EVERYTHING YOU THOUGHT YOU KNEW ABOUT MOOCS COULD BE WRONG

By Phil Hill and Michael Feldstein

OUR VIEW AS OF ABOUT 9 MONTHS AGO

WHATEVER ELSE MOOCS ARE, THEY ARE…

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Massive Open Online Courses But what if they’re not?

NON-MASSIVE “OOCS”

Size could be limited to control for pedagogical quality (e.g., Harvard’s Copyright OOC was capped at 500 students). Some elements of an OOC could be massive while others are not (e.g., SJSU added a F2F component to Udacity and edX courses).

NON-OPEN “MOCS”

• •

Most xMOOCs are not open in the sense that their content is not provided under a Creative Commons license. Some “recommend” for-pay textbooks; others could charge fees in the future. Most consistent kind of open is open access, which is related to but not the same thing as “free.” This may be the hardest aspect of MOOCs to change. (Or not.)

NON-ONLINE “MOCS”

Blended delivery is possible (e.g., the SJSU model). This is a kind of classroom flipping.

NON-CLASS “MOOS”

Classes tend to have beginning and end dates; MOOs could be project-based communities (e.g., the FMS Photo a Day Challenge). MOOCs could serve as launch pads for MOOs (e.g., edX 6.003z).

WHAT TO EXPECT NEXT

WHAT TO EXPECT NEXT

Lots of experimentation and mutation will happen as people begin to recognize that MOOCs have to serve some particular purpose for students and (often, but not always) institutions. The scale that MOOCs have brought to the conversation will be applied selectively and in new ways.

Questions?

MindWires Consulting http:/www.mindwires.com/ http:/mfeldstein.com/ e-Literate blog michael@mindwires.com or phil@mindwires.com

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