P. 1
Personal Productivity

Personal Productivity

|Views: 17|Likes:
Published by ravichandran_pc1851
Personal Productivity
Personal Productivity

More info:

Categories:Topics
Published by: ravichandran_pc1851 on Sep 17, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/15/2015

pdf

text

original

Personal Productivity

Training Manual  Corporate Training Materials 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Module One: Getting Started ............................................................................................................... 4  Workshop Objectives ................................................................................................................................ 4  Pre‐Assignment Review ............................................................................................................................  5  Module Two: Setting SMART Goals ...................................................................................................... 6  The Three P’s ............................................................................................................................................. 6  The SMART Way ....................................................................................................................................... 7  Prioritizing Your Goals ..............................................................................................................................  8  Evaluating and Adapting ..........................................................................................................................  8  Module Three: The Power of Routines ................................................................................................. 9  What is a Routine?  .................................................................................................................................... 9  Personal Routines ................................................................................................................................... 10  Professional Routines .............................................................................................................................  10  Six Easy Ways to Simplify Your Life .........................................................................................................  11  Module Four: Scheduling Yourself ...................................................................................................... 12  The Simple Secret of Successful Time Management  ...............................................................................  12  Developing a Tracking System ................................................................................................................  12  Scheduling Appointments .......................................................................................................................  15  Scheduling Tasks ..................................................................................................................................... 15  Module Five: Keeping Yourself on Top of Tasks .................................................................................. 16  The One‐Minute Rule ..............................................................................................................................  16  The Five‐Minute Rule ..............................................................................................................................  17    What to do When You Feel like You’re Sinking .......................................................................................  17  Module Six: Tackling New Tasks and Projects ..................................................................................... 18  The Sliding Scale ..................................................................................................................................... 18 

A Checklist for Getting Started ...............................................................................................................  19  Evaluating and Adapting ........................................................................................................................  19  Module Seven: Using Project Management Techniques ..................................................................... 20  The Triple Constraint............................................................................................................................... 20  Creating the Schedule .............................................................................................................................  21  Using a RACI Chart .................................................................................................................................. 23  Module Eight: Creating a Workspace  ................................................................................................. 24  Setting Up the Physical Layout ...............................................................................................................  24  Ergonomics 101 ...................................................................................................................................... 25  Using Your Computer Efficiently .............................................................................................................  25  Module Nine: Organizing Files and Folders ......................................................................................... 26  Organizing Paper Files ............................................................................................................................  26  Organizing Electronic Files ......................................................................................................................  26  Scheduling Archive and Clean‐Up ...........................................................................................................  27  Module Ten: Managing E‐Mail ........................................................................................................... 28  Using E‐mail Time Wisely........................................................................................................................  28  Taking Action! ......................................................................................................................................... 29  Making the Most of Your E‐mail Program ..............................................................................................  29  Taking Time Back from Handheld Devices ..............................................................................................  30  Module Eleven: Tackling Procrastination............................................................................................ 31  Why We Procrastinate ............................................................................................................................  31  Nine Ways to Overcome Procrastination  ................................................................................................  32  Eat That Frog! ......................................................................................................................................... 33  Module Twelve: Wrapping Up............................................................................................................ 34  Words from the Wise ..............................................................................................................................  34   

Part of being a winner is knowing when enough is enough.        Workshop Objectives Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated  with learning. participants should be able to:          Set and evaluate SMART goals    Use routines to maximize their productivity  Use scheduling tools to make the most of their time  Stay on top of their to‐do list  Start new tasks and projects on the right foot  Use basic project management techniques  Organize their physical and virtual workspaces for maximum efficiency  Take back time from e‐mail and handheld devices  Page 4  . set goals. With that in mind.  At the end of this workshop. let’s review  our goals for today. Donald Trump Module One: Getting Started Most people find that they wish they had more time in a day. it occurs more easily and rapidly.  and use time‐honored planning and organizational tools to  maximize their personal productivity. and move on to something that's more productive. Participants will learn how to  establish routines. create an efficient environment.  This workshop will show participants how to organize their lives  and find those hidden moments. Sometimes you have to give up the fight and walk away.

 Complete  the three‐day productivity survey and identify your least productive areas.     Page 5  .   Beat procrastination  Pre‐Assignment Review The purpose of the Pre‐Assignment is to get you thinking about the efficiency  strategies that you are already using and where you need to improve.  Keep these areas in mind throughout the day and to focus on tools and solutions  that could help you with your problem areas. Do a  round‐robin and compile the most common areas of inefficiency.

 They must reflect your own dreams and values."   Personal: Goals must be personal. so they help you feel good about yourself and what  you're trying to accomplish. or even  spiritual. most  people never learn how to do properly. and the future is the direct result of what you do right now!    The Three P’s Setting meaningful. including financial. setting and achieving short‐term goals can help you accomplish the tasks you'll  need to achieve the long‐term ones. no matter what the unforeseen or uncontrollable events. When crafting your goal statement. A better alternative might be this: "Enroll in pre‐law classes so I can  help people with legal problems someday.Time is the stuff that life is made of. Setting goals puts you ahead of the pack!  Some people blame everything that goes wrong in their life  on something or someone else. It is also important to make sure that all of your  goals unleash the power of the three P's:    Positive: Who could get fired up about a goal such as "Find a career that's not  boring"? Goals should be phrased positively. It is the  single most important life skill that. relationships. always use the word “I” in the  sentence to brand it as your own. unfortunately. personal development. or the media. a more reasonable goal might be to attend a    Page 6  . Goal setting can be  used in every single area of your life.  Possible: When setting goals. Successful people instead dedicate themselves towards  taking responsibility for their lives.  physical. not those of  friends. long‐term goals is a giant step toward achieving your dreams. In  turn. They take the role of a victim  and they give all their power and control away. In the latter case. According to Brian Tracy’s book Goals. Benjamin Franklin Module Two: Setting SMART Goals Goal setting is critical to your personal productivity. Live in the  present: the past cannot be changed. When your goals are personal. you'll be more motivated to  succeed and take greater pride in your accomplishments. written goals. and a plan for getting  there. be sure to consider what's possible and within your control. family. fewer than  3% of people have clear.  Getting into an Ivy League university may be possible if you are earning good grades but  unrealistic if you're struggling.

university or trade school that offers courses related to your chosen career. your subconscious mind begins to  work on that goal. to bring you closer to achievement.   Specific: Success coach Jack Canfield states in his book The Success  Principles that. night and day. Goals.  Relevant: Before you even set goals. Goals that are in  harmony with our life purpose do have the power to make us happy. in and of themselves. By setting a deadline.   Achievable: Setting big goals is great.  Often. creating a list of benefits that the accomplishment of your goal  will bring to your life.   Timed: Without setting deadlines for your goals. it’s a good idea to sit down and define your core values and  your life purpose because it’s these tools which ultimately decide how and what goals you  choose for your life. do not provide any happiness.     The SMART Way SMART is a convenient acronym for the set of criteria that a goal must have in  order for it to be realized by the goal achiever. but setting unrealistic goals will just de‐motivate you. will you give your mind a compelling reason to pursue that goal.          Page 7  .” In order for you to  achieve a goal.  Measurable: It’s crucial for goal achievement that you are able to track your progress towards  your goal. you must be very clear about what exactly you want. you have no real compelling reason or  motivation to start working on them. A  good goal is one that challenges. but is not so unrealistic that you have virtually no chance of  accomplishing it. “Vague goals produce vague results. That’s why all goals need some form of objective measuring system so that you can  stay on track and become motivated when you enjoy the sweet taste of quantifiable progress. You might also  pursue volunteer work that would strengthen your college applications.

 the most important goal right now.Prioritizing Your Goals Achieving challenging goals requires a lot of mental energy. invest your  mental focus on one goal. When you reach the  target date set out in your goal. Instead of  spreading yourself thin by focusing on several goals at once. choose a goal that will have the greatest impact on your life  compared to how long it will take to achieve. keep an eye on new trends and ideas around you – you might just find one that will change  your life. look at what you have achieved. When you are  prioritizing. but also identifying what you must give  up in your life in order to get it.    Page 8  .    Evaluating and Adapting As we change and grow.       What percentage of my goal did I achieve?  Why did I achieve that percentage?  What would I do differently next time?  What is my next step?  What other goals might need to change now?  In addition. Most people are unwilling to make a conscious decision to give up the  things in their life necessary to achieve their goals. A large part of goal setting is  not just identifying what you want. Here is a  checklist to help you out. our goals should change too.

 Because routine tasks are already planned for. and no room for spontaneity. perhaps you normally exercise right after work. perhaps your routine involves going to the gym. stretching. For you. it can be modified at any  point in time. getting  changed.  2. Identify the Task. repetitive life. For example. you have more  energy to spend on the tasks that will bring you closer to your goals  and bring more joy to your life. Routines and rituals. With our exercise example.”   In fact.  3.        Page 9  . or pattern of  behavior regularly performed in a set manner.  Remember. you shower and go home.  however. Once you establish a routine.Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishment. the word “routine” typically conjures up an image  of a boring. Then. doing 45 minutes on the treadmill. “any practice. Let’s say you want to build an exercise routine. depending on what works for you. Jim Rohn Module Three: The Power of Routines For most people. with every moment controlled and  managed. you could easily decide to  exercise before work or even at lunch and still use the basic task and sub‐tasks. and  doing a lap around the pool to finish things off. can actually help increase the spontaneity and fun in your  life.  1. you can build any type of routine in three easy steps. performing three reps of weights. Identify the Time and/or Trigger. Identify the Sub‐Tasks.        What is a Routine? The Random House Dictionary defines a routine as. a routine shouldn’t be set in stone.

 too. and exercise form the building blocks of our lives. Without this  stable foundation. This can be as simple as five minutes  in the morning to update the day’s list. or do yoga in the morning before work. and Web sites throughout the day. and industry journals). Appliances like slow  cookers and delayed‐start ovens can also help you make sure supper is ready when you are.  In the morning. and five minutes at day’s end to evaluate today and create a starting list for tomorrow. One easy  way is to go for a brisk walk at lunch. e‐mail. meals. You can batch many types of tasks in this way for maximum  efficiency. and at the end of  the day). other personal productivity efforts won’t be as successful. batch and sequence your activities (for example. five minutes at noon to update what you have done  already.  Meals: Take a half hour each weekend to plan meals for the next week. news. Then. morning. Then. This might  include creating a to‐do list for the next day. or half an hour each day. including lunches and  suppers.   Set up a system for maintaining your task tracking system.  taking a warm bath. noon. enjoying a cup of tea.          Page 10  . and or performing some stretches.  Exercise: Try to exercise for one hour three times a week.  Here are some ideas. You can also lay out your  clothes and prepare your lunch the night before for maximum efficiency. It is best to try to go to bed at around the same time every night. make a grocery list and get everything you will need. set  aside one or several periods (for example.  news.Personal Routines Sleep. routine manner.   Sleep: Establish a routine for half an hour before you sleep. All of these activities will help you wind  down and sleep better.      Professional Routines Here are some routines that many people find helpful in maximizing their time in the  office:   Instead of checking e‐mail. perform your tasks in an organized.

 It all adds up!  6. Our world is filled with shortcuts: everything from speed dial. to automatic television recording. Just make sure that you have the money in your  account at the required time. set up automatic  payments so you don’t have to pay it yourself. and energy. Save the difference.    Page 11  . dry. chili. Keep everyone organized. nearly all banks offer automatic bill payments.  money. A service near  my home will wash. Take advantage of shortcuts. Plan your meals. Advance notice means better planning and improved  efficiency.  3. sort. you can reduce the number of items on your to‐do list. Evaluate the time you spend on household chores  and decide whether it is worth it to pay someone else to do it. Planning meals in advance (both lunches and suppers) will save you time. or casseroles on the weekend and freezing them for  use during the week. Try making soups. Pay someone else to do it.  4. a spouse.  keep a calendar in a central location (such as on the fridge) so that everyone can record  important dates and appointments.  Here are our top six suggestions. Use electronic banking. can save you a few seconds here and  there.   5. and fold a load of laundry for only five dollars!  We also pay a neighborhood kid ten dollars a week to mow our lawn. to  ready‐made salad kits. Today. “Buy used and save the  difference. The motto of the super‐sized Duggar family is. If you share your household with roommates. or children.  1. If you have bills  that are the same amount and due at the same time at regular intervals.  2.” You can do the same thing with newfound minutes: save them up during the day  and use them to work towards one of your goals.Six Easy Ways to Simplify Your Life With some creative thinking.

 You must explore different methods and. e‐mail. remember what we said earlier about growth. You might just find something that works for you. find the  solutions that work for you. and goals to work on. In addition to these key activities.          The Simple Secret of Successful Time Management In order to be as productive as you can be. Here are our top three ideas.Time is what we want most. projects to complete. and as your life changes. you  may need to revise your time management system. There is no secret. through trial and error. you must remember the simple secret of  time management. task. you will have day  to day tasks. William Penn Module Four: Scheduling Yourself Routines and rituals should form the framework of your days at home  and in the office.    Developing a Tracking System Although there are many time management systems out there. no one‐size‐fits‐all solution. we have found  that most systems boil down to a few key principles. and  contact information all in one place.  Page 12  . but what we use worst. This means that they can store calendar. This module  will explore how to schedule those tasks and activities in the most  efficient way possible.  As a last note. and no magic  button. As you grow. Remember.  Electronic Solutions: Most e‐mail applications (including Microsoft Outlook and  Lotus Notes) actually fall into the category of a PIM (Personal Information  Manager) application. keep an eye on what others are doing  and new ideas that emerge. Note that we said –most people find that combining  several different time management and productivity methods creates a system that  works for them.

  Cross off items as you complete them. follow these tips:   Keep personal and professional information in two separate locations. get yourself a spiral notebook and label it as your Personal Productivity Journal or your  Professional Productivity Journal. Items that are not completed should be carried over to the next  page.      Page 13  .  You can keep a long‐term calendar in the back of the book (or use a three‐ring binder with sections) to  record upcoming events. (We recommend keeping a separate journal for work and for your  personal life. thus maintaining your optimal work/life  balance. Highlight the top three items and focus on those first. or two e‐mail profiles on the same computer. Switching between your computer and your  day timer will waste time and increase the risk of missing information. so you can focus on them at separate times. (For example. prioritize each task in order of importance.  Try to use just the application as much as you can.  To start.  Next. you might  have a computer at home and one at work. We’ll look at this a bit more later on in the course.) Label each page with the day and the date and what needs to be done that particular day.    Productivity Journal: If you’re more of a traditionalist and prefer using something similar to an old‐ fashioned day timer. try this solution.To make the most of your electronic solution.)  Take the time to learn about the features of the application and how to use them to be more  productive.

 Plan to  do these tasks next. coined the  Eisenhower Principle. Postpone  these chores. To do this. But Not Important: These chores do not move you forward toward your own goals. It  was rediscovered and brought into the mainstream as the Urgent/Important Matrix by Stephen Covey in  his 1994 business classic.  Manage by delaying them.    Page 14  . and achieving the things that you want to  achieve.   Urgent and Important: Activities in this area relate to dealing with critical issues as they arise  and meeting significant commitments. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. But Not  Important • Maintenance • Routine tasks Not Urgent and  Not Important • Trivia   Here is a breakdown of each quadrant. But Not Urgent: These success‐oriented tasks are critical to achieving goals. is said to be how former US President Dwight Eisenhower organized his tasks. Perform these duties now.   Urgent and  Important • Crisis • Problems • Deadlines Important. cutting them short and rejecting requests from others. This concept. you  need to distinguish clearly between what is urgent and what is important. means spending your time on things that are important and not just urgent.  Important.  Urgent.The Urgent/Important Matrix: Managing time effectively. But  Not Urgent • Opportunities • Progress • High value • Long term Urgent.

) When possible.    Scheduling Appointments It’s important to master the art of scheduling appointments efficiently in order to  maximize personal productivity. most meetings lose steam.       Scheduling Tasks Are you finding your to‐do lists getting longer and longer? Give some of these ideas  a whirl:   Instead of being overwhelmed by a large project. or whenever you find  yourself working most productively. Suggest start and finish times for meetings and strictly  adhere to them.  Meetings can be a big time‐waster. Not Urgent and Not Important: These trivial interruptions are just a distraction. deconstruct it into  smaller.   If you’re leading a meeting. You can also use voice mail to  communicate your current status – at your desk all day. Avoid these distractions altogether. remember to prepare a meeting agenda in advance with copies e‐ mailed to everyone. meetings. Set a good example by starting and finishing on time. but be flexible enough to accommodate individual situations. to 10 a. or ask them to  leave you a time that’s convenient for you to call them back.. travelling. and should be  avoided if possible. (Remember. Make sure that  people know you’re unavailable from 9 a. with important points  discussed first.  Be strict with deadlines.          Page 15  . be careful not to mislabel things like time with family and  recreational activities as not important. after 45 minutes.  Always have a backup plan!  Allow for extra time when dealing with external parties.   Delegate effectively by matching up individual strengths with project tasks. However.m. use  conference calls and web conferences to save travel time.  Leave the most convenient time for callers to call on your voice mail message. or visitors dropping in unannounced. or on vacation. bite‐sized projects. Some tips to get started:   Block off solid.m. quiet time to work at your desk without interruptions—no  phone calls.

Anonymous Module Five: Keeping Yourself on Top of Tasks Even after you’ve got a plan in place. do it! Here are some things that you can  accomplish in 60 seconds or less:         Check for new messages on your voice mail and e‐mail  Quick replies to e‐mails  Accept a meeting invitation  Quick stretches to give you an energy boost  Review new RSS feeds    Page 16  .              The One‐Minute Rule If you can do a task in a minute or less. This module will  give you some ways to help you stay on top of your to‐do list. it’s important to keep adjusting  your plan so that you can stay in control of your time. Great people think of using it.Ordinary people think merely of spending time.

Next.  Here are some ideas for putting this into action:       Desk too cluttered? Set aside five minutes at the end of each hour to clear off one part. This plan. follow these five easy steps to get things back under control. Identify the three most important items.The Five‐Minute Rule If you’re stuck on a task – can’t get started. Make sure that your mind is calm and clear before  you begin.  Inbox overflowing? Set aside five minutes each hour to work on clearing it out. there will likely come a  time when you feel like you just can’t get your head above water.  mark it beside each item.  Report not coming along? Set aside five minutes each hour to work on a particular part.  Like other plans.  1. day timer. etc. First. Transfer these items to  your tracking system (Outlook. If there is a due date.  4.    Page 17  . Make those a priority for today. productivity journal. Now. or just can’t seem to  get it wrapped up – set aside five minutes each hour to work on it until you’ve hit the  desired progress point. should help you get your head above water and get back on  track.   3. Create a plan for the most important items. look at your calendar. If possible. however.  2. When this  happens. take a deep breath.  What to do When You Feel like You’re Sinking No matter how well you plan and how organized you are. start work on the most critical item.  5. have hit a roadblock. you will probably need to revisit your to‐do items and priorities once you have  completed a few tasks.). make a list of all the tasks that are outstanding.

 you might want to use:     RACI charts  Visual timelines  Storyboards  And for large projects. you may want to spend several days or even weeks gathering information  and creating a plan. for example. Leo Kennedy Module Six: Tackling New Tasks and Projects When you’re assigned a new task or project.  For small tasks. try to create the right size plan for the task. On the other hand. if you’re handed a complex  project. basic tools such as a to‐do list or calendar will probably be the best  choice. it’s important to create  a plan at the beginning so you get off to a good start.             The Sliding Scale When planning and organizing. This module  will look at some different techniques that you can use to tackle  new to‐do items. consider:    Gantt charts  Project plans  Page 18  .The surest way to be late is to have plenty of time. If your  goal is to organize your inbox. it’s probably not necessary to spend  several hours planning each action.  For medium‐sized tasks or projects.

 you’ll need very little information for simple tasks.  You’re not motivated to work on the project. and more detailed  information for complex tasks. Typically.  Some other signs that it may be time to review your plan:        You keep falling further and further behind. you will need some background information before you begin.  You’re finding that your plan isn’t the right size for your project.)  What work has already been completed?     Evaluating and Adapting For most medium to large sized tasks. You will want to gather all required  information from them before they leave. determine  what is working and what is not working. these occur at key gateways (called milestones in the project  management world).    Project‐specific productivity journals  Online time tracking dashboards  A Checklist for Getting Started For most tasks.  Page 19  .  Major changes have happened in your project. you will look at your plan.  Basic information you will gather should include:      What is the date I will start this task? What is the deadline?  Who else can I rely on for help?  What are the major things that need to be completed?  What obstacles might I encounter? How can I get around them? (For example. and adjust as necessary. one of your key  resources might be going on vacation in two weeks. At these gateways.  Remember. you will want to build evaluation points into  your plan.

        The Triple Constraint The Triple Constraint illustrates the balance of the project’s scope. quality. During the planning phase of a project. the project managers discover that there may be  changes or adjustments to be made in one of these areas. organizing.  the other factors of the triple constraint are likely to be affected as well. and cost.A project is complete when it starts working for you. rather than you working for it. time. and quality of a project. the project  management team defines the project scope. schedule  (time). cost. Scott Allen Module Seven: Using Project Management Techniques Project management is the art and science of planning. When this happens.   Time Quality Scope Cost   Page 20  .  and managing resources to ensure that a project is completed  successfully. Although project management tools are often used for  major endeavors. This module will give you an introduction to key  project management techniques and ideas and show you how to use  them to become more productive. we can scale down some of them and use them in  our day to day work.  As the process continues.

   The second column specifies the duration time of each task listed.    Task  Calculated  People  Time  Required  1.  The same thing happens if the cost decreases. Choose a paint  color  1 hour  2 hours  Sue. Friday  6 p.  10 a. They want to paint their guest room this weekend. and sometimes the project team. Joe  Start Time  and Date  5 p.‐10 a. or hours.m. the scope and time will decrease too. This duration might be listed in terms  of days.    Creating the Schedule The next task is to build the schedule.   If you are relying on other people or machines to help you complete your task.m. depending on the project.  The first column lists the tasks that need to be performed.‐5 p.m.m.   There are many scheduling tools out there.m. Friday  End Time and  Date  6 p. This list is typically  organized in the order in which the tasks will be accomplished chronologically.For example. Keep it up to date to  make sure that you will meet your deadlines. Friday  Page 21  . to help subdivide tasks that will be performed. For personal task management.m. Joe  Sue.‐noon  1 p. to identify how a change to a  single element will change the other elements.m.m.  Saturday  9 a.m. Friday  8 p. Get paint samples  2.m.m. it is logical to assume that the scope and time will increase as well.    Here is an example schedule for our room‐painting project. if the cost increases.  1 p. Here is a summary of their  availabilities:    Joe  Sue  Friday  5 p. A good schedule will allow you to will grow  and change while you’re working on your task or project.m.m. table‐style format.‐10 p.‐5 p.  think of how it might be broken up into phases.  5 p.‐10 p.m.   It is the job of the project manager. weeks. we  prefer a simple.m. If it’s a large project.  Let’s look at Joe and Sue. make a list of restrictions  and availabilities.

3.  Saturday  Noon  Saturday  3 p. Apply second coat  2 hours  Sue or Joe  8.     Page 22  .m.  Saturday  6.m. try to include deliverables with the milestones.  Make sure to include lag and lead time in your tasks. there  is little to no time allotted for the paint to dry between coats.m. Milestones are identifiable points in your project that  require no resources or time. Paint trim  1 hour  Joe  8 p.    Look for places where resources can perform activities simultaneously. The project will definitely fall  behind schedule. They are simply a key point in time. Take off trim  5.m.  sponsors and stakeholders have tangible results at various stages in the project.  Indicate milestones in your schedule.m.  Saturday   10 . Friday  9 p. Apply first coat  2 hours  Sue or Joe  7. They can also help you group  your project into phases.m.  Saturday  3:30 p. In the painting project.  Saturday  4:30 p.m. Milestones in this project might be:  o o o o  Have paint color chosen  Have room cleaned out  Get painting complete  Have room put back together  If you are delivering a business project.m.  Saturday  3:30 p.m. Friday  ½ hour  1 hour  Joe  Sue or Joe  9 p.  Saturday  10 p. This way.m. for example.m.  Saturday   1 p.m. Friday  9 a. accurate. Friday 10 a. and useful.am. and are more  likely to stay interested and committed. Put trim back in  ½ hour  Joe  9.  Saturday   3 p. Remove all  furniture  4. Put all furniture  back in    1 hour  Joe  Here are some tips to make your schedule efficient.

Using a RACI Chart A RACI chart is an excellent way to outline who is responsible for  what during a project or task.  Now. create a chart with tasks  listed on the left hand side. To start. put the appropriate letter in each cell:      R: Responsible for execution  A: Approver  C: Consult  I: Keep informed  Example    Build widget plan  Build widget  Ship widget to customers    Sue  A  R  I  Bob  R  A  I  Joe  I  C  I  Jane  I  I  R  Page 23  . and resources listed across the top.

  Keep your desk as clear as possible.  Try to have an area for your computer and an empty workspace. position the desk so that it receives maximum natural light. Store tools and papers where they belong. Plants. pictures. (If you’re bringing items into an office. and small fishbowls  are ideal for any work area. Keep mugs and glasses away from electronics. Keep your eyes open for new ideas. Make  sure that light doesn’t point at the monitor or in your face. check company policy first.)  Focus on the changes that you can make.  Do a complete clean and reorganization of your workspace once or twice a year. L‐shaped desks are ideal for  this.  If possible.The journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step. Lao Tzu Module Eight: Creating a Workspace In order to be the most productive that you can be.  Place the telephone within easy reach. This module will give you some ideas  for creating an effective.  Make your workspace a pleasant place to be. unlit candles. ergonomic workspace in any office. you must create  the appropriate environment.          Page 24  .             Setting Up the Physical Layout One key aspect of an effective workspace is the physical layout. Keep these tips in  mind:    Make sure your chair provides sufficient support. Make a habit of  cleaning off your desk at the end of each day.

 customize your working areas as much as  you can.  Here are some things that you can adjust to make your workspace more  ergonomic. and keyboard wrist rests can help to decrease muscle strain. such as repetitive strain injuries (RSI’s). and the positive effects that those have.  Page 25  . back pads. we’ll switch focus to your virtual workspace.  Most importantly.)  Use natural light when possible. pay attention to your body. It has been  proven that particular factors can increase or decrease the risk of certain injuries  and conditions. particularly computer maintenance tasks. productive physical  workspace. You may also need to consult your doctor for  specialized treatment. (Some people prefer to place it  directly on the desk.      Keep your back straight. Here are some ideas to get you started.  To use your computer most efficiently.  Your feet should be flat on the floor or on a footrest.     Organize your Start menu so that you can easily find the applications you need. In this topic. Stay positive  and focus on the changes that you can make.  Ensure your monitor is tilted at a comfortable viewing angle.  Keep your virtual desktop like your real desk – organized and clutter‐free. we focused on creating an effective. back problems. If you develop aches and pains.  Customize toolbars on your desktop and within applications to place frequently used commands  at your fingertips.  Chair arm rests. your company may limit your customization capabilities. it may be a sign  that your workspace needs to be adjusted.      Using Your Computer Efficiently In the last two topics.  Make use of applications that automate tasks for you. while others find that a monitor stand eases neck strain.    As with your physical workspace. and eye  problems.Ergonomics 101 Ergonomics is the study of how workers relate to their environment.

find Simplicity. find Harmony. One of the most common ways of organizing electronic files is to  create a folder for each project or task and then create sub‐folders as appropriate.Out of clutter.)   Page 26  .  2. organize  files in the simplest way possible. For ease of retrieval. you could label files with a one or two word tag  and arrange the files alphabetically. Reference files: Information needed only occasionally.  3. Archival files: Materials seldom retrieved but that must be kept. For example. Working files: Materials used frequently and needed close at hand.          Organizing Paper Files To retrieve materials quickly. From discord. it is important to organize your computer files  (including your e‐mail) in a way that makes sense to you and enables you to retrieve  information quickly. Some studies estimate that people  spend up to an hour and a half each day looking for things! This  module will give you some ways to keep your files organized. In the middle of difficulty lies Opportunity. Albert Einstein Module Nine: Organizing Files and Folders Being able to find a particular piece of information when you need it  is essential to being productive. you’ll need an effective filing system that includes  three basic kinds of files:   1.    Organizing Electronic Files Even with advanced search tools. you may want to create folders for correspondence with particular  people.  (For e‐mail.

 or external storage area. (Be sure to shred sensitive documents. being sure to label and store them consistently.      Page 27  . you must clean up and archive your files  regularly.To take organization a step further. or at the beginning of each year – it  depends on what works for you. This could be at  the end of each month. and virtual folders. Set a consistent date and put a reminder in your calendar. there are many applications to help you archive your data. DVD. go through your archive files  and see if you can throw anything out. you can move files to a CD. Many e‐mail applications  offer an automatic archive feature. Likewise. jump lists. go through your working and reference files and move any old items  to archive files.  tags.    Scheduling Archive and Clean‐Up In order to keep your files organized.  This is also a good time to perform a backup of your entire system.  For paper files.)   For electronic files. use operating system or search program features like keywords. Likewise. the end of each quarter.

Anonymous Module Ten: Managing E‐Mail E‐mail can be a great time‐saver. We suggest setting aside a period of  time at the beginning of the day. If you can’t get it all done during your designated time frame. We’ll also look at how to take back your life from  your handheld device. or use the five‐minute rule  and work on it throughout the day. too.To err is human. e‐mail is best handled in batches at  regularly scheduled times of the day. let it wait until your next e‐mail session. focus on getting your inbox cleaned  out. This will prevent you from being distracted and help  you maintain a more continuous workflow. but to really foul things up requires a computer. decide  whether to extend the time frame. and at the  end of the day.          Using E‐mail Time Wisely Like other routine tasks (such as returning phone calls. handling paper  mail. rather than every minute.  If your business requires you to be more responsive. but it can also be a great time  waster.          Page 28  . try setting your e‐mail program to download e‐mail  every 30 to 60 minutes. This module will give you some tools to manage your e‐ mail time wisely. During that period. right before or after lunch. and checking voice mail).

 or perform other actions upon certain triggers  Colored flags.Taking Action! When reviewing your e‐mail. and then file or delete it  Reply to it and then file it  Delete it without taking any other action (appropriate for junk mail)  Forward it and file it  Mark it for follow‐up (appropriate when you need to gather information before replying)  Making the Most of Your E‐mail Program You might not know it. including follow‐up flags with reminders  Categories or keywords   Search tools  Junk mail filtering  Auto‐archive and e‐mail cleanup  Integrated task. and contact management systems  Our challenge to you: take five minutes each day to see what your e‐mail program can do for you!      Page 29  .  Our favorite features include:          Custom folders (much like the folders on your hard drive)  Rules to move e‐mails to folders. calendar. try to take action right away to keep your inbox  as clear as possible. Most e‐mail programs include tools to  save you time and reduce the time you spend dealing with e‐mail. but your e‐mail program can probably take  over some of your daily tasks. You can:         Read it.

 anytime!  To ensure that your handheld device increases (rather than decreases) your  productivity.  smart phones.  Use voice mail and automatic reply to let people know when you’ll be away from your desk.          Turn off as many notifications as possible. can come from handheld devices. and BlackBerries. Now you can be interrupted anywhere. set the device aside.  If you’re at your desk.Taking Time Back from Handheld Devices Disruptions are the biggest obstacle towards being more productive. try these tips.  Give your number to essential people only.  Page 30  . or turn it off if possible.  Set your device to vibrate in meetings. We have  already talked about handling e‐mail and unannounced visitors. ironically. cell phones.  Use your device for work or home – not both. Another major  source of disruptions.

 including:        No clear deadline  Inadequate resources available (time.      Page 31  . information.             Why We Procrastinate There are many reasons why we tend to procrastinate.)  Don’t know where to begin  Task feels overwhelming  No passion for doing the work  Fear of failure or success  Why do you procrastinate? Understanding your personal reasons will help you create a solution that will  work for you.How soon “not now” becomes “never. money.” Martin Luther Module Eleven: Tackling Procrastination Procrastination means delaying a task (or even several tasks) that  should be a priority. etc. The ability to overcome procrastination and  tackle the important actions that have the biggest positive impact in  your life is a hallmark of the most successful people out there.

 Can the task be given to someone else?  Do it now. It will provide positive reinforcement and motivate you toward  your goals. Assign yourself a deadline for projects and milestones and write it down  in your day planner or calendar. and then to  start on that task and get it done both quickly and well. “Break it down into the ridiculous.Nine Ways to Overcome Procrastination Your ability to select your most important task at any given moment.  Delegate. Postponing an important task that needs to be done only creates feelings of anxiety  and stress. Make your deadlines known to other people who will hold you  accountable. ask yourself if it’s really something that you are responsible  for doing in the first place. As Bob Proctor  says.  Give yourself a reward. Know your job description and ask if the task is part of your  responsibilities. If the task is important.                Page 32  .  Ask for advice.  Here are some ways to get moving on those tough tasks. or expert can give you  some great insight on where to start and the steps for completing a project. the majority of your time management issues will simply fade away.  Obey the 15 minute rule. coach. Break large projects into milestones and then into actionable steps. supervisor. What are the consequences of not doing the task at all? Maybe it doesn’t need to be  done in the first place. Do it as early in the day as you can. each actionable step on  a project should take no more than 15 minutes to complete.  Chop it up.” Huge things don’t look as big when you break it down  as small as you can.   Delete it. will probably have greatest  impact on your success than any other quality or skill you can develop! If you  nurture the habit of setting clear priorities and getting important tasks quickly  finished. To reduce the temptation of procrastination.  Remove distractions.   Have clear deadlines. Celebrate the completion of project milestones and reward yourself for  getting projects done on time. You need to establish a positive working environment that is conducive to  getting your work done. Asking for help from a trusted mentor. Remove any distractions.

 But many employees confuse activity  with accomplishment and this causes one of the biggest problems in organizations today. you can  go through the day with the satisfaction of knowing that that is probably  the worst thing that is going to happen to you all day long!"   Your frog is the task that will have the greatest impact on achieving your  goals. it does not pay to sit and look at it for a very long time!"   The key to reaching high levels of performance and productivity is for you to develop the lifelong habit  of tackling your major task first thing each morning. You must also continually remind yourself that one of the most important decisions you  make each day is your choice of what you will do immediately and what you will do later. Don’t spend excessive time planning what you will  do.Eat That Frog! "If the first thing you have to do each morning is to eat a live frog.   Successful.      Page 33  . and most important task first.  Finally. and the task that you are most likely to procrastinate starting. Discipline yourself to begin immediately and then to persist until  the task is complete before you go on to something else.   In the business world. "If you have to eat a live frog. You are  paid for making a valuable contribution that is expected of you. which is  failure to execute. eat the ugliest one first!"   This is another way of saying that if you have two important tasks before you. "If you have to eat two frogs.  hardest. You must develop the routine of "eating your frog" before you do anything else and without taking  too much time to think about it. You must resist the temptation to start with  the easier task. you are paid and promoted for achieving specific. measurable results.  Another version of this saying is. start with the biggest. effective people are those who launch directly into their major tasks and then discipline  themselves to work steadily and single‐mindedly until those tasks are complete. or postpone  indefinitely.

   Newell D. This  will be a key tool to guide your progress in the days. we hope that your  journey to improve your personal productivity is just beginning. you'll get run over if you just sit  there. It is always the result of a  commitment to excellence.  Please take a moment to review and update your action plan. Franz Kafka Module Twelve: Wrapping Up Although this workshop is coming to a close. and focused effort. Meyer: Productivity is never an accident. intelligent planning.Productivity is being able to do things that you were never able to do before. We wish you the best of luck on the  rest of your travels!       Words from the Wise  Paul J. weeks.       Page 34  . Hillis: Man must make his choice between ease and wealth.  months. and years to come.  Will Rogers: Even if you are on the right track. but not both. either  may be his.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->