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09-14-2013 Edition of the San Mateo Daily Journal
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10/22/2013

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 24
RESCUE MISSION
NATION PAGE 7
SOUTH CITY
BEATS CAP
SPORTS PAGE 11
‘SALINGER’ IS
OVER HYPED
WEEKEND PAGE 17
STRANDED RESIDENTS PLUCKED FROM COLORADO
FLOODWATERS
1528 S El Camino Real
Suite 408, San Mateo
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — In a final flur-
ry of legislative action, state law-
makers approved bills to boost
California’s minimum wage, grant
driver’s licenses to immigrants in
the country illegally, and address
the state’s overcrowded prisons.
Many of the hundreds of bills
that survived the Legislature this
year were big wins for Democrats
on long-sought issues. They also
were among Gov. Jerry Brown’s
top policy priorities after clearing
California’s budget hurdle and
restructuring the school finance
system.
The measures send the governor
into next year’s expected re-elec-
tion campaign with a string of vic-
tories and a track record generally
favorable to the labor unions that
have laid the foundation for his
political success.
“To g e t h e r ,
the Assembly,
the governor
and the Senate,
we are focused
on serial
achievement. I
mean, it’s one
thing after the
other,” Senate
President Pro
Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-
Sacramento, said in an interview
early Friday after the chamber fin-
ished its business for the year.
He said a last-minute compro-
mise to address a federal court order
to lower the state inmate popula-
tion “has the potential to change
the course of, and the direction of,
our criminal justice system.”
The proposal asks federal judges
to delay their end-of-year deadline
for reducing the prison popula-
Brown lands
key victories
for his party
Democrats deliver landmark bills
in final flurry of legislative session
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Apetition for a new high school
focused on design and hands-on
projects while retaining tradition-
al learning was filed with the San
Mateo Union High School District
Thursday, bringing the school one
step closer to fruition.
With good schools already in
the district, Ken Montgomery, 40,
the person behind Design Tech
High School, said he still wants to
provide students with another
option. The petition had more
than 300 signatures, more than
the 75 signatures required for the
potential 500-student charter
school. They hope to open in fall
2014 with a freshmen class, then
add on classes each year follow-
i ng.
“Some students would maybe
benefit from a different experi-
ence,” said Montgomery, Design
Tech’s director. “It would teach the
skills people need to be success-
ful: persistence, collaboration and
critical thinking. We’re also driv-
en by equity. Public school stu-
dents should have access to the
same services [as similar private
schools].”
Montgomery, who is assistant
principal at Capuchino High
School and is married with one
child, grew up on a farm in Idaho
with 41 students in his graduating
high school class. Prior to his
work in different administrations,
he was a teacher and he was even
named as part of the USA Today
All-Teacher Team.
“The design tech school — with
extreme personalization — con-
Learning by design
Design Tech High School moving from conception to reality
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With the downtown Burlingame
post office for sale and develop-
ment plans in the works, city offi-
cials are considering making a
request to act as the agency that
helps preserve its historical
integrity.
The 220 Park Road property,
which officially went up for sale in
August, is protected under its list-
ing on the National Register of
City may oversee post office historic preservation
Burlingame officials consider asking to be responsible agency
Jerry Brown
By Elliott Spagat
and Amy Taxin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA ANA — To get the dri-
ver’s licenses they’ve long
sought, immigrants living in
California illegally will have to
do something many have long
resisted: publicly identify them-
selves.
The driver’s license bill that the
Legislature passed on its final day
requires a distinction that will
indicate if someone is in the coun-
try without proper documentation.
Like many immigrants, Albin
Bandera said he’s willing to take
the risk. The 28-year-old said he
currently skateboards to his job as
a waiter in Los Angeles.
Immigrants may flag status
to get state driver’s license
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Design Tech High School’s director Ken Montgomery works with Nicole Cerra, the school’s curriculum director.
DAILY JOURNAL FILE PHOTO
The downtown Burlingame post office is protected under its listing on
the National Register of Historic Places.
See DESIGN, Page 20
See HISTORIC, Page 20
• AB60 would let immigrants
who are in the country illegally
obtain driver’s licenses with a
special designation. Under the
bill authored by Assemblyman
Luis Alejo, D-Watsonville, the
licenses would state that they are
for driving purposes and not to
be used as federal identification.
• AB1024 would enable lawyers
to be licensed,regardless of their
immigration status. The bill by
Assemblywoman Lorena
Gonzalez, D-San Diego, was
inspired by the case of law
school graduate Sergio Garcia,
who passed the state’s bar exam
Other actions
See BROWN, Page 6
See LICENSE, Page 6
See ACTIONS, Page 6
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1814
Francis Scott Key was inspired to
write a poem, “Defence of Fort
McHenry,” after witnessing how an
American flag flying over the
Maryland fort withstood a night of
British bombardment during the War
of 1812; the poem later became the
words to “The Star-Spangled Banner.”
“America has been called a melting pot,but it seems
better to call it a mosaic,for in it each nation,people or
race which has come to its shores has been privileged
to keep its individuality,contributing at the same time
its share to the unified pattern of a new nation.”
— King Baudouin I of Belgium (1930-1993)
Russian Prime
Minister Dmitry
Medvedev is 48.
Rapper Nas is 40.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Artist Liu Bolin is painted by an assistant, as part of a project to make himself and other participants look exactly the same
as the seats in a theater, in Beijing, China.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog and
drizzle in the morning. Highs in the mid
60s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy
fog and drizzle after midnight. Lows in
the mid 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 15
mph.
Sunday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog and drizzle in the morn-
ing. Highs in the upper 60s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Local Weather Forecast
The article “Get ready for green” in the Sept. 13 edition
had incorrect information. The Burlingame Green Street
Fair is 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 15.
Correction
I n 1812, Napoleon Bonaparte’s troops entered Moscow
following the Battle of Borodino to find the Russian city
largely abandoned and parts set ablaze.
I n 1829, the Treaty of Adrianople was signed, ending war
between Russia and the Ottoman Empire.
I n 1861, the first naval engagement of the Civil War took
place as the USS Colorado attacked and sank the Confederate
private schooner Judah off Pensacola, Fla.
I n 1901, President William McKinley died in Buffalo,
N.Y., of gunshot wounds inflicted by an assassin. Vice
President Theodore Roosevelt succeeded him.
I n 1927, modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan died in Nice
(nees), France, when her scarf became entangled in a wheel
of the sports car she was riding in.
I n 1941, Vermont passed a resolution enabling its service-
men to receive wartime bonuses by declaring the U.S. to be
in a state of armed conflict, giving rise to headlines that
Vermont had “declared war on Germany. ”
I n 1963, Mary Ann Fischer of Aberdeen, S.D., gave birth
to four girls and a boy, the first known surviving quintuplets
in the United States.
I n 1964, Pope Paul VI opened the third session of the
Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, also known as
“Vatican II.” (The session closed two months later. )
I n 1975, Pope Paul VI declared Mother Elizabeth Ann
Bayley Seton the first U.S.-born saint.
The 100 billionth Crayola crayon
rolled off the production line in
Easton, Penn. in 1996.
***
The first president of the United States
born in a hospital was Jimmy Carter
(born 1924), the 39th president.
***
One of Hollywood’s most famous
kisses was between Burt Lancaster
(1913-1994) and Deborah Kerr (1921-
2007) in the movie “From Here to
Eternity” (1953). The scene of the
passionate kiss on a beach in the surf
is only three seconds long.
***
The only words with three dotted let-
ters in a row are hijinks, Beijing and
Fiji.
***
The Uniform Time Act of 1966 stan-
dardized the beginning and end of
Daylight Savings Time nationwide.
*** ***
Rabbits were brought to Australia in
1859 for hunting. Soon rabbits, not
native to Australia, were reproducing
at such a rapid rate they were becoming
a plague. In 1950, the government
introduced a disease called myxomato-
sis that successfully controlled the
rabbit population with a mortality rate
of 99 percent.
***
The trumpeter swan is the largest
waterfowl in North America. Apair of
trumpeter swans mates for life. They
live 20 to 30 years.
***
The world’s smallest bird is the bee
hummingbird. Found in Cuba, the tiny
birds are about the size of a bee and
weigh 0.07 ounces.
***
On July 16, 1945, a test took place
that was code named Trinity. Do you
know what the test was? See answer at
end.
***
Elephants walk at a speed of about 4
mph.
***
French physicist Augustin Jean
Fresnel (1788–1827) invented the
Fresnel lens used in lighthouses. The
multi-prismed lens intensified the
light and focused the beam in light-
house lamps.
***
In 1996, the Food and Drug
Administration approved olestra, a
calorie-free fat substitute, for use in
salty snacks such as chips and crack-
ers. However, all snacks containing
olestra had to carry a warning label
that olestra may cause abdominal
cramping and loose stools. As of
2003, the label was no longer required
because it confused consumers.
***
Introduced in 1930, the Motorola was
one of the first commercially success-
ful car radios. The brand name came
from combining the word motor, for
motorcar, and “ola,” which implied
sound; thus Motorola meant sound in
moion.
***
Ad campaigns for Lifebuoy Soap pop-
ularized the term “B.O.” for body odor.
***
Harvard College, established in 1636,
was named for its first benefactor.
John Harvard (1607-1638) of
Charlestown, Mass. was a minister
who left his library and half his estate
to the new institution.
***
Actor Telly Savalas (1924-1994) was
Jennifer Aniston’s (born 1969) godfa-
ther. Telly is short for Aristotle.
***
Answer: It was the testing of the first
atomic bomb, conducted by the United
States. The plutonium bomb was deto-
nated on July 16, 1945 at
Alamogordo, N.M. The explosion was
equivalent to 20 kilotons of TNT and
the mushroom cloud reached 7.5 miles
in height. Trinity is considered the
beginning of the Atomic Age.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers Monday)
CRIMP SWISH SNEAKY DILUTE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The careless driver needed to —
WRECK LESS
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PENST
SIALA
LEYWOL
ROBWUR
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print answer here:
Actress Zoe Caldwell is 80. Feminist author Kate Millett is
79. Actor Walter Koenig is 77. Basketball Hall of Fame coach
Larry Brown is 73. Singer-actress Joey Heatherton is 69.
Actor Sam Neill is 66. Singer Jon “Bowzer” Bauman (Sha Na
Na) is 66. Rock musician Ed King is 64. Actor Robert Wisdom
is 60. Rock musician Steve Berlin (Los Lobos) is 58. Country
singer-songwriter Beth Nielsen Chapman is 57. Actress Mary
Crosby is 54. Singer Morten Harket is 54. Country singer
John Berry is 54. Actress Melissa Leo is 53. Actress Faith
Ford is 49. Actor Jamie Kaler is 49.
Actor, writer,
director, producer
Tyler Perry is 44.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Solid Gold, No.
10, in first place; Gorgeous George, No. 8, in
second place; and Whirl Win,No.6,in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:46.04.
3 1 0
3 5 14 40 46 2
Mega number
Sept. 13 Mega Millions
11 19 33 42 52 33
Powerball
Sept. 11 Powerball
2 17 27 33 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
7 3 3 5
Daily Four
3 9 9
Daily three evening
3 5 14 40 46 2
Mega number
Sept. 11 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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SAN MATEO
Burglary. A subject entered a residence
through an unlocked window and took gold
and jewelry items on the 500 block of Le
Conte Avenue before 9 a.m. Monday, Sept.
9.
Vandal i sm. A vehicle’s window was
smashed on the first block of North
Ellsworth Avenue before 9:34 p.m. Sunday,
Sept. 8.
Theft. Asubject cut the tags off a pre-paid
phone on the 1700 block of South Delaware
Street before 6:23 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 8.
Drugs. A subject was arrested for having a
large bag of marijuana in a vehicle on the
500 block of Carmel Avenue before 9:09
p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7.
St ol en vehi cl e. A vehicle was stolen on
the 300 block of North Bayshore Boulevard
before 9:13 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 7.
UNINCORPORATED
SAN MATEO COUNTY
Burglary. A vehicle’s window was broken
and three laptops and an iPad were taken on
the 4000 block of Highway 1 before 6:50
p.m. Sept. 11.
Burglary. A vehicle’s window was broken
and a laptop was stolen on the 6000 block
of Highway 1 before 12:30 p.m. Tuesday,
Sept. 10.
Police reports
Thrilla in manila
Amanila envelope was placed on top of
a mail box behind City Hall on the 500
block of Linden Avenue in San Bruno
before 12:42 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
11.
CITY
GOVERNMENT
• The San
Carl os Pl anni ng
Commi ssi on will
consider recom-
mending the Ci ty Counci l adopt envi-
ronmental findings and zoning amend-
ments for the proposed Transi t Vi l l age
development.
The Planning Commission meets 7
p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 at City Hall, 600
Elm St., San Carlos.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sentencing was delayed again Friday for
two former mosquito district finance workers
who stole more than a half-million dollars of
taxpayer money and used it for a variety of
personal things including partially paying
one’s legal fees in an earlier embezzlement
case.
Jo Ann Dearman, otherwise known as
Joanne Seeney, sought more time because
the house sale with which she plans to pay
restitution is going slow. The amount of
repayment by Dearman doesn’t affect the
possible sentence imposed on co-defendant
Vika Sinipata but she also delayed her hear-
ing because attorneys want both women to
stand together. Sentencing was reset for Oct.
25.
Former finance director Dearman, 62, was
originally charged with nearly 200 crimes.
She pleaded no contest to 10 felonies in
return for seven years at most but possibly
less depending on repayment. Bookkeeper
assistant Vika Sinipata, 37, pleaded no con-
test to 12 felonies with no sentencing prom-
ises.
Dearman was the finance director at the San
Mateo County Mosquito and Vector Control
District. Sinipata served as an accounting
supervisor and bookkeeper assistant. The
pair embezzled the funds
between 2009 and 2011
by giving themselves
extra pay at a higher pay
rate and fraudulent time
off, excessively con-
tributed to their deferred
compensation funds, used
credit cards for personal
purchases and electroni-
cally transferred money
into their own accounts.
An audit showed more than $635,000 miss-
ing but prosecutors only charged them with
stealing approximately $450,000 because
they could not prove an actual loss of the
greater amount. Other evaluations have
placed the district lose closer to $800,000
for the embezzlement and more than $1.2
million when attorney fees are added in.
The charges against Dearman and Sinipata
raised questions about the district’s over-
sight and operations, particularly because at
the time Dearman had one embezzlement
conviction on her record and was being pros-
ecuted for a second. Manager Robert Gay
hired Dearman without a background or refer-
ence check after Sinipata referred her.
Dearman then hired Sinipata.
According to a now-retired operations
director at the district, Dearman charged
defense attorneys fees for that case to the dis-
trict and at one point took
medical leave, claiming
she needed to care for her
mother but in actuality
served two years and eight
months in prison for the
two different embezzle-
ment cases. In one case,
Dearman ran up more than
a half-million dollars on
her boss’ credit card.
The embezzlement came to light after a
board member appointed by the city of San
Carlos questioned the balance in a pesticide
account.
The county’s special district oversight
board considered dissolving the mosquito
agency and handing its functions back to San
Mateo County but ultimately voted against
doing so. In July, the county’s civil grand
jury recommended the Local Agency
Formation Commission reconsider because
it concluded that mismanagement, insuffi-
cient accountability and inadequate over-
sight led to the embezzlement. The report
specifically blamed the district’s manager
and 21-member board of trustees.
On Wednesday, LAFCo agreed reconsidera-
tion is warranted and asked the county
Environmental Health division to first pro-
vide more financial information on the pos-
sible transfer.
Embezzling mosquito district
workers sentencing delayed
Pair accused of stealing public money from special district
Jo Ann
Dearman
Vika Sinipata
Bay Area man charged
in warning shot killing
A62-year-old San Francisco Bay Area man
is facing an involuntary manslaughter
charge after authorities say he fired a warn-
ing shot that killed a fleeing car thief sus-
pect.
Craig Yuhara of Los Gatos did not enter a
plea during his arraignment in San Jose on
Thursday in the death of 47-year-old Daniel
Winslow.
Authorities say Yuhara got into an argu-
ment on Sunday with Winslow and another
man after spotting them filling up a stolen
van with gas. The van was parked in front of
Yuhara’s house.
Yuhara allegedly opened fire as Winslow
and the man were leaving in another vehi-
cle. The bullet entered the back of the vehi-
cle and hit Winslow. He was later found dead
near San Jose State University.
Around the Bay
4
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
It’s not quite biting the bullet, but Sheriff
Greg Munks will ask county supervisors
Tuesday for the legal right to sell off its
stock of old duty weapons and use the pro-
ceeds to buy new guns for sworn personnel.
Selling the 355 current duty weapons plus
another 400 old guns should raise between
$130,000 and $150,000, depending on the
number and type sold, which will offset the
estimated $150,000 price tag of the new
Smith & Wesson weapons.
Currently, code prohibits law enforcement
officials from selling, trading or otherwise
transferring any firearm owned or possessed
by San Mateo County. The Board of
Supervisors at its Tuesday meeting will con-
sidering amending the
code to allow the sale.
The manufacturer has
offered to buy the old duty
weapon inventory at fair
market value, according
to Munks. Munks first
wants to offer the
weapons to interested
sworn personnel. Any
firearms left will be sold
to Smith & Wesson.
Both sales will be through a licensed
firearms dealer.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m.
Tuesday, Saturday, Sept. 17 in Board
Chambers, 400 County Government Center,
Redwood City.
Sheriff aiming to sell
guns, rearm personnel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
One of two people charged with human
trafficking for allegedly prostituting four
women, including one underage girl, at a
South San Francisco
motel will stand trial on
several felonies in
December.
Sate Stallone Jones,
26, and Maria Carolina
Jiminez, 26, have both
pleaded not guilty to sev-
eral counts of human traf-
ficking and enticing a
minor into prostitution.
Jones is scheduled for trial Dec. 16;
Jiminez’s case is still set for Oct. 15
although that will likely be amended to the
other, too.
In mid-February, a man later identified as
Jones reportedly dropped off two women
one night and two women
the next at the La Quinta
Inn in South San
Francisco between Feb.
15 and Feb. 16. The
women reportedly told
police the couple gave
them illegal drugs to keep
them working all night
and sometimes deprived
them of food. When the
man returned with a
woman, identified as Jiminez, to collect the
four others, they were arrested.
Jiminez is free on $350,000 bail while
Jones is held on the same amount.
Trial set for human trafficking defendants
Greg Munks
Sate Jones
Maria Jiminez
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
5
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Erica Werner
and Alicia A. Caldwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — With immi-
gration legislation stalled in
Congress, advocates are intensi-
fying pressure on the Obama
administration to act unilaterally
to stop deportations or grant legal
status to some of the 11 million
people now living in the U.S.
illegally.
Activists are stepping up acts of
civil disobedience like one last
month in Phoenix, where they
blocked a bus full of immigrant
detainees. And labor leaders plan
to press the issue with a top White
House official in an upcoming
meeting.
Many advocates continue to
hold out hope for a legislative
solution even as some shift their
focus to the White House.
“If Congress doesn’t move, the
president has a duty to act,” said
Ana Avendano, director of immi-
gration and community action at
the AFL-CIO. “Just because the
Republicans have buried their
heads in the sand doesn’t mean
that immigrant communities
aren’t feeling the sting of con-
stant deportations.”
The possibility of executive
action is inflaming Republican
suspicions. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-
Fla., and others warn that
President Barack Obama will be
tempted to act on his own to
legalize some or all of the people
now living in the country illegal-
l y.
“I think that’s actually what
Obama wants to do. I think he
wants Congress not to pass some-
thing so he can do it on his own
and he can take credit for it,” Rep.
Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, said in an
interview. “He needs to be very
careful, though, because he con-
tinues to flout the law, and he con-
tinues to do things that are
beyond his authority. And at some
point, Congress is going to have
enough.”
The administration acted on its
own a year ago to change policy
and suspend deportations of some
immigrants brought illegally into
the country as children. More than
450,000 of them have benefited
so far.
Advocates turn to Obama for action on immigration
REUTERS
Women demanding ‘Fair Immigration Reform’are arrested by U.S.Capitol
police for blocking Independence Avenue during their rally on Capitol
Hill in Washington, D.C.
Bill would create California
quake warning system
LOS ANGELES — California
could join Japan, Mexico and other
earthquake-prone countries that
alert residents to the approach of
powerful shaking under a bill await-
ing approval from Gov. Jerry
Brown.
The state Legislature advanced
the bill that would create a quake
warning system during Thursday’s
last hours of its session. Brown has
until Oct. 13 to decide.
The U.S. lags behind other
nations in developing a public alert
system, which provides several
seconds of warning after a fault rup-
tures — enough time for trains to
brake, utilities to shut off gas lines
or people to dive under a table until
the shaking stops.
Investigators: 36,000
game disability system
WASHINGTON — Social Security
made $1.3 billion in potentially
improper disability payments to
people who had jobs when they
were supposed to be unable to work,
congressional investigators said in
a report Friday.
The Government Accountability
Office estimated that 36,000 work-
ers got improper payments from
December 2010 to January 2013.
The numbers represent less than 1
percent of beneficiaries and less
than 1 percent of disability pay-
ments made during the time frame.
News briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO —
California Gov. Jerry Brown and
a China’s top climate negotiator
signed an agreement to boost
cooperation between the state
and China on clean energy tech-
nologies and climate change.
The governor said the memo-
randum of understanding signed
Friday is the first climate
agreement between China’s
National Development and
Reform Commission and a sub-
national government.
Under the 2-year commitment,
Chinese and California environ-
ment and energy officials will
work together to find ways to
share new low carbon technolo-
gies, as well as research and poli-
cy innovations meant to combat
climate change.
Brown said the state’s agree-
ment with China is important in
the absence of progress in nation-
al and international climate
change negotiations.
California, Chinese officials announce climate deal
6
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
tion, and would dedicate millions of dollars
to rehabilitation programs if they agree.
Several of the bills receiving the most
attention were sought by the most liberal
constituents of the Democratic Party. One
was AB60 to allow immigrants in the coun-
try illegally to apply for California driver’s
licenses. Brown said he supports the bill
and hopes it sends a message to
Washington about immigration reform.
Another bill, AB10, would boost the state’s
$8 hourly minimum wage to $10 an hour by
2016.
California Chamber of Commerce
spokeswoman Denise Davis said the pro-
posed increase, which Brown helped bro-
ker, “will be hard on California small busi-
nesses and on workers.” Employers already
are facing higher health care and unemploy-
ment insurance costs, she said.
Still, the session did not produce the lib-
eral onslaught some conservatives had
warned about after Democrats won two-
thirds majorities in both houses of the
Legislature. The chamber said the minimum
wage legislation was the only one of 38
bills it had identified as “job killers” to sur-
vive.
Brown, a pragmatist who generally takes
the long view in pushing for reforms, had
sought to broker a middle road throughout
this year’s legislative session.
He pushed for fiscal restraint in the $96.3
billion state budget earlier this year and
warned Democrats that he would not
approve tax increases. It was a promise he
made to voters last November when they
endorsed his initiative to raise the
statewide sales tax and income taxes on
high-income earners.
“The people have given us seven years of
extra taxes. Let us follow the wisdom of
Joseph, pay down our debts and store up
reserves against the leaner times that will
surely come,” Brown said in his January
State of the State address.
The extra income helped avoid more cuts
to California schools and paved the way for
the school finance reform Brown sought.
That will direct proportionately more
money to schools with high numbers of
students from lower-income families and
students who have limited English profi-
ciency. The voter-approved tax increases
are set to expire about the time Brown
would leave office if he wins a fourth term
next November.
Continued from page 1
BROWN
“It’s just great because I can be mobile and
able to transport myself from job to job, to
school,” said Bandera, who came here from
Mexico as a toddler. “The day it comes out, I
am there, the first one in line.”
Gov. Jerry Brown is expected to sign the
bill. It’s one of several pro-immigrant
pieces of legislation approved at the end of
the session and would add California to the
growing list of states that give driver’s
licenses to immigrants in the country ille-
gally. Other measures aim to crack down on
fraud by immigration lawyers and consult-
ants, ensure overtime pay for domestic
workers, and scale back cooperation
between police and federal immigration
authorities.
In California, the bill authored by
Democratic Assemblyman Luis Alejo would
grant licenses to anyone who passes written
and road tests, regardless of immigration
status. The licenses would carry a distinc-
tion on the front of the card, however, and
state that they are to be used for driving and
not as federal identification to board an air-
line flight.
It isn’t clear whether entities in
California like local government offices,
libraries or banks would accept the license
as a form of identification, immigrant advo-
cates said. Some worry the distinction will
contribute to racial profiling and discrimi-
nation, but many immigrants are desperate
to drive without fear of being ticketed, hav-
ing their car impounded or being detained
by police and potentially deported.
“What is most important to us is there be
protection against law enforcement action
or discrimination on the basis of the mark-
er,” said Thomas Saenz, president of the
Mexican American Legal Defense and
Educational Fund, which opposed a prior
version of the bill.
Continued from page 1
LICENSE
but has been living in the country illegally.
• Immigration attorneys and consultants
wouldn’t be allowed to charge money for
services related to immigration reform before
an overhaul is passed by Congress. The bill,
known as AB1159,was authored by Gonzalez
and supported by the State Bar over concerns
that fraudulent immigration services could
bankrupt a client security fund.
• AB4 by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano,D-San
Francisco, would prohibit local law
enforcement from holding people in custody
for deportation if they are arrested for a minor
crime. The bill creates a statewide standard
for how local law enforcement agencies
comply with the federal Secure Communities
program,which requires law enforcement to
check the immigration status of anyone
arrested.
• Domestic workers would be guaranteed
overtime payments for working more than
nine hours a day or 45 hours a week.
Ammiano’s bill, AB241, calls for a study of the
provision’s effect on workers and their
employers.
Continued from page 1
ACTIONS
S
t. Matthew’s Epi scopal
unveiled its new Early Childhood
Center in a ribbon cutting ceremo-
ny on 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 10.
***
Two dozen San Mateo Union High
School Di stri ct seniors were named
National Merit Scholarship semi-
finalists, it was announced Wednesday,
Sept. 11. Finalists from Aragon High
School were Amy Barch, Elkana
Chan, Yuki Chin, Brianne Felsher,
John Herrera, Patrick Lin, Brandon
Liu, Jonathan Staryuk and Nathan
Zhang. Finalists from Burlingame
Hi gh School were Amelia Berger,
Georgiana Du, Evelyn Li, Andrew
Mal ta, Alice Rao, Faraaz Rashidi,
Charlie Spira, while Hi l l sdal e Hi gh
Sc hool had Evan Doyl e and Vi ct or
Goswami , while Ti ffany Chen and
Robert Lu represent Mi l l s Hi gh
Sc hool. San Mateo Hi gh School ’s
Jordan Barron Goldman, Megha
Bindal, Sara Evensen, Andrew Lin
and Ran Zhang also made the cut.
Winners will be made public in spring of
next year.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school news.
It is compiled by education reporter Angela
Swartz. You can contact her at (650) 344-5200,
ext. 105 or at angela@smdailyjournal.com.
NATION 7
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pollution
Prevention Week
September 16
th
-22
nd
The City of Millbrae wishes to thank all
residents and businesses for their efforts towards
making a difference by:
Properly Disposing of Medications
Police Bureau, Monday-Friday 9:00 am-5 pm
Properly Disposing of Household Hazardous Waste
Visit fowstobay.org
Gardening with Non-toxic Products
Visit ourwaterourworld.org
Cleaning with Non-toxic Products
Visit the eco-home page @ baywise.org
Keeping Storm Drains Clean
Place waste in trash & maintain vehicles
Remembering Wipes Clog Pipes
Flush only human waste and toilet paper
AND
Participating in the Annual
Coastal/Citywide Cleanup at Central Park
Saturday, September 21 9:00—noon at
For more information contact 650.259.2397
or callin@ci.millbrae.ca.us
ci.millbrae.ca.us/
sustainablemillbrae
By P. Solomon Banda and Mead Gruver
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LYONS, Colo. — By truck and helicopter,
thousands of people stranded by floodwaters
came down from the Colorado Rockies on
Friday, two days after seemingly endless
rain turned normally scenic rivers and
creeks into coffee-colored rapids that
wrecked scores of roads and wiped out neigh-
borhoods.
Authorities aimed to evacuate 2,500 peo-
ple from the isolated mountain community
of Lyons by the end of the day, either by
National Guard convoys or airlifts.
One of them, Mary Hemme, recalled hear-
ing sirens going off in the middle of the
night and her husband saying they needed to
leave. They stepped outside their trailer and
into rushing water that nearly reached their
knees.
She got in her car and tried to drive away.
“But I only got so far, because the river
was rushing at me, so I threw it in reverse as
fast as I could,” Hemme said. “I was so afraid
that I was going to die, that water came so
fast.”
Others were less fortunate. The body of a
woman who had been swept away was found
Friday near Boulder, raising the death toll to
four.
National Guard troops aided by a break in
the weather started airlifting 295 residents
from the small community of Jamestown,
which has been cut off and without power or
water for more than a day.
Dean Hollenbaugh, 79, decided to take
one of the helicopters after officials warned
electricity and water could be disrupted for
weeks.
“Essentially, what they were threatening
us with is ‘if you stay here, you may be here
for a month,”’ Hollenbaugh said as he wait-
ed for his son to pick him up from the
Boulder airport. “I felt I was OK. I mean I’ve
camped in the mountains for a week at a
time.”
Airlifts also were taking place to the east
in Larimer County for people with special
medical needs.
Stranded residents plucked from Colorado floodwaters
REUTERS
A National Guard helicopter lands at Boulder Municipal Airport after ferrying supplies and
rescue personnel to mountain towns that have been cut off by the flooding in Boulder, Colo.
WORLD 8
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
HURRY! ORDER YOUR TICKETS
NOW FOR THIS VERY IMPORTANT
HEALTH SEMINAR ABOUT PAIN
CAUTION... Many of the most common foods you
have in your cupboard and medicines in your medicine
cabinet could actually be causing you chronic pain and
stealing your energy.
Which foods and drugs could be doing you more harm
than good? Find out at this seminar!
SEPT.
17TH
HURRY
CALL
NOW!
Tuesday, Sept. 17th, 6pm-9:30pm
at the Foster City Recreation Center at
650 Shell Blvd., in Foster City
Tickets are $35 and include a light dinner
FORTICKETS CALL 415-378-6789
These seminars are scheduled for the third Tuesday of almost every month. Dr.
Eleanor Britter, a Naturopath, and Chef, Ed Baumann bring you this special series of
seminars through the Peninsula Special Interest Lions Club.
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
Police end occupation of Mexico City center
MEXICO CITY — Riot police swept thousands of strik-
ing teachers out of the heart of Mexico City on Friday, driv-
ing protesters through the streets with tear gas and water
cannons in a swift end to the weeks-long occupation of the
Zocalo plaza over reforms to the dysfunctional national edu-
cation system.
It was a dramatic reassertion of state authority after weeks
of near-constant disruption in the center of one of the
world’s largest cities. The teachers have marched through
the capital at least 15 times over the last two months, decry-
ing President Enrique Pena Nieto’s plan to break union con-
trol of education with a new system of standardized teacher
testing that become law on Tuesday.
Authorities did not immediately report any injuries.
Federal police chief Manuel Mondragon said more than 20
demonstrators were arrested.
Four men given death
sentences in India gang rape
NEWDELHI — An Indian court Friday sentenced to death
four men for the gang rape and murder of a young New Delhi
woman, ordering them to the gallows for a brutal attack that
riveted India, where it became a symbol of the widespread
mistreatment of women and the government’s inability to
deal with crime.
Issuing his decision, Judge Yogesh Khanna said the attack
“shocked the collective conscience” of India. “In these
times, when crime against women is on the rise, the courts
cannot turn a blind eye toward such gruesome crimes.”
After the death sentence, the wail of one of the four men,
20-year-old Vinay Sharma, filled the tiny courtroom.
Sharma, an assistant at a gym, then broke down in sobs.
Around the world
By Edith M. Lederer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
UNITED NATIONS — Secretary-
General Ban Ki-moon said Friday he
believes there will be “an overwhelm-
ing report” from U.N. inspectors that
chemical weapons were used in an
attack in Syria on Aug. 21, but he did
not say who was responsible.
The Syrian government and rebels
blame each other for the attack in the
Damascus suburb of Ghouta. The Obama
administration, which says 1,429 peo-
ple were killed, has said it has evidence
that clearly indicates the Syrian gov-
ernment was behind the attack. But
Russia, a key ally of Syria, has said it is
not convinced by the U.S. evidence.
The U.N. inspectors have a mandate
to determine whether chemical weapons
were used — and if so, which agent —
not to establish who was responsible.
But two U.N. diplomats said the report
could point to the perpetrators, saying
that the inspectors collected many sam-
ples from the attack and also inter-
viewed doctors and witnesses.
Ban spoke shortly before the chief
chemical weapons inspector, Ake
Sellstrom, told the Associated Press
that he would deliver his report to the
secretary-general in New York this
weekend.
A senior U.S. intelligence official,
meanwhile, said the U.S. reached its
own figure for the dead in Ghouta by
analyzing videos taken in the hours
after the attack and counting the number
of people who appeared to have died by
chemical attack, including bodies under
bloodless shrouds — a sign that they
probably did not die by rocket fire or
some other conventional means.
U.S. lawmakers were also shown
transcripts of the communications
intercepts of Syrian officials discussing
the attack both before and afterward —
including a conversation where one
Syrian commander told the military’s
chemical weapons unit to cease firing,
because they’d done enough damage,
according to a congressional official.
U.N.: Report will show chemical weapons use in Syria
By Amir Shah and Nahal Toosi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan — The Taliban
attacked a U.S. Consulate in western
Afghanistan with car bombs and guns on
Friday, killing at least four Afghans but fail-
ing to enter the compound or hurt any
Americans.
The attack in the city of Herat underscored
concerns about an insurgency that shows
no signs of letting up as U.S.-led troops
reduce their presence ahead of a full with-
drawal next year.
Within hours of the assault, the U.S. tem-
porarily evacuated many of its consular per-
sonnel to the embassy in Kabul, 650 kilo-
meters (400 miles) to the east.
Herat lies near Afghanistan’s border with
Iran and is considered one of the safer cities
in the country, with a strong Iranian influ-
ence. Friday’s attack highlighted the
Taliban’s reach: The militants once concen-
trated their activities in the east and the
south, but in recent years have demonstrat-
ed an ability to strike with more frequency
in the once-peaceful north and west.
In a phone call, Taliban spokesman Qari
Yousef Ahmadi took responsibility for the
assault.
An interpreter and three members of the
Afghan security forces were killed, said
U.S. State Department deputy spokes-
woman Marie Harf.
Seven militants, including two drivers of
explosives-laden vehicles, also died,
according to Gen. Rahmatullah Safi, Herat
province’s chief of police.
At least 17 people were wounded, said
Herat hospital official Sayednaim Alemi.
The attack began about 6 a.m. when mili-
tants in an SUV and a van set off their
explosives while others on foot fired on
Afghan security forces guarding the
Consulate, Safi said.
He said the militants were not able to
breach the compound, where Americans live
and work.
Taliban attack on U.S. Consulate kills four Afghans
REUTERS
Afghan security forces inspect a damaged car, which was used during a suicide bomb attack,
outside the U.S. consulate in Herat province.
OPINION 9
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Bacon and Brew
Editor,
I would like to extend an invitation
to all San Mateo County residents, and
in particular Dorothy Dimitre (regard-
ing her column “Food porn” in the
Sept. 11 edition of the Daily Journal),
for a day of fun, refreshment and
wholesome snacks at the San Mateo
Bacon and Brew Festival from noon to
6 p.m. Sept. 28 at Central Park.
John J. Dillon
San Bruno
Letter to the editor
By Barbara LaRaia
O
ur bodies have changed sig-
nificantly over the last cen-
tury. Puberty levels are five
years earlier than before, and two-
thirds of Americans are overweight.
Astonishingly, our own government
may be the culprit.
Recommended Daily Allowances of
vitamins and minerals were estab-
lished after World War II, but the
U.S. RDAs have no optimal levels
for physical and mental well-being.
For example, the RDA for iodine was
based on the amount needed to pre-
vent goiter, mental retardation,
hypothyroidism and death. Iodine is
an essential trace mineral needed to
make thyroid hormones which regu-
late our metabolism; it is critical for
every cell function in the body.
Iodine was used universally by most
doctors 100 years ago. A1911
French medical journal article even
discusses asthma cured by iodine.
Even mild iodine deficiency is a fac-
tor in CNS disorders; attention
hyperactivity disorders; thyroid dys-
function and cardiac disease.
Interestingly, Amiodarone, a major
heart drug for arrhythmia, is full of
iodine. And thyroid cancer is now
the fastest growing cancer among
women, having soared 240 percent
over the past 20 years.
In the United States, iodine was
considered so important that until
20 years ago it was routinely added
to bread dough conditioner.
Then it was replaced by bromide,
an “iodine antagonist.” The National
Institute of Health states that urinary
iodine levels have decreased by 50
percent, much of this caused by iodi-
nated bread being replaced by
bromine, which actually blocks the
absorption of iodine in the body.
To make matters worse, our bod-
ies’ iodine levels have been assault-
ed by government-mandated
endocrine disrupters (which mimic
estrogen in the body) and iodine dis-
rupters such as fluoridation of our
water supply. Sixty-six percent of
the U.S. population receives artifi-
cially-fluoridated water, which many
view as mass medication without
informed consent. And there have
been no safety
studies of the syn-
ergistic effects of
fluorides with
water “purifica-
tion” chemicals
such as chlorine
and chloramine,
also mandated by
our elected offi-
cials.
Interestingly, most European
countries do not fluoridate water sup-
plies, yet they have seen substantial
declines (75 percent) in tooth decay
due to the introduction of fluoridated
toothpaste in the 1970s.
Another assault on our metabolism
is government farming mandates.
Soil formulas and farming methods,
legislated and enforced by the state
Departments of Agriculture, contain
heavy metals and deplete soils of
minerals, which can lead to degener-
ative metabolic diseases. North
America has the highest soil mineral
depletion, and the average U.S. soil
depletion is 85 percent compared to
100 years ago — the highest in the
world. In 1936, scientists warned
Congress about this issue (Senate
Document No. 264). Veterinarians
have long known about our depleted
soils, which is why 45 trace miner-
als are added to dog and livestock
food.
So what can we do to assure opti-
mal collective metabolisms? Ideally,
government should stop messing
with our hormones, especially with-
out our consent. Most countries
worldwide, and even a few U.S. water
districts purify their water without
the use of endocrine and iodine dis-
rupting chemicals such as chlo-
ramine and chlorine. And most coun-
tries and some U.S. water agencies
do not fluoridate their water to try to
reduce dental cavities. We can get our
fluoride from toothpaste, mouthwash
and gels if we so desire.
Regarding our minerally-deficient
soil, agriculture departments may do
well to research and reassess large-
scale farming methods and teach
proper stewardship of our land. Soil
nutrients can be thrown out of bal-
ance with high concentrations of the
fertilizers currently used.
RDAs must be changed to ODRs —
Optimal Daily Recommendations.
Japanese consume 100 times our
RDA of iodine, have the lowest can-
cer rates worldwide and are some of
the healthiest people on Earth.
RDAs are merely the “bare bones” of
preventing death or major disease
states. Also, government does not
require food labeling of iodine con-
tent, and this should change as soon
as possible.
Perhaps medical schools should
consider training more doctors in
the area of toxicology, due to all the
chemicals we are exposed to daily.
And laboratory test results will
probably need to have a new “abnor-
mal,” especially for endocrine disor-
ders like thyroid diseases. American
endocrinologists have discussed
changing the “normal” range for
thyroid blood test results. There is
just too much iodine deficiency and
endocrine disruption to keep test
norms the same as they were 50
years ago.
Perhaps the implementors of
Obamacare could save taxpayer
money by having government rec-
ommend things that enhance our
metabolism rather than disrupt it;
the government recommended
iodized salt and then fluoridated our
water supplies. Fluoride disrupts the
body’s assimilation of iodine.
Meanwhile, I’ll continue eating
my eggs with the iodine-containing
yolks, helped by the 45 nutrients
added to livestock feed. And I’ll con-
tinue to get my produce at the local
farmers’ market.
Barbara LaRaia has contributed guest
perspectives to the Daily Journal for
10 years. She lives in San Bruno. She
can be reached by phone at 615-9384
or by email at
barbaralaraia2004@yahoo.com.
The new abnormal
Applying lessons of Vietnam
O
ver the last few weeks, I’ve written about some my
experiences in Vietnam and Asia. Those experi-
ences colored my view of politics and military
action. Vietnam taught me lessons I’ll never forget.
Today our country finds itself on the brink of war again.
Do the lessons of Vietnam hold any importance for us now?
I think they do.
Gen. Colin Powell learned
those lessons and laid out what is
known as the Powell Doctrine.
Essentially, he states that
before the United States under-
takes military action we should
be clear that among other things:
1). Vital U.S. interests are threat-
ened, 2). We have realistic,
attainable objectives, 3). There is
a viable exit strategy to avoid
entanglement, 4). The American
people support the action and 5).
There is broad international sup-
port for our action as well.
When these criteria are not met, our actions will likely
end badly, whether in Vietnam or as in Lebanon where, “We
inserted those proud warriors into the middle of a five-fac-
tion civil war complete with terrorists, hostage-takers and a
dozen spies in every camp, and said, “Gentlemen, be a
buffer.” The results were 241 Marines and Navy personnel
dead and a U.S. withdrawal from the troubled area.”
Sound familiar? I think that it does. Ashort history of the
Syrian crisis is in order.
The so-called “Arab Spring” began in Tunisia as a largely
secular uprising against entrenched rulers and quickly
spread across the Arab world. In Syria, protests against the
harsh rule of Bashar Assad (an ally of Iran and arms supplier
to the terrorist group Hezbollah) broke out in March 2011.
In August 2011, President Obama declared, “Assad must
go.” Yet, the United States did next to nothing to support
the protesters’ cause. Slowly, protests turned to civil war.
The composition of the opposition changed too, from sec-
ular protesters to al-Qaida linked and trained operatives
funded by Islamist extremists from the Arab Gulf.
During a news conference in August 2012, President
Obama ad-libbed his now infamous “Red Line” comments
about the use of chemical weapons. With no vital U.S.
interests at stake, with no set objectives, with no exit
strategy, with no support of the American people and with
no international support, the president committed the
United States to war if certain conditions were met.
In December, chemical weapons were first used. The
attacks continued in March of this year and, in April,
Assad’s forces again used Sarin gas.
The president did nothing. His red line had become pink
and blurred.
Then came the sarin attacks of August and the president
threatens action. But not regime change. Apparently Assad
no longer “must go.” Asenior White House official told the
Los Angeles Times that action would be “just muscular
enough not to get mocked” and “just enough to mean some-
thing, just enough to be more than symbolic.”
The White House seems to think that a response to
Assad’s crossing the line is more about political perception
of the president that it is about vital American interests.
Afew days later, Secretary of State John Kerry offers up
another ad-libbed gaffe saying, “what we’re talking about
doing — unbelievably small, limited kind of effort.” As
U.S. Sen. John McCain pointed out, “Kerry says Syria
strike would be ‘unbelievably small’ — that is unbeliev-
ably unhelpful.”
Finally, Kerry issued an offhand comment that military
action wouldn’t be necessary if Assad turned over all his
chemical weapons within a week. Vladimir Putin jumped on
the comment, even though the State Department issues a
“clarification.” This forces President Obama during a round
of television interviews to acquiesce to Putin’s “sugges-
tion” of U.N. control of Syria’s chemical weapons at some
future date.
The bumbling, amateur circus continues. As I write,
President Obama has just finished an address to the nation. I
fear he has not cleared up any of the confusion. He has not
learned the lessons of Vietnam.
Until he clearly articulates how vital U.S. interests are
threatened in Syria, how we have attainable objectives that
meet our political goals, and how we will avoid endless
entanglement, the American people will not support mili-
tary action in Syria.
Our military men and women now have the support of our
citizens. Sending them off to war without a clear explana-
tion, whether limited or something more, will erode that
support and bring back the kinds of vituperative attacks I
received when I returned home from Vietnam.
We can’t let that happen again. The president and his
advisors owe our military clarity and consistency in the
mission he is asking them to undertake. Until then, the
bodies of innocent victims will continue to pile up, with
no end in sight.
Chuck McDougald headed the Veterans Coalition, first for
California, then for the Western Region, when Sen. John
McCain ran for president in 2008. In 2010, he served as
Statewide Volunteer Chair for Carly Fiorina’s campaign for
the U.S. Senate. He is currently the Western Region director
for ConcernedVeteransforAmerica.org. He lives in South
San Francisco with his wife and two kids.
Guest
perspective
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 15,376.06 +75.42 10-Yr Bond 2.898 -0.009
Nasdaq 3,722.18 +6.22 Oil (per barrel) 107.31
S&P 500 1,687.99 +4.57 Gold 1,360.10
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
The Walt Disney Co., up $1.55 to $65.49
The media company plans to “significantly increase”its stock buybacks
next year, its chief financial officer says.
The Men’s Wearhouse Inc., down $4.69 to $34.08
The men’s clothing retailer lowered its full-year earnings forecast and
posted weaker-than-expected second-quarter results.
Weatherford International Ltd., down 77 cents to $14.97
The oilfield services company’s chief financial officer departs abruptly
amid a turnaround effort.
Walgreen Co., up $2.54 to $53.29
Goldman Sachs adds the pharmaceutical retailer to its “Conviction Buy”
list.
Barrick Gold Corp., down $1.03 to $17.61
Gold and silver prices slump to four-week lows,dragging down the shares
of precious metal miners.
Nasdaq
Dominion Resources Inc., up $1.17 to $59.78
The government gives the energy company permission to export
liquefied natural gas from its southern Maryland terminal to countries
that don’t have free trade agreements with the United States.
Lululemon Athletica Inc., down $3.73 to $65.29
A quarterly and full-year oulook from the Canadian yoga gear seller
spooked investors.
The Wendy’s Co., up 37 cents to $8.62
The fast food chain gets an upgrade from Argus,which points out value-
menu items and a new look at its restaurants.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Stocks rose broadly
Friday, giving the Dow Jones indus-
trial average its best week since
January.
The market got a lift from two eco-
nomic reports, one showing that
inflation remained tame in August and
the other showing that Americans
spent more at stores last month.
The Dow rose 75.42 points, or 0.5
percent, to 15,376.06. The index
closed up three percent for the week,
its best five-day performance since
the week ending Jan. 4.
Intel led the Dow higher. Analysts
at Jefferies & Co. said Intel may be
able to increase its sales with power-
efficient chips. Intel rose 81 cents, or
3.6 percent, to $23.44.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
rose 4.57 points, or 0.3 percent, to
1, 687. 99. The Nasdaq composite
index rose 6.22 points, or 0.2 per-
cent, to 3,722.18.
Traders had a few economic reports
to work through. Americans increased
their spending modestly in August,
roughly 0.2 percent, the Commerce
Department reported, however that
was half of what economists expect-
ed.
The sales report was mixed.
Shoppers spent more on cars, elec-
tronics and furniture, but they didn’t
buy much else. Last month, several
retail chains including Nordstrom,
Macy’s and Wal-Mart cut their profit
forecasts for the year.
The government also reported that
wholesale prices rose 0.3 percent last
month. Over the past year, prices have
only gained 1.4 percent, a sign that
inflation has remains modest. One
thing driving wholesale prices higher
was energy, which spiked as tensions
with Syria and the U.S. escalated.
Trading was light as Wall Street
headed into the weekend and the
Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur.
Investors were looking ahead to the
Federal Reserve’s policy meeting on
Sept. 17-18, when the central bank is
expected to decide the future of its
bond-buying program.
“There’s a lot of ‘wait and see’
going on until the Fed meeting next
week,” said Frank Davis, director of
sales and trading at LEK Securities.
The Fed is buying $85 billion in
bonds each month, and the consensus
among investors is that the central
bank will decide to reduce its buying
to about $75 billion or $80 billion a
month. The question is not whether
the Fed will cut back on its bond buy-
ing but by how much, said Scott
Clemons, chief investment strategist
with Brown Brothers Harriman
Wealth Management.
The price of gold fell $22 to
$1,308.60 an ounce. Oil slipped 39
cents to $108.21 a barrel. The yield
on the 10-year Treasury note fell to
2.89 percent from 2.91 percent late
Thursday.
September has been very strong for
stocks so far. The Dow is up 3.8 per-
cent and the S&P 500 has gained 3.4
percent.
In corporate news, Ulta Salon,
Cosmetics & Fragrances surged
$17.37, or 17 percent, to $117. 50.
The company reported a 28-percent
increase in quarterly profit, thanks to
stronger sales at its growing chain of
stores.
Supermarket chain Safeway rose
$1.61, or 6 percent, to $28.20 after
analysts at Credit Suisse upgraded the
stock to “outperform” from “under-
perform.”
Galena Biopharma plunged 34
cents, or 14.9 percent, to $1.94 after
the company sold 17.5 million shares
of stock at $2 a share.
Dow has its best week since January
“There’s a lot of ‘wait and see’ going
on until the Fed meeting next week.”
— Frank Davis, director of sales and trading at LEK Securities
TiVo names Motorola’s Moloney to its board
SAN JOSE — TiVo said Friday it has named former
Motorola Mobility president Daniel Moloney to its
board of directors.
TiVo Inc. said Moloney was appointed on Wednesday.
The move expands TiVo’s board to eight directors.
Moloney worked at cellphone maker Motorola Inc.
for more than a decade. Motorola Mobility was spun off
as a separate company in 2011 and was acquired by
Google Inc. in 2012 for $12.4 billion.
Tivo shares slipped a penny to $12.20 in morning
trading.
Business brief
By Elliott Spagat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — California posted its
strongest homes sales for any August
in seven years as price increases
cooled, a research firm said Friday, a
relief to buyers who have been com-
peting over slim pickings.
There were 42,546 new and existing
houses and condominiums sold, up 3.1
percent from 41,280 sales a year earli-
er and the highest August tally since
51,054 homes sold in 2006, according
to DataQuick.
The median sales price was
$361,000, down 0.6 percent from
363,000 in July but still up 28.5 per-
cent from $281,000 in August 2012. It
was the 18th straight month of annual
price gains.
Sales were especially strong for mid-
to high-priced homes. Sales above
$500,000 jumped 28.2 percent in the
nine-county San Francisco Bay area
and soared 48.7 percent in Southern
California.
Louis Marcoux, 35, lost three bids
before buying a four-bedroom house
last month for $830,000 in
Pleasanton, east of Oakland. It is bet-
ter house than the previous ones he
sought — and less expensive.
“It got sort of crazy in May, June,”
said Marcoux, an executive at a med-
ical device maker. “We were ready but
weren’t pressed for time ... The wait
was worth it.”
The median sales price in the Bay
area was $540,000, down 3.9 percent
from $542,000 in July but still up a
whopping 31.7 percent from
$410,000 in August 2012. There were
8,616 homes sold in the Bay area,
down 0.6 percent from a year earlier.
DataQuick reported Thursday that
Southern California’s median sales
price was $385,000 last month,
matching a 64-month high and mark-
ing the 13th straight month of annual
double-digit gains. Sales increased 2.8
percent to 23,057 homes.
“We’re starting to see an overdue
correction that’s going to lead to much
more moderate price increases,” said
Michael Lea, lecturer at San Diego
State University’s Corky McMillin
Center for Real Estate.
The sales increase partly reflects a
national trend of fewer homeowners
owing more than their homes are
worth, allowing them to sell without
taking a loss, analysts said.
CoreLogic Inc., a real-estate data firm,
reported this week that 15.4 percent of
its mortgaged homes in California
were “underwater” at the end of June,
down from 21.3 percent three months
earlier.
State home sales climb in August, prices cool
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Americans boost-
ed their spending at retail businesses
only modestly in August, indicating
that economic growth remains slug-
gish. Consumers bought more cars,
furniture and electronics last month
but held back on most other purchases.
Spending at retail businesses rose
just 0.2 percent last month, the
Commerce Department said Friday. It
was the smallest gain in four months.
But the government said retail spend-
ing was stronger in the previous
month than first estimated, revising
the July estimate to 0.4 percent from
0.2 percent
Excluding volatile spending on
autos, gas and building supplies, sales
in August increased just 0.2 percent, or
less than half July’s 0.5 percent gain.
Consumer may be growing more cau-
tious about spending, a trend that
could slow economic growth in the
July-September quarter. Slow wage
growth, modest job gains and higher
taxes have limited Americans’ spend-
ing power.
Retail sales are closely watched
because they’re the government’s first
look each month at consumer spend-
ing, which accounts for 70 percent of
economic activity.
“Consumer spending remained stuck
in middle gear in the summer,” said Sal
Guatieri, an economist at BMO Capital
Markets.
Guatieri forecasts that spending is
growing at an annual rate of roughly 2
percent in the current July-September
quarter, about the same as the previous
quarter. That suggests economic
growth is slowing to an annual rate of
about 2 percent, down from the 2.5 per-
cent annual rate that the government
estimated for the April-June quarter.
U.S. retail sales rise slight 0.2 percent in August
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Older people searching for jobs have
long fought back stereotypes that they
lack the speed, technology skills and
dynamism of younger applicants. But
as a wave of baby boomers seeks to
stay on the job later in life, some
employers are finding older workers are
precisely what they need.
“There’s no experience like experi-
ence,” said David Mintz, CEO of dairy-
free products maker Tofutti, where about
one-third of the workers are over 50. “I
can’t put an ad saying, ‘Older people
wanted,’ but there’s no comparison.”
Surveys consistently show older peo-
ple believe they experience age dis-
crimination on the job market, and
although unemployment is lower
among older workers, long-term unem-
ployment is far higher. As the American
population and its labor force reshape,
though, with a larger chunk of older
workers, some employers are slowly
recognizing their skill and experience.
About 200 employers, from Google
to AT&T to MetLife, have signed an
AARP pledge recognizing the value of
experienced workers and vowing to
consider applicants 50 and older.
Some employers see perks of hiring older workers
<< Quakes move stadium opening date, page 14
• Army hopes to be ready for No. 5 Stanford, page 15
Weekend, Sept. 14-15, 2013
LOCAL HIGHLIGHTS: COUNTY FOOTBALL, VOLLEYBALL, WATER POLO AND TENNIS SCORES >PAGE 12
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Sequoia High School head football coach
Rob Poulos said there was one thing on his
mind heading into Week 2 of the 2013 sea-
son.
“I wanted to see if last week was a fluke,”
he said. “I wanted to see, are we legit?”
The answer to Poulos’ question was a
maybe, at first. After dismantling Fremont
42-14 last week, the Cherokees came out
against a tougher Monta Vista squad Friday
night and, with the exception of one big
play on their second drive, shot themselves
in the foot constantly — to the point that
they only led 9-7 at the half.
But something got into Sequoia in the
second half, particularly in the fourth quar-
ter, that turned that “maybe” into a resound-
ing “yes.”
Fueled by five turnovers and 213 yards of
offense, the Cherokees scored 28 points in
the fourth quarter to speed past the Matadors
40-14. Were it not for a questionable kick-
off return for a touchdown by Monta Vista
late in the game, the score might have been
even more lopsided.
“I don’t think the fourth quarter was much
different than the other three quarters,”
Poulos said. “That could have happened at
any point. The turnovers, it was constant
change of momentum. They (Monta Vista)
did a great job of controlling the clock in
the first half, setting the tone, making their
adjustments. We had to make adjustments
off of that, which I think put us in better
position in the second half.”
While Sequoia outgained Monte Vista 243
to 148 in the first half, 94 of those yards
came on a Cameron Greenough touchdown
pass on the second drive that gave the
Cherokees a 6-0 lead. The Matadors took
the lead shortly thereafter, answering with
their lone offensive touchdown with 11:51
left in the second quarter.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
For the second time in as many games, the
South City football team found itself trail-
ing in the second half.
And for the second week in a row, the
Warriors rallied for the win.
After beating Santa Clara 26-25 in over-
time last week, South City scored 13 points
in the fourth quarter to pullout a 23-22 win
over Capuchino in San Bruno Friday after-
noon.
“We’re really young. We knew there would
be some growing pains,” said South City
coach Frank Moro. “But it’s nice to be
growing at 2-0.”
For Capuchino, Friday’s performance was
a big turnaround from last week’s 33-point
loss to Homestead. The Mustangs did a good
job of moving the ball in the first half, tak-
ing a 14-10 lead at haltime. In the second
half, however, the Mustangs appeared to
wear down. They ran 19 plays in the second
half, compared to 39 for the Warriors.
Capuchino coach Josh Horton was
pleased, however, to see his team battle to
the final whistle. Down by 10 with less than
10 seconds to play, Mustangs quarterback
Tony Pellegrini found Rory McDaid wide
open for a 47-yard scoring pass as time ran
out. The Mustangs then converted the 2-
point conversion when Pellegrini hit Juan
Rodriguez in the flat, who then bulled his
way into the end zone.
“They fought. My guys straight fought,”
Horton said. “They didn’t quit. I’m beyond
proud to be their coach.”
South City was led by running back Dupra
Goodman, who rushed for a game-high 146
yards and a touchdown on 22 carries. Cesar
Torres added 28 yards and a score on seven
carries.
Cap was led by Pellegrini and McDaid,
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The El Camino football team rushed for
247 yards — including 158 yards from
Brandon Gip — and amassed nearly 400
yards of offense Friday night against host
Aragon.
And yet it still wasn’t enough to down the
Dons. Aragon scored three touchdowns in
the fourth quarter to pull away for a 34-26
win over Colts.
“When I saw El Camino last weekend
(against Washington-SF), I was impressed
with their size,” said Aragon coach Steve
Sell. “They can run the football.
“I told our defense, this is what [the Colts]
are going to do. This where they are going
to attack us. And they did.”
That would be right at the Dons’ defensive
front. Gip and teammate Danny Ruiz, who
finished with 78 yards on 13 carries, took
turns gouging the Aragon defense as the
Colts took a 26-19 lead with 10:49 to play.
Aragon’s offense wasn’t finding much
resistance against the El Camino defense,
either. With their backs against the wall,
the Dons finally put the Colts away with
three fourth-quarter touchdowns. Keith
Samujh scored his second touchdown of the
night on a 6-yard run on the first play of the
fourth quarter to tie the game at 19 after the
extra point was blocked.
After El Camino’s Michael Keegan
By Craig Massei
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — It was another oppor-
tunistic, rise-to-the-occasion performance
by the San Francisco 49ers’ defense against
a top NFC opponent in the season opener.
Except for one thing.
“As a group, we weren’t
pleased with our tack-
ling,” coach Jim
Harbaugh said. “It’s not
what we’ve been accus-
tomed to the last couple
of years with our
defense.”
The 49ers uncharacter-
istically missed several
tackles in key situations,
allowing the Green Bay
Packers to turn short gains into big plays
before San Francisco pulled out a 34-28 vic-
tory.
That’s one area
where the 49ers will
look to get better
entering Sunday
night’s showdown
against a top NFC
opponent that ran
over and through the San Francisco defense
the last time the divisional rivals met.
The Seahawks present a different set of
challenges for the 49ers with aggressive
running back Marshawn Lynch and versatile
quarterback Russell Wilson.
Both players gave the 49ers fits when
they met late last December at noisy
CenturyLink Field.
Lynch rushed for 111 yards and scored two
touchdowns while Wilson eluded and frus-
trated San Francisco’s defense all evening.
Wilson finished with four touchdown passes
and 29 yards rushing as the Seahawks routed
San Francisco 42-13, the worst loss of
Harbaugh’s first two seasons with the team.
“You have the added challenge of defend-
ing the plays Wilson creates with his feet,”
49ers defensive coordinator Vic Fangio
said. “(Lynch) runs the ball extremely hard
and is obviously a very hard guy to tackle.
Then, just as critical, in last week’s game we
missed a lot of tackles on receivers. We’ve
got to be able to tackle these guys after the
catch.”
Rookie safety Eric Reid, in his first NFL
start, missed an open-field tackle near the
line of scrimmage that receiver Jordy
Nelson turned into a 22-yard gain after the
catch. On Green Bay’s next possession,
cornerback Perrish Cox bounced off tight
end Jermichael Finley, allowing Finley to
score on a 12-yard catch and run that left the
Sequoia scores 28 in fourth to beat Matadors
See SEQUOIA, Page 16
See WARRIORS, Page 14
See DONS, Page 14 See 49ERS, Page 13
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
SouthCity running back Dupra Goodman,right,rushed for 146 yards on 22 carries — including a 56-yard scoring burst — to beat Capuchino.
Warriors hang on for win
Aragon holds off tough El Camino squad
The battle in
Seattle next
up for 49ers
Raiders’ RB looks
to stay patient
smdailyjournal.com
ONLINE
Jim Harbaugh
Girls’ tennis
Turns out the rumors about the Hillsdale
girls’ tennis team are true.
The Knights swept all four singles match-
es to clinch a 4-3 victory over Menlo-
Atherton in the Peninsula Athletic League
opener Thursday in Atherton.
After a year away from her high school
team, Cindy Liu is back in the fold and dom-
inated in the No. 1 singles spot, winning 6-
2, 6-1. Natalie Spievack slots into the
Knights’ No. 2 singles spot and came away
with an even more convincing win, 6-1, 6-
1.
Mariko Iinuma, the Daily Journal’s reign-
ing Tennis Player of the Year PAL individual
champion, now occupies the No. 3 position
after playing No. 1 last year. She cruised in
a 6-1, 6-1 victory. Irene Palisoc rounded out
the singles’ sweep for Hillsdale, winning 6-
1, 6-2.
Menlo-Atherton swept the three doubles
matches. Sally Carlson and Amanda
Scandalios won at No. 1 doubles, winning
6-3, 6-3. Julia Chang and Camilla
Calmasini pulled out the toughest match of
the day, needing three set to record a 7-6, 5-
7, 7-6(4) win. Erin Perrine and Natalie
Baker took the No. 3 doubles match by a
margin of 7-5, 6-1.
Woodside def. Westmoor
The Wildcats opened the PAL Ocean
Division season with a 5-2 win over the
Rams. Woodside’s Monica Chanda cruised
to a 6-1, 6-2 win at No. 1 singles, while the
No. 1 doubles team of Fiona Gilbert and
Taylor Sweeney also won in straight sets, 6-
2, 6-0.
Other scores: Carlmont downed Sequoia 7-
0; San Mateo beat Half Moon Bay 6-1;
Menlo School defeated Leland 6-1; Crystal
Springs beat Drew School-SF 5-0..
Girls’ volleyball
Menlo School picked up a huge non-
league victory with a 25-21, 25-20, 20-25,
25-20 win over St. Francis-Mountain View.
Maddie Huber paced the Knights with 11
kills, while Lida Vandermeer added 10 kills
and five blocks.
Menlo improves its record to 5-2.
Notre Dame-Belmont def.
Burlingame
The Tigers moved to 6-3 on the season
with an impressive three-game sweep of
PAL favorite Burlingame.
The Tigers blitzed the Panthers in the first
set and then held them off in Games 2 and 3
to record a 25-9, 25-23, 25-21 win.
A pair of freshmen led the way for Notre
Dame: Katie Smoot, who finished with 13
kills; and Tammy Byrne, who had nine kills
and nine digs. Sophomore Jess Beering
added eight kills for the Tigers.
Palo Alto def. Sacred Heart Prep
Sacred Heart Prep was swept by Palo Alto,
25-17, 25-22, 25-22 Thursday evening.
Victoria Garrick paced the Gators with 16
kills, Natalie Marshall dished out 29 assists
and Mamie Caruso finished with 16 digs.
SHP falls to 2-2 on the year.
Water polo
Woodside and Mills split a pair of water
polo matches Thursday.
The Lady Wildcats jumped out to a 6-0 lead
on their way to a 17-4 victory, raising their
record to 3-0 in PAL Ocean Division play.
On the boys’ side, Mills scored seven
first-period goals and cruised to a 16-5 win.
Seven different Menlo players scored
goals and eight had assists in the Knights’
lastest win — a 19-7 drilling of
Burlingame.
Menlo improves to 2-0 on the league sea-
son.
Nick Bisconti led the charge for Menlo
with six goals. Chris Xi scored five. Andreas
Katsis notched a hat trick. Johnny Wilson
found twine twice.
Girls’ golf
Jessica Koenig led Sacred Heart Prep with
a 2-over 38, but Leland’s Kristen Le was one
shot better in the Chargers’ 206-213 win
over the Gators at Santa Teresa Golf Course
in the Gators’ season opener.
All six Leland golfers shot 44 or better,
while SHP had five players shoot 45 or bet-
ter.
Lauren von Thaden finished with a 42 for
the Gators, while Maddie Ellison and Annie
Fishback fired 44. Kiana Cacchione finished
with a 45.
Menl o- At hert o n head coach Sione
Taufoou told his players after a tough loss to
Campolindo in Week 1 that they were very
close to putting the pieces together.
It appears his players believe what he
says.
M-A trailed 10-7 at the half to Central
Coast Section power Los Gatos but rallied
with 12 points in the second to pull out a
19-10 win. Two big turnovers fueled the
Bears in the win. They are now 1-1.
Carlmont runs its record to 2-0 by scor-
ing on a quarterback sneak late in the game
to top Gunn of Palo Alto 13-7. The Scots
scored on their first drive of the game cour-
tesy of Osvaldo Nava, but didn’t find the end
zone again until it mattered the most. An
interception late in the contest set up the
game-winning touchdown for Carlmont.
The rest of the teams in the Peninsula
Athletic League didn’t fare so well Friday
night.
San Mateo got a dose of its own medi-
cine after blowing out Gunn last week. The
Bearcats traveled to Berkeley and were
shelled 42-6. The Yellow Jackets dominat-
ed, scoring 35 points in the first half.
Woodsi de managed only six point in a
lobsided loss to Milpitas. The team from
the south bay took down the Wildcats 50-6.
And after a nasty 50-0 loss to Aragon in
Week 1, Jefferson of Daly City suffered a
nastier 63-0 loss to St. Patrick/St. Vincent.
The Indians are now 0-2.
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Local Sports Highlights
Local Football Roundup
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Continued from page 11
49ERS
A’s pick up huge AL West win
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas — Yoenis Cespedes
gave Oakland an early lead with his bat. He
prevented what could have been a huge col-
lapse with his arm.
Cespedes hit a three-run homer in the first
inning, then threw out Alex Rios at third base
to end a big Texas comeback in the eighth as
the Athletics survived a shaky night from the
bullpen to extend their ALWest lead with a 9-
8 victory over the Rangers on Friday night.
The Rangers trailed 9-2 when Elvis Andrus
and Rios had two-run singles as part of six-
run inning to close within one.
Adrian Beltre’s third hit was a single to
Cespedes in left field, and the Cuban star
ended the threat by throwing out Rios trying
to go from first to third, where the tag from
Josh Donaldson arrived just about the same
time as Rios’ foot.
“It was a bang-bang play,” Donaldson said.
“Cespedes made a perfect throw and I was able
to put a tag on it, and it ended up as an out.”
Rios said he was certain he would make it to
third with the play happening in front of
him.
“And actually, I was correct,” said Rios,
who was ejected by Andy Fletcher for angrily
arguing the call. “I believe I was safe on that
call.”
The A’s handed the Rangers their fourth
straight loss and moved 4 1/2 games ahead of
Texas in the opener of the final series of the
regular season between the past two AL West
champions.
Cespedes’ 23rd homer came off Derek
Holland (9-9), who is winless in a career-high
seven straight starts.
Dan Straily (10-7) allowed two hits in 5 2-
3 innings to win his fourth straight start and
beat Texas for the second time in 11 days.
The right-hander might have stayed around
longer if he hadn’t struggled with four walks
and a hit batter. The bullpen was wild, too,
and it almost cost the A’s the game.
Brett Anderson walked Beltre and A.J.
Pierzynski to start the eighth, and Ron Cook
later gave Ian Kinsler a free pass with the
bases loaded for Oakland’s eighth walk.
Andrus followed with a single to right field,
and Rios singled to center after a passed ball
moved both runners into scoring position.
The call against Rios set off several
Rangers. First-base umpire Joe West tossed
Texas pitcher Matt Garza for complaining
from the dugout in the top of the ninth.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Madison Bumgarner
outdueled Clayton Kershaw, and the San
Francisco Giants held off the Los Angeles
Dodgers for a 4-2 win on Friday night when
Adrian Gonzalez’s hard grounder took a for-
tunate hop for the final out.
With runners on first and third and two
outs, Gonzalez hit the ball off Sergi o
Romo’s leg, and the ball bounced to third
baseman Joaquin Arias, who threw to first
for the final out.
Hunter Pence homered and scored twice
and the Giants got to Kershaw (14-9) with
four consecutive singles to start the sev-
enth.
Bumgarner (12-9) allowed two runs and
five hits in six innings, extending his
streak of allowing three earned runs or fewer
in each of his past 18 starts. The left-hander
struck out six and walked two.
Romo got the final four outs to earn his
34th save in 38 chances. He gave up con-
secutive singles to start the ninth, putting
the tying runs on with no outs.
Yasiel Puig struck out swinging and Nick
Punto hit into a fielder’s choice groundout
before pinch-hitter Gonzalez’s ground out.
With second-place Arizona’s 7-5 loss to
Colorado, the Dodgers’ magic number was
reduced to four for clinching their first NL
West title since 2009.
Kershaw gave up three runs — two earned
— and eight hits in seven innings. The lefty
who leads the majors in ERA struck out six
and walked none. He had won three straight
home starts against the Giants.
Giants rally in 7th to top L.A.
A’s 9, Rangers 8
Giants 4 , Dodgers 2
game tied 14-14 at halftime.
There were other blown tackle attempts
by a defense that otherwise played well
against Green Bay’s high-powered attack.
Those could become costly Sunday
against a more-balanced Seattle offense
that once again will look to establish a
ground game against one of the NFL’s best
rushing defenses. Lynch has three consecu-
tive 100-yard rushing games against the
49ers.
“We don’t want to give up anything,”
linebacker Patrick
Willis said. “We don’t
want to give up 100
yards rushing; we don’t
want to give up 20 yards
rushing. We know we
have to get after them,
and when you get your
shot, you have to make
sure and make it count.”
One thing will be
much different about the defense that was
bruised in Seattle last December: It will
have All-Pro defensive tackle Justin
Smith, who missed that game after tearing
his left triceps during a win over New
England the week before.
With a healthy Smith again causing dis-
ruption in the trenches, the 49ers are con-
fident they’ll be better prepared this time.
“Justin’s one of the best defensive play-
ers in this game,” Willis said. “Any time
he’s not out there, we miss him. No ques-
tion about it. We’ve got him back now, so
we know he’s going to be a difference-
maker, as always.”
Patrick Willis
hooked up with tight end D.J. Werner for
an 8-yard scoring strike and a 26-19 lead on
the Colts’ ensuing drive, but the Dons need-
ed just four plays to take the lead. Matt
Foppiano took the ensuing kickoff 58 yards
to the El Camino 20, only to see the ball
moved back to the Colts’ 35 because of an
unsportsmanlike flag against the Dons.
It merely delayed the inevitable, however.
After two rushes picked up a first down,
Aragon quarterback Nat Blood found tight
end Rodolfo Hernandez down the seam for a
20-yard score. Kono Filimoehala-Egan put
the Dons ahead to stay when he took a pitch
and bulled his way into the end zone for a 2-
point conversion and a 27-26 Aragon lead.
Aragon’s Daniel Alas-Gomez picked off a
Keegan pass on the Colts’ next possession
and the Dons struck again, going 33 yards
on seven plays, with Hernandez plunging in
from two yards for the score and a 34-26
lead.
“I’m proud with our effort. We played El
Camino football,” said El Camino coach
Mark Turner. “We have the potential to be a
good team. We have to be able to finish.”
The first half was as even a half of football
one could see. The game was tied at 13 at
halftime as Aragon piled 209 yards of
offense and El Camino had 208. Both teams
finished the first half with eight first downs.
Aragon (2-0 overall) had a chance to take
the lead early, but Blood — who passed for
192 yards and a pair of touchdowns — was
picked off at the El Camino 20.
El Camino (1-1) took over and had a long
drive stall at the Aragon 32, turning the ball
over on downs.
The Dons scored on their next possession,
going 68 yards on nine plays, converting a
fourth down in the process. Samujh capped
the drive with a 7-yard touchdown run for a 6-
0 Aragon lead.
El Camino came right back to take the lead
on its next drive as Ruiz went in from three
yards out to cap a nine-play, 85-yard drive.
Aragon was forced to punt on its next pos-
session, the only punt of the game, and El
Camino responded with a score when Gip
bolted into the end zone from 26 yards out.
Aragon, however, tied the game just before
halftime when Blood found Foppiano on an
out pattern. He turned upfield, got a great
downfield block from Filimoehala-Egan and
went 42 yards untouched to tie the score at
13 with 27 seconds left in the first half.
“Our ability to throw the ball (was the dif-
ference),” Sell said. “We weren’t going to
have that breakaway run. We had to create
some big plays and fortunately we did that
with the passing game.”
Gabriel Campos supplying most of the
Mustangs’ rushing attack. Pellegrini com-
pleted 6 of 18 passes for 126 yards, with
McDaid catching three passes for 108 yards
and a pair of touchdowns. Campos rushed for
62 yards 10 carries.
Capuchino (0-2 overall) wasted little time
in letting the Warriors know the Mustangs
would not roll over for them. After recover-
ing an onside kick to start the game, Cap
drove 53 yards on eight plays, with
Pellegrini going in from a yard out to put
the Mustangs up 7-0.
South City (2-0) responded with a James
Donegan 31-yard field goal to cap a 15-play,
73-yard drive.
The Warriors took a 10-7 lead minutes
later when Tyler Keahi recovered a fumble in
the end zone after a Capuchino snap sailed
over its punter’s head deep in Mustangs ter-
ritory.
After the teams traded punts, Capuchino
took a 14-10 lead into halftime. On fourth-
and-long from the South City 46, Pellegrini
found Daid over the middle. McDaid bounced
off a would-be tackle and motored into the
end zone for touchdown.
In the second half, South City simply bat-
tered Capuchino into submission. Doing
most of their damage between the tackles,
the Warriors methodically moved the ball.
The Warriors gained 162 of their 297 yards
of total offense in the third and fourth quar-
ters. Goodman rushed for 100 yards in the
second half, including a 56-yard scoring run
with 6:55 to play to give South City a 23-
14 lead.
“[Capuchino] looked a little tired and we
were in a little better shape,” Moro said.
“We had certain advantages and we tried to
attack those.
“We made some mistakes, but, again,
found a way to win.”
Earthquakes stadium
opening delayed until 2015
SAN JOSE — The new stadium for the San
Jose Earthquakes will have to wait at least
another year.
The Earthquakes said Friday that the venue
will open for the 2015 season, a year later
than previously planned. All 2014 games
are scheduled for Buck Shaw Stadium in
neighboring Santa Clara.
The club cited “significant complications
at the stadium site” for the delay, noting
“additional complexities in connecting the
stadium to the city sewer system.”
It also said “the high water table has
slowed the site utility phase” and the “full
scope of the site-related work could only be
determined when the work was fully under-
way. ”
“We are continuing to work hard to deliv-
er the best stadium possible for our fans,”
said Earthquakes president Dave Kaval.
“However, due to significant complications
at the stadium site, we do not feel certain
that we could open the stadium for the 2014
season.We are obviously disappointed, but
we are more committed than ever to build a
first-class venue that we know our fans
deserve.”
The planned 18,000-seat stadium will be
located next to San Jose International
Airport.
SPORTS 14
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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www.UNrealestate.info
A blog dedicated to UNreal events in Real Estate
Things that have remained UNchanged in 30 years. (Part 3)
John King has been serving home sellers and buyers on The Peninsula and Silicon Valley for almost 30 years.
Top 1% of Keller Williams agents.
Among the things that have remained the same over my 30 years in
residential real estate is that buyers and sellers can argue over the
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Continued from page 11
DONS
Continued from page 11
WARRIORS
Sports brief
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Aragon’s Nick Tolfa makes a catch during the
Dons’ 34-26 win over El Camino.
SPORTS 15
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 88 59 .599 —
Washington 78 69 .531 10
Philadelphia 68 79 .463 20
NewYork 65 81 .445 22 1/2
Miami 54 92 .370 33 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 86 61 .585 —
Pittsburgh 85 62 .578 1
Cincinnati 83 65 .561 3 1/2
Milwaukee 64 82 .438 21 1/2
Chicago 63 84 .429 23
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 86 61 .585 —
Arizona 73 73 .500 12 1/2
Colorado 68 80 .459 18 1/2
SanDiego 67 79 .459 18 1/2
SanFrancisco 67 81 .453 19 1/2
Friday’sGames
ChicagoCubs 5, Pittsburgh4
Washington6, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Mets 4, Miami 3
SanDiego4, Atlanta 3
Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 1
St. Louis 2, Seattle 1, 10 innings
Colorado7, Arizona 5
SanFrancisco4, L.A. Dodgers 2
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 90 59 .604 —
Tampa Bay 80 66 .548 8 1/2
New York 79 69 .534 10 1/2
Baltimore 78 69 .531 11
Toronto 67 80 .456 22
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 85 62 .578 —
Cleveland 79 68 .537 6
Kansas City 77 70 .524 8
Minnesota 63 83 .432 21 1/2
Chicago 58 89 .395 27
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 86 61 .585 —
Texas 81 65 .555 4 1/2
Los Angeles 70 77 .476 16
Seattle 65 82 .442 21
Houston 51 96 .347 35
Friday’sGames
Cleveland 3, Chicago White Sox 1
Baltimore 5,Toronto 3
Detroit 6, Kansas City 3
Boston 8, N.Y.Yankees 4
Oakland 9,Texas 8
Houston 9, L.A. Angels 7
Tampa Bay 3, Minnesota 0
St. Louis 2, Seattle 1, 10 innings
Thursday’sGame
New England 13, N.Y. Jets 10
Sunday’sGames
Dallas at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
Tennessee at Houston, 10 a.m.
Washington at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
Minnesota at Chicago, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
Miami at Indianapolis, 10 a.m.
Cleveland at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
Carolina at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Detroit at Arizona, 1:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 1:05 p.m.
Jacksonville at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
Denver at N.Y. Giants, 1:25 p.m.
San Francisco at Seattle, 5:30 p.m.
Monday’sGame
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 5:40 p.m.
Thursday, Sep. 19
Kansas City at Philadelphia, 5:25 p.m.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL — Fined Tampa Bay S Dashon Goldson
$30,000, N.Y. Jets S Dawan Landry $21,000, Green
Bay LB Clay Matthews $15,000, San Francisco LB
Ahmad Brooks $12,750 and Tampa Bay LB Lavonte
DavidandSanFranciscoWRAnquanBoldin$7,875
for their actions during last week’s game.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed RB Kerwynn
Williams from the practice squad.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS— Released OL R.J.Dill
from the practice squad. Signed OL Josh Kline to
the practice squad.
OAKLANDRAIDERS—SignedFBMarcel Reeceto
a three-year contract extension.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
ST. LOUISBLUES — Agreed to terms with D Alex
Pietrangelo on a seven-year contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
DALLASMAVERICKS—Signed F Devin Ebanks.
PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Named Brandon D.
Williams general manager of Delaware (NBADL).
PORTLANDTRAILBLAZERS— Signed F Richard
Howell.
Women’sNational Basketball Association
MINNESOTALYNX— Signed F Seimone Augus-
tus to a three-year contract extension.
SOCCER
Major LeagueSoccer
FC DALLAS — Added M Peter Luccin to the ac-
tive roster. Placed F Eric Hassli on the DL.
PHILADELPHIA UNION — Traded G Chris
KonopkatoTorontoFCfor a2014third-rounddraft
AMERICAN LEAGUE NATIONAL LEAGUE
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 2 0 0 1.000 36 31
Miami 1 0 0 1.000 23 10
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 28 30
Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 21 23
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 21 17
Tennessee 1 0 0 1.000 16 9
Houston 1 0 0 1.000 31 28
Jacksonville 0 1 0 .000 2 28
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 0 1 0 .000 21 24
Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 9 16
Baltimore 0 1 0 .000 27 49
Cleveland 0 1 0 .000 10 23
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 28 2
Denver 1 0 0 1.000 49 27
San Diego 0 1 0 .000 28 31
Oakland 0 1 0 .000 17 21
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 33 27
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 36 31
Washington 0 1 0 .000 27 33
N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 31 36
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 1 0 0 1.000 23 17
Tampa Bay 0 1 0 .000 17 18
Carolina 0 1 0 .000 7 12
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 17 23
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 1 0 0 1.000 34 24
Chicago 1 0 0 1.000 24 21
Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 28 34
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 24 34
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000 27 24
Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 12 7
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 34 28
Arizona 0 1 0 .000 24 27
NFL GLANCE TRANSACTIONS
Army hopes to rise to challenge vs. Stanford
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WEST POINT, N.Y. — If there’s a
team in America facing a more daunt-
ing challenge this week than Army,
it’s difficult to imagine.
Fifth-ranked Stanford (1-0), with its
power run game and imposing defense,
visits Michie Stadium Saturday and
that doesn’t bode well for the Black
Knights (1-1).
Since the heydays of its Heisman
Trophy winners — Doc Blanchard
(1945), Glenn Davis (1946), and Pete
Dawkins (1958) — Army hasn’t fared
very well against the top teams in the
country.
Its last victory over a ranked team
was a 17-14 triumph over No. 15 Air
Force on Nov. 4, 1972.
Now, try this on for size.
Stanford has one of the biggest and
best offensive lines in the country —
left tackle Andrus Peat (6-foot-7, 312
pounds), left guard David Yankey (6-5,
313), center Khalil Wilkes (6-3, 286),
right guard Kevin Danser (6-6, 296),
and right tackle Cameron Fleming (6-
6, 318). Ends Mike Ugenyi (6-3, 257)
and Kyle Maxwell (6-5, 231) are the
most physically imposing players on
the Army defense.
Not easy.
“They are going to challenge you
physically like you’ve never been
challenged,” Army coach Rich
Ellerson said. “They are a powerful
football team. They have what we’ve
seen before, but they are going to do it
in larger proportions. My goal for the
football team is going to be to lean
forward and come out of your shoes at
these guys.”
Stanford coach David Shaw remains
wary.
“You can look at the numbers and say
that, especially up front on both lines,
we’re bigger,” Shaw said. “The prob-
lem is, when you’re
going against
smaller guys, a lot
of times smaller
guys are quicker.
They move, and it’s
hard sometimes for
big guys to get
down.”
After a solid game
to open the season
— no fumbles and
no penalties in a 28-12 win over
Morgan State — Army fell apart a week
ago at Ball State, losing 40-14 amid
two lost fumbles and eight penalties.
Stanford started its season by beating
San Jose State 34-13 last Saturday.
David Shaw
From there, turnovers and big penalties
hurt Sequoia as the Cherokees tried to pull
away. They managed a 26-yard field goal
with a little more than four minutes left in
the half to take a 9-7 into recess.
Mistakes continued into the third quarter
— mostly, Sequoia got hit with the fumble
bug. But to the Cherokees’ credit, the
defense held without causing them more
damage. Sequoia added three more points in
the third to make it 12-7.
“The idea is, you can’t go back to the
past,” Poulos said. “You have to turn the
page and move on to the next play. We don’t
want to be cavalier about it, but you can’t
dwell on it. Dwelling on it is just going to
make the next one bad. So, we did a good
job of turning the page and giving the guys
second opportunities.”
Sequoia made the most of those opportu-
nities because when the fourth quarter buzzer
went off, something got into Sequoia and
they became a takeaway machine.
The Cherokees used an interception, a
fumble, a fumbled kick off return, another
kick and still another fumble into 28 fourth-
quarter points to completely pull away from
Monta Vista. Will Davenport, Greenough,
Matt Jenkins and Ivan Ayarza found the end
zone for Sequoia.
Sequoia put up 311 yards of offense in the
second half alone.
16
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Weighty issues, big money for Mayweather-Alvarez
By Tim Dahlberg
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS — Listen to Floyd Mayweather
Jr.’s people and Canelo Alvarez wanted to
fight their man so badly he offered to drop a
few pounds to get him to sign on the dotted
line.
Listen to the Alvarez camp and Mayweather
wanted the fight at an even lower weight that
Alvarez would have to starve himself to make.
“The truth,” promoter Richard Schaefer
says, “lies somewhere in the middle.”
Weight is always a big deal in fights, and it
is center stage again in one of the biggest
fights in recent years. Saturday night’s
megafight is officially for a version of the
154-pound title held by Alvarez, but will be
fought at a catch weight of 152 pounds that
will be harder for Alvarez to make than it is for
Mayweather.
“They’re the ones who said they would fight
at a lower weight,” said Leonard Ellerbe,
Mayweather’s manager. “We can’t help it
Alvarez has idiots for managers, but we’re
going to take every advantage they give us.”
Alvarez is a full-fledged junior middleweight
and has been for more than three years now.
He’s physically bigger at 5-foot-9 than
Mayweather and has had to lose good amounts
of weight in the final days in some of his
recent fights just to get to the 154-pound class
limit.
But when the chance came to move in to the
upper stratosphere of fighters against
Mayweather — with at least a $5 million pay-
day attached to it — Alvarez had to give up a
few pounds against a fighter more used to
fighting at 147 pounds.
“They wanted me to go to 147,” Alvarez
said earlier this week when he said he was
already down to 154 pounds. “I said that was
physically impossible. Then they wanted 150
and then 151. I wanted to make the fight so I
agreed to 152. Then they forced me to be quiet
about it.”
Alvarez was 152 pounds at the official
weigh-in Friday, delighting a raucous crowd of
about 12,000 who packed the MGM Arena to
watch. Mayweather weighed in at 150 1/2.
Getting an advantage is nothing new to
Mayweather. He does it in the ring with his
tremendous skills to adapt, and he does it out-
side the ring by playing with his opponent’s
mind. For Mayweather, making Alvarez think
constantly in training about making 152
pounds may have been more important than
the actual weight itself.
“There’s a thousand different ways I can beat
a guy,” Mayweather said.
Oddsmakers in this gambling town believe
Mayweather will find one of those ways when
he takes on the undefeated Mexican star in
what could be boxing’s richest fight ever. He’s
a 2 1/2-1 favorite against a bigger and pre-
sumably stronger fighter who will probably
rehydrate to enter the ring 10 pounds heavier
than Mayweather, though those are the short-
est odds for a Mayweather fight in years.
The fight, which also features a much antic-
ipated 140-pound title bout between Danny
Garcia and Lucas Matthysse, will be televised
on pay-per-view at a suggested cost of
$74.95.
Mayweather will earn the biggest purse ever
for a fighter, $41.5 million guaranteed with
even more millions to come if the pay-per-
view takes off. Early indications are that the
fight will be one of the biggest in years, with
celebrities who usually get free tickets even
offering to pay for ringside seats at the MGM
Grand hotel that first sold at $2,000 and now
are being offered for as much as $29,000.
Continued from page 11
SEQUOIA
By Janani Kumar
W
hat do teenagers love? The
Hunger Games, Harry Potter,
Lord of the Rings, Supernatural,
Doctor Who. All seem-
ingly different, but under
what umbrella do all
these fall? Fantasy. I see
it all the time, even in,
or should I say especial-
ly in, myself. All my
friends and I are hooked
on at least one fantasy
book series or television
show. To this day, I still find myself reread-
ing the Harry Potter series.
I have been thinking about this question
for a long time now, so perhaps now it is
time for me to dig a little deeper. What
makes fantasy so appealing, especially to
teenagers?
The answer is short, but requires a bit of
explaining. Teenagers all crave action and
adventure in their lives, definitely more
than what the average teen actually gets.
So when a character in a book goes off to
fight monsters or performs magic,
teenagers decide to attempt to escape the
mundane reality of their everyday lives by
reading and watching such stories. How
many times has someone said “And now
back to reality?” And why do they say it
with such a melancholic tone? It’s because
they were perfectly content in their perfect
little world, and oftentimes the real world
is not how people wish it were actually.
Fantasy provides an outlet of emotions and
a safe haven in which teenagers, with their
everyday stresses of classes and drama, can
find comfort.
An offshoot of the traditional fantasy
genre that also seems to be appealing is
magical realism, in which characters live in
a seemingly ordinary world, but continue to
be consciously or unconsciously affected
by the paranormal. Apopular example of
this would be the television series
Hooked on fantasy
Shepherdstown
Birthplace of
the U.S.Army
SEE PAGE 19
Burlingame
Recycling ‘UnWaste’ Event
Items, including electronics, whether
working or not, are accepted. No charge for
smaller items; small fees for larger ones.
You can drive through to drop off items.
Enter lot from Howard Avenue near Park
Road.The event is 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday
and Sunday at Parking Lot W.
Foster City’s beginning
T. Jack Foster Jr. talks about the creation of
Foster City and how he, his father and two
brothers transformed four miles of Bay-
front lands into a thriving city of 30,000
people. Book signing follow discussion.The
event is 1 p.m. Saturday at the San Mateo
County History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free with the price of
admission to the museum. $5 for adults, $3
for students and seniors.
Millbrae Library
Mid-Autumn Festival
Musical instruments, singing, calligraphy
demonstration and traditional Asian
children’s arts and crafts. Sample Chinese
moon cakes, Japanese rice cake and
Korean sweets.The event is 1:30 p.m. to
3:30 p.m. Saturday at the Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave. Free.
Best bets
‘Salinger’ over hyped
By Jocelyn Noveck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
“Reclusive.” Is that an adjec-
tive, or is it actually part of J.D.
Salinger’s name? The word has
been used so often to describe the
famous writer, one could be forgiven
for thinking it appears on his birth
certificate.
But there’s obviously much
more to the story of
“reclusive author J.D.
Salinger” than the way
he withdrew from pub-
lic view and publishing
and spent much of his
life in Cornish, N.H.,
where he was frequently
pursued by avid fans. One of
the more entertaining tidbits
in “Salinger,” the exhaustive,
exhausting and overly hyped
new documentary by Shane
Salerno, is the account of
one of those fans, who made
the pilgrimage and clearly
See SALINGER, Page 18
See STUDENT, Page 18
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Colorful boas, tie dye and peace symbols
are back in vogue as San Jose Repertory
Theatre opens its new season with “One
Night With Janis Joplin,” a tribute to the
’60s musical legend and the black women
singers who influenced her.
Kacee Clanton as Joplin, joined by four
other women singers and an eight-man
band, sings an array of Joplin’s greatest
hits. In addition, Tiffany Mann as the Blues
Singer recreates Joplin’s inspirations such
as Bessie Smith, Etta James, Nina Simone,
Odetta and Aretha Franklin.
Between songs, Clanton’s Joplin talks
about growing up in Port Arthur, Texas. Her
mother, a fan of Broadway musicals, would
buy one cast album per week and play it so
much that Joplin and her two siblings knew
every song by heart. Her mom also gave the
kids singing lessons.
Eventually Joplin made her way to San
Francisco, where she sang with Big Brother
and the Holding Company and other bands.
She quickly became an icon of rock ’n’ roll
with her raw, passionate interpretations of
Musical pays tribute to Joplin
DON IPOCK
Kacee
Clanton who
plays Janis
Joplin in the
‘One Night
with Janis
Joplin’
previously
played the
Queen of
Rock ’n’ Roll
in Kansas
City Rep’s
2006
production
of ‘Love, Janis’
(pictured).
See JOPLIN, Page 18
18
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felt he was owed more time than he was grant-
ed.
“I’m not a counselor,” Salinger said, final-
l y. “I’m a fiction writer.”
It would have been enough if “Salinger”
had merely explored that one idea: How much
did this writer, after capturing the world’s
attention with “The Catcher in the Rye,” owe
us? Did he owe us a sequel, a novel every few
years, or his presence on talk shows, with
opinions on the issues of the day? Did he
“owe” us more than he gave, before his death
in 2010 at the age of 91? It seems many felt
that way.
But Salerno, until now best known as a
screenwriter for “Armageddon” and
“Savages,” spent nearly a decade researching
Salinger for this project, which includes a
700-page book and a TV documentary. And
he had enough material, clearly, for five dif-
ferent films: “Salinger and his Wartime Past,”
“for example. “Salinger and his Women.”
“Salinger and His Struggles With Fame.”
Instead, he took a kitchen-sink approach,
and while the film moves quickly for its 120
minutes, that approach blunts its impact.
Take, for example, the mere number of
voices here. Though arguably the two most
important people — Salinger’s children —
did not cooperate, it seems most anyone
else did. And so we have fellow authors, lit-
erary folk, historians, former lovers,
acquaintances, and fans all having their
say. Some have fascinating stories indeed
— as in the wartime buddy who tells how
Salinger arrived on the Normandy beaches
on D-Day carrying in-progress chapters of
“Catcher.”
Others, including Martin Sheen, John
Cusack, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ed Norton
or director Judd Apatow, are there to describe
the impact Salinger’s work had on them —
with mixed effect.
And one thing the director might certainly
have jettisoned, in addition to a sometimes
excitable score, are the needless dramatiza-
tions — an actor on a stage, pounding at a
typewriter, or a neglected child knocking
fruitlessly on the door of Salinger’s work
cabin.
For those not already well versed in all
things Salinger, there’s absorbing material
on his wartime past: the amount of time he
spent in combat, his counter-intelligence
work and the breakdown he suffered later,
after witnessing death-camp horrors.
On an entirely different note, there are
amusing anecdotes about his aversion to
selling out, particularly to Hollywood. “Tell
Billy Wilder to stop calling me!” is one
memorable quote.
There’s also much on Salinger’s affinity for
younger women. Yet again, the material —
though like much here, not all of it new — is
undeniably interesting, like the account of
Jean Miller, whom he met when she was 14.
Continued from page 17
SALINGER
her own and others’ songs.
No one had ever sung quite the same way
before, and no one has sung exactly that
way since. However, Clanton does a great
job in this demanding, high-energy role.
Likewise, Mann is terrific in songs like
“Nobody Knows You When You’re Down and
Out,” which she sings by herself. She’s also
joined by Clanton in other songs like
“Spirit in the Dark” and “Little Girl Blue.”
They’re backed vocally by the three
Joplinaires: Cari Hutson (the alternate for
Joplin), Shinnerrie Jackson and Tricky
Jones. The instrumentalists sometimes
chime in vocally.
Created, written and directed by Randy
Johnson, this show is opening simultane-
ously on Broadway with a different cast but
the same director.
Rick Lombardo, San Jose Rep artistic
director, said on opening night that this
local show is proving to be the biggest
seller in the company’s history, resulting in
a week’s extension.
While the show has an abundance of gems
for Joplin fans, it’s not content with high-
lighting the music. Instead it’s greatly
over-produced, especially the lighting and
projections.
Matthew Webb’s lighting design often
sends blinding lights into the audience.
Some of the almost nonstop projections by
Colin Lowry are interesting, especially the
psychedelic posters from the period and
examples of Joplin’s artwork, but other
images amount to visual overkill.
Cliff Simon’s workable set features stacks
of the huge (though nonworking) amplifiers
used in rock concerts. Bottles of Southern
Comfort, which became a Joplin trademark,
are placed around the stage, but the script
makes scant mention of her excessive
drinking.
Nor does it touch on the drug usage that
led to her untimely death in 1970 at the age
of 27.
Steve Schoenbeck’s sound design is
expectedly loud. Susan Branch Towne has
designed some eye-catching costumes for
the women.
Because the show is so visually overdone,
it’s not as effective as the earlier “Love,
Janis,” which played at San Francisco’s
Marines Memorial Theatre in 2006. Still,
many people in San Jose’s audience seemed
to love the show, especially when it show-
cased hits like “Piece of My Heart,” “Down
on Me,” “Me & Bobby McGee,” “Ball and
Chain” and “Mercedes Benz.”
“One Night With Janis Joplin” will con-
tinue at San Jose Repertory Theatre, 101
Paseo de San Antonio, San Jose, through
Oct. 6. For tickets and information call
(408) 367-7255 or visit www.sjrep.com.
Continued from page 17
JOPLIN
“Supernatural,” in which two brothers
secretly destroy ghosts, demons, polter-
geists, etc., in an otherwise seemingly
normal world. For me, magical realism has
its own charm, mainly because the genre
portrays lives similar to the ones we live
today, with a side of action and danger. In a
way, magical realism can seem even more
appealing to teenagers because most of the
genre is plausible, which, in turn makes
the supernatural element seem less implau-
sible.
I actually saw this love for magical real-
ism a lot in my sophomore English class.
One of the books we read was “Lord of the
Flies,” in which the characters ultimately
turn into animal-like creatures with violent
tendencies. My whole class, myself includ-
ed, really enjoyed the book. Reflecting
back now, I can say that we all probably
liked it because it turned from reality to
fantasy very quickly, a plot twist that was
so unexpected.
Actually, isn’t that how most fantasy
novels begin? Ordinary boy receives a
Hogwarts acceptance letter; ordinary boy is
sent to Camp Half Blood; ordinary girl gets
thrown into the Hunger Games.
I think we all foster at least a small love
for the fantasy genre. Be it any offshoot of
the traditional fantasy, we all display an
appreciation for it. And while I know that
99.99 percent of mature young adults know
reality from fantasy, a little part of us goes
to bed at night with a little 1 percent hop-
ing to wake up, and be living the action-
filled, amazing lives of our beloved charac-
ters.
Janani Kumar is a senior at Burlingame High
School. Student News appears in the weekend edi-
tion. You can email Student News at news@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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iLoveJacks.com
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
MAKE A BEELINE TO SHEPHERD-
STOWN, W. Va. : WHERE THE REVO-
LUTIONARY WAR MEETS REVOLU-
TIONARY THEATER ON THE BANKS
OF THE POTOMAC. In 1775,
Shepherdstown, W.Va., (part of Virginia
until 1863), was already a bustling business
center along the Potomac River, on the
Great Wagon Road that connected
Philadelphia to Georgia. Today, visitors
still flock to Shepherdstown (an hour from
Washington, D.C., and minutes from
Harpers Ferry and Antietam National
Battlefield), drawn by the cutting edge pro-
ductions staged at the Contemporary
American Theater Festival at Shepherd
University, just a short walk from the
town’s historic main street.
A WALK TO THE BIRTHPLACE OF
THE U.S. ARMY. An easy stroll through
the town of Shepherdstown takes the visitor
through a rich cross-section of American
history, beginning with a remarkable trek
at a time of crisis. In June 1775, the
Continental Congress ordered the forma-
tion of two companies of Virginia volunteer
riflemen to aid George Washington’s forces
gathered at Cambridge, Mass. Captain Hugh
Stephenson filled the ranks of his company
from the Shepherdstown area. These rifle-
men were the first continental or regular
troops of the rebelling colonies. On July
16, 1775, Stephenson departed with his 98
troops from “Morgan’s Spring,” about one-
half mile south of the town limits.
Marching 600 miles in 24 days,
Stephenson’s riflemen arrived at Cambridge
on Aug. 11. The extraordinary journey of
the Virginians became known as the Bee
Line March. Amonument to their feat stands
in Shepherdstown’s Elmwood Cemetery
where 38 Revolutionary veterans are buried.
In 1989, the secretary of the Army designat-
ed the starting point of the march as the
birthplace of the U.S. Army.
THE CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN
THEATRE FESTIVAL AT SHEPHERD
UNIVERSITY CHALLENGES AND
ENTERTAINS. Today the historic town is
home to Shepherd University, which for a
month every summer hosts the
Contemporary American Theater Festival
(CATF). CATF specializes in premieres and
second or third productions of new plays,
looking at “the absurdities, the injustices
and the hypocrisies of our contemporary
society,” and seeking, as its core value
statement says: “To sustain an artistic
process of innovation and daring; To tell
diverse stories; [and] To create a profound
and ever-evolving relationship between the
audience and the work.”
CATF Founder and Producing Director Ed
Herendeen said: “Over the last 23 years, the
Theater Festival has embraced and celebrat-
ed its geography. Shepherdstown is a per-
fect blend of metropolitan thought and rural
ambience, nestled in the beautiful foothills
of the Appalachian Mountains. Just 70
miles from both Washington, D.C., and
Baltimore, Md., each summer we bring
artists and audiences from around the coun-
try to West Virginia to create five provoca-
tive, daring new plays professionally pro-
duced in rotating repertory. In addition to
terrific restaurants, lodging, historic sites
and boutique shopping, we enhance our
work through readings, lectures, workshops
and countless discussions that ask you to
‘think theater. ’ As we celebrate our 100th
play produced, I am humbled and honored to
know that our work has gone on from here
to been seen regionally, off-Broadway,
Broadway and in film. Atrip to CATF is to
truly experience America’s newest plays in
West Virginia’s oldest town.”
Information about the Contemporary
American Theater Festival and its produc-
tions may be found at catf.org, (304) 876-
3473, (800) 999-2283 or info@catf.org.
STAYING IN SHEPHERDSTOWN.
The Alpine-style Bavarian Inn, near the
CATF stages and the main street of
Shepherdstown, has tastefully appointed
accommodations overlooking the Potomac
River Bend. Many guest rooms feature large
sitting areas, gas fireplaces and whirlpool
baths. The Bavarian Inn Hunt Room, deco-
rated with a stone fireplace and antler chan-
deliers, offers German fare such as Wiener
Schnitzel (Breaded veal steak, served with
red cabbage and spaetzle); Schweinebraten
(roasted pork scented with juniper sauer-
kraut and potato dumpling); and seared
pheasant breast wrapped in applewood
bacon, pineapple and champagne kraut,
with whipped potato and bacon croutons. A
special dinner is served in time for the early
performance curtain on Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday during the Theater
Festival. The Inn’s Rathskeller provides
casual dining in a European pub tradition
with cozy seating for after-theatre night-
caps. 164 Shepherd Grade ROAD, Route
480, Shepherdstown, W,Va. www.bavarian-
innwv.com.
AND REMEMBER: Travel is glamorous
only in retrospect. — Paul Theroux.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North American
Travel Journalists Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International Food, Wine & Travel
Writers Association. She may be reached at
susan@smdailyjournal.com.
SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL
AN ARMY IS BORN. The Bee Line March Monument stands in Elmwood Cemetery in
Shepherdstown, W.Va. It commemorates Virginia volunteer riflemen who answered the
Continental Congress’s call to arms in June 1775 and marched from Shepherdstown to George
Washington’s camp in Cambridge, Mass., covering 600 miles in just 24 days. In 1989, the
secretary of the Army designated the starting point of the march as the birthplace of the U.S.
Army.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, SEPT. 14
Kaplan PSAT Practice Test. 9 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. For high schoolers
only. Free. for more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Free document shredding and
Goodwill drive. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The dirt
lot at the northeast corner of Holly
Street and El Camino Real in San Carlos.
On-site document destruction is free
for three standard size bankers boxes.
Participants must show proof of resi-
dency. Goodwill donation drive of
clothing, housewares, computers and
e-waste (working or not). For more
information call 802-4228 or go to
www.cityofsancarlos.org.
Recycling ‘UnWaste’ Event. 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. Parking Lot W adjacent to the
Burlingame Green Street Fair,
Burlingame. Items, including electron-
ics, whether working or not, will be
accepted. No charge for smaller items;
small fees for larger ones. You can drive
through to drop off items. Enter lot
from Howard Avenue near Park Road.
For more information call (888) 832-
9839 or go to unwaste.com.
Kimochi Inc. Third Annual Show ‘n
Shine Car Show. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
College of San Mateo, 1700 W. Hillsdale
Blvd., San Mateo. Free Admission. For
more information call (415) 931-2294
or go to www.kimochi-inc.org.
St. Peter’s Second Annual Antique
and Collectibles Show. 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. St. Peter Catholic Church, 700
Oddstad Blvd., Pacifica. For more infor-
mation call (415) 602-6702 or go to
www.stpeterantiqueshow.com.
First Baptist Church of San Carlos
Kids Carnival. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. First
Baptist Church, 787 Walnut St., San
Carlos. Free games and prizes. Two
bounce houses, velcro wall, Police K-9
unit and more. Free.
Founders’ Day Festival. 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Monte Bello Open Space Preserve,
Page Mill Road, Palo Alto. The event site
is located about 7.5 miles west of
Interstate 280 on Page Mill Road, about
1 mile east of Skyline Blvd; the event
site is about half an mile from main
Monte Bello staging area. This family-
friendly festival will include live music,
an opportunity to meet rangers, a kids’
area, a historic exhibit, gourmet food
trucks, information booths and family-
friendly activities, including a short hike
to the official Founders’ rock. For more
information or to RSVP, visit www.open-
space.org/foundersday.
Affordable Books at the Book Nook.
Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane, Twin
Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks are
three for $1, trade paperbacks are $1,
hardbacks are $2, children’s books are
$.25 cents. For more information call
593-5650.
Presentation by T. Jack Foster Jr. on
the creation of Foster City. 1 p.m. San
Mateo County History Museum, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City. Foster will
discuss how he, with his father and two
brothers, transformed 4 miles of
Bayfront lands into what has become a
thriving city of 30,000 people. Book
signing will follow. Free with the price
of admission to the museum. $5 for
adults, $3 for students and seniors. For
more information call 299-0104 or go
to www.historysmc.org.
Millbrae Library Mid-Autumn
Festival. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave. Musical instru-
ments, singing, calligraphy demonstra-
tion and traditional Asian children’s arts
and crafts. Sample Chinese moon
cakes, Japanese rice cake and Korean
sweets. Free family event. For more
information call 697-7607.
Friendship Force Program: ‘Mystical
Myanmar, Land of Golden Pagodas.’
2 p.m. Community Activities Building,
1400 Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City.
Free. For more information email presi-
dent@ffsfba.org.
Tricycle Music Fest presents: The
Corner Laughers. 2 p.m. Portola Valley
Library, 765 Portola Road, Portola Valley.
Family music event to promote literacy.
For more information go to
www.smcl.org.
An Afternoon with Author Oliver
Potzsch. 3 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Oliver
Pötzsch is a German writer and film-
maker. Free. For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
The Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents ‘The Tragedy of
Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.’ 7:30 p.m.
Cameron’s Outback, 1410 Cabrillo
Highway, Half Moon Bay. $20, $15 for
students and seniors. For more infor-
mation email
halfmoonbayshakes@gmail.com or go
to hmbshakespeare.org.
Monty Python’s ‘Spamalot.’ 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Foster City. An irreverent parody of the
legendary tale of King Arthur and his
knights. Plays until Sept. 22. Tickets start
at $23 and can be purchased at hill-
barntheater.org or by calling 349-6411.
Coastal Repertory Theatre presents
‘The Diary of Anne Frank.’ 8 p.m.
Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main
St., Half Moon Bay. This moving adapta-
tion confronts a new generation with
the horrors of the Holocaust. Tickets
start at $27. For more information or to
purchase tickets go to www.coastal-
rep.com or call 569-3266.
Groovy Judy Gets Funky. 8:30 p.m. St.
James Gate Irish Pub and Restaurant,
1410 Old County Road, Belmont. Ages
21 and up. For more information go to
www.groovyjudy.com.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 15
Burlingame Green Street Fair and
Recycling Event. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Burlingame Avenue at Park Road, adja-
cent to Burlingame Fresh Market. More
than 60 vendors, free children’s crafts
and activities, entertainment and
hourly drawings for prizes. Free gift to
first 500 visitors. Free. For more infor-
mation visit www.burlingamegreen-
fair.com.
St. Peter’s Second Annual Antique
and Collectibles Show. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
St. Peter Catholic Church. 700 Oddstad
Blvd., Pacifica. For more information call
(415) 602-6702 or go to www.stpeter-
antiqueshow.com.
Meet the All-Stars! 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Belmont Sports Complex, 550 Island
Parkway, Belmont. The Belmont-
Redwood Shores Little League became
the Nor-Cal Champions for the first
time in history and there will be a com-
munity rally to celebrate. For more
information call 595-7441.
Sunday Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
Jenevein and Sylvan avenues, San
Bruno. For more information go to
www.westcoastfarmersmarkets.org.
Worship service featuring Eric
Leong. 11 a.m. Good Shepard
Episcopal Church, Belmont. Eric Leong
will play the violin and trumpet. His set
will include War March of the Priest, vio-
lin solos and standard hymns. Free.
The Hipwaders. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Courthouse Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. For more informa-
tion call 780-7311.
Q&A Session, Reception and Book
Signing by William Paul Young,
author of ‘The Shack.’ 3 p.m. First
Presbyterian Church, 1500 Easton
Drive, Burlingame. Meet in the
Fellowship Hall. Tickets in advance are
$25 for adults and $10 for students. At
the door $35 for adults and $15 for stu-
dents. Proceeds benefit Orphan
Compassion. Tickets available at
www.burlpress.org. For more informa-
tion call 342-0875.
Affordable Books at the Book Nook.
Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane, Twin
Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks are
three for $1, trade paperbacks are $1,
hardbacks are $2, children’s books are
$.25 cents. For more information call
593-5650.
Third Sunday Book Sale. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San
Carlos. Friends of San Carlos Library
invite you to search their collection of
gently used books, CDs and DVDs. We
offer an extensive variety of items to
choose from and offer a monthly spe-
cial ‘dot’ sale. We have an overflow of
books this month. For additional infor-
mation about Friends of the San Carlos
Library, go to www. friendsofscl.org or
call 591-0341.
Third Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance. 1
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San
Bruno. The Bob Gutierrez Band will be
performing. $5. For more information
call 616-7150.
Monty Python’s ‘Spamalot.’ 2 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
Foster City. An irreverent parody of the
legendary tale of King Arthur and his
knights. Plays until Sept. 22. Tickets start
at $23 and can be purchased at hill-
barntheater.org or by calling 349-6411.
Getting Health Insurance Under the
Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo City Library,
Oak Room, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Free. For more information call 342-
5853.
Coastal Repertory Theatre presents
‘The Diary of Anne Frank.’ 2 p.m.
Coastal Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main
St., Half Moon Bay. This moving adapta-
tion confronts a new generation with
the horrors of the Holocaust. Tickets
start at $27. For more information or to
purchase tickets go to www.coastal-
rep.com or call 569-3266.
The Half Moon Bay Shakespeare
Company presents ‘The Tragedy of
Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.’ 3 p.m.
Cameron’s Outback, 1410 Cabrillo
Highway, Half Moon Bay. Tickets are $20
for adults, $15 for students and seniors.
For more information email halfmoon-
bayshakes@gmail.com or go to
www.hmbshakespeare.org.
Folksinger Tuck Wilson. 3:30 p.m. to
5:30 p.m. Ms. Kitty’s Harmony Road, 731
Main St., Half Moon Bay. There will be a
children’s concert from 3:30 p.m. to 4:15
p.m. and a recular concert from 4:30
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. For reservations and
tickets call 440-5112 or visit www.har-
monyroad.us.
Charnett Moffett. 4:30 p.m. The Bach
Dancing & Dynamite Society at the
Douglas Beach House, 307 Miranda
Road, Half Moon Bay. Enjoy Charnett
Moffett’s Solo Bass Tour. $35. For more
information call 726-2020.
Songs of September. 7 p.m. Hillbarn
Theatre, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster
City. Featuring Notre Dame de Namur
University and Hillbarn Theatre. Tickets
are $25 and can be purchased at
www.hillbarntheatre.org or by calling
349-6411.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
Historic Places. The City Council will
vote Monday on whether to authorize
Mayor Ann Keighran to send a letter to
the U.S. Postal Service advising the
independent federal agency to give the
city consent to serve as the responsi-
ble agency for monitoring and enforc-
ing the preservation covenant.
The council originally voted 4-1,
with Councilwoman Cathy Baylock
voting against, to send a letter to the
U.S. Postal Service requesting that
preservation covenants not be added as
a requirement of sale for the parcel.
Doing so, the majority said, would tie
local control while the historical con-
siderations would be covered under the
California Environmental Quality Act.
Baylock, on the other hand, said the
practice is customary and could act as
an extra form of protection for a his-
torical aspect of Burlingame’s down-
town.
But the California Office of Historic
Preservation wrote that if the U.S.
Postal Service were to “transfer, lease
or sell property out of federal owner-
ship or control without adequate and
legally enforceable restrictions or con-
ditions to ensure long-term preserva-
tion of the property’s historical signif-
icance” it will result in adverse effects.
This letter by Carol Roland-Nawi, state
historical preservation officer, to the
USPS is dated April 3, 2013.
Since the covenants are now a
requirement, Bill Meeker, community
development director, said the city
wants to be the authority responsible
for monitoring them.
Normally, the California Office of
Historic Preservation wants to put a
certified local government agency that
has an official preservation ordinance
to oversee preservation in charge of
such a feat, said Baylock. Burlingame
does not have such an agency.
“With no one else to take that on, we
want to make sure requirements in the
covenant are honored,” Baylock said.
“We’re the alternative since there isn’t
anybody to play that role and I think
it’s as good an option as any because
we all know the history of city better
than an outsider. I’m happy there are
going to be preservation covenants.”
There is one publicly-known party
interested in purchasing the post
office. Grosvenor, an international
property development, investment and
fund management group, put forward a
mixed-use project using lot E — locat-
ed between Lorton Avenue, Park Road,
Burlingame Avenue and Howard Avenue
— and the adjacent post office. The
concept for the lot space includes 100
residential units, 35,000 square feet of
retail and/or restaurant space and 125
residential parking spaces, according
to a city staff report.
Under the preservation covenants,
the new owners must preserve the orig-
inal hanging light fixtures, marble
wainscoting — including marble on
the vestibule walls, metal trim used
throughout the interior, original tall
tables, original service windows, orig-
inal bronze bulletin board, federal star
motifs, terrazzo flooring, original win-
dows and doors to and within the
lobby, cantilevered service desks and
original post office boxes.
The historic exteriors include overall
mass and plan of the main facade,
poured concrete exterior siding and
smooth stucco wall cladding, original
metal frame windows, original bronze
doors, the red clay tile roof, cast stone
art deco relief sculptures over the main
entrance and under the windows and a
bronze relief of a woman over the
entrance doors.
In other city business, staff will
recommend holding a public hearing
to introduce an ordinance for a two-
hour parking restriction on the 1600
block of Howard Avenue, west of El
Camino Real. This comes as a result
of a petition from residents on the
block concerned about increased
long-term on-street parking by non-
residents on the street, a staff report
stated. The residents also felt the need
for their block to be consistent with
the current parking restrictions on the
adjacent 1500 block of Howard
Avenue.
The council will meet 7 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 16 in Council
Chambers, 501 Primrose Road.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
HISTORIC
nects to my non-traditional, personal
experiences with school,” said
Montgomery, who first presented the
idea for the high school to the school
district about a year ago.
That’s not to say that Montgomery
doesn’t think bigger schools can’t
work. When he taught at a 3,200-stu-
dent school in San Diego, he was
impressed by how things worked out
logistically. Extracurriculars are part
of the reason for its success, he said.
Montgomery envisions a school
similar at Stanford University’s
d.school — Hasso Plattner Institute of
Design — where he attended classes
when he was pursuing his doctorate in
administration and policy analysis.
The school teaches design thinking
and students will learn to apply this
thought approach to real-world prob-
lems.
At Stanford, Montgomery studied
under Linda Darling-Hammond, who
served as President Barack Obama’s
education advisor during his 2008
presidential campaign.
Nicole Cerra, a sophomore English
teacher at Capuchino High School, is
curriculum director for the potential
new school.
“We want to create a school that
gives students a better sense of who
they are and what they may want to
pursue earlier on in their education,”
Cerra said.
She notes that the skills that would
be taught at Design Tech would match
up with what would be tested on the
state’s upcoming Smarter Balance
Assessments.
Speaking with the independent
school called The Nueva School in
Hillsborough and San Mateo that also
emphasizes project-based learning and
personalized learning, Cerra and
Montgomery learned that it’s impor-
tant to have hands-on experiences in
high school before choosing a college
major. For example, a student without
such experience might go into college
pre-med, then find out he or she doesn’t
like the sight of blood.
“We would like to develop a strong
relationship with the community
through internships and would like to
establish design challenges,” Cerra
said.
A balance of content and projects
would be a huge part of the curriculum,
they said.
Design Tech was originally called
Idea High School, but it was recently
scrapped since there are idea public
schools in Texas and they do not want
to be confused with them. The name
also captures our essence more as
Design Tech is active and it also made
sense since the school is no longer
just an idea, Montgomery said.
The school board has 30 days in
which to hold a public hearing on the
proposal. Avote by the board will fol-
low and, if the petition is approved,
Montgomery and his team will go into
a planning phase which would involve
looking for a school location and
developing curriculum. They said
they’d like to have a central school
location, so that all students in the dis-
trict are able to attend.
Back in July, the potential school
received $100,000 in planning grant
funding from Next Generation
Learning Challenges for help with
costs associated with opening a new
high school. They will seek further
funds if the school is approved.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
DESIGN
COMICS/GAMES
9-14-13
friday’s PUZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOUs
sUdOkU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Evergreen
4 ATV feature
7 Explorer Zebulon —
11 Murmur of content
12 Black and white snack
13 Desktop picture
14 Chaucer pilgrim
16 Business VIPs
17 Madrid museum
18 Zorro’s disguise
19 Stadium fller
20 Milk amts.
21 Soft drink brand
24 End-of-day event
27 Half a bray
28 Auto supplies store
30 Above
32 Signs
34 Pals
36 Novelist Levin
37 Barked
39 Kukla’s friend
41 Easel display
42 Boxing’s greatest
43 Sotto —
45 Faux pas
48 Support
49 Crossroad
52 — meridiem
53 Curved molding
54 Even one
55 Flashy sign
56 Codgers’ queries
57 Mao — -tung
dOwn
1 Kennel sound
2 Lawman Wyatt —
3 Fan noise
4 Refrigerant
5 Unseld of the NBA
6 Two, in Tijuana
7 “Guernica” painter
8 Applies frosting
9 Eccentric
10 USN offcer
12 Decree
15 Clumsy ones
18 Geol. formation
20 Better than stereo
21 Frat letter
22 Counting rhyme start
23 Lap dog
24 Future fries
25 Sinister
26 Hatcher or Garr
29 Help go wrong
31 — Dawn Chong
33 Abate
35 Comfort
38 Before, in combos
40 Boost
42 De Mille or Moorehead
43 Windmill blade
44 Numerical prefx
46 Edict
47 Long times
48 Forbid
49 Diner coffee
50 Yecch!
51 PBS “Science Guy”
diLBErT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLE
fUTUrE sHOCk®
PEarLs BEfOrE swinE®
GET fUZZy®
saTUrday, sEPTEMBEr 14, 2013
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Patience coupled with
tender, loving care will bring you closer to someone
you enjoy spending time with. Plan to make personal
changes that will improve your status.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Don’t overdo it.
Generosity will generate a false friendship with
someone looking for a handout. Draw the line and
be prepared to change your plans when it comes to
entertainment and socializing.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Do the preparatory
work that will make planned alterations to your life
or your home easier. Make sure that you involve all
necessary parties for maximum harmony.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Progressive
action will result in greater productivity. Stand tall
and wield opportunities like a pro. Don’t let emotions
mess with your mind.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You’ll be greatly
impacted by the actions of others. Emotions will be
close to the surface, and expressing your feelings
will help you recognize who is on your side and who
isn’t.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Stick close to home
and avoid any interaction with authority fgures
or agencies that can cause setbacks. Use your
intelligence to fnd loopholes that will help you get
what you want.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) — It’s a good time to
tackle pressing business matters. The infuence
you have on the outcome of a situation that could
positively shake things up is far greater than you
realize.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) — You’ll have trouble
making up your mind today. Don’t read too much into
a situation that could disrupt your life. You’ll need to
readily be able to forgive and forget.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) — Keep your mind
focused on the big plan, but don’t forget to have
some fun. Seek out some close friends and loved
ones for a little quality recreation time.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) — Listen and pay
attention to what others say. Get any offers in
writing. Stick close to home and do whatever it takes
to make your place comfortable and user-friendly.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) — Make changes to your
personal appearance. Feeling good about the way
you look will give you the confdence to reach out
and to participate. An unusual pursuit will appeal to
you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Research something you
want to purchase or pursue. What you fnd out will
help you avoid a mishap that could infuence your
domestic situation.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
ASSISTANT MANAGER,
SPORT CLUB
STUDENT UNION, INC. -
SJSU
FT-EXC. BENEFITS
$3800-$5500
PLEASE APPLY AT
www.applitrack.com/sjsu/onlineapp
AA/EOE/ADA EMPLOYER
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CASHIER - PT/FT, will train. Apply at
AM/PM @ 470 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
110 Employment
CUSTOMER SERVICE
YOU ARE INVITED
Are you:
Dependable
Friendly
Detail Oriented
Willing to learn new skills
Do you have:
Good English skills
A Desire for steady employment
A desire for emplployment benefits
Sewiing skills
If the above items describe you,
please call (650)342-6978.
Immediate opening available for
Customer Service/Seamstress.
Call for appointment.
Crystal Cleaning Center
San Mateo CA, 94402
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
124 Caregivers
TOM’S
COMPASSIONATE CARE
Are you in need of home
patient care?
We've got you covered.
Please call us.
You won't regret it.
650-515-0669
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523128
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Adela Mirin Manzano
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Adela Miryn Manzano filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Adela Mirin Manzano
Proposed name: Adela Mirin Pagan
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 10,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 09/07/13, 09/14/2013,
09/21/2013, 09/28/2013)
I, RACHANA KACHOLIA will be correct-
ing the spelling of my first name to Rach-
na and will be known as Rachna Kacho-
lia for all purposes go forward.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257298
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: The Nibo Company, 949-G
Edgewater Blvd. Ste 1005, FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404, is hereby registered by
the following owners: Sunny Khatri and
VIral Khatri 6 Spring Ln., Belmont, CA
94002. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Sunny Khatri /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257249
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Golden Bay Motors, 218 Shaw
Rd. Ste. O, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080, is hereby registered by the
following owners: Bilal Soufi, 172 W. Hill-
sdale Blvd., San Mateo CA 94403. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Bilal Soufi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257198
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: JA Event Productions, Japi,
500 Price St., DALY CITY, CA 94014 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Jerome R. Alipio, 341 Shady Oak
Dr., Oakley, CA 94561. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Jerome R. Alipio /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256826
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Fresh Mix Concrete Co., 70 Lo-
dato Ave., Ste. 5 SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: R. Thomas Colsman, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ R. Thomas Colsman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
23 Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
v
v
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256876
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Huntington Liquors, 763 Hun-
tington Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Pierre Letheule, 3232 Bayo Vista Ave.,
Alameda, CA 94501. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Pierre Letheule /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257306
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Walnut Manor SA Apartments,
3822 West Ave., SAN ANTONIO, TX
78213 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Andrew Peceimer, 1575 Bay-
shore Highway Ste. 100, Burlingame, CA
94010. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/19/2013.
/s/ Andrew Peceimer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257268
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Bentley Capital, 210 S. Ells-
worth Ave., #781, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Danny Kim, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
08/01/2013.
/s/ Danny Kim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257240
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Easy Gift Sales, 128 Cypress
Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Petros
Fanourgiakis, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Petros Fanourgiakis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #256969
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) JIAssociates, 2) Japanese
Interpreters Associates, 740 Bair Island
Rd., Ste. 103, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Miho Ueyama Kite, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/27/2013.
/s/ Petros Fanourgiakis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 07/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/24/13, 08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257380
The following person is doing business
as: Solve By Coding, 1129 El Camino
Real, Apt. 7, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Olena Galligan, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s / Olena Galligan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13, 09/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257211
The following person is doing business
as: MD2 of Menlo Park, 1706 El Camino
Real, MENLO PARK, CA 94027 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Watson & Matles PC. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on07/29/2013.
/s / Harlan Matles /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13, 09/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257411
The following person is doing business
as: Ryu Sushi Bistro, 1201 Laurel St.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Hui Jin,
3878 Rudman Dr., South San Francisco,
CA 94080. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s / Hui Jin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/31/13, 09/07/13, 09/14/13, 09/21/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257501
The following person is doing business
as: Tim Page Trucking 208 Ottawa St.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Timothy
Donald Page, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 03/26/1987.
/s/ Timothy Donald Page /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/07/13, 09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257244
The following person is doing business
as: Rancho Las Trancas, 792 El Camino
Real, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Hilario Quintero, 226 A St.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on 1994.
/s/ Hilario Quintero /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/07/13, 09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257504
The following person is doing business
as: Thoughtful Tutoring Service, 2341
Rosewood Dr., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Kathy Asta, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Kathy Asta /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/07/13, 09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257513
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Westface College Planning, 2)
Westface Financial Advisory, 990 Indus-
trial Rd. , Ste. 112, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Paceline, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Kathy Asta /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/07/13, 09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257539
The following person is doing business
as: Apex Physical Therapy and Sports,
1810 Gateway Dr., Ste. 110, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94404 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Matoso-Togneyyi,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
05/04/2013.
/s/ Anthony Tognetti /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13, 10/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257613
The following person is doing business
as: Face Time, 401 S. Norfolk St., #217,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Digital
Group, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Deanna Lopez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13, 10/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257295
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Ithought Technologies, 1534
Plaza Ln., #172, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Alan Toy, 1065 Macadamia
Dr., Burlingame, CA 94010 and Edwin
Balli. 111E W. Hillsdale Blvd., San Ma-
teo, CA 94403. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 01/20/2007.
/s/ Alan Toy /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13, 10/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257517
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 1) Spectrum Auto Body, 2) The
Garage, 3) My Mechanic 320 10th St.,
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103 is hereby
registered by the following owner: DC
Automotive Management, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Danny Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13, 10/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257517
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Palladino Play and Train, 729
Chestnut St., Apt. 7, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94063 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Nicholas Palladino and
Stella Porath, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/11/2013.
/s/ Nicholas Palladino /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13, 10/05/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257605
The following person is doing business
as: Beauty Place, 5-M Serramonte Cen-
ter Space #901, DALY CITY, CA 94015
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Sergio Miranda Rojas, 2390 Lu-
cretia Ave., #1716, San Jose, CA 95122.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Sergio Miranda /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/14/13, 09/21/13, 09/28/13, 10/05/13).
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: Sept. 11, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
BEL MATEO BOWL, INC.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
4330 Olympic Ave.
SAN MATEO, CA 94403
Type of license applied for:
47 - On-sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 14, 2013
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: July. 29, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
ROCIO LENOYR, STEVE SEGOVIA
ORTEGA
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
319 Baden Ave.
South San Fracisco, CA 94080-4716
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 14, 21, 28, 2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, (650)322-
6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
WHITE CRIB / toddler bed with mattress
excellent condition $95 (650)345-9595
296 Appliances
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. SOLD!
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SIGNED MARK MCGWIER BASEBALL
- 70th Home Run, $30., (650)595-3933
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STERLING SILVER Cigarette Case.
Made by silversmith E.A. Bliss circa
1910. Excellent condition. $99 firm.
Cash. SOLD!
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
24
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
ALL METAL TONKA TRUCK -great
condition, $25., 650-595-3933
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LEGO, UNOPENED, 299 pieces Mon-
ster Truck Transporter, 3 projects to build
, 3 action figures, tools, 5-12, $27.00
(650)578-9208
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE OAK SCHOOL DESK - with
ink well, pencil holder and under seat
book shelf, great for a childs room or of-
fice, $48., (650)574-4439
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 MP3 multi media player new in box
(both) for $20 (650)726-1037
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PHOTOSMART Printer, mint condi-
tion, 2 sided, view & print color & black,
multi-functions, includes 2 unopened car-
tridges $45.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
304 Furniture
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manuel included. $575 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA SECTIONAL RECLINER - 3
piece, $75., (650)591-2720
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, SOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, SOLD!
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
KITCHEN POTS - (3) stainless steel
with black handles - 21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5
gal. Asking $10 all. Will sell separately,
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good con-
dition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
STANDARD BATHROOM SET - lid
cover and mat, beige. Asking $10. Call
(650)574-3229 (Foster City) between 10
a.m. and 7 p.m.
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINYL SHOWER CURTAINS (3) one is
beige/coral floral; one is aqua/black/
gold floral, and one is royal blue solid
with white nylon over-curtain. Asking
$10 each. Call (650)574-3229 (Foster
City) between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCH - INVICTA, ProDiver, new, still
in box, $100., (650)726-1037
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
10" MAKITA mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
B & D 17" HEDGE TRIMMER - pro mod-
el, sharp blades, only $19, 650-595-3933
BLACK AND Decker electric 18" blade
lawn mower, rated at 4 HP,
$45.(650)367-8146
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 21" belt sander $35 also 10
boxes of belt make offer, SOLD!
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
SOLD!
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
10" STERLING silver loving cup circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
3 LARGE old brown mixing bowls $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History,
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALOE VERA PLANTS - (30) medicine
plant, $3.00 each, SOLD!
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99., (650)580-
3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14., (650)578-9208
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BASS PRO SPOTLIGHT - (2) one mil-
lion candlelight, new in box, $100 for
both, (650)726-1037
BATHROOM VANITY light fixture - 2
frosted glass shades, brass finish, 14”W
x 8.75”H x 8.75”D, wall mount, $40,
(650)347-5104
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRAND NEW TARP - 7' X 5' sealed fac-
tory package, Only $9., 650-595-3933
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
model #38640, lead drisel dome, 44 car-
ot plated, $45., (650)315-5902
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60
(650)697-5405
COLEMAN ICE CHEST - 80 quart, $20.,
(650)345-3840
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
(650)578-9208
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HOT POCKET/PANINI MAKER - elec-
tric, heat top & bottom only, $9., 650-
595-3933
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
310 Misc. For Sale
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15., (650)345-
3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide in wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12” L x
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NEW NEWTONE DOOR BELL -factory
pack, complete only $15, 650-595-3933
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., (650)578-9208
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), clay colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel set(bath,
hand, face), gold colored. Asking $15.
Call (650) 574-3229 (Foster City) be-
tween 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
SSF, (650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS CRYSTAL glasswear set
$50 SOLD!
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $25., (650)345-3277
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS - “Human
Physiology Mechanisms of Disease”, 6th
edition, $15., and “Pathphysiology Bio-
logic Basics”, 4th edition, $25., (650)345-
3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suit case
1950's collectibles perfect condition large
size pearl color hard surface $50
(650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10.00 all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STAINED GLASS panels multi colors
beautiful work 35" long 111/2" wide $79
OBO (650)349-6059
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
SUMMER READING, 100 paperbacks
and hard cover, popular authors, Cuss-
ler, Patterson, Brown, Steele, more.
$30.00 all obo (650)578-9208
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10., Call (650)574-3229
(Foster City) between 10 am - 7 pm.
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
310 Misc. For Sale
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. South San Francisco
(650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited edi-
tion with Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-
5902
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Dressy ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 (650)341-1628
DENIM JACKET - faded but in good
condition, man's XL, $19., 650-595-3933
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
IONIC BREEZE quadra, Sharper Image,
3 level silent air purifier. 27”h, energy
saver, original box, video. Excellent con-
dition. $77. (650)347-5104
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
25 Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 __ shirt
7 Catholic
pilgrimage
destination
15 Written to last
16 Member of DC
Comics’ Legion
of Super-Heroes
17 Coliseum team,
once
18 March Madness
event
19 What busy
people are on?
20 WBA decisions
21 Dos’ followers
22 Special
screening
26 Trauma sufferer’s
goal
27 Yellowstone
grazer
31 Comic who wrote
jokes for
Kennedy
33 Start of a
response to a
brainteaser
34 Language “jai
alai” comes from
35 Latin 101 word
36 Jersey Shore
resort
38 Nautilus letters
39 Show deference
41 7 and 11: Abbr.
42 Stuffing material
43 Mullah’s faith
44 Regular guest on
“The O’Reilly
Factor”
46 Where funnels
are often seen
50 Spot at the
bridge table
53 Slick
54 Its capital is
Valletta
55 Big name in
racing
58 “Turn Me Loose”
singer, 1959
59 Cut across
60 Double-edged
61 1980 hit with the
line “I longed to
speak but did not
dare”
62 Just
DOWN
1 Softens
2 Pioneer Day
celebrant
3 Hunter with a
distinctive cry
4 1963-’64 painter
of the Paris
Opera ceiling
5 1937 title
gangster Pépé
6 Life support
syst.?
7 Collective feeling
of oppression
8 Recess
9 East German
secret police
10 Portfolio element
11 Fail to keep up
12 Structural beam
13 Canine order
14 Some votes
20 Ranking suit
23 “Bah!”
24 Selling point?
25 Ill. neighbor
28 It may precede a
cold front
29 Kick out
30 Emulate bees
31 “The Storyteller”
storyteller
32 Book by a
prophet
34 Low man
36 Interrogación
word
37 Hardly chipper
40 Use a shuttle
42 Over-explain
44 Rat
45 City on the Volga
47 Basic teaching
techniques
48 Net biz
49 ’50s TV
adventurer __
Derringer
50 Way
51 Dictator’s
phrase
52 Modern info
holders
56 BP checkers
57 That, in Tijuana
58 Bit of fiction
By Barry C. Silk
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/14/13
09/14/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
(650)368-0748
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
318 Sports Equipment
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - $.25 each, or all for
$100., (650)921-6741
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
RED HAWK Ruger .44 Mag Revolver
with leather holster & belt 3 boxes of
shells, $1000 best offer, (650)591-0419
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels, $85.
obo, (650)223-7187
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
TRAINING BASEBALLS - Soft center
(3) $2. each and Regular Softballs (2)
$3. each, (650)595-3933
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
COMMUNITY-WIDE
GARAGE SALE
AT THE ISLANDS
FOSTER CITY
(End of Balboa)
Saturday,
September 14th
9 am - 4 pm
***
Treasures Abound
FLEA MARKET
3015 E. Bayshore Rd.
In Redwood City
September 14th
Between 8am & 3pm
MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE SALE!!
Saturday Sept 14,
8AM-4PM
(maybe Sunday too!)
BRIARFIELD WAY,
BELMONT
Antiques, fishing gear, tools,
furniture, PS2 and games,
brass bed, household item
from downsizing and
Estate Sale!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
620 Automobiles
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 NISSAN Xterra XE-V6, 4x4 228k
miles. Runs good, needs minor exhaust
work, $2300, (650) 255-9866
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD ‘95 LX Coupe -
$1900., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $50. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - New With
Tags, Modular Dual Visor M/C Helmet,
only $69., (650)595-3933
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35., (650)670-
2888
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
FREE 14' boat with trailer (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
EDELBROCK VALVE COVERS - for a
389 engine, new in box, $100.,
(650)726-1037
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Neat Nit’s
Natural
Home
Cleaning
Te peninsula’s genuinely all natural
cleaning company, using all natural,
non-toxic cleaning agents.
Chemical free! Ideal for those with
small children and pets.
We have your good health in mind!
Mention this ad for a 15% discount
on your frst two cleanings!
800.339.6020
www.neatnit.com
-ڀInterior Residential
- Oďce
- Move Ins/Move Outs
- Friendly & Eďcient StaČ
- Licensed/Insured/Bonded
- FREE Estimates
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Housecleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650)453-3002
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Handy Help
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bath remodling, Tile
work, Roofing, And Much More!
Free Estimates
(650)771-2432
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Yard Boss
by Greenstar
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
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&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Yard Boss
by Greenstar
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NBJOUFOBODF BOE SFNPWBM
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Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
$89 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Installation of Trenchless Pipes,
Water Heaters & Faucets,
Carpet, Tile
(650)461-0326
Lic# 983312
27 Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. NANJAPA DDS
DR. SABOOWALA DDS
DR. VIRAPARIA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
We Moved:
1528 S. El Camino Real, #408,
San Mateo 94402
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
Health & Medical
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Insurance
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
Massage Therapy
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Massage Therapy
28
Weekend • Sept. 14-15, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
C oi ns º Dent al º J ewe l r y º S i l ver º Wat ches º Di amonds
1211 80t||0¶zM0 âä0 º 650-34I-I00I
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRY‡BURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 9/30/13
WEBUY
$50
OFF
Established 1979
ROLEX SERVICE
OR RE PAIR

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