Training Manual

BLOCK MODELLING
VULCAN 4 – Block Model Training Manual
Copyright © 2002 Maptek Pty Limited
All rights reserved. No part of this manual shall be reproduced, 
stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted by any means – electronic, 
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise – without written 
permission from Maptek Pty Ltd.  No patent liability is assumed with 
respect to the use of the information contained herein.  Although 
every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this manual, 
the publisher and author(s) assume no responsibility for errors or 
omissions.  Neither is any liability assumed for damages resulting 
from the use of the information contained herein.
Trademarks
Microsoft Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft 
Corporation.
AutoCAD is a registered trademark of AutoDesk.
Conventions used in this manual
The following conventions are used throughout this manual.
Examples are written in bold italics.
Important points or references are written in bold.
Tip!
Hints, tips and warnings appear between horizontal lines.
i
Contacting Maptek
Corporate
Web: http://www.maptek.com.au
VULCAN product
Website: http://www.vulcan3d.com
Sales
Email: Australia:  info@maptek.com.au
North America:  info@maptek.com
South America:  info@maptek.cl
Europe:  info@maptek.co.uk
Web: http://www.maptek.com.au/contact/contact.html
Telephone: Australia:  61­8­8338 9222
North America:  1­303­763 4919
South America:  56­2­234 4608
Europe:  44­115­947 2000
Support
Email: Australia:  support@maptek.com.au
North America:  support@maptek.com
South America:  suporte@maptek.cl
Europe:  tech@maptek.co.uk
Web: http://www.maptek.com.au/services/services_email.html
Telephone: Australian:  61­8­6211 0000
North America:  1­303­763 4919
South America:  56­2­234 4608
ii
Europe:  44­115­947 2000
iii
Contents
Table of Contents
VULCAN 4 – Block Model Training Manual ........................................................... . i
Table of Contents ...................................................................................................... . iv
Table of Figures .................................................................................................... .... vii
CHAPTER 1 - BLOCK CONSTRUCTION IN VULCAN .................................. 1
What is a Block Model?.......................................................................... .................2
Why do we use Block Models?......................................................... .......................2
Advantages of using block models .............................................................. .............. 2
How do you create a block model in VULCAN?....................................... .............2
Block Construction............................................................................................. ......3
1.1 Create a Block Definition File (.bdf) ............................................................ ....... 3
1.1.5.1 Inversion Examples:................................................................7
1.1.5.2 Projection Axes:......................................................................7
1.2 Create the Block Model .................................................................... ................... 9
Workshop: Creating your first model......................................................... ............9
1. The model origin and orientation (Orientation Panel) ........................................ 10
4. Creating the model: .............................................................................. ................ 11
CHAPTER 2 – VIEWING BLOCKS IN VULCAN .......................................... 13
VULCAN Block Viewing Methods............................................................ ............12
Reasons for Viewing Block Models....................................................................... .12
Getting Information about your Block Models.................................. ..................12
2.1 Getting a List of your Block Models ...................................................... ........... 12
2.2 Opening Your Block Model ................................................................... ............ 13
2.3 Displaying the Block Model Header Information ............................................. 13
Block Viewing....................................................................................... ..................13
2.4 Generating Contours of the Block Model ......................................................... 13
CHAPTER 3 – BLOCK MANIPULATION ..................................................... 16
3.1 Editing a Block Model ......................................................................... .............. 16
3.2 Performing a Calculation on the Block Model ................................................. . 16
iv
Contents
3.3 Mining the Block Model .......................................................................... .......... 17
3.4 Using Scripts ................................................................................... ................... 17
3.4.3.1 Comparison operators:..........................................................18
3.4.3.2 Logical operators:.................................................................18
3.4.3.3 Assignment operators............................................................18
3.4.3.4 Mathematical operators.........................................................18
Workshop Exercise: Scripts........................................................................... ........20
1. Plan your calculation ..................................................................................... ....... 20
2. Document your work: ..................................................................... ..................... 21
3. Document Temporary Variables .......................................................................... . 21
3.5 Adding Block Model Variables ................................................................... ....... 21
3.6 Deleting Variables from a Block Model .................................................. .......... 22
3.7 Renaming Variables in a Block Model ................................................... ........... 22
3.8 Translating a Block Model ........................................................................... ...... 22
3.9 Rotating a Block Model ........................................................................ ............. 22
3.10 Indexing a Block Model ................................................................................. .. 23
3.11 Assigning Values to a Block Model ......................................................... ........ 23
CHAPTER FOUR – BLOCK TRANSFER ..................................................... 25
4.1 Importing a Regular Block Model ............................................................. ........ 25
4.2 Importing a Sub-blocked Block Model ............................................................. 26
4.3 Importing Attributes into a Block Model .......................................................... 27
4.4 Exporting a Block Model ............................................................................ ....... 29
4.5 Export Variables to a Map File ......................................................... ................. 30
4.6 Intersect a Drill Hole Database .................................................................. ........ 34
4.7 Block Model Addition ................................................................................... ..... 35
Workshop - Block Manipulation, Add.............................................. ....................40
4.8 Regularising a block model ........................................................... .................... 40
4.9 Deleting Blocks from a block model ......................................................... ........ 46
4.10 Extracting Blocks to a new Block Model .................................................... .... 48
CHAPTER 5 - INVERSE DISTANCE GRADE ESTIMATION ....................... 50
Grade Estimation in VULCAN............................................................................. .50
What is Grade Estimation? ................................................................. ..................... 50
Why use Grade Estimation? .................................................................................. ... 50
How do we use Grade Estimation in VULCAN? ................................................... . 50
CHAPTER 6 – BLOCK RESERVES ............................................................. 51
Overview – Reserves submenu........................................................... ...................51
v
Contents
6.1 Simple Reserves ................................................................................... .............. 51
6.2 Block Reserves ........................................................................................ .......... 56
6.3. Advanced Reserves ........................................................................ ................... 64
6.3.3.1 Select Polygons as Regions..................................................70
6.3.3.2 Select triangulations as regions.............................................73
6.3.7.1 Open report specification file................................................77
6.3.7.2 Define General Report Details..............................................78
6.3.7.3 Define Column specs............................................................79
6.3.7.4 Define Table Details..............................................................82
6.3.7.5 Save the specification file.....................................................84
6.3.7.6 Reporting the reserves..........................................................85
Workshop - Block Reserves................................................................ ...................86
vi
Figures
Table of Figures
FIGURE 1-1: BLOCK MODEL SLICE............................................................1
FIGURE 1-2: REGULAR BLOCK MODEL.....................................................2
FIGURE 1-3: BLOCK MENU..........................................................................3
FIGURE 1-4: BLOCK MODEL UTILITY - ORIENTATION PANEL.................3
FIGURE 1-5: BLOCK MODEL UTILITY – SCHEMES PANEL.......................4
FIGURE 1-6: BLOCK MODEL UTILITY – VARIABLES PANEL....................5
FIGURE 1-7:BLOCK MODEL UTILITY – LIMITS PANEL..............................6
FIGURE 1-8: BLOCK MODEL UTILITY – BOUNDARIES PANEL................7
FIGURE 1-9: INVERSION WITH 3D (SOLID) TRIANGULATIONS................7
FIGURE 1-13: PROJECTION ALONG THE Y AXIS.......................................8
FIGURE 1-15: BLOCK MODEL UTILITY – EXCEPTIONS PANEL...............8
FIGURE 1-16: BLOCK MODEL ORIENTATION PANEL..............................10
FIGURE 1-17: ADD SCHEMA PANEL.........................................................10
FIGURE 1-18: ADD VARIABLE PANEL.......................................................11
FIGURE 1-19: BLOCK CREATE PANEL.....................................................11
FIGURE 2-1: MULTIPLE BLOCK MODEL SLICES.....................................13
vii
Contents
FIGURE 2-3: REPORT WINDOW SHOWING BLOCK MODEL DETAILS. .15
FIGURE 2-4: BLOCK CONTOURS PANEL.................................................15
FIGURE 3-1: BLOCK EDIT PANEL..............................................................16
FIGURE 3-2: BLOCK CALCULATION PANEL............................................16
FIGURE 3-3: STOPE MINING PANEL.........................................................17
FIGURE 3-4: ADD BLOCK MODEL VARIABLE PANEL.............................21
FIGURE 3-5: BLOCK MODEL CHANGE VARIABLE NAME PANEL..........22
FIGURE 3-6: BLOCK MODEL TRANSLATION PANEL..............................22
FIGURE 3-7: BLOCK MODEL ROTATION PANEL......................................23
FIGURE 3-8: INDEX BLOCK MODEL PANEL.............................................23
FIGURE 3-9: ASSIGN BLOCK VALUES PANEL.........................................24
FIGURE 1-4: REGULAR IMPORT PANEL...................................................26
FIGURE 4-2: SUB-BLOCKED IMPORT PANEL..........................................27
FIGURE 4-3: IMPORT ATTRIBUTES INTO MODEL PANEL.......................28
FIGURE 4-4: BLOCK MODEL EXPORT PANEL.........................................29
FIGURE 4-5: THE MASK BLOCK MODEL PANEL.....................................31
FIGURE 4-6: LOAD SAMPLES DATABASE PANEL...................................33
viii
Contents
FIGURE 4-7: INTERSECT DRILLING PANEL.............................................34
FIGURE 4-8: DB INTERSECTION RECORD PANEL..................................34
FIGURE 4-9: DB INTERSECTION FIELDS PANEL.....................................35
FIGURE 4-10: NEW DEFINITION PANEL....................................................36
FIGURE 4-11: BLOCK MODEL PARENT SCHEME PANEL.......................37
FIGURE 4-12: ADD VARIABLE PANEL.......................................................38
FIGURE 4-13: BLOCK MODEL ADD PANEL..............................................39
FIGURE 4-14: MODEL REBLOCKING PANEL...........................................40
FIGURE 4-15: REBLOCKING DIMENSIONS PANEL..................................41
FIGURE 4-16: RESULTING VARIABLES PANEL........................................41
FIGURE 4-17: COMMON BLOCKS..............................................................43
FIGURE 4-18 –REGULAR BLOCK (R), SUB-BLOCKS (S1, S2, S3 AND
S4) AND COMMON BLOCKS (C1, C2, C3 AND C4)...................................45
FIGURE 4-19: BLOCK SELECTION PANEL...............................................46
FIGURE 4-20 BLOCK EXTRACTION PANEL..............................................49
FIGURE 6-1: RESERVES SUBMENU..........................................................51
FIGURE 6-2: RESERVES CALCULATION PANEL.....................................52
FIGURE 6-3: RESERVES CUT-OFFS PANEL.............................................52
ix
Contents
FIGURE 6-4: BLOCK SELECTION PANEL.................................................53
FIGURE 6-6: RESERVES REPORT.............................................................54
FIGURE 6-7: POLYGON RESERVE PANEL................................................55
FIGURE 6-8: CONFIRM BOX.......................................................................55
FIGURE 6-9: DATA SOURCES ...................................................................56
FIGURE 6-10: GRADE NAMES PANEL.......................................................57
FIGURE 6-11: BREAKDOWN NAMES PANEL............................................57
FIGURE 6-12: GRADE CUT-OFFS PANEL..................................................57
FIGURE 6-13: SOLID MODEL LIST PANEL................................................58
FIGURE 6-14: SOLID MODEL LIST PANEL WITH TRIANGULATIONS.....58
FIGURE 6-15: PICK DATA SOURCE PANEL..............................................58
FIGURE 6-16: BLOCK MODEL PANEL.......................................................59
FIGURE 6-17: BLOCK MODEL GRADE VARIABLES PANEL...................59
FIGURE 6-18: BLOCK MODEL BREAKDOWN VARIABLES PANEL........60
FIGURE 6-19: SAVE REPORT FORMAT PANEL........................................60
FIGURE 6-20: COMPLETE REPORT PANEL..............................................61
FIGURE 6-21: RESERVE LISTING SHOWING A COMPLETE REPORT. . .61
x
Contents
FIGURE 6-22: RESERVE LISTING SHOWING AN ABOVE CUT-OFF
REPORT....................................................................................................... .62
FIGURE 6-23: UNFORMATTED DUMP PANEL...........................................62
FIGURE 6-24: RESERVE LISTING SHOWING A DUMP REPORT.............63
FIGURE 6-25: OPEN RESERVES SPECIFICATION FILE PANEL.............65
FIGURE 6-26: BREAKDOWN FIELDS PANEL............................................65
FIGURE 6-27: A BLOCK INSIDE A RESERVE REGION THAT HAS BEEN
0.3 MINED (70% AVAILABLE).....................................................................67
FIGURE 6-28: A BLOCK 50% INSIDE A RESERVE REGION THAT HAS
BEEN 0.3 MINED (70% AVAILABLE)..........................................................68
FIGURE 6-29: SECOND BREAKDOWN FIELDS PANEL...........................68
FIGURE 6-30: GRADE VARIABLES PANEL...............................................69
FIGURE 6-31: GRADE CUT-OFFS PANEL..................................................70
FIGURE 6-32: DEFINE REGIONS BY POLYGON PANEL..........................71
FIGURE 6-33: MULTIPLE SELECTION BOX..............................................72
FIGURE 6-34: CONFIRM BOX.....................................................................72
FIGURE 6-35: RENAME REGION PANEL...................................................73
FIGURE 6-36:SELECT TRIANGULATIONS PANEL...................................73
FIGURE 6-37: SET GROUP NAME PANEL.................................................73
xi
Contents
FIGURE 6-38: RESERVE REGION REPORT PANEL.................................74
FIGURE 6-39: BLOCK SELECTION PANEL...............................................74
FIGURE 6-40: SAVE RESERVES SPECIFICATION FILE PANEL..............76
FIGURE 6-41: CALCULATE RESERVES PANEL.......................................77
FIGURE 6-42: OPEN REPORT SPECIFICATION FILE PANEL..................77
FIGURE 6-43: GLOBAL REPORT PARAMETERS PANEL........................78
FIGURE 6-44: REPORT COLUMNS PANEL...............................................79
FIGURE 6-45: REPORT TABLES PANEL...................................................83
FIGURE 6-46: SAVE REPORT SPECIFICATION FILE PANEL...................85
FIGURE 6-47: CREATE REPORT PANEL...................................................85
xii
Chapter 1 Block Construction
Chapter 1 - Block Construction in VULCAN
Figure 1­1: Block Model Slice
1
Use conditions 
(exceptions) to 
remove blocks
Use sub­blocking to increase 
accuracy along contacts
Define regions using 
Triangulations
Use large parent 
blocks to 
minimise the 
block model 
size.
Limit the 
maximum block 
size within 
regions
Automatic 
block 
optimisation
What is a Block Model?
• A block model is a series of 
"blocks" or "cells" that 
collectively define a larger 
block. Each block defines 
an exact piece of 3D space.
• Each cell can be assigned 
a series of attributes, eg 
grade, geological code, 
metallurgical code or 
geotechnical code that 
represent the physical 
properties of the deposit. 
In this way a complete 
"model" of the deposit can 
be produced.
Figure 1­2: Regular Block 
Model
Why do we use Block
Models?
Advantages of using block
models
• A block model is a very 
efficient data structure in 
which to store a large 
amount of information.
• Very flexible construction 
methods allow you to 
create a model that 
accurately represents the 
geological and mining 
conditions.
• Allows excellent 
visualisation of geological 
zones or grade trends 
within an orebody.
• The increased use of 
geostatistical methods to 
express grade distribution 
requires a block model 
structure to store the 
results of the estimation.
• Rapid calculations between 
the values within variables 
allow effective 
resource/reserve estimates 
to be undertaken.
How do you create a
block model in
VULCAN?
Creating a block model in 
VULCAN typically consists of 
the following steps:
2
1. Construct the model 
(Construction submenu).
2. Verify the model by slicing 
contouring etc. (Viewing 
submenu).
3. Perform calculations, add 
variables, etc. 
(Manipulation submenu).
4. Interpolate grades into the 
model (Grade Estimation 
submenu).
5. Report the Resource 
(Reserves submenu).
Figure 1­3: Block Menu
Block Construction
The block construction 
process typically consists of 
two steps;
1. Create a block definition 
file (.bdf) (Block > 
Construction > New 
option).
2. Create the block model 
(Block > Construction > 
Create Model option).
1.1 Create a Block Definition
File (.bdf)
The New Definition option 
allows you to create a new 
block definition file (.bdf). This 
file stores all the parameters 
required for the construction 
of a VULCAN block model. 
When the option is selected, 
the Block Model Utility is 
started.
Figure 1­4: Block Model 
Utility ­ Orientation Panel
3
1.1.1 Origin and Orientation
The origin is commonly either 
the minimum point of the 
model or the map grid origin 
(0, 0, 0). It can, however, be 
any value.
Orientating the model to 
match the overall orientation 
of the deposit will generally 
result in better edge definition 
between geological zones, 
producing fewer blocks.
Orient the model by entering 
absolute and relative rotations 
about the three axes.
Notes:
• All rotations are measured 
anti­clockwise. If clockwise 
rotations are required, 
then use negative angles.
• Bearing, Plunge and Dip 
are not used with their 
geological definitions, but 
rather refer to rotations 
around the axes.
• For a rotated model it is 
easier to use the minimum 
co­ordinates of the model 
for the origin.
• For Block Addition the 
models must have the 
same orientation.
1.1.2 Block Model Offsets, Parent
Block Size and sub-blocking
The Schemes panel allows 
you to define the model 
extents, i.e. the start and end 
offsets that define the 3D 
aerial extent of the model, 
parent block size and extent, 
and block size of any sub­
block areas.
Figure 1­5: Block Model 
Utility – Schemes Panel
The first row in the table must 
be the Parent Scheme. 
Notes:
• If the model origin is 
(0,0,0) then the start and 
end offsets are the co­
ordinates of the minimum 
and maximum points of 
the model. If the model 
origin is the minimum 
point of the model, then 
the start and end offsets 
are the distances relative 
to the origin in order to 
define the 3D extent of the 
model.
4
• The parent block size must 
be a divisor of the model 
extent. If the parent block 
size does not fit exactly 
within the model extent, 
you are notified and 
prompted to adjust the 
extent.
• Subsequent rows in the 
table are for any sub­block 
areas. Specify the 
minimum block sizes in 
the “Block X, Y and Z” 
fields. If the sub­blocking 
is to take place in a sub­
region of the block model, 
then enter start and end 
offsets.
• Additional sub­blocking 
extents may be defined 
within the model if 
required.
• The sub­blocking extents 
must not exceed the model 
extents.
• Sub­blocking minimum 
sizes should be kept to a 
reasonable resolution to 
define the boundaries. The 
smaller the sub­blocking 
size the larger the model. 
This will affect computer 
performance and the time 
taken to create or modify 
the block model.
• Sub­blocking maximum 
sizes must not exceed the 
parent block size.
• Sub­blocking sizes must 
be a divisor of the parent 
block size.
1.1.3 Variable Names and Default
Values
The Variables panel allows 
you to specify all variables to 
be created in the model.  You 
must also specify the data 
type and a default value for 
each variable.  The description 
is optional.
Figure 1­6: Block Model 
Utility – Variables Panel
Notes:
• Variable names should 
never start with a numeric 
value.
• Keep variable names as 
short as possible.
• Select the data type most 
appropriate to the 
requirements of the 
variable. As some data 
types use more memory 
than others, selecting an 
inappropriate data type 
could result in much larger 
5
block models than 
necessary.
• Variables used for 
estimation must be either 
"float" or "double" data 
type.
1.1.4 Define the Limits of the
Block Sizes by Variables
The Limits panel allows you 
to specify a maximum block 
size for blocks of predefined 
values. Values are assigned 
using the Boundaries panel.
For example, within a 
particular ore zone the block 
limits may be 5, 2.5, 2.5. 
Whereas in another ore zone 
the block limits may be 1,1,1.
Figure 1­7:Block Model 
Utility – Limits Panel
Notes:
• A block will have this limit 
applied if the variable 
value is equal to that 
specified in the panel. You 
may therefore use many 
different limit values to 
define accurately the zones 
in the model.
• The maximum block size 
must lie between the 
smallest sub­block size 
and the parent block size. 
Hence you must have 
defined sub­blocks.
• The maximum block size 
must be a divisor of the 
parent block size. 
1.1.5 Boundaries
The Boundaries panel allows 
you to apply attributes to 
blocks based on their position 
relative to triangulations. This 
option also allows sub­
blocking to be performed. 
For example, a geological code 
may be applied if a block lies 
within a solid triangulation 
defining the geological region.
Priority levels are assigned to 
resolve areas of conflict 
between triangulations; the 
higher the value the higher 
the priority. The highest value 
allowable is 9999.
Inversion and projection along 
an axis are used to determine 
the area of interest relative to 
a triangulation.
6
Figure 1­8: Block Model 
Utility – Boundaries Panel
Notes:
• Wildcards may be used 
when listing triangulation 
names.
• Partial inversion is only 
used with surface 
triangulations.
• The higher priority value 
takes precedence over the 
lower.
1.1.5.1 Inversion Examples:
Figure 1­9: Inversion with 
3D (Solid) Triangulations
Figure 1­10: Inversion with 
2D (Surface) Triangulations
1.1.5.2 Projection Axes:
The projection axis defines the 
direction for a surface and has 
no effect when working with 
solids. The projection axis 
option is used in situations 
where steeply dipping 
structures define regions.
Figure 1­11: Projection Axes
If No inversion is selected the 
negative side of the 
triangulation is the area of 
interest. If Partial or Complete 
inversion is selected the 
positive side of the 
triangulation is the area of 
interest.
For triangulations (ore bodies) 
that are steeply dipping, it 
may be necessary to project 
along the X or Y axes to 
7
ensure the correct inversion is 
applied. 
Figure 1­12: Projection 
along the X axis
Figure 1­13: Projection 
along the Y axis
For triangulations (ore bodies) 
that are near to horizontal i.e. 
lying in the XY plane, a 
projection along the Z axis 
may be more suitable. The 
area of interest is then below 
the triangulation if No 
inversion or above if Partial or 
Complete is selected. 
Figure 1­14: Projection 
along the Z axis
1.1.6 Exceptions
The Exceptions panel allows 
you to specify conditions that 
will result in those blocks that 
match the condition being 
removed.
For example, if the exception, 
topo eq "air", is used then all 
blocks where the variable 
"topo" has the value "air" will 
be removed from the model.
Figure 1­15: Block Model 
Utility – Exceptions Panel
Notes:
• Removing unnecessary 
blocks from the model will 
reduce the size of the 
model resulting in better 
computer performance.
8
• Remember that if you 
simply use the topography 
triangulation to remove 
blocks, then you may be 
discarding some blocks 
that are required for 
accurate reserves, 
scheduling etc.  To avoid 
this, make a copy of your 
topography triangulation, 
translate it to a height 
about twice the block 
height above the 
topography triangulation 
and then use this copy for 
the exception.
1.1.7 Saving the Block Definition
File
The Block Model Utility > 
File > Save As option allows 
you to save the block 
definition file. The maximum 
size of the definition file name 
is 20 alphanumeric 
characters.
1.2 Create the Block Model
The Create Model option 
(either the Block > 
Construction > Create Model 
or the Block Model Utility > 
Model > Create Model) allows 
you to build the model.
Once all the required 
parameters have been entered 
using the New Definition 
option, simply specify the 
block definition file name 
(.bdf) and the name for the 
model.  By default the 
definition file that is currently 
loaded is displayed in the 
panel and a block file name 
that matches the definition file 
name is suggested.
The index model option 
should be selected to allow the 
generation of a block model 
index.  A block model index 
will allow much faster access 
to the model for future 
processing.  If the block model 
is large, then the creation of 
the index may take some time.
The block model creation 
process is run in a shell 
window, thus allowing you to 
continue working within 
VULCAN.
Workshop: Creating
your first model
The aim of this workshop is to 
create a number of models 
that demonstrate the various 
options available.  We will 
create a simple regular model 
and then introduce some 
simple viewing techniques so 
that you may verify the model.
Work at your own pace. Use 
the manual if required or ask 
9
the MAPTEK staff for 
assistance.
1. The model origin and
orientation (Orientation Panel)
Enter the origin co­ordinates 
and the Rotation angle:
X origin coordinate:
77900.000
Y origin coordinate:
4300.000
Z origin coordinate:
300.000
Bearing:
62
Figure 1­16: Block Model 
Orientation Panel
This will create a model 
trending 62°, with horizontal 
plunge and dip.
2. The model dimensions
(Schemes Panel)
Enter the start offset: 
Start X Offset:
0.000
Start Y Offset:
 0.000
Start Z offset:
0.000
Enter the End offset: 
End X Offset:
810.000
End Y Offset:
330.000
End Z Offset:
600.000
Enter the parent block size: 
Block X Size:
30.000
Block Y Size:
30.000
Block Z Size:
30.000
Figure 1­17: Add Schema 
Panel
This will define a model 810 ×
330 × 600 metres.
10
Select File > Save As.
Enter the block definition file 
name:
File Name:
first
3. Adding variables (Variables
Panel)
Enter:
Variable name:
geol
Select the data type:
name
Enter the default value:
air
Enter the description:
geological code
Figure 1­18: Add Variable 
Panel
This model will only have one 
variable called ‘geol’ with a 
value equal to ‘air’.
Select File > Save.
4. Creating the model:
Select Model > Create Model.
Enter the model name:
first
Enter the definition file 
name:
first
Figure 1­19: Block Create 
Panel
Select OK to build the model.
When the model has been 
created use the Block Viewing 
­ slice and blocks options to 
verify the model.
Now that you have created 
your first model you may like 
to experiment with the other 
options available. Try the 
following examples. Either 
build on previous models by 
editing the .bdf or create new 
block definition files.
A regular model with origin at 
model minimum
A regular model ­ rotated
A regular model ­ plunged
A regular model ­ dipped
A sub­blocked model using 
solid triangulations
11
A sub­blocked model using 
surface triangulations
A sub­blocked model using 
both solid and surface 
triangulations
A sub­blocked model using 
limits
A sub­blocked model using 
exceptions
Finally create a model, which 
we will use for grade 
estimation, using some or all 
of these options.
12
Chapter 2: Block Viewing
Chapter 2 – Viewing Blocks in VULCAN
Figure 2­1: Multiple Block Model Slices
13
VULCAN Block Viewing
Methods
VULCAN allows you to display 
the block model in a variety of 
ways.
You may:
• Display the block model 
extents.
• Slice the model at any 
orientation.
• Slice the model 
dynamically.
• Display multiple slices.
• Load blocks as 3D boxes, 
rectangles or crosses.
• Contour the model.
• Interrogate the model 
directly.
Reasons for Viewing
Block Models
After a block model has been 
created it must be verified. 
Common types of checks 
performed include:
• Blocks have been created 
in the correct place.
• Blocks are of the correct 
size.
• Sub­blocking has 
performed as expected.
• Variable values have been 
assigned correctly.
• Check for "leaks".
After grade estimation the 
model is viewed again to verify 
the estimation process. The 
model may be viewed at any 
time to gain information.
Getting Information
about your Block
Models
The Block menu contains 
options that allow you to
• List the block models in 
your working directory 
(Block > Directory).
• Open a block model (Block 
> Open).
• Display the block model 
header information (Block 
> Header).
2.1 Getting a List of your Block
Models
The Directory option allows 
you to display a list of the 
block models in your working 
directory.
12
Figure 2­2: Report Window showing block model directory listing
2.2 Opening Your Block Model
The Open option allows you to 
open a block model. You can 
also use the  Open button 
on the Standard toolbar or the 
Open Block Model button 
on the Open toolbar to Open 
Block models.
The standard Windows Open 
Panel is displayed. 
Use the Look in field to 
navigate to the directory in 
which the block model is 
stored.
From the Files of Type field 
select Vulcan Block Models. 
Note this is only necessary if 
you used the Open button on 
the Standard toolbar.
Select the block model to open 
and select Open.
Note:
• You can only have one 
block model open at a 
time.
2.3 Displaying the Block Model
Header Information
The Header option allows you 
to view general information 
about the model.
The information includes:
• Model name
• Number of blocks
• Number of variables
• Model origin
• Model orientation
• Creation/Edit date
• Variable defaults
• Translation tables
• Model schemes
Block Viewing
2.4 Generating Contours of the
Block Model
The Contour option allows 
you to contour any variable in 
the model in any plane. One 
or more sections may be 
contoured at any time. Zonal 
contours may be created.
Note:
13
• Contours are restricted to 
values in the plane being 
contoured.
• Use "continuous contours" 
to take care of blocks with 
default values.
• Displaying contours as 
underlays will assist in 
graphics performance.
• Contour intervals are 
controlled by those set out 
in the contour legend 
scheme. See Analyse > 
Legend Edit if you do not 
have a contour legend 
scheme.
14
14
Figure 2­3: Report Window showing block model details
Figure 2­4: Block Contours panel
15
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
Chapter 3 – Block
Manipulation
The Manipulation submenu 
allows you to:
• Edit variable values.
• Perform one­line 
calculations.
• ‘Mine’ the block model 
using triangulations.
• Perform multi­line 
calculations using scripts.
• Add, delete and rename 
variables.
• Translate or rotate the 
block model.
• Index the block model for 
faster access.
• Assign values to a block 
model.
3.1 Editing a Block Model
The Edit option allows you to 
edit the value of a variable in 
any block within the model. 
Simply click on the block you 
want to edit, select the 
variable name and enter the 
new value in the edit panel.
Figure 3­1: Block Edit panel
3.2 Performing a Calculation on
the Block Model
The Calculation option allows 
you to perform a one­line 
calculation on any block 
within the model.  
Simply select the variable on 
which to perform the 
calculation and enter the 
equation to perform. 
For example, you might want 
to determine the dollar value 
of each block. 
Consider:
Variables:
au = gold grade (grams per 
tonne)
sg = density (tonnes/m
3
)
volume = volume (m
3
)
dollar = dollar value of block
Calculation:
(tonnes × au) × gold value per 
tonne – (tonnes × mining cost 
per tonne)
i.e. ((sg * volume) * au) * 34.00 
­ (sg * volume) * 40.0
Figure 3­2: Block 
Calculation Panel
16
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
3.3 Mining the Block Model
The Mine option allows you to 
mine out the block model 
against solid triangulations 
that represent the mined out 
zones of an ore body. This 
value can then be used in the 
advanced block reserve 
options.
A variable is required to store 
the mined value. You have the 
choice of storing the 
percentage of the block 
remaining or the fraction of 
the block mined. You also 
have the option of selecting 
blocks using the full cell or 
proportional cell evaluation 
methods.
Use full cell evaluation if you 
want to include those blocks 
whose centroid falls within the 
region. The entire block is 
selected.
Use proportional cell 
evaluation if you want to 
include those blocks that are 
(either fully or partially) in the 
region. The selected blocks are 
scaled according to the 
proportion of the block's 
volume that lies within the 
region.
Note:
• The proportional cell 
evaluation method applies 
only when restricting 
blocks using a bounding 
box, closed triangulation 
or bounding surfaces.
Figure 3­3: Stope Mining 
Panel
3.4 Using Scripts
3.4.1 Why use scripts in
VULCAN?
• allows you to perform 
complicated calculations 
on the block model.
• scripting can be used to 
modify existing variables in 
the model by acting on one 
or more variables at a 
time.
• examples of using scripts 
include calculating dollar 
values for use in Whittle 
3D, establishing percent of 
block mined and creating 
classification fields for 
reserve reporting.
• scripts can be stored as a 
record of the modifications 
to a block model and thus 
rerun or used as an audit 
trail.
17
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
3.4.2 Scripting Constructs
Scripts follow the basic 
construct shown below.
if ( expression )
then
statement
elseif ( expression )
then
statement
elseif ...
else
statement
endif
Note:
• "If" statements may be 
nested, but remember that 
each "if" must have its own 
"endif".
• Spaces and indents are 
optional, but help in 
legibility and debugging.
• The "elseif" and "else" 
statements are optional.
3.4.3 Operators
The operators below are just 
some that can be used with 
scripts.
3.4.3.1 Comparison operators:
Numeric:
eq equal to
ne not equal to
le less than or equal to
lt less than
ge greater than or equal 
to
gt greater than
Character:
eqs equal to string
nes not equal to string
3.4.3.2 Logical operators:
Use "and", "or" for complex 
conditions.
For example,
if ( au gt 0.5 and au
le 2.5 ) then
3.4.3.3 Assignment operators
= to assign a value
3.4.3.4 Mathematical operators
+ add
­ subtract
/ divide
* multiply
abs absolute
sqrt square root
sin sine
cos cosine
18
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation

Note:
• See the Online Help > 
Envisage > Core 
Appendices > Appendix D 
and H for additional 
information on scripting 
syntax and operators.
3.4.4 Example Script:
The example below assigns 
different values for "recovery" 
based on the value of the "geo" 
and "weathering" variables.
* demorecover.bcf
* block model calculation
script to define a
recovery
* factor based on "geo"
and "weathering".
*
* This script assumes
that the "recovery"
variable has been added
to the block model
*
* rec_103 = recovery
expected in geo = 3 and
weathering = 100
* rec_105 = recovery
expected in geo = 5 and
weathering = 100
* rec_203 = recovery
expected in geo = 3 and
weathering = 200
* rec_205 = recovery
expected in geo = 5 and
weathering = 200
* rec_0 = recovery
expected in non-ore zones
*
* Assign variable values
rec_103 = 0.833
rec_105 = 0.85
rec_203 = 0.97
rec_205 = 0.92
rec_0 = 0.00
if ( geo eq 3.0 ) then
if ( weathering eq
100.0 ) then
recovery = rec_103
elseif ( weathering
eq 200.0 ) then
recovery = rec_203
else
recovery = rec_0
endif
elseif (geo eq 5.0 ) then
if ( weathering eq
100.0 ) then
recovery = rec_105
elseif ( weathering
eq 200.0 ) then
recovery = rec_205
else
recovery = rec_0
endif
else
19
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
recovery = rec_0
endif
Note:
• Scripts are executed for 
each cell in turn.
• Any variable names may 
be used, but only those 
variables defined in the 
block model will save the 
results. i.e. Scripts allow 
the use of temporary 
variables to make the 
calculations easier to 
understand and 
implement.
• Comment lines may be 
used freely throughout the 
script. Simply begin the 
line with an asterisk.
• Scripts provide a good 
permanent record, or audit 
trail, of calculations 
performed on the block 
model.
Sequence of events:
• Geology supply block 
model with geology and 
grade variables.
• Add the required 
engineering and economic 
variables.
• Execute scripts to 
calculate the values of 
economic and engineering 
variables to aid in mine 
planning.
Workshop Exercise:
Scripts
Use one of the block models 
constructed earlier to 
calculate a dollar field for 
reporting and evaluation 
purposes.
1. Plan your calculation
a.  What variables will you 
need?
b.  What logic will best 
suit the calculation and 
cell selection?
c.  You may have to add 
your variable(s) first.
Note:
• Use units analysis to 
confirm that the value you 
are calculating is actually 
the quantity you want. i.e. 
Do you wish to calculate 
the total dollar value of 
each cell or the $/t value 
of the material?
20
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
2. Document your work:
a.  Include details such as 
your name, the date, the 
name of the script (so that 
if the script is printed out 
it can be identified), the 
purpose of the script and 
the model at which it was 
targeted.
b.  You may also include 
details of where this script 
fits into the mine planning 
data flow, and what 
variables were added to 
the "original" model to 
allow the script to run.
Note:
• Make the calculation as 
complex as you wish, but 
be liberal with comments 
(for your and other people’s 
reference). Also build the 
complex calculation up 
from a simple one. Confirm 
that each new part runs 
before doing more. 
3. Document Temporary
Variables
a.  Define all constants to 
be used as temporary 
variables at the head of 
the script. This makes 
editing and re­running 
scripts easier.
b.  Don’t forget to 
document different 
versions of scripts for 
reference.
Note:
• If you will be doing a 
complex calculation on a 
large or huge block model, 
then it may pay to extract 
a small section on which to 
test the scripts before you 
edit the real model.
3.5 Adding Block Model
Variables
The Add Variable option 
allows you to add variables to 
the block model. 
Figure 3­4: Add Block Model 
Variable panel
You must:
• Enter a new variable 
name.
• Select the type of data to 
be stored in the variable.
• Enter a default value.
21
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
• And enter an optional 
description for the 
variable.
On completion of the Add 
Block Model Variable panel, 
it is redisplayed, so that 
additional variables may be 
defined. When all variables are 
defined, cancel out of the 
panel. The variables will be 
added to the model.
3.6 Deleting Variables from a
Block Model
The Delete Variable option 
allows you to delete variables 
from a block model. 
Simply select the variable to 
be deleted from the variable 
list and select OK. 
Note:
• All data associated with 
the deleted variable is also 
removed.
3.7 Renaming Variables in a
Block Model
The Change Name option 
allows you to rename any 
existing variable in the block 
model:
• Select the variable to be 
renamed from the variable 
list.
• Enter the new name.
• Enter an optional variable 
description.
• Enter an optional default 
value.
Figure 3­5: Block Model 
Change Variable Name Panel
3.8 Translating a Block Model
The Translate option allows 
you to move a block model. 
Enter the X, Y and Z 
translation distances. The 
block model will then be 
moved (translated) the 
appropriate distance along 
each axis.
Figure 3­6: Block Model 
Translation Panel
3.9 Rotating a Block Model
The Rotate option allows you 
to rotate a block model about 
its origin. Simply enter the 
22
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
rotation angles for the X, Y 
and Z axes. All rotation angles 
are anti­clockwise. If clockwise 
rotation is required, then enter 
negative rotation angles.
Figure 3­7: Block Model 
Rotation Panel
Note:
• The rotation axes are the 
same as defined in the 
block construction area. 
Therefore the Bearing, 
Plunge and Dip do not 
have their normal 
structural definitions.
3.10 Indexing a Block Model
The Index option allows you to 
index a block model. Indexing 
a block model writes a spatial 
index of the block locations to 
the block model file, 
consequently allowing for 
faster access to the block 
model. If the structure of the 
block model changes in any 
way, the block model must be 
indexed again. Adding or 
deleting variables has no effect 
on the index of the block 
model.
Figure 3­8: Index Block 
Model Panel
Note:
• The index procedure 
requires an amount of disk 
space equal to the amount 
that the model already 
occupies. This means that 
if the model is 4Mb in size 
and only 3Mb is free you 
won't be able to index the 
model.
• When indexing the model 
you can choose to use the 
fast method, which is CPU 
intensive and stops you 
working in Envisage, or the 
slower method, which 
allows you to continue 
working in Envisage.
3.11 Assigning Values to a
Block Model
The Assign Values option 
allows you to assign block 
variable values from an input 
model to an output model. The 
block variable values are 
assigned based on their 
common block overlap and the 
calculation method chosen. 
23
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
The open block model 
(remember you can only have 
one block model open at a 
time) is the input model. You 
specify the output model on 
the Assign Block Values panel. 
You also specify the name of 
the block definition file (.bdf) 
that is to be created or edited 
in the assignment process.
Figure 3­9: Assign Block 
Values Panel
Note:
• The input and output 
model must have the same 
orientation (i.e. bearing, 
plunge and dip) and their 
parent (primary) block 
extents must overlap. If the 
output model extent is 
beyond the input model 
extent, input blocks on the 
edge will be assigned 
incorrect values due to the 
difference in volume. 
• All definition files are 
displayed in the definition 
file list, however, only 
those files created in a 
previous assign values 
procedure should be 
selected. 
• Load only an existing 
assignment definition file if 
it was created with the 
same input and output 
block model so that 
variable details match. 
Figure 3­10: Assignment 
Variables Panel
Name variable values in the 
output model are ignored, i.e. 
you cannot assign a value 
from the input model to a 
name variable in the output 
model. For this reason, the 
Assignment Methods are not 
displayed for output name 
variables. 
Use the Next button to step 
through each output variable's 
panel. 
The name, default value and 
data type of the output 
variable is displayed at the top 
of the panel.
24
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
For each output variable, 
specify the assignment 
calculation method:
• Use default value ­ uses 
the default value of the 
output variable (shown in 
the top half of the panel). 
• Majority variable ­ allows 
you to enter or select an 
input variable for which 
the majority value will be 
calculated and placed in 
the output variable. 
• Total variable ­ allows you 
to enter or select an input 
variable for which the total 
will be found and placed in 
the output variable.
• Average variable ­ allows 
you to enter or select an 
input variable for which 
the average will be found 
and placed in the output 
variable.
• Percentage variable ­ 
allows you to enter an 
input variable and an 
ordinal value. The 
percentage of variable 
values equal to the ordinal 
value is calculated and 
placed in the output 
variable.
Select the Weight blocks 
using density option to weight 
output variables by density. 
You can either use a density 
value or an input density 
variable. 
Once all output variables have 
been assigned, you are 
prompted whether to continue 
with the assignment process 
or to change the definition. 
If you select Change 
definition, you are returned 
to the first output variable's 
panel. If you select Continue, 
the external block assignment 
program is run in a shell 
window. Once this is finished, 
press Enter to remove the 
window. 
Note: 
• The block assignment 
program processes the 
output model in strips of 
X­Y blocks with the Z 
depth of the output model. 
Where these strips overlap 
the input model, the input 
model blocks are re­
blocked and the calculated 
volume and (possibly 
density weighted) values 
are assigned to the output 
model blocks. 
• To run the block 
assignment program from 
outside Envisage, start a 
Hamilton C Shell, navigate 
25
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
to your working directory 
and execute the block 
assignment program 
bassign from the 
VULCAN_EXE directory. 
Use your input and output 
block models and a 
previously created 
assignment definition file 
(the definition file must 
match the input and 
output models). 
For example:
$VULCAN_EXE/bas
sign demoinput
demooutput
demoassign.bdf 
or, if VULCAN_EXE 
is not defined
$VULCAN_BIN/exe
/bassign
demoinput
demooutput
demoassign.bdf
Chapte
r Four

Block
Transf
er
The 
Transfer 
menu 
allows you 
to:
• Import 
regular 
and 
sub­
blocked 
models.
• Import 
attribut
es from 
an 
ASCII 
file.
• Export 
the 
block 
model 
to an 
ASCII 
file.
• Mask a 
block 
model.
• Write 
block 
values 
to a 
map 
file 
(drilling
).
• Add 
two 
block 
models.
• Regular
ise a 
block 
model.
• Delete 
section
s of a 
block 
model.
• Export 
a block 
model.
4.1
Importing a
Regular
Block
Model
The 
Regular 
option 
allows you 
to import 
an ASCII 
file that 
represents 
a regular 
block 
model. 
You must 
25
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
set up a 
definition 
file to 
match the 
ASCII file.
Within the 
ASCII file, 
the fields 
must be in 
a specific 
order with 
each line 
representin
g a block. 
It must 
have an X, 
Y and Z 
centre, 
then the 
grade or 
model 
fields, in 
the same 
order as 
defined in 
the 
definition 
file. The 
block co­
ordinates 
must be in 
real world 
co­
ordinates.
See the 
Online 
Help > 
Envisage > 
Block 
Model > 
Appendix 
A for more 
details on 
the ASCII 
file format 
and the 
correspond
ing 
definition 
file. 
Enter the 
name of 
the block 
model to 
be created, 
the name 
of the 
definition 
file and the 
name of 
the ASCII 
file to be 
imported 
in the 
Regular 
Import 
panel.
Figure 1­
4: Regular 
Import 
Panel
Note:
• Use an 
alphab
etic 
charact
er as 
the 
first 
charact
er of 
the 
block 
model 
identifi
er.
• The 
block 
model 
name 
may 
have a 
maxim
um of 
20 
charact
ers. 
The 
block 
model 
extensi
on 
(.bmf) 
will be 
added 
automa
tically.
• The 
ASCII 
model 
file 
name 
should 
contain 
the full 
name 
(includi
ng the 
file 
extensi
on) of 
the 
ASCII 
file to 
be 
importe
d.  
4.2
Importing a
Sub-
blocked
Block
Model
The 
Subblock 
option 
allows you 
to import 
an ASCII 
file that 
represents 
a sub­
26
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
blocked 
block 
model. You 
must set 
up a 
definition 
file to 
match the 
ASCII file.
Within the 
ASCII file, 
the fields 
must be in 
a specific 
order with 
each line 
representin
g a block. 
It should 
have an X, 
Y and Z 
centre, X , 
Y and Z 
size, and 
then the 
grade or 
model 
fields in 
the same 
order as 
defined in 
the 
definition 
file. The 
block co­
ordinates 
must be in 
real world 
co­
ordinates.
See the 
Online 
Help > 
Envisage > 
Block 
Model > 
Appendix 
A for more 
details on 
the ASCII 
file format 
and the 
correspond
ing 
definition 
file. 
Figure 4­
2: Sub­
blocked 
Import 
Panel
You specify 
the name 
of the 
block 
model to 
be created, 
the name 
of the 
definition 
file and the 
name of 
the ASCII 
file to be 
imported 
on the 
Sub­
blocked 
Import 
panel.
Note:
• Use an 
alphab
etic 
charact
er as 
the 
first 
charact
er of 
the 
block 
model 
identifi
er.
• The 
block 
model 
name 
may 
have a 
maxim
um of 
20 
charact
ers. 
The 
block 
model 
extensi
on 
(.bmf) 
will be 
added 
automa
tically.
• The 
ASCII 
model 
file 
name 
should 
contain 
the full 
name 
(includi
ng the 
file 
extensi
on) of 
the 
ASCII 
file to 
be 
importe
d.
4.3
Importing
Attributes
into a
Block
Model
The 
Attributes 
option 
27
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
allows you 
to import 
an ASCII 
file 
containing 
block 
model 
details and 
grade 
estimation 
results, 
into a pre­
existing 
block 
model.
The format 
of the 
ASCII file 
must be: 
X centre
Y centre
Z centre
data1
data2
data3 ……
where X, Y 
and Z 
centre, is a 
point in 
space. 
Whatever 
block 
encloses 
the point, 
gets data1, 
data2, 
data3 
inserted 
into the 
specified 
fields. If 
two data 
points 
exist for 
the same 
co­ordinate 
point, or 
two co­
ordinate 
points lie 
in the 
same 
block, then 
the last co­
ordinate 
read in the 
ASCII file 
will 
overwrite 
any 
previous 
ones. 
The data 
variables 
in the 
ASCII file 
do not 
have to be 
in the 
same 
sequence 
as the 
block 
model. Not 
all the 
variables 
within the 
block 
model have 
to be in the 
ASCII file. 
However, 
all the data 
variables 
within the 
ASCII file 
must be 
imported, 
otherwise 
errors will 
occur 
when 
reading the 
file. 
Therefore, 
if the 
ASCII file 
has eight 
data 
variables 
and only 
three of 
them are 
to be 
imported, 
the file 
must be 
stripped of 
the excess 
columns. 
Figure 4­
3: Import 
Attributes 
into Model 
Panel
The open 
block 
model 
name is 
displayed 
at the top 
of the 
panel 
Import 
Attributes 
into Model 
panel.
Enter the 
ASCII file 
28
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
name in 
the 
Insertion 
file name 
field. The 
full file 
name must 
be entered, 
including 
the file 
extension. 
If the file is 
not in your 
working 
directory, 
precede 
the file 
with the 
required 
path 
(paths may 
be relative 
or full). 
Up to 30 
variables 
can be 
imported 
at a time.
Centroids 
can be 
imported 
as real 
world co­
ordinates 
or as 
relative 
offsets. 
Real world 
co­
ordinates 
are an 
actual 
location in 
space. 
Relative 
offsets are 
the 
distances 
in the X, Y 
and Z 
directions 
with 
respect to 
the origin 
of the 
block 
model. 
Note:
• This 
option 
does 
not 
require 

definiti
on file. 
4.4
Exporting a
Block
Model
The 
Export 
ASCII 
option 
allows you 
to export a 
block 
model to 
an ASCII 
file.
The name 
of the open 
block 
model is 
displayed 
at the top 
of the 
Block 
Model 
Export 
panel. 
Enter the 
destination 
file name 
in the 
Export file 
name field. 
Include a 
file 
extension 
if required. 
For 
example, 
<file
name>.asc
. The 
maximum 
file name 
size is 20 
alphanume
ric 
characters. 
The file will 
be placed 
in your 
working 
directory. 
Figure 4­
4: Block 
Model 
Export 
Panel
To export 
the block 
identificati
on 
numbers, 
select the 
Export 
block ids 
check box. 
Don’t tick 
this box if 
you want 
to import 
the model 
back into 
Envisage.
29
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
To export 
the 
physical 
volumes of 
the blocks, 
select the 
Export 
block 
volumes 
check box. 
Don’t tick 
this box if 
you want 
to import 
the model 
back into 
Envisage.  
To export 
all 
variables 
in the 
block 
model 
select the 
Export all 
variables 
radio 
button. 
Alternativel
y you can 
choose to 
export a 
subset of 
the 
variables 
in the 
block 
model. If 
this is the 
case, select 
the Export 
individual 
variables 
radio 
button. A 
maximum 
of 30 
variables 
may be 
exported 
using this 
method.
Centroids 
can be 
exported 
as real 
world or as 
relative 
offsets.
4.5 Export
Variables
to a Map
File
The 
Export 
Mask 
option 
allows you 
to export 
variables 
from the 
open block 
model, 
correspond
ing to the 
X, Y and Z 
locations of 
a specified 
map file 
(this may 
be an ISIS 
database 
or ASCII 
map file).
This option 
creates a 
new map 
file that 
includes 
all fields 
from the 
"old" map 
file (the file 
being read) 
plus up to 
6 new 
fields. 
The data 
that will be 
exported is 
specified in 
the 
<proj><na
me>.bmm 
parameter 
file. This 
parameter 
file can be 
used with 
the 
Hamilton C 
Shell 
bmask
command, 
e.g. 
bmask
<proj><n
ame>.bmm
This option 
is useful if 
you want 
to write the 
estimated 
grade 
values to a 
map file for 
validation 
purposes 
and 
bivariate 
analysis 
(see the 
Online 
Help 
Envisage > 
Analyse > 
Statistics 
11 section). 
It is also 
useful to 
map the 
geological 
domains 
defined in 
the block 
model to a 
map file, 
so that 
domain 
30
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
restrictions 
can be 
used in 
grade 
estimation.
Figure 4­
5: The 
Mask 
Block 
Model 
panel
The open 
block 
model 
name is 
displayed 
at the top 
of the 
Mask 
Block 
Model 
panel. 
Enter the 
name of 
the 
parameter 
file to be 
created or 
modified in 
the 
Parameter 
Identifier 
field. The 
maximum 
size of the 
name is 10 
alphanume
ric 
characters. 
As the 
project 
code and 
extension 
are added 
automatica
lly, you do 
not need to 
enter these 
values. 
To import 
from or 
export to 
an ISIS 
database, 
select the 
Use 
samples 
database 
option. 
Specify the 
design 
name and 
the 
database 
identifier.
To import 
from or 
export to 
an ASCII 
map file, 
enter MAP 
in the 
Design 
Name 
field.
Up to 6 
variables 
can be 
selected. 
You'll also 
need to 
specify an 
appropriat
e default 
value. 
Note:
• The 
design 
names 
for the 
"old" 
and 
new 
databa
se 
must 
not be 
the 
same 
(unless 
using 
map 
files, in 
which 
case 
they 
will 
both be 
MAP). 
• If 
exporti
ng data 
to an 
ISIS 
databa
se, the 
data 
may be 
groupe
d in the 
resulta
nt 
databa
se file. 
ISIS 
databa
ses 
may 
contain 
multipl

groups. 
ASCII 
map 
files 
may 
consist 
of one 
31
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
group 
only. To 
create a 
new 
group, 
enter a 
unique 
name 
in the 
Group 
field. 
The 
maxim
um size 
of the 
group 
name is 
12 
alphan
umeric 
charact
ers.
• You 
may 
want to 
enter 
an 
optiona
l 40 
alphan
umeric 
charact
er 
descrip
tion of 
the 
map or 
databa
se. The 
descrip
tion 
appear
s in the 
header 
of the 
new 
map 
file. 
• If 
exporti
ng to 
an 
existing 
ISIS 
databa
se or 
map 
file, 
selectin
g the 
Appen
d to 
existin

group 
check 
box will 
allow 
you to 
append 
the 
specifie
d group 
to the 
same 
group(s
) in the 
existing 
databa
se or 
map 
file. 
• If the 
Use 
Fortra

Format 
option 
is 
selecte
d, 
specify 
the 
map 
file 
identifi
er 
(<mfi>) 
in 
which 
the 
existing 
sample 
data is 
stored. 
Note:
When 
using 
Fortran 
formats
, data 
will be 
append
ed to 
the 
specifie
d map 
file 
instead 
of a 
new 
map 
file 
being 
created
.
The 
FORTR
AN 
format 
stateme
nt 
identifi
es the 
location 
of the 
X, Y, 
and Z 
co­
ordinat
es. 
Envisag

expects 

charact
er 
variabl

indicati
32
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
ng the 
numbe
r of 
column
s to be 
skipped 
before 
the 
first 
locatio
n is 
reached 
plus 
three 
real 
numbe
rs. The 
three 
real 
numbe
rs 
represe
nt the 
X, Y 
and Z 
co­
ordinat
es. For 
exampl
e, 12X, 
3F13.3 
means 
that 
the co­
ordinat
es are 
located 
starting 
in the 
13th 
column 
(first 12 
column
s are 
skipped
). The 
maxim
um size 
of the 
format 
is 80 
alphan
umeric 
charact
ers. 
The 
fields 
support
ed in a 
FORTR
AN 
format 
stateme
nt are 
listed 
in the 
Online 
help, 
Envisag
e > 
Core 
Append
ixes.
If the Use 
samples 
database 
option is 
selected, a 
panel will 
be 
displayed 
allowing 
you to 
enter the 
group 
name and 
field 
informatio
n required.
Figure 4­
6: Load 
Samples 
Database 
Panel
Enter the 
name of 
the group 
to be 
loaded 
from the 
source file.
Wild cards 
(* multi 
character 
and % 
single 
character) 
may be 
used if you 
can't 
remember 
a group's 
name. 
However, 
only one 
group will 
be loaded­ 
this is the 
first group 
in the file 
that 
matches 
the entered 
criteria. 
For 
example, 
A* loads 
the first 
group in 
the map 
file that 
starts with 
an A. 
Specify the 
names of 
the fields 
containing 
the X, Y 
and Z co­
ordinates. 
The sample 
data will 
then be 
exported 
33
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
and a map 
file will be 
created or, 
if using a 
FORTRAN 
format, the 
data will 
be 
appended.
The export 
occurs in a 
Shell 
window. 
This 
window 
also 
displays 
error 
messages.
When the 
export is 
finished 
press 
[Enter] to 
remove the 
window. 
4.6
Intersect a
Drill Hole
Database
The 
Export 
Drilling 
option 
allows you 
to intersect 
a drillhole 
database 
with 
variables 
of the open 
block 
model that 
correspond 
to the X, Y 
and Z 
locations of 
the 
database. 
This option 
is useful if 
you want 
to write the 
estimated 
grade 
values to a 
drillhole 
database 
for 
validation 
and 
analysis 
purposes 
analysis 
(see the 
Online 
Help 
Envisage > 
Analyse > 
Statistics 
11 section).
Note:
• The 
drillhol

databa
se 
fields 
will be 
overwri
tten 
with 
the 
block 
model 
variabl
es 
unless 
destina
tion 
fields 
have 
been 
created 
in 
which 
the 
intersec
tion 
results 
will be 
stored. 
Figure 4­
7: 
Intersect 
Drilling 
Panel
The open 
block 
model is 
displayed 
at the top 
of the 
Intersect 
Drilling 
panel. 
Enter the 
design 
(datasheet) 
name 
(.<dsn>) of 
the drill 
hole 
database 
and the 
optional 
database 
identifier. 
Figure 4­
8: DB 
Intersecti
on Record 
Panel
34
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
Enter the 
drill hole 
database 
table 
(record) to 
be 
intersected

Figure 4­
9: DB 
Intersecti
on Fields 
Panel
Select the 
From and 
To fields in 
the 
specified 
table 
(record). 
Up to 10 
block 
model 
variables 
can be 
matched to 
drillhole 
fields. 
Note:
• The 
block 
model 
variabl
es and 
drillhol

databa
se 
fields 
must 
be real 
numbe
rs (4 
bytes). 
4.7 Block
Model
Addition
The 
Addition 
Parameter
s option 
allows you 
to create a 
block 
definition 
file to be 
used when 
combining 
two block 
models 
into a new 
model. The 
models to 
be 
combined 
may:
• Totally 
overlap 
each 
other.
• Partiall

overlap.
• Not 
overlap.
• Have 
differen

parent 
block 
sizes.
• Contai

differen

variabl
es.
T
h
e

m
u
s

b

o

t
h

s
a
m

o
r
i
e
n
t
a
ti
o
n

i.
e

b
e
a
r
i
n
g

p
l
u
n
g

a
n

d
35
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
i
p
.
Some 
specific 
uses for 
this option 
include:
• Adding 
two 
adjacen

models 
so that 

resourc

calcula
tion 
may be 
perfor
med on 
the 
total 
model.
• Extract
ing a 
portion 
of a 
model 
for 
modific
ation, 
i.e. 
adding 
in a 
variabl
e or 
updatin
g the 
grade 
estimat
ion, 
then 
adding 
it back 
into the 
original
.
• Creatin
g a new 
empty 
model 
that 
may 
contain 

surface 
or solid 
which 
was not 
present 
in the 
old 
model. 
Then 
combin
ing this 
model 
with 
the 
original 
to 
create a 
new 
model 
that 
now 
include
s the 
surface 
or solid 
zones.
Creating a
New
definition
File
Figure 4­
10: New 
Definition 
Panel
Specify the 
two block 
models to 
add. Also 
enter the 
name of 
the new 
block 
model that 
will be 
created 
when this 
option is 
run.
Hints:
• It does 
not 
matter 
which 
model 
you 
select 
as the 
first or 
second 
one. 
Only 
the 
variabl
es are 
stored 
in the 
definiti
on file 
(.bdf) ­ 
the 
names 
of the 
block 
models 
are not 
stored. 
• The 
new 
block 
definiti
on file 
name 
will be 
taken 
from 
the new 
block 
36
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
model 
name. 
For 
exampl
e, if you 
enter 
FINAL 
as the 
new 
block 
model 
name, 
your 
block 
definiti
on file 
will be 
named 
<proj>F
INAL.b
df. 
Defining the
Parent
Scheme
The two 
models 
may be 
combined 
into a new 
one, using:
• Either 
model 
scheme
.
• A 
combin
ed 
scheme
.
• A new 
scheme
.
Figure 4­
11: Block 
Model 
Parent 
Scheme 
Panel
Columns 
in the 
Block 
Model 
Parent 
Scheme 
panel are 
ordered X, 
Y and Z. 
The offsets 
are the 
offset 
distances 
relative to 
the origin 
point. 
Hints:
• A new 
block 
definiti
on file 
is 
created 
for the 
new 
model.
• The 
new 
model 
extent 
is 
depend
ent on 
the 
scheme 
entered 
on this 
panel.
• If your 
final 
model 
does 
not 
cover 
the 
expecte
d area, 
check 
the 
scheme 
used.
• The 
model 
1 and 
model 

parent 
scheme
s must 
be 
multipl
es of 
each 
other. 
The 
resulta
nt 
model's 
parent 
scheme 
must 
encomp
ass 
both 
other 
parent 
scheme
s.
Adding New
variables
New 
variables 
may be 
added into 
the 
resulting 
block 
model 
37
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
and/or 
existing 
variables 
in either 
model can 
be 
manipulate
d for use in 
the new 
model.
Figure 4­
12: Add 
Variable 
Panel
If new 
variables 
are 
required in 
the final 
block 
model, 
which do 
not exist in 
either of 
the two 
original 
models, 
they may 
be added 
using the 
Add 
Variable 
panel. See 
the Block 
Manipulati
on – Add 
Variable 
section for 
details on 
adding 
variables. 
If no new 
variables 
are 
required or 
all 
variables 
have been 
added, 
cancel this 
panel.
Determining
which
variables to
include
(Variable
Constrainin
g)
There are a 
number of 
options 
regarding 
how 
existing 
variables 
are used in 
the new 
model:
• Variabl

Domin
ance ­ 
Variabl
es from 
both 
models 
are 
used. 
Select 
which 
model 
variabl
es will 
be used 
in 
areas of 
overlap.
• Averag
e of 
Variabl
es ­ 
Uses 
the 
average 
of the 
two 
model 
variabl
es in 
areas of 
overlap.
• Direct 
Variabl

Mappin
g ­ 
Allows 
the use 
of 
variabl

values 
from 
one 
model 
only.
• Use 
scripts 
– 
Allows 
variabl

values 
to be 
determi
ned by 

script.
The 
Variable 
Constraini
ng panel 
will be 
displayed 
for each 
variable. 
You must 
choose 
whether or 
38
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
not to 
include the 
variable in 
the final 
model.
If a 
variable 
exists in 
both 
original 
models 
and is not 
selected for 
inclusion 
in the final 
model 
when 
displayed 
as a 
variable in 
the first 
model, it 
will appear 
again when 
displaying 
variables 
from the 
second 
model.  If 
the 
variable is 
selected 
from the 
first model, 
it will not 
appear for 
the second 
model.
When 
using 
Variable 
Dominanc
e a block 
addition 
script file 
is 
generated 
automatica
lly. For 
example:
IF
(m1:mater
ial NE
“-9999999
999”)
THEN
m3:minera
lisation
=
m1:materi
al
ELSE
m3:minera
lisation
= “WASTE”
ENDIF
END
Note:
• All 
block 
model 
scripts 
created 
by the 
block 
additio

routine 
have 
the 
extensi
on 
“.bcf”.
Creating the
new Block
Model
The 
Perform 
Addition 
option 
allows you 
to create a 
new block 
model by 
adding two 
existing 
models. 
The 
process 
uses the 
block 
model 
addition 
definition 
file and 
block 
model 
addition 
variable 
constrainin
g script 
files 
created in 
the Block > 
Transfer > 
Addition 
Parameters 
option.
You must 
specify the 
two 
existing 
block 
models 
and the 
new block 
addition 
definition 
file name.
Figure 4­
13: Block 
Model Add 
Panel
Note:
• It does 
not 
matter 
which 
model 
you 
select 
as the 
39
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
first or 
second 
one.
Worksh
op -
Block
Manipul
ation,
Add
The aim of 
this 
workshop 
is to 
experiment 
with the 
Block 
Addition 
options to 
become 
familiar 
with the 
consequen
ces of 
each.
Try the 
following:
• Add 
two 
models 
that do 
not 
overlap
.
• Add 
two 
overlap
ping 
models
.
• Extract 
part of 

model, 
modify 
it, and 
then 
add it 
back to 
the 
origina
l.
• Add a 
waste 
model 
to an 
ore 
model.
4.8
Regularisin
g a block
model
The 
Regularise 
Parameter
s option 
allows you 
to create or 
edit a 
block 
definition 
file 
(<proj><na
me>.bdf). 
This file is 
then used 
by the 
Perform 
Regularisa
tion option 
to 
regularise 
a block 
model. 
Hints:
• Block 
definiti
on files 
are also 
created 
by 
other 
block 
model 
options
, e.g. 
the 
Block > 
Transfe
r > 
Additio

Parame
ters 
option 
and the 
Block > 
Constr
uction 
> New 
Definiti
on 
option. 
If you 
use the 
Regular
ise 
Parame
ters 
option 
to edit 
these 
types of 
.bdf 
files, a 
warnin

messag
e will 
be 
display
ed 
informi
ng you 
that 
the .bdf 
file is 
not a 
reblock 
definiti
on file. 
Figure 4­
14: Model 
40
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
Reblockin
g Panel
The 
Parameter 
file to 
copy 
option 
allows you 
to copy 
and then 
modify an 
existing 
definition 
file.
Enter the 
name of 
the new 
parameter 
file in the 
New 
parameter 
file field. 
The project 
code and 
extension 
are added 
automatica
lly. The 
maximum 
size of the 
parameter 
file name 
is 20 
alphanume
ric 
characters 
and this 
includes 
the project 
name and 
file 
extension 
(.bdf). 
Figure 4­
15: 
Reblockin

Dimension
s Panel
The 
Reblocking 
Dimension
s panel 
requires 
you to set 
the regular 
model's 
origin, 
start and 
end 
(minimum 
and 
maximum) 
X, Y and Z 
offsets for 
its extent, 
and its X, 
Y and Z 
regular 
block sizes.
The 
regular 
model can 
sit 
completely 
inside, 
outside or 
partially 
inside the 
sub­
blocked 
model. 
The block 
sizes do 
not have to 
be aligned 
with the 
sub­
blocked 
model's 
sizes. The 
model’s 
dimension
s are 
completely 
independe
nt of the 
sub­
blocked 
model 
being 
regularised
.
On 
completion 
of this 
panel, the 
Resulting 
Variables 
panel is 
displayed. 
This panel 
needs to be 
completed 
for each 
variable 
required in 
the new 
model. 
Figure 4­
16: 
41
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
Resulting 
Variables 
Panel
Enter the 
name of 
the 
variable 
you want 
to create in 
the new 
model in 
the 
Variable 
Name 
field. The 
maximum 
size is 20 
alphanume
ric 
characters. 
The 
Default 
value is 
only 
required if 
using the 
default, 
total or 
average 
regularisa
tion 
methods 
(see below). 
The 
following 
characters 
may be 
used in 
combinatio
n with the 
default 
value, but 
not on 
their own:
[ ]
( ){ }% ,
+ - * / &
For each 
variable 
you must 
specify a 
data type 
and 
regularisa
tion 
method. 
Available 
data types: 
• Float ­ 
A real 
number 
accurat
e to 7 
signific
ant 
figures. 
It is 
generall
y used 
for 
grades 
and 
densitie
s. 
• Double 
­ A 
floating 
point 
numbe

accurat
e to 14 
signific
ant 
figures. 
It is 
generall
y used 
for 
sensitiv

grades. 
Use of 
this 
data 
type 
will 
result 
in large 
block 
model 
files 
that 
are 
slower 
to 
process

• Integer 
­ A 
fixed 
point 
number 
in the 
range 
[­2 000 
000 
000 to 
 +2 000 
000 
000]. 
• Byte 
data ­ 
A fixed 
point 
number 
in the 
range 
[0 to 
255]. 
The 
regularisat
ion 
methods 
(listed 
below) 
calculate 
variables 
using sub­
blocks, 
regular 
blocks and 
common 
blocks. 
Common 
42
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
blocks are 
generated 
when a 
regular 
block 
intersects 
sub­
blocks. In 
the 
example, R 
indicates 
the regular 
block, S 
the sub­
blocks and 
C the 
common 
blocks. The 
number of 
sub­blocks 
intersected 
by a 
regular 
block is 
denoted by 
NSB. 
Figure 4­
17: 
Common 
Blocks
Available regularisation 
methods: 
• Use default value ­ This 
method uses the default 
value specified at the top 
of the panel. 
• Majority variable ­ This 
method calculates the 
ordinal value that occupies 
a majority of the regular 
block's volume. The input 
and output variable types 
should be byte or integer. 
Floating point variables 
will be truncated. The 
calculation may be defined 
as follows: 
es) ed_variabl ode(weight Weighted_M majority ·
where
[ ]
NSB
mon_block) VOLUME(com variable ariables weighted_v
1
× ·
• Total variable ­ This 
method calculates the total 
of the variable from the 
sub­blocks intersected by 
the regular block. The 
calculation may be defined 
as follows:
 
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
<
>
·
·
0 e sum_tonnag sum_total,
0 e sum_tonnag sum_total,
0 e sum_tonnag tal, default_to
total
where,

·
×
·
NSB
1 i
_block) VOLUME(sub
mon_block) VOLUME(com variable
sum_total
and

·
·
NSB
1 i
mon_block) VOLUME(com e sum_tonnag
• Average variable ­ This 
method calculates the 
average of the variable 
from the sub­blocks 
intersected by the regular 
block. The calculation may 
be defined as follows:
43
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
¹
'
¹
<
>
·
·
0 e sum_tonnag
e sum_tonnag
sum_units
0 e sum_tonnag
e sum_tonnag
sum_units
0 e sum_tonnag erage, default_av
average
,
,
where.

·
× × ·
NSB
1 i
density mon_block) VOLUME(com variable sum_units
and

·
× ·
NSB
1 i
density mon_block) VOLUME(com e sum_tonnag
Hint:
• If density weighting is not 
used, the density value 
defaults to 1. Otherwise, 
the specified density value 
or sub­block density 
variable is used.
• Percentage variable ­ This 
method calculates the 
percentage of the regular 
block volume occupied by 
sub­blocks matching a 
specified ordinal value. 
The input variable type 
should be byte or integer, 
and the output variable 
type should be floating 
point. The number of sub­
blocks intersected by a 
regular block and also 
matching the given ordinal 
value is denoted by NSB. 
The calculation may be 
defined as follows: 
100 × ·
lume regular_vo
_match sum_volume
percentage
where,

·
·
NSB
1 i
mon_block) VOLUME(com _match sum_volume
and
) ular_block VOLUME(reg lume regular_vo ·
The 
Weight 
blocks 
using 
density 
option is 
applicable 
only if you 
are 
averaging 
or totalling 
a field's 
contents 
(i.e. 
density 
weighted 
averages ­ 
e.g. 
grams/ton; 
density 
multiplied 
totals ­ e.g. 
tonnages). 
Examples -
Regularisa
tion
Methods
(2D only) 
44
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
Figure 4­
18 –
Regular 
Block (R), 
sub­blocks 
(S1, S2, 
S3 and S4) 
and 
common 
blocks 
(C1, C2, 
C3 and 
C4)
When 
regular 
block R 
intersects 
sub­blocks 
S1, S2, S3, 
S4 it 
generates 
common 
blocks C1, 
C2, C3, 
C4. See 
Figure 4­
18 and 
Tables 4­1 
and 4­ 2. 
Table 4­1: 
Sub 
Blocks 
Sub­
block
Volume
S1 400.0
S2 400.0
S3 400.0
S4 400.0
Table 4­2: 
Common 
Blocks 
Common 
Block
C1
C2
C3
C4
Default Variable ­  No 
calculation performed.
Majority Variable ­ Refer to 
Figure 4­18, Table 4­1 and 
Table 4­2. 
Majority for zone variable in 
regular block: 
B)] of (100 A), of [(300
A)] of (100 B), of (100 A), of (100 A), of [(100 ariables weighted_v
·
·
hence, the majority = A
Total Variable ­ Refer to 
Figure 4­18, Table 4­1 and 
Table 4­2. 
Total for gold variable in 
regular block: 
5 . 2
1 5 . 0 25 . 0 75 . 0
400
100
4
400
100
2
400
100
1
·
+ + + ·

,
`

.
|
× +
,
`

.
|
× +
,
`

.
|
× +
,
`

.
|
× ·
400
100
3 sum_total
400
100 100 100 100 sum_volume
·
+ + + ·
hence, the total = 2.5
Average Variable ­ Refer to 
Figure 4­18, Table 4­1 and 
Table 4­2. 
Average for gold variable in 
regular block: 
45
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
5 . 2 ·
·
·
+ + + ·
·
× + × + × + × ·
400
1000
average hence
400
100 100 100 100 e sum_tonnag
1000
100) (4 100) (2 100) (1 100) (3 sum_units
NOTE: 
• Density weighting is not 
used for this example. 
Percentage Variable ­ Refer to 
Figure 4­18, Table 4­1 and 
Table4­2. 
Percentage of regular block 
volume filled by sub­blocks 
with a zone value of A: 
% 75
100
·
×
,
`

.
|
·
·
·
+ + ·
400
300
zone(A) percentage hence,
400 lume regular_vo
A of 300
A) of (100 A) of (100 A) of (100 _volume sum_common
Fill Percentage Variable 
(fillpc) ­ Reblock option ­ 
Refer to Figure 4­18, Table 4­1 
and Table 4­2. 
Filled percentage for regular 
block: 
% 100
100
·
×
,
`

.
|
·
·
·
+ + + ·
400
400
fillpc hence
400 ) ular_block VOLUME(reg
400
100 100 100 100 _volume sum_common
4.9
Deleting
Blocks
from a
block
model
The Delete 
cells 
option 
allows you 
to delete 
blocks 
from a 
block 
model. 
When this 
option is 
selected, 
the block 
selection 
panel is 
displayed 
allowing 
you to 
choose the 
blocks to 
be deleted.
Figure 4­
19: Block 
Selection 
Panel
Either all 
blocks or 
specific 
blocks can 
be 
selected. If 
you select 
specific 
blocks, you 
can specify 
one or 
more of the 
following 
46
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
selection 
criteria: 
By 
variable ­ 
To restrict 
blocks by a 
variable, 
specify the 
variable 
and a 
particular 
value. For 
example, 
all blocks 
where the 
Material 
variable 
equals Ore. 
By 
bounding 
triangulati
on ­ To 
select 
blocks 
within a 
particular 
solid 
triangulati
on, e.g. a 
stope. If 
there is 
more than 
one 
triangulati
on loaded, 
you'll be 
prompted 
to select 
the 
required 
one. 
By 
bounding 
box ­ To 
restrict the 
selected 
blocks to 
those 
contained 
within a 
cube. The 
cube is 
defined in 
Interactiv
e or Co­
ordinate 
mode. The 
required 
mode is 
selected 
from the 
panel 
displayed 
upon 
completion 
of the 
current 
panel. 
If you 
select 
Interactiv
e mode, 
you'll be 
prompted 
to create 
the box by 
indicating 
the lower 
left corner 
and then 
dragging 
the 
"rubber" 
band 
rectangle 
to the 
upper right 
corner. 
If you 
select Co­
ordinate 
mode, 
enter the 
minimum 
and 
maximum 
co­
ordinates 
for the box.
By section 
­ To 
restrict the 
blocks to a 
defined 
section 
plane. You 
can then 
enter its 
associated 
thickness. 
The section 
plane can 
be selected 
by line, 
points, 
grid co­
ordinates 
or 3 points 
(the panel 
for this 
informatio
n is 
displayed 
as soon as 
the current 
panel has 
been 
accepted). 
By 
condition 
­ To use a 
field 
constraint, 
for 
example, 
Fe gt
10.0
(iron value 
greater 
than 10.0). 
A list of 
available 
operators/f
unctions is 
provided in 
the Online 
Help (in 
Appendix 
47
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
D of the 
Core 
Appendices
.
By 
bounding 
surfaces ­ 
To restrict 
the blocks 
by a 
bounding 
surface. A 
panel in 
which to 
specify the 
top and 
bottom 
surface 
triangulati
ons is 
displayed 
once this 
panel is 
completed.
Reverse 
matching 
­ To 
reverse the 
block 
selection, 
that is, to 
select the 
blocks that 
were not 
selected by 
the other 
selection 
criteria. 
Cells can 
be 
evaluated 
using 
either full 
or 
proportion
al cells. 
Use full 
cell 
evaluation 
(that is 
select the 
Use Block 
Centres 
option) to 
select 
those cells 
where the 
centroid 
falls within 
the region. 
Use 
proportion
al cell 
evaluation 
(that is 
leave the 
Use Block 
Centres 
option 
unticked) 
to select 
the exact 
proportion 
of a block 
or sub­
block that 
is 
intersected 
by the 
region. 
Hints:
• The 
proport
ional 
cell 
evaluati
on 
method 
applies 
only 
when 
restricti
ng 
blocks 
using a 
boundi
ng box, 
closed 
triangu
lation 
or 
boundi
ng 
surface
s. 
• Make a 
copy of 
the 
block 
model 
and 
use the 
copy for 
deletion 
if you 
don't 
want 
the 
original 
to be 
affected

4.10
Extracting
Blocks to a
new Block
Model
The 
Extract 
cell option 
allows you 
to extract 
specified 
blocks 
from a 
block 
model and 
save them 
to another 
block 
model file.
48
Chapter 3: Block Manipulation
Figure 4­
20 Block 
Extraction 
Panel
Enter the 
block 
model 
identifier of 
the block 
model into 
which the 
extracted 
blocks will 
be saved in 
the 
Destinatio
n model 
field.
Hint:
• Use an 
alphab
etic 
charact
er as 
the 
first 
charact
er of 
the 
block 
file 
identifi
er. 
Select the 
Record 
block IDs 
in 
destinatio
n model 
option to 
extract the 
block 
identificati
on 
numbers 
as well. 
The Block 
IDs 
variable 
option is 
only 
applicable 
if you are 
extracting 
block 
identificati
on 
numbers. 
It allows 
you to 
store the 
block 
identificati
on 
numbers 
into a 
nominated 
(existing) 
variable. 
On 
completion 
of this 
panel, the 
Block 
Selection 
panel is 
displayed, 
so that any 
extraction 
can be 
restricted 
to blocks 
matching a 
particular 
condition. 
For 
example, 
where the 
geology 
matches a 
certain 
value or 
the grade 
within a 
particular 
range. 
Refer to 
4.9 
Deleting 
Blocks 
from a 
Block 
Model for 
informatio
n on this 
panel.
Upon 
completion 
of the 
Block 
Selection 
panel, the 
blocks are 
extracted 
and saved 
into the 
nominated 
block 
model file 
(.bmf). 
Hints:
• If you 
are 
selectin

blocks 
by 
section, 
the 
Plane 
definiti
on 
panel 
will be 
display
ed 
before 
any 
blocks 
are 
extract
ed and 
saved. 
49
Chapter 5: Grade Estimation
Chapter 5 - Inverse
Distance Grade
Estimation
Grade Estimation in
VULCAN
The Grade Estimation 
submenu allows you to:
• Use multiple estimation 
techniques.
• Run single or multiple 
estimation passes.
• Match ellipsoid orientation 
to known structures.
• Display the ellipsoid 
onscreen.
What is Grade Estimation?
• Grade Estimation is the 
process of interpolating 
values from a database or 
file into the blocks of a 
block model. 
• The technique covered in 
this course is the inverse 
distance method. This 
technique assigns weights 
to the samples that are 
inversely proportional to 
their distances from the 
points being estimated. 
Why use Grade Estimation?
• The aim of block modelling 
is to model the deposit as 
accurately as possible. 
This not only applies to its 
structural characteristics, 
but also to its grade 
distribution.
• Grade estimation 
techniques provide a better 
solution than classical ore 
reserve methods as they 
attempt to account for the 
spatial relationships 
between the samples.
How do we use Grade
Estimation in VULCAN?
Grade Estimation in VULCAN 
is accomplished by entering 
the parameters that control 
the estimation pass into an 
estimation parameter file 
(.bef). This file contains 
information such as:
• The type of estimation 
method.
• The estimation variable.
• Variables, which contain 
statistical information, to 
aid in analysis.
• The search ellipsoid 
orientation and size.
• Type of sample weightings.
• The sample database or 
file for use.
• Sample manipulation 
specifications.
• Block selection criteria.
50
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Chapter 6 – Block Reserves
There are four different reserving options; three of the options are 
grouped under the Reserves submenu and the fourth under the 
Advanced Reserves submenu.
Overview – Reserves submenu
Figure 6­1: Reserves submenu
6.1 Simple Reserves
6.1.1 General
The General option allows you 
to calculate quick and simple 
reserves on the open block 
model, using multiple block 
selection criteria, grade cut­
offs and report breakdown by 
a zone variable. 
Although up to 6 grade 
variables may be specified, 
51
This section 
allows for 
titled reserve 
reports.
Use the Setup 
option to 
define report 
titles, geologic 
breakdowns 
This section 
contains options 
for generating 
quick and 
unsophisticated 
reports.
Select 
triangulations or 
polygons that 
define the 
regions from 
which the 
reserves will be 
Match report 
titles to data.
Calculate 
reserves.
Use this section 
to report the 
reserve between 
cut­offs, above 
cut­offs or in 
spreadsheet 
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
General Reserves is really 
only useful for reporting 
tonnes and the grade of a 
single grade variable.  You 
have little control over the 
format of the reserves report.
Figure 6­2: Reserves 
Calculation Panel
Up to 6 grade variables may 
be used in the calculation. 
Select the Use zone 
breakdown option to use a 
zone variable, e.g. the geology 
variable in the reserves 
calculation.
The density can either be a 
variable within a density field 
in the block model or a 
constant (value). 
Select the Save report to file 
option to save the calculated 
reserves. Specify a file name. 
The maximum size is 20 
alphanumeric characters. The 
file will be placed in your 
working directory. The file 
extension .brf (block model 
report file) is automatically 
added. 
The Spawn reserves 
calculations in window 
option is only applicable if the 
Save report to file option was 
selected. It allows you to run 
the reserves calculations in 
another window thus freeing 
the current window for further 
Envisage work. 
Figure 6­3: Reserves Cut­
offs panel
52
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Select the Use cut­off grades 
option to use cut­off grades. 
Enter the number of cuts and 
the cut­off values (up to 13). 
The reserves report will only 
include those cut­offs for 
which values have been 
supplied, e.g. if you specified 
13 cuts, but supplied only 
values for the first 5, only the 
first 5 cuts will be reported. 
Figure 6­4: Block Selection 
Panel
Either all blocks or specific 
blocks can be selected. If you 
select specific blocks, you can 
specify one or more of the 
following selection criteria: 
By variable ­ To restrict 
blocks by a variable, specify 
the variable and a particular 
value. For example, all blocks 
where the Material variable 
equals Ore. 
By bounding triangulation  ­ 
To evaluate reserves within a 
particular solid triangulation, 
e.g. a stope. If there is more 
than one triangulation loaded, 
you'll be prompted to select 
the required one. 
By bounding box ­ To restrict 
the selected blocks to those 
contained within a cube. The 
cube is defined in Interactive 
or Co­ordinate mode. The 
required mode is selected from 
the panel that is displayed 
upon completion of the 
current panel. 
If you select to use 
Interactive mode, you'll be 
prompted to create the box by 
indicating the lower left corner 
and then dragging the 
"rubber" band rectangle to the 
upper right corner. 
If you select to use Co­
ordinate mode, you enter the 
minimum and maximum co­
ordinates for the box.
By section ­ To restrict the 
blocks to a defined section 
plane. You can then enter its 
associated thickness. The 
section plane can be selected 
by line, points, grid co­
ordinates or 3 points (the 
panel for this information is 
displayed as soon as the 
current panel has been 
accepted). 
By condition ­ To use a field 
constraint, for example, 
53
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Fe gt 10.0
(iron value greater than 10.0). 
A list of available 
operators/functions is 
provided in the Online Help (in 
Appendix D of the Core 
Appendixes.
By bounding surfaces ­ To 
restrict the blocks by a 
bounding surface. A panel in 
which you specify the top and 
bottom surface triangulations 
is displayed once this panel is 
completed.
Reverse matching ­ To 
reverse the block selection, 
that is, to select the blocks 
that are not selected by the 
other selection criteria. 
Cells can be evaluated using 
either full or proportional 
cells. 
Use full cell evaluation (that 
is select the Use Block 
Centres option) if you want 
the average grade of those 
cells where the centroid falls 
within the region. 
Use proportional cell 
evaluation (that is leave the 
Use Block Centres option 
unticked) if you want to use 
the exact proportion of a block 
or sub­block that is 
intersected by the region. This 
calculates the weighted 
average of those portions and 
is the most precise method. 
Hints:
• The proportional cell 
evaluation method applies 
only when restricting 
blocks using a bounding 
box, closed triangulation 
or bounding surfaces. 
The reserves are then 
calculated and displayed. If 
the Zone Breakdown option 
has been selected, then both 
grades and zones are included 
in the report. 
Figure 6­6: Reserves Report
Note:
• The total grade is a 
cumulative sum of the 
values in the grade 
variable.
6.1.2 Calculate Reserves based
on POLYGONS
The Polygon option allows you 
to calculate reserves in a 
similar manner to the General 
option, but based on a 
polygon.
54
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
This option is designed to take 
a polygon, which represents a 
section of a mining block or 
bench, and define the bench 
by specifying the height, 
bearing, and dip adjustment 
and position of the polygon.
Figure 6­7: Polygon Reserve 
Panel
Enter the thickness of the 
bench or block in the Height 
field. 
The String Position defines 
the position of the string 
(polygon) within the bench or 
mining block. The position can 
be top, middle or base. 
Select the Use bearing and 
dip adjustment option to set 
the orientation of the bench 
strings (polygons) within the 
bench. Enter the bearing and 
the dip.
Select the Project onto plane 
option to project the bench 
string onto a plane. Once this 
panel is completed, you will be 
prompted to select the bench 
string, and the Section Plane 
panel is displayed. See the 
General option for an 
explanation of the fields on 
this panel. 
Select a bench string once the 
Polygon Reserves panel is 
accepted. A temporary solid 
triangulation, defined by the 
polygon, and a Confirm box 
(refer to Figure 6­8) are 
displayed.
Figure 6­8: Confirm box
Select Incorrect solid to exit 
the option.
Select Correct solid, if you 
are satisfied with the 
triangulation. The Reserve 
Calculation panel is displayed. 
See the General option for an 
explanation of the fields on 
this panel. 
55
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Once the Reserve Calculation 
panel has been completed, the 
Reserve Cut­off panel is 
displayed. This panel is also 
described in the General 
option. 
Upon completion of the 
Reserve Cut­off panel, the 
reserves are calculated and 
displayed. An example is given 
at the end of the General 
option's description. 
6.2 Block Reserves
The Block Reserves options 
(Block Reserves Setup, Save 
Parameters and Load 
Parameters) provide you with 
greater flexibility to control 
the formatting of the reserve 
report than the General or 
Polygon options.
The Block Reserves options 
allow you to generate reserves 
for up to 5 different block 
models.
6.2.1 Setup the specification
The Block Reserves Setup 
option allows you to create a 
specification file to store all 
the required parameters for 
the block reserves report.
The report parameters consist 
of the titles to appear in the 
report plus cut­off values. The 
titles are for the data sources, 
grades and breakdowns. 
Once the report parameters 
have been set up, use the 
Regions (Triangle or Polygon) 
and the Assign Data options 
to specify the regions in which 
to calculate the reserve report 
and the block models and 
variables to be used in the 
reserves calculation. 
The titles for the report are 
entered in the Data sources 
panel.
Figure 6­9: Data Sources 
For example, if you want to 
report on more than one 
model enter their names in 
title #1 and title #2.  A 
maximum of 5 data source 
titles may be entered. This 
means you can calculate 
reserves for up to 5 block 
models simultaneously.
The Grade titles, e.g. copper, 
gold etc, are entered in the 
Grade Names panel. A 
maximum of 10 grade titles 
may be entered.
56
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Figure 6­10: Grade Names 
Panel
The breakdown titles are 
entered in the Breakdown 
Names panel. Breakdowns are 
used to calculate reserves 
within each breakdown value. 
For example, you may want to 
break the report down by the 
"geology".
Figure 6­11: Breakdown 
Names Panel
The grade cut­off titles are 
entered in the Grade Cut­offs 
panel. For example; 0, 0.5, 1.0 
.... 10.0
Figure 6­12: Grade Cut­offs 
Panel
A maximum of 9 numeric 
grade cut­off values may be 
specified. The values are used 
by the Above Cut­off option. 
Note:
• Only the first grade 
variable is used for the 
cut­offs. All others are 
calculated within the cut­
off grade range for the first 
grade variable.
The next step is to select the 
regions in which to calculate 
the reserve.
6.2.2 Select the data regions
The Triangle Regions option 
allows you to select the solid 
triangulations to use for the 
reserve calculation. 
Alternatively you may use 
polygons (and the Polygon 
57
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Regions option) to define the 
region for the reserve 
calculation. The regions will 
have the same name as the 
triangulations from which 
they were derived. 
Figure 6­13: Solid Model List 
Panel
Select the Add button to select 
triangulation(s). The common 
open dialog is displayed. The 
usual Windows selection 
methods apply to this panel, 
i.e. use [Ctrl] and the left 
mouse button to select 
multiple non­adjacent files 
and [Shift] and the left mouse 
button to select adjacent files. 
Once the triangulations are 
highlighted use the   
button to move the files to the 
selection area of the panel and 
then select Open. The 
triangulations will be added to 
the Solid Model List panel (see 
Figure 6­14).
Figure 6­14: Solid Model List 
panel with triangulations
Selected triangulations are 
displayed in the list with a 
green tick, deselected with a 
red cross (the deselected 
triangulations will be removed 
from the list once the OK 
button is selected. Double 
click on a triangulation to 
toggle its selection state.
6.2.3 Define the data source
The Assign Data option allows 
you to match the data source 
titles to the block model(s) and 
block model variables that are 
to be used in the reserve 
calculation.
Figure 6­15: Pick Data 
Source Panel
58
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
The Pick Data source panel 
will contain all of the data 
sources that you specified in 
the Block Reserves Setup 
option.
Select the data source you 
want to assign to a block 
model.
Note:
• All data sources listed 
must be assigned a block 
model (this may be the 
same one). 
Figure 6­16: Block Model 
Panel
Enter the name of the block 
model in the Block model 
name field.
The Density can be a single 
value (Use supplied density 
option) or a variable (Use 
stored density option).
Cells can be evaluated using 
either full or proportional 
cells. 
Use full cell evaluation to 
reserve those blocks where the 
centroid falls within the 
region. 
Use proportional cell 
evaluation to use reserve 
exact proportion of a block or 
sub­block that is intersected 
by the region. 
Note:
• The proportional cell 
evaluation method applies 
only when restricting 
blocks using a bounding 
box, closed triangulation 
or bounding surfaces. 
The Block Model 
grade variables 
panel is displayed. 
All grade variable 
titles that were 
specified in the 
Block Reserves 
Setup option are 
listed on this panel. 
Figure 6­17: Block Model 
Grade Variables Panel
For each grade variable title, 
specify a grade variable. All 
59
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
variable titles listed must be 
assigned a grade variable. 
If Breakdown variables were 
specified in the Block 
Reserves Setup option, the 
Breakdown variables panel is 
displayed.
Figure 6­18: Block model 
breakdown variables Panel
For each breakdown variable 
title, specify a breakdown 
variable. All variable titles 
listed must be assigned a 
breakdown variable. 
The Pick Data Source panel is 
then redisplayed if you have 
any unassigned data source 
titles.
Once all data sources have 
been assigned to a block 
model and all other titles to 
block model variables, the 
parameters can be saved. 
6.2.4 Save the reserve
specification
Select the Save Parameters 
option to store the reserve 
parameters in a specification 
file.  The file will automatically 
be given the file extension of 
.bpf.
Note:  
• As the regions are not 
saved in the spec file, each 
time you want to generate 
a new reserve using the 
spec file, you must define 
the region(s) of interest.
Figure 6­19: Save Report 
Format Panel
6.2.5 Calculate the reserves
Select the Calculate option to 
generate the report.   The 
calculations are carried out 
using the specifications 
detailed in the currently 
loaded reserves parameter file 
<project code><spec file 
name>.bpf.
6.2.6 Display the report
Select the Complete option to 
display the report. The report 
is displayed showing the 
tons/grades between cut­offs.
60
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Figure 6­20: Complete 
Report Panel
Select the Ignore zero 
tonnages option to exclude 
zero tonnages.
Select the Save report to file 
option to save the report to a 
file. The maximum size of the 
report name is 20 
alphanumeric characters. No 
file extension is added.
Figure 6­21: Reserve Listing Showing a Complete Report
Select the Above cut­off option to display the report by cut­off grade.
You will be prompted with a panel similar to the Complete Report 
Panel (see Figure 6­17). Select the options required and a report will 
be displayed.
61
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Figure 6­22: Reserve Listing Showing an Above Cut­off Report
The Units column in the report is the product of the Tonnage column 
with the Average Grade column, that is, reports the mass of metal 
contained for each breakdown field. If, for example, Tonnage was 
expressed in Tonnes, and Grade was expressed in grams per Tonne, 
the units in this case would be grams.
Select the Dump option to display the report without titles. This 
output is suitable for importing into a spreadsheet package.
Figure 6­23: Unformatted Dump Panel
Select the Save report to file option to save the report to a file. The 
maximum size of the report name is 20 alphanumeric characters. 
62
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
Figure 6­24: Reserve Listing Showing a Dump Report
63
Chapter 6: Block Reserves
6.3. Advanced Reserves
The Advanced Reserves submenu provides you with total flexibility 
in formatting the titles and content of a block model reserves report. 
You can report on a range of breakdown fields, including being able 
to generate product codes by nominating specific conditions.
64
1. Use Open 
Parameters to 
create the 
reserves 
parameter file.
2. Use Variables to 
specify the block 
variables, cut­offs, 
density, product 
codes and 
partially mined 
3. Use Polygons or 
Triangles to define 
the regions for the 
reserve.
4. Use Block 
Selection to 
apply the 
selection 
criteria to the 
block model.
5. Use 
Calculate to 
generate the 
reserves dump 
file.
6.3.1 Open the specification file
Advanced block reserves are 
calculated according to the 
parameters set up in a reserves 
calculation specification file 
(.res). A specification file must be 
opened (Open Parameters 
option) before the parameters 
can be specified.
Figure 6­25: Open Reserves 
Specification File Panel
Specify the name of the Reserves 
specification file. The maximum 
size for new file names is 80 
alphanumeric characters (the 
size includes the .res file 
extension, which is 
automatically added to the file 
name). 
6.3.2 Specify the Variables (from the
block model on which to report)
The Variables option allows you 
to specify the variables to be 
used when calculating the 
reserves. Each variable will be 
saved to the reserves dump file 
(.dmp) as a column. 
Note:
• A Block model must be open 
before you can specify the 
variables. If no block model 
is open, you'll be prompted to 
open one before the panels 
associated with the variable 
specification are displayed. 
Similarly, you will be 
prompted for a calculation 
reserves file if there is none 
open. 
Figure 6­26: Breakdown Fields 
Panel
The Classification fields allow 
the specification of a breakdown 
variable. In this way the reserves 
can be broken down according to 
fields, such as GEOLOGY or 
ORE_TYPE. For example, 
GEOLOGY could be a field in the 
block model with the values: 
TQ1, TQ2, TQ3. Each of these 
different codes could form the 
basis for a breakdown of the 
reserves, with grades reported 
for each of the three geological 
types. 
A breakdown variable may be of 
data type Name, Byte, Short or 
Integer, but not of type Float or 
Double (see the Online Help 
Envisage > Block > Transfer > 
Edit for an explanation on data 
types). If the breakdown variable 
is of data type Name it will be 
left justified in the dump file, 
otherwise it is right justified. 
Some block models have a 
number of variables, which 
define the fraction of each 
material type. For example, two 
variables FORE and FWST might 
contain the fraction (0.0 to 1.0) 
of ORE and WASTE in each 
block respectively. The reserves 
for material ORE are calculated 
based on the fraction of the 
volume (for each block) specified 
in the FORE field, and the 
reserves for material WASTE 
would be calculated using the 
fraction of the volume (for each 
block) specified in the FWST 
field. The Material type by 
fractions fields can therefore be 
used to classify reserves 
according to material type.
Classifying reserves according to 
material type will also be affected 
by the use of the mined out 
field. If a block has been mined 
out, then the volume is adjusted 
correspondingly before the 
fraction field value is applied to 
the volume (see also the 
description of the Mined Out 
Field). Blocks with unknown 
(missing) values for the fraction 
field, will contain "unknown 
material" in the material column 
of the dump file. 
The remaining options on this 
panel apply to fields in the block 
model that contain percentages 
or fractions related to the volume 
of each block. 
The options are typically used to 
process the results of the Mine 
option (Manipulation submenu) 
or the Execute option (Transfer 
submenu). 
In the Mined out (or fillpc) field 
enter the name of the field in the 
block model that contains the 
mined out or fillpc value. 
You can either select the 
percentage for each block 
(volume) available for mining or 
the fraction of each block 
(volume) that has already been 
mined. 
For example, if the mined out 
field for a block has a value of 
70%, 70% of the block's volume 
is used in determining reserves. 
If the mined out field for a block 
has a fraction value of 0.7, 0.3 of 
the block's volume is used in 
determining reserves. 
When a block is evaluated 
against a region (triangulation) 
the proportion of the block 
inside the region is determined. 
If the block has been partially 
mined, as indicated by a mined 
fraction or available percentage 
field, the treatment of the mined 
part has two cases: 
Case 1 ­ Incremental Pits
If a previous pit has been used to 
set a mined field, then the mined 
part of a block can reasonably be 
assumed to lie inside the new 
pit. Hence select the Mined 
portions assumed inside 
regions option. In this case the 
proportion inside region volume 
is determined and then the 
mined out volume of the block 
subtracted. This method can be 
used to obtain accurate 
incremental pit volumes without 
the need to reblock the model. 
See Figure 6­27 for an example. 
Figure 6­27: A Block inside a 
reserve region that has been 
0.3 mined (70% available).
2 . 0 × ·
× × ·
·
V
0.3) (V - 0.5) (V
VM - VR RV
where,
RV=reserve volume
VR=volume in region
VM=volume mined
V =Total volume
Case 2 ­ Underground Stope 
with Development 
Triangulations of development 
may be used to set a mined field 
in a block model. In this case 
when evaluating a stope region 
the mined part of a block partly 
inside the region needs to be 
assumed equally distributed. 
Hence Do not select Mined 
portions assumed inside 
regions option. In this case the 
reserve volume is the product of 
the proportion in region volume 
and the percentage not mined. 
See Figure 6­28 for an example. 
Figure 6­28: A block 50% 
inside a reserve region that 
has been 0.3 mined (70% 
available)
0.35 V
0.3) - (1 0.5) V
F * VR RV
× ·
× × ·
·
(
where,
RV=reserve volume
VR=volume in region
F=fraction not mined
V =Total volume
Figure 6­29: Second 
Breakdown fields panel
Select the Generate product 
codes option to use product 
codes and apply conditions. If 
unselected, no product codes 
can be specified. 
Each block in the model can be 
classified according to product, 
based on whether it satisfies the 
condition for that product. Each 
product must have an 
associated condition and the 
first condition satisfied will 
determine the product for each 
block. Blocks that don't meet the 
conditions for any of the 
products specified will contain 
"unknown product" in the 
product column of the dump file. 
For example;
Product 
Code
Condition
Lg cu lt 0.5 and au lt 
1.0
mg cu ge 0.5 and cu lt 
2.0 and au ge 1.0 
and au lt 3.5
hg cu ge 2.0 and au ge 
3.5
The next panel (Grade Variables) 
allows you to enter a density and 
up to 15 grade variables for the 
reserve calculation.
Figure 6­30: Grade Variables 
panel
The density variable allows the 
mass to be calculated from the 
volume values. The default 
density is used in the tonnage 
calculation for those blocks 
where the density field value is 0 
(zero) or negative. 
Up to 15 grade variables can be 
specified for the calculation of 
reserves. Each variable can be 
specified as wt by mass, wt by 
vol or sum. 
Sum  ­ Sum is used for variables 
containing units (e.g. grams of 
gold) that should be cumulated 
rather than averaged. 
Wt by Vol ­ Weight by volume is 
used for grade variables 
containing values based on 
volume­weighted averages (e.g. 
grams of gold per cubic metre). 
Wt by Mass ­ Weight by mass is 
used for grade variables that 
should be treated as a weighted 
average based on mass (e.g. 
grams per tonne of gold). 
Grade values are sent to the 
dump file according to type and 
appropriate entries are placed in 
the VARIABLE_TOTALS block. 
Select the Use Average box to 
use the average grade value of 
the selected blocks in the reserve 
calculation. 
Warning!  Do not tick this box if 
any of the blocks do not have a 
specific grade assigned to them 
(i.e. they have a default grade 
instead) as the resulting reserves 
will be incorrect.
Supply a Default for Missing 
value to replace the default 
creation value of the selected 
blocks during the reserve 
calculation. 
If no default is specified and the 
Use Average box is unselected, 
the total volume and tonnage 
values for that grade variable 
may be different to the values for 
the breakdown. In that case the 
total tonnage and total volume 
for the grade variable are also 
reported and the grade value is 
based only on the blocks with 
known values. 
Specify the number of decimal 
places to be included in the 
report.
The final panel in the Variables 
series is the Grade Cut­offs 
panel.
Figure 6­31: Grade Cut­offs 
Panel
Grade cut­off values may be 
specified by:
• Range and increment.
• Specific values.
Select the Use grade cut­offs 
option to use a grade cut­off 
variable to breakdown the 
reserves. Specify the cut­off 
variable. New breakdowns are 
defined based on the specified 
grade cut­off values (see below). 
The Below cut­off value is used 
in the "below cut­offs" column in 
the dump file if the value of the 
grade cut­off variable is less 
than the first (lowest) cut­off 
value. 
The Unknown cut­off value is 
used in the dump file for missing 
values in the grade cut­off 
variable if no default grade value 
has been specified. However, if 
the average grade is to be 
applied for the grade cut­off 
variable, then the average grade 
is calculated based on the 
matching breakdowns (i.e. 
across the cut­off values) and 
the values are incorporated into 
the breakdown with the 
appropriate cut­off value. 
Grade cut­off values may be 
specified as a range (first and 
last values), increment or 
explicitly by value. 
6.3.3 Define Regions
6.3.3.1 Select Polygons as Regions
The Polygons option allows you 
to specify polygons, which are 
converted to triangulations, to be 
used in the reserve calculation. 
Specify the height of the bench 
and the location of the polygon 
within the bench (i.e. top, middle 
or bottom) and the orientation of 
the polygon within the bench, or 
project the polygon (forwards 
and/or backwards) to create the 
triangulation.
Note:
• The polygon must be 
displayed on the screen.
Figure 6­32: Define Regions by 
Polygon Panel
Select the Bench height option 
to convert the polygon to a 
triangulation using bench 
height. Specify the height of the 
bench and the location of the 
polygon relative to the bench 
(top, middle or base). The Use 
directional adjustment on 
sides option is only applicable to 
the bench height conversion 
method.  It allows you to apply a 
directional adjustment, in the 
form of a bearing and gradient, 
to the sides of the bench (used 
for benches with non­vertical 
sides). The Project polygons 
onto plane option is also only 
applicable to the bench height 
conversion method. This option 
allows you to project the 
polygons onto a plane, which is 
defined after this panel is 
completed.
Select the By projection option 
to convert the polygon to a 
triangulation using projection. 
Specify a back and forward 
projection distance. 
Select the Confirm each 
polygon option to view each 
triangulation before it is saved 
and added to the regions list. 
This is particularly useful when 
multiple polygons are being 
converted into triangulations.
Region triangulation files are 
named according to the polygon 
object name and the number of 
regions that have been selected 
for determining reserves. Select 
the Allow duplicate object 
names option if you don't want 
duplicate object names to be 
detected. If unselected, you'll be 
prompted to rename any region 
found to have the same polygon 
object name as another region. 
Region triangulations created 
using this option are 
automatically included in the list 
of selected regions in the 
Triangles option. 
Note:
• If you are converting by 
bench height and projecting 
the polygons onto a plane, 
the Section Plane panel will 
be displayed before the 
Multiple Selection box (which 
is used to select the method 
of selecting the polygons). 
Refer to Reserves > General 
for information on this panel.
Figure 6­33: Multiple Selection 
Box
Select the method for selecting 
the polygons and select the 
polygons. If selecting by group, 
feature or layer, you'll be 
prompted to confirm that the 
correct objects have been 
selected. No prompt appears if 
selecting by object. 
The polygon is then converted to 
a triangulated region. You will be 
asked if the conversion created 
the correct region. 
Figure 6­34: Confirm box
Select Correct region to accept 
the triangulation. If you were 
selecting by object, you will be 
prompted to select another 
object. Right click to return to 
the Multiple Selection box. If you 
were selecting by group, feature 
or layer, then you are returned to 
the Multiple Selection box when 
you accept the region. Right click 
to cancel when you have finished 
creating regions. Incorrect 
region returns you to the “Select 
object” prompt. That is, you’ve 
selected your method of selecting 
the strings and now you need to 
select the strings.
Use the Save Parameters option 
to save the regions.
Note:
• If you selected not to have 
duplicate names (see Allow 
duplicate object names 
option), you'll be prompted to 
rename any duplicates found. 
Figure 6­35: Rename Region 
Panel
Enter the name of the region. 
The maximum size is 10 
alphanumeric characters
6.3.3.2 Select triangulations as
regions
The Triangles option allows you 
to select the triangulations 
(solids) to use as regions in the 
reserve calculation.
Figure 6­36:Select 
Triangulations Panel
Select the Select triangulations 
by picking off screen option to 
pick the triangulations off the 
screen. Triangulations that are 
already regions are automatically 
selected. To remove these 
regions, simply left click on the 
triangulation. To select a 
triangulation, left click on the 
triangulation (you will need to 
confirm the selection). To assign 
or alter the group code, left click 
again on the selected 
triangulation. The Set Group 
Name panel is then displayed. 
Figure 6­37: Set Group Name 
Panel
Enter the group code for the 
selected triangulation. 
Note: 
• To edit the group code of 
existing regions, you will 
need to deselect them first 
and then reselect them. 
Select the Select triangulation 
by name option to access the 
standard open dialog. From this 
dialog, highlight the 
triangulations – the standard 
windows selection methods apply 
(i.e. [Ctrl] + Left mouse button to 
select non­adjacent files and 
[Shift] + Right mouse button to 
select adjacent files.) Once 
highlighted, use the   
button to move the files into the 
selection section of the panel. 
Select Open.
The Reserve Region Report panel 
is displayed.
Figure 6­38: Reserve Region 
Report Panel
This panel lists the names of the 
selected triangulations. To 
specify the group, highlight the 
name(s) in the list, enter the 
group name in the Edit Group 
field and select Set Group.
Select the Deselect all 
triangulations option to remove 
all triangulation regions from the 
parameters.
Use the Save Parameters option 
to save the triangulations.
6.3.4 Specify Block Selection
Conditions
The Block Selection option 
allows you to specify block 
selection criteria for the reserve 
calculation.
Figure 6­39: Block Selection 
Panel
Either all blocks or specific 
blocks can be selected. If you 
select specific blocks, you can 
specify one or more of the 
following selection criteria: 
By variable ­ To restrict blocks 
by a variable, specify the 
variable and a particular value. 
For example, all blocks where 
the Material variable equals Ore. 
By bounding triangulation ­ To 
evaluate reserves within a 
particular solid triangulation, 
e.g. a stope. If there is more than 
one triangulation loaded, you'll 
be prompted to select the 
required one. 
Note:
• If regions are being used, the 
block selection triangulation 
will be ignored. Therefore we 
recommend that a 
triangulation only be used in 
block selection when not 
including regions.
By bounding box ­ To restrict 
the selected blocks to those 
contained within a cube. The 
cube is defined in Interactive or 
Co­ordinate mode. The required 
mode is selected from the panel 
displayed upon completion of the 
current panel. 
If you select to use Interactive 
mode, you'll be prompted to 
create the box by indicating the 
lower left corner and then 
dragging the "rubber" band 
rectangle to the upper right 
corner. 
If you select to use Co­ordinate 
mode, enter the minimum and 
maximum co­ordinates for the 
box.
By section ­ To restrict the 
blocks to a defined section plane. 
You can then enter its associated 
thickness. The section plane can 
be selected by line, points, grid 
co­ordinates or 3 points (the 
panel for this information is 
displayed as soon as the current 
panel has been accepted). 
By condition ­ To use a field 
constraint, for example, 
Fe gt 10.0
(iron value greater than 10.0). A 
list of available operators/ 
functions is provided in the 
Online Help (in Appendix D of 
the Core Appendices).
By bounding surfaces ­ To 
restrict the blocks by a bounding 
surface. A panel in which you 
specify the top and bottom 
surface triangulations is 
displayed once this panel is 
completed.
Reverse matching ­ To reverse 
the block selection, that is, to 
select the blocks that are not 
selected by the other selection 
criteria. 
Cells can be evaluated using 
either full or proportional cells. 
Use full cell evaluation (that is 
select the Use Block Centres 
option) if you want the average 
grade of those cells where the 
centroid falls within the region. 
Use proportional cell 
evaluation (that is leave the Use 
Block Centres option unticked) 
if you want to use the exact 
proportion of a block or sub­
block that is intersected by the 
region. This calculates the 
weighted average of those 
portions and is the most precise 
method. 
Hints:
• The proportional cell 
evaluation method applies 
only when restricting blocks 
using a bounding box, closed 
triangulation or bounding 
surfaces. 
6.3.5 Save the Parameters
The Save Parameters option 
allows you to save the open 
reserves specification file. This 
must be done before the 
Calculate option is used as the 
reserves calculations are based 
on the contents of the reserves 
specification file.
Figure 6­40: Save Reserves 
Specification File Panel
Enter the name of the 
specification file (the open 
specification file name is 
displayed as the default). The 
maximum size is 80 
alphanumeric characters 
(including the .res extension). 
6.3.6 Calculate the Reserves
The Calculate option allows you 
to calculate the block reserves 
for the open specification file. 
The results are stored in a dump 
file (.dmp).
When calculating reserves, the 
block creation default value will 
be ignored when calculating the 
grade value. The estimation 
default value, if it is different 
from the block creation default 
value, will be included when 
calculating the grade value. All 
blocks that satisfy the selection 
criteria are used for the tonnage 
calculation regardless of their 
default grade value. 
Note:
• As the block creation default 
values are ignored when 
calculating reserve grades, 
blocks with these values are 
effectively treated as if they 
had the average grade of the 
blocks selected for that 
reserve breakdown zone. 
• If there are many regions 
being used or the block 
model is large, then the 
calculation may take a while. 
It is recommended that you 
perform the calculation in 
another window so that 
further work in Envisage can 
proceed. However, the block 
model cannot be accessed 
until the reserves calculation 
is complete. 
• Choose spawn reserves 
calculation in window to 
make the calculation run in a 
separate window.
Figure 6­41: Calculate 
Reserves Panel
Enter the name of the dump file. 
The default is the name of the 
open parameter file. The 
maximum size is 40 alpha­
numeric characters (this 
includes the .dmp file extension). 
Select the Spawn reserves 
calculations in window option 
to run the calculation process in 
another window, thus freeing the 
current window for further 
Envisage work. 
6.3.7 Reporting the Reserves
• Use the Open Report option 
to create the reserves report 
parameter file.
• Use the Global option to 
store global settings, such as 
report titles and layout.
• Use the Column option to 
set up column formats and 
user defined variables.
• Use the Tables  option to set 
up table formats and choose 
which columns to report in 
the table(s).
• Use the View Report option 
to report the reserves and 
select the tables to use.
6.3.7.1 Open report specification file
The Open Report option allows 
you to open a report 
specification file (<name>.tab).
Note:
• The block model does not 
need to be open to perform 
any report setup functions. 
Figure 6­42: Open Report 
Specification File Panel
Enter the name of the 
specification file. The maximum 
size is 80 alphanumeric 
characters. The size includes the 
.tab file extension.
Hint: 
•  It is highly recommended 
that you are consistent with 
your filenames.  It is best to 
give the same unique name 
to all four files, that is, the 
.res file, the .dmp file, the 
.tab file and finally the .rep 
file are all given the same file 
name. You will then be able 
to distinguish between them 
by their different file 
extensions. 
Select the Read columns from 
.dmp file option to create the 
report based on the column 
information that exists in the 
header of the dump file (.dmp). 
Specify the name of the dump 
file. 
If reading columns from a dump 
file, the column name, width, 
type and totals calculation 
classification for each dump file 
column/variable are read in 
from the dump file header and 
each column is added to the end 
of the columns list. Columns 
present in the columns list with 
the same name as dump file 
columns are not replaced. 
6.3.7.2 Define General Report
Details
The Global option allows you to 
set the general parameters that 
apply to all tables in a report. 
You may:
• Enter page length
• Enter margin widths
• Enter page header
• Enter page footer
Figure 6­43: Global Report 
Parameters Panel
Enter the maximum number of 
Lines per page. The default is 
60 (standard for an A4 portrait 
page).  A page break is 
automatically inserted when the 
maximum is reached.
Enter the margins. The left 
margin is the number of spaces 
before the text starts (the default 
is 10). The top margin is the 
number of lines before the text 
starts (the default is 4). This 
number is in addition to the 
maximum number of lines per 
page.
Tick the Use box to separate 
rows and optionally columns. 
Enter the separating character in 
the Row and Column fields.
Tick the Use Tab box to use tabs 
instead of a character to 
separate the columns.
Up to 5 lines of page header 
information can be specified. The 
maximum size of each line is 80 
alphanumeric characters.  The 
page header appears at the top 
of each page.  The header lines 
are included in the maximum 
number of report lines specified 
earlier. 
Note:
• The page header may include 
the variables $page (current 
page number), $date (current 
date), $time (current time) 
and $blocksel (block 
selection information from 
dump file). These variables 
are substituted when the 
report is created. The 
variables may be in either 
upper or lower case. 
Up to 15 lines of page footer 
information can be specified. The 
maximum size of each line is 80 
alphanumeric characters.  The 
page footer appears at the end of 
the report. The footer lines are 
included in the maximum 
number of report lines specified 
earlier. 
Note:
• The same variables as 
mentioned above may be 
included in the page footer. 
6.3.7.3 Define Column specs.
The Columns option allows you 
to add, delete, or edit columns in 
the report column list. You may 
change:
• The header
• Width
• Number of decimals
• Class
Note:
• Columns may also be 
derived, i.e. calculated, from 
values in other columns.
Figure 6­44: Report Columns 
panel
The column name must be 
unique within the list of 
columns. The maximum size is 
20 alphanumeric characters. 
Spaces are not allowed. The 
maximum number of columns 
per specification file is 50. 
The heading appears at the top 
of the column. The maximum 
size is 20 alphanumeric 
characters. Spaces are allowed. 
The heading will be centred 
within the width specified below. 
It must not contain more 
characters than the column 
width. 
The width defines the number of 
characters that the column 
entries will take up in each row. 
If a character column value 
exceeds the width of the column, 
it will be truncated to fit. If a 
numeric column value exceeds 
the column width, the column 
will be expanded for that row to 
accommodate the value. This is 
to avoid undefined numeric 
values in reports. Numeric 
column values are right justified, 
character column values are left 
justified. 
The decimals value determines 
how numeric columns are 
displayed. If the value is 
negative, no decimal places are 
displayed and the column values 
are rounded.
For example, a value of ­1 
rounds to the nearest 10, ­2 to 
the nearest 100 etc. The 
rounding of numeric columns 
does not affect the original 
column values used in 
calculations; only the displayed 
values are rounded. 
Tick the Derived column 
checkbox to derive the column 
from other columns. If 
unselected, the column must be 
from the dump file. 
The Calculate on output option 
is only applicable if you have 
selected the Derived column 
option. It allows you to calculate 
the derived column on output. 
Calculations are based on the 
actual dump file column values 
for each row, except for columns 
that are to be calculated on 
output. Columns that are 
calculated on output use the 
column values displayed for that 
row. 
For example,
Column 1 and Column 2 have 
the following input values:
Column 1 Column 2
Value 1 10.0
Value 1 20.0
Value 3 30.0
Value 4 40.0
Column 3 and Column 4 are 
both derived from values in 
column 2:
Column 3
Derived Yes
Derived on 
output
No
Expression 1 1.0/column2 
condition 1: 
column2 gt 
0.0
Expression 2 0.0
type sum
Column 4
Derived Yes
Derived on 
output
Yes
Expression 1 1.0/column2 
condition 1: 
column2 gt 
0.0
Expression 2 0.0
type sum
And the table is ordered and 
reported by column 1:
Table
Order_by Column 1
Report_by Column 1
Results in the following being 
reported:
Col 1 Col 2 Col 3 Col 4
Val 1
30.0 0.15000 0.0333300
Val 2
70.0 0.05833 0.0142857
100.00 0.20833 0.0476157
Note:
• The values in column 3 are 
different to column 4 because 
column 4 has been derived 
from the column 1 output 
values of 30.0 and 70.0, 
whereas column 3 was 
derived from the values 10.0, 
20.0, 30.0 and 40.0 
05833 . 0
40
1
30
1
15 . 0
20
1
10
1
· +
· +
The 
Expression/Conditio
n options are only 
applicable for derived 
columns. An 
expression will only be 
used (in the 
calculation of the 
column) if a condition 
is associated with the 
expression and that 
condition is met. The 
first condition to be 
met determines the 
expression to use and 
an expression without 
a condition will always 
evaluate to TRUE. 
To avoid undefined column 
values, it is very important that 
there is always an expression 
that can be used, especially in 
the case when none of the 
conditions are met (see example 
on the previous page). Take care 
also to avoid division by zero, 
numeric underflow and numeric 
overflow errors in expressions. 
Expressions for derived columns 
may include: 
• Arithmetic operators
• logical operators
• string operators
• numeric functions
• logical functions
• string functions
• column names*
• column internal function 
names** 
See the Online Help, Envisage > 
Core Appendices > Appendix D 
for a description of the available 
operators/functions. 
* Never use operators in column 
names or give columns the same 
name as any of the functions. 
**Three types of column internal 
functions are available for use in 
deriving columns. This is done 
by prefixing the name of a 
numeric column with Sum_, 
Max_ or Min_. These are the 
cumulative sum, maximum and 
minimum column internal 
functions respectively. 
The functions can be used to 
derive column values in the 
same way as column names. 
Specify the class for numeric 
columns. The class options are: 
Value, Average, Sum, Maximum, 
Minimum, and Weighted average. 
These options determine how the 
column values are to be 
calculated and displayed. Each 
variable column is generally 
treated as a sum, average, 
maximum, minimum or weighted 
average based on another 
column's value (e.g. grade based 
on tonnage). Specify that other 
column in the Weight By 
Column field. The Value option is 
used for columns that are not to 
be subtotalled, but rather have 
their actual values reported. For 
example, columns using the 
column internal functions 
Cumulative Sum, Maximum and 
Minimum. 
The Display final total option is 
only applicable if the Value 
option was selected. It allows you 
to display the final total. 
6.3.7.4 Define Table Details.
The Tables option allows you to 
add, delete, and edit tables used 
in the report. For each table you 
may specify:
• Columns to be reported
• Columns to order by
• Columns to report by
• Conditions to apply to 
columns.
Note:
• When you are finished 
defining the tables save the 
specification file.
Figure 6­45: Report Tables 
Panel
The table name must be unique 
within the list of tables. The 
maximum size is 20 alpha­
numeric characters. Spaces are 
not allowed. 
Select the Descending to sort 
column values (rows) in 
descending order. If unticked, 
values will be sorted in 
ascending order. 
The Order by column allows you 
to specify the column(s) by which 
to order. If entering more than 
one, separate each column with 
a comma. The total number of 
characters for the columns 
specified here must not exceed 
80 characters. If no columns to 
order by are specified, the rows 
remain unsorted (i.e. in the same 
order as the dump file). 
If using a column to order by 
that is also a column to be 
subtotalled (see Report by 
option), that column must be the 
last entry. 
Note:
• Columns based on column 
internal functions or 
columns calculated on 
output cannot be used, as 
sorting is performed before 
column subtotalling. 
Select the Only Display Totals 
option to only report total values.
The Report by option allows you 
to specify a column for which 
subtotals will be reported. Every 
time the column value changes a 
subtotal row will be displayed in 
the table. If also ordering by this 
column, make sure that the 
column is the last one specified 
in the Order by field. 
Note:
• As subtotalling is performed 
before reporting column 
values, columns calculated 
on output cannot be used. 
Character columns will be 
excluded from the report if they 
are not used for ordering or 
subtotalling. Numeric columns 
are always included except if the 
Display final total option is 
unselected (see Report Columns 
panel in the Columns option). 
The condition fields allow you to 
select which rows to include in 
the table based on whether 
certain column conditions are 
met. For example, the following 
condition will select only the 
rows with a copper grade 
between 1.4 and 6.0: 
cu_ivd gt 1.4 and cu_ivd lt 6.0
Up to 5 conditions may be 
entered. To access the conditions 
panel, click on the icon at the 
right of the field. All conditions 
must be true before a row is 
included in the table. See the 
Online Help, Envisage > Core 
Appendices > Appendix D for a 
full list of available 
operators/functions. 
Note:
• Any column name can be 
used in the row selection 
conditions, but row selection 
is performed before the 
sorting and subtotalling of 
columns, so columns based 
on column internal functions 
or columns calculated on 
output cannot be used. 
Either all columns can be used 
in the table or a subset (select 
columns).
If the Select All columns option 
is selected, the columns appear 
in the table as in the columns 
list. 
To select a subset of the 
columns, untick the Select All 
columns option and enter the 
names (separated by a comma) 
of the columns you want to 
include in the Selected 
Columns field.
Note:
• If subsets are selected, the 
columns used to order and 
report by must be included in 
the subset. Selecting a 
column does not necessarily 
mean that it will be displayed 
in the table. See the 
description of the Report by 
option. 
6.3.7.5 Save the specification file
The Save Report option allows 
you to save the open report 
specifications file. This must be 
done before the View Report 
option is used as the report 
creation is based on the contents 
of the report specification file. 
Figure 6­46: Save report 
Specification File Panel
Enter the name of the report 
specification file. The default 
name is the name of the open 
report specification file 
(<name>.tab). This can be 
overwritten with a new name if 
you don't want the "old" file to be 
affected. The maximum size is 
80 alphanumeric characters. The 
size includes the .tab file 
extension.
6.3.7.6 Reporting the reserves
The View Report option allows 
you to generate a report using 
the open report specification file.
The resulting report is stored in 
a report file (.rep).
The results may be posted to the 
screen if required.
Note:
• The report is automatically 
sent to the Report Window, 
but will be limited to the 
width of that window so 
some columns may not be 
displayed. If this is the case, 
save the report and view it in 
a text editor.
Figure 6­47: Create report 
Panel
Enter the name of the dump file 
containing the required 
calculation results.
Enter the name of the resulting 
report file. The default is 
report.rep. The maximum size is 
40 alphanumeric characters 
(this includes the .rep file 
extension). 
Either all tables or selected 
tables can be included in the 
report. If you select All tables, 
the tables appear in the report in 
the same order as they do in the 
table list. If you select Select 
tables, the tables appear in the 
order that they are selected. Use 
the drop­down lists to select the 
particular tables.
Select the Post report in 
graphics option to display the 
report in the Primary window.
Once this panel is completed, 
you will be prompted to specify a 
layer for the report (if no layer is 
currently open) and the name of 
the report to be loaded into that 
layer. A colour for the report text 
is also specified. You are then 
prompted to indicate the text 
origin, i.e. the left hand corner 
where the report text will start, 
and the text extent. 
The report is displayed in the 
Report Window or, if posting in 
graphics, displayed as a layer. In 
the latter case you can use the 
Text Edit options under Design 
for any text editing functions. 
Workshop - Block
Reserves
The aim of this workshop is to 
use both of the block reserves 
submenus to gain an 
understanding as to what each 
offers.
Try producing a few simple 
reports first and then progress to 
more complex reports.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful