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THURSDAY
SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
HOME TOUR
A tour of homes on Hayselton Drive is slated
for Sunday.
■ ESCAPE
VOL. 148, NO. 172 WWW.NEWSTRIBUNE.COM
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J EFFERSON CI TY, MI SSOURI
FIRST AND TEN
Find information on this week’s local prep
football matchups inside Sports.
■ SPORTS C3-5
■ WATERCOOLER
She didn’t have ‘Peaceful Easy Feeling’
Authorities say a South Carolina woman stabbed
her roommate after getting fed up with the man lis-
tening to the Eagles and watching TV with his brother.
North Charleston police say 54-year-old Vernett
Bader is charged with criminal domestic violence of
a high and aggravated nature after the Monday night
scuffle. It was not known if Bader had an attorney.
An incident report says police responded to a report
of a stabbing and found Bader’s 64-year-old roommate
with stab wounds to his arm, hand and elbow.
The report says Bader grew angry as the roommate
was listening to the Eagles and watching television with
his brother. Police say she got a knife from a kitchen
drawer and, when the men wrestled it away, got another.
■ INSIDE
Business ..................A4
Calendar ..................B1
Classifieds ........... D1-5
Comics ................... D6
Crossword ............... D6
Dear Abby ............... D5
Obituaries ................B2
Opinion ....................B3
People .....................A2
Sports .....................C1
Statistics .................C2
TV Schedule ............ D6
Weather ...................A2
Warm with
rain tonight
Today’s high: 90
Today’s low: 68
■ OUTSIDE
© Copyright 2013
News Tribune Co.
News Tribune
online
Check for breaking news,
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about today's stories at:
www.newstribune.com
Two local hoteliers have
prepared a third conference
center proposal they say is
the perfect solution for Jef-
ferson City, but it may be too
late for them to enter the mix.
What do you think of their
proposal?
Join the discussion at
www.facebook.com/newstribune
Julie Smith/News Tribune
While you generally have to bend down to work in your garden, Angie Stegeman has the
opposite issue. She had to reach high to pull down the plants to reach the okra growing
upward on her plants. She said she cuts fresh growth of the seedpods about every other day.
Local venues
will host outdoor
games, athletes
for next four years
By Michelle Brooke
mbrooks@newstribune.com
The Special Olympics Missouri
State Outdoor Games will return
to Jefferson City in 2014.
More than 900 athletes and
coaches from across the state will
participate in softball, tennis,
soccer, bocce, flag football and
golf from Oct. 3-5, 2014, at local
venues including Adkins Stadi-
um, Fields of Legends, 63 Sports
complex, Binder Park, Riverside
Park, Ellis-Porter YMCA and Rail-
wood Golf Course.
Special Olympics and the Jef-
ferson City Convention and Visi-
tors Bureau announced the four-
year contract for the statewide
games Wednesday.
“It’s great to be back,” said
Mark Musso, CEO/president of
Special Olympics Missouri.
The organization organizes
more than 330 events for more
than 17,000 athletes annually
statewide.
After winning at the local and
district levels, some of those ath-
letes advance to two statewide
events, which will become three
in 2014.
Musso noted when the outdoor
games were hosted in Jefferson
City prior to 2007, the commu-
nity was generous, easy to work
with, has “outstanding” venues,
and had an “incredible” volunteer
base.
Diane Gillespie, bureau exec-
utive director, noted that more
than $125,000 should be gener-
ated with this returning event,
which includes about 250 rooms
for three nights for participants.
Nearly 500 volunteers will be
needed for the event.
On the Web:
www.somo.org
Special
Olympics
moving
to JC
By Bob Watson
bwatson@newstribune.com
No hearings have been set, yet.
But the two defendants in a two-month-old
lawsuit this week asked Cole County Circuit
Judge Jon Beetem to dismiss the civil suit before
it really gets started.
The Swallow Tail company, based in Harri-
sonville, is a “private wetland and stream com-
pensatory mitigation bank provider” that sued
the state Conservation department and the not-
for-profit Conservation Heritage Foundation
on July 9, accusing them of working together
to hurt for-profit companies and benefit the
foundation.
The lawsuit accused the state agency and
the foundation of having a too-cozy, “illegal”
relationship that’s resulted in the foundation
having an unfair advantage over Swallow Tail
and other companies in contracts with the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers.
The suit raised five counts against the depart-
ment and foundation, saying their actions and
cooperation:
• “Constitute a tortious interference with
Swallow Tail’s business expectancy.”
• Are a conspiracy “to attempt to monopolize
(Missouri’s) stream mitigation industry” to ben-
efit the foundation.
• Violate provisions of a 1999 memorandum
of understanding between the foundation and
the Corps, damaging “Swallow Tail in its abil-
ity to participate in the mitigation banking
market.”
• Violate Missouri’s Constitution by allowing
Conservation employees to work with the foun-
dation on its stream mitigation plans, resulting
in the unconstitutional spending of “public
money to benefit (a) private ... association.”
• Seek to “destroy competition in the stream
mitigation field by creating an unbalanced play-
ing field in which only (the foundation) would
be truly competitive.”
Swallow Tail’s lawsuit asked the court to
prohibit the department and foundation “from
engaging in the unlawful conduct,” order the
department and foundation to end their rela-
tionship, award the company triple damages
and award it damages for its past and future lost
business and its attorney’s fees.
The legal battle involves the ways the Corps
of Engineers awards contracts for improving
some sections of streams when other sections
are damaged by construction, farming or other
projects.
In separate filings Wednesday, the Conser-
vation department and the foundation asked
Beetem to dismiss Swallow Tail’s lawsuit, say-
ing the company failed “to state a claim upon
which relief can be granted.”
In its brief supporting its motion to dismiss,
the foundation rejected the company’s claim of
lost mitigation banking business. “Swallow Tail
must proceed beyond mere speculation and
identify the business relationship interfered
with,” the foundation said.
The department’s 18-page brief argued Swal-
low Tail can’t prove some of its claims because
the Corps of Engineers approved them.
Court asked to determine legal battle over mitigation contracts
Local hoteliers say they
have a better conference
center proposal
By Jessica Duren
jessicad@newstribune.com
Local hoteliers Ravi and Vivek Puri
announced Wednesday their intent to
submit a proposal to the City Council
for an alternate location for a confer-
ence center.
Puri Group currently owns several
hotels in Mid-Missouri, including the
downtown DoubleTree by Hilton, and
most recently, the historic Truman
Hotel. The Puris said they have a
proposal that is a “win-win” for the
city, one that will strengthen the hotel
market, and cost the city less money.
The City Council is considering
two proposals for a conference center
from the Jefferson City-based Farmer
Development, which would place the
facility at the Capital Mall site, and
the Hannibal-based Ehrhardt Hospi-
tality Group, which would place it on
West McCarty Street.
The Puri Group proposal includes
taking the existing Truman Hotel,
temporarily dismantling a portion
of its current property, and within
two years, rebuilding on the property,
replacing the rooms, and essentially
doubling its current meeting space.
By accepting either of the propos-
als on the table, presented by Farmer
Development and Ehrardt Hospital-
ity Group, Vivek said the city will be
saturating an already weak hotel mar-
ket. Vivek noted the occupancy levels
News Tribune file
As indicated by the hotel’s marquee, the Truman Hotel is open under new management.
Third option comes to light
Please see Center, p. 3
Obama traveling to
Kansas City-area auto plant
By Chris Blank
Associated Press
Missouri’s automotive manufacturing will
be getting renewed attention this week when
President Barack Obama visits a Ford Motor
Co. facility near Kansas City to discuss the auto
industry.
The president is scheduled to travel Friday
to Ford’s stamping plant in Liberty, which is
near its assembly in Claycomo. Democratic
U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill said Tuesday she is
joining Obama and that the plant is a good
place to discuss the turnaround.
Obama used some funds allocated to help
the financial system to bail out General Motors
and Chrysler. McCaskill said the industry now
is thriving after a “near-death blow to automo-
bile manufacturing in our country.” She said
President
brings
renewed
attention
Okra maintenance
Please see Plant, p. 3
Please see Battle, p. 3
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Wednesday midday drawing
Pick 3: 0+4+2
Pick 4: 8-8-9-9
Wednesday evening drawing
Pick 3: 4-1-2
Pick 4: 0-8-2-4
Show Me Cash: 1-4-7-21-35
Lotto: 13-15-16-33-40-41
PowerBall: 7-10-22-32-35-Pb19
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NEW YORK (AP) — “Scandal” star Kerry Washington
is the world’s best-dressed woman, according to People
magazine.
Washington, 36, has proved a red-carpet risk-taker,
wearing up-and-coming designers and making atypical
choices — such as a crystal-covered coral Miu Miu gown
for the Oscars. At Tuesday’s pre-Emmy reception, she wore
a hot-pink cocktail frock.
Unlike her character on ABC’s “Scandal,” Washington
says she doesn’t wear many power-broker pantsuits.
Washington, selected by the magazine editors, works
with stylist Erin Walsh.
People then tapped other tastemakers to pick their
favorites, including Jennifer Lawrence for her high-fashion
style, Jessica Chastain specifically for her red-carpet looks,
Kate Bosworth for street style and Zoe Saldana for her
denim style.
__________
NEW YORK (AP) — Spike Lee will receive the 20th annu-
al Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize, which carries a reward of
$300,000.
The Gish Prize Trust announced the selection Wednes-
day. Selection committee chairman Darren Walker says Lee
was chosen “for his brilliance and unwavering courage in
using film to challenge conventional thinking.”
In an interview Wednesday, Lee said he was familiar with
Lillian Gish as an actress, but he hadn’t heard of the award
until he was called “out of the blue.”
The prize will be presented to Lee at the Museum of
Modern Art on Oct. 30.
__________
BOSTON (AP) — Mark Wahlberg is now a high school
graduate — 25 years after dropping out of a Boston high
school.
The 42-year-old actor-producer finished his diploma
requirements after taking classes online. He dropped out of
Copley Square High School, now known as Snowden Inter-
national School at Copley, in the 9th grade.
Wahlberg wrote of the struggles he faced growing up
surrounded by “drugs, violence and crime” in a column in
The Huffington Post on Monday.
__________
Today’s Birthdays: Author Roger Angell is 93. TV host
James Lipton (“Inside the Actors Studio”) is 87. Actor
Adam West is 85. Actor David McCallum (TV: “NCIS”) is 80.
Actor Randolph Mantooth is 68. Actor Jeremy Irons is 65.
Actress Twiggy Lawson is 64. TV personality Joan Lunden is
63.Actress Carolyn McCormick is 54. Country singer Trisha
Yearwood is 49. Actress-comedian Cheri Oteri is 48. Celeb-
rity chef Michael Symon is 44. Comedian and TV talk show
host Jimmy Fallon is 39. Actor Columbus Short is 31.
FRIDAY
72˚/49˚
The News Tribune is the leading source for local information
each day. Please watch for these upcoming stories.
NEXT NEWS
NEWSTICKER
In Wednesday’s edition of the
News Tribune, the story “Hilpert
named interim administrator”
stated the City Council would
look at the job description for the
city administrator in closed ses-
sion Monday night. Interim City
Administrator and City Attorney
Drew Hilpert clarified Wednesday
that the discussion would take
place in open session.
CORRECTIONS
Hi Lo Prc Otlk
Albany,N.Y. 72 39 Clr
Albuquerque 82 65 PCldy
Amarillo 87 65 Cldy
Anchorage 51 43 PCldy
Asheville 67 56 .01 Cldy
Atlanta 78 65 PCldy
Atlantic City 71 40 Clr
Austin 94 71 Cldy
Baltimore 71 44 Clr
Billings 67 57 .03 Cldy
Birmingham 84 68 Clr
Bismarck 78 61 .04 Cldy
Boise 67 52 Clr
Boston 75 51 Clr
Brownsville 89 76 .30 Cldy
Buffalo 73 46 PCldy
Burlington,Vt. 71 40 Clr
Casper 80 52 .04 Clr
Charleston,S.C. 81 62 PCldy
Charleston,W.Va. 72 52 .01 Cldy
Charlotte,N.C. 77 59 Cldy
Cheyenne 77 53 .01 PCldy
Chicago 81 60 .44 Cldy
Cincinnati 77 59 .01 Cldy
Cleveland 76 52 Cldy
Columbia,S.C. 81 62 Cldy
Columbus,Ohio 77 59 Cldy
Concord,N.H. 74 35 Clr
Dallas-Ft Worth 97 78 Cldy
Dayton 81 58 Cldy
Denver 84 60 PCldy
Des Moines 92 65 Rain
Detroit 73 49 Cldy
Duluth 64 58 .02 Rain
El Paso 87 68 PCldy
Evansville 82 63 .20 PCldy
Fairbanks 37 31 .06 Cldy
Fargo 81 60 .02 Cldy
Flagstaff 74 47 Clr
Grand Rapids 79 51 Cldy
Great Falls 59 52 PCldy
Greensboro,N.C. 72 54 Cldy
Hartford Spgfld 73 37 Clr
Helena 65 48 PCldy
Honolulu 88 76 PCldy
Houston 93 74 Cldy
Indianapolis 81 62 Cldy
Jackson,Miss. 90 67 PCldy
Jacksonville 83 74 .44 Cldy
Juneau 53 49 .15 Rain
Kansas City 90 67 PCldy
Key West 85 80 Cldy
Las Vegas 94 74 Clr
Little Rock 97 70 .43 Cldy
Los Angeles 79 62 PCldy
Louisville 79 63 Cldy
Lubbock 88 67 Cldy
Memphis 89 71 Cldy
Miami Beach 87 78 Cldy
Midland-Odessa 87 69 Rain
Milwaukee 79 61 .04 Cldy
Mpls-St Paul 74 58 .17 Rain
Nashville 84 67 Cldy
New Orleans 88 77 .39 Cldy
New York City 72 51 Clr
Norfolk,Va. 74 61 PCldy
North Platte 92 58 PCldy
Oklahoma City 94 71 PCldy
Omaha 91 68 Rain
Orlando 85 75 .39 Cldy
Pendleton 71 53 Clr
Philadelphia 71 48 Clr
Phoenix 107 84 Clr
Pittsburgh 73 46 Cldy
Portland,Maine 70 42 Clr
Portland,Ore. 73 55 PCldy
Providence 71 44 Clr
Raleigh-Durham 74 51 Cldy
Rapid City 93 56 Clr
Reno 73 45 Clr
Richmond 74 49 PCldy
Sacramento 87 57 Clr
St Louis 88 67 .18 Cldy
St Petersburg 87 76 .45 Rain
Salt Lake City 71 56 Clr
San Antonio 95 76 .11 Cldy
San Diego 71 63 PCldy
San Francisco 78 54 Clr
San Juan,P.R. 90 79 .84 PCldy
Santa Fe 75 60 PCldy
St Ste Marie 67 47 Cldy
Seattle 70 56 PCldy
Shreveport 97 74 Cldy
Sioux Falls 88 63 .01 Cldy
Spokane 67 48 .17 Clr
Syracuse 74 41 Clr
Tampa 91 76 Rain
Topeka 92 68 Rain
Tucson 100 76 PCldy
Tulsa 94 70 PCldy
Washington,D.C. 74 52 Clr
Wichita 94 70 PCldy
Wilkes-Barre 72 41 Clr
Wilmington,Del. 70 42 Clr
National Temperature Extremes
High Wednesday 107 at Phoenix, Ariz.
Low Wednesday 24 at Bridgeport, Calif.
m — indicates missing information.
NATIONWIDE
Temperature
Wednesday
High: 82; low: 62
Record high for today’s date:
100 degrees in 1954.
Record low for today’s date:
38 degrees in 1938.
River, lake stages
Kansas City 10.10
Boonville 6.73
Jefferson City 5.85
Hermann 4.98
Lake of the Ozarks 658.05
Precipitation
For the 24 hours ending at
7 p.m., the National Weather
Service reported:
Wednesday: 0.14
The record on this date:
2.58 inches in 1942.
Month: 1.64
Normal for month: 2.84
Year: 30.80
Normal for year: 30.69
Sun
Sunset today 7:11 p.m.
Sunrise tomorrow 6:53 a.m.
SATURDAY
71˚/45˚
SUNDAY
72˚/46˚
MONDAY
75˚/49˚
TUESDAY
77˚/54˚
JEFFERSONCITYAREA
ALMANAC
HOW MAY
WE HELP
5-DAY
FORECAST
CELEBRITYNEWS
Partly
Cloudy
Cloudy
Showers
Thunder-
storms
Rain
Flurries
Snow
Ice
IOWA
ILL.
KAN.
OKLA. ARK.
TENN.
© 2013 Wunderground.com
Today's Forecast
Thursday, Sept. 19
City/Region
High | Low temps
Forecast for
Kirksville
90° | 68°
Kansas City
91° | 73°
Columbia
91° | 68°
St. Louis
91° | 68°
Springfield
88° | 66°
Cape Girardeau
86° | 68°
Jefferson City
90° | 68°
Weather Underground • AP
Thunderstorms Great Lakes To Texas
Sunny Pt. Cloudy Cloudy
A cold front will extend from Upper Michigan to New Mexico.
Scattered showers and thunderstorms will be likely along the front.
Showers and thunderstorms will also be possible over much of
Texas
National forecast
Forecast highs for Thursday, Sept. 19
Fronts Pressure
Cold Warm Stationary Low High
-10s 100s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 110s
Ice Snow Flurries T-storms Rain Showers
Weather Underground • AP
Today will be mostly cloudy with a slight chance of
showers in the afternoon. Highs will be around 90 with
south wind at 10-15 mph. It will be partly cloudy early in
the evening then becoming mostly cloudy with occasional
showers and thunderstorms. Lows will be in the upper 60s
with south wind around 10 mph.
Friday should be cloudy and cooler with showers and
thunderstorms likely in the morning and a high around 80.
West wind around 10 mph in the morning will shift to the
northwest. Friday night will be mostly clear and cooler.
N
E
W
S

T
R
I
B
U
N
E
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
A2
From The Associated Press
MISSOURI
URBAN CRIME SUMMIT: Attorney Gen-
eral Chris Koster wants state lawmakers
to approve a special gun court in St. Louis
after city judges rejected the move earlier
this week. Koster reiterated his call for a
new “armed offender docket” at the start of
an urban crime summit Wednesday at the
downtown St. Louis University law school.
The four-day summit began Monday in
Kansas City.
NATION
FEDERAL RESERVE: The Federal Reserve
decides against reducing its stimulus for the
U.S. economy, it will continue to buy $85
billion a month in bonds because it thinks
the economy still needs the support. Stocks
spike after the Fed released the statement at
the end of its two-day policy meeting.
MISSING VEHICLES: For more than a gen-
eration, this rural community has been
haunted by twin mysteries: a couple that
vanished in the 1950s and a group of teens
who disappeared two decades later after
heading to a football game. Now police
believe they may have solved both cold
cases in a single day after divers on a train-
ing exercise discovered two cars in a lake.
STARBUCKS-GUNS: Starbucks sets itself
apart by taking strong positions on progres-
sive political issues, but that reputation
has landed the company in the middle of
the heated national debate over gun laws.
On Thursday, the Seattle-based company
will embark on a national campaign to tell
customers that guns are no longer welcome
in its stores, but is stopping short of an
outright ban.
WORLD
TRAIN, BUS COLLIDE: Frightened passen-
gers screamed at a driver to stop just before
he plowed his double-decker bus through a
closed crossing barrier and slammed into a
passenger train during morning rush hour
in Canada’s capital, killing six people and
injuring dozens.
SYRIA: The trajectory of the rockets
that delivered the nerve agent sarin in
last month’s deadly attack is among the
key pieces of evidence linking elite Syrian
troops based in the mountains overlooking
Damascus to the strike that killed hundreds
of people, diplomats and human rights
officials say.
Friday
‘Michael J. Fox Show’
TVWEEK: Michael J. Fox stars in
“The Michael J. Fox Show,” on
Thursday on NBC.
Saturday
Weekend local football
It’s Helias vs. Hickman and Blair
Oaks vs. Southern Boone. Get
details in SPORTS on Saturday.
Inside Today
Hayselton Drive tours
ESCAPE: Historic City of Jefferson
is hosting an annual homes tour
featuring Hayselton Drive.
Sunday
Yard of the Month!
Artistic accents and features
helped a family in the Boonville
Road area win Yard of the Month.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 A3
FROM PAGE ONE
www.newstribune.com
and average daily rate, or ADR,
has been very weak, a direct
result of the lodging tax.
“We lost occupancy as well
as ADR in Jeff City, and it has
taken us quite some time to
build that back up and only
right now, recently, are we
showing some weak signs of
recovery in the local economy
as far as hotels are concerned,”
he said.
According to the Smith Trav-
el Research Report published
in the Jefferson City Conven-
tion and Visitor’s Bureau Sep-
tember newsletter, occupancy
rates for the year-to-date are
55.2 percent, and room rates
are $68.26.
Vivek said Drury Hospital-
ity pulled its proposal for the
conference center earlier this
year, specifying a weak ADR
and low occupancy that would
keep the hotel and conference
center from being self-sustain-
ing.
“What we would be doing
is effectively moving those 233
rooms out of the market tem-
porarily, allowing the market
to have more demand, which
would drive occupancy and
would drive rates at the same
time, as long as the people
were improving their product,”
Vivek said.
“And then we would be
putting these 233 rooms right
back into the market, new and
improved. So we did not take
an already weak market and
dilute it any further. What we
did was allow the market to
strengthen while we did the
construction.
“If you are going to put in
another 200 rooms, it is going
to dilute it, because the cur-
rent occupancy rate is not that
great. It is going to affect every-
body. But if you are replacing
rooms and putting in a confer-
ence center, you are killing two
birds with one stone.”
“When you are running a
city-wide occupancy of 50 per-
cent, and running an ADR of
$65 you are barely breaking
even. Do you want to further
divide that down? You are basi-
cally dooming the industry to
fail,” Vivek explained.
Plan meets RFP
needs
Vivek said their plan ful-
fills every aspect of the RFP
(request for proposal) because
no continuing subsidy is being
requested.
“You get the 200+ rooms
you’ve requested, you get the
40,000+ square feet of meet-
ing space requested, you get
no ongoing subsidy and you
strengthen the hotel market in
Jefferson City. It is a win-win
situation for everybody,” Vivek
related.
Ravi also pointed out that
the two current proposals
made to the city are request-
ing help with parking. Their
proposal is not.
“We are giving a space which
is easy access, easy in and out,”
Ravi explained. “We have more
space, we have more parking
space, we don’t want any sub-
sidy, that is the key too.”
The proposal from Farmer
Development has not publicly
requested any assistance with
parking, asserting the Capi-
tal Mall location will provide
ample parking already.
“A location where the infra-
structure is already in place
to handle the volume of traf-
fic that we are talking about,”
Vivek added. “A location which
is central, whether you are on
the west end of town or down-
town.”
The new Truman own-
ers said they plan to main-
tain the legacy of the Truman
Hotel, keeping its shell. It will
become a full-service interna-
tional Holiday Inn. The Puris
have already purchased the
franchise rights to the Holiday
Inn name, something they said
shows their investment to the
city.
“We have already put our
money where our mouth is.
We have already shown that
we are committed, not based
on any funds that are going
to be ‘promised’ or not prom-
ised, as the other two groups
have. We’re not going to buy
the franchise if we get funding,
we’ve already bought it. We’ve
already invested into it,” Vivek
said.
The Puris said they have not
brought this proposal to the
city yet, but believe they have
a right to do so. Vivek said he
planned to speak during the
public hearing today at noon.
For the public hearing
today, the City Council has
limited the scope of what
people can comment on to
four specific topics: the desir-
ability of one proposal over
the other, including location;
facilities the public would like
to have in a conference cen-
ter; the amount of subsidy, if
any, to be provided for a con-
ference center beyond the $9
million contribution; and the
desirability of having the city
finance and provide parking at
either location.
Proposal timing
argued
Interim City Administrator
and City Attorney Drew Hilp-
ert said staff may have to stop
any presentation of an alter-
nate proposal because it does
not fit into the four identified
topics.
“I think the city wants to
hear everything from every-
body. If there’s a proposal,
I’m sure it’s important for the
council to hear it, but that may
not be the right place to do
it,” Hilpert said. “We’re pretty
far deep into the conference
center proposals.”
By law, Vivek said, the
proposals submitted during
the time period allowed are
accepted or rejected as writ-
ten.
“Amendments are not
allowed on these proposals.
Amendments must be done
before the bid closes. And
everyone that has amended it,
they can say to ‘give us your
best and final proposal,’” Vivek
explained.
“When you accept the bids
or submissions, and then
you’ve closed it to everybody
else, then they are as they
stand.
“If they are requiring these
proposals to be ‘revised’ after
submittal then the entire bid-
ding process must be opened
to the general public.”
Hilpert said he does not
believe the city is required to
reopen the bid process, though
he noted he’d have to hear the
full complaint from the Puris
before being able to say defini-
tively.
“It’s hard to answer without
knowing what his full allega-
tion is, but I don’t believe that
to be the case,” Hilpert said.
The original request for
proposals sent out last fall did
allow for developers to submit
alternate proposals and the
changes to the proposals from
Ehrhardt and Farmer that are
going on are being seen as
ongoing contract negotiations
by city staff.
Puri Group has more than
540 rooms in this market.
Vivek said they have “the most
to lose and the most to gain
from this project.”
“Wouldn’t the city want
someone whose livelihood is
tied to the center to be the
one to be involved in it, who
is affected by it no matter
what?” Vivek asked. “We’ve
already shown that we believe
in Jeff City, with the amount of
investment we’ve made to this
town. Now we want Jeff City
to show its support for us. Its
belief in our abilities to deliver
what we promise.”
Pushing lodging
tax change
Once the conference center
is built, the Puris said it would
be their hope the money col-
lected on the lodging tax could
be used to further beautify the
city, as well as increase services
and help local infrastructure.
“The key is, we are coming
with no subsidy,” Ravi said.
The money the city will be
able to save from the subsidy
the other groups are proposing
can be utilized to improve the
infrastructure of the city.
“That’s what we expect from
the city,” Ravi said.
For example, the Puris would
like to see an increase in the
Convention and Visitor’s Bureau
budget, in order to bring more
business to town, in turn sup-
porting the conference center.
They would also like to see the
money used to increase the
police force, to expand the fire
department, to beautify the
streets and roads, and to help
the local school systems.
“These things are required
to bring more people in,” Ravi
noted.
The development of the
conference center and infra-
structure improvements
should be simultaneous, the
local hotel owner said.
“These have to go hand-in-
hand.”
However, by law, lodging
tax collections must be used
to promote tourism to the area
and can’t be used for general
revenue purposes.
The Puris said they hope
that building a conference
center is just phase one of sev-
eral more phases that will help
Jefferson City grow economi-
cally and create more jobs.
“The conference center is how
it begins.”
Vivek referred to their plan
and the city’s RFP as a “perfect
storm.” He noted that all the
elements are there.
“This is the perfect oppor-
tunity. They have a builder that
can deliver. They have a builder
that’s promising everything on
the RFP that they’ve been try-
ing for the last 30 years, and all
they have to do is reach a hand
across and shake the hand that
has been extended to them.
And if they don’t see that, then
it is an unfortunate day for the
people that are leading this
community.”
If city rejects
proposal
When asked what the Puris
plan to do if the city decides
not to allow more proposals,
Vivek said they will cross that
bridge when it comes.
“We are still going to
improve it (Truman Hotel),
with the present circumstanc-
es, I think this is our plan,”
Ravi said.
Vivek said Puri Group did
previously present a propos-
al for a conference center in
recent years; however, it was
not at the Truman Hotel loca-
tion, as the hoteliers did not
acquire that property until
earlier this year.
Today’s hearing is the sec-
ond on the conference cen-
ter this week. A third public
hearing will be held at 5:30
p.m. Monday at City Hall.
Comments at both today’s
and Monday’s meetings will
be limited to five minutes per
person.
People wishing to speak at
any public hearing are encour-
aged to sign up in advance
by contacting the city clerk at
634-6311.
Madeleine Leroux contrib-
uted to this article.
Center:
Continued from p. 1
although Ford did not receive
government assistance, the
company would have been
harmed indirectly if the other
manufacturers had not sur-
vived.
U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt said
Tuesday he is pleased Obama
is going to see the expansion
of a plant that the Republican
lawmaker said he had advo-
cated for and was glad to see
happen.
In 2011, Ford announced
a $1.1 billion expansion at its
Kansas City Assembly Plant
that included construction
of a new, integrated stamp-
ing plant. Earlier this year,
Ford said it was adding a third
shift and 900 jobs because of
demand for its trucks. The
company also said it was add-
ing 1,100 workers to prepare
for introduction of a new full-
size van.
McCaskill said efforts
by Gov. Jay Nixon and other
Missouri officials have been
important.
“Gov. Nixon and the state
government has played a
major role in making sure that
they are now re-investing bil-
lions of dollars in that plant,”
she said. “For generations to
come, they’re going to be mak-
ing great automobiles out of
Claycomo.”
Missouri lawmakers
approved a state incentives
package for automotive manu-
facturing in 2010 that was aimed
primarily at enticing Ford to
continue making vehicles at
the Kansas City-area facility.
The automaker incentives allow
manufacturers to keep with-
holding taxes for employees
that otherwise would be paid
to the state if they improve their
factories for new or expanded
product lines. Suppliers also can
get a tax break.
Lawmakers approved the
incentives during summer
special session after a senator
ended a more than 20-hour
filibuster. Nixon held a bill
signing ceremony the follow-
ing day a union hall near the
Ford plant.
Plant:
Continued from p. 1
Instead of challenging the
Corps’ decision in federal
court, Swallow Tail sued in
state court, Jefferson City law-
yer Heidi Vollet wrote for the
department. She added a foot-
note that the company likely
wouldn’t win in federal court,
either.
The department and foun-
dation argue that the agencies’
cooperative work is protected
from the lawsuit’s anti-trust
claims.
Both want Beetem to rule
that Swallow Tail didn’t prove
its right to benefit from the
foundation’s contract with the
Corps of Engineers.
Beetem could rule based on
the motions that have been
filed, or schedule a hearing for
oral arguments.
Battle:
Continued from p. 1
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Wash-
ington Navy Yard gunman visited two
hospitals in the weeks before the ram-
page but did not say he was depressed
or having thoughts of harming him-
self or others, the Veterans Affairs
Department said Wednesday.
Aaron Alexis, a former Navy reserv-
ist who killed 12 people Monday
before being slain in a police shoot-
out, complained of insomnia during
an Aug. 23 emergency room visit at
the VA Medical Center in Providence,
R.I. He was given sleep medication
and was advised to follow up with a
doctor.
He made a similar visit five days
later to the VA hospital in Washing-
ton, when he again complained of
not being able to sleep because of his
work schedule. His medication was
refilled.
Law enforcement officials have
said the 34-year-old man was grap-
pling with paranoia, hearing voices
and convinced he was being fol-
lowed.
Two weeks before his ER visit,
he complained to police in Rhode
Island that people were talking to
him through and the walls and ceil-
ings of his hotel room and sending
microwave vibrations into his body to
deprive him of sleep. Newport police
alerted the naval station, and they did
not hear from again.
Alexis had enrolled in VA health
care in February 2011, and received
monthly disability payments of $395
for orthopedic problems.
Meanwhile, Alexis’s mother said
Wednesday she does not know why
her son opened fire and on office
workers during a more than 30-
minute rampage and shootout with
police.
Cathleen Alexis read a brief state-
ment inside her New York home, her
voice shaking. She did not want to
appear on camera and did not take
questions from a reporter.
“Aaron is now in a place where he
can no longer do harm to anyone, and
for that I am glad,” Cathleen Alexis
said. “To the families of the victims, I
am so so very sorry that this has hap-
pened. My heart is broken.”
Authorities said he used a valid
badge to enter Building 197 on the
sprawling grounds of the Navy Yard,
carrying with him a Remington 870
Express shotgun — a firearm that
would not be covered under a pro-
posed weapons ban supported by the
White House.
VA: Navy gunman didn’t reveal homicidal thoughts
QUICKNATION
Man acknowledges
shooting at White
House in 2011
WASHINGTON (AP) — An
Idaho man is facing at least 10
years in prison after acknowl-
edging that he shot an assault
rifle at the White House two
years ago.
Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Her-
nandez pleaded guilty Wednes-
day to two of the 19 charges
against him as a result of the
shooting. As part of a plea
agreement, prosecutors will
drop the remaining charges.
That includes the most serious
charge he faced, attempting
to assassinate the president,
which carried a potential life
sentence.
No one was injured in the
shooting, but it left a number
of bullet marks on the execu-
tive mansion. President Barack
Obama and his wife were in
California at the time of the
shooting, but other members
of the first family were there
that night.
Former Army captain
to receive MoH
WASHINGTON (AP) — A
former Army captain hailed
for bravery during combat in
Afghanistan in 2009 will add
the Medal of Honor to his list
of military decorations.
The White House says
President Barack Obama will
bestow the nation’s highest
military honor on William D.
Swenson at the White House
on Oct. 15.
A statement says Swenson
is being recognized for coura-
geous actions while he was an
embedded trainer and mentor
with the Afghan National Secu-
rity Forces in Kunar Province
in northeastern Afghanistan
on Sept. 8, 2009.
Swenson retired from the
military on Feb. 1, 2011. He has
a Purple Heart and Bronze Star
Medal and lives in Seattle.
People march against
Greek segregation
at Alabama
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP)
— Several hundred people are
protesting at the University of
Alabama to oppose racial seg-
regation among the school’s
Greek-letter social organiza-
tions.
Students and teachers
marched Wednesday from the
university library to the admin-
istration building, where the
president’s office is located.
The group was gathered on
the steps of the administra-
tion building, standing behind
a large banner that said “Last
stand in the schoolhouse
door.”
2nd company rockets
toward space station
A Virginia company is on its
way to the International Space
Station, doubling the number
of commercial suppliers.
Orbital Sciences Corp.
launched its first-ever cargo
ship Wednesday morning from
Virginia. The capsule, named
Cygnus, is due at the space sta-
tion on Sunday, following four
days of testing.
It’s only the second private
business to attempt a ship-
ment like this. The California-
based SpaceX company has
been delivering station cargo
for more than a year under a
NASA contract.
First lady hosts summit
on food marketing
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Michelle Obama is urging food
makers and television broad-
casters to do more to promote
healthier foods to children
— and to do it faster.
She says the country is
doing a better job of offering
healthier food options.
The first lady says the proof
is in the kale salads now being
served in restaurants and in
the salad bars in many school
lunchrooms.
But she says more positive
change is needed.
Beanie Babies creator
charged with tax evasion
CHICAGO (AP) — The cre-
ator of Beanie Babies stuffed
animals was charged Wednes-
day with federal tax evasion for
failing to report income earned
in a secret offshore bank
account, and he has agreed to
pay a more than $53 million
penalty.
As prosecutors in Chicago
announced the charge against
H. Ty Warner, his defense law-
yer issued a statement say-
ing the 69-year-old billionaire
intended to plead guilty and
pay the massive penalty.
Send in your child’s winning team
photo or individual photo from any
competitive sport to be published, at
no charge, in our monthly sports page
for children up to the 8th grade!
Photos will publish on a Àrst
come Àrst serve basis.
Publishing the last
Sunday of each
month. Deadline is
the Monday prior.
Email display@newstribune.com or mail to
We Won, News Tribune, 210 Monroe St.
Jefferson City, MO 65101
Monthly Kid’s Sports Page
Child’s Name__________________________________ Age:_________
Team:________________________________________________________
Award:_______________________________________________________
Event Date:__________________________________________________
Maximum of 3 photos per entry. Photos will publish on a Àrst come Àrst serve basis.
www.newstribune.com
/QPG[/CTMGVU
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Deere Co DE 79.50 4 95.60 84.51 +.80 +1.0% s s s -2.2% +5.7% 2829 10 2.04
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Dow Chemical DOW 27.45 0 40.33 40.86 +1.15 +2.9% s s s +26.4% +31.7% 7559 45 1.28
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Ferrellgas Part FGP 15.21 9 23.74 22.14 -.01 ...% t t s +31.4% +21.1% 221 38 2.00
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Gen Electric GE 19.87 0 24.95 24.86 +.41 +1.7% s s s +18.4% +14.2% 50666 18 0.76
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Hershey Company HSY 68.09 9 98.00 94.22 +.64 +0.7% s s s +30.5% +35.5% 537 30 1.94f
Hewlett Packard HPQ 11.35 7 27.78 21.80 +.13 +0.6% t t t +52.9% +22.0% 12980 dd 0.58
Home Depot HD 58.51 9 81.56 77.37 +1.57 +2.1% s s t +25.1% +31.1% 10499 23 1.56
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Johnson Controls JCI 24.75 0 43.00 43.06 +.28 +0.7% s s s +40.4% +51.7% 4624 17 0.76
Kellogg Co K 50.21 7 67.98 61.21 +.57 +0.9% s t t +9.6% +23.7% 2237 23 1.84f
Kroger Co KR 23.09 0 40.74 40.56 +.01 ...% s s s +55.9% +72.8% 5340 14 0.60
Lee Enterp LEE 1.10 9 3.20 2.82 -.18 -6.0% t s s +147.4% +100.0% 940 71 ...
Leggett & Platt LEG 24.15 7 34.28 31.24 +.44 +1.4% s s s +14.8% +28.3% 1780 20 1.20f
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McDonalds Corp MCD 83.31 8103.70 98.70 +.78 +0.8% s s t +11.9% +9.6% 4236 18 3.24f
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NextEra Energy NEE 66.05 8 88.39 82.55 +3.55 +4.5% s s s +19.3% +20.8% 4072 20 2.64
O Reilly Auto ORLY 78.58 0128.45 126.95 +1.57 +1.3% s s s +42.0% +55.8% 589 24 ...
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Regions Fncl RF 6.19 8 10.52 9.61 -.03 -0.3% s t s +34.8% +31.5% 15512 12 0.12
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Sears Holdings Corp SHLD 38.40 7 68.77 59.62 -2.41 -3.9% t s s +44.1% +7.7% 2120 dd ...
Smucker, JM SJM 81.60 9114.72 108.48 +.18 +0.2% s s s +25.8% +26.9% 510 21 2.32f
Southern Co SO 40.63 3 48.74 42.63 +1.48 +3.6% s s t -0.4% -4.0% 7690 18 2.03
Staples Inc SPLS 10.94 7 17.30 15.12 +.16 +1.1% s s t +32.6% +28.9% 12736 dd 0.48
Suncor Energy SU 26.83 0 36.55 36.58 +.64 +1.8% s s s +10.9% +4.9% 3156 13 0.80
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Target Corp TGT 58.01 5 73.50 65.48 +1.10 +1.7% s r t +10.7% +2.3% 4309 16 1.72
Teradata Corp TDC 48.11 5 77.85 60.48 +.99 +1.7% s s s -2.3% -21.9% 1612 27 ...
UMB Financial UMBF 40.27 6 62.20 53.32 -.24 -0.4% s t t +21.7% +8.0% 371 19 0.86
Unilever NV UN 35.27 7 42.99 40.00 +.90 +2.3% s s s +4.4% +12.5% 1823 1.35e
Union Pacific Corp UNP 116.06 9165.18 159.50 +2.06 +1.3% s s s +26.9% +26.3% 1885 18 3.16f
UPS class B UPS 69.56 0 91.78 90.97 +1.08 +1.2% s s s +23.4% +24.4% 3967 63 2.48
US Bancorp USB 30.96 0 37.97 37.84 +.32 +0.9% s s s +18.5% +12.1% 9893 13 0.92
Verizon Comm VZ 40.51 6 54.31 48.72 +.15 +0.3% s s t +12.6% +13.6% 10853 99 2.12f
Viacom Inc B VIAB 47.61 0 84.60 83.20 +.06 +0.1% s s s +57.8% +61.2% 3029 20 1.20
Visa Inc V 132.38 0196.00 193.65 +2.05 +1.1% s s s +27.8% +44.1% 2556 24 1.32
Vodafone Group VOD 24.42 0 34.08 34.17 +.37 +1.1% s s s +35.7% +25.1% 8648 1.57e
WalMart Strs WMT 67.37 8 79.96 76.42 +1.27 +1.7% s s s +12.0% +4.0% 6818 15 1.88
Walgreen Co WAG 31.88 0 55.23 55.63 +.71 +1.3% s s s +50.3% +57.0% 4855 25 1.26f
Wells Fargo & Co WFC 31.25 9 44.79 43.31 +.46 +1.1% s s s +26.7% +24.3% 23435 12 1.20
Wendys Co WEN 4.09 0 8.75 8.49 -.06 -0.6% t s s +80.5% +97.5% 5628 cc 0.20f
Yum! Brands Inc YUM 59.68 0 75.13 73.62 +.88 +1.2% s s s +10.9% +11.3% 1975 23 1.34
Zoltek Cos ZOLT 6.02 8 17.24 14.50 +.26 +1.8% s s s +87.1% +61.3% 356 52 ...
52-WK RANGE CLOSE YTD 1YR VOL
NAME TICKER LO HI CLOSE CHG %CHG WK MO QTR CHG RTN (Thous) P/E DIV
.QECN5VQEMU Today
AP
Improved revenue?
Wall Street anticipates that
ConAgra Foods’ latest quarterly
earnings will show that its revenue
grew from a year earlier.
The company, whose products
include Egg Beaters, Chef
Boyardee, Slim Jim and Hebrew
National, is due to report fiscal
first-quarter earnings today.
ConAgra has been adjusting its
promotion, merchandising and
pricing strategies in a bid to boost
sales at its consumer goods
segment.
Home sales pickup?
The National Association of Real-
tors reports its tally of August
home sales today.
Economists expect sales of pre-
viously occupied homes eased
last month after climbing to a
3-year high in July. Sales jumped
6.5 percent in July to a seasonally
adjusted annual rate of 5.4 million,
a pace associated with a healthy
housing market. Over the past 12
months, sales have surged 17.2
percent.
Back to a loss
Rite Aid has notched three straight
profitable quarters.
But the drugstore chain is
expected to report a loss today for
its second fiscal quarter. An influx
of generic equivalents to brand-
name drugs has dented revenue
for Rite Aid and other drugstore
chains for several quarters
because generics cost less than
their brand-name counterparts.
Source: FactSet
Price-earnings ratio: 15
based on trailing 12 months’ results
Dividend: none
Operating
EPS
2Q ’12 2Q ’13
est.
-$0.05 -$0.05
0
1
2
3
$4
RAD $3.71
$1.32
’13
Source: FactSet
Existing home sales
seasonally adjusted annual rate
4.00
4.75
5.50 million
A J J M A M
5.1
5.4
4.9
5.0
5.1
est.
5.3
NET 1YR
TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG WK MO QTR AGO
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
YEST
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
3-month T-bill .01 .01 ... r t t .10
2-year T-note .33 .38 -0.05 t t s .26
10-year T-note 2.69 2.85 -0.16 t t s 1.81
30-year T-bond 3.75 3.83 -0.08 t t s 3.01
5-year T-note 1.43 1.61 -0.18 t t s .70
52-wk T-bill .10 .11 -0.01 t t t .17
NET 1YR
BONDS YEST PVS CHG WK MO QTR AGO
Barclays LongT-BdIdx 3.54 3.65 -0.11 t t s 2.69
Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.19 5.23 -0.04 t t s 4.28
Barclays USAggregate 2.53 2.54 -0.01 t s s 1.78
Barclays US High Yield 6.19 6.18 +0.01 t t s 6.17
Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.71 4.72 -0.01 t s s 3.61
Barclays CompT-BdIdx 1.64 1.75 -0.11 t t s 1.00
Barclays US Corp 3.47 3.49 -0.02 t s s 2.91
Interestrates
The yield on the
10-year
Treasury note
fell to 2.69
percent
Wednesday.
Yields affect
interest rates on
consumer loans.
Crude Oil (bbl) 108.07 105.42 +2.51 +17.7
Ethanol (gal) 1.85 1.81 +0.06 -15.8
Heating Oil (gal) 3.04 3.00 +1.41 -0.2
Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.71 3.75 -0.85 +10.8
Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.74 2.66 +3.04 -2.5
FUELS CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
Gold (oz) 1307.80 1309.50 -0.13 -21.9
Silver (oz) 21.51 21.74 -1.02 -28.7
Platinum (oz) 1425.20 1422.40 +0.20 -7.4
Copper (lb) 3.28 3.23 +1.72 -9.8
Palladium (oz) 701.45 705.25 -0.54 -0.2
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
Cattle (lb) 1.25 1.25 +0.08 -3.6
Coffee (lb) 1.11 1.11 +0.23 -22.6
Corn (bu) 4.56 4.54 +0.50 -34.7
Cotton (lb) 0.86 0.85 +1.13 +14.1
Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 348.10 341.80 +1.84 -6.9
Orange Juice (lb) 1.27 1.28 -0.67 +9.2
Soybeans (bu) 13.48 13.43 +0.39 -5.0
Wheat (bu) 6.47 6.43 +0.54 -16.9
AGRICULTURE CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD
Commodities
Oil rose after a
report showed
the amount of
supplies in in-
ventory fell more
than expected. It
rose further after
the Federal
Reserve said
that it will main-
tain its economic
stimulus.
/WVWCN(WPFU
American Cent AllCapGrInv LG 34.54 +.26 +20.9 +15.6+16.6 +8.9 E C D
VistaInv MG 22.01 +.16 +24.0 +22.1+15.6 +6.7 D D E
American Century GrowthInv LG 32.30 +.37 +20.2 +16.0+15.9 +9.7 E D C
SelectInv LG 51.69 +.64 +18.7 +12.8+16.8 +9.7 E C C
American Funds GrthAmA m LG 42.55 +.54 +23.9 +24.9+16.8 +9.6 A C C
IncAmerA m MA 19.94 +.26 +13.3 +14.4+12.7 +9.3 B A A
InvCoAmA m LB 36.58 +.48 +22.7 +21.7+15.7 +9.3 C D C
SmCpWldA m WS 49.02 +.52 +22.8 +26.0+13.4 +11.3 A B A
Dreyfus MidCapIdx MB 35.88 +.35 +24.1 +25.9+18.3 +11.5 C C B
Fidelity DivGrow LB 33.82 +.43 +22.3 +21.4+16.2 +11.0 C C A
LowPriStk d MB 47.20 +.37 +25.5 +27.8+19.2 +13.6 B B A
Magellan LG 91.03 +1.21 +24.8 +22.4+14.5 +7.3 B E E
FrankTemp-Franklin FlxCpGr A m LG 58.62 +.66 +25.0 +20.8+14.2 +8.7 C E D
FrankTemp-Mutual Discov Z WS 34.07 +.30 +19.6 +20.7 +11.9 +9.0 C C B
Shares C m LV 26.53 +.19 +20.4 +20.5+13.2 +7.2 D E D
Janus EntrprsT MG 80.42 +.43 +21.9 +25.7+17.9 +10.9 C B C
OverseasT FG 36.56 +.81 +6.9 +14.2 -4.4 +2.9 E E E
T LG 38.30 +.45 +19.9 +18.6+13.8 +8.6 D E D
Lord Abbett AffiliatA m LV 14.74 +.18 +23.5 +23.6+14.5 +6.9 C E E
MFS MAInvGrB m LG 19.40 +.22 +21.0 +20.1+17.5 +10.4 C B B
Neuberger Berman GenesisInv MG 42.59 +.26 +25.2 +26.6+19.3 +9.0 B A D
Oppenheimer CapApC m LG 49.59 +.57 +17.8 +14.1+13.5 +6.1 E E E
GlobOppB m WS 35.86 +.40 +32.7 +29.9+13.4 +12.7 A B A
Pioneer CoreEqB m LB 13.30 +.14 +20.5 +17.3+15.6 +8.9 E D C
Prudential Investmen ValueA m LB 19.80 +.17 +26.8 +28.9+15.5 +9.0 A D C
Putnam HiYldA m HY 7.96 +.01 +4.2 +6.7 +8.6 +10.5 B B B
IntlEqA m FB 22.45 ... +16.7 +21.3+10.5 +5.5
VoyagerA m LG 28.65 +.44 +30.0 +25.8 +11.8 +13.1 A E A
T Rowe Price BlChpGr LG 57.96 +.84 +27.0 +24.0+20.6 +12.5 A A A
NewHoriz SG 45.80 +.39 +38.1 +34.8+27.8 +18.2 A A A
Vanguard Wndsr LV 19.12 +.19 +27.2 +30.1+19.2 +11.7 A A A
PERCENT RETURN PEER RANK
FAMILY FUND OBJ NAV CHG YTD 1YR 3YR 5YR 1YR 3YR 5YR
6-month T-bill .03 .03 ... r t t .13
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
A4
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Joe Machens Capital City
NEW YORK (AP) — The stock
market hit a record high Wednes-
day as investors cheered the Federal
Reserve’s surprise decision to keep
its economic stimulus program in
place.
Stocks traded slightly lower
throughout the morning, but took off
immediately after the Fed’s decision
in the early afternoon. Bond yields
fell sharply — their biggest move in
nearly two years. The price of gold
had its biggest one-day jump in four
years as traders anticipated that the
Fed’s decision might cause inflation.
Fed policymakers decided to
maintain the central bank’s $85 bil-
lion in monthly bond buying, a pro-
gram that had been in place in one
form or another since late 2008. The
buying is designed to keep interest
rates low to spur economic growth,
and has fueled a four-and-a-half-year
bull run in stocks.
While the U.S. economy appeared
to be improving, the bank’s poli-
cymakers “decided to await more
evidence that progress will be sus-
tained” before deciding to slow bond
purchases. The bank also cut its full-
year economic outlook for this year
and the next.
Stock traders completely shrugged
off the Fed’s dimmer outlook and
focused on the continued stimulus.
The S&P 500 surged 20.76 points,
or 1.2 percent, to 1,725.52, slicing
through its previous all-time high of
1,709.67 set on Aug. 2.
The Dow Jones industrial average
jumped 147.21 points, or 1 percent,
to 15,676.94, also above its previous
record high of 15,658 from Aug. 2.
The Nasdaq composite rose 37.94
points, 1 percent, to 3,783.64.
The fate of the Fed’s economic
stimulus program has been the
biggest question on Wall Street for
months. It was widely expected that
the Fed would cut back on its bond
buying at the September meeting.
Tom di Galoma, a bond trader
at ED&F Man Capital, said he was
“completely shocked” that the Fed
decided to wait.
Some investors advised caution,
even as the stock market hit all-time
highs.
While the Fed’s decision is posi-
tive for the market in the short term,
“investors need to take a step back
and consider the idea that maybe
the U.S economy is on weaker foot-
ing than we originally thought,” said
Marc Doss, regional chief investment
officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank.
Bond prices also rose sharply,
sending yields lower. The yield on the
10-year Treasury note fell to 2.68 per-
cent — from 2.87 percent a minute
before the Fed released its statement.
It was rush into bonds by investors
not seen since October 2011. That
yield is a benchmark for many kinds
of lending rates, including home
mortgages.
As bond yields plunged, investors
snapped up stocks that tend to pay
richer dividends, such as utilities. The
Dow Jones utility average jumped 3
percent, its best day in two years.
Home builder stocks also rose as
investors speculated that the Fed’s
pledge to keep interest rates low
would continue to benefit the hous-
ing market. Pulte Homes, Hovnanian
and Toll Brothers were up more than
five percent each, while homebuilder
D.R. Horton jumped nearly seven
percent.
The price of gold jumped $55, or 4
percent, to $1,364 an ounce.
Stock market sets record after Fed keeps stimulus
SEC eyes mandate on
CEO-worker pay gap
WASHINGTON (AP) — Public
companies would have to show
the difference in pay between
their CEOs and ordinary employ-
ees under a proposal advanced by
federal regulators.
The Securities and Exchange
Commission voted 3-2 Wednes-
day to propose a rule that would
compel companies to report
that information publicly. Com-
panies would have to report the
ratio between their chief execu-
tive’s annual compensation and
the median, or midpoint, pay of
employees.
Business groups such as the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce vig-
orously oppose the requirement,
saying it will be costly and time
consuming for companies to
gather the pay information on
their employees.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 A5
NATIONAL
www.newstribune.com
AP
Law enforcement officials from multiple agencies Wednesday examine the two cars
pulled from Foss Lake, in Foss, Okla. The Oklahoma State Medical Examiner’s Office
says authorities have recovered skeletal remains of multiple bodies in the Oklahoma
lake where the cars were recovered.
ELLENWOOD, Ga. (AP)
— A 14-year-old Georgia girl
abducted in a home invasion
robbery was found alive on
Wednesday after a wide search
by several law enforcement
agencies, and two suspects
were in custody, police said.
Ayvani Hope Perez had
been taken from her suburban
Atlanta home early Tuesday
after authorities said armed
robbers broke in, demanded
money and jewelry and were
told there was none. Authori-
ties said Wednesday they
hadn’t established a motive for
the abduction.
Clayton County Police Chief
Gregory Porter said the girl was
found in a nearby community,
Conyers, and has since been
reunited with her family.
“She’s in good health, she’s
being evaluated as we speak,”
Porter said.
Wildrego Jackson, 29, faces
a federal charge of conspiracy
to kidnap. The police chief also
said Juan Alberto Contreras-
Rodriguez, a 40-year-old Mexi-
can national, has been arrested
on immigration-related charg-
es.
He did not elaborate fur-
ther.
It was not immediately
known if the two men had law-
yers. Henry County sheriff’s
records indicate that a man
named Juan Alberto Contreras-
Ramirez was arrested on drug
trafficking charges in Decem-
ber of 2012, but the charges
were later dropped. A federal
official confirmed that man
was Contreras-Rodriguez.
He and Jackson were not
the men identified in police
sketches released Tuesday,
FBI Special Agent Rick Max-
well said. Investigators are still
looking for tips about the two
men pictured in the sketches,
Maxwell added.
When asked at a news con-
ference whether the suspects
in custody knew Ayvani and
her family, Maxwell said only
that “we have not determined
the relationship between those
people.”
The FBI and the Georgia
Bureau of Investigation assist-
ed Clayton County police in
the search.
Police: Ga. teen abducted
from home found alive
FOSS, Okla. (AP) — For more than a genera-
tion, this rural community has been haunted by
a mystery: What happened to three teens who
headed off to a high school football game in the
early 1970s and were never seen again?
Police believe they may finally have an
answer after divers on a training exercise dis-
covered a car containing skeletal remains in
a murky lake. Divers also recovered a second
vehicle containing bones, and investigators
were searching Wednesday for other cold cases
that might match the grim discovery.
The cars were found not far from a marina,
but Custer County Sheriff Bruce Peoples said
it was no surprise that the murky waters held
a secret.
“This lake isn’t crystal clear. It’s a typical
western Oklahoma lake with a lot of silt in it.
The visibility is only 6 to 12 inches on a good
day,” Peoples said. “We’ll consider it a mystery
until we prove otherwise.”
The sheriff said it was entirely possible
that people simply drove into Foss Lake and
drowned.
“We know that to happen, even if you know
your way around. It can happen that quick,” he
added.
The sheriff said he was confident the dive
teams had found the teens because one of the
cars was a Chevrolet Camaro that appeared to
match the description of the vehicle the two
boys and one girl were in when they vanished
in 1970. The other vehicle was a Chevrolet from
the early 1950s.
“We thought it was just going to be stolen
vehicles, and that’s not what it turned out to be,
obviously,” Highway Patrol spokeswoman Betsy
Randolph said.
The origins of the second vehicle were less
clear. It was found 50 feet from the end of a
boat ramp.
Tim Porter of Enid said he believed the
remains could be those of his grandfather, John
Albert Porter, who disappeared along with two
other people in 1969.
“Forty-something years of wondering who
or why,” Porter said. “If it is my grandfather in
there, it’s a gift.”
The sheriff said Wednesday he was not sure
whether the cars held five or six bodies. The
state medical examiner’s office believed the
remains of six people were recovered.
The bones were being sent to the medical
examiner’s office for identification and to deter-
mine the cause of death.
Divers had found three skulls as of Tuesday
evening. They planned to continue looking for
more remains, Randolph said.
Authorities hoped the discoveries offer some
relief to families who may have gone decades
wondering about the fate of a missing loved
one.
Submerged cars
may solve cold cases
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)
— Confronted at a hospital by
police who said he’d just killed
a man, drunk driver Matthew
Cordle was angry and in denial.
“He became very irate, and
began yelling, he didn’t kill
anyone, he didn’t do it, and he
wasn’t going to give them any
blood sample,” Franklin Coun-
ty Prosecutor Ron O’Brien said
Wednesday.
Sober and in recovery,
Cordle had a change of heart.
He decided to plead guilty as
quickly as possible, and made
an online video confessing to
the crime. He didn’t waver from
the position he took in the Sept.
3 video, and on Wednesday he
made good on his pledge and
pleaded guilty to aggravated
vehicular homicide.
“I drank so much I was
blacked out,” Cordle told
Franklin County Judge David
Fais near the end of a 38-min-
ute hearing.
“So I would say this was a
binge drinking situation, cor-
rect, Mr. Cordle?” Fais asked.
“Yes, your honor,” Cordle
said.
His guilty plea came just
over a week after he was indict-
ed, light speed compared to
most court cases which can
drag on for weeks or months.
Sentencing was set for Oct.
10. Cordle, 22, faces two to 8
1
⁄2
years in prison, a $15,000 fine
and loss of driving privileges
for life. He also pleaded guilty
to operating a vehicle under
the influence of alcohol. His
blood-alcohol level was more
than twice the legal limit of
0.08.
In a 3
1
⁄2-minute video posted
two weeks ago, Cordle admit-
ted he killed a man from
another Columbus suburb and
said he “made a mistake” when
he decided to drive that night.
“My name is Matthew Cordle,
and on June 22, 2013, I hit and
killed Vincent Canzani,” he
says somberly. “This video will
act as my confession.”
Cordle told Fais he’d been at
a series of bars near downtown
Columbus and was on his way
home but remembered little
else.
“I have no recollection,” he
said, when asked if any of his
friends had tried to stop him
from driving. He also couldn’t
remember how long he’d been
drinking or if he’d had any-
thing to eat. His attorneys said
he may have suffered a brain
injury from a cracked skull in
the accident.
Two other cars narrowly
avoided involvement in the
crash that night, including two
women in a car who suffered
minor injuries as they swerved
to avoid Cordle, O’Brien said.
Cordle did not ask to be
released before sentencing and
the judge revoked his $255,000
bond.
Cordle received permission
to give a media interview from
jail Thursday with a news orga-
nization his attorneys wouldn’t
identify.
Video confessor pleads
guilty to fatal DUI
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OTTAWA, Ontario (AP)
— Passengers screamed “Stop!
Stop!” seconds before their bus
crashed through a crossing bar-
rier and into a commuter train
during morning rush hour in
Canada’s capital on Wednesday,
killing six people and injuring
34.
“He smoked the train,” wit-
ness Mark Cogan said of the bus
driver, who was among those
killed. “He went through the
guard rail and just hammered
the train, and then it was just
mayhem.”
It was not immediately clear
what caused the bus to smash
through the lowered barrier at a
crossing in suburban Ottawa.
The front of the double-
decker bus was ripped away by
the impact, and the train’s loco-
motive and one passenger car
derailed, though there were no
reports of major injuries to train
passengers or crew.
Eight were still listed in criti-
cal condition late Wednesday.
The crash brought trains on
the national Via Rail’s Ottawa-
Toronto route to a standstill.
It was Canada’s second
major rail accident in less than
three months. A runaway oil
train derailed and exploded in
a Quebec town on July 6, killing
47 people.
Tanner Trepanier said he and
other passengers could see the
four-car train bearing down on
them as the bus approached the
crossing.
“People started screaming,
‘Stop! Stop!’ because they could
see the train coming down the
track,” Trepanier said.
But the driver didn’t slow
down, said Rebecca Guilbeault,
who was on the bus with her 1-
year-old son.
“I don’t know if the bus driv-
er blacked out,” she said. “I’ve
seen a few people dead, some-
one ripped in half.”
Another passenger, Gregory
Mech, said the train crossing
has about a 90-degree bend and
he didn’t think the driver saw
that the signals were flashing
and the barrier was down.
“The bus actually hit the
train dead on,” Mech told the
Canadian Broadcasting Corp.
Passenger Romi Gupta, a 40-
year-old office worker headed
to her job in downtown Ottawa,
boarded what she called the
“overfull” bus at its last stop
before the crash.
“The driver was OK. I got in
a minute before and I said hello
to him and he was fine,” said
Gupta.
Moments later, she looked
out the window and saw the
train headed straight for the
bus.
Transit union president Craig
Watson confirmed the driver
was killed. He did not identify
the driver but said he was in
his early 40s and had been with
the bus company for about 10
years.
www.newstribune.com
A6 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 INTERNATIONAL
AP
Emergency
personnel
survey the
scene after
a collision
between a
Via Rail train
and a city bus
at a crossing
in Ottawa,
Ontario.
6 killed as bus strikes passenger train
Mexico floods kill 80, thousands stranded
ACAPULCO, Mexico (AP) — The toll from devastating twin
storms climbed to 80 on Wednesday as isolated areas reported
damage and deaths to the outside world, and Mexican officials
said that a massive landslide in the mountains north of the resort
of Acapulco could drive the number of confirmed casualties even
higher.
Interior Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chong said federal
authorities had reached the cutoff village of La Pintada by helicop-
ter and had airlifted out 35 residents, four of whom were seriously
injured in the slide. Officials have not yet seen any bodies, he said,
despite reports from people in the area that at least 18 people had
been killed.
Woman survives 16 days trapped in well
BEIJING (AP) — A woman stranded for 16 days in an aban-
doned well in central China said Wednesday that she shouted for
help every day and began to lose hope, but that she managed to
survive on raw corn and rainwater.
Su Qixiu, 48, was gathering herbs when she fell into the 13-foot-
deep well in a village in Henan province on Sept. 1. Her husband
and children unsuccessfully searched for her, but she was finally
found Monday by a passer-by.
Su said she lost around 33 pounds during her ordeal.
She said she was walking past a cornfield but couldn’t see the
road clearly and fell into the well.
French Senate: Ban child beauty pageants
PARIS (AP) — France’s Senate has voted to ban beauty pageants
for children under 16, in an effort to protect girls from being sexu-
alized too early.
Anyone who enters a child into such a contest would face up to
two years in prison and 30,000 euros in fines. A pageant organizer
lamented that the move was so severe.
The Senate approved the measure 197-146 overnight, as an
amendment to a law on women’s rights. The legislation must go
to the lower house of parliament for further debate and another
vote.
Calls for debate on Muslim veil mount in Britain
LONDON (AP) — In Britain this week, a judge struck a blow
for religious freedom. Or for secularism. It all depends on whom
you ask.
Judge Peter Murphy ruled that a female Muslim defendant
may stand trial wearing a face-covering veil — but must remove it
when giving evidence. The compromise ruling had some insisting
it backs a woman’s religious right to wear the veil, and others say-
ing it shows British justice remains independent and won’t bow to
religious demands.
The case has reignited a debate about Muslim veils that has
flared across Europe, sparking protests and exacerbating religious
tensions in several countries.
Anti-fascist protests across Greece turn violent
KERATSINI, Greece (AP) — Violent clashes broke out in several
Greek cities Wednesday after a musician described as an anti-fas-
cist activist was stabbed to death by a man who said he belonged
to the far-right Golden Dawn party. More than 75 people were
detained.
The death of Pavlos Fyssas, 34, drew condemnation from across
Greece’s political spectrum and from abroad. While the extremist
Golden Dawn has been blamed for numerous violent attacks in
the past, the overnight stabbing is the most serious violence so far
directly attributed to a member.
NKorea urges talks ‘without preconditions’
BEIJING (AP) — North Korea’s senior nuclear strategist called
Wednesday for a new round of six-nation denuclearization talks
without preconditions, a proposal unlikely to gain traction in
Washington.
First Vice Foreign Minister Kim Kye Gwan’s remarks in Beijing
came at a forum marking the 10th anniversary of the talks, which
have been stalled since the last round in 2008 broke down over
how to verify North Korea was meeting its pledges.
“We are ready to enter the six-party talks without precondi-
tions,” Kim was quoted as saying by South Korea’s Yonhap news
agency.
QUICKWORLD
Rocket trajectory links
Syrian military to attack
BEIRUT (AP) — The trajec-
tory of the rockets that deliv-
ered the nerve agent sarin in
last month’s deadly attack is
among the key evidence linking
elite Syrian troops based in the
mountains overlooking Damas-
cus to the strike that killed
hundreds of people, diplomats
and human rights officials said
Wednesday.
The Aug. 21 attack precipitat-
ed the crisis over Syria’s chemi-
cal weapons. The U.S. threat-
ened a military strike against
Syria, which led to a plan nego-
tiated by Moscow and Wash-
ington under which the regime
of President Bashar Assad is to
abandon its chemical weapons
stockpile.
A U.N. report released Mon-
day confirmed that chemical
weapons were used in the attack
but did not ascribe blame.
The United States, Britain
and France cited evidence in
the report to declare Assad’s
government responsible. Rus-
sia called the report “one-sided”
and says it has “serious reason
to suggest that this was a provo-
cation” by the rebels fighting the
Assad regime in Syria’s civil war.
The report, however, pro-
vided data that suggested the
chemical-loaded rockets that
hit two Damascus suburbs were
fired from the northwest, indi-
cating they came from nearby
mountains where the Syrian
military is known to have major
bases.
Mount Qassioun, which over-
looks Damascus, is home to one
of Assad’s three residences and
is widely used by elite forces to
shell suburbs of the capital. The
powerful Republican Guard and
army’s Fourth Division, head-
ed by Assad’s younger brother,
Maher, has bases there.
A senior U.N. diplomat,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity because some of this
material was from private
meetings, said: “It was 100 per-
cent clear that the regime used
chemical weapons.”
The diplomat cited five key
details, including the scale of
the attack, the quality of the
sarin, the type of rockets, the
warheads used and the rockets’
trajectory.
A Human Rights Watch
report also said the presumed
flight path of the rockets cited
by the U.N. inspectors’ report
led back to a Republican Guard
base in Mount Qassioun.
“Connecting the dots pro-
vided by these numbers allows
us to see for ourselves where
the rockets were likely launched
from and who was responsible,”
said Josh Lyons, a satellite imag-
ery analyst for the New York-
based group.
But, he added, the evidence
was “not conclusive.”
VOTE for the cutest pet!
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MIDMISSOURI
MSP program at State
Archives canceled
The Missouri State Archive’s “Shanks
to Shakers: Reflections of the Missouri
State Penitentiary” program has been
canceled.
The program had been scheduled for
7 p.m. today at the Missouri Archives.
Antique Power festival
begins Friday
The Osage River Antique Power Asso-
ciation is holding the 13th annual Reliv-
ing the Past show Friday through Sun-
day at the Miller County Fairgrounds in
Eldon.
The event includes daily demon-
strations of an antique sawmill, steam
engines, hay baling, threshing, shingle
sawing and blacksmithing.
There is a garden tractor pull at 7 p.m.
Friday, and the Helen Russell & Company
Show/dance will be held at 10 a.m. Satur-
day. There will also be a parade at noon
and a tractor pull at 2 p.m. Saturday.
Volunteer opportunities
Hospice Compassus seeks non-medi-
cal volunteers to provide compassionate
support to terminally ill patients and
their families. Duties may include: listen-
ing, reading and visiting with patients,
caregiver relief and/or office assistance.
Contact Kathy Knapp at 556-3547.
JCTV seeks volunteers to assist with
videotaping community events and
city meetings, editing video and assist-
ing with studio productions. Training is
available. Interested persons should call
681-5443 or send an email to enloeg@
lincolnu.edu.
Not-for-profit groups that would like to be added to the
database for periodic inclusion may contact Mary Fisch-
er, editorial assistant, News Tribune Co., 210 Monroe St.,
Jefferson City, Mo., 65101, by telephone at 761-0240 or
send an e-mail to edasst@newstribune.com.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
B
INSIDE
SECTION
B2 Obituaries
B3 Opinion
B4 State N
E
W
S

T
R
I
B
U
N
E
COMINGEVENTS
Tell us about your event or news! You can
submit stories for News Tribune briefs by e-mail-
ing them to nt@newstribune.com. If you prefer to
submit items via hand delivery, e-mail, fax or mail,
call Mary Fischer at 761-0240 for assistance.
Post your event in this
calendar and online at
newstribune.com/go or
by e-mailing the details
to nt@newstribune.com.
If you prefer to submit
items via hand delivery,
e-mail, fax or mail, call
Mary Fischer at 761-0240 for assistance.
TODAY
• Free Community Meal, 5-6 p.m., Holts Summit Civic
Building.
• “Miracle Worker,” 7:30 p.m., Thursday-Friday, 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Stained Glass Theatre, 830 E. High St., 634-
5313.
• “Shanks to Shakers: Reflections of the Missouri
State Penitentiary,” 7 p.m., Missouri State Archives. (can-
celled)
• Jam Session, 6:30-10 p.m., California Nutrition Center
featuring finger food, drinks, players, singers, dancers and
card players.
• Yoga Class, 8 a.m., Missouri River Regional Library, Art
Gallery, 634-6064, ext. 238.
• Teen Anime Club, 3:30 p.m., Missouri River Regional
Library, Art Gallery, 634-6064, ext. 248.
• Book Worm Book Club, 7 p.m., Missouri River Regional
Library, Storyhour Room, 634-6064, ext. 253.
• Free Community Dinner, 5:30-6:30 p.m., First Baptist
Church Fellowship Hall.
• Jefferson City Fire Fighters Local 671 charity barbe-
cue, 4-7 p.m., Memorial Park, chicken or pork steak, carry
out available, tickets at the door.
FRIDAY
• Cole County Farmers Market, 4-6 p.m., Kmart park-
ing lot.
• Central Bank Tailgate, 5-6:30 p.m., Helias vs Hickman,
hot dogs, chips and drinks.
• “Miracle Worker,” 7:30 p.m., Thursday-Friday, 2 p.m.,
Saturday, Stained Glass Theatre, 830 E. High St., 634-
5313.
• Family Movie Night, “Cloudy with a Chance of
Meatballs,” 6 p.m., Missouri River Regional Library, 634-
6064, ext. 299.
• Rummage/bake Sale, 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Grace Lutheran
Church, Holts Summit.
• River City Habitat for Humanity chicken dinner, 11
a.m.-1 p.m. and 4-7 p.m., Eagles Club, 635-8439 for car-
ryout of five or more during lunch only.
Auditor questions high landfill fee
Schweich still rates
state program ‘good’
By Bob Watson
bwatson@newstribune.com
Missouri may be charging too
much for each ton of solid waste
going into landfills, state Auditor
Tom Schweich said Wednesday.
His 11-page audit of the Natural
Resource’s department’s Solid Waste
Management Program also suggest-
ed that lawmakers have required
too many audits for solid waste
management districts.
Lawmakers created the program
to reduce the state’s solid waste in
landfills, and to help prevent illegal
dumping and other environmental
problems.
The 20 solid waste management
districts were established in 1990.
Schweich’s audit, which covered
the 2011 and 2012 state business
years ending on June 30, 2012, rec-
ommended that DNR “perform a
comprehensive review to deter-
mine the most cost effective meth-
od to deliver solid waste manage-
ment services statewide, including
whether the current tonnage fee
can be reduced or the funding allo-
cation formula should be revised.”
But the audit also rated the pro-
gram’s overall operations as “good.”
Lawmakers this year created a
special, 10-member Joint Commit-
tee on Solid Waste Management
District Operations, which will hold
its first meeting next week.
It is charged with examining
“district operations, including ... the
efficiency, efficacy, and reasonable-
ness of costs and expenses of such
districts to Missouri taxpayers.”
The state charges $2.11 a ton
for solid waste that is taken to any
landfill, and the money collected
is paid into the state’s Solid Waste
Management Fund.
After the first $1 million collected
is divided between the state’s Envi-
ronmental Improvement and Energy
Resources Authority and manage-
ment districts that get fewer funds
from the current state formula than
under a previous formula, the rest
of the money is split between the
statewide program, 39 percent, and
the 20 districts, which share 61 per-
cent of the money. Each district gets
state money based on a formula that
includes the district’s population
and number of landfills.
Districts may spend no more
Body on porch
was female
Man believed her
ex-roommate arrested
on unrelated charges
By Ceil Abbott
For the News Tribune
CAMDENTON — Camden County author-
ities say the badly decomposed body found
last Sunday in the Camelot Estates Subdivi-
sion in Camden County is that of a female.
Although the body has not been positively
identified, in a press release sent out Wednes-
day, the Camden County Sheriff’s office said
they believe it to be that of the woman who
rented the home.
The sheriff’s department also said 30-year-
old Jamison D. Shelton has been arrested on
unrelated charges. Shelton has no perma-
nent address, but is a known associate of the
woman who lived in the home for a time.
Shelton was arrested Tuesday at a Jefferson
City motel by sheriff’s detectives in coopera-
tion with the Eldon and Jefferson City police
departments and the U.S. Marshals Service.
The woman’s body was found on the back
porch of a home she rented. The landlord
contacted the sheriff’s department after he
discovered what he believed to be decompos-
ing human remains. The landlord had gone to
the home after failing to hear from the renter
for an extended period of time.
When deputies arrived they discovered
Tour to feature
potted gardens
By the News Tribune
The Capital Garden Club of Jefferson City is
sponsoring a Backyard Garden Pots and Quilts
Tour from noon-5 p.m. Sunday at various gardens
around the city.
Mary Ann Thacker, a member of the club and
chairman of the event, said the tour will offer a
great menagerie of potted gardens.
“Some will be stylish, and some will be more
upscale,” she said. “Some were made using recy-
cled objects. It will be unusual and quaint.”
She said each garden location will also show-
case a variety of handmade quilts.
Tickets for the tour are $10 and may be pur-
chased at the garden locations or by calling 635-
9585.
The garden locations include:
• 9604 Stoney Gap Road
• 4504 Randall Drive (Taos area)
• 7620 Forest Hill Drive (off of Route J)
• 1100 Jobe
• 1201 Jobe
• 220 West Fillmore (near South School)
Nuclear incident
exercise next week
By Katherine Cummins
For the News Tribune
The Federal Emergency Management
Agency will conduct a test of local and state
radiological emergency preparedness and
response plans in support of the Callaway
Energy Center on Tuesday that includes offi-
cials from Callaway, Gasconade, Osage and
Montgomery counties.
The exercise is a required test every two
years involving the activation of emergency
facilities by participating local and state offi-
cials — a process which will be monitored by
the FEMA Region VII Radiological Emergency
Preparedness Program. The on-site perfor-
mance at the Callaway Energy Center will be
evaluated by the Nuclear Regulatory Com-
mission.
“The exercise is conducted every two years
just to make sure all of the responding agen-
cies and elected officials would be able to
respond in a coordinated fashion in case
there’s a problem at the nuclear plant,” said
Michael O’Connell with the Missouri Depart-
ment of Public Safety. “This is considered a
drill to make sure everything is in place and
set up in case there were a real event.”
Western District Commissioner Doc Kritzer
said there was a preliminary tabletop exercise
several months ago in preparation for Tues-
day’s test.
“We’ll start out with an unusual event, then
it elevates,” Kritzer said of the drill. “There are
four levels, and at each level different things
take place — they’ll throw situations at you to
make you think and make you plan. We’ll go all
the way through to a release mode where we’ll
have to set up transportation needs, evacua-
tion plans and calling in for assistance.”
He described the biennial test as “a good
time to go through and learn and evaluate.”
“It’s a very major occurrence, but it gets
us communicating and working together,”
Roberto Clemente Jr. carries on father’s legacy
Dak Dillon/Contributed
Roberto Clemente Jr. speaks during the Hancock Symposium
on Wednesday at Westminster College. Sports was the theme
for the event this year.
By Elyssa Mann
For the News Tribune
A global sports symposium at
Westminster College closed Wednes-
day with a link to a renowned sports
humanitarian.
Roberto Clemente Jr., the son of
famous baseball player and human-
itarian Roberto Clemente, was the
closing speaker at The Hancock Sym-
posium.
Clemente Jr. spent much of his ses-
sion discussing the profound impact
his father had on the world. Though
he’d never been to these places, a
stadium in Germany has been named
after Clemente and a Japanese profes-
sional baseball award is in his honor
— the Golden Spirit Award.
“He lived as a baseball legend,”
Clemente said, “but died a hero.”
Clemente was on a plane deliver-
ing supplies and aid to survivors of
a Nicaraguan earthquake when his
plane went down just a few miles after
takeoff Dec. 31, 1972.
Before his death, Clemente was
known for his kindness and goodwill.
“He would get up after a night
game and hand deliver a set of per-
sonally-signed letters to a nearby hos-
pital,” Clemente said. “He was more
than a baseball player, he was some-
one people looked up to.”
While Clemente is now awed by
how much his father accomplished
in 38 years, he didn’t understand the
impact he’d had on baseball and the
world during his career.
“For me, he wasn’t a superhero, he
wasn’t a baseball player,” Clemente
said. “He was just my dad.”
Clemente was recently named as
a True Sports Hero by Fox Sports and
Julie Smith/News Tribune
Quigg Commons
Pam Quigg Henrickson and her mother,
Shirley Quigg, react to the large sign
unveiled Wednesday afternoon at the new
Bill Quigg Commons on Fourth Street in
North Jefferson City. At right, Phil Stiles
walks by two of four bicycles mounted in
concrete at the Commons, a cooperative
project between the Master Gardeners and
the Parks and Recreation Foundation. The
area adjacent to the demonstration gardens
has been designed to be a picnic area or
just a pleasant place to walk. In time, picnic
tables will be installed among other things
for a welcome feeling. Please see Body, p. 2
Please see Landfill, p. 2
Please see Events, p. 2
Please see Nuclear, p. 2
Please see Clemente, p. 2
• United Way Barbecue, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.,
News Tribune parking lot, 210 Monroe St.
• United Way Rummage Sale, 9 a.m.-
noon, News Tribune, 210 Monroe St.
• POW/MIA Recognition Day, 6:30 p.m.,
Capital Veterans Memorial.
SATURDAY
• Cole County Farmers Market, 2-4 p.m.,
Kmart parking lot.
• Lincoln University Farmers Market, 9
a.m.-noon, 1219 Chestnut St.
• St. Aloysius Fall Festival, noon-mid-
night, Argyle, chicken dinner, soap box derby,
bingo, entertainment, kid’s games, country
store, silent auction.
• JCMG Fun Walk/run, 6:30 p.m., 1225
W. Stadium Blvd., orthopaedic parking lot,
635-0234, ext. 5210.
• St. Thomas Knights of Columbus Gar-
den Tractor Pull, 4 p.m., Knights of Colum-
bus, St. Thomas.
• “Miracle Worker,” 2 p.m., Thursday-Fri-
day, 2 p.m., Saturday, Stained Glass Theatre,
830 E. High St., 634-5313.
• K of C Samaritan Center Food Drive,
8 a.m.-noon, Hy-Vee, Gerbes West, Gerbes
East, Moser’s, Schnuck’s, Schulte’s, Walmart
on Stadium and Walmart super store.
• Teen After Hours, 6 p.m., Missouri River
Regional Library, Art Gallery, 634-6064, ext.
248.
• Rummage/bake Sale, 8 a.m.-noon,
Grace Lutheran Church, Holts Summit.
• California Ham & Turkey Festival, in
California.
• Dedication of the new Seabees monu-
ment, 11 a.m., Jefferson City National Cem-
etery, 1024 E. McCarty.
• JC Fire Department/Unilever Family
Fun Event, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Fire Department
Training Facility, 2304 Hyde Park Road,
includes Hotter-n-Hell 5K at 9 a.m.
SUNDAY
• Historic City of Jefferson 8th annual
Homes Tour-Hayselton River Walk Tour,
1-5 p.m., 635-3265, tickets at Samuel’s Tuxe-
dos, Art Bazaar and Schulte’s Fresh Foods.
• Backyard Gardens and Quilts, noon-5
p.m., sponsored by Capital Garden Club of
Jefferson City, tickets available at the Gar-
dens or by calling 635-9585.
• Family Fun Day, 3-6 p.m., Cedar Grove
Baptist Church, Holts Summit, horse rides,
wagon rides, face painting, ring toss, Lego
building and more.
• Walk to End Alzheimer’s, 11:30 a.m.-2
p.m., Missouri State Capitol south lawn.
• Friend’s Day, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Fountain
of Life Worship Center,95 Grant Street, free
barbecue, bounce houses, face painting.

MONDAY
• Russellville City Council, 7 p.m.
• LEGOs, 7 p.m., Missouri River Regional
Library, Art Gallery, 634-6064, ext. 229.
• CASA fundraiser, 6:30 p.m., Blair Oaks
High School, Capital City Dunkers vs Harlem
Ambassadors, tickets at Samuel’s Tuxedos,
Hy-Vee, Joe Machens, EcoWater Systems
and Finishing Touches Gift Shop.
TUESDAY
• Cole County Farmers Market, 4-6 p.m.,
Kmart parking lot.
• Free Community Meal, 5-6 p.m., Holts
Summit Civic Building.
• Preschool Story Time, 10:30 a.m.,
Missouri River Regional Library, Storyhour
Room, 634-6064, ext. 229.
than 50 percent of their state
funding on administrative
costs, and auditors found the
operating cost percentages in
2011 and 2012 ranged from a
low of 7 percent to a high of 50
percent, with a statewide aver-
age of 32 percent of the $13
million state funding provided
to the districts.
During last spring’s legisla-
tive debate, several lawmakers
questioned the wide difference
in administrative costs.
Schweich’s audit said the
money currently given the dis-
tricts through the state formula
is “more than needed for current
operations, resulting in some
districts accumulating signifi-
cant reserves for future opera-
tions and grant programs.”
The audit said the Solid
Waste Management Fund’s
balance on June 30, 2012,
“included $7.6 million in
unspent district allocations.”
At the same time, the audit
found, only two of Missouri’s
eight neighboring states had
higher tonnage fees than Mis-
souri’s $2.11.
Iowa charges range from
$3.25 per ton to $4.75 per ton,
while Arkansas’ fee is $2.50 per
ton, the audit reported.
“We didn’t try to verify this,
but we’ve heard that garbage
operators like to take their
waste to Kansas or, now, even
Illinois, because their fees are
lower — so Missouri loses out
on those tonnage fees,” said
audit manager Mark Ruether.
The audit calledt is difficult
to compare Missouri’s pro-
gram to other states.
“However, the high tonnage
fee compared to contiguous
states, coupled with significant
variations in administrative cost
percentages (and) the existence
of significant fund reserves ...
suggest the delivery of solid
waste management services
could be performed more cost
effectively,” the audit said.
And Deputy State Auditor
Harry Otto added, the audi-
tors didn’t look at any effect
the higher tonnage fee might
have on reducing the amount
of waste headed for landfills.
“These things should be
breaking even,” he said. “You
shouldn’t gig somebody on one
side so that somebody on the
other side was getting a break.”
The Legislature’s joint
committee has until the end
of the year to write a report
and recommend any changes
in current law for the General
Assembly to consider.
www.newstribune.com
POLICE
REPORTS
SHERIFF
REPORTS
Tuesday calls for service
Burglaries were report-
ed in the 700 block of East
High Street, 200 block of
West Atchison Street and
1400 block of Elizabeth
Street.
Property destruc-
tion was reported in the
1100 block of Fairgrounds
Road.
Domestic violence was
reported in the 1100 block
of East Atchison Street.
Thefts were reported
in the 1100 block of Jack-
son Street, 1400 and 2300
blocks of Missouri Boule-
vard, 3600 block of Coun-
try Club Drive and at 10
Jackson St.
An accident with inju-
ries was reported in the
1100 block of U.S. 54.
Accidents with property
damage were reported at
U.S. 54 East and Madi-
son Street, 1000 block of
Madison Street, and at U.S.
50/63 West and Monroe
Street.
Officers were also called
to Jefferson City High
School after a 17-year-old
male brought a knife to
school Tuesday morning.
He admitted to having it.
In cases like these, school
board policy allows the
principal to give up to 10
days suspension and refer
the matter to the superin-
tendent. Principals believe
the boy had no malicious
intent.
Tuesday calls for service
Property destruction
was reported in the 800
block of Route T in Elston
and 5100 block of South
Brooks Drive.
Thefts were reported
in the 5100 block of West
Business 50 and 10500
block of Deer Run Road.
Burglaries were report-
ed in the 10600 block of
Deer Run Road and 2300
block of Schott Road.
Domestic violence was
reported in the 1600 block
of Chaddsford Drive.
N
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
B2
Body:
Continued from p. 1
that the remains were so
decomposed it was impos-
sible to determine the sex of
the corpse. The remains were
taken to a Springfield lab.
A DNA sample from the
corpse has been sent to a Texas
lab for positive identification.
The sheriff’s department
is asking anyone with infor-
mation to contact Sgt. Chris
Moehle at the Camden County
Sheriff’s Department at 573-
346-2243.
Landfill:
Continued from p. 1
Events:
Continued from p. 1
Nuclear:
Continued from p. 1
Clemente:
Continued from p. 1
Kritzer said. “As glitches come
up, we work on solutions. It’s a
good exercise.”
There will be a public meet-
ing Sept. 26 in Jefferson City
to describe the process and
share preliminary perfor-
mance findings. Members of
the public are invited to attend
the meeting, to be held at 10
a.m. in the auditorium of the
State Emergency Management
Agency, located at 2302 Militia
Drive.
one of the most influen-
tial Latino athletes of all
time.
After sharing his
father’s story, Clemente
also mentioned some of
the humanitarian work
he is involved in. In addi-
tion to being involved
with charity work, he has
also partnered with Car-
rick Brain Centers, a neu-
rological therapy group.
Their treatment, which
focuses on traumatic
brain injuries, helps those
with autism, ADHD, ADD,
Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s
and PTSD.
His main desire is to
carry on his father’s legacy
— kindness and goodwill.
“Every time you have
the opportunity to help
someone and you don’t,
you’re wasting your time
on Earth,” Clemente said.
Six injured in trio
of accidents
A one-vehicle accident
Wednesday morning left a Jef-
ferson City woman with minor
injuries.
According to Jefferson
City police reports, officers
responded about 7:04 a.m. to
the southbound lanes of Mis-
souri 179, just south of the
Route C overpass, for a single-
vehicle injury crash.
It was reported that a vehi-
cle, driven by Jennifer Rans-
dell, 27, ran off the road and
down an embankment.
The investigation deter-
mined that Ransdell was trav-
eling southbound in the right
lane. She changed to the left
lane and started skidding on
the wet pavement. The vehicle
then overcorrected and ran off
the road to the right and went
approximately 150 feet down an
embankment before striking a
ditch at the bottom of the hill.
Ransdell was transported to
Capital Region Medical Center
for treatment of minor injuries
and was later released.
She was wearing a seat belt.
An Eldon man was injured in
a one-vehicle accident at 11:45
a.m. Tuesday on Route W, north
of Route V, in Morgan County.
According to the Highway
Patrol report, a 2012 Isuzu box
truck driven northbound by
Bobby D. Comer, 52, dropped
the passenger side wheels off the
right shoulder, lost control and
went down a steep embankment.
It overturned and struck a tree.
Comer was taken to Capital
Region Medical Center.
He was wearing a seat belt.
Four Hermann residents
were injured in a two-vehicle
accident at 10:50 p.m. Tuesday
on Missouri 19, north of Route
Z, in Gasconade County.
The patrol reported a 1996
Jeep Cherokee, driven south-
bound by Nicholas A. Martin,
28, crossed the center line and
struck a 2006 Ford PC, driven
northbound by Wayne E. Ger-
ling Jr., 26, nearly head-on.
Martin, Gerling and a pas-
senger in the Gerling vehicle,
and Lyla Gerling, were taken to
Washington Hospital. Another
passenger in the Gerling vehi-
cle, Lyla Gerling, age unknown,
was taken to St. Louis Chil-
dren’s Hospital.
It is not known if anyone
was wearing a seat belt.
Julie Smith/News Tribune
Welcomed wings
A hummingbird found itself the recipient of kindness and
warmth from Doris Smith, Jefferson City earlier this week.
It drank food from a feeder that had been chilled by the
overnight air and when it did, the cold shocked its body
and it fell to the ground. She held it for approximately
one-half hour and after it started to flutter in her cupped
hands, she set it free. In a not-so-graceful fashion, it
flew around the enclosed porch looking for a perch or
way out. It kept going above the door header so it finally
landed on a sign. The sign must have made the tiny bird
feel welcome because it landed on it and stayed for quite
some time.
MU Provost Foster retiring
as of next January
COLUMBIA (AP) — The
provost at the University of
Missouri-Columbia is retiring
at the start of next year.
The university announced
Wednesday that Provost Brian
Foster will retire Jan. 1 after
serving in the position for more
than eight years.
The university says Foster
was instrumental in developing
the Mizzou Advantage initiative,
which promotes collaboration
among staff and students in dif-
ferent programs to address “real-
world needs and problems.” The
university’s efforts currently are
focused on four areas — food,
health, energy and the media.
Before taking the provost
job in Columbia in 2005, Foster
served as provost and vice pres-
ident for academic affairs at the
University of New Mexico.
Deputy Provost Ken Dean
will serve as interim provost
until a permanent replacement
is chosen.
State to investigate ‘pension advances’
Missouri Treasurer Clint
Zweifel is raising concerns about
deals in which retirees are signing
over future pension checks to get
quick cash.
Zweifel says the deals typi-
cally involve an upfront, lump-
sum payment to a person under
a contract in which the business
gets a portion of the person’s
future pension payments. The
deals often carry consumer fees.
Attorney General Chris
Koster said he plans to join
Zweifel in an investigation of
such practices.
Zweifel says he will work with
lawmakers next year on a bill
that would prohibit businesses
from offering cash advances in
exchange for a person’s future
public pension payments. The
bill would cover state, city, fire,
police and teacher pensions.
He says a federal law already
prohibits such arrangements
for military pensions.
KENT
Linda Kay Kent, 69, of
Jefferson City, died Saturday,
September 7, 2013, at Barnes-
Jewish Hospital in St. Louis
after a courageous battle with
cancer.
Visitation will be held on
S a t u r d a y ,
S e p t e mb e r
21, 2013, from
3-6 p.m., a
time to gather
with the fami-
ly and cele-
brate Linda's
life, at Dulle-
T r i m b l e
F u n e r a l
Home, 3210 N. Ten
Mile Drive, Jefferson City, MO
65109. Her favorite flowers
were roses and daisies and she
asked for those in lieu of large
flower arrangements.
Memorials are suggested to
Goldschmidt Cancer Center,
1432 Southwest Blvd., Jeffer-
son City, MO 65109.
Dulle-Trimble Funeral
Home is in charge of the
arrangements.
PURVIS
Alleta Margaret Purvis, 95,
of Martinsburg, passed away
Tuesday, September 17, 2013,
at Golden Living Center, Pin
Oaks, in Mexico.
Alleta is survived by three
sons, Lee Montgomery Purvis
Jr., James Edward "Jim" Purvis
and Ray Louis Purvis and wife,
Donna of Jefferson City.
Visitation will be 4-7 p.m.,
with a Prayer Service at 7 p.m.,
Thursday, September 19, at the
Myers Funeral Home in
Wellsville.
A Funeral Mass will be at 10
a.m., Friday, September 20, at
St. Joseph Catholic Church in
Martinsburg. Burial will be in
Liberty Cemetery, south of
Martinsburg.
Expressions of sympathy
may be made to the family at
www.myersfuneralhome.biz.
OBITUARIES
JOHNSON
Bertha May Watson
Johnson, 79, of Dixon, died
Monday, September 16, 2013,
at her residence near Dixon.
Survivors include her
adopted son, Christopher
Osteen; three step-children,
Mike Johnson, Mary Ann Wat-
son, and Christopher Johnson;
one brother, Small Watson of
Dixon; one sister, Pauline
(Charles) Sherrell of Dixon;
five step-grandchildren and
five step-great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be held from
1-2 p.m., Sunday, September
22, 2013, with a memorial
service following at 2 p.m., all
in the Long-Kloeppel Funeral
Chapel, Dixon.
Memorials are suggested to
the family's wish. Envelopes
are available at the Long-
Kloeppel Funeral Homes and
Cremation Services, Dixon.
www.newstribune.com
And Joseph gathered corn as the
sand of the sea, very much, until he
left numbering: for it was without
number.
Genesis 41: 49
The Associated Press
“How did he carry out and
plan this attack? How did he get
access to the weapons? What
could have been done to prevent
this tragedy? And most impor-
tantly, whether anyone else aided
or assisted him either wittingly
or unwittingly in this tragedy?”
— Ron Machen, U.S. attorney
for the District of Columbia, list-
ing some unanswered questions
about Monday’s mass shooting
at the Navy Yard in Washington.
“In this case, the public
image of our country was one
of fleeing responsibility. Instead
today, thanks to all your work
and thanks to this concept of
assuming responsibility” Italy’s
reputation has been restored. —
Premier Enrico Letta to Franco
Gabrielli, the head of Italy’s civil
protection agency, at a ceremo-
ny in Rome to mark the righting
of the Costa Concordia.
Local children,
day care receive
well-deserved
assistance
The News Tribune
A good deed may be its own reward,
but recognition in the form of a help-
ing hand is welcome.
Jefferson City Day Care has been
helping area families by nurturing and
educating children since it opened in
1966. It has been in its current facility
on Myrtle Drive since 1972.
Gov. Jay Nixon announced during a
visit to the facility Tuesday that it has
qualified for $200,000 in Neighbor-
hood Assistance Program tax credits.
The tax credits, through the “Mis-
souri Smart Start” initiative, will pro-
vide $400,000 in assistance, to be com-
bined with funds dedicated by the
center for needed renovations.
The project list includes: a new
roof; kitchen renovations; new fur-
nace; enhanced security; addition-
al restrooms; added natural light;
improved line of sight to monitor chil-
dren; removal of a wide staircase that
is not handicapped-accessible; and
subdividing large, noisy rooms.
The nearly 12,000-square-foot facil-
ity provides early childhood education
year round, primarily for children of
low and moderate income families. It
is licensed to serve 99 children, up to
age 8.
During his announcement, Nixon
discussed the center’s contribution to
early children education.
“For more than four decades,” he
said, “the Jefferson City Day Care Cen-
ter has provided working families with
access to affordable child care while
helping young children learn the skills
they need to be kindergarten-ready.”
He added: “Quality early childhood
education can play an important role
in the academic success of students
and in turn, the strength of our future
workforce. Simply put, early childhood
education is a smart investment with a
big return.”
Jefferson City Day Care is a United
Way partner agency, and the ongoing
United Way campaign is designed to
assist the center’s operations.
The much-needed building
improvements, however, will go a long
way toward improving the structural
safety, security and learning environ-
ment for children.
Director Donna Scheidt said the
goal is to facilitate learning by keeping
the children “safe, healthy and ready
for school.”
We applaud everyone involved with
Jefferson City Day Care for their ser-
vice to our community and its chil-
dren. And we are delighted the facil-
ity will receive deserved assistance for
needed renovations.
Veto session votes, other issues
dominate first installment
By State Rep. Jay Barnes
I’m starting a Capitol report email to com-
municate better with constituents, friends, and
colleagues about what’s happening in the state
Legislature. My plan is to send weekly updates
during session and a monthly update when we’re
out of session. This report’s topic is veto ses-
sion. I’ll follow-up in October with informa-
tion on Medicaid. In November, we’ll talk about
education. And in December, we’ll do a session
preview. If you have any questions, comments,
or ideas for topics, please send me an email at
jaybarnes@barnesformissouri.com.

Why I voted to cut your taxes
The Missouri House tried, but failed, to over-
ride Gov. Nixon’s veto of SB 253, the first com-
prehensive tax cut and reform bill in nearly 100
years for our state. I voted in favor of an override
because economic growth and entrepreneurship
matter, and Missouri has suffered from a stag-
nant economy for too long.
The Legislature has tried so-called “jobs” tax
credits and other favors for big business — but
neither worked to improve our state economy. I
believe it’s time to move in a different direction
for economic development — one that encour-
ages business growth for entrepreneurs and small
business owners as well as large employers. And
one that cuts taxes for every single working Mis-
sourian, not just those able to hire high-priced
consultants who know how to work the system at
the Department of Economic Development. To
learn more about why I voted in favor of HB 253,
visit my blog at BarnesforMissouri..
Defending the Constitution
The House voted to override HB 436, a bill
which purported to declare all federal guns laws
unconstitutional and unenforceable in the state
of Missouri, including laws against the knowing
sale of a firearm to a felon, domestic abuser or
illegal immigrant.
The law was given extra punch by declaring it
a crime for any local law enforcement official to
attempt to enforce these federal laws — and by
creating a cause of action against any Missouri
law enforcement officer that attempts enforce-
ment in conjunction with a joint-federal-state-
and-local crime task force.
I voted no because: (1) It is plainly unconsti-
tutional. Our Constitution is not a cheap Chinese
buffet where we get to pick the dishes we like and
discard the rest. And (2) the bill would hamper
important law enforcement efforts to fight illegal
drugs in our state.

A proposal to end withholding politics
Rep. Todd Richardson announced last week
that he would file a resolution next year asking
Missouri voters to prevent future governors from
playing political games with budget withholds.
Article IV, Section 27 of the Missouri Constitu-
tion gives the governor the power to control the
rates of expenditure and to withhold spending
“whenever the actual revenues are less than the
revenue estimates.”
Before this year’s veto session, Gov. Nixon
made budget withholds that were of dubious
constitutionality. Even though revenues were
ahead of estimates, Gov. Nixon withheld educa-
tion and other funding to scare Missourians into
opposing the first serious tax reform measure in
nearly 100 years. Rep. Richardson plans to clarify
the language of our constitution to prevent these
political scare tactics in the future — and he has
my support.

Lobbyists don’t deserve public pensions
In August, the AP reported that Missouri allows
some lobbyists for private entities to receive pub-
lic pensions. This was news — and a shock — to
me. Luckily, it’s only a small number of organiza-
tions. While the Legislature cannot legally or mor-
ally renege on promises already made to people
in the system, I believe we should reserve public
pensions for actual public employees going for-
ward. I’ll be pushing for legislation next year to
close this loophole in our state pension laws.

The 100 Missouri Miles Challenge
Gov. Nixon started the Missouri 100 Miles
challenge to encourage Missourians to exercise
and enjoy the great outdoors in our state. I
started in June, and have reached 224 total miles
— the vast majority of them running between
my house and the Capitol. Have fun and join the
challenge.
Local lawmaker begins Capitol report
Walter E. Hussman Jr., Publisher
Terri Leifeste, Vice President and General Manager
Richard F. McGonegal, Opinion Page Editor
Gary Castor, Managing Editor
N
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W
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T
R
I
B
U
N
E
A family owned and operated independent newspaper
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
B3
PERSPECTIVE
YOUROPINION
Issue-oriented letters to the edi-
tor are welcome. All letters should be
limited to 400 words. The author’s
name must appear with the letter, and
the name, address and phone number
provided for verification. Letters that
cannot be verified by telephone will
not be published.
__________
Horstmann’s views
challenged
Dale Reichel
California
Dear Editor:
I wonder if Mr. Horstmann is real-
ly as ignorant as his letters read. In
response to many of his letters and in
particular Sept. 13:
He like other conservatives keeps
saying liberal press. I suppose Horst-
mann is a capitalist and privatizer
like most Republicans. Doesn’t he
know most all of our media is pri-
vately owned, big corporations, the
wealthy.
Obama is a warrior also, I agree
drones etc. and yes he has not gotten
our forces out of the Middle East —
Bush’s wars. I doubt if Obama would
have started two wars like that, like
Bush and his buddies did. He is not
that stupid. Trillions spent, thousands
upon thousands of innocents killed.
Horstmann talks about nukes in
Iran, North Korea, Libya, Benghazi.
Okay, Horstmannn do you want boots
on the ground in all those places? If
so I want you and John McCain to
go fight on the ground and back up
your talk.
How many parties, or golf, how
many trips to Crawford, Texas, did
Bush make? All the fuel we paid for.
Mr. Horstmann, Bush was an
incompetent leader too in my opin-
ion. Remember our economic crash.
Remember the job market. Remem-
ber the trampling on our civil rights.
Remember the debt Bush and his
Republican congresses’ spending. I
do. Remember Bush and Ashcroft try-
ing to take out our Social Security and
overtime pay? I do.
Thank God for Fox News, Hannity,
Limbaugh, Horstmann says. These
guys spin news and opinions like a
kitchen mixer. They are biased for
sure.
I challenge your ignorance Mr.
Horstmann. Listen to “Democracy
Now” on KOPN 89.5 at 8 a.m. and
many other good shows on the same
station. Read some of the books on
the market.
You are missing out.
__________
Double standard on
military intervention
Steve Sampson
Jefferson City
Dear Editor:
Question: Why haven’t the anti-war
progressives (Obamabots) amongst
us sent in letters deriding our dear
“Ruler” about the coming bombing
of Syria? I can cite the names of those
that have written letters deriding for-
mer president Bush, about almost
everything associated with the wars
in Iraq and Afghanistan. These same
“anti-war” individuals remain oddly
silent when their beloved “Ruler” pro-
motes the same policies.
It shouldn’t surprise us that several
of our political leaders are now all for
the “Ruler’s” new military escapades.
Very strange indeed. These same peo-
ple haven’t grown tired of telling us
that Bush lied about weapons of mass
destruction.
What intelligence agency has the
dear “Ruler” gotten his latest infor-
mation from? Did the NSA intercept
some texts or e mails from regular
citizens and learn of what Bashar
al-Assad is supposed to have done
to his own people? How do we know
that Al-Qaeda didn’t use the chemical
weapons they confiscated?
Our dear “Ruler” and his minions
have known for years that Al-Qaeda
has had these weapons as it was pub-
lished in newspapers and even on the
national news, but that is an incon-
venient fact that they wish us not to
remember.
We must always remember that
sometimes despots use the “Reich-
stag Fire” effect to achieve their
objectives. I wouldn’t be surprised if
our dear “Ruler” knows something
about this situation.
I don’t know what is worse, Kerry
(who served in Vietnam) bumbling
along or our dear “Ruler” being so
inept!
It would be nice if our local Obam-
abots would explain why George
Bush was so evil to attack Iraq and
Afghanistan and the dear “Ruler” is
to be honored for riding in on a white
horse to save the day in Syria.
__________
People oppose
combative posture
Beverly Shelton
Jefferson City
Dear Editor:
It is certain that many families in
our country who lost loved ones who
fought in foreign countries and had
to struggle with their grief in seeing
their sons/fathers/uncles returned in
body bags to be buried in American
soil have seen enough and, like those
of us now, do not wish for this to hap-
pen again.
True-blue Americans seem to have
voted a warlike administration in our
government that doesn’t like to have
anyone complain or vote against their
ill-conceived policies. This citizen
wishes to vote against the sending
of servicemen to these God-forsaken
countries.
These are not our people with
the same beliefs as we possess. The
Obama administration sent our ser-
vicemen into northern Africa where
they should not have been sent.
Are we going to become warlike
and perhaps considered so by our
friends in the northern countries of
Europe who are like us in beliefs.
My suggestion is that the read-
ers of this newspaper read the story
of Shaka Zulu, the so-called king of
the Zulus in Africa. Your eyes will be
opened surely by what this so-called
king did to his own people. America
has always been blamed for slavery.
Slavery began in Europe before our
country was even founded.
With just a few of the northern
countries in Europe coming to our
aid when we had need for same, oth-
ers have not; you know just which
ones these were so they don’t have to
be listed here.
And with the current crisis con-
fronting us with this administration in
power trying to inject illegal authority
to engage us in combat and realiz-
ing that we are against his action,
he is attempting to go to the people
and most assuredly those states that
supported his candidacy to lead this
country.
It should be remembered that
Missouri, the Show-Me State, voted
against this pompous leader.
So you can’t fault us for the prob-
lems confronting Americans on every
level.
The good policies established a
long time ago have been forsaken by
this regime and our nation is becom-
ing crippled by Obamarama.
OUROPINION
NEWSQUOTES
B4 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
STATE
www.newstribune.com
By Chris Blank
Associated Press
The Missouri Senate’s chief budget-writer
announced Wednesday he is seeking the 2016
Republican nomination for attorney general.
Sen. Kurt Schaefer is serving his second term
from Columbia and pointed to his past experi-
ence as an assistant state attorney general and
special prosecutor. He said he secured roughly
100 felony convictions for crimes such as mur-
der, rape and drug offenses.
“Missourians need an attorney general with
experience putting violent criminals behind
bars,” Schaefer said. “From our county court-
houses to the Missouri Supreme Court, I’ve pros-
ecuted some of Missouri’s most dangerous crim-
inals and fought to protect the rights of victims.”
The attorney general’s office likely will be
up for grabs. Incumbent Democratic Attorney
General Chris Koster already has said he is mak-
ing preparations to run for governor in 2016.
Missouri attorneys general are responsible for
defending state laws and policies when they are
challenged, helping county prosecutors when
requested, pursuing consumer fraud cases and
investigating potential violations of the state’s open
meetings and records law. Most who have held the
post during the past 60 years eventually ended up
in the Governor’s Mansion or the U.S. Senate.
Schaefer first was elected to the Legislature in
2008 and is barred by term limits from seeking a
third, four-year term in the state Senate. He previ-
ously worked as the general counsel and depu-
ty director for the state Department of Natural
Resources, a special counsel to the Department of
Agriculture and a special counsel to the governor.
Campaign finance reports filed with the Mis-
souri Ethics Commission show Schaefer had
about $80,000 in his campaign account at end
of June. In mid-July, his campaign reported
receiving $500,000 from a family trust.
GOP senator announces bid
for Mo. attorney general
BUCKHORN (AP) — A 70-
foot sinkhole that killed a south-
central Missouri hunter was so
well hidden by foliage that some
rescue workers nearly dropped
into because they couldn’t see it,
the Pulaski County sheriff said.
Curtis Powelson, 31, died
after he fell into the sinkhole
Monday evening while tracking
a deer near his home in Buck-
horn, just outside of Waynes-
ville, Sheriff Ron Long said.
Powelson was a Marine who
trained military police officers
at nearby Fort Leonard Wood.
After his wife reported him
missing Monday, emergency
responders and neighbors
searched for hours before dis-
covering Powelson’s body in
the sinkhole early Tuesday. The
hole was covered by foliage and
was difficult to see in the dark.
“We had some deputies that
were real close and didn’t see
it, also some firefighters that
almost went off into the sink-
hole,” Long told KSPR-TV.
Several people rappelled
into the sinkhole to retrieve
Powelson’s body.
“We had to do that cau-
tiously too because this was a
very new sinkhole, the sides
were freshly collapsed, and
just getting up to the edge you
could see the dirt and ground
giving way,” the sheriff said.
The hole might be a part of
a cave system, he said, and it
heavy rains last month might
have caused it to emerge. Long
said he’s concerned other sink-
holes might open in the area,
which is home to many military
families and is being developed.
The hole is too large to fill
and will be fenced off, he said.
“I kind of use that term
loosely because I’ve seen sink-
holes before and this was noth-
ing like I’ve seen before,” Long
said. “It was very cylindrical.”
Powelson leaves behind a
wife and young child, KSPR
reported.
Mo. hunter who died
in sinkhole was a Marine
Julie Smith/News Tribune
Half-staff honor
At MIssouri’s Capitol, the Missouri Veterans Commission, Missouri, POW and MIA and
United States flags are all being flown at half-staff out of respect for the vicitims of
Monday’s shooting at the naval yard in the nation’s capitol.
Missouri S&T reports record fall enrollment
ROLLA (AP) — Missouri
University of Science and
Technology is reporting record
enrollment, including record
numbers of female and minor-
ity students.
The Rolla campus of the
University of Missouri system
released the figures Wednes-
day from the first four weeks of
the fall semester.
Registrar Deanne Jackson
says total enrollment stands at
a record 8,130 students, up 6.3
percent from September 2012.
Female enrollment is at
an all-time high, with 1,839
women attending. And the
number of minority students
rose 9.6 percent from last year,
to an all-time high of 881.
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www.newstribune.com
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
C
INSIDE
SECTION
C2 Statistics
C2 Calendar
C6 Norton dies
FIRST & TEN
Area high school squads
prepare for week 4 of the
2013 season.
■ PREP FOOTBALL C3-5
N
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W
S

T
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I
B
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N
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Hometown Favorites
JEFFERSON CITY 28, HAZELWOOD
EAST 7 — The Jays bounce back from
their first loss of the season with a
resounding win against a Class 5 pow-
erhouse.
HELIAS 27, HICKMAN 13 — Even a
12th defender won’t help Hickman this
time. Helias is just flat-out better than
Hickman in 2013.
BLAIR OAKS 42,
SOUTHERN BOONE
7 — Blair Oaks blast-
ed Southern Boone
last season by 26
points. Even with all
the personnel losses,
either by graduation
or injury, the Falcons
should roll again.
MISSOURI 42,
INDIANA 28 — This
should be a fun
watch for those who can actually view
it. A shootout between high-powered
offenses against a pair of suspect defens-
es. Missouri has a little more than the
perenial Big Ten cellar-dwelling Hoo-
siers.
LINCOLN 21, MISSOURI SOUTHERN
14 — Lincoln has already turned a few
heads this season. Heads might be spin-
ning when the Blue Tigers win on the
road to improve to 2-1. I’m starting to
believe Mike Jones is turning this pro-
gram around.
KANSAS CITY 20, PHILADELPHIA
17 — Thursday night games are usually
low-scoring. Weary and beat-up players
don’t really perform up to their typical
superhuman standards. Even the fast-
paced Eagles.
DALLAS 28, ST. LOUIS 24 — The
Rams’ secondary is awful. Tony Romo,
while certainly awful in big moments,
can be the opposite of that against infe-
rior teams. St. Louis still fits that mold.
Around the NFL
GREEN BAY 35, CINCINNATI 27 —
There’s been no stopping the Packers’
offense. That should make up for a sub-
par defense in what looks to be the best
game of the weekend.
TENNESSEE 17, SAN DIEGO 10 —
Both teams have been better than adver-
tised in the early going. The home field
gives the Titans the advantage here.
MINNESOTA 34, CLEVELAND 10 —
Adrian Peterson will put up video-game
numbers against the porous Browns’
defense. Poor Cleveland. At least the
Indians are in the wild-card chase.
NEW ENGLAND 23, TAMPA BAY 16
— Even with all of Tom Brady’s griping
about his substandard receiving corps,
the Patriots are still among the NFL’s
best.
NEW ORLEANS 38, ARIZONA 21 —
Drew Brees and the Saints’ offense is
once again a force to be reckoned with.
Now stronger defensively, New Orleans
is a playoff-caliber team.
WASHINGTON 28, DETROIT 27 —
Robert Griffin III hasn’t been able to
rekindle the magic of a year ago. It comes
back against the Lions.
CAROLINA 13, NEW YORK GIANTS
10 — What a rough start for Eli Man-
ning. The Giants are staring at a second
straight postseason miss.
HOUSTON 21, BALTIMORE 14 —
The Texans need to prove they can win
against one of the AFC’s big boys. This is
a start. The ageless Ed Reed gets to face
his former squad.
ATLANTA 28, MIAMI 21 — The Fal-
cons are without Steven Jackson and
Sean Weatherspoon. They’re still better
than the rising Dolphins, even though
Miami has won two straight games on
the road.
BUFFALO 10, NEW YORK JETS 7 —
Nobody will care about this game out-
side of New York. Scratch that, nobody
will care about this game except for fan-
tasy football owners who have the unfor-
tunate predicament of having a player
from either team other than C.J. Spiller.
SAN FRANCISCO 24, INDIANAPOLIS
21 — San Francisco never fares well in
Seattle. The 49ers are almost unbeatable
at home. A fun battle between young
quarterbacks awaits.
SEATTLE 35, JACKSONVILLE 0 —
Who will score more points: The Jaguars’
offense or the Seahawks’ defense? That
might make for an interesting wager.
This will get out of hand early.
CHICAGO 31, PITTSBURGH 17 —
Brandon Marshall and Matt Forte will
be running circles around the decrepit
Steelers’ defense. Oh, how the mighty
have fallen.
Monday’s Game
DENVER 49, OAKLAND 3 — It
wouldn’t surprise me to see Peyton Man-
ning match his record-tying seven touch-
down passes in this snoozer on ESPN.
Last week, BRENT FOSTER gave the News Tribune a boost by
hitting on 14-of-20 picks (70 percent). The staff is 29-of-44 (66 percent)
on the season.
Adam Stillman
AP
Andy Reid will make his
return to Philadelphia
tonight.
Kris Wilson/News Tribune
Marcus Woodruff of the Jays celebrates after scoring what turned out to be the game-
winning goal just under Rolla goalkeeper Gage Scurlock (far left) during the first half of
Wednesday’s game at the 179 Soccer Park.
Reid downplays his return
to Philadelphia
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Andy Reid
cleared his throat, uttered some familiar
phrases and downplayed his return to
Philadelphia.
Same old Andy.
“That’s not where I’m at right now,”
Reid said when asked if it’s going to be
emotional when his Kansas City Chiefs
(2-0) play the Eagles (1-1) tonight.
“I don’t feel that way. If we weren’t
playing a football game against a good
football team, maybe your mind goes
there. I don’t see my mind going there.
My mind is going to be on the job at
hand and what we’ve got to get accom-
plished in a tough place to play.”
Clearly, Reid is still a stoic guy. But he
also has to be aware of the spicy plot in
which he is the centerpiece?
Reid led the Eagles to nine playoff
appearances, six division titles, five NFC
championship games and one Super
Bowl before he was fired after going 4-12
last year in his 14th season.
While he’s off to an excellent start with
the Chiefs, who were 2-14 last year, Chip
Kelly has reinvigorated the Eagles and
their fans with his fast-paced offense
and all-around energy.
“I have great respect for Andy,” Kelly
said. “If you’re a coach in the NFL, any-
body head coaches in one spot for 14
years, you kind of look to them and say,
‘Holy Smokes!’ If you just walk down
these hallways and look at the cham-
pionships, the division championships,
the conference championships, what
he’s done, he’s had a huge impact on
this organization.
“There’s not a lot of guys out there
Not a homecoming
Please see Chiefs, p. 6
Missouri has just three
QB sacks this season
By Brent Foster
sports@newstribune.com
COLUMBIA — Before the sea-
son started, Missouri defensive end
Michael Sam said the Tigers had a
goal of getting at least 30 sacks this
season.
While the season is far from over,
early returns haven’t quite lived
up to that promise. Through two
games, the Tigers have just three
sacks for a total loss of nine yards.
An early cause for concern? Not
quite yet according to coaches and
players.
“We’d like to get more sacks,”
Missouri head coach Gary Pinkel
said. “I think (quarterbacks) have
been pretty good in terms of getting
rid of the football.”
Pinkel said he felt Toledo quar-
terback Terrance Owens got rid of
the ball quickly thanks to a lot of
short dump passes and screens.
All threes of Missouri’s sacks came
in the season-opening win against
Murray State.
“He didn’t put himself in posi-
tion to be back there very long,”
Pinkel said of Owens. “That ball
was gone.”
Getting pressure on the quarter-
back has seemed to be a point of
emphasis for Missouri since pre-
season camp. The Tigers struggled
to get much heat on the quarterback
last season when they recorded just
21 sacks. That was down from 27 in
2011 and 38 in 2010.
Missouri’s defense will be at a
disadvantage for part of Saturday’s
game at Indiana (7 p.m. Big Ten
Network-TV).
Senior linebacker Andrew Wil-
son will sit out the first half after
being ejected for targeting during
the second half of the Sept. 7 game
against Toledo.
Wilson has six tackles so far this
season.
“It wasn’t like he had a hit and
he wanted to hit the player there,”
Pinkel said. “There certainly was no
vengeance on his part. He’s never
had that kind of penalty before even
before the rule existed. There’s les-
sons to learn there.”
Wilson, who has led the Tigers
in tackles the last two seasons,
appeared to lower his head and
extend his forearm when he hit
Toledo’s Bernard Reedy on a recep-
tion across the middle. The play
warranted a flag and an immedi-
ate ejection. Although the ejection
could have been overturned by a
review in the booth, the call stood.
“I’m not going to change the
way I play at all,” Wilson said. “I’m
just going to keep hitting people,
hit them a little lower and a little
harder.”
Michael Scherer, a redshirt fresh-
man from MICDS in St. Louis, is
slated to get the start Saturday in
place of Wilson.
Wilson’s loss could be felt for
the Tigers against an Indiana squad
Adding some pressure up front
Please see Tigers, p. 6
Helias tops Moberly
MOBERLY — Helias
broke out its bats Wednes-
day.
Five players had at least
two hits as Helias downed
Moberly 9-3.
Peyton Hall paced the
Lady Crusaders with three
hits. Julie Harris, Paige
Bange, Jordyn Nappier and
Lauren Morrow all had two
hits. Bange and Nappier
had three RBI each.
Lindsey Steinbeck
picked up the victory as
she threw 5
2
⁄3 innings while
allowing two runs on six
hits. Bange threw the final
1
1
⁄3 in relief.
The Lady Crusaders (3-
Big bats
Please see Helias, p. 6
Jays post 2-1 win vs. Rolla
By Adam Stillman
sports@newstribune.com
Fresh off what could end up being the big-
gest win of the regular season, Jefferson City
was due for a little bit of a letdown.
That was still more than enough to beat a
strong Rolla squad Wednesday.
“Coming off of (a 2-1 victory against Class
3 No. 4) Marquette, we were kind of a mess
really,” Jefferson City head coach Eddie Horn
said following the Jays’ 2-1 victory against Rolla
at the 179 Soccer Park. “That was a great result
for us Saturday. I think everybody thought we
would just show up and everybody would just
roll over because we beat Marquette. Found
out that wasn’t the case. In all fairness, Rolla’s a
tough team to play against. It just wasn’t a very
good game for us.”
“This was just kind of a grind it out, not at
your best night. You got a result and you take it
and move on.”
Rolla, ranked third in Class 2, controlled the
early portions of the game. The Bulldogs were
finally rewarded with a goal at the 18:22 mark
of the opening half.
“I thought for the first 20 minutes they
really had us,” Horn said. “They came out and
pressed. We didn’t know what to do, stood on
Enough to get the win
Please see Jays, p. 6
Wainwright lifts Cardinals
to 4-3 win against Rockies
DENVER (AP) — Adam Wainwright pitched
effectively into the eighth after a shaky start
and helped himself at the plate with three hits
as the St. Louis Cardinals beat the Colorado
Rockies 4-3 on Wednesday night to expand
their lead in the NL Central race.
Wainwright (17-9) gave up two runs in the
first and then found his groove to earn his 17th
win, second-most in the NL this season.
He went 3-for-3 with a double and two RBI
to help the Cardinals stretch their lead to two
games on Pittsburgh after the Pirates lost 3-2
loss to San Diego. St. Louis also reduced its
magic number for clinching a playoff spot to
three with 10 games to play.
Tyler Chatwood (7-5) allowed four runs in
six innings before being lifted for a pinch hit-
ter. Chatwood is rounding back into form after
missing nearly a month with an inflamed right
elbow.
The hard-throwing Wainwright allowed 10
hits and struck out eight before running into
a jam with two on and two outs in the eighth.
Reliever Trevor Rosenthal got Charlie Black-
mon to ground out to end the threat. Edward
Mujica pitched his way out of a bases loaded
mess in ninth for his 37th save in 40 chances.
He struck out Todd Helton, who’s retiring at the
end of the season, to quiet the cheering crowd
and end the game.
St. Louis solve Chatwood in the third, string-
ing together four straight hits to tie the game at
2. Wainwright had an RBI double and Matt
Carpenter followed with a run-scoring single.
Carpenter now has 67 RBI from the leadoff
spot, the most by a Cardinals player since Lou
Brock had 76 in 1967.
The Cardinals took the lead for good in the
fourth when Yadier Molina led off the inning
with a double and was brought home by Wain-
wright’s single.
Stretching
the lead
KANSAS CITY (AP) — Bruce
Chen worked five innings and Sal-
vador Perez doubled home two
runs and the Kansas City Royals
beat the Cleveland Indians 7-2 on
Wednesday night.
Chen was pulled in the sixth after
giving up a single to Michael Bourn
and walking Nick Swisher to lead off
the inning.
Francisley Bueno replaced Chen
and recorded two outs with three
pitches.
After Jeff Kipnis advanced the
runners with a sacrifice, Bueno kept
the runners put when Carlos Santa-
na grounded out to third baseman
Mike Moustakas. Louis Coleman
came in and got Ryan Raburn on a
fly to right to strand the runners.
Royals relievers Tim Collins, Will
Smith and Greg Holland preserved
the lead, allowing just one hit, to
keep the team’s playoff chances
alive.
The Royals broke the game open
with three runs off four Indians
pitchers in the eighth. Alcides Esco-
bar had a two-run single, while Jar-
rod Dyson walked with the bases
loaded.
Rookie Danny Salazar (1-3), who
had allowed just one run in 13
2
⁄3
innings in his first three September
starts, took the loss, giving up four
runs and six hits in six innings.
The Royals jumped out to a 3-0
lead in the first with Perez’s two-out
double, scoring Eric Hosmer and
Billy Butler. Perez went to third on
the throw home and scored on a
Salazar wild pitch.
The Royals used a double steal
in the fifth for their fourth run.
Escobar avoided the tag of catcher
Gomes to steal home, while Alex
Gordon, who was initially caught in
a rundown, stole second.
Chen leads Royals to victory against Indians
Cardinals Box
Cardinals 4, Rockies 3
ST. LOUIS COLORADO
ab r h bi ab r h bi
MCrpnt 2b 4 0 2 1 CDckrs lf-cf 4 1 1 0
Jay cf 5 0 1 0 LeMahi 3b 5 1 1 0
Hollidy lf 4 1 1 0 Tlwtzk ss 4 0 2 2
Freese 3b 4 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf 3 0 1 0
Mujica p 0 0 0 0 Culersn lf 2 0 1 0
YMolin c 4 1 2 1 Helton 1b 5 1 1 0
MAdms 1b 3 0 0 0 Pachec c 4 0 1 0
BPtrsn 1b 1 0 0 0 Rutledg 2b 3 0 0 0
SRonsn rf 4 0 0 0 Blckmn cf-rf 4 0 2 1
Descals ss-3b 3 1 1 0 Chatwd p 2 0 1 0
Wnwrg p 3 1 3 2 RWhelr ph 1 0 0 0
Rosnthl p 0 0 0 0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0
T.Cruz ph 1 0 0 0 WLopez p 0 0 0 0
Kozma ss 0 0 0 0 Ottavin p 0 0 0 0
Brothrs p 0 0 0 0
Fowler ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 36 4 10 4 Totals 38 3 12 3
St. Louis 002 110 000 — 4
Colorado 200 001 000 — 3
E—Ma.Adams (2). DP—St. Louis 1. LOB—St. Louis
7, Colorado 11. 2B—Holliday (31), Y.Molina (41),
Descalso (22), Wainwright (4), LeMahieu (21), Helton
(17), Blackmon (15). S—Co.Dickerson.
IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
Wainwright W,17-9 7 2-3 10 3 3 1 8
Rosenthal H,29 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Mujica S,37-40 1 2 0 0 1 1
Colorado
Chatwood L,7-5 6 8 4 4 1 1
Outman 1-3 1 0 0 1 0
W.Lopez 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 2
Brothers 1 1 0 0 0 2
WP—Chatwood.
Umpires—Home, Kerwin Danley; First, Vic Cara-
pazza; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Lance Barksdale.
T—2:53. A—26,955 (50,398).
Royals Box
Royals 7, Indians 2
CLEVELAND KANSAS CITY
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 3 0 1 1 AGordn lf 4 0 2 0
Swisher 1b 3 0 1 0 Bonifac 2b 5 0 1 0
Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 Hosmer 1b 5 1 2 0
CSantn dh 4 0 0 0 BButler dh 3 1 2 0
Raburn rf 4 0 0 0 Getz pr-dh 0 1 0 0
AsCarr ss 4 0 0 0 S.Perez c 4 2 1 2
YGoms c 3 1 1 0 Mostks 3b 3 0 0 0
Brantly lf 3 1 2 0 L.Cain rf 3 1 0 0
Aviles 3b 2 0 0 0 JDyson cf 3 0 0 1
AEscor ss 4 1 2 2
Totals 29 2 5 1 Totals 34 7 10 5
Cleveland 002 000 000 — 2
Kansas City 300 010 03x — 7
E—Raburn (2), J.Dyson (4). LOB—Cleveland 4,
Kansas City 8. 2B—Brantley (25), Hosmer (32),
B.Butler (26), S.Perez (24). SB—Bourn (23), A.Gordon
(11), A.Escobar (21). S—Kipnis, Aviles, Moustakas.
SF—Bourn.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cleveland
Salazar L,1-3 6 6 4 4 1 3
M.Albers 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Rzepczynski 1-3 2 0 0 0 1
C.C.Lee 0 1 2 1 0 0
Hagadone 1-3 0 1 1 2 0
Carrasco 1-3 1 0 0 1 0
Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 0
Kansas City
B.Chen W,8-3 5 4 2 2 1 1
Bueno H,1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0
Coleman H,4 1 0 0 0 0 1
Collins H,21 1-3 1 0 0 0 0
W.Smith H,6 1 0 0 0 0 1
G.Holland 1 0 0 0 0 0
B.Chen pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
C.C.Lee pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
WP—Salazar 2.
Umpires—Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Bill Welke;
Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Fieldin Culbreth.
T—2:49. A—21,198 (37,903).
Major League Leaders
AMERICAN LEAGUE
G AB R H Pct.
MiCabrera Det 140 524 100 182 .347
Trout LAA 148 561 108 185 .330
Mauer Min 113 445 62 144 .324
ABeltre Tex 149 587 81 186 .317
Cano NYY 151 570 80 177 .311
DOrtiz Bos 129 489 77 151 .309
Hosmer KC 150 585 81 177 .303
HKendrick LAA 113 440 52 133 .302
Donaldson Oak 149 546 82 165 .302
Nava Bos 126 426 69 128 .300
RUNS—Trout, Los Angeles, 108; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 100; CDavis, Baltimore, 100; AJones, Balti-
more, 97; AJackson, Detroit, 95; Encarnacion, Toronto,
90; Ellsbury, Boston, 89.
RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 134; CDavis, Baltimore,
134; Cano, New York, 104; Encarnacion, Toronto, 104;
Fielder, Detroit, 102; AJones, Baltimore, 102; Trumbo,
Los Angeles, 98.
HITS—ABeltre, Texas, 186; Machado, Baltimore,
185; Trout, Los Angeles, 185; MiCabrera, Detroit, 182;
Pedroia, Boston, 181; AJones, Baltimore, 178; Cano,
New York, 177; Hosmer, Kansas City, 177.
DOUBLES—Machado, Baltimore, 51; Lowrie, Oak-
land, 43; CDavis, Baltimore, 41; Pedroia, Boston,
40; AlRamirez, Chicago, 39; Trout, Los Angeles, 39;
Longoria, Tampa Bay, 36; Napoli, Boston, 36; DOrtiz,
Boston, 36; Saltalamacchia, Boston, 36.
TRIPLES—Gardner, New York, 10; Trout, Los Ange-
les, 9; Ellsbury, Boston, 8; Drew, Boston, 6; AGordon,
Kansas City, 6; LMartin, Texas, 6; BMiller, Seattle, 6.
HOME RUNS—CDavis, Baltimore, 51; MiCabrera,
Detroit, 44; Encarnacion, Toronto, 36; Trumbo, Los
Angeles, 34; ADunn, Chicago, 32; AJones, Baltimore,
31; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 29.
STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston, 52; RDavis,
Toronto, 42; Andrus, Texas, 40; Rios, Texas, 37; Altuve,
Houston, 35; Trout, Los Angeles, 33; JDyson, Kansas
City, 32; LMartin, Texas, 32.
PITCHING—Scherzer, Detroit, 19-3; CWilson, Los
Angeles, 17-6; Colon, Oakland, 16-6; Tillman, Balti-
more, 16-6; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 15-3; AniSanchez,
Detroit, 14-7; Lester, Boston, 14-8; Griffin, Oakland,
14-9; Masterson, Cleveland, 14-10; Guthrie, Kansas
City, 14-11.
ERA—AniSanchez, Detroit, 2.51; Colon, Oakland,
2.73; Iwakuma, Seattle, 2.76; Darvish, Texas, 2.79;
Scherzer, Detroit, 2.95; FHernandez, Seattle, 3.01;
Sale, Chicago, 3.08.
STRIKEOUTS—Darvish, Texas, 256; Scherzer,
Detroit, 227; Sale, Chicago, 214; FHernandez, Seattle,
200; Verlander, Detroit, 195; Masterson, Cleveland,
188; AniSanchez, Detroit, 188.
SAVES—JiJohnson, Baltimore, 47; MRivera, New
York, 44; GHolland, Kansas City, 43; Nathan, Texas,
39; Balfour, Oakland, 38; AReed, Chicago, 38; Perkins,
Minnesota, 36.
G AB R H Pct.
Cuddyer Col 125 468 72 155 .331
CJohnson Atl 134 483 50 158 .327
McCutchen Pit 148 551 93 180 .327
MCarpenter StL 147 586 119 190 .324
Werth Was 120 430 78 139 .323
YMolina StL 126 474 64 151 .319
Craig StL 134 508 71 160 .315
Tulowitzki Col 118 416 66 131 .315
FFreeman Atl 138 522 81 162 .310
Votto Cin 152 550 96 170 .309
RUNS—MCarpenter, St. Louis, 119; Choo, Cincin-
nati, 103; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 96; Votto, Cincinnati,
96; Holliday, St. Louis, 94; McCutchen, Pittsburgh, 93;
JUpton, Atlanta, 91.
RBI—Goldschmidt, Arizona, 116; BPhillips, Cincin-
nati, 101; Bruce, Cincinnati, 100; FFreeman, Atlanta,
100; Craig, St. Louis, 97; AdGonzalez, Los Angeles,
97; Pence, San Francisco, 93.
HITS—MCarpenter, St. Louis, 190; McCutchen,
Pittsburgh, 180; Pence, San Francisco, 174; DanMur-
phy, New York, 173; Segura, Milwaukee, 173; Votto,
Cincinnati, 170; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 168.
DOUBLES—MCarpenter, St. Louis, 51; YMolina,
St. Louis, 41; Bruce, Cincinnati, 38; McCutchen, Pitts-
burgh, 38; Desmond, Washington, 37; GParra, Arizona,
37; DanMurphy, New York, 36; Rizzo, Chicago, 36.
TRIPLES—SMarte, Pittsburgh, 10; Segura, Milwau-
kee, 10; CGomez, Milwaukee, 9; Span, Washington,
9; MCarpenter, St. Louis, 7; Hechavarria, Miami, 7;
Venable, San Diego, 7; EYoung, New York, 7.
HOME RUNS—PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 33; Gold-
schmidt, Arizona, 33; Bruce, Cincinnati, 30; DBrown,
Philadelphia, 27; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; JUpton,
Atlanta, 26; Pence, San Francisco, 25; Zimmerman,
Washington, 25.
STOLEN BASES—Segura, Milwaukee, 44; EYoung,
New York, 39; ECabrera, San Diego, 37; CGomez,
Milwaukee, 36; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 36; McCutchen,
Pittsburgh, 27; Pierre, Miami, 22; Revere, Philadel-
phia, 22.
PITCHING—Zimmermann, Washington, 18-8;
Wainwright, St. Louis, 17-9; JDe La Rosa, Colorado,
16-6; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 16-7; Greinke, Los Angeles,
15-3; 7 tied at 14.
ERA—Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.94; Fernandez,
Miami, 2.19; Harvey, New York, 2.27; Greinke, Los
Angeles, 2.75; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 2.83; ClLee,
Philadelphia, 2.95; Strasburg, Washington, 2.96.
STRIKEOUTS—Kershaw, Los Angeles, 214; Wain-
wright, St. Louis, 209; Samardzija, Chicago, 203;
ClLee, Philadelphia, 201; HBailey, Cincinnati, 193;
Harvey, New York, 191; AJBurnett, Pittsburgh, 191.
SAVES—Kimbrel, Atlanta, 48; RSoriano, Washing-
ton, 41; Mujica, St. Louis, 37; AChapman, Cincinnati,
36; Romo, San Francisco, 35; Gregg, Chicago, 32;
Street, San Diego, 31; Cishek, Miami, 31.
NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 2 0 0 1.000 36 31
Miami 2 0 0 1.000 47 30
N.Y. Jets 1 1 0 .500 28 30
Buffalo 1 1 0 .500 45 46
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 0 0 1.000 61 52
Indianapolis 1 1 0 .500 41 41
Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 40 39
Jacksonville 0 2 0 .000 11 47
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 41 55
Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 41 34
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 19 36
Cleveland 0 2 0 .000 16 37
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 2 0 0 1.000 45 18
Denver 2 0 0 1.000 90 50
Oakland 1 1 0 .500 36 30
San Diego 1 1 0 .500 61 61
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 1 1 0 .500 52 48
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 63 60
N.Y. Giants 0 2 0 .000 54 77
Washington 0 2 0 .000 47 71
South
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 2 0 0 1.000 39 31
Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 48 47
Carolina 0 2 0 .000 30 36
Tampa Bay 0 2 0 .000 31 34
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 2 0 0 1.000 55 51
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 55 49
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 66 54
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 54 65
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 2 0 0 1.000 41 10
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 51 55
San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 37 57
Arizona 1 1 0 .500 49 48
Thursday’s Game
New England 13, N.Y. Jets 10
Sunday’s Games
Kansas City 17, Dallas 16
Atlanta 31, St. Louis 24
Houston 30, Tennessee 24, OT
Green Bay 38, Washington 20
Chicago 31, Minnesota 30
San Diego 33, Philadelphia 30
Miami 24, Indianapolis 20
Baltimore 14, Cleveland 6
Buffalo 24, Carolina 23
Arizona 25, Detroit 21
New Orleans 16, Tampa Bay 14
Oakland 19, Jacksonville 9
Denver 41, N.Y. Giants 23
Seattle 29, San Francisco 3
Monday’s Game
Cincinnati 20, Pittsburgh 10
Today, Sept. 19
Kansas City at Philadelphia, 7:25 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 22
St. Louis at Dallas, noon
San Diego at Tennessee, noon
Arizona at New Orleans, noon
Cleveland at Minnesota, noon
Houston at Baltimore, noon
N.Y. Giants at Carolina, noon
Detroit at Washington, noon
Tampa Bay at New England, noon
Green Bay at Cincinnati, noon
Atlanta at Miami, 3:05 p.m.
Indianapolis at San Francisco, 3:25 p.m.
Jacksonville at Seattle, 3:25 p.m.
Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 3:25 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 23
Oakland at Denver, 7:40 p.m.
College Football
This Week’s Schedule
All Times CDT
Subject to change
Today’s Games
SOUTH
Texas Southern (0-2) at Jackson St. (1-2), 6:30
p.m.
Clemson (2-0) at NC State (2-0), 6:30 p.m.
———
Friday’s Games
FAR WEST
Boise St. (2-1) at Fresno St. (2-0), 8 p.m.
———
Saturday’s Games
EAST
Wake Forest (1-2) at Army (1-2), 11 a.m.
Vanderbilt (1-2) at UMass (0-3), 11 a.m.
Georgetown (1-2) at Brown (0-0), 11:30 a.m.
Tulane (2-1) at Syracuse (1-2), 11:30 a.m.
Yale (0-0) at Colgate (0-3), noon
Columbia (0-0) at Fordham (3-0), noon
Chowan (1-1) at Sacred Heart (3-0), noon
Lincoln (Pa.) (1-1) at St. Francis (Pa.) (0-2), 1 p.m.
Bucknell (1-0) at Cornell (0-0), 2 p.m.
Stony Brook (1-1) at Villanova (0-2), 2 p.m.
Kent St. (1-2) at Penn St. (2-1), 2:30 p.m.
Arkansas (3-0) at Rutgers (2-1), 2:30 p.m.
Wagner (1-2) at Delaware (2-1), 5 p.m.
Monmouth (NJ) (0-3) at Holy Cross (1-2), 5 p.m.
Lafayette (0-2) at Penn (0-0), 5 p.m.
Lehigh (2-0) at Princeton (0-0), 5 p.m.
CCSU (0-3) at Albany (NY) (1-2), 6 p.m.
Michigan (3-0) at UConn (0-2), 6 p.m.
SOUTH
Middle Tennessee (2-1) at FAU (1-2), 11 a.m.
North Carolina (1-1) at Georgia Tech (2-0), 11 a.m.
FIU (0-3) at Louisville (3-0), 11 a.m.
Marshall (2-1) at Virginia Tech (2-1), 11 a.m.
North Texas (2-1) at Georgia (1-1), 11:21 a.m.
Pittsburgh (1-1) at Duke (2-1), 11:30 a.m.
Warner (0-3) at Jacksonville (1-2), noon
Jacksonville St. (3-0) at Georgia St. (0-3), 1 p.m.
Davidson (0-2) at Johnson C. Smith (2-0), 1 p.m.
Southern U. (1-2) at MVSU (0-3), 1 p.m.
Towson (3-0) at NC Central (2-1), 1 p.m.
SE Louisiana (1-2) at Samford (2-1), 2 p.m.
Northwestern St. (2-1) at UAB (0-2), 2 p.m.
Tennessee (2-1) at Florida (1-1), 2:30 p.m.
West Virginia (2-1) at Maryland (3-0), 2:30 p.m.
VMI (1-2) at Virginia (1-1), 2:30 p.m.
Mars Hill (1-1) at W. Carolina (0-3), 2:30 p.m.
SC State (1-2) vs. Benedict (2-0), at Columbia,
S.C., 3 p.m.
Charleston Southern (3-0) at Norfolk St. (0-2),
3 p.m.
Arkansas St. (2-1) at Memphis (0-2), 3:30 p.m.
Grambling St. (0-3) at Alabama St. (1-2), 5 p.m.
Hampton (0-3) at Coastal Carolina (3-0), 5 p.m.
Appalachian St. (0-2) at Elon (1-2), 5 p.m.
Bethune-Cookman (3-0) at Florida St. (2-0), 5 p.m.
Charlotte (2-1) at James Madison (2-1), 5 p.m.
Berry (0-1) at Mercer (2-0), 5 p.m.
The Citadel (1-2) at Old Dominion (1-2), 5 p.m.
Liberty (2-1) at Richmond (1-2), 5 p.m.
Colorado St. (1-2) at Alabama (2-0), 6 p.m.
Savannah St. (1-2) at Miami (2-0), 6 p.m.
E. Kentucky (1-2) at Morehead St. (0-3), 6 p.m.
Langston (0-2) at Nicholls St. (1-2), 6 p.m.
Birmingham-Southern (2-0) at Stetson (1-1), 6 p.m.
Morgan St. (0-3) at W. Kentucky (1-2), 6 p.m.
Rhode Island (1-2) at William & Mary (2-1), 6 p.m.
Gardner-Webb (2-1) at Wofford (2-1), 6 p.m.
Troy (2-1) at Mississippi St. (1-2), 6:30 p.m.
Auburn (3-0) at LSU (3-0), 6:45 p.m.
Weber St. (1-2) at McNeese St. (3-0), 7 p.m.
Tennessee St. (2-1) at Tennessee Tech (2-1), 7
p.m.
MIDWEST
Toledo (1-2) at Cent. Michigan (1-2), 11 a.m.
W. Michigan (0-3) at Iowa (2-1), 11 a.m.
Louisiana Tech (1-2) at Kansas (1-1), 11 a.m.
San Jose St. (1-1) at Minnesota (3-0), 11 a.m.
Florida A&M (1-2) at Ohio St. (3-0), 11 a.m.
Ball St. (2-1) at E. Michigan (1-2), noon
Indianapolis (2-0) at Drake (0-2), 1 p.m.
Austin Peay (0-3) at Ohio (2-1), 1 p.m.
SE Missouri (0-2) vs. S. Illinois (1-2) at St. Louis,
1 p.m.
Murray St. (2-1) at Bowling Green (2-1), 2:30 p.m.
Delaware St. (0-2) at N. Dakota St. (2-0), 2:30 p.m.
S. Dakota St. (3-0) at Nebraska (2-1), 2:30 p.m.
Maine (3-0) at Northwestern (3-0), 2:30 p.m.
Michigan St. (3-0) at Notre Dame (2-1), 2:30 p.m.
Purdue (1-2) at Wisconsin (2-1), 2:30 p.m.
Cincinnati (2-1) at Miami (Ohio) (0-2), 3 p.m.
Duquesne (1-1) at Youngstown St. (2-1), 3 p.m.
Louisiana-Lafayette (1-2) at Akron (1-2), 5 p.m.
Dartmouth (0-0) at Butler (2-1), 5 p.m.
Abilene Christian (3-0) at Illinois St. (0-2), 6 p.m.
Cent. Arkansas (1-2) at Missouri St. (0-3), 6 p.m.
E. Illinois (3-0) at N. Illinois (2-0), 6 p.m.
Missouri (2-0) at Indiana (2-1), 7 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Houston (2-0) at Rice (1-1), 2 p.m.
Louisiana-Monroe (2-1) at Baylor (2-0), 3 p.m.
Alcorn St. (2-1) at Ark.-Pine Bluff (0-3), 6 p.m.
Alabama A&M (1-2) at Prairie View (1-2), 6 p.m.
Incarnate Word (2-1) at Sam Houston St. (2-1),
6 p.m.
Montana St. (2-1) at Stephen F. Austin (1-2), 6 p.m.
SMU (1-1) at Texas A&M (2-1), 6 p.m.
Texas St. (2-0) at Texas Tech (3-0), 6 p.m.
Bacone (2-1) at Lamar (1-2), 7 p.m.
Kansas St. (2-1) at Texas (1-2), 7 p.m.
UTSA (1-2) at UTEP (1-1), 7 p.m.
FAR WEST
Panhandle St. (1-2) at Montana (2-0), 2 p.m.
Harvard (0-0) at San Diego (1-1), 2 p.m.
Idaho St. (2-0) at Washington (2-0), 2 p.m.
Utah St. (2-1) at Southern Cal (2-1), 2:30 p.m.
N. Iowa (2-0) at N. Colorado (1-2), 2:35 p.m.
South Dakota (1-1) at N. Arizona (1-1), 6 p.m.
Arizona St. (2-0) at Stanford (2-0), 6 p.m.
Oregon St. (2-1) at San Diego St. (0-2), 6:30 p.m.
Hawaii (0-2) at Nevada (1-2), 7:05 p.m.
Portland St. (2-1) at UC Davis (0-3), 8 p.m.
W. Illinois (2-1) at UNLV (1-2), 8 p.m.
S. Utah (2-1) at Sacramento St. (1-2), 8:05 p.m.
Wyoming (2-1) at Air Force (1-2), 9:15 p.m.
Utah (2-1) at BYU (1-1), 9:15 p.m.
New Mexico St. (0-3) at UCLA (2-0), 9:30 p.m.
Idaho (0-3) at Washington St. (2-1), 9:30 p.m.
WNBA Playoffs
Schedule
x-if necessary
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
Best-of-3
Eastern Conference
Atlanta vs. Washington
Today, Sept. 19: Washington at Atlanta, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 21: Atlanta at Washington, 6 p.m.
x-Monday, Sept. 23: Washington at Atlanta, TBA
Chicago vs. Indiana
Friday Sept. 20: Indiana at Chicago, 6 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 22: Chicago at Indiana, 2 p.m.
x-Tuesday, Sept. 24: Indiana at Chicago, TBA
Western Conference
Minnesota vs. Seattle
Friday, Sept. 20: Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 22: Minnesota at Seattle, 4 p.m.
x-Tuesday, Sept. 24: Seattle at Minnesota, TBA
Los Angeles vs. Phoenix
Today, Sept. 19: Phoenix at Los Angeles, 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 21: Los Angeles at Phoenix, 9
p.m.
x-Monday, Sept. 23: Phoenix at Los Angeles,
9 p.m.
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 14 9 6 48 46 36
Montreal 13 8 6 45 46 39
Sporting Kansas City 13 9 6 45 41 27
Houston 11 10 7 40 32 35
Chicago 11 11 6 39 36 40
Philadelphia 10 10 9 39 37 39
New England 10 11 7 37 39 32
Columbus 10 14 5 35 33 39
Toronto FC 4 14 11 23 24 42
D.C. 3 19 6 15 18 46
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Seattle 15 8 4 49 37 27
Real Salt Lake 14 9 6 48 52 37
Colorado 12 8 9 45 37 30
Los Angeles 13 10 5 44 45 35
Portland 10 5 13 43 44 31
FC Dallas 10 8 10 40 40 41
Vancouver 10 10 8 38 39 38
San Jose 10 11 8 38 29 40
Chivas USA 6 15 8 26 28 49
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Friday’s Game
Colorado at Portland, 9 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Sporting Kansas City at Toronto FC, 3 p.m.
Vancouver at Montreal, 1 p.m.
D.C. United at New England, 6:30 p.m.
Chicago at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.
Chivas USA at Houston, 7:30 p.m.
San Jose at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m.
Seattle FC at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
FC Dallas at New York, 4 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 27
Philadelphia at Sporting Kansas City, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 28
D.C. United at Toronto FC, noon
Real Salt Lake at Vancouver, 6 p.m.
Houston at New England, 6:30 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 29
Los Angeles at Portland, 2:30 p.m.
Columbus at FC Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Seattle FC, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Chivas USA, 10 p.m.
Auto Racing
Sprint Cup Standings
Through Sept. 15
1. Matt Kenseth, 2,063.
2. Kyle Busch, 2,055.
3. Jimmie Johnson, 2,052.
4. Kevin Harvick, 2,048.
5. Carl Edwards, 2,040.
6. Kurt Busch, 2,040.
7. Jeff Gordon, 2,039.
8. Ryan Newman, 2,035.
9. Clint Bowyer, 2,035.
10. Kasey Kahne, 2,032.
11. Greg Biffle, 2,032.
12. Joey Logano, 2,011.
13. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,010.
Transactions
BASEBALL
American League
DETROIT TIGERS—Announced Toledo (IL) man-
ager Larry Parrish will return next season.
KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Placed LHP Danny Duffy
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sept. 8 and 1B Carlos
Pena on the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP
Yordano Ventura from Omaha (PCL). Recalled 3B
Irving Falu and LHP Chris Dwyer from Omaha (PCL).
TAMPA BAY RAYS—Transferred OF Brandon
Guyer to the 60-day DL. Recalled SS Tim Beckham
from Durham (IL). Selected the contract of OF Freddy
Guzman from Durham.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Placed 1B Edwin Encar-
nacion and LHP Brett Cecil on the 15-day DL; Encar-
nacion retroactive to Monday and Cecil to Friday.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Named Lindsey
Hunter assistant coach.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
NFL—Reduced the one-game suspension of
Tampa Bay S Dashon Goldson to a $100,000 fine.
Fined Tennessee S Bernard Pollard $42,000 for his hit
on Houston WR Andre Johnson.
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Placed DE Robert Geath-
ers on injured reserve. Signed CB Curtis Marsh. Re-
signed S Jeromy Miles. Released LB J.K. Schaffer.
CLEVELAND BROWNS—Traded RB Trent Richard-
son to Indianapolis for a 2014 first-round draft pick.
DENVER BRONCOS—Placed OT Ryan Clady on
injured reserve. Signed OT Winston Justice.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Released FB Toben Opu-
rum. Signed S Bradley McDougald to the practice
squad.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Returned F Oliver
Bjorkstrand to Portland (WHL), D Dillon Heatherington
to Swift Current (WHL), G Oscar Dansk to Erie (OHL),
F Josh Anderson to London (OHL) and F Nick Moutrey
to Saginaw (OHL).
DETROIT RED WINGS—Returned Fs Andreas
Athanasiou and Anthony Mantha and D Marc McNulty
to their junior teams. Released F Barclay Goodrow.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Agreed to terms with
F Domenic Monardo on a contract with Reading
(ECHL).
WINNIPEG JETS—Agreed to terms with general
manager Kevin Cheveldayoff on a contract extension.
COLLEGE
BYU—Suspended LB Spencer Hadley indefinitely.
HOFSTRA—Named Adia Revell women’s assistant
basketball coach.
LETOURNEAU—Named Danny Kambel sports
information director.
TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN—Named Anthony Ander-
son women’s assistant basketball coach.
Today
Girls
Tennis
Helias at Fulton, 4:30 p.m.
Girls
Golf
Helias at Hickman,
4:30 p.m.
Boys
Soccer
Calvary/Tolton
at St. James JV, 5 p.m.
Helias vs. Hannibal,
6:45 p.m.
Prep
Softball
Lady Jays vs. Blair Oaks,
6:30 p.m.
Helias vs. Mexico,
6:30 p.m.
Prep
Volleyball
Helias vs. Hermann,
6:30 p.m.
Calvary vs. Wright City,
7 p.m.
Blair Oaks vs. California,
7:30 p.m.
Friday
Girls
Tennis
Helias
at Sedalia S-C Invit., 9 a.m.
Lady Jays at
Mid-Mo Duals
in Columbia, 10 a.m.
Prep
Softball
Helias at
Liberty Tournament
at Liberty North H.S.,
1:30, 3 and 6 p.m.
Blair Oaks at
UCM Tournament,
2 and 4 p.m.
Lady Jays vs. Rolla,
6:30 p.m.
Prep
Football
Helias vs. Hickman, 7 p.m.
(KWOS 950-AM)
Blair Oaks vs. So. Boone,
7 p.m.
www.newstribune.com
SPORTS
CALENDAR
N
E
W
S

T
R
I
B
U
N
E
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
C2
SPORTSTV
——
8:00
TGC European PGA Tour Open
d’Italia -- First Round. (Live)
——
12:00
TGC PGA Tour Tour Championship
-- First Round. (Live)
FS1 UEFA Europa League Soc-
cer Swansea City at Valencia. (Live)
——
1:00
WGN MLB Baseball Chicago Cubs
at Milwaukee Brewers. (Live)
——
2:00
FXSP MLB Baseball St. Louis
Cardinals at Colorado Rockies. (Live)
FS1 UEFA Europa League Soc-
cer Tromso at Tottenham. (Live)
——
6:30
ESPN College Football Clemson
at North Carolina State. (Live)
——
7:00
ESPN2 WNBA Basketball Play-
offs First Round Game 1 -- Washing-
ton at Atlanta. (Live)
NFLN NFL Football Kansas City
Chiefs at Philadelphia Eagles. (Live)
FS1 High School Football Cop-
pell (Texas) and Garland (Texas).
(Live)
——
9:00
ESPN2 WNBA Basketball Play-
offs First Round Game 1 -- Phoenix at
Los Angeles. (Live)
Major League Baseball
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston 92 61 .601 — — 6-4 L-2 50-27 42-34
Tampa Bay 83 68 .550 8 — 6-4 W-1 47-29 36-39
Baltimore 81 70 .536 10 1 5-5 W-3 42-33 39-37
New York 80 72 .526 11 1/2 2 1/2 5-5 W-1 44-31 36-41
Toronto 69 82 .457 22 13 4-6 L-1 37-40 32-42
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 88 64 .579 — — 6-4 L-1 48-29 40-35
Cleveland 82 70 .539 6 1/2 6-4 L-1 45-30 37-40
Kansas City 80 72 .526 8 2 1/2 6-4 W-1 42-36 38-36
Minnesota 65 86 .430 22 1/2 17 4-6 W-1 31-43 34-43
Chicago 60 92 .395 28 22 1/2 3-7 L-1 35-41 25-51
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Oakland 89 63 .586 — — 7-3 L-1 48-29 41-34
Texas 82 69 .543 6 1/2 — 2-8 L-1 39-35 43-34
Los Angeles 74 78 .487 15 8 1/2 7-3 W-1 35-40 39-38
Seattle 67 85 .441 22 15 1/2 2-8 W-1 33-42 34-43
Houston 51 100 .338 37 1/2 31 4-6 L-4 24-53 27-47
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Atlanta 90 62 .592 — — 5-5 W-1 52-22 38-40
Washington 81 71 .533 9 5 8-2 L-1 44-33 37-38
Philadelphia 71 81 .467 19 15 6-4 L-1 43-35 28-46
New York 68 83 .450 21 1/2 17 1/2 4-6 W-1 32-44 36-39
Miami 56 96 .368 34 30 3-7 W-1 31-44 25-52
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis 89 63 .586 — — 7-3 W-2 48-27 41-36
Pittsburgh 87 65 .572 2 — 6-4 L-3 48-29 39-36
Cincinnati 86 66 .566 3 — 6-4 W-2 48-26 38-40
Milwaukee 68 83 .450 20 1/2 17 1/2 7-3 W-4 36-41 32-42
Chicago 63 89 .414 26 23 3-7 L-5 29-46 34-43
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles 87 64 .576 — — 4-6 W-1 46-32 41-32
Arizona 76 74 .507 10 1/2 9 5-5 L-1 43-33 33-41
San Diego 71 80 .470 16 14 1/2 7-3 W-4 41-33 30-47
San Francisco 70 82 .461 17 1/2 16 7-3 L-1 38-38 32-44
Colorado 69 84 .451 19 17 1/2 3-7 L-2 42-33 27-51
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Tuesday’s Games
Cleveland 5, Kansas City 3
Toronto 2, N.Y. Yankees 0
Detroit 6, Seattle 2
Baltimore 3, Boston 2
Texas 7, Tampa Bay 1
Chicago White Sox 4, Minnesota 3
Oakland 2, L.A. Angels 1
Wednesday’s Games
Kansas City 7, Cleveland 2
Minnesota 4, Chicago White Sox 3
L.A. Angels 5, Oakland 4, 11 innings
N.Y. Yankees 4, Toronto 3
Seattle 8, Detroit 0
Baltimore 5, Boston 3, 12 innings
Tampa Bay 4, Texas 3, 12 innings
Today’s Games
Seattle (Paxton 2-0) at Detroit (Fister 12-9), 12:08
p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 6-9) at Cleveland (U.Jimenez
12-9), 6:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 11-11) at Toronto (Redmond
3-2), 6:07 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 16-6) at Boston (Lackey 9-12),
6:10 p.m.
Texas (Darvish 12-9) at Tampa Bay (M.Moore
15-3), 6:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Correia 9-12) at Oakland (Straily 10-7),
9:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
Texas at Kansas City, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Detroit, 6:08 p.m.
Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 6:10 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 6:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Oakland, 9:05 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Tuesday’s Games
St. Louis 11, Colorado 4
Washington 6, Atlanta 5, 1st game
Washington 4, Atlanta 0, 2nd game
Philadelphia 6, Miami 4
San Diego 5, Pittsburgh 2
San Francisco 8, N.Y. Mets 5
Milwaukee 4, Chicago Cubs 3
L.A. Dodgers 9, Arizona 3
Wednesday’s Games
St. Louis 4, Colorado 3
Atlanta 5, Washington 2
Miami 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings
San Diego 3, Pittsburgh 2
N.Y. Mets 5, San Francisco 4
Milwaukee 7, Chicago Cubs 0
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, (n)
Today’s Games
St. Louis (Wacha 3-1) at Colorado (Oswalt 0-6),
2:10 p.m.
San Diego (Kennedy 6-9) at Pittsburgh (Cole 8-7),
11:35 a.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 12-9) at N.Y. Mets
(Niese 7-7), 12:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Arrieta 2-2) at Milwaukee (Lohse
10-9), 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco 13-10) at Arizona (Miley
10-10), 2:40 p.m.
Miami (H.Alvarez 4-4) at Washington (G.Gonzalez
10-7), 6:05 p.m.
Friday’s Games
St. Louis at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m.
Atlanta at Chicago Cubs, 1:20 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 6:05 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 6:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m.
Arizona at Colorado, 7:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 9:10 p.m.
INTERLEAGUE
Tuesday’s Game
Cincinnati 10, Houston 0
Wednesday’s Game
Cincinnati at Houston, (n)
Today’s Games
No Games Scheduled
Friday’s Game
San Francisco at N.Y. Yankees, 6:05 p.m.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 C3
PREP FOOTBALL
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STATERANKINGS
Statewide high school football rank-
ings, as compiled by a 15-member panel
of sportswriters and broadcasters. First-
place votes in parenthesis.
CLASS 6
Rank, team Rec Pts. LW
1. Blue Springs (15) 3-0 150 1
2. Rock Bridge 3-0 135 2
3. Hazelwood Central 3-0 112 4
4. Francis Howell 2-1 98 3
5. Liberty 3-0 84 6
6. Rockhurst 0-3 68 5
7. C.B.C. 2-1 66 7
8. DeSmet 1-2 42 9
9. Jefferson City 2-1 37 8
10. Fort Zumwalt West 2-1 25 -
Dropped out: Raymore-Peculiar (1-2).
Also receiving votes: Blue Springs South
(2-1) 5, Raymore-Peculiar (1-2) 2, Lee’s Sum-
mit (3-0) 1.
CLASS 5
Rank, team Rec. Pts. LW
1. Lee’s Summit West (15) 3-0 150 1
2. (tie) Fort Osage 3-0 126 3
2. (tie) Parkway Central 3-0 126 2
4. Kirkwood 3-0 107 4
5. Camdenton 3-0 79 5
6. Staley 2-1 75 6
7. Ozark 3-0 54 T7
8. Vianney 2-1 43 T7
9. Webster Groves 1-2 36 9
10. Nixa 3-0 9 --
Dropped out: Lebanon (2-1).
Also receiving votes: Kickapoo (3-0) 7,
Lebanon (2-1) 5, Kearney (2-1) 4, Winnetonka
(2-1) 3, Park Hill South (1-2) 1.
CLASS 4
Rank, team Rec. Pts. LW
1. Webb City (15) 2-1 150 1
2. Bolivar 3-0 132 4
3. Helias 2-1 114 3
4. Harrisonville 2-1 108 2
5. Westminster 3-0 92 5
6. Moberly 3-0 59 7
7. Liberty North 2-1 56 6
8. Hillcrest 2-1 50 8
9. Festus 3-0 26 --
10. Hannibal 2-1 19 10
Dropped out: Priory (2-1).
Also receiving votes: Priory (2-1) 14, Carl
Junction (2-1) 5.
CLASS 3
Rank, team Rec. Pts. LW
1. Maryville (15) 3-0 150 1
2. John Burroughs 3-0 134 2
3. California 3-0 119 3
4. Oak Grove 3-0 105 4
5. Duchesne 3-0 92 5
6. Reeds Spring 3-0 68 6
7. O’Fallon Christian 3-0 56 8
8. Monett 3-0 45 9
9. Cameron 3-0 15 --
10. Cassville 1-2 14 7
Dropped out: Center (1-2).
Also receiving votes: Hogan Prep (3-0)
12, Park Hills Central (3-0) 3, Centralia (2-1)
3, Center (1-2) 3.
CLASS 2
Rank, team Rec. Pts. LW
1. Lamar (15) 3-0 150 1
2. Mountain View-Liberty 3-0 135 2
3. Mountain Grove 3-0 115 3
4. South Callaway 3-0 96 4
5. Strafford 3-0 87 5
6. Caruthersville 2-1 66 6
7. (tie) Lafayette County 3-0 52 7
7. (tie) Lathrop 3-0 52 --
9. Brookfield 3-0 32 8
10. Palmyra 3-0 25 9
Dropped out: Herculaneum (1-2).
Also receiving votes: Blair Oaks (2-1) 10,
Ash Grove (3-0) 3, Holden (2-1) 2.
CLASS 1
Rank, team Rec. Pts. LW
1. Valle Catholic (15) 3-0 140 2
2. Westran 3-0 128 3
3. Hamilton 2-1 122 1
4. Cass-Midway 3-0 107 4
5. Salisbury 3-0 78 5
6. Milan 3-0 59 8
7. Skyline 3-0 48 9
8. Marceline 2-1 41 7
9. Thayer 1-2 33 6
10. Drexel 3-0 20 --
Dropped out: Sacred Heart (2-1).
Also receiving votes: Marionville (2-1) 17,
East Buchanan (3-0) 4, Chaffee (3-0) 3, South
Harrison (1-2) 3, Osceola (2-1) 1.
THISWEEK’SGAMES
Friday’s
Games
Hickman at Helias
Southern Boone
at Blair Oaks
Hallsville at California
Warsaw at Eldon
School of the Osage
at Versailles
Tipton at Father Tolton
Hermann
at South Callaway
Kickapoo
at Camdenton
Saturday’s
Game
Jefferson City
at Hazelwood East
Helias looks for same
intensity against Hickman
By Tom Rackers
sports@newstribune.com
The Helias Crusaders found inspira-
tion from a teammate lost for the season
a little more than 24 hours before last
week’s dominating win at Quincy (Ill.)
Notre Dame.
The Crusaders will be looking for that
same intensity Friday night when Helias
(2-1, ranked No. 3 in Class 4) hosts Hick-
man (1-2) at Adkins Stadium.
“We learned how successful we can be
when we’re in that state of mind,” Helias
coach Phil Pitts said. “There are only so
many games in a season, you can get up
once a week and the kids saw how much
fun and enjoyable it can be to play when
you’re like that and we can do that again.
“We executed well, we were physical,
lot of enthusiasm and energy, everything
you would want.”
Helias senior captain Brock Gerstner
suffered a broken leg on the final play of
practice the day before the game.
“They realized one of their buddies
was out and they were inspired because
that was one thing they could do to make
Brock feel better,” Pitts said.
The Crusaders also may find some
inspiration from last year’s meeting with
the Kewpies in Columbia. Trailing 14-0
early in the fourth quarter, the Crusaders
Building off a great effort
Please see Helias, p. 5
Kris Wilson/News Tribune
Blake Wilbers of Helias lunges to recover a fumble during the first half of a game against Sedalia Smith-Cotton ear-
lier this season at Adkins Stadium. Wilbers and the Crusaders will host the Hickman Kewpies on Friday.
C4 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 PREP FOOTBALL
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AREATEAMBYTEAMRESULTS,SCHEDULES
Blair Oaks
Aug. 30 Moberly 48, Blair Oaks 18
Sept. 6 Blair Oaks 55, Owensville 13
Sept. 13 Blair Oaks 38, Hallsville 8
Sept. 20 Southern Boone
Sept. 27 at School of the Osage
Oct. 4 California
Oct. 11 at Warsaw
Oct. 18 at Versailles
Oct. 25 Eldon
California
Aug. 30 California 42, Boonville 7
Sept. 6 California 42, Mexico 14
Sept. 13 California 38, Eldon 0
Sept. 20 Hallsville
Sept. 27 Southern Boone
Oct. 4 at Blair Oaks
Oct. 11 at School of the Osage
Oct. 18 Warsaw
Oct. 25 Versailles
Camdenton
Aug. 30 Camdenton 17, Springfield Hillcrest 14
Sept. 6 Camdenton 35, West Plains 15
Sept. 13 Camdenton 20, Lebanon 17
Sept. 20 Springfield Kickapoo
Sept. 27 at Springfield Parkview
Oct. 4 Rolla
Oct. 11 at Joplin
Oct. 18 at Waynesville
Oct. 25 Glendale
Eldon
Aug. 31 Miller Career Academy 48, Eldon 42
Sept. 6 Eldon 41, Buffalo 14
Sept. 13 California 38, Eldon 0
Sept. 20 Warsaw
Sept. 27 at Versailles
Oct. 4 School of the Osage
Oct. 11 at Hallsville
Oct. 18 Southern Boone
Oct. 25 at Blair Oaks
Hallsville
Aug. 30 Hallsville 42, Fayette 12
Sept. 6 Hallsville 40, Paris 24
Sept. 13 Blair Oaks 38, Hallsville 8
Sept. 20 at California
Sept. 27 at Warsaw
Oct. 4 Versailles
Oct. 11 Eldon
Oct. 18 at School of the Osage
Oct. 25 at Southern Boone
Helias
Aug. 30 Harrisonville 22, Helias 21
Sept. 7 Helias 56, Sedalia Smith-Cotton 15
Sept. 13 Helias 51, Quincy (Ill.) Notre Dame 12
Sept. 20 Hickman
Sept. 28 at Vashon
Oct. 5 Rock Bridge
Oct. 12 at MICDS
Oct. 19 C.B.C.
Oct. 25 at Hannibal
Jefferson City
Aug. 31 Jefferson City 24, McCluer North 7
Sept. 6 Jefferson City 22, Belleville East (Ill.) 14
Sept. 13 Fayetteville (Ark.) 34, Jefferson City 24
Sept. 21 at Hazelwood East
Sept. 27 DeSmet
Oct. 4 at Hickman
Oct. 11 Gateway Tech
Oct. 18 Rockhurst
Oct. 25 at Rock Bridge
School of the Osage
Aug. 30 Fulton 28, Osage 22
Sept. 6 Moberly 34, Osage 7
Sept. 13 Osage 45, Southern Boone 20
Sept. 20 at Versailles
Sept. 27 Blair Oaks
Oct. 4 at Eldon
Oct. 11 California
Oct. 18 Hallsville
Oct. 25 at Warsaw
South Callaway
Aug. 30 South Callaway 31, North Callaway 0
Sept. 6 South Callaway 46, Crystal City 6
Sept. 13 South Callaway 55, Scotland County 0
Sept. 20 Hermann
Sept. 27 at Tipton
Oct. 4 at Battle
Oct. 11 Cuba
Oct. 18 at Tolton
Oct. 25 Montgomery County
Southern Boone
Aug. 30 Kirksville 40, Southern Boone 26
Sept. 6 Southern Boone 32, Tolton/Calvary 28
Sept. 13 Osage 45, Southern Boone 20
Sept. 20 at Blair Oaks
Sept. 27 at California
Oct. 4 Warsaw
Oct. 11 Versailles
Oct. 18 at Eldon
Oct. 25 Hallsville
Versailles
Aug. 30 Knob Noster 35, Versailles 32
Sept. 6 Fulton 44, Versailles 33
Sept. 13 Warsaw 40, Versailles 16
Sept. 20 School of the Osage
Sept. 27 Eldon
Oct. 4 at Hallsville
Oct. 11 at Southern Boone
Oct. 18 Blair Oaks
Oct. 25 at California
Warsaw
Aug. 30 Warsaw 49, Clinton 15
Sept. 7 Warsaw 49, Cole Camp 25
Sept. 13 Warsaw 40, Versailles 16
Sept. 20 at Eldon
Sept. 27 Hallsville
Oct. 4 at Southern Boone
Oct. 11 Blair Oaks
Oct. 18 at California
Oct. 25 School of the Osage
Class 6 District 3
Team Record Points
1. Rock Bridge 3-0 48.67
2. Timberland 3-0 42.33
3. Fort Zumwalt West 2-1 37.67
4. Francis Howell 2-1 36
5. Jefferson City 2-1 35.34
6. Troy 2-1 34
7. Hickman 1-2 27
8. Francis Howell Central 1-2 24.66
Class 5 District 4
Team Record Points
1. Camdenton 3-0 46.33
2. Washington 2-1 39.67
3. Lebanon 2-1 35.67
4. Sedalia Smith-Cotton 1-2 25.67
5. Waynesville 0-3 19.67
6. Rolla 0-3 14
Class 4 District 6
Team Record Points
1. Moberly 3-0 49.67
2. Helias 2-1 45
3. Hannibal 2-1 36.67
4. St. Dominic 2-1 31.67
5. Kirksville 1-2 25.67
6. Warrenton 0-3 24.67
7. Mexico 1-2 23.67
8. Marshall 0-3 14
Class 3 District 3
Team Record Points
1. Salem 3-0 43
2. School of the Osage 1-2 32.99
3. Eldon 1-2 31.33
4. Ava 1-2 27.67
5. Logan-Rogersville 1-2 24
6. Springfield Catholic 1-2 21.86
7. Versailles 0-3 17.67
8. Buffalo 0-3 12
Class 3 District 6
Team Record Points
1. California 3-0 49.66
2. Fulton 3-0 43.33
3. Chillicothe 2-1 42.67
4. Centralia 2-1 37.67
5. Macon 2-1 37.67
6. Southern Boone 1-2 19.33
7. Boonville 0-3 18.66
8. Missouri MIlitary Academy 0-2 9.5
Class 2 District 4
Team Record Points
1. Lamar 3-0 59.66
2. Warsaw 3-0 51.34
3. Sarcoxie 3-0 47.67
4. Ash Grove 3-0 46.33
5. El Dorado Springs 1-2 26.66
6. Diamond 1-2 25.67
7. Stockton 1-2 24.99
8. Butler 1-2 19.99
Class 2 District 6
Team Record Points
1. South Callaway 3-0 48
2. Blair Oaks 2-1 47.67
3. Montgomery County 3-0 46.33
4. Hermann 2-1 46
5. Hallsville 2-1 37.67
6. North Callaway 1-2 28.32
7. Lutheran: St. Peters 0-3 24
8. Father Tolton 0-3 20
Class 1 District 4
Team Record Points
1. Crest Ridge 2-1 39.33
2. Concordia 2-1 37.66
3. Cole Camp 1-2 32.33
4. Tipton 1-2 31.33
5. Sedalia Sacred Heart 2-1 31.77
6. Windsor 2-1 30.83
7. Santa Fe 1-2 23
8. Sweet Springs 0-3 17
DISTRICTSTANDINGS
PLAYERSOF
THEWEEK
Garrett Buschjost, Helias
The Helias starters only
played the first half last Fri-
day, but Crusader senior run-
ning back Garrett Buschjost
made the most of his time on
the field at Quincy (Ill.) Notre
Dame.
Buschjost scored three
touchdowns as the Helias
rolled to a 51-12 victory against
Notre Dame. Behind an offen-
sive line opening huge holes, Buschjost scored
on runs of 5 and 3 yards while also catching a
13-yard touchdown pass from Wyatt Porter.
Dominic Jamerson, Blair Oaks
The junior made his pres-
ence felt all over the field in
Blair Oaks’ 38-8 win over Halls-
ville last week.
Jamerson carried the ball
15 times, including two that
went for touchdowns, while
racking up 232 yards. He also
caught a pair of passes for 63
yards, which included a 61-
yard touchdown catch.
On the defensive side of the ball, Jamerson
hauled in two interceptions and also added five
tackles.
Gabe Marcantonio, Jefferson City
In his third start at quar-
terback, Gabe Marcantonio
showed the poise of a veteran
during Friday’s 34-24 loss at
Fayetteville (Ark.).
The senior threw for 154
yards and ran for ran for 133
while leading the Jays back
within three points on several
occasions after an early 14-
point deficit.
Marcantonio also was a factor on special
teams, punting the ball four times for a 39-yard
average.
Buschjost
Jamerson
Marcantonio
Blair Oaks prepares
for triple threat from
Southern Boone
By Tony Hawley
sports@newstribune.com
WARDSVILLE — A lot of weeks,
the Blair Oaks defense concerns
itself with stopping one particular
player on the opposing team.
This time around, the Falcons
are worrying about a three-headed
monster.
When Blair Oaks welcomes
Southern Boone to the Falcon
Athletic Complex at 7 p.m. Friday,
the Eagles will bring in a three-
pronged attack.
The first part of the attack is
senior running back David Hol-
land, who has 55 carries for 381
yards (6.9 avg.) and four touch-
downs as well as nine catches for
138 yards and one score.
“The big key for us is locating
(Holland) on the field,” Blair Oaks
coach Brad Drehle said. “We’ve
played good kids before and it’s a
case of you know where he’s at, but
can you stop him? That’s the thing.
“It’s one of those deals where
it’s not one person. We’re going
to have to get to the football and
gang-tackle. Sometimes it’s not
going to be pretty, it will be just
get there and hang on and let the
troops arrive.”
The other two big weapons for
the Eagles are junior running back
Jade Taggart and sophomore wide
receiver Grant Anderson, who have
combined for 326 yards rushing
and 78 yards receiving.
“Between those three kids,
you’ve made up 85 percent of their
offense,” Drehle said.
When they go to the air, those
Eagles will be catching passes from
senior quarterback Brice Mueller.
“He does a great job,” Drehle
said. “... He’ll throw the ball 50
yards down the field and he throws
a good ball. He’ll force us to pre-
pare for that.”
One thing Blair Oaks (2-1, 1-0
Tri-County Conference) will need
to slow down Southern Boone (1-2,
0-1) is improved tackling.
“We’re not tackling very well
yet,” Drehle said. “We’re not doing
a very good job of staying on our
feet. We’re stopping our feet or
we’re dropping to our knees when
we make contact.
“We’ve got to finish our tackles
and that’s been part of our conver-
sations (in practice). ... Our kids
are aggressive. It’s not like we’re not
throwing our bodies in there and
hitting people, it’s just that we’re
not finishing.”
It hasn’t hurt the Falcons’ run
defense. When the starters have
played the past two games, they’ve
given up just 50 yards rushing on
81 carries. Included in that is one
featured performer who rushed
16 times for minus-one yard and
another who carried the ball 19
times for 9 yards.
“Our coaches have done a
good job of identifying (how to
stop them) and the kids are study-
ing and doing what they need to
do,” Drehle said. “Practice time
has been productive, and the end
result is what you’ve seen on Fri-
day night. It makes you feel good
as a coach to know those guys are
doing that.”
A good example of the power of
preparation is Haydn Lock. With
starting quarterback Jordan Hair
dazed after a big sack, Lock led the
Falcons on their final two drives,
one of which went for a touch-
down.
“When you can go from play-
ing receiver and strong safety to
lining up at quarterback without
ever taking a snap, he jumps in
there and goes, that says an awful
lot about his focus,” Drehle said.
“... He was just relaxed, that’s what
I saw. A lot of times, you get kids in
there who look like their hair’s on
fire. He handled the situation, and
for us going forward, that gives us a
lot of confidence.”
Drehle added Hair could have
returned, but with no danger of
losing, there was no need.
“As a former quarterback, you
get hit like that and your head goes
to the ground, you get up and you
can’t focus your
eyes, you’ve got snot coming out
of your nose and tears running
out of your eyes,” he said. “You’re
trying to focus and be that tough
guy, but at the same time, you can’t
breathe.
“It was tough and it shocked
him a little bit, but he handled it
well. He was a little frustrated we
didn’t put him back in, but like we
told him, ‘Jordan, the game’s in
hand. We need to see if Haydn can
do this anyway.’”
Things will be back to normal
this week.
“Jordan’s a competitor,” Drehle
said. “He was ready to go Friday
and is ready to go now. I think
you’ll see him step up and play well
this Friday.”
Notes: Holland, Taggart and
Anderson also lead the team on
defense, as they’re part of a four-
way tie for the team lead with
16 tackles apiece. Luke Wallace
is the other Eagle in that group.
... Holland has Southern Boone’s
only interception of the season.
... Southern Boone opened the
season with a 40-26 loss to Kirks-
ville before bouncing back to beat
Tolton/Calvary 32-28. The Eagles
then lost 45-20 to School of the
Osage last Friday.
Trifecta
of trouble
Kris Wilson/News Tribune
Haydn
Lock of
Blair Oaks
breaks an
attempted
tackle on
his way to
a touch-
down dur-
ing a game
earlier
this month
against
Owensville
in Wards-
ville.
Jays get set to meet
Hazelwood East
By Brent Foster
sports@newstribune.com
A loss is a loss, no matter
how Jefferson City head coach
Ted LePage looks at it.
But that doesn’t mean Jef-
ferson City’s 34-24 loss at Fay-
etteville (Ark.) can’t be a learn-
ing experience, good and bad,
for the Jays.
“We did some things we
could really learn from in the
game,” LePage said as the Jays
prepare to play at Hazelwood
East at 1 p.m. Saturday. “The
one thing I really took from
that was we played a really
well coached football team
and found ways to get back in
the football game.”
The good: Quarterback
Gabe Marcantonio overcame
an early interception that was
returned for a touchdown to
put up solid numbers by the
time the game was over. He
threw for 154 yards and ran
for 133 in just his third start at
quarterback.
His performance was indic-
ative of how the offense played
after the first two drives of the
game ended in turnovers.
“We put the ball in his
hands and gave him a chance
to prove what he could do,”
LePage said. “Instead of bow-
ing down to that early mistake,
he rose up and he played with
a ton of, almost, I call it experi-
ence. He looked like he started
15, 16 games.”
The Jays (2-1, No. 9 in Class
6) had six fewer penalties than
the Bulldogs and won the turn-
over battle 3-2.
But none of the above
equated to a Jays’ victory.
That means there are things
LePage saw that his team has
to fix moving forward. Falling
behind 14-0 midway through
the first quarter will be a killer
in almost any game.
Tightening up the passing
defense after last week has
been another focus for the
Jays.
Fayetteville quarterback
Mitch Marshall completed 17-
of-29 passes for 256 yards and
three touchdowns.
“I think our defensive pass-
ing capabilities are some of
the areas we were exposed last
week,” LePage said. “I think
that will be shored up.”
He added: “Once we show
an area of weakness, at our
level of football, everybody is
going to see it and they are
going to go right after it. So you
better shore your weaknesses
up really quick or you’re going
to see it over and over again.”
Jefferson City knows a thing
or two about Hazelwood East’s
offensive capabilities.
The Jays will expect a heavy
dose of Hazelwood East’s run-
ning backs Ahmad Huddleston
and Jimmy Jones. The duo
combined to rush for more
than 200 yards in its 41-32 loss
at Jefferson City last year. The
Spartans finished the game
with 420 rushing yards.
Jones has three rushing and
four receiving touchdowns this
season. He’s averaging nearly
eight yards per carry.
“On defense we can’t allow
those guys to get behind us,”
LePage said. “We’ve got to keep
everything in front of us and
make them consistently move
the ball down the field.”
Huddleston, who is listed
at 5-foot-6 150 pounds, can be
tough for opposing defenses
to bring down. LePage said the
key is to hit him as low as pos-
sible in order to slow his legs
down.
“I’ve never seen a kid carry
a chip on his shoulder like this
guy,” LePage said. “He just goes
1,000 miles an hour. He’s going
to be everywhere on every spe-
cial teams. He never comes off
the field. He plays like he is
the best, biggest, baddest man
alive.”
While the focus this week
has been on stopping Hazel-
wood East’s running game,
the lessons learned from last
week are fresh on the players’
minds.
“The biggest thing you need
to take away from it is we did
some things that didn’t equate
out to a victory,” LePage said.
Notes: Hazelwood East is
2-1 with wins against McClu-
er (41-0) and Pattonville (23-
14), and a loss to Class 5 state
champion Kirkwood (38-
21). The Jays are 3-0 all time
against the Spartans with all
three wins in the last three
years. ... The Jays will be with-
out receiver Daniel Ellinger for
a second straight week as he
recovers from a knee injury. ...
The Spartans are coached by
Aaron Whittington who played
linebacker at UCLA from 2004-
07. His brother Daryl played
defensive end at Missouri from
1996-2000.
Getting better
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 C5
PREP FOOTBALL
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A WINNER
AT
ALL SPORTS...
AREAGAMECAPSULES
Hallsville
at California
Home sweet home.
After opening the season with
three consecutive games on the
road, the California Pintos finally
get to avoid a bus trip when they
host the Hallsville Indians at 7 p.m.
Friday.
California went 3-0 on that road
swing, including victories at Boon-
ville, Mexico and Eldon.
The Pintos are averaging bet-
ter than 40 points per game while
allowing just seven points a contest.
They’re coming off a 38-0 blitzing of
Eldon in the Tri-County Conference
opener for both squads.
A stable of running backs high-
light California’s potent offense,
including a 226-yard performance
on the ground against Eldon. The
Pintos topped 300 yards rushing in
their first two games.
One thing to watch for will be
Dylan Albertson, the star running
back/wide receiver who left last
Friday’s game against Eldon with a
sprained ankle in the first quarter.
Hallsville (2-1) is coming off a
38-8 loss to Blair Oaks, picking up
only a late defensive touchdown
while gaining just 224 yards of total
offense.
The Indians opened the sea-
son with wins against Fayette and
Paris.
Tipton
at Father Tolton
The Tipton Cardinals are back to
their winning ways.
After a pair of losses to begin the
season, Tipton found a modicum
of normalcy with a 49-6 blasting of
Windsor last Friday night.
Now the Cardinals, who saw
their astonishing 68-game regular-
season winning streak come to an
end earlier this year, look to launch
another massive streak with a vic-
tory against Father Tolton at 7 p.m.
Friday.
Tipton opened with losses to
Sedalia Sacred Heart (39-0) and
North Callaway (26-20, OT) before
last weekend’s win.
Father Tolton (0-3) has losses to
Class 1 powerhouse Valle Catholic
(56-0), Southern Boone (32-28) and
Westran (59-7).
The Trailblazers are in just their
second season of varsity football.
Hermann
at South Callaway
South Callaway is still looking
for a challenge. Dont’ expect it Fri-
day night.
The Bulldogs have outscored
their opponents by a combined
132-6 score during the first three
games of the season, all dominating
victories.
Now South Callaway hosts Her-
mann, a team it rolled past 43-8 in
2012, at 7 p.m. Friday night.
The Bulldogs own wins this sea-
son against North Callaway (31-
0), Crystal City (46-6) and Scotland
County (55-0). While Hermann may
pose a tougher test than that trio,
South Callaway doesn’t look to be
in any real danger.
Hermann (2-1) opened the sea-
son with a 23-20 loss to Montgom-
ery County before rebounding to
take wins against Cuba (49-6) and
St. James (41-0).
South Callaway has amassed
870 rushing yards and 14 touch-
downs on the ground through three
games. Smith Kemper leads the way
with 172 yards rushing, while Troy
Hentges has found the end zone
five times on the ground.
Warsaw
at Eldon
The Warsaw Wildcats have won
three straight games to open the
season, already surpassing its win
total from a year ago. The Eldon
Mustangs are coming off a 38-point
loss to California.
The two meet at 7 p.m. Friday.
Warsaw owns wins against Clin-
ton (49-15), Cole Camp (47-25) and
Versailles (40-16). Eldon opened
with a 48-42 loss to Miller Career
Academy before responding with a
41-14 win against Buffalo.
Johnny Eierman continues to
star for the Wildcats, boasting a
three-touchdown game against Ver-
sailles. He ran for two scores and
tossed another.
Wyatt Greenwalt and Zack
Lemen led Eldon’s attack against
California with 42 rushing yards
apiece.
Kickapoo
at Camdenton
A pair of undefeated squads pre-
pare to do battle.
Camdenton, ranked fifth in Class
5, hosts Kickapoo, first in receiving
votes in Class 5, meet at 7 p.m. Fri-
day night.
Camdenton is coming of a 20-17
victory against Lebanon, a game
where the Lakers rallied from a 14-
point deficit to pick up the win.
Matt Endsley scored a pair of
rushing touchdowns, while Josh
Martin found the end zone on the
ground as well.
The Lakers also own wins against
Hillcrest (17-14) and West Plains
(35-15).
Kickapoo (3-0) opened the sea-
son with a 39-25 victory against
Parkview before picking up wins at
Rolla (49-14) and against Waynes-
ville (36-6).
The Chiefs like to throw the ball,
as quarterback Anthony Cooper is
36-of-62 for 651 yards and nine
touchdown passes to go along with
two interceptions.
By comparison, Kickapoo has
642 rushing yards on 98 carries for
the season with seven scores.
School of the Osage
at Versailles
Austin Riley hopes to keep the
momentum going for School of the
Osage.
Coming off a spectacular per-
formance during the Indians’ 45-20
victory against Southern Boone last
Friday night, their first win of the
season, the quarterback looks for
a repeat performance against Ver-
sailles at 7 p.m. Friday.
Riley accounted for five touch-
downs during the win, tossing for
304 yards and three scores while
rushing for 40 yards and two touch-
downs.
School of the Osage opened the
season with losses to Fulton (28-
22) and Moberly (34-7) before last
week’s triumph.
Versailles hasn’t yet found that
first victory. The Tigers (0-3) have
fallen to Knob Noster (35-32), Ful-
ton (44-33) and Warsaw (40-16).
Helias: Inspiration from 2012
Don Sisson/Special to the News Tribune
Ripken Dodson of the Jays makes a one-handed catch
late in the second quarter of last Friday’s game against
Fayetteville in Fayetteville, Ark.
rallied and were poised to tie
the game in the final seconds.
But after an apparent touch-
down run was ruled short of
the goal line, the Kewpies had
12 players on the field on their
final defensive play, an inter-
ception in the end zone.
But instead of dwelling on
that late sequence, the Crusad-
ers took away a positive that
played a big role in their run to
the Class 4 title game.
“We played a really good
fourth quarter and had an
opportunity to win the game,”
Pitts said. “That game is prob-
ably the biggest reason we
won the Hannibal game (a
14-10 win for the district title)
because we learned we could
come back in a fourth quarter,
we could score on a final drive
to win.”
The Kewpies, who have
sandwiched losses to Lee’s
Summit North (27-16) and Fort
Zumwalt East (18-12) around
their lone win against Holt
(30-15), will bring a big-play
offense into the 7 p.m. contest.
“They’ve got scary talent,
some guys that are really, really
good,” Pitts said.
Hickman quarterback
Mason Murray has complet-
ed just 18-of-42 passes this
season, but the Kewpies are
averaging almost 22 yards per
reception.
“They’ve got a big-play
offense and we have to be
ready for it,” Pitts said. “They
want to hit the home run with
the pass game,” Pitts said.
Two of Murray’s top targets
are Roderick Beasley (8 catches
for 191 yards and 3 TDs) and
Missouri recruit Grant Jones
(3-123).
“They are very capable of
winning the one-on-one ball,
so we have to be ready for those
situations,” Pitts said.
Cameron Wright is Hick-
man’s top rusher with 198
yards (5.0 avg.). Justise Keith
has three of Hickman’s four
rushing touchdowns.
Defensively, the Kewpies
operate out of a 4-2-5 forma-
tion that likes to blitz.
“They really want to get after
the quarterback,” Pitts said.
The Crusaders will be with-
out starting left guard Will Fife
for the second time in three
weeks with a shoulder injury.
Colton Ferguson will step
into the offensive starting line-
up in place of Fife, as he did
in the contest against Sedalia
Smith-Cotton.
Notes: Gerstner under-
went surgery earlier this week
and is expected to be at the
game Friday. Gerstner will be
replaced as captain by senior
J.C. Szumigala, Pitts said. ...
On the defensive line, Brody
Buschjost will start in place of
Fife. ... John Rhea graded out as
Helias’ most productive defen-
sive player against Notre Dame,
in part due to his interception
return for a touchdown. He
was followed closely by junior
safety Todd Buschjost, senior
cornerback Nick Haslag and
senior linebacker Michael Tan-
nehill. ... Tannehill leads the
team in tackles through three
games with 35 total stops (20
solo). Shane Colonius, a senior
linebacker, is next with 26,
while Todd Buschjost is third
with 22. ... Pitts said Hickman
will remain on Helias’ schedule
next season. ... The Crusaders
will be back in action Saturday,
Sept. 28, against Vashon in St.
Louis. The 1:30 p.m. game will
be played at Gateway Tech.
Continued from p. 3
C6 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 SPORTS
www.newstribune.com
in this profession that carry themselves, from a
coaching standpoint, when you get a chance to
be around them, like Andy Reid.”
Five things to watch for in Chiefs-Eagles:
• What gives on the ground? Led by LeSean
McCoy’s NFL-best 237 yards rushing, the Eagles
are second in the league with 352 yards on the
ground. The Chiefs’ defense is second against
the run, allowing 54 yards per game. Something
has to give. Last week, the Chargers geared up to
stop the run, so McCoy had a big day catching
the ball. Kansas City may be strong enough up
front to contain the run without having to com-
mit an extra defender in the box. The team that
wins this battle likely wins the game.
“Their front seven is pretty good,” McCoy
said. “So far, it’s the most complete defense
we’ve played. But with the offense we have, it
falls on us. We just have to execute.”
• Pass-happy Andy vs. porous secondary:
Reid has always employed a pass-first phi-
losophy and it’s no different with the Chiefs.
Alex Smith has thrown on 59 percent of Kansas
City’s plays, excluding his scrambles that prob-
ably started as pass plays. The Eagles’ woeful
secondary only gives Reid more incentive to
pass, allowing 748 yards passing, third worst in
the league.
“They try to give you a lot of unorthodox
looks,” Smith said of Philadelphia’s defense.
“We have to be on with our communication.
Loud stadium, so everyone is going to have to
be on the same page.”
• Blocking Poe: Chiefs nose tackle Dontari
Poe already has 3
1
⁄2 sacks, including 2
1
⁄2 on Tony
Romo last week. The big guy is a disruptive
force and presents a difficult challenge for the
Eagles.
“He’s big, he’s got really good feet, he looks
strong in his upper body. He’s a smart player,
too,” Eagles right guard Todd Herremans said.
• Mistake-free Mike: Michael Vick is off to an
excellent start in Chip Kelly’s up-tempo offense.
He’s making smart decisions, protecting the ball
and operating the read option to perfection.
Vick threw for a career-best 428 yards last week
and has a 119.0 passer rating. He’s accounted
for six TDs (four passing, two rushing) and zero
interceptions.
“He’s very explosive, he brings the run aspect
to his position, and him being a dynamic player,
you always have to account for him and make
sure you know what’s going on,” Chiefs safety
Eric Berry said.
• Tired legs: The Eagles are the first team in
NFL history to start the season with three games
in 11 days. The Chiefs are playing their third
game in 12 days. Expect some weary players
out there.
“I’m happy that we’re doing this at the begin-
ning of the season,” Eagles linebacker Connor
Barwin said. “If we were trying to get three
games (in 11 days) in Weeks 12, 13 and 14, I
don’t know if you could do it.”
CHIEFS: DOUBTFUL: TE Anthony Fasano (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: CB
Brandon Flowers (knee), TE Travis Kelce (knee). PROBABLE: T Branden Albert
(shoulder), DE Mike DeVito (neck), LB James-Michael Johnson (neck), LB Nico
Johnson (ankle), LB Dezman Moses (toe). EAGLES: PROBABLE: CB Brandon
Boykin (quadriceps), TE Brent Celek (shoulder), CB Bradley Fletcher (concussion),
C Jason Kelce (thumb), T Dennis Kelly (back), LB Mychal Kendricks (groin).
Continued from p. 1
Chiefs: Front seven key on defense for K.C.
that likes to move the ball up
and down the field at a fast
pace. The Hoosiers (2-1) are
averaging 50 points per game
in three games against Indi-
ana State, Navy and Bowling
Green.
Indiana seems to fit that
mold of fast-throwing quar-
terbacks as the Hoosiers have
allowed just four sacks in three
games.
“You just don’t look at the
sack numbers, you look at
everything,” Pinkel said. “We
want to get more sacks, there’s
no question about that.”
Although the Tigers haven’t
been getting sacks, intercep-
tions are up this season. Mis-
souri had just seven all of last
season, but has six already this
year.
Pinkel said he can’t explain
the reason why the Tigers are
getting more interceptions.
Now, the Tigers would like
to see the sacks to go with the
interceptions.
“Even with the screens they
run, that’s no excuse,” Gold-
en said. “If the quarterback’s
passing the ball, I feel like we
should at least get three sacks
a game. That’s the goal we set
for ourselves and I feel like we
can do it.”
Continued from p. 1
8) play again today at home
against Mexico.
Helias won the JV game
11-9. Brooke Winge was the
winning pitcher. Katey Hunt
had two hits and three RBI for
Helias.
Golf
Helias wins
ROLLA — Helias defeat-
ed Rolla on Thursday at Oak
Meadows Country Club.
Jenna Kosmatka paced the
Lady Crusaders with a 40 as
Helias shot a 176. Other fin-
ishers for Helias were Lauren
Plunkett (41), Hanna Beren-
dzen (46) and Ashton Lorts
(49).
Helias shot a 212 to win the
JV match. Madeline Gramlich
shot a 47.
Helias returns to action
today at L.A. Nickell in Colum-
bia against Hickman and Mex-
ico.
In Monday’s action at the
Smith-Cotton Tournament,
Berendzen shot a 92. Her score
was incorrect in Tuesday’s
News Tribune.
Russellville wins
EUGENE — Mikala Jung-
meyer shot a 78 to lead Rus-
sellville to the team title at the
Eugene Invitational.
The Lady Indians shot
358 as a team. Other finish-
ers for Russellville were Kelsey
Schrimpf (third, 84), Madison
Oliver (fifth, 97), Madie Bun-
gart (sixth, 99) and Chantz
Grellner (130).
Tennis
Rock Bridge 8, Lady Jays 1
The Rock Bridge Lady Bru-
ins showed why they continue
to be one of the state’s top ten-
nis teams.
Rock Bridge defeated Jeffer-
son City 8-1 on Wednesday at
Washington Park.
Haley Snellen (6-2, 4-6, 10-7
match tiebreaker) picked up
Jefferson City’s only victory, but
three different matches went
to match tiebreakers. Kelly
Raithel (0-6, 0-6), Paige Smith
(1-6, 1-6), Eden Hoogveld (6-7,
2-6), Kirsten Schmidt (6-3, 1-6,
3-10) and Athira Nambiar (2-6,
6-2, 2-10 match tiebreaker) all
suffered defeats.
Rock Bridge swept the
doubles portion as Smith and
Hoogveld lost 1-8, Raithel and
Schmidt fell 1-8 and Nambiar
and Snellen lost 4-8.
Jefferson City (10-1) plays
again Friday in the Columbia
Duals against Blue Springs
South at 10 a.m. and Belleville
(Ill.) East at 2 p.m.
Volleyball
Linn 2, Russellville 0
RUSSELLVILLE — Linn
defeated Russellville 25-22, 25-
12 on Tuesday. Linn won the JV
match 25-8, 25-20.
No statistics from the match
were available.
Continued from p. 1
the ball, didn’t move it very fast.
Got frustrated. They score.”
A long ball was misplayed
by the Jefferson City defense,
gifting Rolla’s Aaron Froehlich
with a breakaway. With the
Jays’ goalie venturing out of
his net to try to slide-tackle the
ball away from him, Froehlich
deftly chipped the ball over the
sprawling keeper into the net
for the goal.
“That Froehlich kid scored
57 goals last year for them,”
Horn said. “He made a good
play. That kind of hurt a little
bit.”
Rolla’s score came just min-
utes after Jefferson City’s Mar-
cus Woodruff banged a shot off
the post. After falling behind
1-0, the Jays woke up a little
bit and eventually drew level
thanks to the work of Aaron
Crane.
Crane took on a defender in
the box before being tripped
up and awarded a penalty kick.
Mason Vonderhaar stepped up
to the spot and slid the ball
into the right netting to knot
the game at 1 with 13:18 to go
before halftime.
“We still weren’t playing
well, but we did enough. Then
we got the PK, leveled the game
and it kind of swung to our
favor a little bit,” Horn said.
Jefferson City found the win-
ner at the 7:37 mark of the first
half with another bit of bril-
liance from Crane. The senior
midfielder played a beautiful
through-ball to Woodruff up
the middle, setting the forward
up on a breakaway. The Jays’
leading goal-scorer provided
an admirable finish, slotting
the ball into the left corner of
the net for his seventh tally of
the season.
“Crane made a nice pass
going to goal,” Horn said. “That
was big-time.”
Woodruff had a couple
chances to add insurance in
the second half, curling a shot
just past right post on a break-
away and later being tripped
up on a breakway in the box
that went without a whistle.
Rolla was unlucky not to
equalize in the second half,
having a header tipped over
the crossbar by a lunging Zach
Brooks midway through before
Froehlich missed out on a sec-
ond goal when he chipped a
shot off the crossbar with three
minutes before time.
“We were just terrible in
the back tonight, we really
were,” Horn said. “As crazy as
it sounds because we won, I
should shut up. It was not our
best performance.
“Rolla’s decent though. I
need to give them more credit.
They’ll win a lot of games. It
was their first loss of the year.
They’re not a dog. I was just
disappointed with our play.”
Jefferson City and Rolla
finished even with 13 shots
apiece, while the Jays held a
9-8 edge in shots on goal.
Rolla falls to 3-1 on the sea-
son. One of those victories was
a 4-3 overtime victory against
Class 3 No. 6 Rock Bridge.
Jefferson City (4-0) hosts
Quincy (Ill.) on Saturday.
Continued from p. 1
Jays: PK goal helps turn momentum
Area: Russellville wins title
Kris Wilson/News Tribune
Aaron Crane of the Jays gets taken down in the box by
Rolla’s Austin Parks in the first half of Wednesday’s game
at 179 Soccer Park. Mason Vonderhaar converted the
resulting penalty kick to tie the score at 1.
Tigers: Indiana protects well
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Former
heavyweight champion Ken
Norton, who beat Muhammad
Ali and then lost a controver-
sial decision to him in Yankee
Stadium, died Wednesday at a
local care facility, his son said.
He was 70.
Norton had been in poor
health for the last several
years after suffering a series of
strokes, a friend said.
“He’s been fighting the bat-
tle for two years,” said Gene
Kilroy, Ali’s former business
manager.
Norton broke Ali’s jaw in
their first bout, beating him
by split decision in 1973 in a
non-title fight in San Diego.
They fought six months later,
and Ali narrowly won a split
decision.
They met for a third time
on Sept. 28, 1976, at Yankee
Stadium and Ali narrowly won
to keep his heavyweight title.
Norton dies
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BER 21
210 Monroe St.
To include your Special of the Day
Fax Specials by 3:00 p.m. Thursday to 634-7433 or
Contact Nicole at 761-0271 or nicoleh@newstribune.com
Cost: $25 per week • Daily Specials will be printed Monday - Friday
THURSDAY
Casey’s General Store
102 Eastland Dr. • 573-556-8071
Large Taco Pizza- $13.99 for the month of September.
Pork or Chicken Tenderloin with 32 oz. drink for $3.99.
Open 24 hours including the kitchen!
Delivery available 4:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Daisy Delight Restaurant
2715 E. McCarty, Jefferson City • 573-635-1221
Foot Long Chili Dog with cheese,
fries or tots and 16 oz. soft drink,
fresh brewed tea or coffee - $6.50.
Country Kitchen
1650 Jefferson Street
Try our Hot Open-Faced Sandwiches.
Choice of Pot Roast, Pork & Meatloaf, served with
mashed potatoes and gravy for $8.99!
Add a cup of soup or tossed salad for $1.49.
Breakfast always served 24/7.
Now offering gift certificates!
Shep’s Southside
112 E. Dunklin • Now Open Sat. for lunch
Lunch: Grilled Chicken Spinach Salad! $8.50
Dinner: Grilled Chicken Alfredo Pasta. $12.50
Lunch served 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Dinner served 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Rachel’s Downtown Diner
127 E. High St. • 415-2480
Hours: 7 a.m. - 2 p.m. Seven days a week.
Breakfast: Mon.-Fri. 7-9 a.m.
Two eggs, bacon or sausage, hashbrowns & toast - $5.00
Homemade meatloaf served with mashed potatoes & gravy,
green beans and corn and a homemade roll - $6.50
Make Lunch Decisions EASY
by advertising your
lunch “Specials” with us!
Annual
Chicken Dinner
& Lunch
Friday, September 20
Lunch - 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Dinner - 4-7 p.m.
Eagles Club
1411 Missouri Blvd.
Adults: $10
Ages 5-10: $6
Ages 4 & Under: Free
Dine-in or carry-out
Lunch Delivery - 5 or more
For tickets or information
call 635-8439
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Special thanks to Habitat's
six event sponsors:
Assoc. of Mo Electric
Cooperative/Three Rivers
Electric Cooperative
Central Bank
GuideOne Insurance
Stark Construction Services
Thomas Ittner, Associate,
Thrivent Financial
www.rivercityhabitat.org
Chick's
Tap Room
Come join the fun
Hard To Find -But Worth It!
Located on Lower Level
2713 Industrial
Apple Pie & Jello Shot
Specials All Week
Sat., Sept. 21
High Energy Karaoke
by Davis Entertainment
8:30 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.
Rummage
& Bake Sale
Fri., September 20
th
7 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Sat., September 21
st
8 a.m. to 12 noon
Food and Drinks
will be served
Grace Lutheran
Church
618 Halifax, Holts Summit
Superhair Welcomes
Alyssa Thoenen
$55.00 Haircut
& Highlights
Capital Plaza West, lower level
893-4244
Valid thru 10-31-13
ANNOUNCEMENTS
070 Happy Ads
Guess who's
16 today!
If you see Alex today, wish
him a Happy Birthday!
Good luck on your
driver's license!
Love, Mom, Dad & Rachel
080 Special Notices
Adopt from the Jefferson
City Animal Center
634-6429
Saving one dog or cat may
not change the world,
but for that one dog or cat,
the world would be
changed forever
Adopt from the Callaway
Hills Shelter
896-4049
In Memory, Kai II, Riffy, Buffy & Tag
FREE
Basketball Clinic
at
Jefferson City High
School
for
Boys K-3 & 4-6 Grades
Tuesday & Thursday
9/24 and 9/26
K-3 from 6:00 - 7:30 p.m.
4-6 from 7:30 - 9:00 p.m.
Capital City Cobras
095 Found
FOUND: White Pomeranian in cage,
Centertown area. 573-584-3435
EMPLOYMENT
170 Help Wanted
A FULL TIME PRESCHOOL TEACH-
ER is needed. Must have 1 year
experience working with preschool
age children. $9/hour. 573-634-7863
Access www.cs-business.com
For area job opportunities
ATTENTION: Need line server/prep
person. Call during 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.
573-751-3967
BROADWAY WRECKER is accepting
applications for tow truck operators.
Class A CDL required. Apply in per-
son, 5321 Business 50 West, Jeffer-
son City, MO.
CASHIER/CLERK
Computer skills necessary. Apply in
person, Hometown Lumber & Hard-
ware, Linn, MO.
COMMERCIAL TIRE SERVICE
This position involves the service of
truck and O.T.R tires. Applicants
must have tire experience and a
class A or B CDL. McKnight Tire, 425
W. Dunklin, 573-635-0101
CONCRETE PUMP OPERATOR
Experience preferred. Must have
concrete experience. Wages
commensurate with experience.
Send resume to P.O. Box 642, Eldon,
MO 65026.
EDITOR
Trade association in Jefferson City
needs full time staff person with
strong writing and editing skills. The
ideal candidate will have graphic de-
sign experience with InDesign, a
marketing background and a demon-
strated ability to meet deadlines.
Journalism degree preferred but not
required. Job duties include
compiling and designing association
magazine, newsletter and marketing
material. Benefits include 40l(k);
cafeteria plan; health and dental in-
surance. Salary commensurate with
experience. Send resume, cover
letter and salary history by Oct. 9, to
svanleer@moagent.org, or MAIA,
P.O. Box 1785, Jefferson City, MO
65102-1785.
COOK/DRIVER
Growing food service Company
seeking new team member for a
Cook/Driver position in Jefferson
City. This position is responsible for
the daily cooking and delivery of
meals to account with use of
company van. Must have or be able
to obtain Class E driver's license,
have excellent driving record, good
attendance, and be available to work
weekends and holidays. Hours are
9:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m. and 3:00
p.m.-5:30 p.m. on a rotating
schedule.
Successful candidate will be able to
work independently under own
initiative and interact with clients in a
professional and courteous manner.
Prior cooking experience in profes-
sional setting required. Apply in per-
son at Helias High School cafeteria
or submit applications through
website, www.freshideasfood.com.
Successful applicant will be required
to pass a drug test and criminal
background check. EOE
First Student Transportation
Is NOW HIRING!
Company seeks applicants who are
committed to providing safe trans-
portation and excellent customer
service.
No Commercial Drivers License
needed as all necessary training is
provided.
Applicant must be at least 21 years of
age, have a valid driver's license and
be able to pass a drug test and an
extensive background check.
• Competitive Hourly Wages:
$10-$14 per hour starting
• $500 Sign-On Bonus
• 20 hours a week guaranteed
Extra work is available
Apply at 321 Norman Drive, Jefferson
City, MO
Court Clerk I, Copy File Clerk
The 19th Judicial Circuit, Cole
County, Missouri has an opening for
a Court Clerk I, Copy File Clerk. This
position is entry level clerical work, a
full time, state paid position with
benefits, and a semi-monthly salary
of $908.50. Duties include, but are
not limited to, pulling case files, pre-
paring copies, making case entries,
responding to requestor's questions,
preparing, processing and mailing re-
quests and invoices, and other relat-
ed duties as assigned. This position
can be physically taxing, as the
selected candidate will be required to
pull and replace case files from
shelves above a six foot height, as
well as carrying numerous files from
office to office on separate floors.
The preferred applicant will possess
knowledge of Windows, Microsoft
Office, copiers, and other standard
office equipment. Prior JIS (Justice
Information System) and OSCA Re-
ports experience is beneficial, but not
required. Applicant must have
exemplary customer service skills,
accuracy and attention to detail.
Graduation from high school or GED,
or two years general clerical experi-
ence is required. Preference will be
given to prior court or legal experi-
ence. EOE.
Apply by mailing, delivering, faxing or
emailing resume by September 20,
2013, to:
Cole County Circuit Clerk
P.O. Box 1870
301 E. High Street
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Fax: 573-761-9232
Email: Cole.Web@courts.mo.gov
Qualified applicants should expect to
complete a Cole County Application
for Employment to supplement their
resume.
HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONER
INSTALLER needed. Must have
experience in the HVAC field. Some
knowledge of HVAC Service pre-
ferred but not required. Please send
resume to :
HVAC Installer
P.O. Box 106098
Jefferson City, MO 65110-6098
HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
Local company seeking experience
heavy equipment operator. Class B
license required. Send response to
File 3024, News Tribune, 210 Monroe
St., Jefferson City, MO 65101.
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 D1
CLASSIFIED
ACCOUNTANT
Three Rivers Electric Cooperative, an
electric utility company, seeks to fill
an immediate opening for an entry
level Staff Accountant position in our
Linn, MO office. Primary job re-
sponsibilities will include but are not
limited to payroll processing, payroll
tax reporting, accounts payable, mis-
cellaneous accounts receivable,
bank reconciliations, and subsidiary
accounting. Other job functions will
include processing and balancing of
work orders and capital credits to the
general ledger, maintain and renew
vehicle licensing requirements for the
company's fleet of vehicles, and pre-
pare various state and federal tax re-
ports.
Qualifications: A minimum of an
Associate's degree from an accredit-
ed college or university with a major
in accounting, finance or business
administration is required. A
Bachelor's degree or above is pre-
ferred. Two or more years of work
experience in a progressively re-
sponsible accounting or
bookkeeping position is desirable.
Knowledge of general accounting
principles is a must. This position re-
quires a person who is detailed
oriented, organized and has the
ability to work independently. Other
qualifications include knowledge of
basic budgeting and finance
principles, cash management skills,
proficiency with Microsoft Office
applications, and have knowledge of
Federal and State laws relating to
payroll taxes and sales tax. Addition-
al skills require this position to have
the ability to maintain confidential in-
formation, have the ability to
communicate effectively, handle a
variety of tasks simultaneously,
organize work to meet deadlines and
analyze financial situations in order
to evaluate solutions.
Benefits include medical, life in-
surance, and retirement plans.
Salary will be determined based
upon experience and market value.
No phone calls. Interested applicants
should follow the procedures out-
lined next to be considered for this
job opportunity. Applicants will need
to go to our website at
www.threeriverselectric.com and
download a copy of our employment
application (found under the "Your
Co-op" tab and then under "Job
Openings"). Complete the employ-
ment application and submit it along
with a cover letter, resume, college
transcripts, salary expectations and
at least three references to: Three
Rivers Electric Cooperative, Attn:
Human Resources, PO Box 918,
Linn, MO 65051. Deadline for
applications to be received will be 2
p.m., on October 1, 2013.
Heavy Equipment Operator
Training!
Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3
Weeks Hands On Program. Local
Job Placement Assistance. National
Certifications. GI Bill Benefits
Eligible. 1-866-362-6497
Hogan Truck Leasing is looking to
add technicians and shop support
personnel to our Fulton Mo. Location.
Technicians should be well rounded
in all areas of medium and heavy
truck repair. Electronic diagnostics is
a plus. Shop support duties include,
shop cleaning, stocking parts, pickup
and delivery of parts, trucks, etc.
Part-time employment could be con-
sidered. Call Leon at 314-802-5936
INFANT/TODDLER TEACHER
Full & part time. Increasing enroll-
ment, loving & energetic teacher
needed for full time position. Experi-
ence and/or education required to
start your rewarding career. Benefits.
Learning Connection, 893-4469.
Part time person needed 20-25 hours
per week. Must have basic computer,
telephone & office skills. Send re-
sume to njtackett@gmail.com.
Senior citizens welcome to apply.
LAW LIBRARIAN
The Supreme Court of Missouri is
seeking an experienced library pro-
fessional to oversee the operations of
the Supreme Court Law Library and
enhance the visibility and availability
of the library through use of
technology and public outreach.
Qualified candidates will have a
master's degree in library science, a
law degree, or both. Substantial law
library and library administration
experience or its equivalent are high-
ly preferred.
Starting salary range is $64,400 to
$67,200 annually depending on
experience and qualifications.
Qualified candidates should submit
resumes and at least three profes-
sional references via e-mail to
Bill.Thompson@courts.mo.gov.
A more detailed description can be
viewed at: www.courts.mo.gov refer
to job opportunities section.
Candidates submitting applications
by October 15, 2013 will be given
preference, but applications remain
open until the position is filled.
The Supreme Court of Missouri is an
Equal Opportunity Employer.
LINE SERVER/CASHIER
Small cafe seeking an experienced
Line Server/Cashier. Those with
experience will only be considered.
Must be customer service oriented,
neat in appearance, cheerful,
energetic, professional and well
organized.
Must also be able to pass a
background check.
This is a part time position 7:30 a.m. -
1:00 p.m. Mon. - Fri.
Salary: $8.00/hour
Please be prepared to complete an
employment application and bring
your resume to the Wildwood Cafe,
located at 930 Wildwood Dr., Jeffer-
son City, Mo. between the hours of
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Mid America Precast, a manufactur-
er of precast concrete products, is
currently accepting applications for
the following position:
Batch Plant Operator
Computer, Math, & Mechanical
skills are required. Willing to train
someone with Computer &
Concrete knowledge.
Salary commensurate with experi-
ence. Benefits to include 401K.
Apply in Person
Mid America Precast, Inc.
2700 Westminster Ave.
Fulton, MO 65251
Equal Opportunity Employer
$ $ $ $
NEED CASH?
Dominos Pizza
Worlds largest pizza delivery
company, now accepting applica-
tions for all positions:
• Flexible hours
• Part time/full time available
• Manager training available
• Earn cash daily
Apply in person at 1717 Christy Dr. or
3238 W. Truman Blvd. (background
check and drug screening required)
OFFICE ASSISTANT
Busy Fulton, MO CPA firm seeks
front desk employee with good
organization, computer, and people
skills. Experience in payrolls and
QuickBooks preferred. Immediate
opening, competitive salary and
benefits. Send resume to: dave@djs-
cpa.com
PRESCHOOL TEACHER ASSISTANT
Immediate opening for a Preschool
Teacher Assistant, part-time hours.
Please call 573-338-1061.
OFFICE MANAGER
Office Manager needed for a small
non-profit corporation that partners
with the State of Missouri to provide
business support to visually impaired
managers that operate retail and
food service locations. The ideal
candidate would have proven super-
visory skills, exceptional communica-
tion skills, excellent computer skills,
ability to establish and maintain
effective working relationships with
staff, board members, and clients.
Would have experience in
Accounting and Accounting Soft-
ware, P&L Statements, Payroll, ability
to learn new software, files/record
management, and employee re-
cruiting and training. The position will
supervise various subordinates and
work independently with supervision
from the board of directors and a
board liaison. The corporation pro-
vides a full benefits package and a
starting salary of $29,172.00 with a
12-month probationary period.
Candidates must be able to pass a
background check and provide a
current credit review.
Please submit your Cover Letter, Re-
sume, Three Professional Refer-
ences, and Salary History to:
larry.r.branson@dss.mo.gov by
09-30-2013.
PART-TIME BARTENDER
Jamey's Private Club. Apply between
8 a.m. and 9 a.m.
Part-time Medical Receptionist
Medical receptionist experience re-
quired for 6 days per month position
in a busy physician's office. Must be
professional and able to multitask.
Send resume to:
JCmedicaloffice@gmail.com
PHARMACY TECHNICIAN
Part time opening. Flexible hours,
nights and weekends. Email:
1303hrmgr@hy-vee.com
PROGRAM
DIRECTOR
Central Missouri Foster Care & Adop-
tion Association is seeking a full-time
Program Director. Potential appli-
cants must have a Bachelor's Degree
and have professional experience in
professional training/facilitation and
volunteer management. Some
evening and travel required. Salary
range is $23,000 - $25,000. To apply,
please send cover letter and resume
to ccfosteradopt@gmail.com by
September 20, 2013.
ROSEBUD TRACTOR
AND EQUIPMENT
• Truck Driver - Must have CDL and
prior experience loading and un-
loading a flatbed trailer is de-
sirable.
• Ag Mechanic - Must have own
tools and prior ag experience is
desired.
Both positions are full time with
benefits. Resumes can be sent 1325
East Main, Linn, MO 65051; dropped
off in person; or emailed to:
rosetrac@fidnet.com
SALES POSITION AVAILABLE
We are expanding with a new
building at Putnam Chevrolet and we
are currently seeking a qualified per-
son for an opening in our New and
Pre-owned sales department. Retire-
ment benefits and health insurance
available. Apply in person at 500
West Buchanan, California, MO.
SCHOLASTIC JOB Opportunities
Job Line 632-1787
www.scholastic.com
SERVERS
Love Sushi is now hiring for server
positions. Apply in person at 2201
MO Blvd. No phone calls!
SUBSTITUTES NEEDED: The New
Bloomfield R-III School District is
currently accepting applications for
the following substitutes: Teachers,
aides, and custodians. May print an
application from our web at
www.nb.k12.mo.us or call
(573)491-3700 ext. 101 for an
application. We are an equal
opportunity employer.
The name Kraft is synonymous with
world-class - as in world class
people, products and technology.
Add your talent to the behind the
scenes action that leads to global
leadership. Our Columbia, MO facility
is currently hiring for the following
positions:
LINE TECHNICIAN
Job Number 1302454
ELECTRICAL TECHNICIAN
Job Number 1302453
Candidates may view job descrip-
tions, requirements and apply online
at www.kraftcareers.com
171 Help Wanted - Medical
Adams Street
A Stonebridge Community
has the following positions available:
• Part-Time LPN
• Part-Time CNA, Day Shift
Apply in person, Adams Street Place,
1024 Adams Street, Jefferson City.
EOE
Looking for Part Time/Full Time nurse
aides, or CNAs in the Jefferson City
and New Bloomfield area. Must have
reliable transportation and must be
dependable. If interested please call
1-866-746-2600 to apply. EOE
Phoenix Home Care, a Home Health
Agency that takes care of elderly cli-
ents in their own homes has
openings for experienced Caregivers
and CNAs.
*You must be able to work either 12
or 24 hour shifts and 1 weekend per
month.
For more information, contact:
Harriett Folkman
Apply at:
Phoenix Home Care
718 E. Capitol Ave.
Jefferson City, MO 65101
(573) 635-3900
RN & LPN
Due to increased census, St.
Elizabeth Care Center is looking for
qualified candidates with positive
attitudes who are team players to fill
a full time RN, weekend RN and part
time LPN position. Positions offer
excellent benefit packages and an
excellent work environment.
Please fax your resume to
573-493-2712, E-mail:
sludy@stelizabethllc.com, or mail to
St. Elizabeth Care Center, 649 S.
Walnut Street, St. Elizabeth, MO
65075. For more information or ques-
tions please call 573-493-2215 to
speak with Administrator Susan Ludy
or Mary Schulte, HR. EOE
173 Help Wanted - Sales
Outside Sales
Inside Sales
Independent electrical distributor
located in Jeff City, seeks candidates
for Inside and Outside Sales posi-
tions. A solid knowledge of electrical
materials is a plus. An outgoing per-
sonality and sales-oriented attitude
desirable. Responsibilities will in-
clude servicing and growing current
accounts as well as developing new
sales, providing general customer
service. Great opportunity to join a
successful organization with a 72
year history. Please submit
confidential resume via e-mail to:
hr@butlersupply.com or Apply in
person at Butler Supply, Inc., 2012
Missouri Blvd., Jefferson City, MO
Visit us at www.butlersupply.com
EOE
174 Help Wanted - Drivers
Driver for family owned company.
Reefer operation. Full time, paid
vacation, pay commensurate with
experience. No New York City.
• No touch freight
• 3 years experience in last 3 years
• Must have Class A CDL
Call 1-660-335-4513, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.,
Monday through Friday
178 Business Opportunity
Nice little hair salon for sale, fully
equipped with tanning beds. Moving
out of state. Make reasonable offer.
573-897-3330
TRANSPORTATION
230 Autos For Sale
BUICK LaCROSSE, 2007, Very nice
car! New tires, leather $9950.
Carroll Rehma Motors, Linn, MO
countrymiledeals.com
877-605-8827
CADILLAC DTS, 2010, beautiful pearl
white, 1 owner, low mileage,
excellent condition. 573-230-7353
CHEVROLET CAPRICE CLASSIC,
1989, 110,000 miles, $2900.
573-291-4688 or 573-619-5025
FORD ESCORT WAGON, 1999, 197k
miles, clean inside & outside, good
tires, cold air, driven daily, $950.
573-896-9648 or 573-645-0302
LINCOLN MARK LT, 2007, 6,900
actual miles, like new. MUSTANG GT
convertible, 1988. 635-5900 or
573-291-0401
LINCOLN TOWNCAR, 1995, 4 door,
dark gray, power windows, power
seats, lots of extras. Wheelchair lift
can be purchased extra, good condi-
tion, 53,710 miles, $5,000.
573-634-3664
MITSUBISHI SPYDER GTS
CONVERTIBLE, 2003, 114K, power
everything, air, leather, goo0d condi-
tion, needed larger car, $5700 or best
offer. 573-353-4205
MUSTANG GT, 2006, Premium
Saleen style, 6-cd Shaker 500 stereo,
Power, automatic, 45xxx, Excellent
condition! $17,950 573-893-8713
NISSAN MAXIMA GXE, 1993, V6,
automatic, cloth seats, moonroof,
good condition, 115,000 miles,
$2,500. 573-744-5565
PONTIAC FIREBIRD FORMULA
TRANSAM, 2000, 5.7 liter, V8, 4
speed automatic, 16" aluminum
wheels, many more extras, low miles
- 28K. Grandma is selling - must see
to appreciate - $15,000. Call
573-418-2256, Mon. - Fri.
STANLIN QUALITY USED CARS
2004 Impala1998 Ford Explorer
1990 RX7 CONVERTIBLE
1999 Mazda 6261994 Chevrolet S10
Call Linda, 635-9050
Mon. - Fri., 8:00-5:30
TOYOTA CAMRY, CE, 2007, 87,000
miles, 2.4L, Automatic, Exterior Color
Desert Sand Mica, Beige Interior,
VERY NICE CAR!!! CLEAN CARFAX!!
Have all maintenance/service
records. $11,498. 573-645-0433 or
573-645-0724.
TOYOTA COROLLA, 2008, good
condition. 81,526 miles, $9,250.
573-291-3782
$$ We Buy Junk Cars & Trucks $$
$100 - $350. Same day service.
Call/Text 573-639-1688.
240 Trucks For Sale
FORD F-150, 1994, air conditioning,
cruise control, Pioneer stereo with re-
mote, automatic, power windows,
power locks, chrome bed box and
bed caps, runs and drives great, see
to appreciate, excellent condition,
105,000 miles, $3,850. 573-692-0705
or 660-489-2259 preach76@iland.net
FORD F150, 1999, extended cab,
4x4, runs great, well maintained,
$3950/offer. 573-378-6084
FORD F150 XLT, 1995, 4x4, 141k
miles, $2700. 573-821-2998
FORD F-250 SUPER DUTY XLT
CREW CAB, 2008, 4x4, cloth seats,
very clean excellent condition. 83K,
$25,900. 573-744-5565
FORD F250 XLT, 1997, Powerstroke
diesel, extended cab, 4x4, very re-
liable, $5500/offer. 573-378-6084
FORD RANGER, 1997, regular cab,
five speed, excellent condition, 145K,
$3,800. 573-744-5565
GMC 1500, 2003, regular cab,
Stepside, Clean, rare find, new tires,
sport wheels $11500.
Carroll Rehma Motors, Linn, MO
countrymiledeals.com
877-605-8827
SERVICES
100 Adult Care
In-home care, Care Partners LLC, de-
pendable and professional company
offering care for your loved ones, in-
cluding care for those with
Alzheimer's & dementia.
573-893-2273
Locally owned company providing re-
liable, compassionate, & affordable
care at home. We provide qualified
live-ins, homemakers & companions,
meal preparation, housekeeping,
medication reminders, transportation
& much more. 573-291-9803.
Preferred Care at Home
OFFERING PRIVATE IN-HOME
HEALTH CARE, 2+ years experience,
very caring & professional, excellent
references available. 573-418-7180
SENIOR AIDE - Helping seniors and
others with shopping, cleaning,
moving, etc. You name it. 636-9645
110 Child Care
Christian mother doing child care in
my home. Weekends only, day or
night. Years of experience. 821-6569
KIDZ KINGDOM has openings.
$130/week for babies, 2 & above,
$100/week. Lots of fun learning
activities. Gymnastic twice a month
free to parents. 573-634-3933
SMALL IN-HOME DAYCARE
1 opening, full time. West end. Fun &
loving environment. For more in-
formation call 338-4008.
114 Concrete/Asphalt
Best Rates - Concrete Work
Driveways, Patios, Sidewalks, Floors,
Retaining Walls, Etc. Septic tanks
systems installed. Free Estimates.
Credit cards Accepted! 659-1100
Concrete Engineering, LLC
Driveways, Patios, Walks & Re-
taining Walls. Excavating, Grading
& Drain Lines. Free Estimates. Call
Greg Leary @ 573-680-9504.
130 Hauling/Cleanup
1A Clean up, in/out of home, hauling,
lawn care, powerwashing. 893-8366
ALL REMOVAL & HAULING
1 item, room, shed or whole house
full. Or cleanup. Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured. 573-418-5895
PROPERTY CLEAN-UP SERVICES
Large or small! Call Frank, 797-6997.
Will pick up appliances & farm
machinery for free. 10-4. 619-1874
133 Home Improvement
#1A HANDYMAN
Remodeling & Home Improvement
FIX ~ REPAIR ~ REDO...We Do It All!
Whether you need it or want it.
Quality work - reasonable pricing!
573-592-9195 or 573-694-2117
ALL TYPES of home improvements:
baths, family rooms, deck, concrete
work, etc. 35 years experience. Call
573-619-6284. Major cards accepted.
Bathtub & Tile Repair
Porcelain & fiberglass. Over 25 years
experience, free estimates. 498-3402
BRICK/STONE SPECIALIST
Licensed & insured. Tuckpointing
repair to new construction.
Joe Jacobs, 573-353-5039
BROWN'S CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling experts! Additions, si-
ding, windows, kitchen, bath, pain-
ting, roofing. Deck & sunroom spe-
cials! Licensed, insured. 639-0249
HANDYMAN SERVICES, repairs,
painting, powerwash, roofs. 378-1016
HAYDEN PAINTING
Interior & exterior. FREE estimates.
634-4052
JASON'S
PRO PAINTING
Interior & exterior, drywall repair &
texture. Powerwashing & deck refin-
ishing. Free estimates. 680-6277
Masonry restoration, tuckpointing,
waterproofing. Local, licensed, in-
sured. 30 years experience. 619-4555
tri-countiesmasonry.com
NILGES POWERWASHING
Siding, Concrete, Decks & Fencing
Also Painting
896-5134 or 573-291-0579
Painting, concrete, siding, roofing,
drywall, all types of construction, no
job too small! Farm & home fencing
new or repairs. Mike 573-590-2214
TUCKPOINTING, caulking, water-
proofing. Specializing in masonry re-
pair & restoration. From chimneys to
churches and everything in between.
Tim Capps, 573-619-4299. Thank you
& God bless.
135 House/Office Cleaning
***AN EYE FOR DETAIL***
Local, Affordable, Dependable
Home or Office, **Insured**
Excellent References 573-864-5822
Ashley's Home & Office Cleaning.
2 openings. 680-6804
Cleaning in your home. Very trust-
worthy, have references. Call for
more details, 694-5271.
DIRT ALERT ONE CLEANING
Bi-Weekly & Monthly Openings
Residential & Commercial
Jefferson City & Local Area. 619-1442
138 Lawn Care/Landscaping
Aeration Seeding
Lawn Mowing
Leaf Cleanup
Call now to schedule!
KAUFFMAN'S LAWN SERVICE
573-690-9848 or 573-896-5751
AJ LAWN CARE - 619-5644
It's time to Dethatch, Aerate & Over-
seed. Call today to get free estimate.
Shrub Trimming available.
ALL SEASONS LANDSCAPING
• Landscape design, installation &
maintenance. • Fertilization • Mulch
• Yard Renovation & Clean up.
• Pavers & stone patios & versalock
walls. Call Kris 893-4257
ALL SEASONS LANDSCAPING
Irrigation, Installation & Maintenance
Call Kris 893-4257
ALL SEASONS LANDSCAPING
YARD RENOVATION
Overseeding, dethatching, core plug
aeration. Call Kris, 893-4257.
CAIN'S LAWN CARE:
Call Fred, 694-9504.
EICKHORST ENTERPRISES
Weekly Lawn Service &
Powerwashing.
Reasonable Pricing. Insured.
Free estimates. 573-821-2886
MO RIVER BOTTOM TOP SOIL
Garden quality. References.
573-694-0750 or 573-690-7929
MOST RELIABLE LAWN CARE
Mowing, mulching, fall cleanup,
powerwashing, shrub removal & trim.
Licensed & insured. 573-645-6307
www.mostreliablelawncare.com
Rob's Lawn & Landscaping, 694-4777
Tree/Shrub Trimming/Removal
Stump Grinding, BOBCAT Trackhoe
Overseed/Aeration, Gutters & More
SCULLEY LAWN SERVICE
Mowing, mulching, limb, brush & ivy
removal, flower bed maintenance.
Free estimates. Call or text Mike at
690-5007.
142 Misc. Services
TODD'S Pool & Spa Service
Scheduling pool closings. Low rates
guaranteed. 573-690-1085
We manage rental properties!
Throughout Jefferson City
& Columbia. 573-659-7777
148 Painting/Wallpapering
PAINTING/STAINING
Interior & Exterior Custom Painting &
Staining. Pressure washing & much
more. Gold Seal Painting. 529-1983
154 Roofing/Gutter
!BILL'S ROOFING
Serving Jefferson City for over 30
years. It's how we do, what we do.
Call 636-8433
ROOFING/REPAIRS OR RE-ROOFS
Most any home repair. 36 years.
C&W Harrison 573-680-9345
160 Tree Services
A ABLE TREE SERVICE 636-4410
Licensed & insured. Senior discount.
Neat cleanup. Call anytime. 636-4410
Heuman Tree Service
All your tree needs, insured, free
estimates. Credit cards accepted.
Chris 573-301-0490
RIGHT PRICE TREE SERVICE
573-644-2410
!TREE WORKS PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES 636-6973!
Professional tree service. Insured.
Senior discount. References. Serving
Jefferson City since 1985. Accredited
with Better Business Bureau.
D2 Thursday, September 19, 2013
CLASSIFIED
GMC 1500, 2007, Vortec Max, 6.0 liter
motor, all leather, 106,000 miles, lots
of extras. Asking $15,000. Call or text
573-619-8578
245 Sport Utility Vehicles
FORD EDGE SEL, 2009, silver, all
wheel drive, 58k miles, cloth interior,
panoramic sunroof, cruise, power
windows/locks, keyless entry, 6 disc
CD player & satellite radio (optional).
$18,600. 573-619-3780
FORD EXPLORER, 1997, all wheel
drive, white, tow package, 6
CD/Cassette, great air & heat, lumbar
support, back cargo shade, sunroof,
all electric, rear defrost, 137,600
miles, $5500. 573-694-1173
GMC ACADIA SLE, 2007, keyless
entry, power seats, air conditioning,
anti-lock brakes, cruise control,
alarm system, power locks, power
windows, front wheel drive, power
mirrors, rear air, alloy wheels, trac-
tion control, disc player, fog lights,
auto headlights. Nice vehicle.
Purchased new. Offers considered,
excellent condition, 94,000 miles,
$13,750. 573-645-0201
HONDA CRV, 2009, all wheel drive,
all wheel drive, 1 owner, Ready for
winter, Nice! $15,950.
Carroll Rehma Motors, Linn, MO
countrymiledeals.com
877-605-8827
JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE, 2000, V6,
automatic, air, 185K, 4x4, leather,
newer tires, safety inspected, $3200 -
will trade. 573-680-7772
KIA SOUL+, 2013, 2400 miles, auto-
matic transmission, air, power
windows, locks & steering, receiver
hitch, $18,500. 573-634-7857
TOYOTA 4-RUNNER, 2004, 1 owner,
black, SR5, 4x4, sunroof, luggage
rack, 270,000 hwy. miles, very clean,
$8150. 999-7981
250 Vans For Sale
DODGE 2500 COMMERCIAL VAN,
2002, tow package, 360 engine,
hydraulic lift on the side, 49K, $8,000
or best offer. 573-690-2499
NISSAN QUEST SL, 2005, 1 owner,
3.5 liter V6, excellent condition, pow-
er windows, locks & sliding door,
123K, $6,700. 573-353-5688
260 Motorcycles
HONDA GOLDWING, 2004, low
miles, $11,500. 573-498-3749
263 ATV’s & Go Carts
CARTER MATRIX 300, 2010, Side by
side, UTV-2WD, excellent condition,
$2,700. If interested, Call
573-592-9946 or 573-642-6125.
Factory Authorized Clearance Sale
On all Polaris and Can-Am ATVs
and Side X Sides.
Up to $1,000 rebates
on select models
Ends Sept. 30
(573)395-4044
INFO@TEAMPWPS.COM
"OUTDOOR ADVENTURES"
270 RVs/Campers
FLAGSTAFF, 2004, 26' travel trailer
with slide & ducted air, needs repair
but is usable without, as is take & go,
price $3,995, with hitch & sway
control, $4275. U.S. Rents It, 1513 In-
dustrial Dr., 635-6171 or
1-800-324-4846, ask for Dan or Jim.
Lot clean up sale New 2012 model 34
ft. V Cross 34 ft. travel trailer loaded
with full factory warranty. Free deliv-
ery in MO. New trailer used price.
Yes we trade. US RV Sales 1513 In-
dustrial Drive. 635-6171 ask for Jim
Snowbirds hookup and travel south.
Cherokee, 27 ft. Grey Wolf, ready to
go, low miles, excellent condition.
2009 model, $8,500. 573-897-4573,
call for information.
Super nice clean 32 ft. Four Winds
travel trailer with super slide, ducted
air, $7,995. Free delivery in MO.
635-6171 or 1-800-324-4846. US RV
Sales 1513 Industrial Drive.
Three new Forest River bunkhouse
trailers 21 ft., 31 ft., 32 ft. Sure we
trade! US RV Sales 1513 Industrial
Drive. 635-6171
Two used 2013 Coachmen Clipper
model 106 ST. fold down camping
trailers. Air, furnace, awning, $6,995
each. US RV Sales 1513 Industrial
Drive. 635-6171
280 Boats/Motors/Accessories
BAYLINER, 1985, 16' with 85 h.p.
Evinrude outboard motor and nice
matching trailer. New floor and
carpet. $1300 or best offer.
573-694-3971
CAJUN 18' fiberglass bass & ski boat
with trailer, 126 hours, I/O 143 liter,
Buick engine V6, trolling motor, must
see to appreciate, like new. $3500.
573-374-7360
GIGGING BOAT, 18', with gigging
rail, 60 h.p. Jet, $3500 or best offer.
573-301-2148
RANGER 518, loaded, low use, 200
Mercury, 3 new batteries, cover, al-
ways shedded, tandem trailer,
$16,500. 573-680-1031
SEADOO GTX, 1999, 3 person jet ski,
$1850. Trailer available.
309-212-5977
SEASON CLOSEOUT SALE
G3, Blazer and Sea-Ark Boats
Yamaha, Mercury, Suzuki and
Evinrude outboards.
We must lower the inventory
before winter!!
Some of these new units are
$2,000 off of MSRP!!
(573)395-4044
INFO@TEAMPWPS.COM
"OUTDOOR ADVENTURES"
MERCHANDISE
310 Antiques/Collectibles
OAK CABINET WITH MIRROR, $500.
573-797-8076
320 Appliances
Appliances for sale. ALSO, DO RE-
PAIRS. Will haul off appliances.
573-796-2711 or 353-9376.
GREAT SELECTION of used
appliances: all guaranteed.
896-4157
Whirlpool, 25 cubic ft., side by side
refrigerator with indoor icemaker,
$550. 635-8530
410 Computers
EVGA GEFORCE GTX 660, excellent
condition, two cards. Like new.
Excellent performance. Bridge in-
cluded. $170 single card. $325 for
both, $325. 573-821-6750
420 Electronics/Cameras
NEW APPLE IPAD, 16gb, black, paid
$450, asking $300. 573-353-4147
440 Farm Equipment/Trailers
9400 COMBINE with contour master,
4 wheel drive, 922F flex head, 693
corn head, 3350E/2300S, asking
$70,000 for all, may divide. 353-6960
450 Firewood/Chain Saws
1AA aged firewood, home grown in
USA, Lohman area, $55/$45/load.
573-680-0074
460 Foods
CANNING TOMATOES FOR SALE
$1/pound. 680-5976
470 Free for Free
2 year old male Bichon/Rat Terrier
mix to loving family, 573-826-9291
3 adult female cats, spayed, need
new loving home. 573-301-9616
4 hairless rats, females, homes as
pets - not feeders. Text: 301-2604
KITTENS, 2 black & white.
573-584-3547
Please Submit Free Ads to:
class@newstribune.com
or
News Tribune
P.O. Box 420
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Sweet Female Cairn Terrier, 10 lbs., 9
months old. 573-826-9290
480 Furniture
5 piece sectional with reclining sec-
tion, $400/best offer. 573-635-5380
ANTIQUE BUFFET, fair condition,
$100. 573-301-5016
ANTIQUE CHINA CABINET, good
condition, $150. 573-301-5016
DINING ROOM SET, table, 6 chairs, 3
leaves and hutch, $500.
573-636-9490
MOVING: Glass & wood cabinet 75'
length x 16" width. Dolls, doll lamp,
lamps, hanging lamp, mirrors, glass-
ware, bells, duck collection, duck
yard fountain, patio table/2 chairs,
new twin bed with iron headboard,
white with gold trim chest of drawers,
30" round dinette table/2 chairs, 24"
round bedroom table/2 chairs. Call
635-2971 from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m
New Flexsteel brown sofa features
end recliners; new $1300 - sell $950.
Matching loveseat with recliners,
$850. Will sell both for $1700. Local -
573-694-1448
New mattresses, Sealy Stearns &
Foster with free box, couches, quality
furniture for entire home. B & B
Furniture, 626 Jefferson, 690-9991.
QUEEN MATTRESS SET, Justice
Bedding, excellent condition, queen
mattress, box springs and frame.
Extra firm. 5 years old. Call any day
noon - 8:00 p.m. Located in Holts
Summit, $100. 573-619-3388
Refrigerator, $600. Hitachi TV, 56",
$300. Dining room set. 573-645-7136
Sell it For $25
For a flat rate of $25 you get:
• 4 Lines of Text
• 1 Color Picture
• 155,000 Readers
Your ad will run in the:
• News Tribune
• Fulton Sun
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AND all 4 websites for one week!
Call Today! 761-0226
or email to class@newstribune.com
One Item per ad - No Refunds
terms apply
Serta mattress sale. $199 Serta
mattress set, can deliver, new with
warranty. Call/text 573-819-2416.
SOFA, excellent condition, nice
cream/blue/green plaid sofa, $125.
573-634-5516
490 Hay/Grain/Feed
Fescue seed, cleaned, bagged &
tested, $.60/lb. Buy 10 bags - get 1
bag free. Mixed seed, $.20/lb.
392-1115
GRASS HAY BALES, 4x5, net
wrapped, 2nd cutting, $35 each or
take all for $32.50 each.
573-301-2148
495 Healthcare Items
HOVEROUND electric wheelchair,
perfect condition. 573-619-4954
510 Jewelry/Watches
WE BUY GOLD
Our customers tell us we pay
the highest price in town.
The Blue Diamond 634-4241
www.thebluediamond.com
520 Lawn & Garden Supplies
AGRI-FAB - 40" Spike Aerator, like
new, $65. 573 635-2386
530 Livestock/Horses
ANGUS HEIFERS, fall calving in 3rd
trimester, 4th generation Gardner
breeding. 573-680-0456, 301-5726, or
619-9667.
GUINEAS, $8. YOUNG PEACOCKS,
$30. 573-310-9537
540 Machinery
Victor CutSkill Heavy Duty complete
cutting torch set. Model # D350-510.
Part # 0384-2646. New in box - nev-
er used. $300 online - $400 in local
stores. Sale price at $225.00. Call
Chip 850-516-7428 Leave message.
550 Merchandise Wanted To Buy
Always buying antiques, estates, old
furniture, whole households. South-
side Furniture, 573-556-6400.
Cash paid for your gold or silver
jewelry. Any condition. Capital Pawn,
703 Eastland, 573-659-PAWN.
Wanted: Used electric wheelchair or
scooter. 573-301-5394 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
560 Miscellaneous For Sale
80+ fire brick, houseplants, acoustic
guitars, fiddle, 2 cutaways - electric,
clawfeet desk & chair. 573-489-5329
AMF Playmaster pool table, 8 ft., 3
piece slate, just like new, $900 or
best offer. 573-286-4199
Beautiful handmade grandfather
clock, solid oak, 6.5' tall, Emperor,
$1000 or best offer. 573-286-4199
ELMO TOY ORGANIZER, 9 storage
bins, $40. 893-7018
Genealogy book of the John Boone,
$100. Crocheted, white, full size
bedspread - made out of yarn, $200.
Quilt top, full size, made out of feed
sacks, $50. Assorted feed sacks,
$12/each and pillow slips, $5/each
Please call, 642-6075.
MITSUBISHI 73" DIP TV, $500.
573-797-8076
NEVER MAIL CHECKS,
CASH OR WIRE MONEY
TO ANYONE WHO CALLS IN
RESPONSE TO AN AD
Many that offer to send a check in
exchange for you wiring money are
scams. Please be on guard.
A public service message
from the News Tribune
Perfect flame, 3 burner gas grill with
side burner & cover, very nice, $150.
Charcoal grill, small, used twice,
charcoal & lighter fluid, $60. Electric
smoker, used twice, nice, $50.
893-3993 or 660-229-1033
SUN TANNING BED, SunVision
Pro28LXT, excellent condition,
commercial - extra box of bulbs in-
cluded, must sell, $725.
573-680-2686
WICKER SUNROOM/LIVING ROOM
set, $1500. 573-797-8076
570 Musical Instruments
Band & Orchestra Instruments
Rent-To-Own - Low Monthly Rates
Capital Music Co. 635-2732.
575 Pets & Supplies
20+ Puppies - Non Shed! Miniature
Schnauzers, Toy Aussies, Chi-
weenies, Jack Russells, Havanese,
Chihuahua, Shih-poo, Malti Poo!
11-5 daily Across from Wal-Mart
OSAGE BEACH 573-280-7277
BABIES! Shih-Tzu, Shih-Poo, Yorkie
Poo, small, Sale! 573-259-8534
CATAHOULA PUPPIES, 6 weeks,
registered, current on shots, $200.
660-287-0985
Chain link fence dog run, 6' wide x
10' long x 4' high, $225. 573-619-4634
CHIHUAHUA BABIES! Tiny and
small! $115 and up. 573-642-8008
COCKER SPANIEL, purebred, 5
month female, chocolate color. Very
playful. Shots up-to-date, $400.
417-540-2723
DOG, Male, Black/Tan, Sweet, loving,
small dog free to good home. Giving
away because of circumstances not
because of dog's behavior. He's a
good dog. No calls after 8 pm please.
Neutered, housebroken, wormed,
shots, 3 +, . 573-821-1191
YORKIE PUPPIES, registered, no-
shed, awesome companion, up to
date shots/dewormed, $350/$450.
573-578-9543
580 Sporting Goods
BROWNING OVER/UNDER
SHOTGUNS, all gauges, all tubes,
some skill in box, unfired. 20% off!
BROWNING AR-5 12 gauge, new and
unfired. GUN SAFE, large and new.
NEW WINCHESTER TARGET AMMO,
$6 per box. Call 573-644-4615.
CHARLES DALY 12 GAUGE O/U,
excellent condition, 26" fixed choke
skeet barrels. Nice engraving. Beauti-
ful stock, $750. 573-821-6750
Firearm Repair & Refinishing
Capital City Gunsmiths
724 Scott Station Rd.
10:00 - 6:30 Mon.-Sat.
573-821-1798
CapitalCityGunsmiths.com
GUN SHOW
Sept. 20-22
Fri. 5-9, Sat. 9-5 & Sun. 9-3
COLUMBIA
Boone County Fairgrounds
5212 N. Oakland Gravel Rd.
BUY-SELL-TRADE
Information (563)927-8176
Ruger 10-22, .22LR, $175. Mossberg
500E, .410, $225. Ruger Mk II target
pistol, .22LR, $400. Cash paid for
used guns. We loan on guns. Capital
Pawn, 703 Eastland. 573-659-PAWN.
RUGER SR9, 9x19mm pistol, black
stainless steel finish, $475. Price in-
cludes leather holster & 3rd
magazine - 17 round capacity.
573-418-7869
RUMMAGE SALES
600 Rummage Sales East
1 BIG WARDSVILLE 5 FAMILY SALE
Wed. 4-7 p.m., Thurs. & Fri. 8-5, Sat.
8-12. Kids newborn to adult plus size
clothing, Gymboree, Jumping Bean,
Cato, Old Navy, clothes 1/2 off on
Sat. Toys, dishes, jogging stroller,
tools, high chair, car seat, bikes, lin-
ens, treadmill, dining table, baby
items, Medela breast pump.
573-418-0883
Hwy. 54 to Hwy. 179 to Rt. B to Rt. W
to 1710 S. OAKS DR., 1st house on
the left
1 GREAT SALE!
Friday 8-2. Ladies large-plus clothes,
shoes, maternity, bicycles, toys, tv,
coffee table, dresser, pie safe, home
décor. Girls newborn-4T, boys
newborn-12 months, bottles, baby
bedding, jumparoo, carseat.
1205 CLOVERHILL LANE
left off Rt B south of Moreau bridge
2 FAMILY GARAGE SALE
Wed. 6 p.m. - 8 p.m., Thurs. & Fri. 6
a.m. - 6 p.m. Clothes, Miche purses
brown & black with several covers,
king comforter with shams, vacuum
sweepers, household, toys.
201 S. ROCK CREEK RD.
3 FAMILY GARAGE SALE
Wed. 3-7 p.m., Thurs. & Fri. 7-5, Sat.
8-1. Pack-n-Play, baby girl clothes
0-3T, DVDs, sheets, towels, quilts,
blankets, tablecloths, aprons, doilies,
glassware, Halloween decor,
generator, wheels & tires, 5th wheel
stabilizer, RV cover, Chevrolet head-
lights, SPC valve covers, TV, etc.
3204 COUNTRY VIEW DR., WARDS-
VILLE, off Rolling Road
3 FAMILY RUMMAGE SALE
Wed. 3-7 p.m., Thurs. 6:30 a.m.- 7
p.m, Friday 6:30-NOON. All seasons-
boys 0-4, girls 0-12 months and 4-10.
Girls uniforms 6-10. Maternity large.
Riding toys, Pokemon and Yugioh
cards, Barbie dolls, Dora doll house,
more. CASH ONLY all sales final.
3914 VIOLA VIEW
Rt. B to Rt M, left on Roling Road,
right on Sterling Ridge, left on Viola
View
4 FAMILY GARAGE SALE
Thurs. & Fri. 7:30-6, Sat., 7:30-noon
Girls clothes sizes 6 to 8 & 12/14,
boys size 10, ladies 0 & 1S, misses,
womens & mens clothes, toys
(Barbie Diamond Castle, Barbie
horse & carriage & Step 2 Kitchen -
great Christmas gifts, various other
toys), household items, kitchen
items, twin bed.
6909 RT. W, Wardsville
5 FAMILY RUMMAGE SALE
Wed. 3-7 p.m., Thurs. 6:45-6, Fri. 7-?.
Like new GMC truck camper,
Matthews FX2 TRU Glow site, Whisk-
er Bisket Bow, like new mens Levis
36/38/40 x 30, new L-XL mens shirts,
ladies & junior clothes, antique
furniture and accessories, home &
holiday decor, area rugs, purses,
Little Tikes sandbox & basketball
goal, nice boy & girls clothes 12
months - size 14/16, tons of cleats &
shoes, formals & toys. Also, straw
bales for sale.
6726 KOLB LANE, off Rt. M
INSIDE SHED
A 4 FAMILY SALE- WARDSVILLE
Wed. 4-7, Thurs. & Fri. 7-? Boys
18-24 months & size 10, girls 6 & 7,
juniors, men & women, changing
table, toys, TV, vintage figurines, 200
DVDs, new make-up & perfume,
holiday, & misc.
6711 & 6715 PINE RIDGE RD.
Attention Parents & Grandparents:
You Don't Want To Miss
This 4 Family Sale!
Wed. 4-8 p.m., Thurs. 7-6, Fri. 8-5:30.
Little Tikes jungle gym, house,
school house & slide. Toys, baby
items, riding toys. Name brand
clothes - all on hangers: boys 0-8,
girls 6X-juniors, womens M-XXL,
maternity XL, mens L-XXL. Books, TV
stand, home decor, much more! No
early sales - cash only please.
241 S. ROCK CREEK RD., 4 miles on
Rt. B past gas station, 1st left past
Junction E, 4th driveway on the left.
A-Z SALE - SAT. ONLY
SAT 7-1. 200+ books, man
stuff/tools, boys 3-4, house items,
large lot 25-50 cents, eclectic mix.
1709 GREEN MEADOW DR.
Englewood, right on Green Meadow
BASEMENT SALE
Thurs. & Fri. 6-6, Sat. 6-Noon. 2
hutches/cabinets, night stand, home
decor (pictures, candles, shelves,flor-
al), quilt tops, picture frames, vacu-
um sweeper, retired Stampin' Up!
products (stamp sets, paper,
punches, etc.), baby items (2 crib
sets, Co-sleeper, Rock-n-Play, space
saver high chair, bath tub seat),
toddler bed set, girls clothes
newborn - 3 months & size 3-18,
boys clothes newborn - size 18,
teens/ladies/womens clothes size
0-24 & XS-3X, mens clothes S-XXL,
purses, shoes, lots more!
358 S. ROCK CREEK RD., 4 miles
South on Rt. B from Wardsville
School (watch for green signs with
white letters)
BIG FAMILY SALE
Wed. 4-7 p.m., Thurs. 7-Noon. Lots of
namebrand clothing: boys 18 months
- 16, teen girls, ladies & mens. Toys
galore, nice shoes, Little Tikes riding
toys, G.E. dryer, humidifier, books,
movies, lots more.
6809 SUNRISE ACRES DR.
BYE BYE BABY STUFF!
Wed. 4-7, Thurs. 7-3, Fri. 7-12. Baby
carriers, activity mats, strollers, car
seats, swimming gear, ride-on and
push toys, several breast
pumps/nursing gear, crib/mattress,
toddler beds, glider, blankets,
bedding, clothes (newborn to 3
toddler), Pack-n-Play, and much
more! Toys from infant to big kids,
Halloween costumes, books, DVDs,
puzzles. Also men's and ladies
clothes/shoes (many never worn),
collectibles, linens, home decor,
swimming pool, Coach purses/wal-
lets. Many items brand new!
222 DALWHINNE WAYE
From 179, turn right on Tanner
Bridge Rd. to Grande Highland
Estates, right on Highland Waye,
right on Coventry Waye, left on
Dalwhinne Waye
DECOR GALORE!
Sat. only, 7:30 a.m. Decorator junkie
cleaning house! Tons of high end
wall art, pillows, rugs, lamps, Pier
One and Color Ware dishes, flatware,
glassware, fall and Christmas decor.
All in excellent condition. Come early
to get the best deals!
802 WINSTON COURT
Ellis Blvd. left on Rosewood, left on
Winston, left on Winston Court
DON'T MISS THIS SALE
WED. 3:30-7 p.m., THURS. & FRI. 6-?
4T-5T girls clothing, 0-3 month boys,
15 pairs toddler shoes, womens
clothing size 6-8 & M-L, speed
skates, womens size 18 dress
clothes, many birthday party items,
Bath & Body, kitchen decor, dresser,
wedding decor, antique dishes,
numerous household items, & name
brand purses.
1819 ALMARIE CT. APT. A- Go to
Wardsville, straight on W, 2nd left
Free Ads For Merchandise!
Place a 2 line ad for 3 days FREE!
Ad must include price of item.
Limit of 3 ads per month.
Private Party Advertisers Only
Some Stipulations Apply
Place ad online at
www.newstribune.com
FRI. 7-5 & SAT. 7-12. 18' fiberglass
boat with 200 h.p. motor & Mercruis-
er outdrive, 1975 Honda CB200T
motorcycle, 1980 Honda XR80
motorcycle, climbing tree stand (like
new), mens clothes 1X & 2X, womens
clothes C.J. Banks 2X & 3X, lawn
sweeper, misc., also hot dogs,
brownies & bottled water.
8100 DEER HAVEN RD., Wardsville
FRIDAY ONLY
Friday 7-?. Crib, Pre-20th Century
Books, Kitchen items, Curtains, Toy
Sets, Little Girls Shoes 5-1, Children
and Adult Clothes.
702 OAK POINT DRIVE
Off Southwood Hills
Garage Sale - Wardsville
Thurs. 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Fri. 5:30
p.m. - 7:30 p.m., Sat 7:00 a.m. - noon.
Tons of name brand kids clothing
(girls 0-4T, boys 0-2T), stroller, car
seat, toys, toddler girls tricycle, home
decor, glassware.
1810 CHURCHVIEW HEIGHTS
GARAGE SALE
Wed. 4-7, Thurs. 7-12. NO EARLY
SALES! Rain or shine. Girls 0-18
months (born in September), boys,
womens, juniors, men, shoes, cleats,
toys, board games, go kart, baby
items, flat screen TV stand.
7803 HUNTERS LANE - Deer Haven
Estates, Wardsville
GARAGE SALE: FRI. 7-6 & SAT. 7-?
Name brand clothing, all nice condi-
tion: womens size 10-16, large & XL;
girls size 10-14; boys size 6-12; Mary
Kay (1/2 off), Mary Kay business
supplies, Creative Memories, season-
al decorations, toy box, changing
table, toys, & misc. items.
7818 NEW CHURCH RD.- 8 miles
south of Jefferson City off Hwy. 54
GARAGE SALE: FRI. 8-1
Mens and womens clothes, house-
hold & misc. items. Everything $5
and under!
1017 WINSTON DRIVE
GARAGE SALE
Sat. 8-Noon. Infant clothes, girls size
6X-8 & 18-12, junior clothes, plus size
womens, mens L-XL, holiday decor,
furniture.
325 FREDRICKS LANE
GARAGE SALE
SATURDAY 8-1. Antiques, clothing,
and housewares.
1013 FAIRMONT BLVD.
GARAGE SALE WARDSVILLE
Wed. 3-6 p.m. & Thurs. 7 a.m. - 6
p.m. Boys clothes 10-14, shoes 6-7;
ladies clothes M/L, shoes 7.5; mens
clothes XL, pants 36, shoes 13. Toys,
Christmas & household items.
1308 EVERGREEN LANE
GARAGE SALE WARDSVILLE
Wed. 5-7 p.m., Thurs. 7-5. & Fri. 7-12.
New 20" girls bicycle, scooter,
womens clothes 18W-22W, Bunn
coffee maker, girls clothes 12-16, lots
of misc.
5429 WARDSVILLE RD.
GARAGE SALE
Wed. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.; Thurs. 6 a.m.
to 6 p.m.; Fri. 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Twin
bed frame, headboard, and foot-
board; boys clothing 6/7 to 14; swing
set; glass vases, misc. items. Bikes,
fishing equipment, and LOTS of toys!
5501 ROLING ROAD
GARAGE SALE
Wed. 4 - 7 p.m. & Thurs. - Fri. 6 a.m. -
6 p.m. Hunting & NWTF Items, Guns,
Cake Decorating Items, Gas Grill,
Chain Saws, Holiday Stuff, Clothes
and Miscellaneous.
7515 RT. W - WARDSVILLE
GARAGE SALE
Wed. 4:30-7 p.m., Thurs. 7-5, Fri. 7-12
Girls 2-12, boys 7-10, ladies S to plus
size, mens 2X, high chair, scrapbook
case, train table, antique rocking
chair, MU comforter, misc.
3121 RT. M - WARDSVILLE
GARAGE SALE
WED. 5-7 P.M., THURS. 7:30-5
Boys size 4-5, girls size 7-8, all in
great condition; M-L womens; shoes;
purses; L mens; misc. including
Christmas and Halloween costumes;
rust colored couch with ottoman
lounger; lots of toys - all like new.
Following items available, but prices
will be firm. Step II Train table with
trans $40; Fisher Price Spike the
Dinosaur $40; Leap Frog Leapster II
with 3 games $30; Fisher Price Smart
Cycle with 4 games $50; V-Tech V
Smile TV Learning System with 12
games (ages 3-7) $100; girls size 11
UGG boots $45.
1813 RT. M
HUGE EMPLOYEE
GARAGE SALE
Fri., Sept. 20, 9 - 12
Household items, TV, lots of books,
dishes, lots of toys & clothes of all
sizes, lots & lots of misc.
All proceeds to benefit United Way.
NEWS TRIBUNE PARKING LOT
210 MONROE ST.
Jefferson City
HUGE GARAGE SALE
Thurs. & Fri. 7-5., Sat. 8-? Garage
and carport full. Hundreds of baby
clothes from newborn & up, baby
items, bedding, toys, Graco carseat,
home decor, costume jewelry, dog
house, Precious Moments, small
appliances, and much much more!
705 FRIENDSHIP RD. (Wardsville)
Road in front of bank, 3/4 mile past
subdivisions, follow flags.
HUGE MULTI-FAMILY SALE!
Saturday only, 7:30 a.m. Fiestaware,
Pier One dishes, 12 place settings
Colorware dishes, flatware, glass-
ware, lamps, rugs, fall and Christmas
decor, wood and iron table with 4
chairs, lots of wall art and household
items PLUS 22 girls formal dresses
for HOMECOMING at $20 each!
802 WINSTON COURT
Ellis Blvd. left on Rosewood, left on
Winston, left on Winston Court
HUGE RUMMAGE SALE
WED. thru SAT. 8:00 to 5:00
Desk, Books, Movies, Jewelry, Little
Tikes, High Chair, Pack n Plays,
Tables, Junior & Men Clothing,
Antiques, TV's, Home Decor,
Headboard, Holiday & much more.
6505 ROUTE B
(located in Countryside Treasures)
stay to the right follow the curve
around convenient store - we are
located on the left
KLEFFNER RIDGE GARAGE SALES
6515, 6505, 6415, 6401, 6315
Starting Wednesday 3 p.m. and
Thursday & Friday 7 a.m. Name
brand clothes/shoes (boys 0 - 10,
girls 0 - 10, ladies XS - L, mens M-XL,
maternity M-L, formals, costumes),
Medela breast pump with different
size shields, huge lot of AVENT
bottles, bottles, sippy cups, TONS of
baby items (swings, ride-on toys,
tables, stroller/car seat combination,
double sit'n'stand stroller, jogging
stroller, boosters), TONS of toys,
books, DVDS, Beyblades, Wii games
& accessories, sports gear, golf
bags, Little Tikes water/sand boat,
table/chairs, & desk, kitchen, bath,
bedding, household items & décor,
Longaberger, Pampered Chef,
Rainbow & canister vacuums.
WARDSVILLE
MASSIVE MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE SALE
THURS. 2-7 P.M., FRI. 7-5, SAT. 8-12
Home decor, linens, dishes, exercise
equipment, books, holiday decor, TV,
Jr. & Ladies current fashions (size
0-18), mens wear, shoes, Ariat boots.
1528 LA HACIENDA CT., off Nelson
MOVING SALE
Fri. 7-6, Sat. 8-2. Wood cabinets,
self-propelled mower, gas blow-
er/vacuum, twin bed frames,
holiday decorations, craft items,
nice women's clothing 10/12/14,
plus size 16-18, young men's uni-
form shirts S-M, khaki pants 30-34
waist, suitcases, lots of household
furnishings. Everything must go.
1718 BALD HILL RD.
MOVING SALE: Sept. 19, 20, 21
THURS. & FRI. 7-4, SAT. 8-Noon. Re-
frigerator, furniture, dishes, misc.
boys items, etc. 573-635-2326
5906 COBBLESTONE CT.
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE
Wed. 3-7 p.m., Thurs. 7-7. Clothes in-
fant boys to adult mens & womens,
coats, toys, seasonal decor, washer,
dryer, vintage Hallmark ornaments,
health & beauty items, purses,
jewelry, adult bicycle, printer, misc.
household decor.
3701 RUSTY DR., Rt. M to Rolling Rd.
to Sterling Ridge to Rusty Dr.
NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE SALES
Thurs. & Fri. 7:15-?. Playstation 3
games, Playstation 2 & controllers,
boys/men school uniforms, home
decor.
3701 CHRISTIAN RIDGE, Wardsville
(off Sterling Ridge)
RUMMAGE SALE
Friday 7-2 p.m., Saturday 8-noon.
Furniture, kitchen items, misc.
1601 GREEN BERRY RD.
RUMMAGE SALE
THURS. & FRI. 6:30 - 5 & SAT. 7 - 12.
Boys clothing 0 - 18 years, girls 0 -
2T, baby items and misc. household
items, window air unit.
1111 FRIENDSHIP RD.- Wardsville
SALE FOR TIGHTWADS
FRIDAY 7-2. Teen girl, womens large,
mens XXL, boys clothes, shoes,
furniture, exercise bike, jewelry, toys,
games, decor, and free stuff!
2235 TANNER BRIDGE RD.
573-230-6729
THURS. 3-7 P.M. Tons of girls 0-6X,
boys 0-2T, like new jeans, shirts,
dresses, lots of name brands, shoes
to size 1. Mens & womens clothes,
baby toys, Polly Pockets, Barbie
House, ab lounger, Christmas tree &
misc.
2214 TANNER BRIDGE RD.
Thursday, September 19, 2013 D3
CLASSIFIED
THURS. ONLY 6:30-5: Lots of girls
clothes infant - juniors, boys 3
months -2T, baby accessories, desk.
1405 GRANDVALLEY DR.
Wardsville
Wardsville Citywide Garage Sales
Wed. 4-7 p.m.; Thurs. 7-noon.
Clothes girls size 10 to jr. name
brands to women's business casual -
all $0.50 each, kids books, toys;
home decor, household items, 8
place dish set, 2 twin comforter sets,
white student desk, 2 mens leather
coats -1 small, 1 large.
8009 HUNTERS LANE
Deer Haven
WARDSVILLE GARAGE SALE
Wed. 3-5:30 p.m., Thurs. 7-3. Girls 24
months - 2T, boys size 7-8, mens 2X.
Little Tikes slide, toys, household,
furniture.
5832 PEAR TREE LN., Roling Rd. to
Sterling Ridge to Viola View
WARDSVILLE GARAGE SALE
Wed. 3-6, Thurs. & Fri. 7-? Sat. 7-
Noon. Home decor, area rugs,
pictures, floral, bedding, drapes,
pillows, etc. toys, party dresses size
small, TV stand, mens golf shirts,
womens XS, S & M & boys & girls
clothes, play pen, Bud Lite pool table
light.
3420 RUDY LN. - Greenberry to
Moreau Terrace to right on Rudy
WARDSVILLE GARAGE SALE
Wed., Sept. 18, 3 p.m.-6 p.m.
Thurs., Sept. 19, 7 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Clothes - girls, boys & adult; books;
toys/games;TV; dishes; holiday &
home decorations; go-kart; craft
supplies & much more.
8012 HUNTER'S LN., Wardsville
Deer Haven Estates
WARDSVILLE RUMMAGE SALE
WED. 4-7 p.m. & THURS. 7-12.
Original Beanie Babies, lots of boys
clothes all sizes & uniforms - most
priced 50 cents, books, puzzles,
hockey & foosball table, sports
equipment & misc.
6801 SUNRISE ACRES DR.
WARDSVILLE SALE
Thurs., Fri., Sat., 7 to 4
Retiring teacher/librarian is selling
classroom supplies as well as years
of stored stuff in the barn: Wilton
cake pans, TONS of books, pink sink,
pot rack, landscape pond, dog
houses, oak rocking chair, vertical
blinds, old metal lawn chairs, chest,
Black & Decker power tools, white
wicker bedroom set, bar lights, fish
tanks, desks, and SO much more.
8213 DEER HAVEN RD.
WARDSVILLE SALE!
Wed. & Thurs. 4-7 p.m. Baby clothes
0-2T, lots of summer/winter, pajamas,
holiday shirts/attire & Halloween
costumes. Changing table, Sit &
Stand stroller, baby items too numer-
ous to list.
5912 PEBBLE CREEK DR., off Friend-
ship Rd.
WARDSVILLE SALE
Wed. 4-8 p.m., Thurs. & Fri. 7-5, Sat.
8-12. Baby/ Children GALORE, Girls
18 months-size 7, Boys size 5-8,
Newborn-9 months (boys), toys,
exersaucer, bouncy seat, bottles,
children/adult books, movies, set of
new tires & aluminum wheels
235R75-16, tools, housewares,
Christmas items, material, furniture,
new hardwood flooring (approx. 160
sq ft), women's XL-plus size,
Maternity L-XXL, men's XL-4XL, very
nice 1999 Chevrolet Suburban.
5813 STEEPLEGATE CT.
(by the bank)
WED. 3:30-7, THURS. 6:30-6 & FRI.
7-6: Name brand girls clothes 6
months - 14 years, boys 6 months - 5
years, John Deere brush hog, tires
205/75/15, coffee table, book shelv
es, kitchen set, Lego table, bikes, car
seat, wooden baby beds, outdoor
baby swing, dog kennel, Step 2 desk,
lots of toys.
7518 ROUTE W, WARDSVILLE
WED. 3-7 P.M., THURS. & FRI. 8-5.
Snapper riding mower, leather sec-
tional couch, scroll saw, 2 car seat/
stroller combination, 2 Pack-n-Plays,
girls clothes 0-24 months, boys
clothes for ages 4-10, maternity
clothes, computer desk.
2501 HONEY CREEK ROAD
610 Rummage Sales West
1 BIG SALE
Sat. 7-1. Clothes, boy 0-18 months,
girl 0-6X, ladies small & medium,
men 2X & 3X, booster seat, Pack-n-
Play, dishes, kitchen items, toys, lots
of misc.
302 S. CAPISTRANO DR.
Emerald Ridge Subdv.
2 FAMILY YARD SALE - SAT. 8-?
Boys clothes 0-18 months, girls 18
months to 3T, kerosene heater, baby
items, other misc. items.
1617 ST. MARY'S BLVD.
2-Family Sale
FRI. 7-5, SAT. 7-2. Tables full of
antiques and collectibles. Tin
advertising signs and glasses,
graniteware, kitchen items, crates,
ceramic items, trumpet, new slippers,
robes, knives, jewelry, girls clothes
12/14, large quartz pieces (25 cents).
1511 VIETH
3 FAMILY GARAGE SALE
Fri. 7-4, Sat. 7-Noon. Numerous misc.
items.
152 BOONVILLE RD.
A Multi-Family Sale
Thurs. - Fri. 7-4, Sat 7-?. Lots of baby
items, cleaning supplies, health care
items, household items, air
compressor, and much more. Come
see us!
1200 ST. MARY'S BLVD.
A True Man's Moving Sale
And a little something for the ladies
too! Sat., Sept. 21, 7 a.m.- noon
Hand & electric tools, sanders, grind-
ers, drill press, fishing poles, Carhart
jackets, knick-knacks for all seasons
and some household items.
3901 RUSTIC LN. - Hwy. 54W right
on Monticello, left on Rustic
A-1 MULTI-FAMILY SALE
Sat. only, 7-5. Beautiful oak TV
surround, Yamaha Raptor riding toy,
Red Hatter apparel, everything for
baby girl, equipment, toys, clothing
newborn - 4T, boys 2T-14, girls
12-14, school uniforms 8-14, ladies
S-L, mens M-L (brand names), all
clothes on hangers. Home decor,
kitchen, bedding, holiday, area rugs
8x10 & 5x7, power washer, kids
DVDs, books, movies, toys for all
ages, misc.
4104 CATALINA (follow pink signs)
EARLY ATTIC, LATE BASEMENT
MOVING SALE - CASH ONLY
Thurs., Fri. 8-4, Sat. 8-1.
1904 W. MAIN ST.
BASEMENT SALE
THURS. & FRI. 5-8 p.m. Girls clothes
size 4-10, girls shoes, toys, womens
& juniors sizes S-XL, mens L-XL, new
sunglasses, housewares, & misc.
5935 RAINBOW DR.- around back
BIG sale LOW prices
Saturday, 7-1. Solid wood futon,
NICE electric treadmill, Coach & oth-
er leather purses, computer cabinet,
ladies' scrubs small & x-small,
Classic Pooh collectors items, tons
of books cheap, real yard sale prices,
hardly any junk.
117 RIDGEWAY DRIVE
Off W. Main
FUNDRAISING RUMMAGE SALE
Fri. 5 p.m. - 7 p.m., Sat. 8-Noon.
Lots of misc. items for all ages!
CONCORD CHRISTIAN SCHOOL
1st Floor Multi-purpose Room
3212 Emerald Lane (off Wildwood)
GARAGE SALE
Fri. 7-1 & Sat 7-12. Baby clothes, toys
& accessories, adult, women & mens
clothes, home decor, kitchen
accessories, electronics & more.
3827 LIVERPOOL DR.
Covington Gardens
GARAGE SALE
FRIDAY 7-1. Little bit of everything,
clothes junior & womens, kitchen &
decorative items, pictures, mirrors,
small furniture & misc. items.
1031 BOONVILLE RD.
GARAGE SALE
Sat. 7 a.m. Household items,
antiques, Stamp-In Up, collectibles,
dining set.
923 GARNET PT.
Diamonds Subdv. off Sardonyx
GARAGE SALE
Saturday, 8:00-12:00. Lots of
children's clothing, pictures, knick
knacks, shelving, antique glassware
& more!
1452 BRIAR VILLAGE CT.
Off 179
GARAGE SALE
Thurs. 5-8 p.m., Fri. 8-Noon. Re-
frigerator, stove hood, sink, TV
armoire, girls clothes & shoes, girls
toys & books, home decor, electron-
ics, deck box, luggage, bedding.
3919 TERRA BELLA DRIVE
HUGE HOARDERS MOVING SALE
Thurs., Fri., Sat. 6:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
EVERYTHING Furniture for all
rooms, clothing of all sizes, toys,
foosball/craps & pool table, antiques,
collectibles, advertising...WAY TOO
MUCH TO LIST!
403 ARDEN DR.
Corner of Arden & Country Club, out-
er Rd. between the mall & Apache
Flats
Huge Multi-Family Garage Sale
Friday 7-4:30, Sat 7-1. Infant/toddler
girls clothes newborn-3 toddler, in-
fant/toddler boys clothes 18
months-3 toddler, girls size 4-8, boys
size 4-8, men's small-3 extra large,
women's small-2 extra large, toys,
video games, lots of misc. Priced to
sell!
1706 S. COUNTRY CLUB DR.
HUGE SALE
Thurs., Fri., 7 to 6, Sat. 7 until noon.
Indoor, outdoor decor, lots craft
items, much Christmas, blue & white
dishes, kitchen, small appliances,
kids & adult clothing, toys, books,
outdoor games, puzzles, bedding,
old auto repair manuals, horseshoing
tools, 5th wheel tailgate for 2005
Ford F350, S10 truck tool box, too
much to mention.
1814 CEDAR HILL RD.
HUGE SALE
Sat. 8-? Tons of name brand clothes:
American Eagle, Abercrombie,
Charlotte Russe, Forever 21, Daytrip,
BKE, & many more. Womens size 2-
XL, mens XL-2X, handbags, shoes,
hats, kitchen table & chairs, toys,
silverware, dishes, tons of home
decor.
713 JOSEPH DR.
ITEMS FROM A-Z
FRI. 8-1 & SAT. 8-3. Cedar chest,
hunting clothes, tool chest, large
mens clothing, & collectibles.
932 & 923 COUNTRY RIDGE
FOX BORO
LARGE GARAGE SALE: SAT. 6 - ?
2 tall bookshelves, couch (dual re-
clining), baby girl clothing newborn &
3-6 months, bed with box spring and
mattress, entertainment center with
glass shelving, men's clothing,
women's clothing and coats, solid
oak end table, glass top dining table,
2-drawer file cabinet and more.
2018 HASTINGS RD.- Covington
Garden Subdv. Located next to the
JC Fairgrounds (by water tower)
MOVING SALE - FRI. 7-5 & SAT. 7-12
Washing machine, recliner, glider
rockers, dresser, end tables, night
stands, hunting & fishing equipment,
decoys & waders, meat slicers, baby
crib, desk, computer table, wall
hangings, DJ turntable, DVDs,
clothes, books & more.
901 SCOTT STATION RD.
MOVING SALE
Friday 7 a.m. - 2 p.m., Saturday 7
a.m. - 2 p.m. Furniture, men's and
women's clothing, dishes, glass
ware, baby items, girl clothes
newborn to size 2, comforters, multi-
room items. Something for everyone!
1711 MORGAN COURT
Located behind Fairgrounds, left on
London Way, left on Riley Court, right
on Morgan Ct. (new subdivision -
Fairground Acres)
Multi-Family
Friday 8-5 & Saturday 8-2. Books,
cookbooks, Christmas decorations,
home decor, knick-knacks and misc
items
2204 ANDERSON DRIVE
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE
FRI. 8-5 & SAT. 8-? Doll house,
dresser with mirror, chest of drawers,
wing back chairs, wicker chairs, lawn
mower, Playstation 2 with games, Wii
games, toys, home decor, holiday
decor, purses, books, jewelry, &
MUCH MUCH MORE! All items are
very nice, clean.
4873 WOODHAVEN DR.
Multi-Family Garage Sale
Saturday 7:00-12:00. Household
items, clothing, furniture, video game
systems, and lots more.
2051 HONEYSUCKLE LN.
Multi-Family Garage Sale
Saturday 8-2 and Sunday 8-2. Teen -
young adult clothing, a few formal
gowns, jewelry, home decor, books
4707 DENESE DR.
RUMMAGE SALE
FRI., SEPT. 20, 7 - 6:30. girls clothing
0-18 months, women & mens
clothing, baby items, household
items & misc.
1022 LAUREL DR.
THIS ONE IS HUGE!
4 FAMILY GARAGE SALE
Thurs. 3 p.m.-? Fri. 7 a.m.-?
Jr. clothing (boys & girls), video
games, china, furniture, sewing
machine, cabinet & chair, piano,
breadmaker (new), mini refrigerator,
king comforter set, bedding, Kirby
vacuum, men & womens clothing,
shoes, accessories, lots of jewelry,
tools, kitchen, housewares, holiday
items, adult Halloween costumes,
ceiling fans, 35mm camera set,
school supplies, dog kennels. A lot of
these items are brand new, still in
packages.
814 SHAWN DR.
off Schumate Chapel
620 Rummage Sales North
3 FAMILY GARAGE SALE
Fri. & Sat. 7-2, Girl's (infant to size
12), boy's (10-12), women's (L & 3X),
men's (XL-XXL) name brand clothing,
furniture and kitchen items, twin &
queen comforters and misc.
9489 ERIKA LANE
(Ryan's Lake - New Bloomfield)
3 FAMILY INSIDE SALE
Thurs. & Fri. 8-6:30. Tools, knives,
shotgun, antiques, clothing, books,
items for baby, household misc.
3707 CO. RD. 436, NEW
BLOOMFIELD, follow signs
GARAGE SALE
Fri., Sept. 20, 7 a.m. - 3 p.m., Sat.,
Sept. 21, 7 a.m. -1 p.m. Infant/toddler
sale, stroller, toys, car seat.
195 CREST AVENUE
HOLTS SUMMIT
54 East to Center Street exit, right on
Center, immediate left onto Karen,
right on Crest
GARAGE SALE
Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Clothes,
new condition: Girls (0-3, S-M), boys
(M-XL, 32-42). Books, rugs, paint ball
gun, misc furniture. Little bit of every-
thing.
4801 CO. RD. 480, TEBBETTS
Hwy. 94 to AA, then BB, Co. Rd. 480
GARAGE SALE RAIN OR SHINE
Thurs. & Fri. 7-1. Furniture, teen &
womens clothing, kitchen items,
weed whacker, TV, DVDs, & more.
11918 OAK RIDGE LN.- Holts Summit
HUGE GARAGE SALE
Saturday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Books,
Christmas decor, knick-knacks,
dining set, home decor, small
appliances, dishes, jewelry, misc.
items, freezer
167 E. SIMON, HOLTS SUMMIT
Take highway to Holts Summit, OO-
AA exit, follow signs
MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE
FRI. 7-5 & SAT. 7-1. Furniture, guns,
gun loading equipment, tools, fishing
rod, kitchen items, clothing men &
womens L-3X, VHS, DVDs, games,
Christmas angel ornaments from
Dillards, home decor, 5'x7' trailer, &
misc. More items daily!
145 STAR DR.- Holts Summit
RUMMAGE & BAKE SALE
FRI., SEPT. 20, 7 a.m. - 6 p.m.
SAT., SEPT. 21, 8 a.m. - NOON.
GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH
618 HALIFAX, HOLTS SUMMIT
RYAN'S LAKE NEIGHBORHOOD
GARAGE SALE: Fri. & Sat. 8-?; Some
Saturday Only. Lots of baby girl and
boy items.
RYAN'S LAKE- New Bloomfield
YARD SALE - FRI. 8-5 & SAT. 8-1
Old & crystal dishes, jewelry, toys,
household items, furniture & clothing.
1721 CEDAR LN.
HOLTS SUMMIT
640 Rummage Sales Fulton
HUGE CHURCH RUMMAGE SALE
AND LUNCHEON
*To benefit Youth Mission Trip*
Fri. 7-6 & Sat. 7-3, Antiques, kitchen,
seasonal decor, VHS Disney movies,
and MUCH MORE!
HWY 94
(Tebbetts Community Center)
RENTALS
730 Apartments For Rent
** 2 BEDROOMS **
2 bedroom, 1.5 bath townhome,
hookups, nice yard, $425.
Large 2 bedroom, 2 bath, awesome
view of river valley, deck, $550.
Newer 2 bedroom, 2 bath with gar-
age, water/sewer paid, West, $595.
Newer 2 bedroom, 2 bath, garage,
open floor plan, no steps, west, $695.
Schrimpf Management
1001 Madison 636-3171
** 1 CALL - WE HAVE IT ALL! **
SCHRIMPF
MANAGEMENT
Our leasing service is at
no cost to you!
1 & 2 bedroom apartments
Studio & efficiency apartments
2 & 3 bedroom townhomes
Duplexes, condominiums & homes
Locations throughout Jefferson City
and surrounding areas
Professional maintenance staff
Call Us First
For Your Next Apartment or Home!
1001 Madison 636-3171
www.schrimpfmg.com
1 & 2 bedrooms $295/up. Efficiencies
at $250. Includes some utilities.
573-634-4761 or www.crmjc.com
1 & 2 bedrooms, $335-$435, see
www.jeffcityapartments.com
1 & 2 BEDROOMS
TIMBERLINE APARTMENTS
Short Term Lease Accepted
Electric Whirlpool Appliances,
$355-$415 furnished or unfurnished
By Hwy. 50 & Mo. Blvd. No pets.
Low utilities, laundry facilities.
219 Dix Rd., Apartment 6, 635-8033
1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS
2 & 3 BEDROOM TOWNHOMES
Corporate Units Available
839 Southwest Blvd.
635-0613
http://www.devillesw.com
1 BEDROOM, 1 bath, 15 minutes east
of Jefferson City, quiet location in
Westphalia. No pets. Water, trash &
sewer paid, $320. 573-897-4297
1 BEDROOM, 1 bath, New Bloomfield
area. Water & sewer included, $365
per month, total electric, central
heat/air, washer & dryer hookups.
573-896-4303
1 BEDROOM, $385; all utilities, $500.
Elm & Broadway. 301-0182
1 Bedroom Apartment
1 bath, 1422 E. Miller, first floor of
two story older home. Freshly
painted, new carpet, washer/dryer
hookups in basement, trash paid, no
pets, $325. 573-821-4013
1 BEDROOM AVAILABLE, re-
modeled, $385 + deposit. 694-8777
1 BEDROOM UNITS, close to mall,
washer & dryer hookup, $350 + de-
posit. 301-2288
1 Left Woodlander Apartments
• Spacious 2 bedroom, 1 bath
• Lots of sunlight
• Laundry hookups, $445
No Lease. No Pets. 634-7735
2 & 3 BEDROOM units with attached
garages, completely new and re-
modeled, $600-$825. Available Late
September! Call 573-340-8687
2 bedroom, 1 3/4 bath, water & sewer
paid, storage, $475-$500. 636-4500
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, 15 minutes
East of Jefferson City, Westphalia.
No pets, water/trash & sewer paid,
$420. 573-897-4297
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, $450. No pets.
1516 Sunset Lake Rd. 573-289-2062
2 BEDROOM, 2.5 baths Townhouse,
garage, trash paid, laundry hookups,
centrally located. $695 rent/$695 de-
posit. 338-3996
2 BEDROOM, $350-$425.
Charles Rental Co., 573-230-8206
2 Bedroom Apartment
1 bath, 1104 E. McCarty, second
floor of older home. Freshly painted,
water/sewer/trash paid, no pets,
$350. 573-821-4013
2 Bedroom Apartments, large rooms,
very clean, freshly painted. Starting
at $380. 761-7404. camelotjcmo.com
2 BEDROOM, conveniently located,
washer/dryer hookups, 1.5 bath,
1135 sq. ft., small pets OK, $525.
573-291-4384
2 BEDROOM TOWNHOUSE. Water,
trash & sewer paid. 635-7597
2 bedrooms, 2 baths, water, trash,
parking, W. McCarty, $595. 893-1998
2 BIG BEDROOMS, upstairs, near
Memorial Park. 353-1347
2 or 3 Bedroom apartment, utilities
included, water, trash & electric,
101 Boonville Rd., $700. 619-5944
3 bedroom, 2 bath, over 1300 sq. ft.
New. 1 car garage with opener. Near
Scholastic, quiet neighborhood.
$650. 619-8266 or 896-4334.
505 Ellis Blvd., Jefferson City
(573)636-4141
www.broadmoorapartmnts.com
Call For Move-In Specials!
Publisher's Notice: All real estate
advertised herein is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act, which
makes it illegal to advertise any
preference, limitation, or discrimina-
tion because of race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status, or na-
tional origin, or intention to make any
such preference, limitation, or dis-
crimination.
We will not knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate which is in
violation of the law. All persons are
hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised are available on an equal
opportunity basis.
ADRIAN ENTERPRISES
Apartments, Duplexes, Houses
$350 & UP. Lori @ 694-4014.
8-4, Mon.-Fri. & 10-2 on Sat.
APARTMENT GUIDE
Featured on our Internet site at
www.newstribune.com
See color photos along with detailed
information on area apartments.
For advertising information, please
call the News Tribune Classified
Department 636-3131.
CINNAMON HILL PROPERTIES
LUXURY RENTALS
1550+ SQUARE FEET
1 and 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH
JACUZZI
COVERED DECK
GARAGE
SPECTACTULAR VIEW OF CITY
RENT: $650.00 - $690.00 - $750.00
NO LEASE
********************************
573-896-4585
Jefferson Heights Apartments
Quiet, west end location in park-like
setting. Hardwood floors, pet friend-
ly. Studio & 1 bedrooms. Water, sew-
er & trash paid. 635-1722
LAKESIDE APARTMENTS
1& 2 bedroom apartments.
Call 893-6227
Office: 120 Amador Apt. 5
LARGE 2 BEDROOM, central air,
1215 W. High, some utilities paid,
$475/month. 694-5204 or 619-2987
Realty of Jefferson City, MO, Inc.
2 or 3 bedroom, West, $425-$875.
www.actionrealtyrentals.com
740 Duplexes For Rent
** DUPLEXES **
2 bedroom, 1 bath, no steps, $425.
3 bedroom, 2 bath with family room,
2 car garage, country setting, $695.
New 3 bedroom, 2 bath, garage,
custom cabinets, deck, West, $795.
Schrimpf Management
1001 Madison 636-3171
www.schrimpfmg.com
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, 1 car garage
with lots of storage, quiet location,
near walking trail & park. 1716
Sunset Lake Rd., $550/month, trash
paid, no pets. 573-395-4113
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, Marion Dr., no
pets, basement, $375. 632-7096
2 BEDROOM, 2 bath, garage, newly
redecorated, 1211 Duane Swift.
690-3400
2 bedroom, 2 bath, in New
Bloomfield, newer, 1 car garage with
opener, $600. 619-8266 or 896-4334.
2 bedroom, 2 full bath triplex in quiet
area on Walz Circle, hookups, stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, patio,
attached garage with opener, all
electric, low utilities, no pets, trash,
lawn, snow, Wi-Fi furnished, $650 per
month. Deposit/references. 301-0108
2 BEDROOM, clean, nicely updated,
central location, 1.5 bath, 1 car gar-
age, no pets, $595. Agent owned.
573-301-6787
2 BEDROOM, HOLTS SUMMIT, 140B
Star Dr. No pets, $645. 896-8896
2 LEVEL DUPLEX, older neighbor-
hood, 310 Hickory, 2 bedroom, 1
bath, hardwood floors, water paid,
$425. 573-353-6713
3 BEDROOM, 2.5 bath, garage,
southwest, no pets, $795. 635-6088
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX, 2 bath, quiet
country setting, all brick, no pets,
$675 + deposit. 496-9900, 690-9940
BRAND NEW 2-3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1
car garage duplexes for rent in the
newest subdivision in Holts Summit -
HollyBrook. Spacious floor plans,
ceramic tile, designer kitchens,
laundry hook ups, plus much more.
Please call Sara at (573)298-2318 or
Shelia at (636)208-0848.
Brand new, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1330
sq. ft., landscaped yard, Pioneer Trail
School, $750. 573-690-4377
GREAT LOCATION: 2 Bedroom, 2
bath, 1 car garage, 1210 Southgate
off of Duane Swift Parkway, $700.
573-635-9985
Large 3 bedroom, 2 bath, rec room,
fireplace, $600-$650. 636-4500
NEWER 2 BEDROOM DUPLEX
• Large bedrooms, lots of large
closets
• 1.5 Baths, Garage
• $725. No lease, no pets. 690-1818
750 Homes For Rent
** HOMES - CALL US FIRST! **
2 bedroom, 1 bath home, $450.
3 bedroom, 1 bath, with rec room,
nice yard, garage, West, $595.
Newer 3 bedroom, 2 bath, with rec
room, 4 car garage, nice yard, $975.
Custom executive home off Tower
Dr., nice large home, huge master
suite with fireplace, $2200.
Schrimpf Management
1001 Madison 636-3171
www.schrimpfmg.com
1 central located, clean, 2 bedroom,
1 bath, basement, no pets. Credit/
reference check, $615. 635-5897
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath, laundry
hookups, off-street parking, $550/
month, $550 security deposit re-
quired. 307 Cherry St. No pets.
Available September. 573-230-9163
2 BEDROOM HOUSE, 1 bath, laundry
room off kitchen. For more details
call 584-9468.
2 BEDROOM house, 1 full bath, no
steps, washer/dryer hookup. No pets.
New Bloomfield. 573-616-9540
2 BEDROOM, neat & clean, East,
washer/dryer hookup, off-street
parking, no pets, $475. 690-5035
2 BEDROOM, newly remodeled,
Georgia St., $575/month + deposit.
Call 573-680-1191 or 301-8181.
2-3 BEDROOM, 1 bath, large fenced
in yard, near East school,
$695/month + deposit. 230-6961
3 BEDROOM, 1.5 bath, available
now, $595/month. 573-230-8206
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, large rec room,
hardwood floors, available 9/1, $785.
2961 E. McCarty. 573-230-7901
3 BEDROOM, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage,
West end, no smoking or pets,
$850/month + deposit. 573-680-4783
3 BEDROOM, 3 bath, big deck, West
end, dead-end street, $600. 893-8366
309 Tyler, 3 bedroom, new roof,
windows, furnace, central air &
jacuzzi tub, $600/month. 636-5079
4 BEDROOM, 3 bath, 2 car garage,
800 Maywood, $1140. 636-4061
Country Living, 2 BEDROOM, 1 bath,
detached garage, lots of storage,Ful-
ton schools, no smoking & no pets,
lawn care and trash provided,
$550+deposit. Call 573-220-2857
LEASE TO PURCHASE. 2 bedroom, 2
bath, W. McCarty, $600. 893-1998
Nice 4 bedroom, updated, off street
parking. West end, lease, deposit, no
pets, available now, $750/month,
owner/agent 573-690-0710
WALK TO BLAIR OAKS, 4 bedroom,
2 bath, fenced yard, storage, 1 car
basement garage, $795. 680-4817
755 Mobile Homes For Rent
1600 sq. ft. manufactured home, 3
bedroom, 2 bath, set on large fenced
lot, Holts Summit. 573-896-4303
16x80, 3 bedroom, 2 bath for rent or
sale, possible owner finance.
690-0157, Mon.-Sat., 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.
2 or 3 bedroom mobile home starting
at $365 per month. 573-896-4303
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, 16 x 80, nice
home, $450. 573-584-3441
View pictures and apply online at:
www.elstonacres.managebuilding
.com
DOUBLE WIDE FOR RENT OR SALE
896-9357
756 Mobile Home Lots For Rent
Available nice mobile home or RV
sites in Jefferson City. 635-3339
Nice level mobile home lots for rent.
1st & last month free. 573-230-2643
780 Office Space For Rent
!Schrimpf Management
2000 sq. ft., prime office or retail
space, Eastland area, $1300/month.
22,500 sq. ft., professional office
space available, $7.25/sq. ft.
1630 sq. ft. new office space,
$9.50/sq. ft., build to suit, high traffic
CALL US FOR ALL YOUR NEEDS!
1001 MADISON 636-3171
www.schrimpfmg.com
GORDON REAL ESTATE,
Prime Retail/Office/Land, for informa-
tion 573-353-8990/GordonJC.com
!BOWMAN COMMERCIAL REALTY!
LEASING-SALES-PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
Contact Bowman Commercial Realty
for all your Commercial needs
Call 893-2516
BowmanCommercialRealty.com
!KOLB PROPERTIES!
OFFICE-RETAIL-WAREHOUSE-LAND
Commercial Property for sale or
lease. Large or small, we have it all.
See at www.kolbproperties.com
CALL 893-7320
Office Space for Lease
Great Location, Hwy. 50 West
Visibility 3945 sq. ft. Office Suite can
divide. Aggressive Rates / Ample
Parking. Call RE/MAX Jefferson City
761-9953
790 Retail/Warehouse Space
A MINI-STORAGE: 5x10, 10x10,
10x15, 10x20, 10x30, 12x36x16 tall 4
miles East of MO River bridge on
Hwy. 54. 896-9996 or 645-5864 (cell).
METRO MINI STORAGE
5x10, 10x10, 10x20, 20x20
6 month lease - 1 month free.
1 year lease - 2 months free!
Call 893-6227
NEW STORAGE UNITS FOR RENT.
5x10 - $25; 10x10 - $30; 10x15 - $40;
10x20 - $50; 10x25 - $60. By the Katy
Trail. Call 659-1961.
Ravenwood Storage 10x24-$60 21x
24-$110. 12x24-$80. 690-7061
Schrimpf Management
• Retail spaces available now,
Holts Summit Plaza, $5.50/sq. ft.
• Warehouse, 6500 sq. ft., over-
head doors, utilities paid, $2500
• 2300 sq. ft. retail, Industrial Dr.,
high traffic area, $690
• 2000 sq. ft., heat/air, $665
Many to choose from - call us first!
1001 MADISON 636-3171
REAL ESTATE
900 Commercial Property
407 Jefferson St. 6000 sq. ft. For sale
or lease. Uses: Office/Retail,
Medical/Dental, Substance Abuse
Treatment Facility, Sports/Exercise
Club, Dance Schools, Pool Hall,
Community Building, Concert Hall,
Restaurant, Alcohol Sales, Child/
Adult Day Care, Place of Worship,
Bed & Breakfast, Thrift Shop, Animal
Hospital, Laundromat, C-Store, Video
Arcade. On-site parking. Call Darrel
Gordon 573-353-8990, Gordon Real
Estate dgordon957@aol.com.
501 Missouri Blvd. - Car lot or other
prime business location. High
visibility 20,000 plus cars per day.
Paved lot and nearly new bldg. For
information call Darrel Gordon,
573-353-8990, dgordon957@aol.com
Retire-Invest thriving area Lake
Ozarks. $300k-$1ML Homes built-
sold on 4K'! 3 New homes in
progress! 100-8000' lake front: good
water-views-I will subdivide. 45 min-
utes away 573-257-0123 Owner
920 Farms/Acreage For Sale
7.8 ACRES, approx. 700 ft. of road
frontage, W. Brazito Rd. 690-3400
7.8 ACRES, approx. 700 ft. of road
frontage, W. Brazito Rd. 690-3400
Hunt-fish-turkey-deer-creek-woods-
Hayfield-spring 100/acre $239k!
30/$48k 45 minutes 573-257-0123
MINI FARM - 30 ACRES on Blacktop.
Newish Ranch 2445 sq. ft. 3 Bed-
rooms, 3 baths plus Outbuildings.
4920 Route HH Russellville $389,500.
Lyla Stark, RE/MAX Jefferson City
573-761-3401
930 Homes For Sale
1 BEDROOM, 1 car garage, .42 acres
shaded lot, $42,900. 573-690-8790
1719 Sunset Court. 3 bedroom, 2.5
bath, 2083 sq. ft. Move in ready. De-
tails at www.infotube.net/254473.
$154,900. 573-690-0359
1904 W. Main St. $199,900
Stately all brick home with nearly
3,000 sq. ft above grade. 4 bed-
rooms, 2-1/2 baths plus 2 car, all
brick detached garage. Lots of up-
grades, a true Jefferson City classic!
Details at www.AregHomes.com
or call Dana Wildhaber, GRI
Associated Real Estate Group
573-632-8501
D4 Thursday, September 19, 2013
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 D5
CLASSIFIED/FEATURES
www.newstribune.com
Sealed bids for New
Employee Health
Clinic, Harry S Truman
State Offce Building,
Jefferson City, Mo,
Project No. O1401-
01 will be received
by FMDC, State of
MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM,
10/3/2013. The pre-
bid meeting is 10:30
AM, on 9/24/2013.
For specifc project in-
formation and order-
ing plans, go to http://
www. o a . mo . g o v /
fmdc/dc/list.htm.
N.T. Sept. 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 2013
27 acres, 3 bedroom, 2 car, deep
well, shop, 2 sheds, pond, 75 min-
utes to Jefferson City, $169,000.
573-201-1458.
275 Madelines Park Circle
3 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage,
3,000 sq. ft., Jefferson City. Four side
brick, finished walkout basement with
custom wet bar, John Deere with
separate drive, Belair Elementary,
beautiful home, call for more details,
realtors welcome, $264,900.
573-680-9730
3 bedroom, 2 bath, large 2 car gar-
age, huge lot, $133,500. Holts
Summit. Consider lease purchase,
financing available. 230-3821
316 Ridgeway - $121,900
Country Club Estates
3805 Fairway - $359,900
Kauffman Hills
3617 Graystone - $549,000
629 Belmont $117,500
13328 Valley Dr., Russellville
$79,900
visit www.alanmudd.com for details
Alan Mudd, Associated Real Estate
Group, 632-8507
4% MORTGAGE MONEY
Purchase or refinance.
Call 573-303-5520
5508 Meriwether - $338,500
Priced below recent appraisal
Custom built home on corner lot in
quiet West End subdivision. Outdoor
covered fireplace for entertaining!
Too many great custom features to
list. This is a house you will want to
call home. A must see!
Aaron Grefrath
Associated Real Estate Group
632-8500 694-2461
BLAIR OAKS - 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath,
full basement, 1150 sq. ft., totally re-
modeled, big lot, $132,500.
573-821-4085
Family Home in Blair Oaks District
4,000 sq. ft., 1208 Evergreen features
5 to 6 bedrooms and 4 baths in a
GREAT neighborhood. Includes 3
garages, workshop area, vaulted
ceiling, main floor laundry room,
deck, fireplace, jetted tub, screened
porch, walk-in closets, new roof and
heat pump, $269,000. 573-690-2869
Open Sat. 11-1. 3725 Scarborough
Way. Custom built beautiful 4 bed-
room, 3 bath home. Great fenced-in
yard with nice landscaping. Finished
basement & large unfinished area
with lots of storage. Steps from
Greenway, $179,000. 573-230-7707
**YOUR HOME SOLD IN 120 DAYS
GUARANTEED, or I will buy it myself.
www.heathhiggins.com Realty
Executives of Mid MO 761-3343
940 Lots For Sale
LOTS FOR SALE, St. Martins. Owner
broker, Betty Steck. 573-893-2963
For Sale Large homesite with private
fishing pond, paved road,
underground utilities, park, trails,
many other amenities.
Call 573-590-1370
LAKE OF THE OZARKS- Family fun-
Lots reduced to $3,595 each, $75
down, $59/month. Owner financing,
no credit checks, beautiful trees,
great fishing, swimming, boating,
free lake access and boat ramps.
Prices good thru September 30th.
Hwy. 135 South out of Stover, MO
take the Lake Road 135-12 to the Ivy
Bend office. Closed Tuesdays
( 5 7 3 ) 3 7 2 - 6 4 9 3
www.ivybendlandoffice.com
942 Mobile Homes For Sale
1600 sq. ft. manufactured home, 3
bedroom, 2 bath, set on large fenced
lot, Holts Summit. 573-896-4303
16x80, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, $475, in-
cludes lot rent, in Holts Summit,
$20,000. Financing available.
573-489-1960 or 573-489-4825
16x80, 3 bedroom, 2 bath for rent or
sale, possible owner finance.
690-0157, Mon.-Sat., 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.
2013 Mobile Home Stimulus Pack-
age, $25,000 for your trade-in. Land
owner discounts, list of foreclosures,
financing available. 314-562-7459
CLAYTON HOME, 2010, 72'x16', 3
bedroom, 2 full bath, master bath
with shower & separate tub, thermal
windows, built in pantry, $35,000.
You move. 573-353-5430
DOUBLE WIDE FOR RENT OR SALE
896-9357
For Sale 16x80, 3 bedroom, 2 bath
fixer upper. 573-896-4303
945 Resort/Lake/River Property
Lake Ozarks 2,090' shoreline 100
acres creek-springs-hayfields-woods/
$425k 650' 9/acre $95k 573-257-0123
PUBLIC NOTICES
970 Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF COLE
COUNTY, MISSOURI
VIVIANNE GRACE RAY JOHNSON,
by her next friend,
NIA VIVIAN RAY
5511A DEER VALLEY DRIVE
JEFFERSON CITY, MO 65109,
PETITIONER
CASE NO. 13AC-FC00750
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
The Court hereby orders that the
following Notice of Change of Name
be published:
To Whom It May Concern: Notice is
hereby given that on 9-2-13, the
Circuit Court of Cole County, Mis-
souri, entered judgment in Cause
Number 13AC-FC00750, changing
the name of VIVIANNE GRACE RAY
JOHNSON to VIVIANNE GRACE RAY.
9-3-13
Patricia Joyce
N.T. September 5, 12, 19, 2013
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
For default in the payment of debt
secured by a deed of trust executed
by Desheila Milton and Frank L. Mil-
ton, Sr, dated September 18, 2001,
and recorded on September 24,
2001, Document No. 014196, in Book
No. 445, at Page 303 in the Office of
the Recorder of Deeds, Cole County,
Missouri, the undersigned Successor
Trustee will on October 4, 2013, at
2:00 PM, at the South Door of the
Cole County Courthouse, Jefferson
City, Missouri, sell at public vendue
to the highest bidder for cash:
Lot Number One Hundred Sixty-three
(163), WESTVIEW HEIGHTS SUB-
DIVISION, SECTION FOUR (4), per
plat of record in Plat Book 9, Page
49, Cole County Recorder's Office;
said WESTVIEW HEIGHTS SUBDIVI-
SION, SECTION 4, being a subdivi-
sion of part of the West Half (W1/2) of
the Southeast Quarter (SE1/4) and
part of Fractional Southwest Quarter
(Frac.SW1/4) of Section Eighteen
(18), Township Forty-four (44), Range
Twelve (12), Cole County, Missouri.,
commonly known as 1635 Westview
Drive, Jefferson City, MO, 65109
subject to all prior easements, re-
strictions, reservations, covenants
and encumbrances now of record, if
any, to satisfy the debt and costs.
South & Associates, P.C., Successor
Trustee
First Publication: September 12,
2013. For more information, visit
www.southlaw.com
NOTICE
Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b),
no information concerning the collec-
tion of this debt may be given without
the prior consent of the consumer
given directly to the debt collector or
the express permission of a court of
competent jurisdiction. The debt
collector is attempting to collect a
debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose (Case-
file No. 49185 / Invoice No.
49185-655058).
N.T. Sept. 12, 19, 26, Oct. 3, 2013
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE
For default under the terms of the
Deed of Trust executed by Beverly K.
Quigley, a single person and Daryl
Wayne Morley a single person, dated
October 24, 2006, recorded on
October 30, 2006 as Document No.
200612053, in Book 541, Page 810,
Office of the Recorder of Deeds,
Cole County, Missouri, the under-
signed Successor Trustee will on
Friday, September 20, 2013, at 10:00
AM at the South Front Door of the
Cole County Courthouse, 301 East
High Street, in Jefferson City, Mis-
souri, sell at public vendue to the
highest bidder for cash:
Lots Nos. 28 and 29, in Block H, in
MCDAVITT'S ADDITION to the Town
of Russellville, Missouri, per plat of
record in Plat Book 1, Page 27, Cole
County Recorder's Office,
to satisfy said debt and costs.
Martin, Leigh, Laws & Fritzlen, P.C.
Successor Trustee
Richard L. Martin, Vice President
(816) 221-1430
www.mllfpc.com
(Quigley and Morley, 5723.046,
Publication Start: 08/29/2013 )
MARTIN, LEIGH, LAWS & FRITZLEN,
P.C., AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE, IS
ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT
AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED
WILL BE USED FOR THAT
PURPOSE.
N.T. Aug. 29; Sept. 5, 12, 19, 2013
TRUSTEE'S SALE
IN RE: Robert D. Morris and Lisa A.
Morris, Husband and Wife Trustee's
Sale:
For default in payment of debt and
performance of obligation secured by
Deed of Trust executed by Robert D.
Morris and Lisa A. Morris, Husband
and Wife dated January 30, 1996 and
recorded in the Office of the Record-
er of Deeds of Cole County, Missouri
in Book 218, Page 951 the under-
signed Successor Trustee, at the re-
quest of the legal holder of said Note
will on Friday, October 11, 2013
between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and
5:00 p.m., (at the specific time of
12:55 PM), at the South Front Door of
the Courthouse, City of Jefferson,
County of Cole,, State of Missouri,
sell at public vendue to the highest
bidder for cash the following de-
scribed real estate, described in said
Deed of Trust, and situated in Cole
County, State of Missouri, to wit:
LOT NO. 1, LIBBERT-MORRIS
SUBD., PER PLAT OF RECORD IN
PLAT BOOK 11, PAGE 747, COLE
COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE;
SAID LIBBERT-MORRIS SUBD.,
BEING A SUBDIVISION OF PART OF
A TRACT OF LAND AS DESCRIBED
IN BOOK 354, PAGE 375, COLE
COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE,
SIAD [SAID] TRACT BEING A PART
OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE
NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SEC-
TION 30, TOWNSHIP 42 NORTH,
RANGE 13 WEST.
to satisfy said debt and cost.
MILLSAP & SINGER, P.C.,
Successor Trustee
612 Spirit Drive
St. Louis, MO 63005
(636) 537-0110
File No: 91015.101113.314197 FC
NOTICE
Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b),
no information concerning the collec-
tion of this debt may be given without
the prior consent of the consumer
given directly to the debt collector or
the express permission of a court of
competent jurisdiction. The debt
collector is attempting to collect a
debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose.
N.T. Sept. 19, 26; Oct. 3, 10, 2013
TRUSTEE'S SALE
IN RE: Terry W Pritchett, Sr. and De-
bra A Pritchett, husband and wife
Trustee's Sale:
For default in payment of debt and
performance of obligation secured by
Deed of Trust executed by Terry W
Pritchett, Sr. and Debra A Pritchett,
husband and wife dated April 19,
2004 and recorded in the Office of
the Recorder of Deeds of Cole
County, Missouri in Book 509, Page
282 the undersigned Successor
Trustee, at the request of the legal
holder of said Note will on Friday,
September 27, 2013 between the
hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., (at
the specific time of 12:55 PM), at the
South Front Door of the Courthouse,
City of Jefferson, County of Cole,
State of Missouri, sell at public
vendue to the highest bidder for cash
the following described real estate,
described in said Deed of Trust, and
situated in Cole County, State of Mis-
souri, to wit:
LOT NO. 45, WESTWOODRIGE
[WESTWOODRIDGE] SUBDIVISION,
SECTION 4, IN THE CITY OF
JEFFERSON, MISSOURI, PER PLAT
OF RECORD
IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 93, COLE
COUNTY RECORDER'S OFFICE.
SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS AND
EASEMENTS OF RECORD.
to satisfy said debt and cost.
MILLSAP & SINGER, P.C.,
Successor Trustee
612 Spirit Drive
St. Louis, MO 63005
(636) 537-0110
File No: 154193.092p713.312377 FC
NOTICE
Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection
Practices Act, 15 U.S.C. §1692c(b),
no information concerning the collec-
tion of this debt may be given without
the prior consent of the consumer
given directly to the debt collector or
the express permission of a court of
competent jurisdiction. The debt
collector is attempting to collect a
debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose.
N.T. Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2013
Friends moving into retirement together get plenty of advice
DEAR ABBY: In response to “Contem-
plating Change in Rhode Island” (June
23), who is considering retiring with a
friend to a city with a warmer climate,
I would offer the same advice we have
given our friends. She should know that
she’ll need to be proactive in
developing a social network in
her new location.
My wife and I also moved
far south when we retired. We
wanted neighbors with a variety
of ages so we could hear chil-
dren play nearby from time to
time. We purchased a house in a
“normal” neighborhood instead
of a retirement community. But
we soon realized that, unlike us,
our neighbors had jobs, family
responsibilities and little time for
us. More disconcerting was going grocery
shopping and no longer seeing the three
or four acquaintances we would see back
home.
Without jobs to occupy our time and
give us a framework for social contact,
we found ourselves isolated. To solve that
problem we joined organizations and did
volunteer work to meet new friends. Our
story has a happy ending, but it took some
effort to make it happen. “Contemplat-
ing” should be prepared to do the same.
— MIKE IN SPARKS, NEV.
DEAR MIKE: “Contemplating Change”
asked if readers had experience moving
far away at her age (late 60s). You, and
many others, wrote to share overwhelm-
ingly positive feedback. Thank you for it:
DEAR ABBY: For the women planning
to buy a retirement home together, please
tell them there are wonderful places
everywhere. I have moved 15 times since
the age of 70 and at 91 am mov-
ing again. (No, I am not trying
to stay ahead of the sheriff.) I
have sought more pleasant cli-
mates as well as the company
of ambitious writers. For the last
move, I am going to a retirement
community where I don’t have
to cook, wash dishes or clean
house because it’ll be done for
me. — LIFETIME WRITER IN
SEDONA, ARIZ.
DEAR ABBY: I want to encour-
age your Rhode Island reader.
Renting first is excellent advice. Research
what you want in your new destination.
Make sure it’s a growing community
where transplants will be welcome.
Be outgoing. Join a church, commu-
nity center or other place to meet people.
No one will beat a path to your door or
care about your former home. Don’t make
negative comparisons to locals, and don’t
cling to your old friend.
If all goes well, consider buying a twin
home/duplex where you can be close but
have your own space. I’m glad I moved. I
now have more diverse friends than ever
before. — RETIREE IN SOUTH CARO-
LINA
DEAR ABBY: Yes — rent first to check
housemate compatibility. As to a new
social community, check out nearby col-
leges or universities. Many offer programs
for creative learning in retirement or
something similar. One can make friends
with shared interests through classes. Also,
find a local “newcomers club.” — NANCY
IN ASHEVILLE, N.C.
DEAR ABBY: You’re never too old to
make new friends. My suggestion to the
ladies would be to consider buying what
is referred to as a park model (manufac-
tured home) in an RV park. They could
even try renting one in a few different
parks to get a feel for the park and loca-
tion. These parks have all kinds of activi-
ties going on from morning ’til night.
— MICHIGAN SNOWBIRD
DEAR ABBY: Moving into an over-
55 community was the perfect solution
when we relocated. There was instant
community with loads of activities and
opportunities to make new friends.
When you buy, make sure you own the
land as well as the house. Public libraries,
churches, schools and nursing homes will
welcome you as volunteers, and you can
become as immersed in the new com-
munity as you want. We LOVE being “relo-
cated.” — MARJORIE IN LONGMONT,
COLO.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van
Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or
P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
Dear Abby
The
Leader
of the
Stack.
We are your source for Breaking News, Marketing and Digital Expertise,
Graphic Design, Commercial Printing, Web Design, Mobile, and Text Alerts.
Starbucks’ progressive stance
puts it in hot seat on guns
NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks has always set
itself apart by taking strong positions on pro-
gressive political issues. Now that reputation has
landed the company in the middle of the heated
national debate over gun laws.
On Thursday, the Seattle-based company will
run full-page ads in major newspapers, telling
customers that guns are no longer welcome in
its cafes. But Starbucks is stopping short of an
outright ban, exposing the fine line it needs to
walk on a highly divisive issue.
“We are not pro-gun or anti-gun,” CEO How-
ard Schultz said in an interview, noting that
customers will still be served if they choose to
a carry gun.
The move comes as the company has finds
itself at the center of a fight it didn’t start. In
recent months, gun control advocates have been
pressuring Starbucks to ban firearms, while sup-
porters of gun rights have celebrated the com-
pany’s decision to defer to local laws. About
a month ago, Starbucks shut down a store in
Newtown, Conn. early to avoid a demonstration
by gun rights advocates. They had planned to
stage a “Starbucks Appreciation Day,” bringing
their firearms and turning the company into an
unwitting supporter of gun rights.
Support for guns runs counter to the Starbucks
image. The warm feeling Starbucks customers
get when they’re sipping lattes doesn’t always
come from the coffee. For some, part of the
brand’s attraction is the company’s liberal-lean-
ing support of gay marriage and environmental
issues. At least some of Starbucks’ more than $13
billion in annual revenue is derived from people
who agree with the company’s views.
But with some 7,000 company-owned stores
across the country —in red states and blue—
Starbucks is being forced to tread carefully with
its special blend of politics and commerce.
Many states allow people to carry licensed
guns in some way, but some businesses exer-
cise their right to ban firearms. They can do so
because their locations are considered private
property. Starbucks isn’t the only company that
doesn’t ban guns, but it has become a target for
gun control advocates, in part because of its
corporate image.
“This is a coffee company that has champi-
oned progressive issues,” said Shannon Watts,
founder of the gun reform group Moms Demand
Action for Gun Sense in America. “They’ve posi-
tioned themselves about being about the human
spirit — that was so at odds with this policy that
allowed guns inside their stores.”
Starbucks’ mission statement is to “inspire
and nurture the human spirit” and over the
years, it has taken strong positions on a number
of thorny issues. Earlier this year, the company
banned smoking within 25 feet of its stores,
wherever its leases allowed. The idea was to
extend its no-smoking policy to the outdoor
seating areas, regardless of state laws on the
matter.
At the company’s annual meeting in March, a
shareholder stood to criticize Starbucks’ support
of marriage equality. Schultz told the man it was
a free country and that he could sell his shares.
Starbucks has also been vocal about its
health-care benefits for workers. And the com-
pany says it only does business with coffee farm-
ers who pay workers decent wages and farm in
an environmentally friendly way.
Such stances explain why Moms Demand
Action, which was founded the day after the
mass shootings in Newtown, Conn., has been
urging Starbucks to ban guns with its “Skip Star-
bucks Saturdays.
In turn, gun rights advocates have been gal-
vanized by the company’s decision to defer to
local laws and staged the “Starbucks Apprecia-
tion Days.”
Schultz said the events mischaracterized the
company’s stance on the issue and the demon-
strations “have made our customers uncomfort-
able.”
He said he hopes people will honor the
request not to bring in guns but says the com-
pany will nevertheless serve those who do.
“We will not ask you to leave,” he said.
AP
Starbucks’ corporate headquarters is seen in
Seattle. Starbucks says guns are no longer
welcome in its cafes, though it is stopping
short of an outright ban on firearms.
Judge: Parents can name their baby ‘Messiah’
ENEWPORT, Tenn. (AP)
— A Tennessee woman will be
allowed to name her 8-month-
old son “Messiah,” a judge
ruled Wednesday, overturning
an order from another judge
who said the boy’s name should
be changed to Martin because
“‘Messiah’ is a title that is held
only by Jesus Christ.”
Jaleesa Martin said she
couldn’t believe it when child
support magistrate Lu Ann
Ballew last month ordered Mar-
tin’s 8-month-old son’s name
changed during a paternity
hearing. The parents were dis-
puting the baby’s surname, with
Martin hoping to keep the name
she had given him — Messiah
Deshawn Martin — and father
Jawaan McCullough wanting
the baby to bear his last name.
Ballew surprised both par-
ents by ordering that the
baby’s name change to Martin
Deshawn McCullough, saying
that the name Messiah was not
in the baby’s best interest. Her
written order stated that “‘Mes-
siah’ is a title that is held only by
Jesus Christ,” and “Labeling this
child ‘Messiah’ places an undue
burden on him that as a human
being, he cannot fulfill.”
That decision quickly made
international news, and the
Freedom from Religion Foun-
dation filed a complaint against
Ballew with the state’s Board of
Judicial Conduct.
At a Wednesday appeal hear-
ing in Cocke County Chancery
Court, Chancellor Telford E.
Forgety overturned Ballew’s
decision, finding that she acted
unconstitutionally.
Forgety said there is no basis
in the law for changing a child’s
first name where both parents
are in agreement about it. He
also said that Ballew’s deci-
sion violates the Establishment
Clause of the U.S. Constitution.
By agreement of the par-
ents, Forgety ordered the child’s
name to be changed to Messiah
Deshawn McCullough.
Jaleesa Martin said she found
Ballew’s original ruling “ridicu-
lous” and had been confident it
would be overturned.
She never stopped calling
the baby Messiah, a name she
picked out because she liked
the way it sounded.
www.newstribune.com
D6 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 DIVERSIONS
GARFIELD
PEANUTS
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
SHOE
HI and LOIS
FUNKY WINKERBEAN
SALLY FORTH
MARMADUKE FAMILY CIRCUS
ACROSS
1 One who’s
always on the
go?
6 Pear that’s good
for poaching
10 Glass sheet
14 Superior to
15 Member of the
opposition
16 One on a
pedestal
17 Pick-me-up
18 Governor’s pet
projects?
20 Like one who
forgot the
Dramamine
22 Exposed
23 Nutritionist’s
recommendation
25 Causes to quail
29 Utensil that gives
you ideas?
32 Take to task
34 Cock or bull
35 Blues-rocker
Chris
36 Clothes
37 Alex Haley
classic
39 Abarth
automaker
40 Coffee hour
item
41 Talent
42 Precipitation
43 Bully’s secret
shame?
47 Day spa offering
48 First name in
fashion
49 Pundit’s piece
51 Olympic Airways
founder
56 Say “Come in,
Orson!” e.g.?
60 Empty room
population?
61 Poetic lowland
62 Iroquoian
people
63 Compass
dirección
64 Rep on the
street
65 “Law & Order”
org.
66 Composer
Bruckner
DOWN
1 Expos, since 2005
2 High wind
3 Pulitzer poet Van
Duyn
4 Budget alternative
5 Ruled
6 Hoops score
7 London’s prov.
8 Shot in the dark
9 Fortresses
10 Find one’s voice
11 Stir
12 Eur. kingdom
13 Antlered bugler
19 Take out
21 “Charlie Wilson’s
War” org.
24 Recipient of two
New Testament
epistles
26 Without a
downside
27 Pet’s reward
28 Use the rink
29 After-dinner drink
30 Jekyll creator’s
initials
31 Distillery vessel
32 Things
33 Chick of jazz
37 Winchester
wielders
38 Frequently, in
verse
39 Hardy’s “__ From
the Madding
Crowd”
41 Freak out
42 Liturgical shout of
praise
44 Was revolting?
45 Brought to mind
46 Place for a wide-
screen TV
50 Fishing boat
52 In short order
53 Spreadsheet
function
54 Liking quite a bit
55 Not hidden
56 Home shopping
channel
57 Nasser’s confed.
58 Cry for a picador
59 Fashionable
jeans feature
By Gareth Bain
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/19/13
09/19/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
Thursday Crossword Puzzle
Kids Sports Movies THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
Med Dir Dish 6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30
WGN-A # 307 239 Funny Home Videos How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine How I Met Rules Rules Parks
CW % 14 36 Seinfeld Rules The Vampire Diaries America’s Next Model News Seinfeld Commun Commun ’70s Show ’70s Show
KMOS & 6 6 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Changing Show Ag Sportspage Austin City Limits ’ T. Smiley Business Charlie Rose (N) ’
KOMU _ 8 8
KOMU 8
News
Wheel of
Fortune
The Million Second Quiz “Finale” (Season
Finale) Champions vie for the prize. (N) Å
Valerie’s Story: Vieira
Special
KOMU 8
News
(:34) The Tonight
Show With Jay Leno
Jimmy
Fallon
ME-TV ) M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Gilligan Gilligan Heroes F Troop Rhoda Rhoda Twi. Zone Perry Mason Å Untouch.
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News (N)
Å
ABC 17
News
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Finale) (N) ’Å
Grey’s Anatomy
“Perfect Storm” ’Å
Scandal Olivia and her
team face danger. ’
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Å
(:35) Jimmy Kimmel
Live (N) ’Å
(:37)
Nightline
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Entertain-
ment Ton.
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Theory
Two and a
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Big Bang
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’Å
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David Letterman ’
Ferguson
KZOU , 32
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The Office
“Sex Ed”
The Office
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30 Rock
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Wommack
Great Awakening Christ the
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KNLJ
Specials
Stakel/Ter-
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Building a
Difference
7th Street
Theater
Great Awakening You and
Me
LIFE = 252 108
Wife Swap ’Å Project Runway “Let’s
Do Brunch” Å
Project Runway The designers
create looks for fans. (N) Å
Supermarket Super-
star “Dinner Entrees”
(:31) Double
Divas
(:02) Project Runway
“Let’s Do Brunch”
ESPN > 206 140
Coll. Foot-
ball Live
College Football Clemson at North Carolina State. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N)
(Live) Å
ESPN2 ? 209 144
WNBA Basketball First Round, Game 1: Teams
TBA. (N) (Live) Å
WNBA Basketball First Round, Game 1: Teams
TBA. (N) (Live) Å
Olbermann (N) (Live) Olbermann
FXSP @ 671 418
The New College
Football Show 2013
MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Colorado Rockies. From Coors Field
in Denver. (Subject to Blackout)
Cardinals
Live (N)
Carlos
Beltran
FOX Sports Live (N)
(Live)
FNC A 360 205 FOX Report The O’Reilly Factor Hannity (N) Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity
MSN B 356 209 Hardball Matthews All In With Chris Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word All In With Chris Rachel Maddow Show
CNBC C 355 208 The Kudlow Report Amer. Greed Amer. Greed Amer. Greed Mad Money Amer. Greed
TRUTV D 246 204 World’s Dumbest... World’s Dumbest... Jokers Jokers Jokers Jokers Most Shocking World’s Dumbest...
FX E 248 137
Two and a
Half Men
Two and a
Half Men
Anger Anger Anger Anger ›› “The Green Hornet” (2011) Seth Rogen, Jay Chou. A
spoiled playboy becomes a costumed crime-fighter.
“Green
Hornet”
TNT F 245 138
Castle “Pretty Dead”
’Å
Castle A vigilante is
suspected of murder.
Hawaii Five-0 “Ke
Kinohi” Å (DVS)
Hawaii Five-0 “He
Kane Hewa’ole” ’
CSI: NY A bakery
owner is shot. Å
CSI: NY “Holding Cell”
’Å
WE G 260 128
Roseanne
’Å
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Å
Tamar &Vince “Bump
on the Road”
Tamar &Vince “Posh &
Pregnant” (N)
Tamar &Vince “Posh &
Pregnant”
Tamar &Vince “Posh &
Pregnant”
Tamar &Vince “Posh &
Pregnant”
DISC H 278 182
Airplane Repo ’Å Airplane Repo ’Å Airplane Repo ’Å Airplane Repo (N)
’Å
Airplane Repo ’Å Airplane Repo ’Å
A&E I 265 118
The First 48 Å The First 48 “Birthday
Girl” Å
The First 48 “Hot Ride;
Debt Collector”
The First 48 “Desper-
ate Moves” Å
(:01) The First 48 “Fatal
Call” Å
(:01) The First 48
“Birthday Girl” Å
CNN J 202 200 Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Live (N) AC 360 Later (N) Erin Burnett OutFront Piers Morgan Live
HLN K
Jane Velez-Mitchell
(N)
Nancy Grace (N) Dr. Drew on Call (N) HLN After Dark (N) Showbiz Tonight Dr. Drew on Call
TVL L 304 106
Boston Legal ’Å Boston Legal ’Å Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
The King
of Queens
(:12) The King of
Queens ’Å
FAM M 311 180
(5:00) ›› “Burlesque” (2010,
Drama) Cher, Christina Aguilera.
››› “Pretty Woman” (1990) Richard Gere. A corporate raider
hires a hooker to act as a business escort.
The 700 Club ’Å Fresh
Prince
Fresh
Prince
TBS N 247 139
Seinfeld
“The Fire”
Family
Guy ’
Family
Guy ’
Family
Guy ’
Big Bang
Theory
Big Bang
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Theory
Big Bang
Theory
Conan (N) Å The Office
’Å
Conan Å
TOON O 296 176 Legends Dragons NinjaGo Teen King/Hill Cleveland Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Childrens Heart
NICK P 299 170
Hatha-
ways
Sponge-
Bob
iCarly Carly wants her
father to escort her.
Full House
’Å
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’Å
The Nanny
’Å
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“The Will”
Friends
’Å
(:33)
Friends
(:06)
Friends
(:39)
Friends
AP Q 282 184 Gator Boys Gator Boys ’Å North Woods North Woods Gator Boys ’Å North Woods
TLC R 280 183
Say Yes:
ATL
Say Yes:
ATL
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ATL
Say Yes:
ATL
Four Weddings:
Unveiled (N) ’Å
Four Weddings (N)
’Å
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Unveiled ’Å
Four Weddings ’Å
MTV Y 331 160 Ridic. Ridic. Ridic. Ridic. Ridic. Ridic. Ridic. Ridic. Strangers Ridic. Ridic. Ridic.
VH1 Z 335 162 Marry T.I.-Tiny T.I.-Tiny T.I.-Tiny T.I.-Tiny T.I.-Tiny Tiny Tonight! Back Behind the Music ’ Behind the Music T.I.
CMT [ 327 166 Reba ’ Reba ’ ›› “Happy Gilmore” (1996) Adam Sandler. Fat Cops Fat Cops Cops Rel. Cops Rel. ›› “RV” (2006)
SPIKE ¨ 241 168
Cops ’Å Cops ’Å Cops ’Å Cops ’Å iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ (Live) Å Bellator MMA Live ’ Ink Master Eyelid
tattoos. ’Å
AMC ≠ 254 130
›› “National Treasure” (2004, Adventure) Nicolas Cage, Hunter Gomez. A
man tries to steal the Declaration of Independence.
Owner’s
Manual
Owner’s
Manual
The Pitch “Gibson
Brands” (N) Å
Owner’s
Manual
Owner’s
Manual
USA Æ 242 105
NCIS “The Penelope
Papers” ’
NCIS “Enemy on the
Hill” Å (DVS)
NCIS A man dies from
being force-fed liquid.
NCIS “Rekindled” ’
Å (DVS)
Covert Affairs “Levi-
tate Me”
(:01) Law & Order:
Special Victims Unit
DISN ∞ 290 172
Shake It
Up! Å
Dog With
a Blog ’
“Lemonade Mouth” (2011, Musical) Bridgit
Mendler, Adam Hicks, Hayley Kiyoko. ’Å
Good-
Charlie
Jessie
’Å
Shake It
Up! Å
Austin &
Ally Å
Good-
Charlie
Good-
Charlie
HALL ± 312 185
Little House on the
Prairie Å
››‡ “Little John” (2002, Drama) Ving Rhames,
Gloria Reuben. Å
Frasier
’Å
Frasier
’Å
Frasier
’Å
Frasier
’Å
Golden
Girls
Golden
Girls
OXY ≤ 251 127
Best Ink Old customers
return to the chair.
››› “Fun With Dick and Jane” (1977, Comedy)
Jane Fonda, George Segal.
›› “Employee of the Month” (2006, Comedy)
Dane Cook, Jessica Simpson.
››› “Fun With Dick
and Jane”
SYFY ≥ 244 122
Revolution Aaron and
Rachel are captured.
Revolution “The
Longest Day” (N) Å
Revolution “Clue” (N)
’Å
Revolution Rachel and
Monroe face off. (N)
Revolution The rebels
infiltrate the tower. (N)
Haven Duke is ejected
and rescued.
BRAVO ¥ 273 129
Million Dollar Listing:
Los Angeles
Inside the Actors Stu-
dio “Jake Gyllenhaal”
Tamra’s O.C. Wedding Eat, Drink, Love (N) What Hap-
pens
I Dream of NeNe: The
Wedding
What Hap-
pens
HIST μ 120
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
(:31) Pawn
Stars
Hatfields & McCoys:
White Lightning (N)
(:01) Pawn
Stars
(:31) Pawn
Stars
TRAV ∂ 277 215 Man, Food Man, Food Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum Mysteries-Museum
FOOD ∑ 231 110 Chopped Cutthroat Kitchen Chopped Anne Burrell Food Truck Race Chopped
HGTV ∏ 229 112 Hunt Intl Hunters House Hunters Reno Flip or Flip or Hunters Hunt Intl Hunters Hunt Intl Flip or Flip or
COM π 249 107
Colbert
Report
Daily
Show
Chappelle
Show
Chappelle
Show
Always
Sunny
Always
Sunny
Tosh.0 Å Tosh.0 Å Daily
Show
Colbert
Report
(:01)
Tosh.0
Tosh.0 Å
E! ∫ 236 114 E! News (N) The Soup Hello Ross Kardashian Kardashian Chelsea E! News Chelsea
BET ª 329 124 106/Park ›‡ “B.A.P.S” (1997) Halle Berry. Å ›› “Big Momma’s House” (2000) Martin Lawrence. Wendy Williams Show
JCTV ¡ Music Videos Top 3 1music Night/Joy Music Videos Soul Mag Videos Night/Joy Music Vid
CREATE Δ
Sara’s Hubert
Keller
Essential
Pépin ’
Test
Kitchen
Chef John
Besh
Martha
Bakes ’
Hometime
Å
R. Steves’
Europe
Burt Wolf:
Travels
Essential
Pépin ’
Test
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Sara’s
EWTN Π370 261 Daily Mass: Our Lady World Over Live (N) Crossing Rosary Life on the Rock (N) Defending Women of Daily Mass: Our Lady
MUSIC
JEFFERSON CITY
Easy Rhythm Band, Saturday, 8-11:30
p.m., Eagles Club.
Sonny and Partly Cloudy, Sept. 28, 6-
10 p.m., Veit’s Pub.
John Wright, Sept. 29, 1:30 p.m., Jefferson
City VFW.
Gary Libbert and Countryfied, Oct. 4,
8:30-11:30 p.m., American Legion.
Easy Rhythm Band, Oct. 11, 8:30-11:30
p.m., American Legion.
Marshall Morgan and Musicians,
Oct. 13, 1:30 p.m., Jefferson City VFW.
Johnny’s Friends, Oct. 20, 2 p.m.,
Jefferson City VFW.
AREA TOWNS
California Community Ensemble,
Saturday, noon, Finke Theatre in California.
Phil Lewis Combo, Saturday, 1:15 p.m.,
Finke Theatre in California.
Easy Rhythm Band, Oct. 5, 7-10 p.m.,
Callaway Senior Center, Fulton.
COLUMBIA
Roots N Blues BBQ, Friday through
Sunday, Friday 5:30-11:30 p.m.; Saturday
noon-11:15 p.m.; Sunday 12:30-6 p.m., at
Stephens Lake Park.
Easy Rhythm Band, Oct. 12, 7-10 p.m.,
Columbia Senior Center.
ST. LOUIS
Harry Connick Jr., Oct. 27, Fox Theatre,
314-534-1111.
THEATER
JEFFERSON CITY
“Miracle Worker,” through Sept. 28,
Stained Glass Theatre, 830 E. High St., 7:30
p.m. Thursday-Friday; 2 p.m. Saturday matinee;
634-5313.
“Nuns4Fun Bible Bingo,” Oct. 3, 7
p.m., Miller Performing Arts Center, 291-3524.
“I Hate Hamlet,” Oct. 10-12, The Little
Theatre of Jefferson City at Miller Performing Arts
Center, 7:30 p.m.
AREA TOWNS
“Tuna Does Vegas,” Saturday through
Sept. 28, Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre, 660-837-
3311.
“Dupont Mississippi,” Sept. 27-28,
Camden County Museum, dinner at 6 p.m.;
show at 7 p.m., reservations, 573-873-5101.
ST. LOUIS
“Chicago,” Friday through Sept. 27, Fox
Theatre, 314-534-1111.
“Evita,” Oct. 8-20, Fox Theatre, 314-534-
1111.
Celtic Thunder, Oct. 26, Fox Theatre, 314-
534-1111.
“Beauty and the Beast,” Nov. 1-3, Fox
Theatre, 314-534-1111.
“Rain,” Nov. 15-16, Fox Theatre, 314-534-
1111.
OTHER
FUN STUFF
JEFFERSON CITY
Jefferson City Swing Dance Club,
fourth Saturday at Eagles CLub classes 7-8 p.m.,
dance 8-11 p.m.; Tuesdays classes for non
dancers 1212 E. High St. at 6 p.m.
Museum After Hours, first Wednesday of
each month, State Museum is open until 9 p.m.
Oktoberfest, Sept. 28, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Old
Munichburg.
Jefferson City MultiCultural Fall
Festival, Oct. 12, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., downtown,
with entertainment, food, arts, crafts, storytellers,
community information booth, vendors and
more.
AREA TOWNS
28th Annual Turkey Festival, Sept.
28, Eldon, featuring a parade, music, food,
car show, demolition derby, vendor booths and
more.
Versailles Old Tyme Apple Festival,
Oct. 5, downtown Versailles, with a play at
Royal Theatre, king and queen contest, sock hop,
cruise night and more.
Old Time Quilters Fest, Oct. 5, 10 a.m.-2
p.m., Camden County Museum, with booths with
quilting notions, demonstrations, local quilt group
and lunch.
Tell us about your event! You can
submit items for News Tribune calendars online
at www.newstribune.com. If you prefer to submit
items via hand delivery, e-mail, fax or snail
mail, you still have those options. If you have
questions or need further assistance, call Mary
Fischer at 761-0240.
See CALENDAR, Page 2
www.newstribune.com
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N
E
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n
t
r
a
l

M
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s
s
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i

s

E
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t
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a
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G
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SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
1906 Hayselton
By Michelle Brooks
mbrooks@newstribune.com
Tim Tinnin wanted one more
dance with his late wife Angie, who
loved local live music.
He knows many others who have
grieved the loss of their young
spouses, but they’ve not had the
chance to celebrate that life.
A street dance at the intersection
of High and Madison streets from
4-11 p.m. Sept. 28 will be just that
— a celebration of life.
For those who appreciate local
bands, it will be a night to kick it
up with good dance music from
Soul Root, Cherry Pistols, Low Man
Road and Five Turn Knot.
“I don’t think people realize the
talent stock here,” Tinnin said.
“They’re going to be blown away.”
And for anyone who has lost a
loved one but hasn’t had the chance
to look back and publicly enjoy
that relationship, they’re invited
to bring a large photo to set on the
stage during the celebration.
“It’s not a cryfest,” Tinnin said.
“We’ll get our cellphones in the air
and acknowledge how awesome
our people were.”
The Angiepalooza Facebook page
“exploded” when the street dance
was announced, Tinnin said.
“If a fraction of (the 17,000 hits)
shows up, we’ll have a whale of a
show.”
Tim met Angie at the Missouri
Highway Patrol Troop F, where
they both worked, as he was orga-
nizing barbecue benefits for local
families in crisis, raising more than
$100,000 during its tenure.
“Some people get a bad slate
some times,” Tinnin said. “We
could make it better for them.”
When Angie Tinnin died in
December at the age of 39, a result
of colon cancer, Tim emotionally
had a meltdown.
Tapping into their success with
low-key, in-house events, Tim
focused his energy on creating the
June Angiepalooza — a party for
Angie with nine local bands.
Without heavy rains affecting the
event at the Jefferson City Jaycees
Fairgrounds, the street dance may
never have taken shape, Tinnin
said.
“To me, this is Angie’s legacy, a
natural extension of helping peo-
ple,” he said. “I believe this is sup-
posed to happen.
“I want people who didn’t know
her to think she must have been
one cool girl; that’s the positive that
keeps me going.”
Unlike the June event, which
required tickets, the street dance
is free.
Any proceeds from either event,
which Tinnin intends to continue
annually, will benefit Safety Net, a
support organization for survivors
of emergency responders who die
in the line of duty.
The June event raised about
$6,000.
This time, Tinnin said he is
expecting the street dance, a rare
Angiepalooza to try again
Submitted
Bands perform-
ing at an upcom-
ing street dance
include Cherry
Pistols (left), Five
Turn Knot and Soul
Root.
By Michelle Brooks
mbrooks@newstribune.com
The Hayselton Drive Neighbor-
hood is a well-known subdivision
with prominent names associated
with many of its homes.
Visitors will have the chance to
sneak a peek inside six of those
homes 1-5 p.m. Sunday during the
Historic City of Jefferson’s Eighth
Annual Homes Tour.
The Hayselton RiverWalk Tour
will feature 1924, 1911, 1906, 1813,
1807 and 1608 Hayselton Drive.
“And Hayselton is along the Mis-
souri River; people always like to
see the river,” said co-chairman
Tammy Boeschen.
Many of the homes were nomi-
nated or applied to be part of the
tour, but organizers wanted to
keep the number of homes to a rea-
sonable number that visitors could
visit within the four-hour window,
Boeschen said.
Plus, the 30-year-old not-for-
profit provides more than 100
volunteers from among its 350
members for the event, which is its
largest fundraiser.
Advanced tickets are available
for $12 at Samuel’s Tuxedos, the Art
Bazaar and Schulte’s IGA. Tickets
are available the day of the event
for $15 on site.
The Hayselton neighborhood
was developed primarily through
the 1930s to 1950s. Unlike today’s
modern subdivisions, the homes
vary in architectural design includ-
ing English Tudor, Cape Cod, bun-
galow, cottage, colonial revival and
garrison.
William Searcy created the Sun-
set Place Addition with 80 acres in
1926.
“People appreciate the beauty
Hayselton home tour on tap
1911 Hayselton
1807 Hayselton
See PARTY, Page 2
See TOUR, Page 2
www.newstribune.com
2 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013
Living History/Apple Butter
Days, Oct. 11, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Camden County Museum, with
crafters, demonstrations, quilt raffle,
apple butter and apple pies.
Deutsch Country Days,
Oct. 19-20, Luxenhaus Farm, near
Marthasville, featuring pioneer
folkways and skills of the early
Germans in Missouri.
COLUMBIA
36th Annual Heritage
Festival/craft show, Saturday
and Sunday, Nifong Park with
traditional music and stories, American
Indian dancers, crafts, vendors, food,
demonstrations and a historic village.
EXHIBITS
AREA TOWNS
Robert Friedman Figurative
Drawings exhibit, through Sept.
27, Mildred M. Cox Gallery on the
William Woods University campus.
CALENDAR
Continued from Page 1
Submitted
Tim Tinnin is planning a street dance to celebrate the life of
his wife, Angie, who died in December.
1813 Hayselton
1608 Hayselton
1924 Hayselton
occurrence these days, to be a
great time.
And for young people who
have experienced loss, the
opportunity to pay tribute may
resonate.
“We had our mourning; we
can’t bring them back,” Tinnin
said. “But they’re with us; this is
our celebration.”
On the Web:
www.angiepalooza.com
www.safetynetmo.org
PARTY
Continued from Page 1
NEW YORK (AP) — After months of
rumors and hint-dropping, pop icon Brit-
ney Spears revealed what she called her
“(not-so-)secret” news — she’s heading to
Las Vegas.
The 31-year-old pop star confirmed a
two-year residency at Planet Hollywood
Resort & Casino on ABC’s “Good Morning
America” on Tuesday. “Britney: Piece of
Me” will debut Dec. 27, just in time for Las
Vegas’ massive New Year’s crowds. Spears
announced 16 dates, but she will perform
50 shows each in 2014 and 2015.
Spears was flown to a dry lake bed in the
Nevada desert for the pre-dawn announce-
ment. About 1,300 people had been bused
to the remote location in the wee hours
of the morning, and were waiting for her
dressed in Britney Spears T-shirts or the
singer’s signature schoolgirl look from her
“... Baby One More Time” music video.
The Grammy-winning singer’s confirma-
tion about the residency comes after much
online speculation, including some of her
own Vegas-themed tweets. She said in an
interview on “GMA” that the show will fea-
ture her greatest hits as well as new material.
“I’m definitely ready,” she said in a taped
interview, adding that she’s training five
hours each day.
Spears’ helicopter hovered in the desert
above her fans, who were holding giant
cards that formed a 10-story-tall picture of
her. The singer stepped off the aircraft and
said she was feeling sick. After a second
— and live — interview with “GMA,” she
headed back to the helicopter, barely smil-
ing and offering little more than a wave.
A tweet about the experience later
showed up on her Twitter profile.
“Y’all that will be the last time u EVER
see me in a helicopter. Love u @GMA & that
was INCREDIBLE but helicopters are not
for this girl :(,” it read.
Tickets for “Britney: Piece of Me” go
on sale Sept. 20. Prices range from $59 to
$179.
The show will take place in an “intimate-
ly sized” theater with nightclub touches,
including table and bottle service.
Spears, who debuted on the music scene
in 1999, has released seven platinum-plus
albums. She has more than a dozen Top 10
hits, including “Toxic,” “Gimme More” and
“Oops!... I Did It Again.”
She released a new song, “Work (Exple-
tive),” this week. It’s from her untitled
eighth album, due out Dec. 3, which will
include songs about her ex-fiance Jason
Trawick.
“They suck,” she said. “Breakups suck.”
Britney Spears announces
Las Vegas residency
AP
Brittany Spears announces her new show at Planet Hollywood Vegas to Sam
Champion during the taping of Good Morning America on Tuesday in Las Vegas.
TORONTO (AP) — At the
suggestion that she’s the finest
comedic actress of her genera-
tion, Julia Louis-Dreyfus sighs
an expletive.
The grandness of the state-
ment may make Louis-Dreyfus
squirm, but it’s worth consider-
ing. Think about her, as Elaine
Benes on “Seinfeld,” swooning
over John F. Kennedy Jr. Think
about her, as Vice President
Selina Meyer on “Veep,” stra-
tegically finishing a 10k race
behind a disabled veteran but
before a costumed contestant
(“I’m not going to get beaten by
a banana!”).
Few comediennes have both
her gift for physical comedy
(furiously tearing away George
Costanza’s toupee) and vocal
precision (“He took it out”). In
boy worlds as varied as the dat-
ing banter of “Seinfeld” and the
Beltway politics of “Veep,” she’s
suffered countless indignities,
yet always remained feistily
combative.
“It’s a very joyful way to
make a living,” Louis-Dreyfus
remarked in a recent interview
at the Toronto International
Film Festival. “I kind of crave
it, in a way. But it’s fun to make
them cry, too.”
And with that, she lets out a
full-throated laugh — a bril-
liant, bright cackle that’s ruined
dozens of otherwise good takes.
(If you haven’t seen it, look up
the outtakes from her police
station confrontation with
Jerry Stiller’s Frank Costanza on
“Seinfeld.”)
In “Enough Said,” which Fox
Searchlight will release Wednes-
day, Louis-Dreyfus, transfers
her comedic gifts to the big
screen and, finally, gets to exer-
cise her tear-inducing chops.
“Enough Said,” she joked
after the Toronto premiere
of the film, her first dramatic
work since doing “The Cherry
Orchard” in high school. (She
fell into sketch comedy as a col-
lege student at Northwestern in
Chicago, after which she joined
“Saturday Night Live.” It’s also,
somewhat staggeringly, the first
lead role in a feature film for the
52-year-old actress.
“I’ve spent the bulk of my
career doing television and rais-
ing two children, who I’m still
raising. So the idea of working
eight, nine months on a series
and then on my break going off
to do another project is some-
thing I just couldn’t work into
my life,” says Louis-Dreyfus.
“So I didn’t, much to my agent’s
chagrin.”
In “Enough Said,” which was
written and directed by Nicole
Holofcener (“Please Give,”
“Lovely and Amazing”), Louis-
Dreyfus plays a divorced Los
Angeles masseuse and mother
who begins dating the ex-hus-
band (James Gandolfini) of a
Get out! Louis-Dreyfus a movie star for first time
of the older architecture,” Boe-
schen said.
Mark Pauley and Rob Prenger
own the Patterson Home at
1608 Hayselton Drive.
Allison and Ken Kingsbury
own the Voracek Home at 1807
Hayselton Drive.
Carol and Dan Roark own the
Randazzo Home at 1813 Hay-
selton Drive.
Alice and Mark Steward own
the Cummins’ Chula Vista at
1906 Hayselton Drive.
Tami Turner owns the Suggett
House at 1911 Hayselton Drive.
Karen and Kevin McHugh
own the Bohrer Home at 1924
Hayselton Drive.
The tour also will include art-
ists at work in select front yards,
children operating lemonade
stands and posters with more
history hung around the neigh-
borhood.
On the Web:
www.historiccityofjefferson.org
TOUR
Continued from Page 1
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October 10-12, 2013
Miller Performing Arts Center
Tickets: $15
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Thanks to Our Sponsors: Huber & Assoc., KBIA, News
Tribune, Scruggs Lumber & Cumulus
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Our Lady of Help Parish
FRANKENSTEIN
9 Miles North of Linn on Hwy. C - on parish grounds
DESSERT AUCTION - 3:30 P.M.
Country Store
Craft Store
Souvenir T-Shirts
Raf¾e & Games
Sandwich Stand
Soda Stand
Beer Stand
Sausage Sales
Kettle Corn
SUNDAY, SEPT. 22
ND
WHOLE BAKED TURKEY &
COUNTRY SAUSAGE DINNER
Family Style • Air-Conditioned Hall
SERVING FROM 11:00 TO 6:30 P.M.
Adults: $10.00 • Children (5-12 Years): $4.00 • Under 5: Free
Handicapped Parking and Entrance