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Volume 126 Issue 14 kansan.com Monday, September 16, 2013
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 11
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 12
SUDOKU 5T
Showers early, northeast
winds at 10 to 15 mph.
40 percent chance of rain
Bring an umbrella to class. Index Don’t
forget
Today’s
Weather
Rain, rain, here to stay.
HI: 70
LO: 60
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY GEORGE MULLINIX
Lego released a new Minifgure
character on Sept. 1 that they hope
will break female stereotypes.
Te newest member is diferent
than Lego’s portrayals of females in
the past 10 years. She is a scientist
named Professor C. Bodin who
is dressed in a lab coat, wearing
glasses and holding two fasks of
diferent chemicals.
Te scientist’s bio on the Lego
website states that “she’ll spend all
night in her lab analyzing how to
connect bricks of diferent sizes
and shapes,” and that she won the
Nobrick Prize.
According to a study done by
Scientifc American, the ratio of
male to female Lego minifgures
is 4:1 in favor of males, with most
of the females being portrayed
in stereotypical, sexist ways. Tis
new representation of women in
science, technology, engineering
and math (STEM) careers is an
important social advancement that
many women have waited for.
Barbara Barnett, the associate
dean of journalism, said that there
are only two
images of women
in the media.
“You are either
the virgin or the
whore. You are
either the really
innocent, sweet
person, or the
rowdy person,”
Barnett said.
Tis image is a
representation of
what associate professor Tien-
Tsung Lee wants to show in his
Diversity in Media class.
When discussing gender roles in
the media, Lee said he teaches his
students to be “like a fsh out of wa-
ter.” We think everything is normal
until we get out of the water and
ask questions like, “why has society
made this okay?”
Lee said that this conscious shif
toward non-sexist toys like the
female Lego
scientist “should
have happened
decades and
decades ago. Or
maybe people
would want to
say centuries
ago.”
“I think the
toy is a good
example you are
changing the
water,” Lee said.
Tis change can also be seen in
STEM careers that are slowly gain-
ing more female members.
During the 2012-13 academic
year, the KU School of Engineering
consisted of only 18.2% females,
but despite the low representation
of women, the school has outreach
programs to increase interest in
engineering for both males and
females.
Over the summer, Jacquelyn
Pedigo, the outreach coordinator
for the School of Engineering puts
on a two-week summer camp for
high school girls. Tis summer
camp shows young girls what type
of departments the school has to
ofer.
In the time that Pedigo has
worked at the summer camp she
said that she has learned that many
young girls want to make the world
a better place, and believes this is
why chemical engineering is 50
percent female at the University.
Te School of Engineering’s Self
Engineering Leadership Fellows
(SELF) Program also informs high
school students what the school is
all about.
During junior Caitlin Uyemura’s
senior year of high school in Osage
City, a SELF member came to her
hometown. Te member talked
about wanting to make medicine
for kids with Spina Bifda, and then
switching her interest to makeup,
and eventually going into chemical
and plastics.
“Within one major there are so
many opportunities, and I was real-
ly interested in that,” Uyemura said.
Despite the opportunities in
STEM careers, there is a stigma that
mostly men work in these felds.
Nicole Rissky, a senior from
Tecumseh, said she was never really
confronted by this stereotype. She
was told quite the opposite and was
supported by both her family mem-
bers and professors.
“I think there are a lot of girls that
don’t get that support. Tat’s where
our problem lies.
When you get told you can’t do
something over and over again,
you can go one of two ways: prove
them wrong and do it anyway, or
shy away to the norm you believe
society has for you,” Rissky said.
It’s too early to tell if the new Lego
fgures will change unfair stereo-
types about women, but the inten-
tion to do so is clearly there. Te
creator of the project is Alatariel
Elensar, who says she is an isotope
geochemist.
“Although recently Lego has start-
ed to design and add more female
fgures to their sets, they are still a
minority,” Elensar wrote on Lego’s
website. “I have designed some
professional female minifgures that
also show that girls can become
anything they want.”
— Edited by Sarah Kramer
ASHLEY BOOKER
abooker@kansan.com
Hawks Helping Hawks, a new
philanthropic organization at the
University, aims to help students in
fnancial need.
Zach George, a junior from
Ottawa and president of Hawks
Helping Hawks, along with 14
students who now comprise the
board, wanted to create a philan-
thropic campaign where money
would go directly to students who
are struggling to make ends meet.
“Te goal is to strengthen the
Jayhawk family and create a
culture of giving at the University,”
George said.
Students who are struggling
fnancially will be able to apply for
a “Student Opportunity Award”
which can range from a few
hundred dollars to a few thousand,
depending on an individual’s
circumstances, George said.
A student board will be assem-
bled from members of diferent
groups around campus to choose
which applicants will receive
awards, George said . Te group
hopes to generate enough funds to
give their frst Student Opportuni-
ty Award this fall.
Hawks Helping Hawks is cur-
rently working with the Ofce
of Financial Aid to be able to
consider students’ fnancial need
in confdentiality, as wells as make
sure that an award will not afect
New philanthropy assists
students with fnances
Having a conversation with a
professor in a class of a more than
a hundred students can be dif-
cult; having a one-on-one interac-
tion with a professor can be even
harder. Te College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences allows students
to have lunch with a professor in
order to interact
and get to know
each other bet-
ter through the
“Take Your Pro-
fessor to Lunch”
program.
“I like to get to
know a student
a little bit more
personally,” bi-
ology professor
Craig Martin
said.
“In a class of a thousand it can be
difcult, but this program allows
that.”
Te program allows students
to take a professor to eat at the
Underground, the Market or the
Crimson Cafe by using vouchers
to cover the meal cost for both
students and faculty members.
“Te most common question I
get is, do I really like this music
I play?” said Martin, who plays
heavy metal at the beginning
of lectures. Martin usually has
around 10 students approach him
every semester to go out to lunch.
Professors and students not only
discuss class related topics but
personal topics as well.
Melissa Corder is a senior
psychology major who has taken
several professors out to lunch.
“We talk about all diferent sorts
of things,” said Corder, who had
lunch with her former math in-
structor earlier
last week. “We
talked about
my career plans
and the recent
passing of my
father.”
Students have
to schedule a
lunch time with
the professor or
faculty member
before flling out the application
for the lunch. Te application
must then be submitted at least
one week prior to the scheduled
lunch date in order to get approval
for the voucher.
“Tere are so many purposes
for this,” Corder said. “A lot of
students think that they can use
professors as references for when
they go to grad school or when
they go to get a job, but they’re
more than just people who you
can use as references. Tey’re
potential colleagues, advisers and
friends.”
Te lunch program is only avail-
able to students who are pursuing
academic degrees and majors
within the college. Pre-profession-
al majors are also eligible to take
part in the program. Students can
eat together in groups with their
professor, exceeding no more than
three people per group.
Te program limits students to
one lunch voucher per academic
year, but that doesn't apply to
faculty members. Te voucher is
also limited to $15 to cover meals
for both the professor and the
student. Any expense above that
amount has to come out of pocket.
Both Corder and Martin encour-
age faculty members and students
to take part in the lunch program.
“Te best thing about it is that
you really get to know a student
almost as a friend,” Martin said.
“I've established friendships with
students through the program
that continue now.”
Te “Take Your Professor to
Lunch” program is available to
students throughout the academic
year. Te application and more
information can be found at
college.ku.edu/academics/lunch.
—Edited by Casey Hutchins
SERVICE CAMPUS
YVONNE SAEZ/KANSAN
The executive board of Hawks Helping Hawks organization poses for a picture. Students interested in joining should follow
@JayHHHawks for the time and location of the Sept. 29 meeting.
JENNIFER SALVA
jsalva@kansan.com
SEE HAWKS PAGE 3

“I think there are a lot of
girls that don’t get that
support. That’s where our
problem lies.”
NICOLE RISSKY
Senior from Tecumseh, Kan.
CLAS program promotes
interaction with professors
JOSE MEDRANO
jmedrano@kansan.com

“The best thing about it
is that you really get to
know a student almost as
a friend.”
CRAIG MARTIN
Biology professor
UDK
Toppling gender stereotypes brick by brick
LEGO LADIES
On Friday, the Douglas County
District Attorney’s ofce released
a statement concerning the animal
abuse case involving the Alpha Nu
chapter of Beta Teta Pi. Te fra-
ternity has been under investiga-
tion due to an incident linked with
the abuse and killing of a turkey
during a party at the fraternity’s
house.
“Afer an exhaustive investigation
we believe there is
evidence to suggest
the turkey was mis-
treated,” district
attorney Charles
Branson, stated
in a news release
concerning the
conclusion. “How-
ever, our review
of the evidence re-
vealed conficting
accounts given by
various witnesses, making it dif-
cult to determine exactly who was
responsible for the improper treat-
ment of the bird,” Branson said.
Te statement also contained
sanctions with which the chapter
has agreed to; 1,000 hours of com-
munity service as well as $5,000 to
pay for the investigation conduct-
ed by the Lawrence Police Depart-
ment. In a statement to the Uni-
versity Daily Kansan by Jackson
Long, president of the Alpha Nu
chapter, the fraternity responded
with the following:
“Te Alpha Nu Chapter is
pleased to resolve the investiga-
tion stemming from allegations of
animal abuse at our annual winter
formal last December. In addition
to conducting our own internal
investigation, the chapter has co-
operated fully with both the Law-
rence Police
D e p a r t -
ment and
the Douglas
County Dis-
trict Attor-
ney’s ofce
t hroughout
the duration
of their inves-
tigation. We
recognize that
the allega-
tions brought
upon our chapter do not refect
our core values, and we have taken
the necessary steps to ensure inci-
dents like this do not occur in the
future.”
Te conclusion of the investi-
gation showed that ofcers of the
fraternity were present during the
incident. Conficting media ac-
counts and evidence reports by
witnesses on the scene made it
difcult for investigators to pin-
point the exact perpetrators of the
turkey’s abuse stated the District
Attorney’s ofce.
Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Lit-
tle also released a statement con-
cerning the investigation. “As
members of the KU community,
the participants in this inexcus-
able incident have embarrassed
not only themselves but the entire
university. Te behavior reported
does not refect the principles or
standards of conduct I expect from
our students. Fraternity leadership
should use this time to restore the
trust of the university and the pub-
lic,” Gray-Little said.
According to the District Attor-
ney’s ofce the investigation was
delayed due to proximity the case
had to winter break which caused
a seven month delay. Branson also
stated, “I hope other organizations
holding functions will take notice
of this and police their functions
accordingly.”
— Edited by James Ogden
Te University moved up to 47th
in the 2014 U.S. News and World
Report ranking of public universi-
ties released on Sept. 10.
Te University’s ranking last year
was 51st, and this year the Univer-
sity shares the 47th spot with fve
other public universities. In overall
rankings, the University tied for
101st with seven other national
universities.
A University news release sug-
gests that the shif in the Universi-
ty’s ranking could be due to the im-
plementation of Bold Aspirations,
its strategic plan, and the KU Core
Curriculum. However, the U.S.
News staf writes that changes in
ranking from last year to this year
are most likely due to the changes
made in the methodology of rank-
ing or changes in other schools’
performance, not just changes in
the school’s programs.
Te rankings have been criticized
for using college selectivity and rep-
utation as measurements of school
quality, writes the Lawrence-Jour-
nal World in a Sept. 13 article. Since
the most efective and fair way to
measure the quality of education at
each school is highly debated, U.S.
News updates its methodology for
measuring data frequently.
Even though U.S. News includes
factors other than college reputa-
tion, Emma Zink, a freshman from
Durango, Colo., placed importance
on this aspect when deciding on
which colleges to apply to.
“It probably shouldn’t have mat-
tered as much, but I applied to a
lot of Ivy League schools, because
of their reputation,” Zink said. “I
wasn’t considering Kansas because
I didn’t think it was as good of a
school.”
Zink said when considering po-
tential colleges to apply to, she also
valued factors such as location,
class size and fnancial resources.
Data is gathered about each col-
lege based on 16 areas of academ-
ic excellence, including the high
school performance of students
who attend, faculty resources and
other factors. A weighted compos-
ite score is determined based on
these factors in order to rank the
schools.
Te U.S. News staf recommends
using their rankings as one tool
when deciding on a college, but to
also use other resources such as
counselors, parents, websites and
campus visits. In addition, many
other factors should go into a stu-
dent’s choice about which college
they choose, including the location,
size, fnancial resources and per-
sonal preferences.
Tis year, U.S. News changed its
ranking methodology to better
represent the performance of each
school. It increased the weight for
SAT and ACT scores, and lessened
the weight for high school class
standing of newly enrolled stu-
dents. Tis was mainly due to the
fact that each year, the number of
applying seniors with class rank on
their transcript is declining.
Another factor that was changed
when determining rankings was
graduation rate performance,
which was widened to include all
the Best Colleges ranking catego-
ries. Graduation and retention rates
have a total weight of 30 percent in
the ranking process, which is more
than any other factor.
When trying to compile a list of
potential colleges, the rankings
provide reliable data to compare
schools and help students to look
closely at the diferences between
the specifc factors that are most
important to the individual.
“We do it to help you make one
of the most important decisions of
your life,” the U.S. News staf writes.
Zink says when trying to narrow
down her list of potential colleges,
rankings were not as much of a
concern for her as the experience
she would get out of the university.
“Just looking at rankings, you
would never know the feel of the
campus. Tere’s a community that,
even if you’re not a part of it, you
can walk around and see,” Zink
said.
She considered a small school in
Connecticut, but when she went
to the college for a campus visit,
she discovered that despite its high
rankings, well-respected academics
and picturesque campus, it was not
a place she wanted to attend due to
the limited social aspects of student
life.
“It’s a really good school, but it’s
a miserable place to be,” Zink said.
Due to this, Zink found that rank-
ings are not always the best way to
make a decision on a college.
“You can compare the academics
and the statistics, but schools are
diferent for each person,” Zink
said.
“You have to enjoy the place
you’re at to get more out of it, and
that’s more of a personal thing that
statistics can’t analyze.”
— Edited by James Ogden
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison Kohn
Dylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Business manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren Armendariz
Hayley Jozwiak
Elise Reuter
Madison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole Anneberg
Allyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS
Media director and
content stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 PAGE 2
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
Newsroom: (785)-766-1491
Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: @Kansannews
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student
newspaper of the University of Kansas. The
frst copy is paid through the student activity
fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are
50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased
at the Kansan business offce, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-
4967) is published daily during the school
year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall
break, spring break and exams and weekly
during the summer session excluding
holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are
$250 plus tax. Send address changes to
The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out
KUJH-TV
on Knology
of Kansas
Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what
you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other
news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.
KJHK is the student voice
in radio. Whether it’s rock
‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or
special events, KJHK 90.7
is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
What’s the
Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
HI: 80
HI: 91 HI: 86
LO: 65
LO: 67 LO: 61
— weather.com
Isolated T-storms,
30 percent chance
of rain. Wind SSE
at 10 mph.
Scattered
T-storms. 40
percent chance of
rain. Wind SSW at
14 mph.
Scattered
T-storms. 30
percent chance of
rain. Wind SW at
12 mph.
Rain, rain, go away. Thunderstorms are here
to stay.
Perfect for a lazy day.
Calendar
What: Jewish Studies Fall Welcome Party
When: 4 to 5:30 p.m.
Where: Potter Lake
About: A celebration of the new aca-
demic year to meet the Jewish Studies
faculty.
What: Drop without a W
When: All day
Where: All University
About: Today is the last day to drop a
full-semester class without marking
withdrawn on transcripts.
Monday, Sept. 16 Tuesday, Sept. 17 Wednesday, Sept. 18 Thursday, Sept. 19
The 14th Oldest Jewelry
Store in the Country
A TRADITION OF
EXCELLENCE SINCE 1880
RINGS, WATCHES, CRYSTALS
DIAMONDS, LOOSE & MOUNTED
WEDDING BANDS, JEWELRY, IN
HOUSE WATCH AND CLOCK REPAIR,
FINANCING, SPEED, SERVICE &
CUSTOM DESIGN
827 MASSACHUSETTS 785-843-4266 www.marksjewelers.net
340 Fraser | 864-4121
www.psych.ku.edu/
psychological_clinic/
Counseling Services for
Lawrence & KU
Courses and workshops
starting throughout the fall.
Sign up and score higher!
testprep.ku.edu
Use your
smartphone
and snap
this for an
additional
$50 discount!

Test Prep
GRE GMAT LSAT
Kansas moves up in public university rankings
ACADEMICS
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com
Turkey mistreatment investigation concluded
CRIME
JOSE MEDRANO
jmedrano@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Students can read the rest of the U.S. News and World Report rankings for 2013 at usnews.com/rankings.
What: Business Career Fair
When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, 5th Floor
About: Career fair sponsored by the
School of Business.
What: Kristin’s Story
When: 7 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Woodruff Audi-
torium
About: Lecture by Andrea Cooper on
her daughter’s experience with sexual
assault and suicide.
What: Blurred Lines
When: 7 to 8 p.m.
Where: Sabatini Multicultural Center, SMBC
Classroom
About: Video and discussion on masculinity
What: Japan Foundation Film Festival “Army”
Screening
When: 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Woodruff Auditorium
About: Screening of the 1944 Japanese
anti-war flm.
What: LibArt Exhibit Opening and Awards
When: 3 to 4 p.m.
Where: Watson Library, Third Floor West
About: Reception celebrating the third year
of student artwork shown in University
libraries.
What: Sexual Assault Candlelit Vigil
When: 8 p.m.
Where: Campanile
About: Vigil where the campanile will toll for
every survivor helped by GaDuGi this year.

“Fraternity leadership
should use this time to
restore the trust of the
university and the public,”
BERNADETTE GRAY-LITTLE
University Chancellor
WANT NEWS
UPDATES ALL DAY
LONG?
Follow
@KansanNews
on Twitter
Opened in 1965, Naismith Hall
has housed almost 20,000 students
over the years. Tis historic resi-
dence hall is looking to the future
with major renovations. Te pri-
vately owned residence hall has
just received a major facelif to its
frst foor lobby.
Te Bromley Companies, a New
York-based real estate investment
company, owns Naismith Hall.
Bromley owns other student resi-
dence facilities at Colorado State,
Texas Tech and Ohio University.
Bromley has a reputation for up-
dating residence halls to better suit
student needs. Tis is the frst part
of a renovation process that will
cost approximately $3 million.
Construction on the lobby fn-
ished in August, just in time for
its residents to move in for the fall
semester. Te lobby comes with
plenty of features that residents of
Naismith will enjoy.
Upgrades to the lobby include a
new computer lab with both PCs
and iMacs, increased internet
speeds and free printing. For rec-
reation, the common area also has
a new pingpong table as well as a
pool table. And for those students
who dread doing their laundry,
things got a little easier with a new
laundry room that notifes its users
via text message when their laun-
dry is done. For those who wish
to express their culinary creativi-
ty, residents will be able to take a
break from their meal plans and
cook for themselves in a new com-
munity kitchen.
Te new lobby has a modern
look about it. It feels closer to an
upscale hotel rather than a stu-
dent residence hall. Contempo-
rary yet comfortable chairs ofer
a great place to study or just hang
out. Residents can relax and watch
sports on new fat screen TV’s
hanging on the walls.
Te dominant feature of the
lounge is a long, black freplace
that is a favorite with many of the
people of Naismith.
“I’m really into the sleek, modern
aesthetic. I love the freplace,” said
Shegufa Huma, a freshman living
in Naismith. At any given time
you’re likely to see students congre-
gating around the freplace, which
is an obvious favorite with many of
those who live at Naismith. Te
straight, sharp edges complement
the contemporary seating that sur-
rounds the freplace.
“I come down here no matter
what time of night it is, I know
someone who’s down here, hang-
ing out. It’s very social,” said fresh-
man Carly Aufdem-Brinke, who
isn’t alone when it comes to the
sense of community that the lobby
gives Naismith hall.
Te new lobby is almost univer-
sally admired with an overwhelm-
ing appreciation for the many of
the new features. Eli Finkelstein,
a transfer student at the Universi-
ty, had no trouble identifying his
favorite aspects of the common
areas. “Te pingpong table, brings
people together and the sitting
area, people like to come down
and study.” Te combination of ac-
ademic and social features of Na-
ismith’s new lobby will contribute
to student success and satisfaction
for years to come.
— Edited by James Ogden
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
Today is the last day to drop a
class without having it appear on
your transcript.
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriff’s
Offce booking recap.




SEPTEMBER 18, 2013
ENGlNEERlNG & COMPUTlNG CAREER FAlR
SUlT UP
12 P.M.- 5:00 P.M.
5TH & 6TH FLOOR OF THE KANSAS UNlON
Residents enjoy Naismith Hall’s renovations
HOUSING
TOM QUINLAN
tquinlan@kansan.com
BEN LIPOWITZ/KANSAN
Naismith’s new lobby feaures a pool table, several TVs and a freplace. The area was recently renovated to create a sense of community among students.
A 20-year-old male was arrested
yesterday on the 1100 block
of Indiana Street on suspicion
of possession of another’s
driver’s license and intoxicated
pedestrian in the roadway. A
$200 bond was paid.
A 27-year-old male was arrested
yesterday on the 300 block of 8th
Street on suspicion of operating
a vehicle under the infuence. A
$500 bond was paid.
A 34-year-old male was arrested
yesterday on the 2100 block of
Clinton Parkway on suspicion
of operating a vehicle under
the infuence. A $500 bond was
paid.
A 22-year-old male was arrested
Saturday on the 1000 block of
Mississippi Street on suspicion
of operating a vehicle under the
infuence, failure to report an
accident and damage to vehicle
or property. A $700 bond was
paid.
RECYCLE,
RECYCLE,
RECYCLE,
RECYCLE.
other forms of fnancial aid.
Te group is currently develop-
ing its fundraising strategy and
recruiting ambassadors to spread
the word about Hawks Helping
Hawks and get students interested
in donating. Te group already-
has 60 ambassadors, but George
hopes to increase that number to
500 this semester.
Darby Evans, a junior from
Leawood and Greek Coordinator
for Hawks Helping Hawks, said
that whatever a student can aford
to donate—even just fve dollars—
can help out other students.
“It’s an extremely worthwhile
cause that benefts every aspect of
the University,” Evans said.
According to Evans, it is im-
portant for Greek life to be a part
of the Hawks Helping Hawks
efort to become established as a
campus-wide group because it is
such a large portion of the student
body population.
Current ambassadors and those
interested in becoming a part of
Hawks Helping Hawks should
attend the ambassadors’ meeting
on Sept. 29, George said. Te time
and location of the meeting will
be made available on the Hawks
Helping Hawks Facebook page
and Twitter (@JayHHHawks).
“Life happens, and we want to
make sure that Hawks Helping
Hawks are going to be there for
students when the fall on fnan-
cial struggles. We want this to
strengthen them, and at the same
time strengthen the University,”
George said.
—Edited by Sarah Kramer
HAWKS FROM PAGE 1
I
f you asked me what I
miss the most about living
on-campus, it wouldn’t
be the unlimited fro-yo and
Reese’s Pufs or the constant
free entertainment via bearded
hula-hoopers populating the
Hashinger front steps. It would
be…walking.
Walking?
Yes, walking. You see, my daily,
failed attempts to appear graceful
while hobbling down Daisy Hill,
‘free’ Mrs. E’s cofee in one hand,
cracked iPod in the other, with
the cold morning air startling me
awake while I not-so-subtly kept
my eyes peeled for basketball
players near Jayhawker Tow-
ers (no shame), became oddly
therapeutic to me. In my distant,
exotic homeland of Chicagoland
suburbia, the landscape ranged
from completely fat, to slightly-
less-fat. I grew to welcome the
frequent hill-induced quadricep
burn, the physical manifestation
of my lack of a car, worsened by
my penchant for fip-fops.
Just like the strange bond
formed between two poor souls
on adjacent treadmills, I con-
sidered myself a member of the
exclusive ‘walkers club’ (it’s too
elusive to warrant a more creative
name); a group whose member-
ship fuctuated seasonally but
had its core of dedicated trekkers.
We had diferent schedules
and never acknowledged our
unspoken connection, but the
comradery lived, at least in my
sometimes overly imaginative
mind. Maybe that guy who
didn’t get the memo that shark
tooth necklaces went out with
frosted tips and Backstreet Boys
was smiling at me in acknowl-
edgement of our mutual love
for walking as we passed each
other on overlapping routes, or
maybe ‘Quit Playin’ Games With
My Heart,’ just shufed over his
iPhone—I may never know. But a
girl can dream, right?
Te ability to walk wasn’t just a
way to trick myself into exercis-
ing—although any mom with
a ftness Pinterest board would
tell you that increased physical
activity is certainly not a bad
thing—it was a freedom to savor
the journey. Tere’s something
very un-romantic about dragging
yourself out of bed in your
cement-bunker dorm room onto
a carpeted seat in a slow-moving
bus into a foldout lecture chair.
You never see sunlight, you never
feel a pull in your muscles, never
a shiver on your exposed skin—
you’re just shufing from seat-to-
seat, scrolling through subtweets
about your quasi-friend’s recent
breakups until lecture begins.
To walk to class was to separate
myself from the non-academic
and take time to shake of the
cobwebs, notice the changing
foliage and mentally prepare for
the day ahead. It was a time free
of the seemingly constant, mind-
less stimuli—there was no screen
in my face, no music in my ears
drowning out my thoughts, no
forced small talk to fll the air
(pardon the bias of an introvert.)
Perhaps the buses are so
cramped because we view trans-
portation as a right, as a sacred
necessity. Why walk three blocks
to the store when you could
drive? You could spare yourself
slight physical exhaustion and
maybe the 10 minutes you could
have spent on YouTube—seems
like a simple enough choice,
right? But when you realize the
somewhat meditational value
of a walk, when you learn to
relish the things and people you
pass even briefy, the extra time
doesn’t seem so wasted.
I could be looking back at my
walking days through rose-col-
ored glass, undoubtedly, but
absence truly does make the
heart grow fonder, and my cur-
rent 35-minute bus ride provides
quite a stark contrast. Instead of
skillfully maneuvering cross-
walks, I now attempt to steer
myself clear of the horribly awk-
ward face-to-standing-stranger’s-
crotch scenario that a crowded
bus ride inevitably yields. I try
just to fll my journey instead of
taking the time to enjoy it. So,
selfshly, I issue a plea to you
lucky on-campus dwellers: keep
my secret, most-likely imagined
club alive. Let me live vicariously
through you. Take the time to
walk, and just try not to love it.
Erin Calhoun is a pre-med student
from Naperville, IL.
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 PAGE 4
S
cientists poison, shock, burn,
torture and kill animals;
animals are treated like
prisoners in laboratories, living
in isolation and misery; humans
do not share the same diseases as
animals.
Tese are the kind of ignorant
statements organizations like
PETA and other animal rights
groups advocate. Tis is part of
PETA’s campaign against the use
of animals in research. Unfor-
tunately, these testimonies of
“animal cruelty” appeal to the
emotional side of many individ-
uals who do not possess a strong
science or health background.
Why do we use non-human
models? To study genetic dis-
orders like Parkinson’s or Down
syndrome, we need to use models
that are genetically similar to
humans. Mice share about 95
percent of its DNA with humans.
Tey are also good models in
looking at addiction or cognition,
because many of our brain circuits
are analogous like the reward
(mesolimbic) pathway. Scientists
use rats in substance abuse studies
because they metabolize alcohol
and drugs at a similar rate to
humans. Chick embryos have
provided valuable insights into
the development of the nervous
system, showing how cells migrate
and diferentiate. We can look at
generations of animals in a short
period of time as well as control
the environment to greatly in-
crease the power to detect genetic
efects.
Why can’t we replace non-hu-
man models with non-animal
models as an alternative? Re-
searchers do in fact use math-
ematical models or computer
simulations to predict population
in epidemiology studies. HeLa,
or human cell lines, are a great
example of an immortal cell line
used in cancer research. Tey are
easily cultured and are derived
from human epithelial cells. How-
ever, there are drawbacks in using
cell cultures. Mainly, one does not
know how other systems will be
afected when looking at just cells.
Tis is the splendor of compar-
ative medicine. Researchers use
animal models to observe both
similarities and diferences to gain
insight into the many complex
human biological systems.
Animal research means medical
progress. Whether it is a discovery
of a novel protein, or synthesizing
a new drug or vaccine develop-
ment, animal research has vastly
improved many felds. Tese in-
clude cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS,
birth defects and neurological
disorders, to name a few. Like hu-
mans, animals like your pet cat or
dog also deal with these sorts of
ailments. It is a misconception to
think laboratory animals are treat-
ed cruelly. Before one can work
with the animals, a rigorous train-
ing session is required to go over
proper techniques in handling the
animals. Te Public Health Ser-
vice mandates high-quality hous-
ing, nutrition and veterinary care
for research animals. Research
institutions like universities are
required to have an Institutional
Animal Care and Use Committee.
Te IACUC reviews and approves
research protocols to ensure
proper anesthetics and post-oper-
ational medications are used and
integrated into the studies when
necessary.
At the end of the day, researchers
are saving lives and that’s what
motivates these investigations.
Tere was a poster in my former
lab of a rat to the lef and a little
girl on the right. It said, “Who
would you RAT/HER see live?”
Tis poster embodies the purpose
of biomedical research. While
it seems sad that mice, rats and
chicks are sacrifced, it is for a
common good to save the lives of
humans and animals.
Monica Saha is a frst year Pharmacy
student from Overland Park.
Animal testing advances medical feld progress
Walking to class benefits
more than just your calves
‘Open City’ dissects
self-perception issues
SCIENCE
CAMPUS BOOKS
T
eju Cole is a Nigeri-
an-American writer who
was raised in Nigeria
and moved to the States at age
17. His frst novel, “Open City”
(published 2011), was nominated
for, and won, several awards. Te
novel is narrated by Julius, a Ni-
gerian immigrant living in New
York fnishing the fnal year of his
psychiatry residency. Te beauty
of “Open City” is that you, the
reader, can see yourself in Julius
despite his disparate life circum-
stances. Te events of the book
center around Julius’ increasingly
far-fung walks through the city
of New York (and for some time
a trip to Belgium), the people
he meets, the philosophical
conversations he has with them
and his inner thoughts. Julius’
relationships also play a cen-
tral role in the story: his recent
breakup is perhaps the impetus
for the walks—he visits an elderly
professor he is close with, spends
time with a jazz-loving friend (a
foil to Julius’ passion for classical
music) and meets another girl
later on.
Julius’ conversations with others
and his refections on his own
life and experiences are told with
an intimate, honest tone. Julius
narrates the novel in a retrospec-
tive manner, as if looking back on
his last year in residency in a con-
versation with a close friend, or
perhaps a private diary. Te novel
delves into universal themes like
dealing with loss and death, the
blurred line between sanity and
madness, the still-present racism
here in America and elsewhere,
and the struggle of self and
perception. Tis work is worth
reading because of the truths we
can see about ourselves in it. It’s
worth reading because of the way
it challenges those deep-seated
beliefs we may have about our-
selves. Somewhere in the pages of
the novel you’ll fnd yourself, or
something you can identify with.
In one of the defning mo-
ments of the novel, one character
describes to Julius a time that he
caused great emotional damage to
him/her. Julius had been unaware
of the harm he’d done until this
moment. Tis long-ago wound
redefned the life of the wounded
person; similarly, it redefnes
Julius, both in his self-perception
and in the reader’s eyes. Julius
avers that “...we play, and only
play, the hero, and in the swirl of
other people’s stories, insofar as
those stories concern us at all, we
are never less than heroic... And
so, what does it mean when, in
someone else’s version, I am the
villain?”
Have you had one of these
revelatory moments in which you
realize you’ve been someone else’s
villain, while before you had con-
vinced yourself you were the hero
in your own story? I have. Tese
are moments when I’ve wanted
to rewrite the story, be more
caring, be more understanding,
eface selfsh thoughts in favor of
selfessness. While you may be
the hero of your own story, there’s
a greater human narrative. All
our stories intertwine and mesh
to form this story. It’s the story of
the American Dream, from the
Nigerian immigrant to the son of
a CEO. Or you could say it’s that
of God, Allah, Yahweh, Buddha,
humanism, scientifc progress.
My constant struggle is to orient
and inform my own story in re-
lation to a greater story. In doing
so I hope to be the best version of
myself.
What’s your story? Are you the
hero? What about your profes-
sor’s story? What about your
roommate’s? What about your
RA’s? Are you the hero in theirs
too? Probably not, but your
stories are nevertheless intercon-
nected. I think it’s worthwhile
to consider the ways our stories
connect to others’. Let’s use those
connections to craf an even
better story together.
Jason Bates is a senior majoring in
Chemical Engineering from Overland
Park, Kan. Follow him on Twitter
@schuttebates.
You know you’ve been here too
long when you were around for KU
football’s last road win.
I lay down for a nap and my dog
decides the bone that’s been in his
box all day sounds good now and
proceeds to chew it loudly.
We should have picture day in col-
lege. And it should be the day after
dollar night.
To the gentlemen who was passed
out in front of Nunemaker: I don’t
think you are ready for the honors
program.
Campus road rage: when I’m driving
it’s a crossrun not a crosswalk.
I’m published in the UDK more often
than my friend, and he’s a sports
writer.
So apparently the words “twerk” and
“selfe” have made it into the Oxford
dictionary. They might as well remove
“future” and “optimism.”
Jeff Lang in regards to getting out of
class early: “College students are the
only people I know who want less for
their money.”
There is a Lance Armstrong lookalike
riding his bike on campus!
The opinion pieces on Thursday, 9/12,
were great! Keep up the good work!
I’m hungover. Will you come watch
“Homeward Bound” with me?
I’m watching “Dora the Explorer”
with a 15 month old baby. Am I
bringing sexy back yet?
Just because schol halls are right
next to the Hawk doesn’t mean you
can mack on our porch.
I can tell if you’re a freshman if your
email is still letternumbernumber-
numberletternumbernumbernum-
ber@ku.edu.
When Miley Cyrus gets naked and
licks hammers it’s called art. When-
ever I do it, all I ever get is kicked out
of Home Depot.
AND THE HOME OF THE
CHIEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEFS
Welp. KU football is .500!
Our weekly forecast shows highs in
the 80s, a moderate chance of rain
and 70 percent less sweat dripping
from my body.
Some dude on the bus had iOS7 and
he was trying his damndest to let
everyone know it.
I feel like this is going to be the year
that my parents forget my birthday.
Text your FFA
submissions to
785–289–8351 or
at kansan.com
What business do you wish
would come to Lawrence and
why?
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just
might publish them.
@Gnutt67
@Kansan_Opinion Chuck E. Cheese because
drunken ball pit.
UDK
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
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LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
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The submission should include the author’s name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Dylan Lysen, managing editor
dlysen@kansan.com
Will Webber, opinion editor
wwebber@kansan.com
Mollie Pointer, business manager
mpointer@kansan.com
Sean Powers, sales manager
spowers@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director & content strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
@hannahwv92
@Kansan_Opinion Trader Joe’s! We need some other
organic-y options besides the merc. Plus, everyone
loves TJ!
@MelanieRR
@Kansan_Opinion Valentino’s, it’s pretty much the
greatest thing...even though it started in Nebraska
By Jason Bates
jbates@kansan.com
By Erin Calhoun
ecalhoun@kansan.com
By Monica Saha
msaha@kansan.com
1
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
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WWW.BUSINESSCAREERFAIR.COM · #KUBUSFAIR

BUSINESS
CAREER
FAIR
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 6
Consider practical measures to ad-
vance. Proceed with caution. Maintain
an even keel. Hold judgment in case of
confusion. You're gaining respect. Make
some changes to your work schedule.
Work smarter, not harder.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 6
In a disagreement about priorities,
it's okay to ask questions. Share ideas;
don't hoard them. Tempers could fare.
Face a challenge squarely. Schedule
carefully once the route's determined.
Keep practicing, and you'll get through.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
The schedule is wacky. Keep com-
munication channels open in case of
unexpected developments. Verify info
and sources. Challenge the status quo.
Find affordable ways to improve your
home, and relax with a movie later.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 6
Review investment details. Stay home
instead of going out. Keep it frugal. Let
others solve a distant problem. Follow
through, even with reminders. Be alert
for emotional undercurrents. Courage
and persistence win.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7
Grab an opportunity quickly. Antic-
ipate resistance, and do what really
works. Promises alone won't do it.
Double-check your numbers. Don't
launch yet, but nail the option. Review
instructions and regulations with care
before following through.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is an 8
There may be disagreement about
priorities. Stick to basics or postpone
a meeting. Ask tough questions. Take
care not to provoke jealousies. Review
considerations to make a fnal decision.
When thoughts wander, remember
what's important.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 6
Mind and heart align now. Walk, jog
or run. Take a mental health day. Let
somebody else challenge the status quo
and review facts. Ask them to dig into
the archives for real gems.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 6
A creative venture fops. Face facts.
Accept a new assignment. Take the
long view. You create the price tag. Get
expert advice and team participation.
Your brilliant realization: add more love.
Consider all options.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 6
Public responsibilities take the stage.
Wait for temporary confusion to clear.
Pesky guests or regulations could an-
noy. Splurge just a little. It's a good mo-
ment to ask for a raise. Use creativity.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is an 8
A teacher offers perspective. Research
your next move. Venture farther out.
Don't throw you money away. What feels
good isn't always the best choice. New
information impels a change in plans.
Inspire success with straight questions.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is an 8
Finish an important job. Intuition leads
you to the right resources. Get a partner
to help. If you're going to be late, call.
Finances are unstable. Keep your home
systems functional. Barter and trade.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
Work now and play later. Some innova-
tive ideas won't work. Seek advice from
a wise partner. Keep it all in the family.
You can handle a tough interrogation.
Do the homework, and have a backup
plan.
Te Lied Center stage will
turn blue tonight for its second
performance of the Lied Center
Presents performance series. Te
distinctive style of the Blue Man
Group will enhance audience’s
senses tonight and Tuesday at
7:30 p.m.
Blue Man Group got its start in
1987 in New York and has now
grown into a global phenome-
non. Te unique form of enter-
tainment combines technology,
comedy and music to capture
audiences of all ages. Te group
is currently on its frst North
American tour.
Brian Tavener, who has been a
Blue Man for six years and will be
performing alongside two other
Blue Men on the Lied Center
stage this week, said that this
tour’s show is a spectacle for the
eyes, and is a personal favorite
of his.
“Tis tour has gotten a complete
face-lif on the technology as-
pects of the show, so the audience
can expect a spectacle—it’s a feast
for the eyes just along the lines
of how the show looks,” Tavener
said. “ Also, the four piece band
that plays music the entire show,
which basically represents the
psyche of the Blue Man Group, is
amazing.”
One of the things that draw
most people to the show, Tavener
also said, is that the show is a
constant work in progress that
allows the performers to refect
the culture of the times, and that
is ultimately why the show has
enjoyed such notable success.
“As a Blue Man, I get to be a 110
percent version of Brian Tavener,”
Tavener said.
“I get to be
myself as I
would exist if
we didn’t have
rules, or didn’t
know what was
right or wrong
in our society.
Tat’s what
I like about
being a Blue
Man, it’s like I get to be the baby
that I once was that never knew
anything from anything else. It’s a
beautiful way to experience 2,000
people all at once.”
Blue Man Group is only one
of the many shows that will be
performed as part of Lied Center
Presents this school year. Other
performances this month include
Turkish musician Omar Faruk
Tekbilek as well as the Par-
is-based Hermès Quartet.
University students are at an
advantage when purchasing these
tickets for Lied Center Presents
performances because the Lied
Center is required to hold tickets
that have been subsidized by
the Student Senate, according to
Lied Center Marketing Com-
munications Director, Michele
Berendsen.
“We basically never sell
out of tickets,”
Berendsen said.
“By contract,
we have to keep
tickets up until
the day of. Last
season we came
close to selling
out by about 6
or 7 tickets, but
we never did.”
Tickets for
the Blue Man Group show start
at $35 for University students,
faculty and staf. Students can
save money on other Lied Center
performances this school year
by purchasing a Performing Arts
Pass which allows students into
18 performances for $125.
—Edited by Casey Hutchins
Blue Man Group deliver
unique show to Lied Center
SHOWTIME

“As a Blue Man, I get to be
a 110 percent version of
Brian Tavener.”
BRIAN TAVENER
Blue Man Group
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of the Blue Man Group play unique instruments made from plastic pipes, fexible poles and other unusual
objects.
TOM DEHART
tdehart@kansan.com
Artist: Gogol Bordello
Song: Malandrino
Album: Pura Vida Conspiracy (2013)
Label: ATO
Gogol Bordello is a punk band with its roots in
punk, folk and what some would refer to
as “gypsy music.” Tis song, “Malandrino,” cycles
through a folk-style intro with some classical
guitar, and explodes into a fast, punk-ish beat
with accompanying wind instruments and vio-
lins. At times, the song sounds like two separate
pieces that have been melted together to create a
larger—and more bizarre—track.
—Tom Dehart
Song of the day
Start your week off right with some chill vibes
MUSIC
ATO Records
Follow
@UDKEntertain
on Twitter
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UPDATES ALL DAY LONG?
http://bit.ly/1egHuvQ
Last Tursday, J.K. Rowling, au-
thor of the Harry Potter series, an-
nounced that she will begin writing
the script for her book “Fantastic
Beasts and Where to Find Tem”
as an “extension of the wizarding
world.”
Te fctional character Newt
Scamander, from the Harry Pot-
ter series, wrote “Fantastic Beasts
and Where to Find Tem.” Tis
book, published in 2001, is about
the study of magical creatures, or
Magizoology, and describes the 75
magical species from around the
world.
“Te laws and customs of the hid-
den magical society will be familiar
to anyone who has read the Harry
Potter books or seen the flms, but
Newt’s story will start in New York,
70 years before Harry’s gets under-
way,” Rowling said on her website.
Sophomore Jacob Brainerd from
Clinton, N.C., said he loved ev-
erything J.K. Rowling had written,
but thought “Fantastic Beasts and
Where to Find Tem” was just a
way to milk the Harry Potter fran-
chise.
“I can’t see how they can make it
into a movie,” Brainerd said.
Peyton McNeil, a sophomore
from Topeka, didn’t agree with
Brainerd.
“I think, and hope, that the new
series will be just as good and give
us another series to latch onto and
become a part of for the next few
years,” McNeil said. “We basical-
ly grew up watching them which
made them personal…maybe these
series will be the equivalent to
the Harry Potter series but for the
younger generations now.”
Rowling has been entertaining
thousands for the past 16 years, up
through the last Harry Potter mov-
ie in 2011.
“I always said that I would only
revisit the wizarding world if I had
an idea that I was really excited
about and this is it,” Rowling said
on her website.
No date has been released as to
when the flm will be underway,
but keep an eye on Rowling’s web-
site, www.jkrowling.com, for all the
newest updates..
— Edited by Sarah Kramer
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
““AADDDDIINNNGG AA BBBUUUSSIIINNNEESSSS MMMIIINNNOORR PPUUUTTTTSSS MMMOOORRREE
OOOFFFF OOUUURRR SSKKIILLLLLSS OONN TTTHHEEE FFFIIEEELLLLDDDD..””
—— JO JONN & KA K RE REN, N, SPO P RT RTS S MA MANA NAGE GE GEMME ME M NT NT MMAJ AJOR ORSS
We We W mmmade a a mi minno or r dee decciisi sion on tthat
ma m de de a major diif ifffe ferreenc nce.
Now you can have something more
to talk about. Add a business minor
before September 20th and give
your resume a louder voice.
Visi sit t www.business.ku.ed edu/ u/minnor
EXPECTO PATRONUM
Rowling announces plans for next wizarding world flm
CASSIDY RITTER
critter@kansan.com
ASSOCIATED PRESS
British author J.K. Rowling poses for the release of ‘The Casual Vacancy’ on Sept. 27, 2012, at Southbank Centre in London.

“I think, and hope, that
the new series will be just
as good.”
PEYTON MCNEIL
Sophomore from Topeka, Kan.
Follow
@KansanEntertain
on Twitter
CONCERT REVIEW
Country music festival exceeds expectations for frst-time viewer
Aside from the hats, boots,
blinged-out jeans and Afiction
T-shirts, country concerts have a lot
to ofer.
Sporting Park hosted Flatlands
Country Music Festival this week-
end. It was the venue’s frst music
festival, and it also happened to be
my frst live country music experi-
ence. I’m not a huge country music
fan and had no idea what to expect
going into the event, but my expe-
rience was much better than I had
anticipated.
The Fans
Country fans are rowdy. Tey
seemed like they were having the
time of their lives and didn’t want
to be anywhere else. Te energy be-
tween them and the performers was
high and it was apparent they were
pumped.
Compared to fans at other shows
I’ve been to, they seemed happier
and more energized.
Although their excitement may
have been amplifed from the beer
drinking as opposed to mindalter-
ing drugs people take at dubstep or
electronic shows.
The Performers
Friday night had a strong setlist:
Drew Six, Kevin Fowler, Tomp-
son Square, Rodney Atkins, Darius
Rucker and Luke Bryan. Te artists
were just as happy to be there as the
fans. Te connection between fans
and performers is very intimate.
Rodney Atkins brought a lot of
energy to the stage. He was on his
knees, belting the lyrics by the sec-
ond song. He threw up his guitar to
switch out between songs and kept
the high intensity throughout the
show.
Darius Rucker was grooving
throughout his performance. Kick-
ing of the night with “Alright” and
“Te Craziest Ting,” the audience
knew he was there to put on a good
show. He shook his hips and danced
around in his snakeskin boots with
a giant grin on his face the entire
time.
Voted Entertainer of the Year by
the Academy of Country Music,
Luke Bryan proved he deserved that
honor. Ladies love Luke Bryan. His
big white smile and tight jeans are
only two reasons why.
Bryan used the entire stage and
his confdence was radiating with
every dance move. Another reason
ladies love him: he gets a little frisky
with his moves. But not all Luke
Bryan fans are women. As I looked
around the audience, everyone
knew the lyrics to all of the songs.
At one point in the show, they
brought out a cooler full of beer and
Bryan started to spray it at the fans.
He welcomed the beer the fans
threw back with open arms.
The Experience
Besides the fans and the perform-
ers, the atmosphere is what makes
a country music festival a country
music festival. Everyone is friendly.
Tere are beer tents everywhere.
Te energy is high throughout the
entire lineup.
Country music fan or not, I advise
anyone looking for a fun time with
energized people to go to a country
concert.
— Edited by Paige Lytle
HANNAH BARLING
hbarling@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Darius Rucker dances on stage while performing on the Flatlands Country Music Festival over the weekend.
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Crowds gather at the Flatlands Country Music Festival, which was held Sept. 12-14. It was the frst music festival to be hosted
at the Sporting Park.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7
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FOOTBALL
TROUBLE ON THE ROAD
Offensive gains from week one win are left at home
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Sophomore Ben Goodman (93) attempts to strip a Rice running back of the ball. The defense was the only postive aspect of the game for the Jayhawks in their frst road loss of the season.
Kansas’ defense was the only thing keeping them in the game. The defense made key stops to force
feld goals as well as a handful of punts. Giving up one offensive touchdown is a good sign for the
defense moving forward, especially considering the pre-game worries about the Kansas defense being
able to hold its ground against a dual-threat quarterback. Rice running back Charles Ross, however,
did earn 5.8 yards per carry on 27 handoffs.
DEFENSE: B
They don’t fail only because James Sims played well. In Jake Heaps’ frst real test, he looked horrible.
Heaps was 13 for 28 with two interceptions and 157 yards and one touchdown. The good part of that
stat line should be credited to Tony Pierson for his 77-yard touchdown run. The only other offensive
touchdown KU scored was because of an Isaiah Johnson interception that he returned to the Rice 16.
It wasn’t all Heaps’ fault though: drops plagued the Jayhawk wide receivers again – an area they said
should not have any reason for concern prior to Saturday’s game.
OFFENSE: D-
Transfer punter Trevor Pardula got a lot of action Saturday and did his job fairly well. Rice defenders
did get their hands on two punts in the fourth quarter, though. Kicker Matthew Wyman had a big
chance to give KU a cushion when they were up 14-13 in the third quarter, but Wyman pulled the
47-yarder wide left.
SPECIAL TEAMS: C
A week after spreading carries around on the running back crew, James Sims has 19 carries com-
pared to two for Darrian Miller and one each for Brandon Bourbon and Tony Pierson. Pierson made
some magic in the frst quarter with a 77-yard TD, but only touched the ball fve times in the game.
Backup quarterback Michael Cummings also came on for a third and long situation in the third
quarter. Not a great sign.
COACHING: D
Follow
@KansanSports
on Twitter
WANT SPORTS UPDATES ALL DAY LONG?
“For the second week in a row
I think our passing game has
been inadequate.”
- Charlie Weis
QUOTE OF THE GAME
Weis
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Junior quarterback Jake Heaps (9) looks down feld for an open receiver in Saturday’s 14-23 loss to Rice.
CHRIS HYBL
chybl@kansan.com
CONNOR OBERKROM
coberkrom@kansan.com
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8
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MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Sophomore cornerback Brandon Hollomon attempts to block a catch by Rice. The Owls beat the Jahawks in Saturday’s game.
GLASS HALF FULL
GLASS HALF EMPTY
GOOD, BAD OR JUST PLAIN STUPID
GAME BALL
DELAY OF THE GAME
LOOKING AHEAD
RECYCLE,
RECYCLE,
RECYCLE,
RECYCLE.
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Junior lineback Ben Heeney dives past Rice freshman Joe Ballard for a pass.
While the offense struggled Saturday, the Jayhawks defense held Rice to fewer than 200 yards passing
and held Trevor McHargue, the dual-threat Rice QB, to -3 yards rushing. The defense also came up big
with two turnovers, both INT’s by Isiah Johnson and Dexter McDonald. A&M gave up 21 points in just
one half to the Owls last week and the Jayhawks yielded 17 over the course of the game, so a silver
lining is sort of there.
The offense was a little lethargic and then some. Besides a 77-yard catch and dash by Tony Pierson,
the Jayhawks mustered just 193 total yards of offense. Heaps accuracy and poise just wasn’t there
as he was fushed out of the pocket and the disruption in the Rice defense caused Heaps to throw
2 INT’s including one pick six. The offensive development just wasn’t there and even the rushing
attack, while piling up 100 yards, averaged a meager 2.9 yards per carry as Rice stacked the box
throughout the game begging for Heaps to beat them. He didn’t, fnishing the night 13-for-28 total-
ing 157 yards passing with two picks and just one score.
This was a chance for Kansas to alter some thoughts around the program that they’re heading in
the right direction, but that was almost the polar opposite on Saturday. They had a chance to break
the road losing streak and beat an above average opponent, but none of that happened as another
disappointing Kansas road loss is in the books.
While the offense certainly didn’t amount to much, the defense really made a statement by showing
that they have some talent returning and some new faces that can play. Ben Heeney was all over the
feld, and when he wasn’t making tackles he was always near the ball. He fnished the night with 15
tackles, including 2.5 tackles for a loss.
The game plan that Charlie Weis laid was rather weak and didn’t seem to make much sense. Weis,
who said last week he wanted to pound the ball, seemed like that’s what he wanted the teams’
identity to be. However, he went away from that on Saturday, only handing the ball off to James Sims,
Darrian Miller and Tony Pierson a combined 22 times. Not a good showing for Weis, who clearly wanted
to be an offense that sets up the run with the pass, instead of vice versa.
Kansas now faces Louisiana Tech, who fnished the season 9-3 last year. But now, without Sonny
Dykes, the new coach Skip Holtz has gotten off to a rocky start already compiling two losses to NC
State and Tulane. While Louisiana Tech may be worse than Rice, they are certainly no pushover, prov-
ing that with their record last year. It should make for a close one in Lawrence on Saturday.
FINAL THOUGHT
Did Kansas fans expect to beat Rice? No, probably not, but they at least expected a little more fre. The
Kansas football program had a chance to take a step forward, but they failed to do that with some
regretful coaching decisions and some sloppy QB play. They didn’t take a step backwards however,
as they were in the game most of the time, showcasing some good defense, but the offense certainly
hasn’t done much to inspire a whole lot of confdence so far this season. Once Big 12 play comes
around, they better be more sensible and well-prepared, because it will only get harder from here.
KANSAS
23-14
RE S UL T S
RICE KANSAS
1
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9
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The Universily of Kansas School of ßusiness
PRESENTS
WALTER S. SUTTON
LECTURE SERIES
ROGER W. FERGUSON, JR.
Iresidenl and
Chief Lxeculive Òh cer,
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10th Anniversary Series
Can We Fix the Decit? with former Congressmen,
Jim Slattery (D) & Tom Tauke (R)
Monday, Sept. 23, Dole Institute
3:00 p.m. - The Decit Workshop & 7:30 p.m. - Fixing the Decit
What would you do to x the nation’s budget? In true Dole Institute bipartisan spirit,
this two-part program will explore the complexities of our nation’s budget with
members of both parties. e day will begin with a “workshop,” led by Slattery and
Tauke, where attendees will engage in small group, hands-on discussion and negotia-
tion of how to solve the growing decit. Join us that evening for a discussion on the
importance of dealing with the decit and how it can be done in bipartisan fashion.
Study Groups with Fall 2013 Fellow Sarian Bouma
Exploring Untapped Markets: Global Entrepreneurship
& Politics
Private entrepreneurs and businesses innovate, produce, and compete vigorously.
Entrepreneurs take incredible risk. It’s important to nd the best resources and
understand what the government can do for you, and to you. Dole Fellow Sarian
Bouma will explore the art of entrepreneurship, the role of government, and oppor-
tunities to go global. Made possible, in part, with support from AT&T.
4:00-5:30 p.m. Wednesdays
Sept. 18, 25; Oct. 2, 9, 23, 30; Nov. 6
MAKE YOUR PROFESSORS PROUD
Attend programs at the Dole Institute
All programs are free, open to the public and held at the Dole Institute
e Dole Institute of Politics is located on West Campus, next to the Lied Center
www.DoleInstitute.org 785.864.4900 Facebook/Twitter
Student
Opportunities
Neutral Ground: “Resolved: The Death Penalty Shall
Be Abolished”
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2, Dole Institute
Our popular issue debate program, Neutral Ground, returns! At a time when ratio-
nal discourse is at an all-time low, the Dole Institute provides a forum for measured
and civil debate. Join us as advocates argue this important topic complete with
expert witnesses.
A+
D) & o
. 23, Dole Inst
he Decit Works
u do to x the nation’s
rogram will explore the complexities of our nation’s budg
oth parties. e day will begin with a “workshop,” led by S
attendees will engage in small group, hands-on discussion
o solve the growing decit. Join us that evening for a discus
of dealing with the decit and how it can be done in bipartisan fashion
al Ground: “Resolved: The Death Penalty Shall
bolished”
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2, Dole Inst
popular issue debate program, Neutral Ground, returns! At a time w
iscourse is at an all-time low, the Dole Institute provides a forum fo
civil debate. Join us as advocates argue this important topic complet
ert witnesses.
Pizza & Politics: FREE PIZZA LUNCH ON CAMPUS
Going Global on Health: KU’s Connection to the World Health
Organization
Tuesday, Sept. 17, 12:00-1:15 p.m., Centennial Rm, KS Union
Dr. Steve Fawcett, Director of the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre
for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas, and Ithar Has-
saballa, Masters of Public Health and PhD Student in Applied Behavioral Science,
will present on how we, as students, can contribute to global health. e program
will focus on how KU is a part of the global fabric and the interconnectedness from
Geneva to New York City to campus.
FAMU alumnus shot after surviving crash
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Te dead-
ly encounter was set in motion
when a former college football
player survived a wreck and went
searching for help in the middle
of the night. A frightened woman
heard him pounding and opened
her front door, then called police.
Ofcers found the unarmed man,
and one shot him when a taser
failed to stop him from approach-
ing.
Within hours, investigators
determined that the shooting had
been excessive and charged the
Charlotte-Mecklenburg police
ofcer with voluntary manslaugh-
ter in the death of former Florida
A&M University football player
Jonathan A. Ferrell.
Ferrell, 24, played for Florida
A&M in 2009 and 2010, school of-
fcials said Sunday. He had recently
moved to North Carolina.
Early Saturday, he had appar-
ently been in a wreck and was
seeking help at a nearby house,
according to a statement from
Charlotte-Mecklenburg police. A
woman answered the door and,
when she didn't recognize the
man, called 911.
Ofcers responding to the break-
ing and entering call found Ferrell
a short distance from the home,
police said. As they approached
him, Ferrell ran
toward the of-
cers, who tried
to stop him with
a taser. Police
said he contin-
ued to run to-
ward them when
ofcer Randall
Kerrick fred
his gun, hitting
Ferrell several
times. Ferrell died at the scene.
Police called Ferrell and Kerrick's
initial encounter "appropriate and
lawful." But in their statement late
Saturday, they said "the inves-
tigation showed that the subse-
quent shooting of Mr. Ferrell was
excessive" and "Kerrick did not
have a lawful right to discharge his
weapon during this encounter."
Police said Kerrick was charged
with voluntary manslaughter,
which under North Carolina law
involves killing without malice us-
ing "excessive force" in exercising
"imperfect self-defense."
Police were not expected to ofer
further details Sunday, said Ofcer
Keith Trietley, a department
spokesman.
Te report was
not available
Sunday.
Kerrick, 27, of
Midland, turned
himself in for
booking Satur-
day evening and
was released on
$50,000 bond,
according to
the Mecklenburg County Sherif's
Ofce website. Kerrick joined the
police force in April 2011. He has
a frst appearance court hearing
scheduled for Monday.
FAMU Interim Athletic Director
Michael Smith said Ferrell played
the safety position for the school's
football team during the 2009 and
2010 seasons.
"Our hearts and prayers go out
to his family during their time of
bereavement," Smith said in an
emailed statement.
A search of public records
indicated that Ferrell began living
in Charlotte early this year afer
moving from Tallahassee, Fla.,
home to FAMU.
Police Chief Rodney Monroe de-
scribed the auto accident in a news
conference: Ferrell was driving a
vehicle that crashed into trees of
a northeast Charlotte road early
Saturday, and the wreck was so
severe he would have had to climb
out of the back window to escape.
Monroe said he didn't know what
caused the crash and didn't say
whether Ferrell sufered injuries.
Ferrell apparently walked about a
half-mile to the nearest house and
was "banging on the door vicious-
ly" to attract attention, Monroe
said. Tinking it was her husband
coming home late from work, the
woman who lives there opened the
door. When she saw Ferrell, she
shut it and called police at about
2:30 a.m., Monroe said.
Monroe said he didn't think the
unarmed Ferrell made threats or
tried to rob the woman.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
CRIME
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jonathan Ferrell is seen in an undated photo provided by Florida A&M University.
Ferrell, 24, was shot and killed Saturday, by North Carolina police offcer Randall
Kerrick after a wreck in Charlotte, N.C. Ferrell was unarmed.

“Our hearts and prayers
go out to his family during
their time of bereavement.”
MICHAEL SMITH
FAMU interim athletic director
DETROIT — Max Scherzer
could only watch as the lead —
and another shot at his 20th win
— slipped away.
Te Detroit right-hander didn't
mind, especially once Alex Avila's
homer put the Tigers ahead again
moments later.
Avila homered twice, including a
tiebreaking solo shot in the eighth
inning that lifed Detroit over the
Kansas City Royals 3-2 Sunday.
Scherzer was in line for his 20th
win when reliever Drew Smyly al-
lowed the Royals to tie it in the top
of the eighth, but Avila answered
with a drive to right-center for his
11th home run this season.
"We're just looking to win the
game," Scherzer said. "I don't
care if I win another game, if we
win our division, that's all that
matters."
Te AL Central-leading Tigers
remained fve games ahead of sec-
ond-place Cleveland, which beat
the Chicago White Sox.
Scherzer has two losses and two
no-decisions since a 19-1 start but
was terrifc Sunday. He allowed a
run and fve hits with 12 strikeouts
and one walk in seven innings. He
was on track to become baseball's
frst 20-game winner this year
when he pitched out of a second-
and-third, one-out jam in the
seventh to preserve a one-run lead.
But Smyly (6-0) allowed a leadof
double to Alcides Escobar in the
eighth. Afer a fyout by Alex
Gordon, Emilio Bonifacio struck
out - with Escobar stealing third
on the third strike.
With Eric Hosmer batting, Smyly
bounced a wild pitch that didn't
skip too far away from Avila. Hos-
mer, who hits lef-handed, stood
and motioned to Escobar, who
gambled by trying to score.
Avila jumped up to retrieve the
ball, which had bounced up the
frst-base line - but the Detroit
catcher plowed right into Hosmer,
who had moved slightly to his
right in an apparent efort to get
out of the way.
Tat collision cost the Tigers any
chance to catch Escobar. Tigers
manager Jim Leyland came out to
discuss the play with plate umpire
James Hoye, but the run stood.
"It wasn't interference," Avila
said. "It was the right call. It was
just a weird situation."
Avila's homer in the bottom half
put the Tigers back on top. Afer a
poor start at the plate, Avila is hit-
ting .313 since the All-Star break.
"Just trying to hit the ball hard.
Tere's nothing that I changed,
there's no magic or secret to it,"
Avila said. "I'm just having some
luck, some good swings and hit-
ting the ball hard, really."
Joaquin Benoit got three outs for
his 20th save in 20 chances.
Jeremy Guthrie (14-11) pitched
all eight innings for the Royals,
who remained 3.5 games back in
the AL wild-card race.
"I thought he could get us to the
end. In hindsight, I pushed him
too far, but I thought he could get
us through the bottom of the order
and maybe get the win or turn it
over to the pen with a tie game,"
Kansas City manager Ned Yost
said. "He did a lot of bending, but
he didn't break."
Guthrie allowed three runs and
13 hits. He struck out four and
walked one.
Avila's frst homer was a two-run
drive in the second. Gordon hit a
solo homer for Kansas City in the
fourth.
Detroit lef 10 men on base. In
the ffh, Miguel Cabrera led of
with a single and Prince Fielder
followed with a double. Tey were
stranded when Guthrie retired
Victor Martinez, Andy Dirks and
Omar Infante on consecutive
groundouts.
Gordon's solo homer down the
line in right feld to lead of the
fourth made it 2-1, and Bonifacio
followed with a single. Scherzer
found a groove afer that, retiring
10 of 11 with nine strikeouts
before a one-out single by Salvador
Perez in the seventh.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Despite comeback, Royals leave without victory in Detroit
MLB
BRIAN HILLIX
bhillix@kansan.com
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 10
CHICAGO — Jay Cutler came
through just in time again.
Cutler threw a 16-yard touch-
down pass to Martellus Bennett
with 10 seconds lef to lead the
Chicago Bears to a 31-30 victory
over the Minnesota Vikings on
Sunday.
Minnesota’s Blair Walsh had just
kicked a 22-yard feld goal with
3:15 remaining when Chicago took
over at its 34. Cutler, who led the
Bears back from an 11-point defcit
in a season-opening win over Cin-
cinnati, struck again.
A 23-yard pass to Bennett along
the sideline put the ball on the 16.
Cutler then spiked the ball before
connecting with Bennett in the
front corner of the end zone. Rob-
bie Gould kicked the go-ahead
extra point and Chicago (2-0) re-
mained unbeaten under new coach
Marc Trestman despite committing
four turnovers.
Cutler completed 28 of 39 pass-
es for 290 yards and three touch-
downs. But he was also intercepted
twice and got stripped by Jared Al-
len on a sack, leading to a 61-yard
touchdown return for Brian Robi-
son in the second quarter.
Devin Hester returned fve kick-
ofs for a Bears-record 249 yards
— including a 76-yarder and an
80-yarder.
Bennett had 76 yards receiving
and two touchdowns. Brandon
Marshall had seven catches for 113
yards and a touchdown. Matt Forte
chipped in with 71 yards receiving
and 90 yards rushing.
Minnesota’s Cordarrelle Patter-
son returned the opening kickof
105 yards. Christian Ponder threw
for 227 yards, a touchdown and an
interception afer getting picked of
three times in a season-opening
loss to Detroit. Adrian Peterson ran
for 100 yards, but the Vikings (0-2)
remained winless at Soldier Field
since 2007.
Tey looked as if they might
pull this one out afer two 13-play
drives led to 28-yard feld goals by
Walsh, turning a 24-21 halfime
defcit into a 27-24 advantage in the
fourth quarter.
Te frst came afer Chicago’s
Isaiah Frey recovered a fumble by
Jarius Wright in the end zone, only
to have it overturned on a replay
review. Harrison Smith set up the
second when he intercepted a long-
pass from Cutler to Marshall at the
12 on the frst play of the fourth
quarter. Peterson kept the drive
going with a 4-yard run to the 14
on fourth-and-1, and Walsh boot-
ed the go-ahead feld goal with just
over 8 minutes lef.
Letroy Guion stripped Forte of
the ball near midfeld on Chicago’s
next possession. Tat led to Walsh’s
22-yarder that made it a six-point
game, but Cutler and the Bears had
one more rally in them.
Patterson got this one of to an
explosive start, taking advantage of
some big holes and sprinting past
a lunging Gould on the way to the
end zone. Te 105-yarder matched
the club record set by Percy Harvin
last year and was the frst kickof
return for a touchdown by a Bears
opponent since 2007.
Cardiac Cutler leads Bears to victory
NFL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (6) pumps his fst after throwing a touchdown pass to tight end Martellus Bennett during the frst half of an NFL football game
against the Minnesota Vikings, Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013, in Chicago.
VOLLEYBALL
Jayhawks sweep weekend
tournament in Wisconsin
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Senior setter Erin McNorton launches the ball to her teammate during the Arkansas game on Sept. 7.
ofensive run for themselves with
swarming defense. Sophomore
midfelder Hanna Kallmaier drib-
bled to midfeld before sending a
long pass to senior forward Car-
oline Kastor. Kastor seemed to
have the goalkeeper beat, but her
shot proved to not have enough
power, and gave goalie Madalyn
Schifel plenty of time to catch
the ball.
Te Jayhawks had one fnal
opportunity to score with 15 sec-
onds lef. Junior defender Haley
Yearout sent a corner kick toward
the goal, but Fletcher’s shot on
goal went wide right.
Before this weekend, the
Jayhawks were looking for-
ward to getting back on track
on their home feld. Tey were
2-0 at home before the Kansas
Invitational; now they are 2-2 and
looking for answers.
Te last Jayhawk goal came in
the match against Arizona on
Sept. 6. Arizona came back to
force a tie with the Jayhawks, who
couldn’t protect or extend their
lead that day. Afer that came the
loss to Arizona State, as well as
Friday’s loss to San Diego 2-0.
Francis said his team played
well Friday against San Diego
and lost because of two mental
mistakes. He said his team lost
track of members of the opposing
team, which San Diego midfeld-
er Taylor Housley took advantage
of, scoring both goals. Other than
that, Kansas defended soundly
and played well enough to win.
Now, Friday seems like it was
just part of the current Jayhawk
slump.
“We have to show up and get
a goal Friday to get back on the
winning track,” Francis said.
Kansas drops to 3-4-1 and 2-2 at
home. Up next is a road matchup
against South Dakota State and a
home game against Illinois State
next weekend.
— Edited by Sarah Kramer
SOCCER FROM PAGE 12
Kansas went 3-0 in Madison,
Wisc., over the weekend to win the
InnTowner Invitational, its second
tournament championship this
season.
Te Jayhawks (7-3) beat host team
Wisconsin and closed the tourna-
ment with two consecutive fve-set
victories to claim the title, adding to
their frst place fnish at the Arizona
Invitational.
With a winning stretch of nine-
out-of-10 road matches to open
the season, the team has dubbed
themselves “Road Warriors.” Te
Jayhawks backed up that claim afer
fnishing with a 7-2 record on the
road.
“Road matches are the hardest
ones to play,” said Tiana Dockery,
sophomore outside hitter.
“We had to push through and
work hard, and I think we showed
that mentality this weekend.”
Te Jayhawks started strong, rac-
ing to a three-set victory over the
Milwaukee Panthers with a score
of 25-20, 25-18 and 25-10 in just
one hour and 15 minutes. Junior
outside hitter Chelsea Albers and
Dockery led the team with 10 kills
each. Albers also contributed fve
blocks.
In the primetime match of the
tournament Friday night, Kansas
took on No. 25 Wisconsin, who was
undefeated at 6-0 and about to play
in its home opener. With 3,490 in
attendance, the Badgers stormed
out and took the frst two sets of the
match.
Kansas responded afer the break
and built an early fve point lead in
the third. Redshirt senior middle
blocker Caroline Jarmoc landed
four kills in the set and senior setter
Erin McNorton had 13 assists to
pace the ofense. Wisconsin didn’t
lead the entire set as the Jayhawks
gained momentum and quieted the
home crowd.
Down 3-0 to start the fourth set,
Kansas used a 14-7 run to gain the
advantage and force a decisive ffh
set.
Wisconsin served for the match
leading 14-13 and 15-14, but kills
by junior outside hitter Sara Mc-
Clinton erased both match points.
Tied at 15-all, an attack error by
the Badgers gave the Jayhawks a
match point of their own. A block
by freshman middle blocker Tayler
Soucie and Albers sealed the match
to give Kansas
its frst win over
a ranked team
this season with
a score of 22-25,
21-25, 25-20,
25-21 and 17-
15. Coach Ray
Bechard said the
match gave his
squad great ex-
perience playing
in a difcult road atmosphere.
“You can’t simulate this in prac-
tice,” Bechard said. “Tis match got
the players to experience that kind
of environment with that kind of
pressure.”
Dockery led all players with 21
kills in the match while Jarmoc
contributed 17. Erin McNorton
tied her season-high with 58 assists,
and senior libero Brianne Riley
anchored the defense with 28 digs.
One match away from clinching
the title, the Jayhawks took on
the Bowling Green Falcons (1-6)
Saturday afernoon. Better than
their record suggests, the Falcons
battled back from a 2-1 set defcit to
force a ffh set. In arguably its best
set of the match, Kansas scored fve
points in a row to take a 7-2 lead.
Up 11-8, the Jayhawks won the last
four points of the match to claim
the championship 25-22, 22-25,
25-18, 23-25 and 15-8. Jarmoc
and Dockery continued their hot
play with 41 combined kills, while
Riley set the tone with 31 digs, a
season-high.
Jarmoc was named the tourna-
ment’s Most Valuable Player afer
producing 42 kills and a teamhigh
18 blocks for the tournament. Riley
and Dockery were also named to
the All-Tournament team. Riley led
the Jayhawk defense with 71 digs
for the tournament while Dockery
aided the ofense with 36 kills.
Te Jayhawks are now 3-1 in fve-
set matches for the season with all
three wins coming on the road.
“You’ve got to be determined
and have a
tough mind-
set,” Bechard
said. “When we
needed to buckle
down, we were
able to do that.”
Last year,
Kansas opened
the season with
seven of its frst
10 matches at
home. Senior defensive specialist
Jaime Mathieu said the opening
slate of matches this year will better
prepare the team for the rest of the
season.
“We’re learning how to handle ad-
versity and we’re encountering sit-
uations we’re not used to,” Mathieu
said. “It will get us ready for the
postseason and we’ll be more ready
than we were last year.”
Kansas has now faced teams in the
Pac 12, SEC, Big Ten and Big East
this season. Te Jayhawks stand 3-2
against teams in power conferences.
“We’ve run into a lot of good
teams and we’ll be a better team for
it,” Bechard said. “It’s going to chal-
lenge us to be the best we can be.”
Te Jayhawks now begin a fve-
game home stretch starting on
Friday, Sept. 20, with the Kansas
Invitational. Te experience gained
from the road matches will go a
long way in helping the Jayhawks
reach new heights this season.
“We’re prepared for anything,”
McClinton said.
—Edited by Paige Lytle

“We had to push through
and work hard, and I think
we showed that mentality
this weekend.”
TIANA DOCKERY
Sophomore outside hitter
D
uring the ofseason this last year,
it was revealed that the Universi-
ty of Alabama would play Texas
A&M in week three of the college football
season, which led to the most hyped game
for the current season.
Tis past weekend the two teams played
and they defnitely did not disappoint.
Although the Aggies struggled in the
frst half, they made a great comeback in
the second half, barely losing by a single
touchdown. Teir comeback was led by
the one and only Johnny Manziel. For
those who don’t know, Johnny likes to stir
up trouble on and of the feld. He’s just a
guy trying to live the college life, but can’t
because he is so scrutinized by the media
for being the Heisman trophy winner.
Honestly, Manziel didn’t have a bad game.
He threw for 464 yards, ran for 98 yards,
and had fve touchdowns.
What hurt him and the Aggies were his
two interceptions. Te Aggies terrible
defense also hurt them.
Tey gave up 568 total yards and 42
points to the Crimson Tide. One of
Manziel’s interceptions was returned for a
touchdown, giving Alabama a total of 49
points for the game. Te Aggies can’t keep
relying on Johnny Manziel in order to win
games; their defense needs to step up their
game also.
On the other side of the ball were the
Alabama Crimson Tide. Led by their
star quarterback A.J. McCarron, who
had 334 yards and four touchdowns with
no interceptions, the Tide won 49-42.
What made it an even more impressive
win was the fact that they won on the
road, at the historic Kyle Field in College
Station. Although their defense started
to slip at the end of the game, they were
able to hold Manziel enough to prevent
him from making a comeback. Te Tide
forced two interceptions, returning one for
a touchdown. Te interception by Vinnie
Sunseri returned for a touchdown was fun
to watch as he sidestepped Johnny Manziel
on his way to the end zone. It was a poor
display of defense by Manziel and made
many people wonder why he can’t tackle.
Tis football game will be considered
one of the best
of the entire season, and I will
absolutely agree with that. It was a great
game. Maybe with the win, the Crimson
Tide will be able to shut the media up
about Johnny Manziel. It would be nice to
hear about something other than Johnny
Manziel on ESPN.
—Edited by Sarah Kramer
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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 11

!
?
“I’m so proud of our players for the resil-
iency they showed getting behind 14-0,
just slowly and methodically coming back
in the game and building up the lead.”
— Nick Saban
head coach of Alabama’s football team
QUOTE OF THE DAY
FACT OF THE DAY
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
By Michael Portman
mportman@kansan.com
This week in athletics
Saturday Sunday
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
NO SCHEDULED
EVENTS
Men’s Golf
Ram Masters Invitational
All day
Fort Collins, Colo.
Volleyball
North Dakota State
Noon
Lawrence, Kan.
Soccer
Illinois State
1 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Football
Louisiana Tech
11 a.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Men’s Golf
Ram Masters Invitational
All day
Fort Collins, Colo.
Women’s Golf
Louisville Cardinal Cup
All day
Simpsonville, Ky.
Soccer
South Dakota State.
6 p.m.
Brookings, S.D.
Volleyball
Notre Dame
1 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Volleyball
Georgia
7 p.m.
Lawrence, Kan.
Women’s Golf
Louisville Cardinal Cup
All day
Simpsonville, Ky.
NO SCHEDULED
EVENTS
Q: How many turnovers did the Aggies
have?
A: Two
— ESPN.com
The Texas A&M Aggies had 60 more total
yards than the Alabama Crimson Tide,
yet still lost the game.
— ESPN.com
Alabama victory possibly best game of season
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Te
Kansas City Chiefs are playing
mistake-free football for the frst
time in years.
Te result so far under Andy
Reid has been winning football.
Alex Smith threw for 223 yards
and two touchdowns, and the
Chiefs defense held when it
needed to in the fourth quarter
for a 17-16 victory over the Dallas
Cowboys on Sunday.
Te Chiefs haven't committed
a turnover through the frst two
weeks, and that may be the biggest
reason they've already matched
their win total from all of last year.
Tey're of to a 2-0 start for just
the second time since 2005.
Jamaal Charles had a touchdown
run for the Chiefs, who also got
impassioned play from their
defense for the second straight
week. Tey've allowed only one
touchdown through two games
afer forcing the Cowboys to settle
for three feld goals by Dan Bailey
on Sunday.
Te most important stop came
with 3:55 lef. Tony Romo threw
three straight incompletions to
force Bailey to hit a 53-yarder to
pull within 17-16, but the Cow-
boys defense couldn't get the ball
back quickly enough to have a shot
at a winning drive.
Romo fnished 30 of 42 for 298
yards for the Cowboys (1-1). His
favorite target was Dez Bryant,
who had nine catches for 141
yards and their only touchdown.
Te Chiefs, coming of an
uplifing win at Jacksonville, were
amped for Reid's frst game as
their coach at Arrowhead Stadi-
um. A capacity crowd roared when
they rolled onto the feld in all-red
uniforms, departing from their
traditional white pants to signify
the start of a new era.
Tey kept right on rolling, too.
Kansas City marched 77 yards on
the opening series, the highlight
coming when Smith scrambled
17 yards on third-and-15 and
executed a Fosbury Flop over a
defender for a frst down. Smith
capped the drive with a short TD
toss to Charles.
Tat's when the Romo-to-Bryant
connection got on track.
Bryant outwrestled cornerback
Brandon Flowers for a 53-yard
catch down the Dallas sideline that
helped set up Bailey's 51-yard feld
goal. Later in the quarter, Bryant
beat Flowers for a 38-yard recep-
tion that set up his own 2-yard TD
catch and gave Dallas a 10-7 lead.
Te Cowboys blocked Ryan
Succop's 57-yard feld-goal try
to carry their lead into halfime,
and then Bryant caught three
more passes on the frst drive of
the third quarter to get Dallas in
scoring position again. Tis time,
Bailey knocked through a 30-yard-
er to pad the lead.
Te Chiefs answered with their
best drive of the game. Smith hit
Donnie Avery for 31 yards to con-
vert a third-and-10, and then hit
Dwayne Bowe on a 12-yard slant.
through blown coverage to give
Kansas City a 14-13 lead late in the
third quarter.
Dallas fumbled on its next two
possessions — Lance Dunbar
coughed it up frst and then Romo
was strip-sacked by Ron Parker.
But the Cowboys defense stifened
each time, frst forcing a feld goal
and then getting a sack from Bruce
Carter to push the Chiefs out of
feld-goal range.
Te Cowboys marched deep into
Chiefs territory, but again Dallas
couldn't fnd the end zone.
By the time Romo got the ball
back in his hands, there wasn't
any time lef for some late-game
heroics.
Chiefs knock off Dallas Cowboys, remain undefeated
NFL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kansas City Chiefs coach Andy Reid pumps his fst to the crowd following an NFL football game against the Dallas Cowboys at
Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Mo., on Sunday. The Chiefs won 17-16.
Volume 126 Issue 14 kansan.com Monday, September 16, 2013
FOOTBALL REWIND
VOLLEYBALL
PAGE 7-8
PAGE 10
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Blake Schuster
bschuster@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Kansas offense
lacks identity
Houston -- Moments afer
a 23-14 Kansas loss to Rice,
the Jayhawks players said they
were moving on, to next week’s
matchup with Louisiana Tech in
Lawrence, and putting this game
in the past.
But the disappointment on their
faces couldn’t be masked.
A year ago, the Jayhawks
dropped the second game of the
season to Rice at home. Tat was
the beginning of an 11-game
losing streak that lasted the
remainder of the season.
“It’s not going to spiral,” senior
linebacker Ben Heeney said of the
loss, on Saturday. “We’ll be ready
for next week.”
Whether or not Kansas can do
what it couldn’t last season, and
bounce back from a disappointing
loss, remains to be determined on
future Saturdays. But this one was
painful for the Jayhawks, as they
had the ball and the lead in the
fourth quarter afer an intercep-
tion by cornerback Dexter Mc-
Donald at the Rice six-yard line.
Afer gaining one frst down,
the Jayhawks were forced to punt
from their 24-yard line, and it
was blocked giving Rice the ball
at midfeld. Te Owls kicked a
56-yard feld goal to take a 16-14
lead.
“We shot ourselves in the foot
tonight,” running back James
Sims said.
Te game was marked by a slew
of dropped passes, as well as two
frst-half interceptions thrown by
quarterback Jake Heaps, one of
which was returned 52 yards by
Rice linebacker Michael Kutzler
for a touchdown.
Sims rushed for 109 yards on 19
carries, but following the game he
was focused on why the ofensive
unit failed as a
group.
“We were
supposed to
come out and
start the game
of fast,” Sims
said. “We
played at kind
of a slow pace,
which is what
they wanted.
Tey did a good job, I give them
credit. But we’re better than what
we showed tonight.”
Rice averaged 31 points per
game last season, but was held
to 16 by the Jayhawks defense.
Coach Charlie Weis said the
defense could feel good about
their play, despite the outcome of
the game.
“You hold ‘em to 16 points, that
should be good enough to win,”
Weis said.
Heeney
agreed, and
said the defense
played well in all
areas. Te Jay-
hawks intercept-
ed two passes,
balancing out
the two thrown
by Heaps in
the frst half.
Tey stopped Rice on important
possessions.
“It hurts knowing that the
defense did a great job out there,”
James Sims said. “Tey made stop
afer stop. We have to capitalize
on that.”
Kansas had an opportunity to
end a humiliating streak for the
program, a stretch of four years
without a win on the road.
It was a chance for this team
to separate themselves from the
losing ways of past Kansas teams.
In the end that chance slipped
through the Jayhawks’ grasp
just like so many of the passes
that receivers couldn’t hold onto
against Rice.
“We dropped some big ones
in this game,” Weis said. “Te
bottom line is, whether you win
or lose, it’s a group efort.”
In the locker room, Weis told
the players to put the loss to Rice
in the past, learn from it and
move forward.
“We’re going to bounce back
from this,” Sims said. “Tis is just
a bump in the road for us.”
— Edited by Paige Lytle
MAX GOODWIN
mgoodwin@kansan.com

“We shot ourselves in the
foot tonight.”
JAMES SIMS
Kansas running back
FOWL PLAY
Owls outrun struggling Jayhawk offense on Saturday’s road game
RICE CAKES
Te scoring drought extended for
the Kansas soccer team (3-4-1), as
it fell to San Francisco 1-0 Sunday.
Te drought included shutouts in
the two games over the weekend at
the Kansas Invitational and a 4-0
loss last weekend to Arizona State.
Te lone goal of the match
against San Francisco came 37
minutes into the game of a Dons
corner. San Francisco freshman
midfelder Katherine Woodrum
kicked the corner into the middle
of the pack in front of the Kansas
goal and senior forward Kelsey
Moe tapped the ball in for her frst
goal of the season. But between
these two events, something
strange happened.
As the ball found the crowd of
players, it was sent toward the
net and Kansas junior goalkeeper
Kaitlyn Stroud kicked the ball out.
It’s possible the ball went over the
crossbar and out of play, but that
call was never made and the ball
dropped back onto the feld of play
before fnding the back of the net.
However, the Jayhawks didn’t
lose because of that one play. It
was their inability to capitalize on
scoring opportunities that caused
their loss.
“Tere were plenty of opportu-
nities,” coach Mark Francis said.
“We’ve got to fgure it out ofen-
sively. We scored one goal in the
last four games. You are not going
to win many games doing that.”
Kansas outshot San Francisco
19-12, with 11 of the Jayhawk shots
coming in the second half.
Junior midfelder Jamie Fletcher
led the team with six shots.
Te set-up on many plays could
have resulted in a goal, but the
execution and fnishing touches
were not there.
With 17 minutes lef in the
match, the Jayhawks turned an of-
fensive attack by the Dons into an
STELLA LIANG
sliang@kansan.com
Jayhawks’offense strains against San Francisco
SOCCER
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Kansas Jayhawks offensive linesman Mike Smithburg (65) looks to the ground as the Kansas Jayhawks are defeated by Rice.
EMILY WITTLER/KANSAN
Junior midfelder Haley Yearout makes a shot against San Diego defender Ashley Christensen on Friday’s game. SEE SOCCER PAGE 10
Charlie Weis probably isn’t too
sure what this Kansas ofense is
capable of. For that matter, neither
is anyone else watching the team.
When you turn over a large por-
tion of your roster, how can you
judge it afer only two games?
As nice and fashy as all the
“Dream Team” talk sounds, this is
still a program that’s rebuilding.
And at the moment, there isn’t too
much wrong with that. It’s unfair
to assume that this team could
come out and dominate right
away; those are expectations re-
served for the players. Te rest of
us need to be a little more rational
or start counting the days until
Late Night in the Phog.
What we do know is that Jake
Heaps is not Dayne Crist — in a
good way. Heaps has shown the
ability to put a better touch on the
ball than Jayhawks’ receivers saw
all last season. But we also know
that the passing game is nowhere
near ready to be the cornerstone of
this team.
“Ofensively, we just couldn’t get
going,” Heaps said in a postgame
press conference afer losing to
Rice. “We really just kept shooting
ourselves in the foot. Turnovers
and missed opportunities, we’ve
got to clean that stuf up.”
Te Jayhawks attempted 28
passes and only connected on 13
of them. Te most concerning part
of which is that only one Kansas
receiver caught a pass. Yes, Tre’
Parmalee hauled in just two recep-
tions for 23 yards.
What we also know is that
Kansas can stack up with the best
backfelds in the nation. And if the
passing game isn’t up to par yet, it’s
time to stick with it.
But put yourself in Weis’ shoes.
When you’ve built your name in
part because of the work you did
with Tom Brady in New England,
running the ball doesn’t seem sexy
enough.
Unfortunately, this isn’t a team
that’s going to have much appeal at
all if it doesn’t play to its strengths.
We started to see that with the
way Tony Pierson was used on Sat-
urday. Weis has said that he sees
Pierson as the same type of player
that Tavon Austin was for West
Virginia last year. On Saturday
Pierson gained 95 yards receiving
— including a 77-yard haul — but
only one rushing attempt for three
yards.
Instead, Jake Heaps ran 11 times
for a loss of 26 yards and while
James Sims gained more than one
hundred yards, it wasn’t enough to
push Kansas to victory.
“I felt like we needed to give
James the ball more to establish
the interior line of scrimmage,”
Weis said. “We hadn’t done that.”
So what can you make of the
Kansas ofense afer two games? It
depends what you’re trying to get
out of it. Te Jayhawks aren’t capa-
ble of passing like an SEC school,
and they aren’t quite Oregon on
the ground either. For Weis and
company, their identity may not be
too clear at the moment.
What you can take away is that
there are already more options
than last season. And on this long
road back to relevance, that alone
is a victory.
— Edited by James Ogden

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