M

y dad lef for
Ground Zero
around 8:30 a.m. on
Sept. 11, 2001, and returned on
Friday, Sept. 14.
I grew up in a suburb 24
miles from Ground Zero with
a father who was a frefghter
in one of the busiest frehouses
in New York City’s East
Harlem. “Te Fire Factory” is
a broken down, two-story brick
structure, but it was a second
home to my father. When he
wasn’t there, we were home
together raising the volume
every time there was news of a
fre on the TV, or listening to
the FDNY fre dispatch playing
subtly in my kitchen.
On the morning of Sept. 11,
I attended another seemingly
normal day of third grade at
Covert Avenue Elementary
School. At 10 a.m. I was picked
up early by my friend’s mother.
I didn’t know our country was
in the midst of experiencing one
of the worst terrorist attacks in
our history, I was just thrilled
not to be sitting through another
boring classroom activity. At the
same time, Mayor Rudy Giuliani
was issuing an “all-city alert.”
Tis meant all NYC frefghters
and police ofcers must report to
their jobs.
Tat included my dad. With
that, my mother removed
my father’s FDNY medal, a
birthday gif she got him a few
years prior, from around his
neck and said goodbye as he
lef for lower Manhattan, not
knowing when, or if, he’d return.
He was a frst responder and
made it to Ground Zero before
the collapse of the second
tower. As the day dragged on
and the look of fear and anxiety
consumed my mother, I grew
curious. Our phone was ringing
of the hook and the TV in our
living room was blasting with
voices of scared and confused
newscasters. Nobody knew
what was happening. Some
people were calling this an act of
terrorism; others were calling it
an “accident.”
Afer four nights, my father
returned home. We were the
lucky ones – some families are
still waiting on their loved ones.
But he had slept in the frehouse,
working day and night, ceasing
the fre and rummaging through
the rubble. I don’t know what
my father saw during those long
hours, and to this day he is quiet
about the experience. What I do
1
Volume 126 Issue 12 kansan.com Wednesday, September 11, 2013
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 9
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 10
SUDOKU 5
Sunny. 10 percent chance of
rain. Wind SW at 13 mph.
2 + 2 = 4 Index Don’t
forget
Today’s
Weather
Too hot to function
HI: 97
LO: 68
BRENT BURFORD AND GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Big Jay and Paul Quigley, marketing representative, invite students to vote online for the 2013 Capital One Mascot of the Year. The winner receives $25,000 for mascot costume upgrades or equipment.
BIG LOVE FOR BIG JAY
Students can vote Kansas mascot to victory in national competition
B
ig Jay is vying for the title of
2013 Capital One Mascot of
the Year and needs your support.
He is one of 16 college mascots
selected through video entries for
the nationwide competition. Each
week, Big Jay goes head-to-head
with another mascot and each
match’s winner is declared based on
who receives the most votes. Te
winner of the title will be chosen the
week of the Capitol One Bowl and
receives $25,000 for their school’s
mascot program, which could be
used for costume upgrades and
additional equipment.
Not only does Big Jay deserve to
win, according to Paul Quigley, a
marketing representative for the
mascot, but his senior-night tuxedo
is looking a little worn.
“Te reason Big Jay was chosen
is because he’s a unique character.
Tere’s nothing else in the nation
that’s anything like Big Jay,”
Quigley said. Big Jay is the tallest
(over 7’4”) and most accomplished
mascot with fve national basketball
championships under his belt.
Big Jay defeated Mike the Tiger
from Louisiana State University last
week with 52 percent of the vote
and is currently ahead of Rocky
the Rocket from the University of
Toledo with 53 percent of the vote
in this week’s match-up. Voting
ends on Sunday of each week.
“He’s kind of full of himself. He’s
cooler than everybody else and
he knows it. It’s kind of hard not
to choose Big Jay when he’s that
popular,” Quigley said.
Charlotte Lane, a senior from
Olathe, played alto saxophone in
the Marching Jayhawks for four
years and said that game days
can be exhausting for the band.
Members attend an early morning
rehearsal and begin performing an
hour before kickof.
“I know Big Jay was a reminder to
me that we were there to entertain
and to keep spirits up if they were
down, and to keep us excited until
the very end,” Lane said.
It’s a given that Big Jay should
win — he’s from a school with one
of the best student sections in the
nation, Lane said.
Preston Randall, a sophomore
from Lawrence, is a running-back
for the Jayhawks. He said Big Jay
is a great symbol for fans on game
day. “He represents a great school
and that’s a great reason to vote for
him,” Randall said.
For many students, Big Jay is
a symbol not only of game day
spirit, but also of the hard work
and dedication that is present
throughout the University. Big Jay
lives and dies with Jayhawk wins
and losses, Quigley said.
“Tere’s nothing more important
to him than a win for the Jayhawks,”
Quigley said. “Big Jay deserves
to win because there’s no better
way to show the rest of the nation
how proud and how loud Jayhawk
nation is.”
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
THERE ARE THREE WAYS TO VOTE
1. Go to Capitalonebowl.com and
click “VOTE NOW” on Big Jay’s
mascot page. (1pt)
2. Each week there is a new
challenge or question. Answer it
in a tweet or on Facebook using
#CapitalOneBigJay. This week’s
question is, “If your mascot played
on the team, what position would he
play and why?” (25pts)
3. Make a video of the weekly
challenge. This week, that means
flming yourself playing Big Jay’s
position, and share it on Twitter,
Facebook or Instagram using
#CapitalOneBigJay. (100pts)

“There’s nothing more
important to him than a
win for the Jayhawks.”
PAUL QUIGLEY
Marketing representative for Big Jay
NETWORKING PAYING RESPECT
Afer six months of hard work,
Justin Christian, a senior from
Topeka, can sit back and watch
applications roll in as his new group,
Next Generation Program, unveils.
Tis program is the frst student
development program at the William
Allen White School of Journalism
and Mass Communications. It is
devoted to interaction with the
community and fellow students,
real-world work experience and
engagement with the journalism
school alumni.
Tis program consists of alumni
and 20 students from each class
(freshmen, sophomores, juniors
and seniors) who will be divided
into fve groups with equal class
representation. Groups will work all
year for a business, school group or
any organization that needs a void
flled.
“If a 16-student team with an
alumni advisor approaches a
business that they decided as
a group they want to help, that
organization is crazy not to say yes,”
Christian said.
During the year students will
come up with three presentations:
a research presentation, a progress
report and a fnal presentation,
which will be presented to faculty
and alumni at J-School Generations
the next fall.
Tis program was part of last
year’s Challenge Day at J-School
Generations. Justin’s team was
given four and a half hours to give
a presentation on a design of a 21st
century journalism curriculum with
no funding limitations.
Te team’s main goal was to
create a mentorship program where
students would be able to network
with other students, talk about their
experiences and also pass down
techniques learned inside or outside
the classroom.
For a previous major, Christian
was involved in a mentorship
program where he was required to
meet with a mentor two times. Tey
met twice and parted ways. Tis
process not only was frustrating at
the time, but also made him feel that
his mentor was too busy for him.
Tese experiences shaped what
Christian thinks a mentorship
program should be and, better
yet, he thinks it’s a program that
will give students a more enriched
experience than his own.
Journalism school advisor Dan
McCarthy, who has worked with
Christian, compared education to
a car engine, and said that students
are the driving force and the steering
wheel. McCarthy said that students
are the ones who can say, “No, I
want to go more in this direction.”
Te Next Generation Program
lets students drive each group:
making their own decisions on what
business they will be working with,
how much time they spend together
and how they will complete the
project.
As applications are arriving
in Christian’s inbox, he’s a little
nervous, but excited since he is
seeing the results of his hard work.
Applications are underway and
should be submitted by 11:59 p.m.
Sept. 26. For more information
email Christian at J.Christian@
ku.edu.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
ASHLEY BOOKER
abooker@kansan.com
New journalism program connects students with alumni
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Justin Christian, a senior from Topeka, was motivated to start a student development program that will include alumni mentorship and work experience.
By Dani Brady
dbrady@kansan.com
Daughter remembers
Ground Zero heroes
SEE 9/11 PAGE 4
JENNIFER SALVA
jsalva@kansan.com
Keeping with the spirit of cam-
pus construction and renovation,
the KU Bookstore in the Kansas
Union is undergoing a top-to-bot-
tom remodel this semester.
Te bookstore will join a num-
ber of other campus hotspots that
have been given facelifs in the
past few years, including the Un-
derground and Wescoe Beach.
Tese projects are being undertak-
en by the University in an attempt
to enhance the student experience.
Te eagerness for the bookstore
remodel is evident in the faces of
all of the staf members within
the building. “We’re really excit-
ed about the construction,” said
Estella McCollum, director of KU
Bookstores. “Tis has been a long
time coming.”
Te project has been in the mak-
ing for close to three years and
should certainly wow students and
faculty upon its completion.
Te new foor plan will boast 13
total registers distributed among
the diferent areas of the store. By
moving the registers to the cor-
ners of the foor rather than hav-
ing them lined up in the front, the
bookstore hopes to alleviate some
of the congestion that occurred
with high trafc in the past.
Te KU Tech Shop will have its
own register rather than sharing
sales space with the rest of the
store. By separating clothing, text-
books and technology into their
own areas, McCollum said she
is “confdent that this will create
a much better customer experi-
ence when it comes to peak trafc
times.”
Te remodel is set to be complet-
ed by Nov. 15. Te current phase
of the design, commissioned by
Sabatini Architects and Bruner
Construction, is scheduled for
completion on Sept. 20.
Te nature of the bookstore
gives it quite a bit of control over
the planning process for the de-
velopment. “We are a self-funded
nonproft, so everything that we
make is reinvested into building
upkeep and student activities,”
McCollum said.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney
Te Kansas Creative Arts In-
dustries Commission announced
a new license plate as part of an
initiative called “Driving the Arts”
in a move to generate funding for
arts programs.
Te plates have a $50 annual fee
with 100 percent of the revenue
going to Kansas arts programs.
Te CAIC has a revenue goal of
$100,000 per year, requiring a
minimum of 2,000 plates to be
purchased by April 1 to meet this
year’s goal.
Governor Sam Brownback ve-
toed to continue funding the
Kansas Arts Commission in 2011,
making Kansas the frst state to
stop funding the arts. Brownback
defended his decision by saying
the arts should be funded by pri-
vate contributors, not public tax
dollars.
Tis led to the loss of $689,000
of funding for the Kansas Arts
Commission and more than $1
million in matching funds from
the National Endowment for the
Arts and the Mid-American Arts
Alliance towards arts programs
and grants in Kansas.
Maria Losito, a junior from
Olathe studying illustration and
animation, said even if the funds
from the plates do not make up
for the signifcant amount lost
from funding cuts two years ago,
it might create a positive motiva-
tion to start fnding other sources
of funding.
Since the funding cuts, arts pro-
grams and initiatives have had to
raise funding through local tax-
es and private donations. Many
programs have struggled to raise
funding on their own, specifcally
in rural areas, writes Scott Roth-
schild from the Lawrence Jour-
nal-World.
Losito said she worries that stu-
dents will lose interest in art or not
attempt to pursue artistic endeav-
ors if resources are limited or in-
accessible, and might lose an im-
portant way to express themselves.
“Having an art program helps
young students discover who they
are and gives them extra avenues
to fgure out what they want to do
in life,” Losito said.
In 2012, Brownback formed
the CAIC, a division of the State
Commerce Department, which
replaced the previously disbanded
Kansas Arts Commission.
Te Kansas arts community
recently celebrated a success in
August, when the National En-
dowment for the Arts restored
$560,000 in arts grants to the
CAIC. Some of the grant recip-
ients for this year include the
Hutchinson Teatre Guild and the
Arkansas City Area Arts Council.
Selena Cochran, a senior from
Leawood studying visual art, said
that throughout her time in school
before coming to the University,
her arts and choir classes were “the
most fun part of the day, a release
and escape during school.”
“I think it’s something all chil-
dren should be able to explore if
they want to, and they shouldn’t
have to struggle to fnd a way to do
it,” Cochran adds. “Tey might not
ever know that they’d enjoy some-
thing like that, which is scary.”
Cochran said she doesn’t “un-
derstand why the arts would be
considered less important than
other things,” and said she thinks
the arts deserve funding from the
state.
“It makes people explore other
ways of thinking, and other ways
of processing things,” Cochran
said. “If you don’t have the arts,
you’re not using a whole other part
of your brain, the creative side. It’s
just an important part of life.”
Cochran said she fnds it sad that
some students in schools around
Kansas may not get the opportu-
nity to experience arts classes.
“For a lot of people, it’s their es-
cape if they’re struggling through
something. It helps them get
through difcult times. Everybody
should be able to test it out.”
Losito said she feels that a loss of
arts funding means a blow to con-
tributions that the artistic com-
munity makes.
“It’s great to have people who can
provide beautiful images that will
make people happy,” Losito said.
To reserve a Driving the Arts li-
cense plate, visit
Ka n s a s C o mme r c e . c o m/
ArtsPlate.

— Edited by Chas Strobel
1
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison Kohn
Dylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Business manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren Armendariz
Hayley Jozwiak
Elise Reuter
Madison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole Anneberg
Allyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS
Media director and
content stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013 PAGE 2
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
Newsroom: (785)-766-1491
Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: UDK_News
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student
newspaper of the University of Kansas. The
frst copy is paid through the student activity
fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are
50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased
at the Kansan business offce, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-
4967) is published daily during the school
year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall
break, spring break and exams and weekly
during the summer session excluding
holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are
$250 plus tax. Send address changes to
The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out
KUJH-TV
on Knology
of Kansas
Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what
you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other
news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.
KJHK is the student voice
in radio. Whether it’s rock
‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or
special events, KJHK 90.7
is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
What’s the
Friday Saturday Sunday
HI: 79
HI: 82 HI: 85
LO: 53
LO: 61 LO: 56
— weather.com
Cloudy. Zero
percent chance of
rain. Wind ENE at
8 mph.
A.m. clouds/ p.m.
sun. Zero percent
chance of rain.
Wind ESE at 9 mph.
Isolated t-storms.
30 percent
chance of rain.
Wind S at 8 mph.
Got my head in the clouds. Where’s the fall weather? Let’s hope for the ffty-six.
Calendar
Wednesday, Sept. 11 Thursday, Sept. 12 Friday, Sept. 13 Saturday, Sept. 14
dreams can come true. now open unti l 3am.
( 785) 843- 8650 or
( 785) 841- 7096
1410 Kasol d DR.
( Bob Bi l l i ngs and
Kasol d DR. )
Sun: 11am-Midnight
Mon: 11am-10pm
Tue-Wed: 11-Midnight
Thu-Sat: 11am-3am
%* /& * / t %&-* 7&3: t $"33:065
"4* "/ $6* 4* /&
03%&3 0/-* /&
BU +BEF(BS EFO0OM J OF DPN
The 14th Oldest Jewelry
Store in the Country
A TRADITION OF
EXCELLENCE SINCE 1880
RINGS, WATCHES, CRYSTALS
DIAMONDS, LOOSE & MOUNTED
WEDDING BANDS, JEWELRY, IN
HOUSE WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIR,
FINANCING, SPEED, SERVICE &
CUSTOM DESIGN
827 MASSACHUSETTS 785-843-4266 www.marksjewelers.net
CAMPUS
STATE
Remodel underway
for KU Bookstore
CALEB SISK
csisk@kansan.com
ERIN BREMER/KANSAN
The KU Bookstore is now under construction. The remodel is set to be completed by Nov. 15.
New license plates support the arts with Driving the Arts program
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com
What: Volunteer Fair
When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, 4th Floor
About: KU volunteer clubs and local
programs table in the lobby to give
information on volunteer opportunities
What: Queering the Bible
When: 7 to 8 p.m.
Where: ECM Center, Main Floor
About: A presentation by Rev. Dwight
Welch on being Christian and
challenging social norms
Cost: Small donation requested for
6:30 dinner
What: The Role of Islam in Post 9/11 America
When: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Woodruff Auditorium
About: A lecture by Arsalan Iftikhar,
international human rights lawyer and
author
What: Sexy Science
When: 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Where: Dyche Hall
About: Games, activities and snacks for KU
students 18 years or older
What: Sand Volleyball Tournament
When: 4 to 7 p.m.
Where: Ambler Student Recreation Fitness
Center, Sand Volleyball Courts
About: Six-person team or club tournament
for cash prizes, presented by Student Union
Activities
What: Potselui Putina (Putin’s Kiss)
When: 7 p.m.
Where: Bailey Hall, 318
About: Film and snacks presented by the
Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian
Studies.
What: Monarch Watch Fall Open House
When: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Foley Hall
About: Open house, refreshments, hands-on
activities, garden and lab tours, tagging
demonstrations and bugs
What: Fabrications or How to Lie with a
Computer
When: 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union
About: Keynote speech on manipulating modern
technology
WANT NEWS UPDATES
ALL DAY LONG?
Follow
@KansanNews
on Twitter
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
In this year’s Miss America
pageant, Miss Kansas, Sgt. Theresa
Vail, will be only the second military
contestant in the pageant’s history.
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriff’s
Offce booking recap.




RII
$
5
$
15
OFFER GOOD NOW - 10/13/13
Valid for one transaction only. Limit one
coupon per visit. Not valid on sale
merchandise, rentals, in-store services,
gift cards, previously purchased
merchandise, or in conjunction with any
other coupon, excluding Ace Rewards.
Excludes Weber Grills and Benjamin
Moore paint. Coupon may not be sold
or transferred. Void if photocopied,
duplicated, sold, transferred and where
prohibited. Any other use constitutes
fraud. No cash value.
Note to cashier: scan barcode.
LAWRENCE LOCATIONS:
601 KASOLD
711 W. 23RD STREET

MON. - SAT. 8AM TO 9PM SUN. 9AM TO 7PM
1(@/(>2
REMOVABLE PICTURE HANGERS
STORAGE TOTES
COMMAND HOOKS
PAINT
CHALKBOARD SPRAY PAINT
SPECIALTY LIGHT BULBS
LOCKS
DUCT TAPE
... AND WE CUT KEYS!
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
LIVING ON OR OFF CAMPUS,
WE’VE GOT PRODUCTS TO HELP
YOU DEFINE YOUR OWN SPACE.
GET CREATIVE WITH DUCK TAPE!
NEED A STUDY BREAK? PICK YOUR
FAVORITE PATTERN & CREATE A
DUCK TAPE MASTERPIECE!
FIND IDEAS HERE:
duckbrand.com/duck-tape-club/ducktivities
During a 78-day period during
the summer, KU Dining Services
gutted and then renovated the
Daisy Hill dining facility, Mrs. E’s.
Te $5 million renovation proj-
ect began on May 17 and was open
to students by the beginning of
classes. Renovations to the facili-
ty include the addition of stations
that cater to dietary needs with
gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan
options, additional seating and
updated equipment.
“We had a number of things that
we were getting to the point it was
just worn out,” said Mark Maranell,
manager of Mrs. E’s. “We certainly
did our best to keep the place in
good condition, keep things clean
and in function but we had a num-
ber of pieces of equipment that
were just worn out. It was time.”
According to Sheryl Kidwell,
assistant director of KU Memori-
al Unions residential dining, the
project had been in the books for
roughly fve years, but because of
renovations to other dining facili-
ties, it didn’t come to life until this
year.
“Our design construction man-
agement team here on campus has
to be involved and then we have to
do interviews with contractors and
consultants and all that and equip-
ment contractors,” she said. “Tat’s
why it took so long.”
One thing that both Kidwell and
Maranell said that students have
noticed about the facility is how
much smoother the fow in and
out of the dining room is.
“It defnitely has a cleaner, much
more modern look,” said Dalton
Kingery, a freshman from Fredo-
nia. “I feel like there’s a lot more
space than there used to be.”
Another new feature of the
facility is the K-You Zone, which
expanded catering to students
with special dietary needs, specif-
ically those with gluten sensitivi-
ties. Kidwell says that in the past,
there have been gluten-free, vegan
and vegetarian options available
to those students, but were never
prominently featured in Mrs. E’s.
“We actually did a focus group
last year with a group of those
students for all of KU Dining and
we asked ‘were we meeting your
needs?’ and ‘where can we do bet-
ter?’” Kidwell said. “We’ve always
ofered it but we didn’t do a good
job of featuring it and now we’re
able to do that.”
KU Dining Services held a test
run in August with a Pan-Hellen-
ic sorority rush event. It was their
frst taste of what students thought
of the new facility, and according
to Kidwell, it was a success.
“Tey were extremely impressed
with the facilities, the diferent
concepts and the variety of food
that we’re able to do for them,”
Kidwell said.
— Edited by Casey Hutchins
ELLY GRIMM
egrimm@kansan.com
A 43-year-old male was
arrested Monday on the
3600 block of East 25th
Street on suspicion of
property theft. A $2500
bond was posted.
A 25-year-old male was
arrested yesterday on the
2400 block of Alabama
Street on suspicion of
interfering with the duties
of an offcer and an out of
state warrant. A $100 bond
was posted for interfering
with the duties of an offcer.
A 44-year-old male was
arrested Monday on the
2400 block of Louisiana
Street on suspicion of
driving while intoxicated
and driving with a
suspended or restricted
license. A $1,000 bond was
posted.
A 19-year-old female was
arrested Monday on the
3600 block of East 25th
Street on suspicion of
purchasing liquor as a
minor and having an open
container. A $500 bond was
paid.
CAMPUS
BEN LIPOWITZ/KANSAN
Mrs. E’s, the Daisy Hall dining facility, reopened at the start of the school year after renovations. Renovations included updated equipment and a wider range of catering options.
Mrs. E’s opens with improved options, additional seating
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
PAGE 4
I
t’s been 12 years since the
Sept. 11 attacks, yet the
memory is still fresh in
our mind. If you ask around,
your friends or peers will tell
you exactly where they were
and what they were doing
when the frst plane struck
the North Tower of the World
Trade Center. As the nation
watched the following terrorist
attacks unfold in New York
City and Washington, D.C., our
eyes were glued to the horrifc
scenes running on every news
station. Time stopped as our
nation realized that we weren’t
the invincible and impervious
country we liked to believe we
were. Te World Trade Center
collapsed, and the New York City
skyline was changed forever.
However, as we sat in front of
our television or listened to our
parents call their loved ones,
there were a courageous group
of men and women who didn’t
blink an eye. Te towers fell and
as the smoke flled the Pentagon,
frefghters and police ofcers
responded immediately to the
catastrophic acts.
Today isn’t Independence
Day or President’s Day. It’s not
Tanksgiving and it’s not Martin
Luther King Jr. Day. We’re not
eating stufng and watching
football and we’re not shooting
of freworks or taking the day
of of work and school. Our
lives are busy and our calendars
are full. We’re constantly
focused on what’s next, whether
that’s looking for a job afer
graduation, the biology exam
next week or the birthday party
on Tursday.
Today, we ask you to take a step
back from your busy life. Take a
moment to recognize the brave
frst responders of 9/11 who gave
their life to save another. Take
a moment to thank the men
and women who protect our
communities every day and for
those serving overseas protecting
our country right this minute.
We also ask you to take a
moment to be thankful for
the rights and privileges of
we, as Americans, enjoy. Our
country may not be perfect and
there will always be room for
improvement. However, we’re
better of than many others. Be
thankful we have the freedom to
write this editorial and you have
the freedom to pick up a paper
on campus and read it.
Lastly, we ask you to educate
yourself on the world around
you. Tere is a lot happening
outside of Lawrence, outside
of the Midwest and outside
of our borders. We challenge
you to fip on the nightly news
or read an article online and
inform yourself on the conficts
and struggles our country
is embedded in. As college
students, conscientious citizens
and as Americans, it’s your
responsibility to be informed
and understand that there’s more
than the biology exam next
week or the birthday party this
Tursday.
Be thankful for the sacrifces
others have made to keep our
communities safe and our
country free.
— Allison Kohn for the University
Daily Kansan editorial board
12 years later: First responders haven’t stopped
Conflict in Syria calls for
compromise, understanding
EDITORIAL
INTERNATIONAL
T
his week, Congress and
the American people
should carefully weigh
the options the U.S. could take
in response to Syrian President
Bashar al-Assad’s deployment of
chemical weapons against civil-
ians. Te serious, complex nature
of the decision necessitates that
both supporters and opponents
of military action recognize that
the opposite side’s viewpoint is
valid.
Tere’s strong incentive to
oversimplify the issue. Syria is
complicated. Te geography is
unfamiliar, the sectarian tensions
have deep roots, the civil war’s
history spans two years and
diferent countries around the
world support diferent factions
within the war.
As a result, discussions typically
devolve into statements like
“there’s an al-Qaeda afliate
fghting against Assad, so helping
the rebels only increases terror-
ism,” or “President Obama called
the use of chemical weapons a
‘red line,’ so if we don’t respond,
the U.S. will lose all its interna-
tional credibility.”
Te problem with these argu-
ments is that they assume no
new information can sway the
end result, and that no middle
ground exists. Instead of taking
a little from both camps to create
the most efective action, we
view the upcoming Congres-
sional vote as a stark yes-or-no
choice between full-fedged war
and complete inaction. Tat’s
a problem, because the Syrian
confict is not going to end soon
and carries broader implications
for the rest of the world.
In the movie Argo, CIA
operative Tony Mendez pitches
a desperate, last-ditch plan to
extract six U.S. diplomats from
Tehran during the Iranian
hostage crisis. No good options
remain, he explains, but the
Iranian intelligence forces will
discover the diplomats if the U.S.
does not act. Looking defeated,
his supervisor says that disguis-
ing the six as a camera crew for a
fake science fction movie is “the
best bad idea we have.”
Good ideas about if-and-how
to respond to Syria’s civil war
are scarce. Likely nothing any
country does could create a dip-
lomatic solution or lasting peace.
Sectarian tensions are high,
Russia and China block United
Nations action, extremist groups
support both sides of the confict
and Assad maintains control of
a chemical weapons stockpile.
Over 100,000 lives have been
lost.
Targeting cruise missiles at
the command centers of Assad’s
military to punish the regime for
using chemical weapons is the
best bad idea the Obama admin-
istration has produced so far.
Te aim is to deter the future
use of chemical weapons against
civilians, not to shif the balance
of power within Syria. Current
plans to strike command centers
are limited in scope — Secretary
of State John Kerry referred to
them as “unbelievably small.”
Withdrawing from the conver-
sation isn’t an option, because
we’re in a situation where coun-
tries around the world are watch-
ing and waiting to see how the
U.S. responds. While testifying to
Congress, Kerry pointed out that
international norms against the
use of chemical weapons only
carry power if countries believe
there will be consequences for
using them.
Chemical weapons receive
special attention because they
do not discriminate between
soldiers and innocent civilians.
Te horrifc reports of a chem-
ical weapons attack in suburbs
of Damascus began spreading
three weeks ago. Video footage
showed victims writhing on the
foor while others screamed for
help; doctors described text-
book symptoms of exposure
to the nerve-gas sarin, which
culminates in sufocation as the
nerve agent paralyzes the lungs.
Rescuers reported going from
home to home and fnding entire
families killed as they slept in
their beds. U.S. intelligence con-
frms that rockets launched from
government-controlled areas and
landed in rebel-controlled neigh-
borhoods before the gas spread,
and French spies report that an
enormous stockpile remains
unused.
A complete view of the problem
could reveal some important
nuance in determining how to
respond — so, yes, there is an al
Qaeda afliate operating in Syria,
but it’s just a small group among
many others fghting the regime.
Yes, the use of chemical weapons
violates international norms and
poses a serious danger to the
credibility of treaties, but they
have been used in other conficts
before. No, the proposed strike
does not have a one hundred
percent guarantee of success,
but it may prevent Assad from
brutally murdering some of his
civilians.
Judging by the posts on the
Facebook pages of my represen-
tatives to Congress, a number of
people think that if we create an
infexible rationale for not acting
and then vote against this inter-
vention, the Syrian problem will
no longer be “our problem.”
Tey’re wrong.
We need to recognize that
regardless of what we do, Syria’s
civil war will not end in the near
future. We need to understand
that both sides of the debate
contain valuable insight into how
we can best move forward. We
need to remember that the stakes
are far too high for far too many
people for us to dwell on political
cheap shots. At the very least,
beginning a more reasonable
discussion might at least help us
come up with a few better bad
ideas.
Amanda Gress is a junior studying
political science and economics from
Overland Park.
To the two guys who said, “yes!”
when they found a bathroom with
two empty stalls so they could poop
together. Thanks for showing me
what true friendship is.
25 minutes usually seems like
nothing. Unless it’s for a Tuesday/
Thursday class. Then it seems like
days. Or eternity.
Yoga pants is community service.
Yoga shorts may cause traffc
accidents.
I’m convinced every seat in Budig
has gum on the end of the arm rest.
My trail mix comes with two things,
m&m’s and disappointment.
“I only wear my beanie until 9 on hot
days.”
Just saw a guy walking around
campus with a shirt that said, “Let
my people bro.” I’m reminded of why
I’m still single.
Best bathroom graffti EVER: “I used
this toilet to get to the Ministry of
Magic”
Ladies stop being so hot in the
library. I’m trying to study.
I deserve to be on the track team for
making it from Memorial Stadium to
my class in Haworth in 4 minutes.
Hill yes!
Who pooped in my shower?
To the poop smearing culprit in
Pearson Hall. We will fnd you.
To the guy’s girlfriend in my hall
who drinks all the milk, eats all our
food and smears poop on our toilet
seats... I will hunt you down.
EDITOR’S NOTE: These are all
from different people...
God Bless America
I’m wearing compression shorts
instead of underwear today and none
of you have a clue.
I walked in on my roommate eating
my Oreos and we just stared at each
other for a solid 15 seconds.
What’s the point of a gold iPhone
when everyone on Earth has a huge-
ass Otterbox covering it anyway?
Why isn’t there any good Chinese
food in Lawrence??
I want a dog to just chill with and
take to class so bad.
I’m the dude who passed out outside
the Cave and lost his glasses.
Please drop them off at the Union
lost&found. Proof: they’re rectangle,
black-framed. Be my hero.
Text your FFA
submissions to
785–289–8351 or
at kansan.com
Where’s the best place to
take a nap on campus?
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just
might publish them.
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Dylan Lysen, managing editor
dlysen@kansan.com
Will Webber, opinion editor
wwebber@kansan.com
Mollie Pointer, business manager
mpointer@kansan.com
Sean Powers, sales manager
spowers@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director & content strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
@AleknotAlex
@Kansan_Opinion Budig napping cave
@blev_47
@Kansan_Opinion I swear everyone sleeps in Rel
124 #sleepingthebible #napcity
@jessejayhawk
@Kansan_Opinion Murphy hall practice room!
Perfect napping rooms.
By Amanda Gress
agress@kansan.com
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013
remember is the look on his face
when he returned Friday night
around 2 a.m.
He witnessed death.
His face was gray, he smelled of
smoke and he looked frightened.
I watched my dad attend
countless funerals and take a
leave of absence from his second
job to dig in that pile at Ground
Zero until January the following
year. He searched for a piece
of his missing Lieutenant and
served his time to the city that he
loved with the men he called his
brothers.
Te New York City Fire
Department coined the term
“Te New Normal,” and my
family was trying its best to
adjust to it. But nothing was the
same. I witnessed my father grow
somber and more introverted.
My parents attended counseling
services provided by the city.
Our family vacations scheduled
that year were cancelled. Our city
doubted our safety, lost a sense of
buoyancy and everything was put
on hold.
As a family, we dread this week
more than any other throughout
the year. We want to forget the
death, the fear and the terror
that we witnessed. We ignore
the phonies and money-hungry
people indulging from the
event. Instead, we watch my
father get dressed in his suit and
tie and attend memorials and
church services while the names
of the deceased, including 343
frefghters, are read over the TV.
Tis is not meant to be a sob
story or a plea for sympathy.
Instead, I hope it can give clarity
and understanding to those who
weren’t as close to the tragedy
as me, both emotionally and
physically. Coming to Kansas
for the frst time two years ago
has been one of the greatest
experiences for my family. I am
overwhelmed by the reverence
and the respect Midwesterners
show for my father. Te pride
that beams through my dad’s
smile when someone learns he
was a frst responder and thanks
him for his service is contagious.
Our lives have changed since
that frightful morning, but the
unconditional love and support
makes it easier to believe the
vitality of our country will be
restored.
Dani Brady is a junior studying
journalism from Long Island, N.Y.
9/11 FROM PAGE 1
CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS
Pictured above are badges from Ladder 26 and Engine 58. Both units were frst
responders to Ground Zero during 9/11.
1
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
HOROSCOPES
CROSSWORD
Because the stars
know things we don’t.
SUDOKU
CRYPTOQUIP
CHECK OUT
THE ANSWERS
PAGE 5
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7
Increase your assets for a month,
with Venus in Scorpio. Travel is ap-
pealing under the Sagittarius Moon.
Fantasies aren’t to be relied upon.
Study theory, while taking practical
actions. Build creative resources.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 6
Compromise comes easier. Rely on a
supportive partner, and express your
gratitude. Handle fnancial matters.
Balance your checkbook. Avoid
distractions, as you plot strategy.
Take it slow and easy.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
There’s more work coming in for
a month — the kind you like. Let
somebody else take care of you.
Complete the backstage effort. Stash
your earnings in a safe place.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is an 8
Work gets intense. Artistic efforts
work out. Don’t gamble now, even
on a sure thing. For four weeks with
Venus in Scorpio, you’re lucky in
love. Relinquish expectations and
just play.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 6
You’ll love learning for this next
phase. Dive into a sweet obsession.
Energize your home base. Think
outside the box. Send a postcard to
the offce.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 6
You're a true artist and have a lot
to say. Say it. Don't worry if you're
misunderstood; that's part of the
process. Repeat yourself using new
words and different expressions.
Friends help you get the word out.
Follow your joy.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 6
It’s easier to make money for awhile.
Don’t take it for granted. Gather it
up. The upcoming days are excellent
for studying. Just about anything is
possible. Make plans that include
passion.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is an 8
You’re especially lucky (and attrac-
tive) with Venus in your sign. Stick to
your budget. Spend your new income
on practical domesticity. Meditate.
Keep watching for the full picture.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is an 8
You won’t be wearing your heart on
your sleeve quite as much. Com-
municate fears and expectations to
be free of them. Keep a secret. This
empowers you both. Get organized.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 6
You’re popular, and that busy social
life could cause a problem at home.
You’re out in the public. Get extra
effcient. Spend with care. Move
boldly forward.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 6
Career advances are quite possible
over the next month, and social
activities engage you. This phase is
good for travel. Investigate a dream.
You’re building something of value. A
supposition gets challenged.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 6
The upcoming days are especially
good for setting goals that lead
to beauty, love and joy. Study your
direction. Plan for two days in the
spotlight. Soak up the atmosphere.
Keep it practical.
7:30 p.m.
Sept 16 &
Sept 17
Lied Center
lied.ku.edu
785-864-2787
KU Student Discounts
www.HomesForLease.org www.HomesForLease.org
http://bit.ly/14JDnQz
When asked to describe his
clothing line, Max Ledom replied,
“motivated mentally apparel.” Yet
those 10 syllables, those 24 letters,
defne the dreams, movement
and drive that continue to fuel the
success of Mountain Movers Co.
Originating on a drive back to
Kansas City from Lawrence, the
initial idea for Mountain Mov-
ers has forever changed the life
of Ledom, a 19-year-old col-
lege student from Kansas City,
Kan. “I was thinking back to my
high school graduation party,
where I had invited my sixth-
grade teacher,” Ledom said. “It
had been the frst time I’d seen
her in six years. She had always
been kind, caring and supportive
of all of her students, so I made
sure to send her a heartfelt and
meaningful letter when I was
writing my thank you notes.
She messaged me on Facebook
aferwards and told me that
the letter brought her to tears.
She later went on to say that I
could do anything, and that I
was going to move mountains.”
Tus the name of his company,
Mountain Movers, was born.
“Going into college, I didn’t
really know what I was going
to do,” Ledom said. “I wanted
to take something verbal and
make it in to more than what it
was. I came up with the idea of
a clothing line out of my passion
for streetwear. I aim to motivate
and inspire, and let the clothing
line tell others what my elemen-
tary teacher told me. You can
do what you want with your
life, you can be as happy as you
want, and you’re in control of it.”
Afer solidifying his idea, Le-
dom created a page on Kick-
starter, a website utilized to
provide funding for various
entrepreneurial endeavors
through monetary pledges.
Viewers of the site are provid-
ed with background on proj-
ects and can make donations
to help support the business-
es. Although his original goal
was $3,500, Ledom ended up
with a pledge total of $4,052 to
build his company. His key to
success for any aspiring found-
ers is to “make a kick-ass Kick-
starter page — have really good
videos, descriptions, and show
what you’re passionate about.”
Along with his team of Kansas
students, photographer Andrew
Shepherd and graphic design-
er Adam Henderson, Ledom
has managed to create an es-
teemed reputation for his brand.
Te original spring/summer
collection has almost sold out,
as orders few in for his unique
tie-dye hoodies, neon bro tanks,
and various T-shirts following
the ofcial release on June 3. Le-
dom has gained supporters as
famous as Hoodie Allen and Ed
Sheeran and is currently prepar-
ing for the release of his latest
collection. On Sept. 21, Ledom
will unveil his fall line, which will
include all-new designs for logo
tees and sweatshirts, personal-
ized pocket tees, snapbacks and
much more. Trough his designs,
Ledom’s goal is to capture what
life is all about, not just limiting
himself to motivational slogans.
While Ledom hopes to one day
see Emma Watson, his dream
woman and the “most perfect
person on the planet,” wearing his
Mountain Movers logo, this up-
and-coming brand is capturing
the attention of teens and adults
all over the nation and spreading
rapidly. Ledom is living inspira-
tion that with enough hard work,
dedication and true passion, any-
thing you strive for is within reach.
But most importantly, we all have
the strength to move mountains.
To order online, visit www.
mo u nt a i n mo v e r s c o. c o m.
For updates, follow Moun-
tain Movers Co. on Twit-
ter at @MountainMoverCo.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Max Ledom, 19, used more than $4,000 pledged on Kickstarter to help build his clothing line, Mountain Movers Co. He
plans to release his fall line on Sept. 21.
APPAREL
HANNAH SUNDERMEYER
hsundermeyer@kansan.com
Student builds own clothing line
Follow
@KansanEntertain
on Twitter
Want entertainment updates all day long?
Recycle
Recycle
Recycle
1
AMSTERDAM — A painting that
sat for six decades in a Norwegian
industrialist's attic, afer he was told
the painting was a fake, Van Gogh
was pronounced the real thing
Monday, making it the frst full-
size canvas by the tortured Dutch
artist to be discovered since 1928.
Experts at the Van Gogh Mu-
seum in Amsterdam authenti-
cated the 1888 landscape "Sunset
at Montmajour" with the help
of Vincent Van Gogh's letters,
chemical analysis of the pig-
ments and X-rays of the canvas.
Museum director Axel
Rueger, at an unveiling cere-
mony, called the discovery a
"once-in-a-lifetime experience."
"Tis is a great painting from what
many see as the high point of his
artistic achievement, his period in
Arles, in southern France," Rueger
said. "In the same period, he paint-
ed works such as 'Sunfowers,' 'Te
Yellow House' and 'Te Bedroom.'"
Museum ofcials would not
identify the owner who brought
the artwork to them in 2011 to be
authenticated. Van Gogh paint-
ings are among the most valu-
able in the world, fetching tens
of millions of dollars on the rare
occasions one is sold at auction.
Te artwork will be on display at
the museum beginning Sept. 24.
Te roughly 37-by-29-inch
"Sunset at Montmajour" depicts
a dry landscape of twisting oak
trees, bushes and sky, and was
done during the period when Van
Gogh was increasingly adopting
the thick "impasto" brush strokes
that became typical of his work
in the fnal years of his short life.
It can be dated to the exact day
it was painted because he de-
scribed it in a letter to his brother,
Teo, and said he had painted it
the previous day — July 4, 1888.
"At sunset I was on a stony
heath where very small, twisted
oaks grow, in the background a
ruin on the hill and wheat felds
in the valley," Van Gogh wrote.
"It was romantic. ... Te sun
was pouring its very yellow rays
over the bushes and the ground,
absolutely a shower of gold."
But then Van Gogh confessed
that the painting was "well be-
low what I'd wished to do." Lat-
er he sent it to Teo to keep.
Van Gogh struggled with bouts
of mental distress throughout his
life and died of a self-inficted gun-
shot wound in 1890. He sold only
one painting during his lifetime.
According to a reconstruction
published in Te Burlington Mag-
azine by three researchers, the
painting was recorded as num-
ber 180 in Teo's collection and
given the title "Sun Setting at
Arles." It was sold to French art
dealer Maurice Fabre in 1901.
Fabre never recorded selling
the work, and the painting dis-
appeared from history until it
reappeared in 1970 in the es-
tate of Norwegian industrial-
ist Christian Nicolai Mustad.
Te Mustad family said Mustad
purchased it in 1908 as a young
man in one of his frst forays into
art collecting, but was soon told by
the French ambassador to Sweden
that it was a fake. Embarrassed,
Mustad banished it to the attic.
Afer Mustad's death in 1970, the
distinguished art dealer Daniel
Wildenstein said he thought the
painting was a fake Van Gogh or
possibly the work of a lesser-known
German painter, and it was sold to
a collector. Te museum would
not say who bought it or wheth-
er it had been resold since then.
In 1991, the museum de-
clined to authenticate the paint-
ing when whoever owned it at
the time brought it to them.
"Tat may be a painful admis-
sion, given that the same museum
is now attributing it to Van Gogh,
but it is understandable," since
experts had no information about
what the painting depicted, the
Burlington Magazine article said.
Teio Meedendorp, one of three
experts who worked on the project,
said his predecessors might also
have been confused because the
painting was done at a "transition-
al" moment in Van Gogh's style.
"From then on, Van Gogh in-
creasingly felt the need to paint
with more and more impasto and
more and more layers," he said.
Among other reasons experts
had their doubts: Te painting was
unsigned. Parts of the foreground
were not "as well-observed as usu-
al," the researchers said. And part of
the right side of the painting used
a diferent style of brush strokes.
But when the museum took a
fresh look at the work in 2011,
its experts had the advantage of
a new compendium of all Van
Gogh's letters, and they were able
to identify for the frst time the
exact location "Sunset" depicts:
Montmajour hill, near Arles.
Te ruins of Montmajour abbey
can be seen in the background.
Van Gogh mentioned the
painting in two other letters the
same summer.
Te number 180 on the back
of the canvas was an important
clue, and new chemical analy-
sis techniques showed the pig-
ments were identical to others Van
Gogh used on his palette at Arles.
Also, an X-ray examination of
the canvas showed it was of the
same type Van Gogh used on
other paintings from the period.
Meedendorp said "Sunset" be-
longs "to a special group of ex-
perimental works that Van Gogh
at times esteemed of lesser value
than we tend to do nowadays."
He said it's not impossible an-
other unknown or lost Van Gogh
could be found someday. Te art-
ist is believed to have completed
more than 800 works. While he
destroyed some when he wasn't
satisfed with the results, the
whereabouts of others that are
mentioned in his letters or early
catalogs of his work are unknown.
Te Van Gogh Museum houses 140
Van Gogh paintings and receives
more than a million visitors a year.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7
R
u
d
y

s
Pizzeri a
Voted Best Pizza in Lawrence!
749-0055 • 704 Mass. • rudyspizzeria.com

Wednesday Special

Small 10” 1 topping 3
.75
+ tax
Med 12” 1 topping 5
.75
+ tax
Lg 16” 1 topping 7
.75
+ tax
*Carry out or dine in only *
Fall is quickly approaching and
many would like to have a new
wardrobe for the season. Howev-
er, with a shirt costing more than
$40, if you’re like me, you’re prob-
ably thinking to yourself, “Ain’t
nobody got time for that!” So in
the midst of buying textbooks,
drinks at Te Wheel and All Sports
Combo passes, chances are you
want to look good on a budget.
To help you dress for less,
I found six Lawrence retail-
ers that have deals this week.
At Kieu’s, all denim bot-
toms are 25 percent of and last
call dresses are 30 percent of.
Envy’s sale rack includes sum-
mer dresses and colored pants.
Tey are also selling camis and
tees for $5. As an added bonus, ev-
erything in the store is under $40.
Fortuity is selling their cowboy
boots for 50 percent of and you’ll
fnd savings of up to 75 percent of
their sale rack and jewelry table.
Plato’s Closet has a mini clear-
ance sale on every football game
day, including away games, with
15 percent of all KU apparel.
Find them during games at 1025
Alabama where they will also
be giving out beer pong starter
kits and $5 coupons to the store.
Ditto Boutique is ofering buy
one, get one half of on camis. All
jewelry is buy three pieces get one
free. You can also buy two items
and get one free on their clear-
ance rack. Finally, dresses and
tanks are buy one get one half of.
Don’t forget to put Urban Out-
ftters’ College Night on your
agenda for Sept. 19. It will be
giving Kansas students addi-
tional discounts on regular-
ly priced items and sale items.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
Love him or hate him, rapper
Tauheed Epps, more commonly
known as 2 Chainz and less com-
monly as Tity Boi, is impossible
to ignore. Known for years as the
industry’s favorite unsigned rapper
who never blew up, 2 Chainz
fnally got his mainstream break-
through when he laced up the gold
Cuban links alongside Kanye West
with the 2012 smash hit “Birthday
Song.”
A year later, the Atlanta emcee
known for ofeat interviews about
abstaining from red meat is still
the same quirky pimp draped
in jewels and Versace. His new
album, “Based On A T.R.U. Story
II: Me Time,” is typical 2 Chainz:
equal parts grimacing cocaine rap
and hilarious couplets.
Oh, and the album even comes
with a 28-page cookbook entitled
“#Mealtime,” which states that 2
Chainz is “reaching into his deep,
favorful pockets to hook you up
with recipes you'll need for your
time out on the road.” Seriously,
this is an actual cookbook with
recipes for dishes from garlic
mashed potatoes to beer-steamed
snow crab legs.
So why does the pendulum ofen
swing towards hate when hip-hop
fans talk about 2 Chainz? For one
of two reasons: they don’t under-
stand him, or haven’t taken the
time to really listen to his lyrics.
Sure, “B.O.A.T.S. II: Me Time” fea-
tures plenty of the standard wom-
en, drugs and weapons subject
matter that some despise—not to
mention an awful Fergie cameo on
the track “Netfix”—but in many
songs his wordplay is downright
clever.
Take a line on “Black Unicorn,”
for example, in which 2 Chainz
proclaims, “I switch gears, my yard
so big I got pet deers.” And on “I
Do It” he drops the line, “I tried
to get a tan but I’m black already.
Your pockets on a diet, my pockets
fat already.”
Lines like these are why 2 Chainz
is unique. Unlike other trap rap-
pers such as Young Jeezy and Yo
Gotti who built careers sounding
like they were indicted on murder
charges fve minutes ago, 2 Chainz
takes that gritty attitude and fips
it on its head. “Fork,” the opening
song on the album, is a menacing
ATL beat complete with low-end
organ and machine gun snares.
Yet, true to form, he raps in his
trademark loose drawl, “God
blessed me, like I’m ‘fnna sneeze.”
If Talib Kweli lyrics are what you
want, go somewhere else. But if
you’re looking for entertaining
party rap on the surface with hid-
den lyrical gems underneath, show
2 Chainz some love.
— Edited by Chas Strobel
STYLE
ART
MUSIC
Local retail offers
affordable fashion
CHRISTINE STANWOOD
cstanwood@kansan.com
BROOK BARNES/KANSAN
Pictured above is an outft that can be purchased in Lawrence at an affordable rate. Several local retail stores have fashionable clothes on sale at reasonable prices.
New 2 Chainz album sticks with unique party rap
DUNCAN MCHENRY
dmchenry@kansan.com
DEF JAM RECORDS
Van Gogh painting identifed after long wait in attic
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Van Gogh Museum director Axel Rueger, left, and senior researcher Louis van Tilborgh, right, unveil “Sunset at Montmajour”
during a press conference at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands on Monday. The museum has identifed the
long-lost painting which was painted by the Dutch master in 1888, the discovery is the frst full-size canvas that has been
found since 1928 and will be on display from Sept. 24.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina —
Within minutes of being elected
to the top job in the Olympics,
Tomas Bach got a phone call from
a powerful leader he’ll work with
closely in the next few months:
Russian President Vladimir Putin.
Bach, a 59-year-old German
lawyer, was elected Tuesday as
president of the International
Olympic Committee. He succeeds
Jacques Rogge, who stepped down
afer 12 years.
Bach, the longtime favorite,
defeated fve candidates in a secret
ballot for the most infuential job
in international sports, keeping the
presidency in European hands.
Te former
Olympic fencer
received 49 votes in
the second round
to secure a winning
majority. Richard
Carrion of Puerto
Rico fnished
second with 29
votes.
One of the frst
c ong r at ul at or y
phone calls came
from Putin, who will host the IOC
in less than fve months at the
Winter Olympics in the southern
Russian resort of Sochi.
Te Sochi Games are one of
Putin’s pet projects, with Russia’s
prestige on the line.
“He congratulated and [said]
there would be close cooperation
to make [sure of] the success of
the Sochi Games,” Bach told Te
Associated Press.
Te buildup to the Feb. 7-23
games has been overshadowed
by concerns with cost overruns,
human rights, a budget topping
$50 billion, security threats and a
Western backlash against a Russian
law against gay “propaganda.”
Bach and the IOC have been told
by the Russians there would be no
discrimination against anyone in
Sochi, and that Russia would abide
by the Olympic Charter.
“We have the assurances of the
highest authorities in Russia that
we trust,” Bach said.
It remains unclear what would
happen if athletes or spectators
demonstrate against the anti-gay
law. Rogge said this week the IOC
would send a reminder to athletes
that, under the Olympic Charter,
they are prohibited from making
any political gestures.
“We will work on our project now
and then it will be communicated
to the NOCs [national Olympic
committees] and then athletes,”
Bach said. “It will be elaborated
more in detail.”
At his frst news conference as
president, Bach was asked about
how the IOC would deal with human
rights issues in host countries. Te
IOC has been criticized for not
speaking out
against abuses
in countries
like China and
Russia.
“Te IOC
cannot be
a p ol i t i c a l ,”
Bach said.
“We have to
realize that
our decisions
at events
like Olympic Games, they have
political implications. And when
taking these decisions we have
to, of course, consider political
implications.
“But in order to fulfll our role
to make sure that in the Olympic
Games and for the participants the
Charter is respected, we have to
be strictly politically neutral. And
there we also have to protect the
athletes,” he said.
A former Olympic fencing gold
medalist who heads Germany’s
national Olympic committee,
Bach is the ninth president in the
119-year history of the IOC. He’s
the eighth European to hold the
presidency.
Of the IOC’s leaders, all have
come from Europe except for Avery
Brundage, the American who ran
the committee from 1952-72.
Bach is also the frst gold medalist
to become IOC president. He won
gold in team fencing for West
Germany in the 1976 Montreal
Olympics.
He received a standing ovation
for nearly a full minute afer
Rogge opened a sealed envelope
to announce his victory. Bach
bowed slightly to the delegates to
acknowledge the warm response
and thanked the members in
several languages.
“I want to be a president for all
of you,” he told the members.
“Tis means I will do my very best
to balance well all the diferent
interests of the stakeholders of the
Olympic movement. Tis is why I
want to listen to you and to enter
in an ongoing dialogue with all
of you.You should know that my
door, my ears and my heart are
always open for you.”
PASSING GAME IS MUCH IMPROVED
To the casual Kansas football fan,
last week’s ofense might have
looked a lot like the ofense from
last year. It was run-heavy with 280
total rushing yards and quarterback
Jake Heaps completed 10 out of 20
passes for 110 yards.
Coach Charlie Weis, on the other
hand, did not see last year’s ofense.
“It was nothing like any game last
year,” Weis said. “Tere was not one
game that looked like that game.”
According to Weis, those 10
incompletions by Heaps included
four or fve dropped balls, three
throwaways and two or three clear
incompletions.
“Regardless of how many times
we throw it, I will take those
percentages any day,” he said.
Weis said there has to be
improvement on the receiving end.
Wide receiver Justin McCay had
a dropped pass on a play up the
sideline, which, if caught, would
have been a long completion. Weis
is pushing the receivers to make
those plays.
REVENGE IS NOT A FACTOR IN
REMATCH AGAINST RICE
Kansas football will face a familiar
foe Saturday in the Rice Owls. Te
Jayhawks lost to them 25-24 last
season. Weis said revenge is not a
motivational factor going forward
this week; instead, the loss is a
learning opportunity. In last year’s
game, Kansas led until the fnal
seconds of the game, when Rice
kicked a feld goal to win from
behind.
“I use that more as a teaching
tool,” Weis said. “I don’t talk about
getting revenge for what they did.
We blew it. Tey deserved to win,
because we didn’t close out the
game.”
Tere are positives to facing a team
again in such a short time frame.
Linebackers coach Clint Bowen
said knowing the opponent has its
benefts and knowing the opposing
team’s personnel is the most crucial
factor.
GOAL IS TO REACH NEXT
STEPPING STONE
Last Saturday’s victory against
South Dakota was the team’s frst
triumph in more than a year. Tis
week, the team is looking to capture
the program’s frst win on the road
in four years. Weis described the
upcoming game as the second in
a series of steps to break the team’s
losing streaks one by one.
“For the program, winning last
week got the losing streak out of
the way,” Weis said. “Winning this
week would get losing on the road
out of the way. Winning three
weeks from now against Texas Tech
gets the conference win out of the
way. Tese are stepping stones you
have to take to go ahead and move
up. It is an opportunity to get one
of those put aside.”
Last week’s game also provided
stepping stones for individual
players. Saturday’s win was the
frst playing time for Heaps in
about two years and McCay’s
touchdown holds strong potential.
Although McCay hadn’t played in
a competitive game in years, he can
now put the frst game aside and
focus on the next step.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
1
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8
3080 Iowa St. | 785-371-4075 | Open 11am-11pm 7 Days a week
JOIN US FOR
HAPPY HOUR!
Mon-Fri 3-7pm | Late night Sun-Thur 9-11pm
Want some FREE stuff?
Scan the QR code belowto
join our CLUB CANTINA
$
2
$
3
$
4
2 Empanadas
Ground Beef or Pulled Chicken
3 Mini Crpisy Tacos
Ground Beef or Pulled Chicken
Cantina Nachos
Ground Beef or Chicken
piled high with all the things
E
T
H
I
C
S

A
N
D

T
H
E

F
I
N
A
N
C
I
A
L

S
E
R
V
I
C
E
S

I
N
D
U
S
T
R
Y
The Universily of Kansas School of ßusiness
PRESENTS
WALTER S. SUTTON
LECTURE SERIES
ROGER W. FERGUSON, JR.
Iresidenl and
Chief Lxeculive Òh cer,
TIAA-CRLI
6
:
3
0
P
M
M
O
N
D
A
Y
S
E
P
T
.
1
6
T
H
,
2
0
1
3
K
U

E
D
W
A
R
D
S

C
A
M
P
U
S
F
R
E
E
T
O
T
H
E
P
U
B
L
I
C
1814 W. 23rd
Lawrence, KS

843–6000
Any Sub
Tuesday is
DOUBLE
Stamp Day Not Valid with any other offers
75¢ Off
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Senior safety Dexter Linton chases down South Dakota quaterback Josh Vander Maten during the game on Sept. 7.
PIGSKIN
Football notebook
Weis pushes for more improvement in
upcoming games, one step at a time
STELLA LIANG
sliang@kansan.com
INTERNATIONAL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jacques Rogge, right, outgoing president of the International Olympic Committee, points to Thomas Bach of Germany, left, after Bach was elected as the new IOC president
during the 125th IOC session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Sept. 10.
Russian leader reaches out
to new Olympic president
ASSOCIATED PRESS

“We have to realize that
our decisions at events like
Olympic Games, they have
political implications.”
THOMAS BACH
German lawyer
Follow
@KansanSports
on Twitter
W
ith NHL
training camps
opening
today, here are four more
storylines to watch heading
into the season.

ALFIE JOINS DETROIT
Since 1994, Daniel
Alfredsson has been
a member of the Ottawa
Senators and a vital one at
that. Aside from maintaining
the role of captain since 2001,
Alfredsson has scored more
than 1,000 points for the
Senators during the regular
season and 100 points in the
playofs. All of that is now
behind the Swedish-born
winger as a contract dispute
during the ofseason has
landed him with the Detroit
Red Wings. Detroit already
has a bevy of Swedes and with
head coach Mike Babock still
running the show, it seems
he’ll have no problem ftting
in.

CANUCKS AND RANGERS
TRADE COACHES
OK, so they didn’t make
a formal deal, but once
both coaches were let go by
their respective teams, they
switched homes. Te always-
angry John Tortorella, who
led Tampa Bay to the Stanley
Cup in 2004, lef New York
afer losing control of his
locker room and looks to tone
it down a bit in Vancouver.
Alain Vignault, who has
led many talented teams
but could never quite bring
home the Cup, moved to
New York where he hopes
to take a talented roster for
a deep run in the playofs.

SEGUIN GOES SOUTH
Before he won two Stanley
Cups with the Blackhawks,
Patrick Kane’s immaturity on
and of the ice led many to
wonder if he should be traded.
Boston ran into the same
issue with young star Tyler
Seguin, but unlike Chicago,
they traded their top talent
to Dallas. It seems the Bruins
were done waiting for him
to grow up. Boston received,
among others, Louis Ericsson
in the trade, who may very
well replace Seguin without
much notice. Te real story
will be if Seguin’s second
chance can go his way.
Interestingly enough,
during last season’s
lockout Seguin and Kane
roomed together while
playing abroad. If he needs
any advice on growing up,
checking in with his former
teammate might be a good
place to start.

WORLD DOMINATION
Afer a long debate between
the players association and
the owners, National Hockey
League players will once
again be allowed to compete
for their home countries
during the Olympics. In 2010,
Canada emerged victorious
at the games in Vancouver
when Sidney Crosby scored
the overtime winner in the
gold medal game against the
United States. Four years later,
both teams look to be just as
good, if
not better.
Te USA team will likely be
backstopped by Los Angeles
Kings’ goalie Jonathan Quick,
who led his team to its frst
Stanley Cup victory in 2012.
Conversely, goaltending seems
to be the one weakness for
the Canadians. Right now the
honor is up for grabs with
Blackhawks’ goaltender Corey
Crawford as the favorite. Also
in the mix are Mike Smith
of the Phoenix Coyotes,
Carey Price of the Montreal
Canadiens and the gold-medal
winner in 2010, Roberto
Luongo.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
Laborer Wanted
Must have good driving record
Must be prompt and reliable
Experiemce a plus, but not a must
Please apply in person at:
5030 Bob Billings Pkwy, Suite A
Lawrence, KS 66049
NOW HIRING: friendly, professional &
hardworking individuals to become part
of our kitchen & serving team. Experi-
ence not required but preferred. Please
apply in person at Carlos O’Kelly’s 707
W. 23rd St. (No Phone Calls)
NOW LEASING FALL 2013!
CAMPUS LOCATIONS!
1 & 2 bedrooms
OFFICE: Chase Court Apartments
1942 Stewart Ave, 785-843-8220
www.frstmanagementinc.com
chasecourt@sunfower.com
Full/part time workers needed for
vegetable farm. Call 842-7941 and
leave message with your experience.
The MusicFest.com at Steamboat
Jimmy John’s is looking to hire some
Delivery Drivers & Inshoppers. We make
delicious sub sandwiches & we make
them freaky fast. We’re loud & fast
paced. We love to train new people &
we’re hiring right now! Delivery Drivers
make a full hourly wage & also make
great tips. If you like to move fast & want
to have fun at work, this is the job for
you! Please apply in person at 1730 W
23rd St. Must be available during clos-
ing hrs 5pm-3am, cover all tattoos. No
gauged earrings & one piercing per ear.
Abe & Jake’s Landing is Hiring Private
Event Staff. Please email your resume
to leila@abejakes.com or come by the
offce on Tues. and Thurs. between 12‑5
pm to fll out and application.
AAAC Tutoring Services is hiring Tutors
for Fall 2013! To apply, visit www.tutor-
ing.ku.edu 785-864-7733 EO/AA
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
785-864-4358 HAWKCHALK.COM CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM
housing
for sale
announcements
jobs
textbooks
SALE
1
Party too Hard?
DUI? MIP?
Call FRC 785-289-8851
WWW.UBSKI.COM
1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453
COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK
plus t/s
Vail • Beaver Creek • Keystone • Arapahoe Basin
20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price.
breckenridge
FROM
ONLY
NOW LEASING
HAWKER
APARTMENTS
2 BEDROOM | 2 BATHROOM 5PEClAL
CALL TO RE5ERVE TODAY
785.838.3377
NOW LEASING
ANNOUNCEMENTS HOUSING JOBS
HOUSING
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
JOBS JOBS
KANSAN.COM
HAS A NEW LOOK
THE STUDENT VOICE WITH YOU 24/7
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9

!
?
“Olympians, when you pack your skates,
pack a rainbow pin. When you practice your
Russian, learn how to say, ‘I am pro-gay.’”
— Brian Burke, Director of Player per-
sonnel for the U.S. Men’s hockey team,
on Russia’s anti-gay laws.
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED
QUOTE OF THE DAY
FACT OF THE DAY
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
This week in athletics
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Wednesday Thursday Friday
By Blake Schuster
bschuster@kansan.com
NO SCHEDULED
EVENTS
Volleyball
Bowling Green
1:30 p.m.
Madison, Wis.
Tennis
Midland Invitational
All day
Midland, Texas
Tennis
Midland Invitational
All day
Midland, Texas
Women’s Golf
Louisville
Cardinal Cup
All day
Simpsonville, Ky.
Women’s Golf
Louisville
Cardinal Cup
All day
Simpsonville, Ky.
Soccer
San Francisco
Noon
Lawrence
Men’s Golf
Ram Masters
Invitational
All day
Fort Collins, Colo.
Men’s Golf
Ram Masters
Invitational
All day
Fort Collins, Colo.
Football
Rice University
6:30 p.m.
Houston
Volleyball
Milwaukee
11 a.m.
Madison, Wis.
Soccer
San Diego
4:30 p.m.
Lawrence
Volleyball
Wisconsin
7 p.m.
Madison, Wis.
Tennis
Midland Invitational
All day
Midland, Texas
NO SCHEDULED
EVENTS
Q: Who did the United States hockey
team defeat in 1980 to win the Olympic
Gold Medal?
A: Finland
— ESPN
The United States has not won gold in
hockey at the Olympics since 1980.
— ESPN
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Pictured above is the Sept. 7 game against Arkansas. The team lost to Creighton
21-25, 25-15, 17-25, and 27-29 on Sept. 10.
VOLLEYBALL
Player, coach trades set up new team dynamics for the upcoming season
Despite a record-setting night
from freshman middle blocker
Tayler Soucie, the Jayhawks (4-3)
fell to No. 24 Creighton 21-25, 25-
15, 17-25, 27-29 on Tuesday at the
Ryan Center in Omaha, Neb., in a
match Soucie fttingly labeled as
“up and down.”
Soucie continued to take advan-
tage of her playing time by record-
ing 12 blocks for the match, setting
a program record. Soucie totaled
12 kills against Arkansas on Sat-
urday and led the team with a .435
attack percentage.
“Being able to record 12 blocks is
great because it means I’m making
improvements,” Soucie said.
Senior middle blocker Caroline
Jarmoc got of to a quick start with
six kills in the frst 20 points of the
match as Kansas erased an early
fve-point defcit. Te Jayhawks
hung with the Bluejays for most
of the frst frame, but Creighton
pulled away at the end to secure
the set.
With a scorching 13 kills and
zero errors, the Jayhawks quickly
responded to take the second set
and tie up the match. In a set that
was close starting out, the Jayhawks
pulled away to take a six-point lead.
Kansas scored the last fve points of
the set to tie the match at one set
apiece. Sophomore outside hitter
Tiana Dockery contributed four
kills in the set.
Te Bluejays responded with an
11-3 run to start the third set. Te
Jayhawks clawed back from an 11-3
defcit against Arkansas on Turs-
day, Sept. 5, but couldn’t fnd the
same magic against the Bluejays.
Kansas had just six kills in the set.
Seeking to take back momentum,
the Jayhawks jumped to an early
lead in the fourth set and would
go on to lead 16-13. Creighton
then went on an 11-4 run to take
a commanding 24-20 advantage in
the set. Behind a kill from junior
outside hitter Chelsea Albers and
three attack errors by the Bluejays,
the Jayhawks roared back to tie the
match at 24-24.
Two kills by Albers and one by
Dockery erased match points as the
two teams went back and forth the
rest of the way. At 27-27, Creighton
got back-to-back kills to close out
the match. Te Jayhawks saved an
impressive seven match points in
the contest.
Jarmoc led the way with a team-
high of 12 kills. Albers and junior
outside hitter Sara McClinton, both
Nebraska natives, reached dou-
ble-digit kills with 11 each.
Senior libero Brianne Riley had
22 of the team’s 64 digs for the
match while senior setter Erin Mc-
Norton dished out 44 assists.
Te Bluejays (5-1) helped the Jay-
hawks out with 11 service errors in
the match, but the Bluejays led in
the kill department 59-50.
Big East Preseason Co-Player of
the Year Kelli Browning, a junior
middle blocker, led the Bluejays
with 15 kills and junior outside hit-
Kansas loses despite record-setting night
BRIAN HILLIX
bhillix@kansan.com
ter Leah McNary wasn’t far behind
with 14.
Continuing their road swing, the
Jayhawks travel once more before
beginning a fve-game home swing
at Horejsi Family Athletics Center.
Kansas will head to Madison, Wis.,
for the Inntowner Invitational on
Friday, Sept. 13. Wisconsin, Mil-
waukee and Bowling Green will
join Kansas for the tournament.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
Te motto set by coach Clark
Campbell and the returning
swimmers last season, “Te Jay-
hawk Way,” means being doers
while being supportive, positive
and hard-working. It has tran-
scended in to this season and the
leadership style the three senior
captains — Alison Moft, Ali-
son Lusk and Morgan Sharp —
hope to bring to this year’s team.
All three seniors have had very
diferent swimming journeys
and bring their respective ex-
periences to leading the team.
Lusk, from Chattanooga, Tenn.,
who started swimming at age six,
is a breaststroke swimmer. She
swims the 100-yard breaststroke
and the 200-yard breaststroke as
well as the 100-yard individu-
al medley. Her main motivation
is simply to enjoy swimming.
“Yes, I want to get better and that’s
always something every athlete
wants to do, but half the time you’re
not going to get better if you’re
not enjoying yourself,” Lusk said.
Coach Campbell has noticed how
much Lusk has improved through-
out her four years at Kansas.
“Ali came in from a very good
prep school in Chattanooga and
accomplished a lot as a young
swimmer, and hadn’t improved for
a little while and she came in and
really enjoyed the program. She’s
now our school record-holder in
the 200 breast,” Campbell said.
Lusk takes her leadership role
seriously and is excited to work
with the new freshman class
and make them feel comfort-
able on the team. She said it’s
important to lead by example.
“It’s up to (Alison) Moft, Mor-
gan and I to set the standard,”
Lusk said. “We are trying to make
them feel more comfortable right
away — [this is] going to be the
biggest part to immediately in-
tegrating them into the team.”
Moft, from Flower Mound,
Texas, also believes in fnd-
ing the fun in swimming.
“Te most important part about
leading our team is to keep us
focused on the journey,” Moft
said. “Te swim season is long
and can so easily become over-
whelming if you do not keep
the journey in perspective. You
just have to take swimming day
by day, and have fun with it.”
Moft has been swimming
since age six and joined a club
team at age eight. She is a
distance and freestyle swim-
mer and swims the 500 free,
400 IM and the mile or 1650.
Campbell has seen her grow
and has noticed her improve-
ment, especially in the classroom.
“She was an honor roll stu-
dent last year and worked her
tail of,” Campbell said. “She
has improved so much, both
in the water and, more im-
portantly, in the classroom.”
Sharp, who is from Houston,
Texas, is a freestyle swimmer.
“Morgan [Sharp] is our school
record-holder in the 500 free.
She’s done a good job adjust-
ing to the intensity of college
swimming,” Campbell said.
Overall, the captains and coach
are excited to bring changes to the
team culture. By working through
“Te Jayhawk Way” and using the
strong leadership of the captains
and seniors, they hope to have a
permanent impact on the program.
“Tis year is about the culture,”
Campbell said. “Te culture gets
you to believe in what you’re
doing. Te bottom line is that
you’ve got to believe to achieve.”
— Edited by Emma McElhaney
Volume 126 Issue 11 kansan.com Wednesday, September 11, 2013
FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK
VOLLEYBALL
PAGE 8
PAGE 9
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Daniel Harmsen
dharmsen@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Football aims to end
road losing streak
N
obody is going to tell you
that Harry S. Truman was
the smartest president in
U.S. history, Harry Truman in-
cluded. Even today, his presidency
remains controversial — particu-
larly because of his decision to use
atomic weapons against Japan to
bring a speedy end to World War II.
But one thing a lot of people will
tell you about Harry Truman is that
he was a great leader of people and
an even better decision-maker. In
times of tribulation, he acted —
fast. Tis is the man who oversaw
the Berlin Airlif in 1948 and the
creation of NATO in 1949.
In his address to the National War
College on Dec. 19, 1952, President
Truman famously said, “It’s easy for
the Monday morning quarterback
to say what the coach should have
done, afer the game is over. But
when the decision is up before you
— and on my desk I have a motto
which says ‘Te Buck Stops Here’
— the decision has been made…
you can’t pass the buck to anybody.”
Truman ofen credited his farm-
boy roots for his hard-working,
proactive habits. He was early to
rise and work. Simply, he got things
done when they needed to be done.
Tis Saturday, the Kansas Jay-
hawks football team will have a
“buck” of sorts sitting before them.
A buck that has been passed on to
them from teams past: a nine-
teen-game road losing streak dating
back to 2009.
Facts are facts: Te Jayhawk’s last
road win was on Sept. 12, 2009,
against the UTEP Miners, 34-7. In
that game, Kansas held the Miners
to 208 total yards, dominating
the contest in all facets, from the
opening kick to the fnal whistle. It
was an enthralling victory for the
program, and the future looked as
bright as ever.
Fast-forward to today. Te
27-point victory still stands as the
Jayhawk’s last road win.
I would have never guessed (even
as a high-schooler still relatively
new to watching Kansas football)
that four years later, as a junior in
college, the win in El Paso would
still be the last time I saw a Kansas
road win.
Since that fateful day in ’09, Kan-
sas has allowed an average of 42.6
points per road game and scored
only 15.6 points per road game.
It’s one thing to lose 19 straight
road games. It’s another to lose 19
straight road games by an average
of almost 30 points per game.
I’m not saying that this is going to
be easy. It never was for Truman.
But if there was ever a time for
Kansas to turn the corner and
change the entire attitude sur-
rounding the program, that time
is this Saturday in Houston, Texas,
against the Rice Owls.
Tree days from now, Kansas will
be matched up against a potent Owl
ofense, but an even more exploit-
able Owl defense... on the road.
Te 31-14 win on Saturday was
a little on the sloppy side, littered
with dropped passes and penalties,
but a win all the same. It should
have helped quell the frst-game
jitters of the new athletes.
If the players board the plane due
south not as individuals, but as one
unifed force with one thing on
its itinerary — stop the streak —
they’ll be greeted by Kansas fans
when they get back at 2-0, with a
bowl game realistically in sight.
Let’s go. I can’t wait for Saturday.
Te buck needs to stop here, boys.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney
When the Jayhawks take the
feld against Rice University on
Saturday, it will have been four
years since the program’s last road
win. Tat game was on Sept. 12,
2009, and ended with a dom-
inant 34-7 victory against the
University of Texas at El Paso.
Te Jayhawks will return to
the Lone Star state this week-
end in hopes of ending their
19-game road losing streak.
Te Owls return 18 of 22 starters
from a team that came into Law-
rence a season ago and won on
a last-second 45-yard feld goal.
Kansas faces an
experienced team
on Saturday that
could be further
motivated in its
home opener.
Tis is a game
that will empha-
size the role of
team captains
Jake Heaps,
Keon Stowers,
Ben Heeney and James Sims.
Part of their role is to set the tone
for the team come game time.
“We’ve had that conversation,”
Charlie Weis said in his press con-
ference on Tuesday. “Part of the
burden falls on them to make sure
they’re really ready to go at kick-of.
It’s diferent at home, you got the
home crowd to get you juiced, you
got the band, you got all that stuf.”
Saturday’s crowd likely won’t be
large or loud. Rice Stadium holds
47,000, but last season the high-
est number of fans who showed
up to a game was 23,105, for the
season opener against Univer-
sity of California, Los Angeles.
Te Owls lost that game, and
went 3-3 at home, but all three
wins came in a stretch at the end
of the season when Rice went
6-1 and scored more than 33
points in each of the six wins.
Tere’s no reason to believe that
the task of winning in Houston
will be easy, but it’s something that
needs to be accomplished if Weis
and his team want to prove they
are moving in the right direction.
“For the program, winning last
week got the losing streak out of
the way,” Weis said. “Winning
this week could get the losing on
the road out of the way. Winning
three weeks from now could get the
conference streak out of the way.”
Te Jayhawks took a small step
when they ended the 11-game los-
ing streak that followed them into
the season, and another one when
Justin McCay caught a 5-yard pass
from Jake Heaps in the end zone.
Tat catch ended a season-long
streak of failures to catch touch-
down pass-
es by wide
recei vers.
It will
require a
bigger step
to end the
streak of
losing road
g a m e s ,
which has
lasted lon-
ger and involves more difculty.
South Dakota was not on the same
level as Kansas. Te Coyotes also
won one game a season ago and
they play in the Football Cham-
pionship Subdivision. Te Jay-
hawks didn’t need to worry about
defending the pass, which could
be seen as an advantage, as South
Dakota threw the ball just 18 times
and only a few times downfeld.
Against Rice, Kansas will face
quarterback Taylor McHargue,
who makes plays with his legs and
throws accurate passes downfeld.
Saturday’s road game will be
the frst true test of the sea-
son for the Jayhawks; it’s one
they will treat as a business trip
with the captains in the lead.
“Tere’s stepping stones you have
to take to move up here,” Weis said,
“and this gives us an opportunity
to get one of those out of the way.”
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
ROAD BLOCK
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Junior receiver Justin McCay celebrates with junior tight end Jimmay Mundine during the win over South Dakota on Sept. 7.
McCay scored the frst receiving touchdown since Oct. 22, 2011.
Saturday’s game could be a turning point for Kansas football
MAX GOODWIN
mgoodwin@kansan.com

“Part of the burden falls
on them to make sure
they’re really ready to go at
kick-off.”
CHARLIE WEIS
Coach
SWIMMING AND DIVING
MIRANDA DAVIS
mdavis@kansan.com
Captains bring strong leadership to Kansas
MOMENT OF TRUTH
EMILY WITTLER/KANSAN
Chelsie Miller, a freshman on the Kansas Women’s Swim Team, prepares to swim in
the 500-yard freestyle at a Feb. 2 meet against Arkansas inside Robinson Natatori-
um. Teammates Rebecca Swank and Alison Mofft also swam in this heat.
CHECK OUT MORE PHOTOS OF THE FOOTBALL TEAM ON KANSAN.COM
http://bit.ly/1cTW5KK

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful