Humanity's open-source automated precision farming machine.

Published by Rory Landon Aronson on September 19, 2013
Email ­ rory@farmbot.it
Phone ­ (678) 321 7679
Go.FarmBot.It
1

1. Abstract
The  world’s   population  is  growing  and  with  that  growth  we  must   produce  more  food.  Due  to  the  industrial  and  petrochemical  revolutions,  the
agriculture  industry has  kept  up  in  food  production,  but  only  by  compromising  the  soil,  the  environment,  our  health,  and  the food production system
itself.  The  increased  production  has  largely  come  from  incremental   changes  in  technology  and  economies  of   scale,  but  that  trend  is  reaching  a
plateau. Conventional agriculture methods are unsustainable and a paradigm shift is needed.
FarmBot   is  an  open­source  and  scalable  automated  precision  farming  machine  and  software  package  designed  from  the  ground  up  with  today’s
technologies.  Similar  to  today’s  3D  printers  and  CNC  milling  machines,  FarmBot  hardware  employs  linear  guides  in  the  X,  Y,  and  Z  directions  that
allow  for  tooling  such as  plows,  seed injectors, watering nozzles, and sensors, to be precisely positioned and used on the plants and soil.  The entire
system  is numerically controlled and thus fully automated from the sowing of seeds to harvest. The hardware is designed to be simple, scalable, and
hackable.  Using the  open­source  web­based  software  package,  the user  can graphically design their farm to their desired specifications and upload
numerical  control  code  to  the  hardware.  Other  features  of  the  software  include  storing  and  manipulating  data  maps,  a  decision  support  system  to
facilitate data driven farm design, access to an open data repository, and enterprise class analytics.
The following is a sample of intrinsic advantages of FarmBot that make it a superior system to conventional methods and technologies.








Ability to plant polycrops in a machine efficient manner
Ability to optimize operations such as watering, spraying, and seed spacing
Full automation and 24/7 possible operation
Virtually unlimited farm design possibilities
Incorporates “Big Data” acquisition and analysis for data­driven decision making and “Smart Farming”
Ability to plant in the most space efficient layouts
Scalable from a backyard system to an industrial operation
Allows for the democratization and decentralization of food production
Free and open­source, fully documented, hackable, and accessible

The  vision  of  this  project  is  to  create an open and accessible technology aiding everyone  to grow  food and to grow food for everyone. The mission is
to  grow a community that produces free and open­source hardware plans, software, data, and documentation enabling everyone  to build and operate
a farming machine.
This  white  paper  covers  the  FarmBot  technology  and  vision  as  well  as  details  of FarmBot  Genesis,  the  first  FarmBot currently in development with
plans  for  a  crowdfunded  launch  in  2014.  I  am  seeking  more  people  to  work  on  the  project  and  for  investment  to  help cover  prototyping  and  other
development cost. Please send feedback and inquiries to rory@farmbot.it, call (678) 321 7679, and Go.FarmBot.It!
2

2. Table of Contents
1. Abstract...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................2
2. Table of Contents............................................................................................................................................................................................................3
3. Background.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................6
4. FarmBot..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................7
4.1. Precision..........................................................................................................................................................................................................8
4.2. Combining Polycrop and Monocrop Efficiencies.............................................................................................................................................9
4.2.1. Monocrops........................................................................................................................................................................................9
4.2.2. Polycrops.........................................................................................................................................................................................10
4.3. Data­Driven Agriculture..................................................................................................................................................................................11
4.4. Automation......................................................................................................................................................................................................11
4.5. Scalability........................................................................................................................................................................................................11
4.6. Increased Space Efficiency............................................................................................................................................................................11
4.7. Eliminated Soil Compaction...........................................................................................................................................................................12
4.8. Continuous Land Use.....................................................................................................................................................................................12
4.9. Variable Terraforming.....................................................................................................................................................................................12
4.10. Open­Source................................................................................................................................................................................................13
5. Hardware.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................14
5.1. Tracks.............................................................................................................................................................................................................15
5.1.1. Geometry.........................................................................................................................................................................................16
5.1.2. Scalability.........................................................................................................................................................................................16
5.1.3. Cost..................................................................................................................................................................................................16
5.2. Gantry.............................................................................................................................................................................................................17
5.2.1. Geometry.........................................................................................................................................................................................17
5.2.2. Drive System...................................................................................................................................................................................18
5.2.3. Scalability.........................................................................................................................................................................................18
5.3. Cross­Slide.....................................................................................................................................................................................................18
5.3.1. Geometry.........................................................................................................................................................................................19
5.3.2. Drive System...................................................................................................................................................................................19
5.3.3. Scalability.........................................................................................................................................................................................19
5.4. Tool Mounts....................................................................................................................................................................................................19
5.4.1. Geometry.........................................................................................................................................................................................19
5.4.2. Drive System...................................................................................................................................................................................20
3

5.4.3. Scalability.........................................................................................................................................................................................20
5.5. Tools...............................................................................................................................................................................................................21
5.6. Electronics......................................................................................................................................................................................................22
5.7. Sensors...........................................................................................................................................................................................................22
6. Software.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................23
6.1. Web Frontend.................................................................................................................................................................................................23
6.1.1. User Interface...................................................................................................................................................................................23
6.1.2. Dashboard Tab................................................................................................................................................................................23
6.1.3. Farm Tab.........................................................................................................................................................................................24
6.1.4. Data Tab..........................................................................................................................................................................................28
6.1.5. Manual Control.................................................................................................................................................................................29
6.1.6. User Experience..............................................................................................................................................................................29
6.2. Backend..........................................................................................................................................................................................................29
6.2.1. User Profiles....................................................................................................................................................................................29
6.2.2. Farm Profiles...................................................................................................................................................................................29
6.2.3. Equipment Profiles...........................................................................................................................................................................29
6.2.4. Decision Support System................................................................................................................................................................29
6.3. Microcontroller Software.................................................................................................................................................................................31
6.4. Data Sharing and Open Data Repositories....................................................................................................................................................31
6.5. Mobile Applications.........................................................................................................................................................................................31
6.6. Open­Source and an Open Platform..............................................................................................................................................................31
7. Data...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................32
7.1. Plant Data........................................................................................................................................................................................................32
7.2. Soil Data..........................................................................................................................................................................................................32
7.3. Companion Plant Data....................................................................................................................................................................................33
7.4. Time and Location Data..................................................................................................................................................................................33
7.5. Weather Data..................................................................................................................................................................................................33
7.6. Topography.....................................................................................................................................................................................................34
7.7. Past and Future Data......................................................................................................................................................................................34
7.8. Manual Input Data...........................................................................................................................................................................................34
7.9. Downloadable and Auto­generated Farms.....................................................................................................................................................34
8. FarmBot Genesis...........................................................................................................................................................................................................35
8.1. Genesis Tracks...............................................................................................................................................................................................36
8.2. Genesis X­Direction Drive System.................................................................................................................................................................37
8.3. Genesis Gantry...............................................................................................................................................................................................37
8.4. Genesis Y­Direction Drive System.................................................................................................................................................................39
4

8.5. Genesis Cross­Slide.......................................................................................................................................................................................40
8.6. Genesis Tool Mount and Z­Direction Drive System........................................................................................................................................41
8.7. Genesis Tools.................................................................................................................................................................................................42
8.7.1. Genesis Seed Injector and Seed Bay..............................................................................................................................................42
8.7.2. Genesis Watering Nozzle................................................................................................................................................................43
8.8. Genesis Electronics........................................................................................................................................................................................44
8.8.1. Microcontroller..................................................................................................................................................................................44
8.8.2. Stepper Motors.................................................................................................................................................................................44
8.9. Cost.................................................................................................................................................................................................................45
8.10. Crowdfunded Launch....................................................................................................................................................................................47
8.11. Timeline........................................................................................................................................................................................................47
9. Potential Impacts, Ramifications, and Concerns of FarmBot.......................................................................................................................................48
9.1. Increased Production Efficiency.....................................................................................................................................................................48
9.2. Sustainability...................................................................................................................................................................................................48
9.3. Democratization of Food Production..............................................................................................................................................................48
9.4. Decentralization and Localization of Food Production...................................................................................................................................48
9.5. Elimination of the Farmer................................................................................................................................................................................48
9.6. Increased or Decreased Separation of People and Farming.........................................................................................................................49
9.7. Greater Dependence on Machines and Computers.......................................................................................................................................49
9.8. Loss of Individual and Generational Knowledge and the Gain of Universal and Accessible Knowledge.......................................................49
9.9. Lock­in to an Inferior System..........................................................................................................................................................................50
9.10. Hacking.........................................................................................................................................................................................................50
9.11. Failure of Supporting Infrastructure...............................................................................................................................................................50
10. Defining Short Term Success and Next Steps..........................................................................................................................................................,.51
10.1. List of Action Items........................................................................................................................................................................................51
11. Conclusions.................................................................................................................................................................................................................53

5

3. Background
The  world’s   population  is  growing  and  with  that  growth  we  must   produce  more  food.  Due  to  the  industrial  and  petrochemical  revolutions,  the
agriculture  industry has  kept  up  in  food  production,  but  only  by  compromising  the  soil,  the  environment,  our  health,  and  the food production system
itself.  The  increased  production  has  largely  come  from  incremental   changes  in  technology  and  economies  of   scale,  but  that  trend  is  reaching  a
plateau. Conventional agriculture methods are unsustainable and a paradigm shift is needed.
The  FarmBot  project  started  my  3rd  year  of college  (2011) while at Cal Poly in  San Luis Obispo. I was studying Mechanical Engineering but decided
to take an Organic Agriculture class to help fuel my interest in farming, gardening, food, and the environment.
One  day,  a  guest  speaker  and  local  farmer  came  and  spoke  to the  class.  He  was an  elderly  man  but  very up­to­date on his agriculture technology.
He  drew  for  us  on  the board  a  spiral  looking  line  and  turned around,  very  excited  and pleased. He described to us how his newest tractor,  equipped
with  a  camera  and  a  computer,  could  tell  the difference between weeds and lettuce and selectively destroy the weeds without damaging the lettuce!
The  tractor  used  a  tilling  tool,  similar  to a  pirate's  hook,  to  churn up  the soil in a spiraling fashion as the  tractor drove forward, turning over all weeds
in  the  path.  When  the  camera  and  computer  detected  a  head  of  lettuce  in  the  path, the pirate hook would "skip a beat" and pass around the lettuce,
keeping it intact. The system cost a good chunk of change, but with the long term vision in mind, would save money by reducing labor cost.
While  staring  at  the  chalkboard  I  couldn't  help  thinking:  isn't  there  a  better  way  of  knowing  where  you  planted your lettuce? In some sort of stroke of
genius,  I  realized  I  could  accomplish  the  very  same  task  in  a  much  more  simple  and  elegant  way. If I put the tractor, or more specifically the tractor
tooling,  on  fixed  tracks,  I  could  know  exactly  where  the  tooling  was  located in  relation  to  the  ground  and the  plants, much  like  a  3D  printer  or  CNC
milling machine knows exactly where the tool head is in relation to the environment and surrounding objects.
Over  the  remaining  two and a  half  years in school, I completed a bunch of research, sketched designs,  completed some preliminary CAD modeling,
built  a  visual  prototype,  and  thought  a  lot  about  the project. The benefits of the system kept unfolding and it seemed to get more and more promising
as the ideas brewed.
Now,  the  Summer  after  graduation,  I  have  found  a  new  vision  to  move  the  project  forward  and  I  am  excited  to  dedicate  a  lot  of  time  to  it.  I  am
continuing  development  on  paper,  in  research,  in  writing, and with CAD. I am hoping to have  a rudimentary working prototype by the end of  2013 and
a  crowdfunded  launch  in  2014.  I  am  actively  looking  for  more  people  to  work  on  the  project  and  for  investment  to  help cover  prototyping  and  other
development cost. If you are interested, please email rory@farmbot.it, call (678) 321 7679, visit Go.FarmBot.It, and keep on reading!
Please  note  that  this  is  a  preliminary  report  of  what  I  have  developed  and  thought  about  thus  far.  This  paper is  largely speculative,  I  have  limited
experience with agriculture, and there may be many errors and unbacked claims.

6

4. FarmBot
FarmBot   is  an  open­source  and  scalable  automated  precision  farming  machine  and  software  package  designed  from  the  ground  up  with  today’s
technologies.  Similar  to  today’s  3D  printers  and  CNC  milling  machines,  FarmBot  hardware  (shown  in  FIgure  4.1)  employs  linear guides in  the X, Y,
and  Z  directions  that  allow  for  tooling  such  as  plows,  seed  injectors,  watering  nozzles,  and  sensors,  to  be   precisely  positioned  and  used  on  the
plants  and  soil.  The entire  system is  numerically  controlled and thus fully automated from the sowing of seeds to harvest. The hardware is designed
to   be  scalable,  simple,  and  hackable.  Using  the  open­source  web­based  software  package,  the   farmer  can  graphically  design  their  farm  to  their
desired  specifications  and  upload  numerical  control  code  to  the  hardware.  Other  software  features  include  storing  and  manipulating  data  maps,  a
decision  support  system  to  facilitate  data­driven  design,   access  to  open  data  repositories,  and  enterprise  class  analytics.  FarmBot  has  several
distinct advantages over today’s methods and technologies that will be explained in sections 4.1 through 4.8 and the rest of the paper.

Figure 4.1. FarmBot high level hardware overview and coordinate system.
7

4.1. Precision
Agriculture  equipment  and  technology  has   been  steadily  becoming  more  accurate  and   precise  with   the  advent  of  GPS  and  short  range  radio
locationing,  tractor  autopilot,  computer  vision,  data   mapping  tools,  and  variable  rate  tooling.  These  technologies are  incrementally  augmenting  the
abilities of free­driving tractors to allow some of the many benefits of precision agriculture to be realized.
Rather  than  making  incremental  changes  to  existing  equipment,  FarmBot  takes  a  new  approach  at  precision  agriculture,  tearing  down  everything
from  the  past  and  starting  from  the  ground  up.  By  simply  placing  the  tooling  equipment  on  a   set   of  tracks,  rather  than  a  free­driving  tractor,  the
system  has  the  ability  to  be  extremely  precise and reposition  tooling in exact locations repeatedly  over time. This  is done with similar technology that
has been around for decades in printers, manufacturing equipment, and more recently 3D printers and CNC milling machines.
This  new  method  of  precision  agriculture  has  the  potential  to  be  as  accurate  as  human  labor  with   the  automation  and  cost  effectiveness  of  a
machine. Precision can increase efficiency in the agriculture system in many ways including the following.




Weeds  can  be eliminated  without  damaging  desired  plants through  selective  burning,  spraying of pesticides, or tilling. A mock up top­view of
selective weeding is shown in Figure 4.1.1, where FarmBot can actively avoid desired plants when performing destructive operations.
Any  type  of  plant  packing  structure  can be created and managed including traditional cubic packing, hexagonal packing, and custom irregular
structures. See section 4.5 for more details.
Each  plant  can  be watered,  fertilized,  and  sprayed  individually  and  precisely  with  an  optimized  regimen  that  changes throughout  the  plant’s
life cycle. Plants can be watered at the stalk, in a circle of a certain radius; sprayed everywhere, or just in problem areas, etc.
Plant life cycles do not have to start and end at the same time. Instead, any open space can be immediately replanted.
Precision data mapping will allow the best plants to be grown based on spatial and temporal conditions.

Figure 4.1.1. By knowing where desired plants are, FarmBot can remove everything else.
8

4.2. Combining Polycrop and Monocrop Efficiencies
Food  production  is  all  about efficiency.  How  might  we  produce  more food  with  less  water,  fertilizer,  labor, etc, without compromising sustainability?
There  exist  at  least  two types  of  efficiencies  in  food  production:  biological  and  machine.  The  efficiencies  have  always  been  more or less exclusive,
with  biological  efficiency  stemming  from  the  more  natural  polycropping  system  and  machine  efficiency  from  the  machine  intensive  monocropping
system.  If  we  look  at  both  the  monocrop  and  polycrop,  we  can  see  where  each  one  excels  in  efficiency,  where  each  one  lacks,  and  then  see how
FarmBot combines the best of both worlds.
4.2.1. Monocrops
The  monocrop  benefits  from  superior  machine  efficiency.  The  monocrop  system  shown in Figure 4.2.1.1 has reduced  the farm ecosystem down to
one  plant  species  in  order  for  today’s  tractors  and  tooling  to  perform operations easily,  reliably,  quickly,  with  minimal  human  labor, and at  minimal
cost.  This  system  is  very  conducive  to  scaling  up,  which  is  why  we  usually  see  the  monocrop  system  implemented  on  very  large  farms with large
tractors.  However,  the  monocrop has perhaps zero biological efficiency, requiring many inputs to continue functioning. Because the ecosystem is so
simple,   it  is  unstable,  unsustainable,  and  vulnerable  to  attack.  Monocrops  require  more  fertilizers,  pesticides,   energy,   and  water  than  any  other
farming  system  ever  invented  and  it  is  still a struggle if not impossible to avoid depleting the topsoil, polluting the groundwater, and defending against
insects and massive crop failure. Moreover, it can be argued that the monocrop produces less than the highest quality food.

Figure 4.2.1.1. Monocrops, require the most inputs of any farming system but are very machine efficient.
9

4.2.2. Polycrops
The  polycrop  benefits  from  superior  biological  efficiency.  The  polycrop  shown  in  Figure 4.2.2.1  increases  diversity  within  the  ecosystem in  order to
be  closer  to  a  naturally  occurring  system, thereby  reducing  the  number of inputs needed. Less fertilizer is needed with proper crop rotation and less
pesticides  and  water  are  needed  with  intercropping.  The   plants  work  together  to  form  synergistic  relationships  making  the  system  more  stable,
resilient,  and  sustainable.  These  biological  efficiencies  come  at a  cost  though.  No  traditional  farming  equipment  exists  that  can  perform  operations
on a wide range of plants at the same time, so machine efficiency is sacrificed and more human labor is needed to tend the crops.

Figure 4.2.2.1. Polycrops, are very biologically efficient but require much more labor due to a lack of large scale equipment for managing them.
FarmBot  attempts  to  combine  the  efficiencies  of  both  systems  into  one.  It  does  so  by  being  the  first,  scalable  farming  equipment  that  can  perform
operations  on  a  polycrop.  FarmBot  incorporates  the  machine   efficiency,  scalability,  and  the  minimal  use  of  labor  that  traditional  equipment  takes
advantage  of while  managing  a  polycrop  with  great  biological  efficiency.  FarmBot’s  abilities,  combined  with  the  knowledge of how to properly space
plants,  create  synergies,  utilize  beneficial  insects,  and  match  nutrient  users  and  givers,  could  enable  the  creation  and  management  of  abundant,
resilient, sustainable, and efficient farms with minimal human labor.

10

4.3. Data­Driven Agriculture
“Big  Data”  has  been  a  hot  topic  recently  and  is  transforming  many  industries. Today,  agriculture  data  is  costly  to  gather  and  the  systems  to  make
decisions   based  on  this  data  are  fragmented,  proprietary,  and  not  as  powerful  as  they  could  be.  FarmBot  aims  to  make  big  data  acquisition  and
analysis  a  more  accessible and standard practice in agriculture,  allowing all farmers to make smarter, data­driven decisions.  FarmBot hardware and
software  will  enable the  farmer  to  routinely  gather  many  types  of  data  (see  section  7)  in  a  cost  effective manner, map that data (see section 6.1.4),
and  allow  the  farmer  and  the  decision  support  system  to  make  optimized  decisions  for  the  layout  and  operation of the farm as described in section
6.2.4.

4.4. Automation
FarmBot   will  eventually  become  a  completely  automated  system  from  the   point  of adding bulk  inputs  such  as  seeds  and  water, to  removing  bulk
outputs  like  tomatoes. FarmBot  aims  to  eliminate  the  need  for human labor to drive tractors, pull weeds, harvest, and complete other operations. As
the  software   and  data  analysis  improves,  the  job  of  the  farmer   to  create  a  farm  layout  and  manage  the  operation  of  the  FarmBot  will  also  be
eliminated  in  favor  of  downloadable  and  automatically  generated farm layouts.  By  automating  more  of  the processes,  efficiency will  be  maximized
through constant monitoring, optimized decision making, the minimization of waste and inputs, and the reduced need for human labor.

4.5. Scalability
FarmBot  is  designed  with  scalability  in mind.  The  hardware  design  intention allows  scaling  from  a  small  garden  sized  machine all the way up to an
industrial  farming  operation.  The  same  software  will  be  used  in  all  applications  with  potential  basic,  intermediate,  and  advanced  levels  of  control
depending  on  the user’s  experience.  Because  the  system  functions  the  same  on  every  scale,  FarmBot  could  disrupt the economies of scale of big
agriculture,  making  smaller  scale,  more  local  farming  more  efficient  for  distribution  channels  and  also  increase  resilience  against  severe  weather
conditions.

4.6. Increased Space Efficiency
FarmBot   enables  planting in  a more  space  efficient  packing  structure,  or  layout,  of  plants  that  minimizes  the  space  between  them. Inspired  by  the
hexagonal  close  packing  of  atoms,  the  most  space  efficient  atomic  structure,  FarmBot  allows  for  the  hexagonal  close  packing  of  plants  shown  in
Figure   4.6.1.  This  layout  increases the  amount  of  planted  area  by  over  12%  compared  with  the  traditional  cubic layout shown  in  Figure  4.6.2.  This
means one could grow 12% more food on the same area of land without decreasing the space each plant needs.
Furthermore,  most  traditional  farm  layouts  require  space  for  large  tractor  wheels  to  fit  through rows of plants. FarmBot tracks can be placed farther
apart than tractor wheel pathways and the width required per track can be narrower.

11

Figure 4.6.1. Hexagonal close packing has a density of 90.7%.

Figure 4.6.2. Cubic packing has a density of 78.5%.

4.7. Eliminated Soil Compaction
Traditional  tractor  equipment is  extremely  heavy  and  all  of  that  weight  compacts the  soil  each  time  the  wheels  roll  over  it.  The  use of tracks allows
the  weight of all FarmBot equipment to be supported by the tracks and ultimately the track supports and foundations, a space that will not be used for
growing  plants as  the  tracks  are  fixed  in  place  for  the  long term. Eliminating soil compaction eliminates the need for regular heavy plowing and other
operations that are destructive to the soil structure. This saves time and increases the health of the soil.

4.8. Continuous Land Use
Because  FarmBot  is  able  to individually  tend  to  each  plant  and  the section  of  land  it  is  on,  as  soon  as  that  plant  reaches  the  end  of  its  life cycle, a
new   plant  can  be  put  in.  This  allows  for  continuous  use  of  all  available  space,  independent  of  when  crops  are  planted  or  harvested,  which  ones
mature  faster  or   slower,  and  if  any  plants  fail  to  germinate  or   grow  properly.  Furthermore,  plants  of the  same  species  can  be  planted  at different
times without losing machine efficiency in order to extend the season and availability of crops.

4.9. Variable Terraforming
In  many  agricultural practices,  the soil  is  shaped  into  berms  and  swales  of  certain  sizes to better suit the needs  of the plants. These soil structures
are  formed  in  straight  rows,  usually  regardless  of  the  land’s  topography. FarmBot  could  utilize  topography  maps  to  create soil formations and plant
layouts on contour, allowing rain to be slowed and soak in rather than washing everything away, as well as reducing the need to water.
12

4.10. Open­Source
My  decision  to  open­source  the  FarmBot  project  was  out  of  the  notion  that  I  do  not and do  not want control and ownership of the technology as well
as my love for other open­source projects and the impacts they have.
I  see  many  things  wrong  with proprietary  technologies  that  stifle innovation and halt others from creating better systems. I do not want something so
fundamental, like technology to grow food, to be patented and unavailable for free use. I  cringe at the horror stories of companies shutting  down small
farmers  because  birds  and  wind  have  carried  patented  seeds  onto  other  farms. I do not want that type  of corrupting power to influence the FarmBot
project. This technology is for humanity and is about feeding the world and taking care of our ecosystems, not about maximizing profit.
This  does  not  mean  that  nobody  will  be  able  to  create  a  viable  company  off  of  FarmBot  technology.  There  will  always  be  a  need  for  professional,
quality  equipment  to  be  designed  and   mass  produced  for  greater  affordability.  I  look  at  other  open­source  projects  such  as  Android  as  a   great
example;  anyone  can  use  the  base  technology  for  free  and  then  augment  and  modify  it  to  be  better and more  unique,  and  then  sell  the value  they
have  added.  Another  example  is  the  RepRap  project,  where  the  base  plans  are  free  and  open­source but  many  companies  have  refined them and
now successfully sell their spin­off product.
Moreover,   I  see  so  much  benefit  that  can  come  out  of  opening  up  the  technology  to  everyone.   I  look  to  Wikipedia  as the  prime  example  of  open
information  by  the  people,  for the  people.  I  can  only  hope  that  one  day the community  will build the FarmBot technology and database of information
to as high of a caliber as the best open­source hardware, software, and data projects of today.
I  will  try  my  best  to   document  my  thoughts  and  FarmBot  development  by  posting  plenty  of  images,  concisely  describing  my  design  intent,  and
making  any   CAD  files  and  software  available  in  multiple  common  formats  wherever  possible.  All  of  the  work  from  here  on  out  will  be  posted  on
wiki.farmbot.it and I hope this will become the central place for FarmBot development.

13

5. Hardware
FarmBot  hardware  is  very  similar  to  3D  printer  and  CNC  milling  machine  hardware.  Looking  at  Figure  5.1 for  reference,  you  can see that there are
two  fixed  tracks  extending  in  the X­direction  and  a  gantry  that  spans  the  tracks  and  moves  along  them.  Mounted  to the  gantry  is  a  cross­slide  that
moves  in  the  Y­direction  and  mounted  to  that  is  the  tool  mount that moves in the Z­direction. Tooling includes most traditional agriculture tooling that
is specially adapted for FarmBot use. The tracks, gantry, cross­slide, and tool mount design intent allow for easy scaling in the X, Y, and Z directions.

Figure 5.1. FarmBot hardware high level overview and coordinate system.

14

5.1. Tracks
FarmBot   tracks   are  one  of  the  components  that  differentiate  FarmBot  technology  from  traditional  free­driving  tractors.  The  tracks  are  fixed  in  the
ground  and  allow  the  system  to  have  great  precision   in  an  efficient  and  simple  manner.  There  are  many   reasons  of  why  tracks  are  superior  to
free­driving tractors, a few of which are listed below.



Tracks provide great precision and allow the FarmBot to return to the same position repeatedly
Any type of packing structure of plants can be created and managed because wheel and hardware pathways are no longer needed
Tracks take up less area than paths for tractor wheels and do not compact the soil
Using tracks eliminates the need for tractor steering components and autopiloting systems

Figure 5.1.1. Tracks in relation to the other main components of FarmBot hardware.

15

5.1.1. Geometry
Tracks  take  the  form  of  rails  that  are  slightly  elevated  off  the  ground  by supports  and  small  concrete  foundations.  Each rail acts  as  a  linear  guide,
providing  an interface  for the  gantry  to  mechanically  mate  with  and travel along. Each track has sufficient cross sectional area and strength to resist
deflection  during  high  force operations  such  as  plowing.  Tracks  and  their  foundations  scale  in  size  and  strength as  the  gantry  size  and  number  of
simultaneous operations increases. Tracks may also feature a live rail to provide electrical power to the gantry and other parts.
The  most  basic  FarmBot  system  needs  at  least  two  tracks in order for one gantry to span between them. A three track system can exist that allows
for   two  gantries  to  operate separately  on  their  own  sections  of  land  while  sharing  a  middle  track.  Four,  five,  etc  track  systems  may  also exist  with
more  gantries.  Because  of this  scalability,  there  are  two  types  of  tracks:  single  rail,  and  dual  rail.  Single  rail tracks allow one gantry to move across
while dual rail tracks allow two gantries to share the same track as in the three track system.
For  small  FarmBot  systems,  the  tracks  could  be constructed  from T­slot aluminum extrusions for  ease of manufacturing, flexible assembly, relative
low  cost,  expandability,  and  general  availability.  For  larger  applications, custom  steel tracks  would  likely  be  the  material  of  choice  for  reduced cost,
increased  strength,  and  weldability.  Large,  pre­fabricated  tracks  the  length of  a  semi truck could be shipped in and bolted or welded together on­site
like railroad tracks.
5.1.2. Scalability
As  mentioned in  section  5.1.1,  track  systems  can  be  scaled  in  the  Y­direction  by  simply adding  more  tracks  and more gantries to the system or by
making  the  gantry  wider.  Tracks  can  also scale  in  the  X­direction  by  making  the  tracks  longer and  adding  more  supports.  Theoretically,  the tracks
can  be miles and miles long in an industrial application with the only limit being the amount of area one gantry could properly tend to with the available
amount of time.
Another  idea  for  scalability  is  a serpentine  type  track  system  that  one  gantry  could use,  requiring  curved  track  sections  at  the  serpentine  edges for
the  gantry   to  move  to  the  next  row  of  tracks.  There  may  also  exist  other  methods  that  the  gantry  could  transfer  tracks  by,  but  these  will not  be
covered in this paper.
5.1.3. Cost
Though  the  capital  cost of  any  type  of  track  system is new  in agriculture, the tracks are designed to be as cost effective as possible by being simple
to  manufacture  and  lacking any  moving  parts.  Work  will need to be done to optimize track cross­sectional area and therefore material usage as well
as  easing  the  installation  process.  It  is  estimated  that  the  up  front  investment of tracks can be offset by the  savings from the elimination of the more
complex  drivetrains,  steering,  brakes,  cockpits,  and  other   components  of  tradition  tractors.  In  addition,  lifetime  savings  will  occur  from  increased
productivity of the FarmBot system over conventional systems simply by removing tractor driver labor and allowing for 24/7 operation.

16

5.2. Gantry
The  gantry,  highlighted  in  Figure  5.2.1,  is  the  structural  component that bridges  the  two  tracks  and  moves  in  the  X­direction  via an X­direction drive
system.  It  serves  as a linear guide for the cross­slide (section 5.3) and a  base for the Y­direction drive system that moves the cross­slide across the
gantry in the Y­direction. It can also serve as a base for mounting other equipment such as seed bays, tools, electronics, inputs, and sensors.

Figure 5.2.1. Gantry in relation to the other main components of FarmBot hardware.
5.2.1. Geometry
The  gantry’s  primary  structure  is  an  upside­down  square  U  shape.  At  each  end  of  the  U,  are  linear  guide  systems  such  as  wheels  that  allow the
gantry to move across the tracks in the X­direction. The top of the U shape serves as the bridging component and the linear guide for the cross­slide.
The  gantry  must  be  very  rigid  and  have  tight  tolerancing  on  the  linear  guide  interfaces.  Significant flex or play will lead to less accuracy of the tool or
sensor  location.  This  can  be  especially  important  during  high   force  operations  that  also  require  high   precision,  such  as  selective  tilling,  where
inaccuracy in excess of 1 cm could damage desired plants.
Similar to tracks, the gantry will likely be constructed from T­slot aluminum extrusions for small scale applications and welded steel for larger scales.

17

5.2.2. Drive System
An  optimized   drive  system  for  the  gantry  is  dependent  on  the  size  and  application  of  the  FarmBot  system.  For  smaller  systems,  such   as  a
seedling­only  application,  a timing  belt  and  pulley  may  work  the  best  due  to low cost, ease of installation, minimal maintenance, and good precision.
For  larger  systems, belts may introduce an unacceptable amount of slack and stretch and thereby reduce the level of precision. It also may be costly
or  infeasible  to  implement  strong  enough  belts  to  handle  plowing  and  other  high  force  operations.  In  this  case,  a  rack  and pinion style drive system
may  work  better.  In  this system, a stepper motor and pinion gear could be mounted to the gantry and the tracks could have geared racks mounted to
them in order to mesh with the pinion.
5.2.3. Scalability
The  gantry  can  scale  in  the  Y­direction  by  constructing  it  to  be  wider.  This  modification  would  require  the  tracks  to  be  spaced  farther apart as well.
The  gantry  can  also  scale  in  the  Z­direction  to  accommodate  taller  plants  such as  corn,  sunflowers,  and  even  trees,  by  making  the  basic  U shape
taller.  This  modification  would  require  a  longer  tool  mount  to  be  used.  As  with  all  scaling  up,  the  structure  will  need  to  increase  in strength to resist
deflection and drive systems will need to be more powerful to move the increased mass.

5.3. Cross­Slide
The  cross­slide, highlighted in Figure 5.3.1, moves in the Y­direction across the gantry. This motion provides the second  major degree of freedom for
FarmBots  and  allows  operations  such  as  planting  to  be  done  anywhere  in  the  XY  plane.  The  cross­slide  is  moved using a Y­direction drive system
and functions as the base for the tool mount.

Figure 5.3.1. Cross­Slide in relation to the other main components of FarmBot hardware.
18

5.3.1. Geometry
The  cross­slide  consists  of  a linear  slide  and  a  mounting plate. The linear slide interfaces with the gantry  while the  mounting plate provides the base
for   the  tool   mount  to  interface  with.  The  cross­slide  must  have  high  tolerancing  with  the  linear  slide  interface  and  must  be  rigid enough  to  transfer
high forces to and from the tool mount to the gantry without significant deflection.
5.3.2. Drive System
Several  drive  system  options  exist  including  a  timing  belt  and  pulley,  a rack  and  pinion  system,  or  even  a  leadscrew.  Each  option has  advantages
and drawbacks and may work better than others in certain applications.
A  timing  belt  and  pulley  system  would  work  well  in  small  applications  as  it  is  easily upgraded to longer lengths, easy to source and purchase off the
shelf  components, requires  little  maintenance,  and  is  affordable.  However, as  with  the  gantry  belt  system,  larger  systems  may  introduce  too much
slack and stretch, reducing precision.
Rack  and  pinion  systems  would  work  well  for  small  to  large  systems  and  are  perhaps  the  best  and  most  versatile  option  overall. A rack and pinion
system   may  require   specially  made  components  that  cannot  be  purchased  off  the  shelf,  which  could  be  a  limiting  factor.  However,  the  same
components could be used for the gantry and tool mount drive system as well.
Leadscrew  systems  provide  the greatest  amount  of  torque  and  precision,  but are more susceptible to damage from dusty and dirty environments. It
is  unlikely  that  FarmBots  perform  high  force  or precision  operations  in  the  Y­direction,  perhaps  making  a  leadscrew  system  excessive.  It  is  worth
mentioning though for consideration on smaller applications.
5.3.3. Scalability
The  cross­slide   could  scale  in  the  Y­direction,  allowing  for   multiple  tool  mounts  to  be  attached  in  order  to   complete  identical  operations
simultaneously.  This  type  of scaling would require a more robust gantry, track system, and drive systems to handle concurrent high force operations
such  as  tilling.  This  may also  put  unwanted  constraints  on  the farm design, forcing plants into a more rigid  grid. However, the potential for increased
operation throughput may be worth that sacrifice.

5.4. Tool Mounts
5.4.1. Geometry
Tool  mounts  attach  to  the cross­slide  and  provide  the  FarmBot  with  Z­direction  movement  as illustrated in Figure 5.4.1.1. Tool mounts serve as the
base  for  attaching  tools such  as  seed  injectors,  watering  nozzles,  sensors,  and  plows.  They  consist  of a  tall structural component, a drive system,
and a mounting plate or area for attaching tools to.

19

Figure 5.4.1.1. Tool Mount in relation to the other main components of FarmBot hardware.
5.4.2. Drive System
Tool  Mounts  can be  driven  with  various  drive  systems  such  as a  rack and pinion, leadscrew, belt and pulley, electronic  solenoid, or hydraulic piston.
Depending on the scale of the FarmBot and the desired accuracy and speed requirements, different drive systems will be better than others. It will be
important  to  select  a system  than  can  move  heavy  hardware  up  and  down,  especially  during operations involving soil manipulation such as plowing
or  seed  injecting.  Furthermore,  the tool  mount  will  need  to  move  precisely,  with  perhaps  millimeter  accuracy  for  seed  injection.  Likely  the  rack  and
pinion  and  belt  and  pulley systems will not be powerful  enough, the hydraulic piston will be too complex and expensive, leaving an electronic solenoid
and a leadscrew as options. However, this is only speculative.
5.4.3. Scalability
For  a  FarmBot  to  tend  to taller  plants, the gantry must be raised in  order  to have adequate clearance from the plants when moving in the X­direction.
With  a  taller  gantry,  the tool  mount  must  scale  in  the  Z­direction  so  that  tooling, such  as  a  seed injector, can still reach the soil. The tool mount can
easily scale by making the structure taller and installing an upgraded drive system.
20

5.5. Tools
Tools  will  attach  to the tool mount as highlighted in Figure 5.5.1. FarmBot will likely utilize a custom set of tooling optimized for the FarmBot, but it will
generally  be  very  similar  in  form  and  function  to  existing  agriculture  tooling.  In  other  words,  it  is  likely  not  in  the  scope  of  the FarmBot  project  to
reinvent  the  plow,  but  it is in the scope to adapt and optimize the plow for FarmBot use. However, it is very possible that FarmBot will open the doors
to new tool designs that were not feasible or appropriate to use with conventional equipment.

Figure 5.5.1. Tools in relation to the other main components of FarmBot hardware.
The following list of tooling is likely to be close to the order of development based on importance and functionality.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Seed injector
Watering/fertilizer/pesticide nozzle
Tilling implement
Plow
Cutter/Shredder
Discer
Burner
Combine/Harvester
Robotic harvesting arm
21

5.6. Electronics
The  onboard  electronics  used  will  be  similar  to  those  found  in  CNC  milling  machines and 3D  printers.  Motors,  servos,  solenoids,  valves, sensors,
and  other  hardware  will  be  controlled  with  a  microcontroller  and  supplementary  power  supply.  The  microcontroller  will  ideally  be  open­source  and
purchasable off the shelf such as an Arduino. The microcontroller will need software that can interpret numerical control code and subsequently drive
the  motors  and  other  equipment  to  compete  operations.  There  will  also  need  to  be  a  live Internet connection for transferring numerical code  as well
as sensor data to and from the web backend.

5.7. Sensors
“Smart  Farming,”  as I define it, is using data to make more informed decisions about the setup and operation  of the farm. FarmBot will be able to use
the  following  sensors  and  more  to  collect  data  about  the soil,  plants,  and  weather.  Some  of  this  data  can  be  taken  at  many  points  on  the  farm  to
create data maps as explained in section 6.1.4.
1. Moisture meter
2. Thermometer
3. Rain gauge
4. Psychrometer (humidity)
5. Anemometer (wind)
6. pH sensor
7. Incident light meter
8. Computer vision
9. Hyperspectral imaging
10. Mass spectrometer

22

6. Software
FarmBot  is  as much of a hardware project as it is software. Because the  entire system is automated and numerically controlled, it is useless without
powerful  software  to  create the  numerical  code  in  a  smart,  easy,  and efficient  manner. This will be done with an open­source cloud based software
as a service solution that allows the user to design their farm, program and control their hardware, store and view data, and use analytics tools.

6.1. Web Frontend
The  web  frontend  will  be  the  primary  way  the  user  interacts with and programs their FarmBot hardware. Below is a proposal of how this component
of the software could function and what it might look like.
6.1.1. User Interface
The FarmBot web user interface should be fun, intuitive,  modern,  beautiful, simple, and powerful to use.  The user  should be able to quickly and easily
access  all features of the software. I envision a tabbed  layout with each tab being composed  of several panes that serve various functions depending
on the desired user actions.
6.1.2. Dashboard Tab
The  dashboard  tab will  give  the  user  an  overview  of  the  operation and statistics of the FarmBot system. The dashboard tab will be broken down into
several panes, each offering specific types of information and control as shown in FIgure 6.1.2.1.
One  pane  will be  dedicated  to  hardware  information.  The  user  will be  able to use dropdown menus to pick which types of hardware and tooling they
have   installed  and  be  able  to  add  more  items  such  as  sensors  when  they  become  available.  There  could  also  be  a  way  to  quickly  activate  or
deactivate  hardware  when  it  goes  down  for  maintenance  or  replacement.  This  will  allow  the  FarmBot  to  skip  or  postpone  any  operations  that were
scheduled  requiring  that  hardware.  This  pane  will  also  allow  the user  to  set  up  how  large  their  FarmBot  system  is  by  specifying  the  dimensions  of
their  tracks,  gantry,  and  tool  mount.  As  new  tracks  are  added  to  extend  the  system,  a  single  number  can  be  changed  to  reflect  the  upgraded
hardware and the new farming space available.
A  resources  pane could take the form of an interactive graph displaying historical, current, and projected resource usage for electricity, water, seeds,
fertilizers,  etc.  The  user  will  be  able  to  zoom  in  the  graph  and  see   more  detail  such  as  hour  by  hour  or  even  operation  by  operation  details.
Furthermore,  the  user  will be presented with filtering options to see, for example, how much water is being used  on tomatoes. The graph will not only
display volumetric or other base units of resources, but also their monetary cost to the farmer based on user­entered cost/unit of resource numbers.
A  third  pane  may  show  system  information  as  well  as  some  manual  control  buttons.  A  fourth  pane  may  show  financial   analysis  and  projection
graphs  of  the  whole  operation,  including  expenditures  on  inputs,  expected  revenues  for  crops,  and  other factors such as maintenance and logistics
cost. This graph could also have advanced filtering and analysis options.
23

Figure 6.1.2.1. Mockup of the Dashboard tab showing four panes of interactive information.
6.1.3. Farm Tab
The  farm  tab is  where the user will design the layout of the farm and control how operations are completed, ie: where, how, and when different plants
are  to  be  grown.  The  interface  will  consist  of  a  large  middle  column  and a  left and right sidebar. We’ll call the left sidebar the Plants and Operations
Toolbox  which  will   allow  the  user  to  select  plants  and   operations,  modify  the  settings,  and  eventually  place  the  plant  or  operation  into  the  middle
column.   We’ll  call   the  middle column  the  Farm  Map  which  will  feature  an  interactive  and  zoomable  map  of  the  farm.  The  right  sidebar,  named  the
Operations Agenda, will be for viewing and modifying the list of scheduled operations. Figure 6.1.3.1 illustrates a way that this page could look.
24

Figure 6.1.3.1. Mockup of the farm tab featuring the farm map in the middle and left and right toolbars.
The  different  functions  of the  Plants  and  Operations  Toolbox  are illustrated  in  Figure  6.1.3.2.  First,  the  user  will  be  presented with  a way  to  narrow
down  and  choose  a specific plant  or  operation. The user may either enter a search term, browse the “My Plants and Operations” grouping or the “All
Plants  and  Operations”  grouping.  Once  a  plant  or  operation  has  been  selected,  a  larger  image  will  be  displayed  as  well  as  all  of  the  editable  data
fields associated with that plant or operation as mentioned in section 7.1.

25

Figure 6.1.3.2. Mockups of the Plants and Operations Panel being used to search for, choose, and view a plant and its grow settings (1, 2, & 3),
modify the grow settings (4), and save those settings (5).
Once  the  data  fields  have  been  filled,  the  user  can  then  click  and  drag  the  image  of  the  plant  anywhere  onto  the  Farm  Map.  When  let  go,  a  small
polygon   will  be  created  with  that  plant’s  color.  Inside  the  polygon  will  be  the expected  date  at  which  that plant  will  be harvested  and  the  number  of
plants  that  will  be  planted  in  that  region  given  the  size   of  the  polygon  and  the  seed  spacing  selected.  The  user  can  then  move  and  reshape  the
polygon as they please, as well as change the settings in the options pane for that polygon of plants.
26

The  Farm Map will be  zoomable and moveable and always  show  a units legend similar to other online maps.  There will  be a menu to turn on different
layers such as topography, satellite imagery, and data maps like nutrient levels, moisture content, etc, as discussed in section 6.1.5.
The  Operations  Agenda  as  shown  in  FIgure  6.1.3.3  will  show  all  scheduled  operations  that  the  FarmBot  will  complete  as  well  as  a  calendar.  The
operations  are  created  and  modified  when  the  user  drags  new  plants into the farm map or edits the  settings of already planted areas. The user may
use  the  search  to filter  and  find  specific  operations  and  can  click to  see  details of  that  operation  and  make  quick  edits.  Furthermore,  the  user  may
change  the  selected  date  and  the  Farm  Map  will  update  to  reflect  the  predicted  layout  of  the  farm  on  that  date.  This will  allow the  user  to  plan  in
advance the planting of crops as soon as open space is available after a crop has been harvested as mentioned in section 4.7.

Figure 6.1.3.3. Mockups of the Operations Agenda showing different filtering and the editing process.
27

6.1.4. Data Tab
By  using  the  FarmBot  hardware  to  take  extensive  data  measurements,  the  software can create data maps that the farmer and the decision support
system  (section  6.2.4)  can use  to  make  smarter,  data­driven decisions, resulting in optimized farm layouts and operation settings. These maps can
be  used to show where amendments are needed, where to water more or less, temperature, pH, etc. Extensive mapping at different times can show
how   the  soil  and  other  conditions  change  over  time,   allowing  for  decisions  to  be  made  that   take  into  account historical  data  and  projected  future
conditions. Moreover, long term trends such as yield will be easier to discover and analyze with such extensive data.
Figure   6.1.4.1  shows  a  mockup  data  map  of  moisture  content.  Assuming  the  data  measurements  were  taken  a  few  days  after  a medium  rain,  we
can  see  where  certain  areas  have  since  dried  up  and  where  other  areas  are  still  moist.  Using  this  map,  watering  operations  in  the  blue,  wetter
regions  can  be  decreased  or  even  canceled  for   a  few  more  days,  whereas  that  might  not  be  the  best  decision  for  the  yellow  and  red  zones,
depending  on  what  is  planted  there.  This  map  may  allow  better  plant  placement  decisions   to  be  made  in  the  future,  for  example  placing  plants
susceptible to root rot in areas that show quicker drying after a rain.

Figure 6.1.4.1. Mockup data map of moisture content in the soil.
28

Cost effective and extensive data mapping and analysis has the potential to be one of the most powerful and disruptive aspects of the FarmBot
system. There has been a lot of talk and development in recent years about applying “Big Data” to agriculture. Many agree that big data is going to
create much more efficient and sustainable production, though the current problem is that acquiring that much data requires a lot of time and
expensive equipment. Other systems being developed include flying planes and drones overhead to take imagery, driving around and manually taking
soil samples, and using tractor mounted optical sensors. FarmBot has the potential to collect more data, more accurately, more efficiently, and in a
more cost effective manner. Furthermore, most of the technologies being developed are either proprietary or so prohibitively expensive to own that
farmers must purchase the data as a service. FarmBot could make Big Data collection and analysis affordable and open to all.
6.1.5. Manual Control
Users  will  be  able  to manually control the  FarmBot  through  the  web interface using some simple control buttons. One reason to use manual control
is  in  the  case  of maintenance  or  troubleshooting  that  requires the  movement  of  certain  components.  Another, would be to quickly complete simple,
one­time operations.
6.1.6. User Experience
The  user  experience  will  be  similar  to  some  video  games  such  as  SimCIty  and  Farmville,  where  the  user  is  playing  a  puppet  master  type  role that
exhibits  extensive  control  of  the landscape  and  its  operation.  All  components  will  need  to  feel  easy  to  complete,  intuitive,  and  fun.  The  gamification
elements like the resource tickers, graphic animations of the plants and land will add to the fun and strategy involved.

6.2. Backend
6.2.1. User Profiles
To  use  the  FarmBot  software,  one  will  need  to  create  a  user  account  so that their work and data can  be saved and later accessed. The user profile
will  also  need  to  be  linked  with  any  hardware  that   the  user   owns  in  order  to  provide  authentication  when  uploading  numerical  control  code  to  the
hardware. See section 9.10 for thoughts on hacking.
6.2.2. Farm Profiles
Each  user  will  need  to  store  the  data  associated  with  their  farm  including  size,  plant  layouts  and  settings,  scheduled  operations,  statistics,  data
maps, farm history, and more.
6.2.3. Equipment Profiles
The  software  will need to know exactly what hardware the user owns and its current configuration. Otherwise, the  user may schedule operations that
cannot  be  completed  or  the  numerical  control  sent  to  the  machine will  not  be  compatible.  The  equipment  profile  information will  need  to  be  stored
and easily modified as equipment is upgraded or become inactive for maintenance, etc.
6.2.4. Decision Support System
Everything  regarding  the  farm  layout  and  management  is   a  decision,  such  as  seed  spacing,  plant   pairing,  watering  amounts,  where  to  plant  and
29

when,  etc.  In  order  to  optimize  efficiency,  the  farmer  or  software  must   make  smart,  data­driven  decisions.  The  decision  making  process  can
become very complex with many data streams and when data is variable such as weather patterns and soil properties.
The  decision  support  system  is  an  algorithmic  component  of  the  software  that  uses  all  available  data  to  determine  the  best  settings  for  every
operation.  This  will  perhaps  be  the  most  technically  difficult  and  complex  component  of  the  software  to   develop  and  will  take  mountains  of
experimentation  and  expert  agronomist  and  farmer  input   to  optimize.  The  development  of  the  decision  support  system  can  begin  with  only  a  few
decisions  based  on  only a  few  data  sets,  but  the  idea  is  to build a smart enough system such that optimum settings can be found for every plant, in
every condition.
Figure   6.2.4.1  outlines  a  high  level  overview  of  how  the  decision  support  system  could  function.  Essentially,  the  system  would  determine  the
optimum settings for every operation that FarmBot completes based on the available data streams.

Figure 6.2.4.1. The Decision Support System combines data streams and makes data­driven decisions for every operation setting.
30

6.3. Microcontroller Software
All  sensors,  motors,  and  other hardware  will  interface  with  a  microcontroller  in  the  FarmBot that must interpret the numerical code coming from the
backend  and  also  send  sensor  and  real  time  data  back  online.  The  microcontroller  will  therefore  have  its  own embedded operating system of sorts
that  can  interpret  code,  and  send  and  receive  data  to the  backend  and  to  the  motors  and  other sensors. I think it makes the most sense to do all of
the  more  complex  computing  with  the  decision  support  system  in  the  cloud  backend  and  then   send  only   the  basic  operation  instructions  to  the
FarmBot similar to the G­code used in CNC machines and 3D printers.

6.4. Data Sharing and Open Data Repositories
To  help  FarmBot  owners  create  and  manage  their  farms,  there  will  be  options to  share and  publish  many  different  data  types.  I  hope that an Open
Data  Repository  will  be  created  that  can  help  centralize  and  make  accessible  and  free  all  of  the  information  needed  to  grow  every  type  of  plant,  in
every location,  in every condition. Access to the open data from the FarmBot web frontend will be in the “All Plants and Operations” area of the Plants
and  Operations  Panel.  In  addition,  the  data  repository  may  have  it’s  own  frontend  interface  for  browsing,  searching, and downloading  the data. This
will allow other applications and technologies to use the data for their own purposes as well through an open API.

6.5. Mobile Applications
It  may  be  beneficial  to  develop  mobile  applications  to  allow  for  a  better  user  experience  when  programing  and  monitoring FarmBots. However, with
responsive   design  of  the  web  frontend,  dedicated  mobile  applications  may  not  prove  to  add  any  greater  value  than  simply  using  the  website  on  a
mobile  device.  It  also  may  be  best  to  focus  development  resources  to improving the  web  frontend  than  spreading  development  over  multiple  user
interfaces. However, I understand my ignorance in this subject and will respect any developer’s reasoning to pursue mobile application development.

6.6. Open­Source and an Open Platform
As  stated  before,  all  FarmBot software  will be open­source and this  is for several reasons. First, it is the essence of this project to  make owning and
operating  a  FarmBot  as  accessible  as  possible  and  that  means  making the  software  free  and  easy  to  use,  downloadable, and modifiable. Second,
the  more  people  with  the  ability  to  contribute  to  the  software,   the  better  it  will  become,  faster.  I  look  to  Linux,   Android,  and  Wikipedia  as  great
open­source examples. Third, open­sourcing the software allows the community at large to validate the software for security issues.
A  goal  from  the  beginning  of  software  development  will  be  creating  an  open  platform  that  users  are  not  locked  into.  The  FarmBot  software  service
should  not  be  a  “walled  garden.”  Instead,  users   should  be  able  to  easily  import  and  export  their  data  in  accessible  formats.  Moreover,  developers
should  be  able  to  build  add­ons  and  their  own  services  that  improve  the  experience  and  capabilities  of  the  user.  This  could  happen  with  the
development of an API for data sharing across applications and services.
Moreover,  users  will  not  be required to  own  or  use  FarmBot  hardware  to  sign  up  for  and  use  the  FarmBot software. The software can still help any
farmer or home gardener plan, keep track of, and better manage their farm or garden.
31

7. Data
Agriculture  as   a  method  is  successful  when  knowledge  or  data  is  used  to  make  decisions  that  have   been  proven  successful  before.  FarmBot’s
ability  to  obtain  and  combine  thousands  of  data  points, plant  knowledge,  and  other  factors  in  it’s  decision  support  system  allow  the  farmer  to know
that  their  farming  operation  is data­driven  and  proven.  Sections  7.1  through  7.8  describe  potential  sources  of data that FarmBot can utilize, with the
ultimate goal being complete automation of the farm design and operation processes in an optimized way.

7.1. Plant Data
Plant  data  includes  everything  that  the  FarmBot  needs  to  know in order to successfully plant, grow, and harvest a specific variety of plant in the best
possible way. Below are some of the parameters that might be included in plant data.










Full sun, partial sun requirements
Seed spacing
Seed depth
Number of seeds per hole
Type of planting foundation (mound, hole, none, etc)
Optimum watering regimen throughout plant life (volume, timing, and location)
Optimum fertilizing and spraying regimens throughout plant life (volume, timing, and location)
Special conditions such as frost susceptibility, root rot resistance, etc
Optimum soil conditions such as nutrient levels, soil composition, drainage ability, etc
Best companion plants
Beneficial and problem insects attracted

7.2. Soil Data
Accurate,  plentiful,  and  updated  soil  data  is  perhaps  the  hardest, most time consuming, and expensive data to attain with today’s methods. Soil type
and  conditions can change quickly both spatially and temporally. For example, after a deep till, a heavy watering, or a nutrient intensive crop is grown,
soil  conditions  will  have  changed. Geological features such as streams, valleys, mounds, and higher  concentrations of rocks or clay can change soil
conditions  every  few feet.  FarmBot  can very quickly take many data points in many locations in a systematic way and create high resolution maps of
this  data.  These  maps  enable  the  farmer  and  the  decision  support  system  of  section  6.2.4 to make smarter, data­driven decisions. Types of data a
FarmBot could gather about the soil include the following and likely many more.

Percent organic matter, clay, rock, sand, etc
Moisture content
32








Percolation rate
Nutrient content
Microbiological activity
Temperature
Incident light levels
pH
Alkalinity
Electrical conductivity

7.3. Companion Plant Data
A  key  component  in  farming  a  polycrop  is  choosing  good   companion  plants.  A  great  example  is  the  Three  Sisters  system  of  the  Native  North
Americans,  combining  maize, squash,  and  climbing  beans.  From  Wikipedia:  The  maize  provides  a  structure  for  the  beans to climb,  eliminating the
need  for poles. The beans provide the nitrogen to the soil that the other plants utilize, and the squash spreads along the  ground, blocking the sunlight,
helping  prevent  establishment  of  weeds.  The  squash  leaves also  act  as  a  "living  mulch",  creating  a  microclimate  to  retain  moisture  in  the  soil, and
the  prickly  hairs  of  the  vine  deter  pests. FarmBot enables the farmer to create a farm layout of any complexity without sacrificing  machine efficiency.
Using  best  companion  plant  data  associated   with  every  plant,  the  FarmBot  software  could  suggest  the  best  combinations to  plant  together.  This
data,  combined  with  known  insect  troubles,  nutrient  deficiencies in  the  soil,  the time  of  year,  and  other  factors,  will  allow  the farmer or the software
itself to generate optimum farm layouts.

7.4. Time and Location Data
Current  time  and  location  data  can  allow  the  FarmBot  software  to  determine  daylight and  nighttime  hours  in  order  to  perform  certain  operations  at
optimum  times  such  as  watering or  putting  seeds  in  the  ground.  Location,  orientation, and  date data will enable smarter plant layouts based  on how
high or low the sun will be and at what angle it is in relation to the land and plants.
For  example,  shorter  plants  can  be  planted  closer  to the  sun in order to not block sunlight from farther plants. This concept would be more prevalent
during months when the sun is lower in the sky but not as important when the sun is higher as well as on sloped land.

7.5. Weather Data
The FarmBot software will eventually plug in to local weather data and forecasting for the following potential benefits.



Water plants in a more efficient manner based on rain forecasting and daily temperatures
Protect against frost based on temperature monitoring
Ability to start plants at the best times based on the upcoming forecast
Create farm layouts that are more resilient against high winds
33

7.6. Topography
Topography  plays  a  major  role  in how a farm is planted, how sunny areas are, and where the water wants to flow.  Using topography data, the farmer
and  software  can  place  plants  in  better  locations  and  also  create  more  effective  landforms  such  as  on  contour  lines  rather  than  straight  lines.
Furthermore, the software will be able to better predict and verify with data the flow of water and nutrients after heavy watering or rains.

7.7. Past and Future Data
Farm and weather history and future planning will play an important role in optimizing farm layouts in the following ways.



Prior success or failure of certain plants or sections of land including quantitative measurements such as yield
Prior planting history and soil quality growth or degeneration
Planning for more optimized growing of future crops (building the soil now as an investment)
Planning for market price fluctuations for inputs and the end products

7.8. Manual Input Data
The  farmer  will  always  be  able  to  manually change variables and input special pieces of data in order to have complete control over the farm design.
These  manual  inputs  may  be  overriding,  modifying,  or  adding  to  the existing data. For example, if the farmer knows a herd of cattle is going to graze
a certain section of land, there will need to be a way to account for that within the software through special pieces of manually input data.

7.9. Downloadable and Auto­generated Farms
Eventually,  I   hope  that  the  FarmBot  community  will  create  many  different  farm  and  garden  layouts  that  can  then  be  easily  downloaded  to  any
FarmBot.  This  will  allow  the  layperson to grow an optimized farm without as much experimentation, research, or prior knowledge.  Even farther down
the line, FarmBot should be able to be installed, turned on, take data, check all other data sources, and then auto­generate an optimum farm.

34

8. FarmBot Genesis
FarmBot  Genesis,  currently  in  development and rendered in  Figure 8.1, is the first FarmBot that will be built to a functioning state. It is designed to be
a  foundation  for  experimentation,  prototyping,  hacking,  and  learning,  and  will  initially perform only two operations: injecting seeds and watering them,
with  the   intention  that  more  features,  tooling,  and  functionality  can  be  added  later.  The  driving  factors  behind  the  design  are  simplicity,
manufacturability, scalability, and hackability.

Figure 8.1. Rendering of a 1.5m wide, 3m long, 0.5m tall FarmBot Genesis.
35

Genesis  is  a  small  scale  FarmBot  primarily  constructed  from  V­Slot  aluminum  extrusions  and  hardware  from  Open  Builds
(openbuildspartstore.com.)  The  V­Slot  extrusions  were  chosen  because  they  are  easily  cut,  the  structure  can  be  quickly assembled  and  modified,
and  each  extrusion  can  also  function  as  a  linear  guide.  Stepper  motors  and  an  Arduino  are  used  to  control  the  system  and  were  chosen  for  their
availability  and  hackability.  Genesis  can  vary  in  size  from  a  planting  area  as  little  as 1m2  for  seedling­only  applications  to  greater than  50m2,  while
accommodating  a  maximum  plant  height  of  1m.  With  modifications  to  some  of  the  structural  component  sizes  and  an  alternative  X­direction  drive
system, Genesis could scale up to a 1000m2 planting area and a maximum plant height greater than 2m.

8.1. Genesis Tracks
Genesis  tracks,  rendered  in  Figure  8.1.1,  are  designed   using  V­Slot  aluminum  extrusions  and  hardware  from  Open  Builds.  The  V­Slot extrusions
function  as  the  linear guides for the gantry to move across  and the design intention allows for  easy scaling in the X direction. The tracks may be fixed
to  the  ground by attaching them to concrete pilings, burying them in the ground, fastening them with large stakes, or other methods. Once installed, it
will  be  very  cost  effective  to  scale  in  the  X­direction  by  simply  adding  more  track  sections.  If scaling  in  the Y or Z direction is desired, it may require
upgrading the main track beam to a larger size in order to reduce flex under the increased loads.

Figure 8.1.1. Rendering of a single Genesis track and X­direction drive system.
36

8.2. Genesis X­Direction Drive System
The  Genesis  X­direction  drive  system,  partially  seen  in  Figure  8.1.1,  is  a  dual  belt  and  pulley  system  consisting  of  Nema  17  stepper  motors,  GT2
timing  belts  and  pulleys, and mounting  hardware  from  Open  Builds. One stepper motor and belt  system is attached to each track, with the belt ends
fixed  to  the  gantry  for  actuation.  To  scale  in  the  X­direction,  a   longer  belt  will  be  required.  Nema  17  stepper  motors  and  GT2  components  were
selected for their common use in DIY 3D printers, affordability, and general availability.

8.3. Genesis Gantry
The  Genesis  gantry,  rendered  in  Figure  8.3.1,  is  constructed  of  V­Slot  aluminum  extrusions,  mini­V  linear  guides,  other   components  from  Open
Builds,  and  some  custom  support  braces.  The  gantry  is  primarily  designed  to  be  rigid  while still allowing for easy scaling and places to mount other
hardware. The Genesis gantry interfaces with the tracks (Figure 8.3.2) and also provides the linear guide for the cross­slide as seen in section 8.5.

Figure 8.3.1. Rendering of the Genesis gantry.
37

Figure 8.3.2. Detail rendering of the gantry interfacing with a track.

38

8.4. Genesis Y­Direction Drive System
The  Genesis  Y­direction  drive  system,  rendered  in  Figure  8.4.1,  is  very  similar  to  the  X­direction  drive system;  it  uses  the  same  Nema  17  stepper
motors and GT2 timing belt and pulleys. It is also scalable in the Y­direction with a longer belt.

Figure 8.4.1. Detail rendering of the Y­direction drive system mounted to the gantry and interfacing with the cross­slide.
39

8.5. Genesis Cross­Slide
The  Genesis  cross­slide,  rendered  in  Figure  8.5.1,  consists  of  the  universal  mounting  plate,  two  spacer  blocks,  and  eight  V­wheel  kits  from  Open
Builds for interfacing with the gantry (Figure 8.4.1) and the tool mount (Figure 8.6.2.)

Figure 8.5.1. Rendering of the Genesis cross­slide.
40

8.6. Genesis Tool Mount and Z­Direction Drive System
The  Genesis  tool  mount  and  Z­direction  drive  system,  rendered  in  Figure  8.6.1, consist  of  a  single  V­Slot  extrusion  with  a  Nema  17 stepper motor,
leadscrew,  and  mounting  plates.  Both  the  extrusion  and  the  leadscrew  interface  with  the  cross­slide  as  shown  in  Figure  8.6.2.  A  leadscrew  was
chosen  over  a  belt  and  pulley  for  its  ability  to  sustain  a  load  without  using  motor power,  as  well  as  its  increased  torque  and  precision  which will be
necessary for precision operations like seed injection.

Figure 8.6.1. Rendering of the Genesis tool mount and Z­direction drive
system.

Figure 8.6.2. Detail rendering of the tool mount and Z­direction drive
system interfacing with the cross slide.
41

8.7. Genesis Tools
FarmBot  Genesis  will  initially  be  built with  only  the  two  most  essential  tools:  a seed injector and a watering nozzle. These two tools can be modified
and  expanded  upon  for  more  functionality,  such  as  a  fertilizing  ability  built  into  the  watering  nozzle.  The  Genesis  tool mount and microcontroller will
be able to accept more tools and sensors for future expanded functionality.
8.7.1. Genesis Seed Injector and Seed Bay
The  Genesis  seed  injector,  rendered  in  Figure  8.7.1.1,  consists  of  two  main  assemblies:  a  12V  vacuum  pump  and  selector tip, and the  seed  bay.
The  vacuum  pump and selector tip are attached  to the tool mount and allow for the precise selection of seeds from the seed bay and placing  them at
a  precise  location  and  depth  in  the  ground.  This  is   completed  by  first  dipping  the  selector  tip  into  a  seed  bin  while the  vacuum  is  on,  moving  the
suctioned  seed  or  seeds  to the  desired  location,  driving  them  into  the  ground  to  the  desired  depth,  releasing  the  vacuum,  and  repeating.  The  seed
bay,  attached  to a vertical column of the gantry, moves in the  X­direction such that different seed bins can be positioned for the selector tip to choose
from.  The  Genesis  seed injector  uses two  controlled  components:  the  vacuum  pump,  and  the  stepper  motor  for the  seed bay. This setup will allow
any number of different seeds to be accessed and planted without the need for additional controllable components.

Figure 8.7.1.1. Rendering of the Genesis seed injector and seed bay.
42

8.7.2. Genesis Watering Nozzle
The  Genesis  watering  nozzle,  rendered  in  Figure  8.7.2.1  alongside  the  seed  injector,  consists  of  a  spray  nozzle, a  solenoid  valve,  and  tubing.  Not
pictured  is  additional  tubing  that  will  need   to  run  along  the  tool  mount,  gantry,  and  tracks  in  order  to  connect  to  a  water  source  such  as  a  garden
hose.  Future  watering  nozzles may  feature  flow  meters,  different  spray  nozzles,  or even  the addition of a peristaltic pump and tank that would allow
for the precise addition of liquid fertilizer or pesticide to the water spray.

Figure 8.7.2.1. Rendering of the Genesis watering nozzle (to the left and below the seed injector.)
43

8.8. Genesis Electronics
8.8.1. Microcontroller
An  Arduino  Mega microcontroller,  pictured  in  Figure  8.8.1.1,  will  be  used  to  control  the  stepper motors, vacuum pump, servo, and future electronics
and  sensors.  This  platform  was  chosen  for  it’s  low  cost,  general  availability,  hackability,  expandability  through  shields,  the  expansive  learning
resources  available,  the  strong  DIY  community  already  using  the  platform,  and  the  fact  that  it  is  open­source.   In  addition,  Arduino  programs  are
written  in  the  C  language  and  therefore  very  familiar  to  many.  Expansion  shields  likely  to  be  used  will  include  wifi,  a  RAMPS  stepper  driver,  and an
SD  card  shield.  The  firmware  to  be  installed  will  likely  be  forked  from  an  existing  3D  printer  G­code  interpreter  and  then  modified  for  the FarmBot
application.

Figure 8.8.1.1. An Arduino Mega microcontroller.
8.8.2. Stepper Motors
The  Nema  17   stepper  motor  shown  in  Figure  8.8.2.1  has   been  chosen  for  it’s  general  availability,   common  use  in  similar  projects  such  as  the
RepRap  3D  printer,  easy setup  and  control,  as  well  as  it’s  accuracy,  speed, and torque  outputs.  In  addition,  this motor interfaces with components
such  as  pulleys  and  mounting  plates  available  from many providers including Open Builds. It has yet to  be determined if the Nema 17 motor size will
be powerful enough for FarmBot Genesis due to the larger scale of the hardware than 3D printers.
44

Figure 8.8.2.1. Nema 17 stepper motor available from Open Builds.

8.9. Cost
Table   8.9.1  shows  a  rough  estimation  of  the  cost  to  produce  the  1.5m  wide,  3m  long,  0.5m  tall  FarmBot  Genesis  rendered  in  Figure  8.1  by
purchasing  as  many  components  as  possible.  The   prices   for  the  components  are  at  a  non­bulk  rate   and   there  are  very  likely  more  affordable
suppliers available. All of the mounting plates and brackets are also easily manufacturable, which would further drive the price down if not purchased.
Table 8.9.1. Rough cost breakdown to produce a FarmBot Genesis kit.
Component/Description

Quantity

Total Cost

20x20mm V­Slot Aluminum Extrusions

1.7m

$17

20x40mm V­SLot Aluminum Extrusions

9.5m

$124

12

$56

T Brackets

45

Corner Brackets

4

$5

Custom Large T Brackets

2

$20

Motor Mount Plates

5

$35

Idler Pulley and Threaded Rod Plates

5

$35

V­Slot Universal Plate

1

$12

V­Slot Spacer Blocks

2

$8

Mini­V Plates

5

$45

Mini­V Wheel Kits

20

$65

Dual­V Wheel Kits

8

$31

Nema 17 Stepper Motors

5

$100

Solenoid Valve

1

$8

Vacuum Pump

1

$15

Flex Couplings

2

$10

Leadscrew

1

$30

15m

$100

4

$20

GT2 Timing Belt
GT2 20 Tooth Timing Pulleys
T Nuts, Bolts, and other hardware

$80

Miscellaneous Items

$150

Arduino Mega

1

$60

Ramps Stepper Shield

1

$25

Labor Hours (for a kit, not assembled)

5

$250

Total

$1301
46

8.10. Crowdfunded Launch
I  have  identified  two  main benefits  to  launching  FarmBot  Genesis  on  a  crowdfunding  platform.  The  first,  is  the  great  exposure  and  press  potential.
Crowdfunding has  become  very  popular  in  recent  years  with  both  open­source  and  3D printer projects leading very successful campaigns. Many of
these projects are covered by popular tech blogs and shared virally on social media, leading to large interest.
The  second  reason  is  that  crowdfunding  is  a  great  way  to quickly get a technology into a bunch of people’s hands. For FarmBot to progress quickly,
a  large  community  needs  to be created to begin  tinkering with the technology and improving it. For  those that just want to have a FarmBot shipped to
them  rather   than  sourcing  all  the  parts  and  doing  a  more  complex  assembly,  the  crowdfunding  rewards  will  be  a  good  option.  Anyone  else  who  is
tech savvy and a tinkerer can just use the wiki instructions to build their own FarmBot which is also making progress.

8.11. Timeline
Table 8.11.1 is a rough timeline for the development of FarmBot Genesis.
Table 8.11.1. Timeline of FarmBot Genesis development to a crowdfunded launch.
Dates

Milestone

September 2013

Prepare the wiki, blog, and social media profiles for the public.

September 2013

Publish the FarmBot white paper and gather online and local interest through targeted distribution of the paper.

September 2013

Secure funding for the project in order to pay for prototyping materials and time.

September 2013

Pitch  the  project  to  Cal  Poly  students  and  professors  beginning  their  senior  project  and  capstone  courses  to  get
students working on the technology.

October 2013 ­ April 2014

Construct, test, and iterate FarmBot Genesis while documenting the process.

April ­ June 2014

Crowdfunded launch of FarmBot Genesis.

47

9. Potential Impacts, Ramifications, and Concerns of FarmBot
9.1. Increased Production Efficiency
If  FarmBot  proves  itself  to  function  as  described,  it  will  undoubtedly  help  increase  food  production  efficiency  by   making  the  current  systems  and
methods  obsolete.  FarmBot  has  the  potential  to  be  more  effective  at  growing  crops,  use  less  inputs  and  labor,  and  be  more  economic.  Part of the
vision of FarmBot is to grow food for everyone, and I think that is possible.

9.2. Sustainability
The  majority  of  today’s  industrialized  agriculture  practices  are  unsustainable  both  in  their  energy  and  resource  usage but also in their destruction of
soil   health  and  food  quality.  FarmBot  aims  to  change  this  paradigm  by  offering  a  way  to  produce   sustainably  without  sacrificing  efficiency  or
increasing  cost.  In fact,  the  FarmBot  system  will increase efficiency and decrease cost. Additionally, the decentralization of  food production (Section
9.4) will allow great savings in the energy and infrastructure required to ship and distribute food.

9.3. Democratization of Food Production
FarmBot’s  scalability  allows  anyone  with  access to a computer and a yard, some land, or even a roof to be able  to install and operate a FarmBot. By
open­sourcing  the  technology  as  well  as  designing  for  simplicity,  hackability,  affordability,  and  accessibility,  FarmBot   will  lower  the  barrier  to  the
average person to grow food. Ideally, farming knowledge and special skills will never be needed to install and operate a FarmBot.
By   making  the  choice  to  grow  food  accessible,  FarmBot  will  help  to  democratize  food production,  giving  the  power  of  food  back  to the  people.  No
longer will food production practices, availability, and prices be determined by the food producers, the government, or the economy.

9.4. Decentralization and Localization of Food Production
WIth  more  people  growing food  in  smaller  operations,  food  production  will  be  partially  decentralized  and  localized.  This will  make  each community
and  even household  more  independent  and resilient  to  crop  failures  and  other  large  scale  disasters.  It  will  give  more  people access to fresher food
and provide greater abundance for all. In addition, it will save tremendously on shipping cost and infrastructure requirements.

9.5. Elimination of the Farmer
Perhaps  the  most  controversial  aspect of the FarmBot vision is  the eventual elimination of the farmer. Historically, putting a good amount of time and
effort  into  feeding  yourself  and  your  family  is  something   that   every  living  thing  had  to  do.  But  since  the  dawn  of  agriculture,  humans  have  been
improving  methods  and technologies  in  order  to  spend  less time  on this  task. FarmBot  is  perhaps  the  last  technological  advance needed  to  make
our time spent farming go to zero.
48

By  creating a mechanized system where very specific and routine actions are needed to effectively produce food, it only makes sense to hand off  the
remaining repetitive task to a computer. Like so many technologies in the past, this advancement could make many people’s jobs obsolete.
Depending on who you talk to, this is either good or bad. I see it as a good thing; I would rather have farm laborers becoming educated and working in
other  industries  rather than  picking  berries  all  day,  hunched  over  in  a  field.  That’s  not  to  say  that  the  people who enjoy working on a farm and in the
garden, myself included, cannot continue to do it, but now we can do it as a hobby and not necessarily because it pays the bills.
Depending on  the  adoption  rate  of  a  disruptive  technology  like FarmBot,  there  could be a large spike in unemployment, or a gradual fade out of farm
jobs.  Either  way,  there  may  be  a  whole  new  class  of  jobs  created  such  as  professional FarmBot  installers,  maintenance  specialists,  and  anyone
working to manufacture the components.

9.6. Increased or Decreased Separation of People and Farming
It  is  hard  to  say  if  FarmBot  will  further  separate or  bring  together  people  and  their food.  In  one  case, many small scale FarmBots are implemented,
making  growing  your  own food  more  accessible.  This  would  allow  many  people to  get  hands­on  experience, be physically close to, and have some
level  of  responsibility  and  commitment  with  their  food’s  production. In the other scenario, FarmBot is adopted primarily  on a  larger scale which leads
to even less people being in charge of producing food and those people simply sitting behind a computer, with no physical connection to the process.
But   with  the  current  trends,  scenario  two  is  happening   anyway  and  it  leaves  no  opportunity  for  scenario  one.  So,  at  the  least,  FarmBot  has  the
potential  to  connect  people  with  their  food  more  than  today’s  technology  simply  because   of  the  scalability  and  potential  for  home  installation  and
operation. As a further matter, there are benefits to be realized with both systems, that will likely ultimately lead to adoption on both scales.

9.7. Greater Dependence on Machines and Computers
It  can  be  argued that humanity’s increasing dependence on technology such  as machines  and computers could pose serious threats to humans in a
large  scale  crisis  or  infrastructure  failure.  This  is perhaps  a  fact  we  must  accept  as  we  adopt  any  new  technology,  but  it  is  important  to  step  back
and be mindful of our dependence on these systems, especially when the system is a means to feed ourselves.

9.8. Loss of Individual and Generational Knowledge and the Gain of Universal and Accessible Knowledge
With  the  adoption  of  a  technology  like  this,  there  may  be a great loss of individual and generational knowledge in how to grow food and work with the
land and natural systems. As with any knowledge or cultural loss, it is likely a choice we must make if we are to adopt new methods of doing things.
With  the  loss   of  individual  and  generational  knowledge,  we  will  gain  universal  and  accessible   knowledge  by  cataloging  all  of  our  food  growing
techniques into  one  place  and  making  that knowledge accessible. The losses and gains of our knowledge in farming will be similar to the losses  and
gains that have occurred with the rise of the Internet, mass production, globalization, and other areas.

49

9.9. Lock­in to an Inferior System
It  can  be  argued  that  other  systems  of  growing  food  such  as  permaculture  or  hydroponics  are  the  best  solution  to  sustainably  growing  food  for the
world  in  an  economic  way. However, because of the rigged market that favors conventional growing, conventional growing is the dominating practice
and  we  have  been  somewhat  “locked­in”  to  this  inferior  system.  If  FarmBot  rises  above  conventional  as a better system, it will be important to keep
our minds open to other, even better systems. We must avoid forces that could unfairly favor FarmBot, locking us into another inferior system.

9.10. Hacking
The  fact  that  FarmBots  will  be connected  to  the  Internet  leaves  a  huge  possibility  for  hacking.  Because  many  commercial  and  industrial FarmBots
will  one  day  be  equipped  with  tools  such  as  burners  and potentially harmful chemicals, there is a large risk for a  malicious person to set fire to fields
and  also   poison  the  land,  crops,  and  water  supply  through  inappropriate  practices.  Furthermore,  almost   all   FarmBots,  regardless  of  size,  will  be
equipped  with  plows  and  other  tilling  implements  that  could  destroy  crops.  Lastly,  every  FarmBot  will  at  least  be  connected  to  a  water  supply,
allowing for detrimental overwatering and the waste of a valuable resource on a massive scale.
All  of  these  security  threats  could  cause  destruction  of  crops,  damage  to  the  land  and  environment,  the  waste  of  resources,  and  damage  to  the
FarmBot  equipment itself  on  a  potentially  worldwide  FarmBot  security  breach.  Though  I  am no expert in computer and hardware security, I do know
that each risk will need to be handled appropriately through various methods. Here are a couple of ideas.

Requiring secure encryption between the communication of every FarmBot and any web service
Authentication  requirements  for  any  operation  or  firmware  uploads.  This  could  require  knowing  a  unique  serial  number  on  the  FarmBot
microcontroller or other hardware
● Manual  valves  and  other  hardware  that  require  a   present   human  to  activate,  preventing  dangerous  and  unwarranted  computer  controlled
operations such as burning
● Hosting the FarmBot software backend locally and connecting to the hardware on a secure, local intranet
Because the software will be open­source, it may be  checked for integrity by the community at large. On top  of this,  any user will have the freedom to
download  and host the backend software on  a cloud service of their choice or their own hardware. The software may then also be modified to  require
higher levels of authentication or other, additional forms of security if desired.

9.11. Failure of Supporting Infrastructure
Because  FarmBots  may  rely  heavily on an Internet connection and the electric grid, failure of these infrastructures could cause detrimental effects to
fields.  These  risks  could  be  mitigated  with  the  use  of  local  hardware  running  FarmBot  software  connected  via  an  intranet,  and  on­site  power
generation with photovoltaics, wind, or backup generators.

50

10. Defining Short Term Success and Next Steps
I  believe  the  FarmBot  Project  has  the  potential  to  revolutionize  the  way  humanity  produces  food   both  on  the  small  and  large  scale.  As  the  vision
states,  the  project  aims  to  create  an  open  and  accessible  technology  enabling  everyone  to   grow  food  and  to  grow  food  for  everyone.  However,
revolution  will  not  be  the  defining  metric  of  success  in  the  short  term.  I   think  that  short  term  success  boils  down  to  achieving  two  important
milestones.
The  first  milestone  is  to   create  and  demonstrate  a  functioning   minimum  viable  product  such  as  FarmBot  Genesis.  This  will  right  away  prove  or
disprove  the   viability  of  the  technology.  This  milestone  also  includes  making  available  the  plans,  source  code,  and  even  purchasable  kits  of  the
minimum viable product in order to lower the barrier to entry for others to learn about and contribute to the project.
This  leads  me  into  the  second  milestone:  creating  a  vibrant  and excited community of DIYers, makers, hackers, and enthusiasts who will contribute
to  the  development  of  the project.  I  don’t  know  exactly how this would be measured but perhaps it is reaching a critical mass of people such that  the
project and community is self sustaining and grows on its own.
The  next steps in the development of the FarmBot project are completing the initial working hardware and software package that is FarmBot Genesis
and  preparing  the  technology  and  wiki  for  the  crowdfunded  launch.  For  this  to  happen  in  the  most  efficient manner, I  am looking for more people to
join the development team and for investment to purchase prototyping hardware and pay for the development cost.
I  am  looking  for  great  people  with  knowledge  in  mechanics,  manufacturing,  robotics,  mechatronics, microcontrollers,  agriculture, botany, hydrology,
soil   science,   marketing,  graphic  design,  and  software  development  including  web  backend  and  frontend,  internet  of  things,  wikis,  mobile  app
development,  computer­machine  interfaces,  UI,  UX,  algorithm  development,  big  data analysis,  etc,  you  name  it.  Everyone  who  is  interested  in  the
project  is  welcome  to  join  the  team  as  all  skills  and  perspectives  are  appreciated.  Please  email  rory@farmbot.it  or  call  (678)  321­7679  if  you  are
interested! You can also follow the blog at blog.farmbot.it, contribute to the wiki independently at wiki.farmbot.it, and follow the social media profiles.

10.1. List of Action Items
The following list is an incomplete, high level overview of things that need to happen for the minimum viable product and for the project as a whole.





Secure $3,000+ investment/donations
Finish CAD work and sourcing parts for FarmBot Genesis
Document FarmBot Genesis development on the wiki
Purchase materials and construct the prototype
Conduct testing and iteration of the prototype and document all experience
Develop or modify an Arduino sketch to interpret G­code, drive the hardware, record data, and communicate with the backend
51








Develop a backend that supports user profiles and data, remote connection with an Arduino, and has a decision support system
Complete the design of the web frontend
Design graphic assets including buttons, plant icons, logos, etc
Develop the interactive and responsive web frontend
Develop or set up an open data repository and API that is searchable and accessible by people and the backend
Aggregate plant data in the open data repository
Plan for the crowdfunding launch
Tons of other things

52

11. Conclusions
Thank  you  for  reading  this  paper  and  learning  about  a  project  that  I am  passionate  about  and have  dedicated  a  lot  of  time  to. I believe this idea can
bring  us  closer  to  sustainable  food  production  for  all  and  I hope  you  think  so  too.  If  you  found  this  paper  interesting  or  know  someone  who  might,
please pass it along through that series of tubes where you came across it.
Please  send  any feedback  or  inquiries  about  the technology or joining the development team to rory@farmbot.it or call (678) 321­7679. You can also
follow the blog at blog.farmbot.it, contribute to the wiki independently at wiki.farmbot.it, and follow the social media profiles.
­ Rory

53