for safe and affordable
medications. Our licensed
Canadian mail order phar-
macy will provide you with sav-
ings of up to 75 percent on all
your medications needs. Call
today 1-800-341-2398 for
$10.00 off your first prescrip-
tion and free shipping.
Miscellaneous
LINER REPLACEMENT KIT
complete for 15x35 above
ground pool. Includes full prin-
ted liner, foam underlay, sides,
ski mmer basket & gaskets
/ accessor i es. Pai d $800.
sel l i ng f or $350. OBO.
570-881-2311
DISH:
DISH TV Retailer. Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.) &
High Speed Internet starting at
$14.95/month (where avail-
able.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
NOW! 1-800-734-5524
DOORS - (4 Bi-fold Louvered)
one 6 ft, one 5 ft, & two 4 ft for
$100. 570-822-1824
DVD/ VCR/ CD pl ayer $75.
TREADMILL Li festyl er Ex-
panse $100.
Call 5710-654-5141
ENTERTAINMENT CENTER
Sauder $35. Tough guy truck
boxed $100. Handicap walker
$35. 570-905-6573
FREE AD
POLICY
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accept ads for used private
party merchandise only for
items totaling $1,000 or
less, maximum 8 lines for
7 days. All items must be
priced and state how many
of each item. Your name,
address, email and phone
number must be included.
No ads for ticket sales ac-
cepted. Pet ads accepted if
FREE ad must state FREE.
You may place your ad
online at timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com
SORRY NO PHONE
CALLS.
INSULATION, 6x23, 4 rolls;$25 a
roll. Curio cabinet; $75. Plastic
chair mat; $30. Sofa, chair, and ot-
toman; $75. BF Goodri ch ti re,
215/75/R14; $20. Stone laundry
t ub; $45. Met al t ool - box f or
truck;$45. Oak coffee table; $75.
Si ngl e bed compl et e; $20. 00.
Mountain bike $40. 570-868-4444
MEDICAL GUARDIAN:
Medical Alert for Seniors - 24/7
monitoring.
FREE Equipment. Free
Shipping. Nationwide Service.
$29.95/Month CALL Medical
Guardian Today
855-850-9105
MY COMPUTER WORKS:
My Computer Works
Computer problems? Viruses,
spyware, email, printer issues,
bad internet connections - FIX
IT NOW! Professional, U.S.-
based technicians.
$25 off service. Call for
immediate help.
1-888-781-3386
OMAHA STEAKS:
ENJOY 100% guaranteed,
delivered-to-the-door
Omaha Steaks!
SAVE 74% PLUS 4 FREE
Burgers - The Family Value
Combo - Only $39.99.
ORDER Today
1-888-721-9573,
use code 48643XMD - or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/mbff6
9
TELESCOPE Celestron Astro-
master 130EQ. 1 year old, 2
eyepieces & instruction. Over
$200 new sell for 120. neg.
570-693-0306
Miscellaneous
PICK YOUR OWN
RASPBERRIES
Limited number of PYO
Blackberries available
8 am to 1 pm
Closed Mon. & Thurs.
Rt. 29, Noxen
Call for availability 298-0962
WhistlePigPumpkin.com
READY FOR MY QUOTE
CABLE:
SAVE on Cable TV-Internet-
Digital Phone-Satellite. You've
Got A Choice! Options from
ALL major service providers.
Call us to learn more!
CALL TODAY.
888-929-9254
SEWING MACHINE with cab-
inet, sewing attachments, elec-
tric knee pedal $25. Technics
CD player, MCS series, 3040
stereo graphic equalizer all for
$65. 570-287-2760
TIRES 2 Wi nterforce snow
tires, 175/70R/13 mounted on
'92 Geo Prizm rims, both rims
& tires like new $100. 570-825-
8438 after 6pm
TOTE metal hitch tote expand-
able $50. Karaoke singing ma-
chine $50. White TV tray $10.
570-592-2549
TV Zenith 36" HDTV & stand
$75. Rust plush electric lift
chair $100. Deluxe fine china
service 8 $50. Propane gas
heater $50. Golf cart $20. 3 pc
Early American living room set,
3 tales $200. 693-3978
Pools & Spas
POOL LINER vinyl, fully prin-
ted, 15x15 above ground, foam
underl ay & si des, ski mmer
basket assembly, never used,
new in box. Originally paid
$800. sell all for $300. OBO.
570-881-2311.
Sporting Goods
GOLF BALLS used Top-Flite.
Great quality, very clean. 50
balls for $13. Have 10 bags.
570-359-3158
Televisions /Accessories
TV STAND good condition,
asking $20.
570-821-5916
Tools
BAKER SCAFFOLD, like new,
Metal/Tech brand, holds up to
1,000 pounds. 2 side pieces,
pl atform, wheel s, ful l y ad-
justable, asking $125. A great
deal. 570-239-8149
Want To Buy
WANTED TO BUY
Old car books, brochures,
catalogs & paint chip binders.
$$Cash Paid! 570-516-2914
Want To Buy
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES-BARRE
GOLD
(570)48gold8
(570)484-6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
_______________
London Fix
Gold Price
Sept. 4 - $1,390.00
____________________
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am-6pm
Closed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315
Blvd.
(Plaza 315)
315N, 1/2 mile
before Mohegan
Sun Casino
We Pay At Least
80% of the London Fix
Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES-BARRE
GOLD
(570)48gold8
(570)484-6538
Highest Cash Pay- Outs
Guaranteed
London Fix Gold Price
Sept. 4 - $1,390.00
Open 6 Days a Week
10am-6pm
Closed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
315N, 1/2 mile
before Mohegan Sun Casino
We Pay At Least 80% of the
London Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@yahoo.com
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Yard Sale
ASHLEY
ESTATE SALE
Sun., Sept 8, 9am - 3pm
Furni t ure, t ool s, ant i ques,
household items. Priced to
Sell! CASH ONLY
AVOCA
1232 Main St.
ESTATE
TAG SALE
Saturday, Sept 7
8:00 – 3:00
An Old Clockmaker’s Estate
Par t i al Li st i ng: Cl ocks:
Joseph Doll Tall Case Clock
with inlaid marquetry; Antique
5 1/2 foot tall hanging oakE.
Howard, made i n Bost on;
dozens of pocket watches in-
cluding a 14KT gold and ster-
ling silver case; antique mantle
clocks; dozens of alarm clocks;
many clock cases and wrist-
watches (i ncl udi ng Mi ckey
Mouse); clock parts and mech-
anisms sold by bags. Civil
War era saber with scabbard;
many antique toys including a
cast iron Jonah and the Whale
bank; high end 6 Piece art
deco bedroom set with clear
and gol d mi rrors; 7 pi ece
carved oak kitchen set (buffet,
table and four chairs); slag
glass lamp; great antique oak
library table; antique round oak
china closet with claw feet and
carved backsplash; cherry and
mahogany occasional tables; 4
piece Victorian parlor set; circa
1880 carved Victorian ward-
robe; many prints and oil paint-
ings; antique mining items (i.e.
carbide lamps, plungers, picks,
etc.); antique railroad items
(i.e. lock, lantern, keys, etc.);
antique political items; old ad-
vertising; many pieces of an-
tique jewelry; old glassware in-
cluding Stegmaier plate, de-
pression glass, and antique
pottery; old DC comics (i.e.
Batman, Superman, etc.); old
license plates, trains, fishing
stuff including old licenses;
WWII battleship cards; many
old tools; also hundreds of
items normally found in old es-
tates. Real Estate for sale by
owner: $59,000.
BEAR CREEK TWP
340 OLD EAST END BLVD.
Sat., 9/7, 7:30am to 2pm
3 FAMILIES
Household items Little Tykes,
pi cni c tabl e, sl i di ng board,
desk, girls toddler canopy bed,
Precious Moments, Lenox, 350
engine, & more
DUPONT
GIANT OUTDOOR
FLEA MARKET
Over 50 vendors!
Country Store
Wide variety of fruits
& vegetables
Rain or Shine. All Tables
Under Tent
Food Menu Also Available
Potato Pancakes, Pierogies,
Haluski & More!
Saturday, September 7th
9am to 5pm
POLISH HARVEST
FESTIVAL
(DOZYNKI)
Sunday, September 8th
11 am to 7pm
Harvest Wreath
Ceremony & Blessing - 2pm
Polka Punch Band - 3pm
Games, Prizes
Country Store Stand
Wide variety of fruits
& vegetables
HOLY MOTHER OF
SORROWS CHURCH
212 WYOMING AVE.
CALL 655-0981
For More Information
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
ESTATE SALE
22 Laflin Road
Sat., Sept. 7, 2013
8:00-4:00
Directions: Off Main St.
Jenkins Twp.
Ent i r e Cont ent s of
House I ncl udi ng:
Lionel Trains, Living Room
Furniture, Bedroom Furniture,
Like New Futon, Lots of Nice
Glassware and Kitchenware,
Paintings and Prints, Decorat-
or Items, Wooden Handled
Gold Clubs, Like New Stair
Glide, Hand Tools, Crafts-
man Self Propelled Lawn-
mower and Much more!
This is a Nice Sale!
SALE BY COOK & COOK
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATE
LIQUIDATORS.COM
DUPONT GARAGE SALE
204 Elm. Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-4
Tools, trains and accessories,
toys, books and something for
everyone!
Yard Sale
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
777 East Lake Road
Saturday, September 7
9am-4pm
Directions: Follow Rt. 115
South to Beaupland Rd. Fol-
low Beaupland Road to E.
Lake Rd, Turn Left onto E.
Lake Rd. Home is on Left.
Watch for Signs!!!
Complete Content of
Exceptional Home: Mu-
seum Quality 19th Century
Black Forest Italian Renais-
sance Heavily Carved Large
Sideboard and Buffet, Black
For est Car ved Mat i has
Bauerle Grandfather Clock,
Exquisite Italian Renaissance
Carved Desk, Pair of Antique
Heavi l y Car ved Cur ul e
Chairs, Renaissance Carved
Antique Bar Cabinet, High
Quality Red Leather Sofa &
Chai r, Si gned Bronzes by
Rudolph Kuchler, Otto Kainz,
& J. Moller, Rosenthal Tea
Set, Antique Black Forest
Cuckoo Clock, Sterling Silver,
Bronze Lamps, Black Forest
Antler Floor Basket & Gun
Rack, Ant l er Chandel i er,
Chi nese Bl ack Lacquer 3
piece Bedroom Set, Heavily
Carved Chinese Dresser, 3
piece Pine Bedroom Suite,
Wooden Table with 4 Chairs,
Two Modern Lane Recliners,
Wooden Futon, Maple Table
with 2 Benches, Tables, Kit-
chenware, Linens, Wall Art,
Religious, Cut Glass, Holiday
Decor, ESPN Pool Tabl e,
Models, Lighting, Rugs, Patio
Table Set, Simplicity Lawn
Tractor with Cart, Plus Gar-
age Contents, Tools, Out-
door Supplies, Wooden Play-
house, & Much More!!!
This is a Really Nice
Sale!!!
Sale by Wm. Lewis
www.wvestates.com
DALLAS
ESTATE SALE
224 Church Street
Sat. Sept. 7, 9-3
Entire Household Furnish-
ings of a clean, well main-
tained home. Antiques-Vic-
torian Ornately Carved Chairs
with Needle Point Seats- Vic-
torian Sofa, Marble Top Ta-
ble, Mahogany Games Table,
Marquetry Inlaid Round Ta-
ble, Stack Oak Barrister
Bookcase, Blanket Chest,
1920s Walnut Bedroom and
complete American Drew
Bedroom Set, Reverse
painted table lamp, dining
room set, Large pastel
Tapestry, Flo blue, Depres-
sion cut and Amber glass,
older Christmas Collectibles,
tools etc. and other general
household.
Sale conducted by:
Dick and Nancy Jayne
Indian Hill Antiques,
Laceyville, PA.
DALLAS
7 FAMILIES
562 HUNSTVILLE RD
SAT., 9/7 8AM-2PM
DALLAS
Gigantic Garage Sale
90 Monroe Ave.
Sat., Sept 7, 9-3
Selling contents of a lovely Es-
tate,Two blocks behind Disque
Funeral Home. Modern and
vintage furniture for bedroom,
dining room, living room and
nursery. Household items in-
cluding lamps, water cooler,
small appliances, china, glass-
ware and wall decor. All holi-
day items including Halloween,
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and
Easter. Artificial flowers and
plants. Vintage sewing ma-
chines, clothing, and cook-
books/books. Table and bed
linens, candles, playing cards,
toys, games, videos. All items
priced to sell.
KINGSTON
ESTATE SALE
118 West Dorrance Street
4 pc. mahogany bedroom
set, 7 pc. mahogany dinette
set, drop leaf kitchen set,
small appliances, pictures, 2
pc. living room set (blue),
glassware, recliner & much
mor e! House i s Sol d,
Ever yt hi ng Must Go!
Sale by Marva
Yard Sale
DALLAS
HOUSE SALE
35 PHEASANT RUN
OFF IREM ROAD
SAT., 9 to 4 pm
Baldwin spinet piano, 9 pc.
Danish dining room, sofa bed,
TVs, & stands, chairs, tables,
bedroom furniture, wall units,
microwave, lamps, computer
desk, tea cart, entertainment
centers, pictures & frames,
Royal Dalton china, books,
jewelry, Pierco beekeepers
honeycomb unit, water cooler,
linens, kitchen items, glass
ware, golf clubs, CDs, DVDs,
Star wars, Nintendo, designer
clothes, shoes, purses, bikes &
carrier, skis & boots, gas
mower, 24' ladder, lawn
spreader & more!
DALLAS
YARD SALE
SEDLER RD
Corner of Campground Rd. &
Upper Demunds Rd.
I t ems i ncl ude: Ant i ques,
Pampered Chef, gun cabinet,
bedroom sui t, ki tchenware,
baby items, designer purses,
child race car bed. Must See!
Rain date: 9-14-13
DURYEA
STRAWBERRY LANE
BLUEBERRY HILLS
SAT., SEPT 7th ,9-2
MULTI FAMILY SALE
Fitness equipment, children's
toys, books and lots more!
EXETER
JUPITER MOON
STUDIOS ANTIQUES
250 PEPE COURT
Sat., 9/7, 9am-1pm
ESTATE FINDS
Vintage & modern, furniture,
1950's stove/oven & more!
EXETER
811 SCHOOLEY AVE.
Wyoming Ave to Schooley Ave
past Highland Manor
Sat & Sun 9.7 & 9.8
8 am until ?
First Assembly of
God Church
EYM Flea Market
Join us on Sat., Sept. 7th for
the First Assembly of God
Evidence Youth Ministry
Community Flea Market. We
will also be hosting a FREE
CAR WASH (donations ac-
cepted) and selling hot dogs,
water, and snacks.
When: Sat., Sept. 7
Time: 9-2
Where: First A/G Parking Lot
424 Stanton St,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
*Rain or Shine*
FORTY FORT
YARD SALE
305 River Street
Sat., Sept 7th, 8-1
Costume j ewel ry, cl othi ng,
pur ses, househol d, baby
equipment, books & clothes.
FORTY FORT YARD SALE
73 W. Pettibone Street
Sat. & Sun., Sept. 7 & 8, 9-3
NO EARLY BIRDS!
Pro Form treadmill, washer &
dryer, antiques, family clothing,
housewares, tools, end tables,
toddler toys, purses, leather
jackets, new boxed gifts, elec-
t roni cs, new 5. 8 Mot orol a
phone system, 5' family bar.
HANOVER TWP.
1012 SIVELY ST
FRI. & SAT., 9-3
Legos, golf clubs, clothing,
games, books, toys, glass-
ware, & much more.
Reasonably priced.
Hanover Twp. Liberty Hills
237 Constitution Avenue
Sat. & Sun. 9-3
Furniture, household items, lots of
kids items, clothing & more.
HARVEYS LAKE
HUGE YARD SALE
19 Beaumont Hill Road
Fri. & Sat., Sept. 6 & 7, 9-1
Cleaning out! Household, fish-
ing equip, tons of sports col-
lectibles and cards, Barbies,
Breyer horses, Die cast, an-
tiques, bikes, wooden swing
set, treadmill, home gym.
HUNLOCK CREEK
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
Thorny Apple Acres
& Neighbors
Rt 29, 1/2 mile from Moon
Lake, Fri. & Sat. 8-3
Wrought iron patio set, ce-
ment mixers, household, mis-
cellaneous, some free items.
Look for bal l oons on mai l -
boxes.
KINGSTON
202 Zerby Ave.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-2
Many Great Finds for
Men and Women!
KINGSTON
327 Rutter Ave.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-2:30
Glassware, lamps, lamp
bases, dishes, jewelry, picture
frames, garden tools, quart
canning jars, luggage, old
Flexible Flyer sled, stained
glass shade and more!
Yard Sale
KINGSTON
584 Warren Ave.
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-1
Talbot's clothing size 12.
Vests, slacks, blouses, skirts,
winter and summer. Volvo car
mats. New never used
Weathertech $115, now $60.
Some collectibles. Artwork, art
supplies, some jewelry, garden
pots and household items.
KINGSTON
MULTI FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
16 Seneca Place
Sat., Sept 7, 7-3
Dresser, espresso make, oth-
er small furniture, linens, baby
gear, strollers, toys, games,
scrap booking supplies, new
health & beauty, kitchenware,
books, clothes, shoes.
KINGSTON
32 W. Walnut St.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8 to 1
Everything reasonably priced,
most items under $1.
Rain Date, Sat., Sept. 14.
KINGSTON
57 S. GOODWIN AVE
SAT., 9/7 9AM-3PM
WESTMOOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
FLEA MARKET
LUNCH AVAILABLE
KINGSTON
EAST BENNETT ST
COMMUNITY
SALE
SAT., 9/7, 9am-1pm
KINGSTON
Rear of 57 Sharp St.
3 FAMILY SALE
SAT,. 9/7 7am-noon
Houseware, tools, baby items
KINGSTON
YARD SALE
44 w. Walnut Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-1
Ladies winter coats, Hess
trucks, household & more.
Cheap Prices!
KINGSTON
YARD SALE
54 Academy Lane
Sat, Sept. 7, 8-11
Sporting goods, bikes, DVD's,
Li f e & Spor t s I l l ust r at ed
magazines, other household
items. No Early Birds!
LUZERNE
740 BENNETT ST
SAT., 9/7, 8AM-1PM
GREAT STUFF CHEAP!
Clothing for adults, kids &
babies. Lots of DVDs, VHS,
toys, baby gear, much more!
LUZERNE
749 N WALNUT ST
SAT., 9/7, 9AM-2PM
MULTI FAMILY
Household, movies & more!
LUZERNE
MULIT FAMILY YARD SALE
840 BENNETT STREET
Sat, Sept. 7, 8-2
Exercise & stereo equipment,
CD's, books, clothes, house-
hold & holiday items, 18' above
ground pool. Something for
Everyone!
LUZERNE
MULTI FAMILY YARD
SALE
890 Bennett Street
Sat., Sept 7, 9-1
Girl's toys, baby, craft sup-
plies, fabric, rustic country
decor, multi-colored camo,
tools, DVD's, fishing rods.
MINERS MILLS
YARD SALE
147 St. Clair Street
Sat., Sept 7, 9-2
Granite wine bar, stroller, toys,
household items & much more!
MINERSMILLS
307 EAST MAIN ST.
SAT 9/7 & SUN 9\8
8AM TO 2PM
Electric scooter, girl's bike, TV,
ceramic Christmas decora-
tions, girl's & boys clothing,
household items, everything
priced to sell!
Minners Mills
188 & 190 Miller Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-2
Kids clothes, Sears Hard Side
Luggage Carrier, Non-foldable
tables, portable TVs and More!
PLYMOUTH
231 Nottingham Street
Saturday, September 7
8:30 AM to 4:00 PM
Large amount of indoor
decorations for Halloween,
Christmas, Easter, etc. We
also have jewelry, watches,
houseware items, toys and
games. If you were here
before then you know the
real deals are on the hill…
It all has to go.
MOUNTAIN TOP
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
11 Orchard View Lane
Summit Meadow Estates,
across from Fire Hall
Tons of girl's & boy's designer
clothes, shoes, coats, women's
clothing, Power Wheels Jeep,
baby items, housewares, gui-
tar, games, toys, Something
For Everyone!
Yard Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
(Nuangola)
ESTATE SALE
625 Deer Rack Drive
(Laurel Lakes)
Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013
9:00-4:30
Directions: From 81 S take
Nuangola exit R on Van Ave.
to R on Aspen to L on Deer
Rack.
Entire Contents of
Home:
Beautiful Mahogany Dining
Room Set, like new living
room Furniture, Bedroom Fur-
niture, like new Recliner
Chairs, Oak Kitchen Set,
Fancy Antique Upright Piano,
Nice Glassware, Large
Pfaltzgraff Dinnerware Set,
Quality Kitchenware, Many
designer items, loads of Holi-
day, some Vintage. Lots of
Craft Supplies, Mountain
Bikes, Lots of Nice Lawn
Statuary, Lawn and Garden,
hand Tools and Much More!
This is a great sale!
CREDIT CARDS
ACCEPTED!
SALE BY COOK & COOK
ESTATE LIQUIDATORS
WWW.COOKAND-
COOKESTATE
LIQUIDATORS.COM
MOUNTAIN TOP
31 Park Lane North
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-1
Assorted household items.
MOUNTAIN TOP
10 WASHINGTON BLVD.
COMMUNITY
GARAGE SALE
Sat., 9/7 & Sun 9/8
STARTS 8AM
Tools, furniture, garden tractor,
new faucets & door knobs, 2
sink vanity, clothes, several
families.
MOUNTAIN TOP
2 Garage Sales
9 & 11 Colony Drive
(Walden Park)
Sat., Sept. 7, 8 AM
Furniture, toys, clothes and
Much More!
MOUNTAIN TOP
912 Beaver Trail
Laurel Lakes
Sat., 9/7, 9am-2pm
Sun., 9/8, 9-12
Baby items, household items,
Dale Earnhardt Sr. memoribil-
ia & more.
MOUNTAIN TOP
GARGAE SALE
24 Brook Lane, Briarbrook
Sat., Sept 7th, 9-1
New items, glassware, house-
hold, 20 pies of ribbon & much,
much more!
MAYFIELD
ESTATE SALE
329 DELAWARE ST
SAT., 9/7, 8AM TO 3 PM
ENTIRE CONTENTS OF
HOME
MOUNTAIN TOP
Woodland Estates
220 Fairwood Blvd.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-3
Kitchenware, Leather Living
Room Set, Lawn Mower, Tele-
vision, Christmas Tree, Christ-
mas Ornaments, Christmas
Decorations, Home Interiors
Decorations, Tools, Girl Tod-
dler Clothes & Toys. Games,
Puzzles, Used High End
Bowling Balls & other Items.
NANTICOKE
Multi-Vendor Sale!
147 E. Main St., Former
Bartuska Furniture Bldg.
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-1
Vintage furniture, baby boy
clothes, holiday decor, dishes
& glassware, adult jeans, beer
trays & signs, HO trains, col-
lectibles & much more!
NANTICOKE
3 EAST NOBLE ST
MULTI FAMILY SALE
SAT. 9/7, 7:30am- 2pm
Toys, boys & girl's clothes all
sizes, household, items,
Halloween costumes, video
games & more.
NANTICOKE
Honey Pot Section
Garage Sale
132 Garfield Street, across
from playground
Fri & Sat, 6 & 7 8-3
Sharke steam mop, (NIB), tow-
els, curtains, household, holi-
day items, clothes & more!
NANTICOKE
LEXINGTON
VILLAGE
AGOSTINA DRIVE
COMMUNITY YARD SALE
Sat., Sept 7, 9-1
Lots of Great Stuff!
NUANGOLA
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
630 Nuangola Road
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-1
Kitchen chairs, books, DVD's,
jewelry & lots more!
Yard Sale
PITTSTON
YARD SALE
156 Williams Street
Sat., Sept 7th, 9-3
Girl's clothes, shoes & boots,
winter coats, toys & bike &
much more!
PITTSTON
GARAGE
SALE
351 South Main Street
Sat & Sun., Sept 7 & 8, 8-4
Appliances, furniture, clothing
tools, boat, electric motors,
doors & windows. Too Many
Items to List! Rain or Shine.
PITTSTON TWP.
HUGE GARAGE SALE
110 Sterling Street, off Oak St.
Sat., Sept 7th, 8-2
Furniture, home decor, house-
hold, clothes, games & much,
much more!
PITTSTON
YARD SALE
12 Curtis Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-3
Adult & kid's bikes, tools, cloth-
ing, housewares, printer, large
fi sh tank, basketbal l back-
board & net, 3 seat wooden
rocker, toilet, computer desk,
golf bag & clubs & much more!
PLAINS
104 Powell Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-2
Kids clothes 0-4T, stroller
system, toys, electric guitar
and much more!
PLAINS
Multi-Family Garage Sale!
15 Skidmore Street
Sat. & Sun 9/7 & 9/8
9am to 3 pm
Motorcycle, tools, housewares,
furniture, hand-made jewelry,
etc. RAIN OR SHINE.
PLAINS
33 WARNER ST. Sat., 8-4.
HH items, antique cedar chest.
Dale Earnhardt die cast cars,
toys. Something for all!.
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
166 North Main St.
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-4
bedroom suit, rocker, tables,
collectibles, household and
Much Much More!
PLYMOUTH
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
Rear 40-42 ACADEMY
Sat & sun, 7 & 8, 9-4
Furniture, small appliances,
tires, back packs, tents, cloth-
ing, baby items & much more!
PLYMOUTH
ROAST CHICKEN
DINNER
First Reformed Church
33 Willow St.
Sat., Sept. 7th, 3-6
$8 ADULTS/$4 CHILDREN
Take Outs Available
PITTSTON
St. John's
Lutheran
Church
7 Wood Street
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Pig Roast
Sat., Sept. 7, 2013, 3-6 p.m.
Games, Raffles and Theme
Baskets
TICKET PRICES:
$20 with Beer
$15 with Soda
Kids: $10 (Ages 6-10)
Under 5: Free
CONTACT:
JoeMerc10@aol.com
Subject Box: Pig Roast, or
leave a message
570-655-2505
TICKETS-QUESTIONS
DIRECTIONS
KINGSTON
Grace
Episcopal
Church
RUMMAGE
SALE
Butler St. behind Dairy Queen
THURSDAY 9/5 9-3
FRIDAY 9/6 9-12
BAG DAY
WILKES-BARRE
YARD SALE
54 Penn Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 9-3
Tools, furniture, lamps, pic-
tures, tapestry, electronics,
CD's, curtains, blinds, house-
hold, rugs, jewelry, printers. No
Early Birds! 970-8065
WILKES-BAARE
YARD SALE
111 West River street
Sat., Sept 7th, 9-3
Tabl es, chai rs, el ectroni cs,
jewelry, toys & clothes (wed-
di ng gown), househol d &
much, much more!
Yard Sale
SCRANTON
/GREENRIDGE
ESTATE SALE
2223 Capouse Avenue
Sat & Sun, Sept 7 & 8, 9-6
Entire contents of a 4 floor
home & back & front yard
owned by former collectors,
dealers & national artists.
Sale includes beautiful an-
tiques, Depression, Deco,
vintage, retro, modern & col-
lectibles. Furniture, porcel-
ai n, cryst al , Depressi on
etched & other glassware,
china, Rosenthal, Haviland,
Limoges, Belleek, Francis-
can, Lenox, Asian, Bavarian,
Fenton, Lefton, decorative,
this artist wall art & other
wall art, lighting, house &
cookware, utensils. Jewelry,
religious, curtains, bedding,
carpeti ng, cl othi ng & ac-
cessories, cameras, video,
electronics, stereo, speak-
ers, copier, heaters, air con-
di t i oners, vi ol i ns, CD' s,
DVD' s, t apes, r ecor ds,
stands, cabinets (office & kit-
chen), drafting tables, book
shelves, Christmas, season-
al, crafts, books, (art & oth-
er), collectors vintage bi-
cycles, patio furniture. lawn
& garden, garden art, bird
baths, handicapped metal
ramps, snow blower, freezer,
tools, electric & other, power
washers, industrial reserve
gasoline tank with cradle,
brass filler & events & much
much more! 1,000's of items
in this home, you will need
time to get through it. Fab-
ulous Sale, Don't Miss! DIR:
81 S. to exi t 188 toward
Dunmore, turn left onto N.
Bl akel ey St., ri ght on W.
Drinker St., W. Drinker St.
becomes Electric St. Turn
right on to N. Washington
Ave. turn left on to Grand-
view. Take 2nd right onto
Capouse, house is just past
Woodlawn St. Take 81 N. to-
wards Dunmore & Car-
bondale, exit 186 Drinker St.
toward Dunmore, turn left on
to E. Drinker St., E. Drinker
St. becomes Electric St, turn
right on to N. Washington
Ave, turn left on to Grand-
view. take 2nd right on to
Capouse Ave, house is just
past Woodlawn St.
SHAVERTOWN
38 Harford Avenue
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-2
Twin poster bed, tools, toys,
glassware, some antiques,
holiday, weight bench, lawn
mower and Much More!
SHAVERTOWN
28 E. Meadows St.
Chase Manor
Sat., Sept. 7th, 9-4
Lamps, tools, DVD player,
Household items, ceramics,
holiday items, much more!
SHAVERTOWN
126 Hillcrest Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-1
309 to E. Center to
Goeringer to Hillcrest.
SHAVERTOWN
YARD SALE
112 LINCOLN DRIVE
Sat., Sept. 7th 9am-3pm
bedroom set, kitchen table with
4 chairs, buffet/hutch, 2 love
seats, play set & more
SLOCUM TOWNSHIP
565 Lily Lake Road
1 Mile from Mud Pond, Look
for Green Signs!
Fri.,7-7 & Sat., 7-Noon
WILKES-BARRE
YARD SALE!
252 S. Sheridan St.
Off Empire Street
Fri. & Sat., Sept. 6 & 7, 8-3
Antiques, household, furniture,
yard, clothing & much more!
WILKES-BARRE
45 Division Street
Sat., Sept. 7, 8-3
Advertisements, baby furniture
& clothes, collectibles, exer-
cise equipment, games, beer
memorabilia, toys, furniture
and hundreds of items!
WILKES-BARRE
Garage Sale
167 Laird Street
Fri. & Sat., Sept. 6 & 7, 8-3
Household items, furniture,
better clothes & much more!
WILKES-BARRE
MOVING SALE
14 Tenbrook Street
Sat., Sept 7, 8-12
Furniture, appliances, tools,
clothing and More!
813-731-9277
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
250 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd.
Across from Applebees
near carlot
Sun. Sept. 8, 8:30AM-2pm
Get all the advertising inserts
with the latest sales.
Call 829-5000 to start your home delivery.
F U N N I E S FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA

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