ISA Certified Automation Professional (CAP

)
Job Analysis Study 2004

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Table of Contents Introduction ...............................................................................................................................................3 Phase I: Initial Development and Evaluation ............................................................................................4 Phase II: Validation Study.........................................................................................................................5 I. Questionnaire Design, Sampling Plan, and Distribution..........................................................5

II. Characteristics of the Sample .................................................................................................5 III. Evaluation of Performance Domains......................................................................................20 A. Validation Scales.........................................................................................................20 B. Panelists’ Evaluations .................................................................................................21 C. Respondents’ Evaluations ..........................................................................................22 D. Comparison of Panel Members’ and Respondents’ Evaluations ................................24 E. Survey Respondent Subgroups’ Evaluations..............................................................25 IV. Reliability Analysis for Domain Scales...................................................................................33 V. Delineation of Required Knowledge and Skills .......................................................................33 VI. Summary of Results...............................................................................................................34 V. Conclusion ..............................................................................................................................34 Phase III: Test Specifications..................................................................................................................35 Domain, Task, and Knowledge and Skill Statements..................................................................36 Appendix A: Contributors for the Practice Analysis Study ......................................................................59 Appendix B: Other Responses................................................................................................................60 Appendix C: Major/Focus of Highest Degree..........................................................................................62 Appendix D: Job Analysis Survey ...........................................................................................................63

In January 2004. A content-valid examination for ISA’s Certified Automation Professional program. These principles and methods are outlined in federal regulation (Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures) and manuals. Based on the ratings gathered from the representative sample of automation professionals. as well as standards set by American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Content validity is the most commonly applied and accepted validation strategy used in establishing certification examinations. such as Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing (published by the American Educational Research Association. A job analysis also helps to determine the type of examination. Initial Development and Validation. III.The Instrumentation. Inc. and skills consistent with this purpose. Systems. the test specifications for the examination were developed. tasks.Introduction ISA. II. 1999). Inc. In psychometric terms. 2002). the study validates importance and criticality to practice. then. A content-valid examination in automation contains a representative sample of items that measure the knowledge and skills essential to the job. and Standards for Accreditations of Certification Programs (published by The National Commission for Certifying Agencies. Consistent with this mission. with representatives from CASTLE Worldwide. The panel identified the domains. a panel of 15 experts assembled by ISA met in Research Triangle Park. A representative sample of 1. and Automation Society works to protect the public by identifying individuals who are competent to practice in several related career fields. NC. The ISA Certified Automation Professional practice analysis study consisted of the following three phases. Development of Test Specifications. Passing scores on the examination indicate that the Certified Automation Professional has achieved a level of ability consistent with requirements for competence on the job. The guidelines hold that it is necessary to determine the knowledge and skills needed to be a competent practitioner in the field in order to develop a practice-related examination. ISA follows these standards in developing examinations for its credentialing program. which serves as a blueprint for examination development. knowledge. such as multiple-choice. Validation Study. the intended function of the ISA Certified Automation Professional (CAP) examination program is to assess competence in the automation professional. The development of a quality credentialing or licensing examination must follow certain logically sound and well-researched procedures. For both broad content areas and tasks. which are the focus of this report: I. Through its relationship with CASTLE Worldwide. The job analysis study is an integral part of ensuring that the examination is content-valid—that the aspects of automation covered on the examination reflect the tasks performed in the range of practice settings throughout the United States and Canada.500 practicing automation professionals was asked to review and validate the work of the job analysis panel. to be developed in order to assess essential competence in the most appropriate manner. validation is the way a test developer documents that the competence to be inferred from a test score is actually measured by the examination. The critical reason for conducting a job analysis study is to ensure that the examination has content validity.. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 3 . appropriately evaluates knowledge and skill required to function as a competent practitioner in the automation profession. to define the essential elements of the profession of automation. The process for identifying these competency areas includes a job analysis study.. These ratings play an important role in determining the content of the examination.

4. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance B. and various experience levels as well as educators. In 2004.PHASE I INITIAL DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION Since 1996. the panel delineated essential tasks in each of the six domains. and the identification of the knowledge and skills associated with each task. CASTLE developed a electronic survey and distributed it to a sample of automation professionals. The tasks define the domains and focus the automation professional on public safety. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 4 . A complete list of panel members is provided in Appendix A. ISA began the first steps in the development of a new credentialing program for Certified Automation Professionals. 2. To conduct the study. The results of the survey are the focus of Phase II. rating each on importance and criticality to the automation practice. Next. Based on the work of the panel of experts. the listing of tasks performed under each domain. The following steps were undertaken to complete Phase I: A. 6. ISA has offered a well-recognized certification program for control systems technicians. The six domains of practice denote major responsibilities performed by automation professionals. The first steps in analyzing the automation profession included the identification of the major content areas or domains. The panel members then evaluated each performance domain and task. health. The panel determined that the profession could be divided into six major domains of practice. and welfare. ISA assembled a 15-member panel of automation experts to discuss the practice. Certified Control System Technicians (CCSTs) work in a variety of industries to monitor and calibrate devices that control the manufacturing process. These performance domains are: 1. C. 5. The panel members represented automation professionals practicing in various job settings. 3. all geographic regions of the United States. The panel subsequently generated a list of knowledge and skills required to perform each task.

the response rate achieved is reasonable. The questionnaire also solicited biographical information from the respondents in order to ensure a representative response and completion by appropriately qualified individuals. The panel of experts discussed key variables that might have an impact on how members of the profession view their work and developed 14 questions that accounted for them. and provide other feedback on the domain and task lists delineated by the panel of experts. ISA provided CASTLE with a list of 1. Due to the fact some respondents elected not to respond to the various questions. the total number of responses per question may vary. 219 submitted usable responses. Survey respondents were asked to provide this information by responding to the questions. Questionnaire Design. individuals unable to log into the survey. the overall response rate was 14. the frequencies reported below do not total the number of respondents. Discounting undeliverable e-mail addresses. II. Not all individuals responded to every question. Given that the survey required approximately 20 minutes to complete and that it was unsolicited. and individuals opting out of the survey. Of the 1500 individuals who were asked to participate online. CASTLE distributed the questionnaire to these 1. The following tables summarize the information provided by survey respondents.500 professionals to consider. and Distribution Using the domains and tasks identified by the panel of experts. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 5 . Sampling Plan.PHASE II VALIDATION STUDY I. out of office individuals. therefore. CASTLE developed an electronic questionnaire to be completed by a sample of automation professionals.500 names of professionals in the automation field.95%. rate. Characteristics of the Sample The characteristics of the sample are important as a means to assess the degree to which the group of respondents represents the automation profession along key dimensions.

6 100. Gender As shown in the chart and graph below.4 5. the majority of respondents (203.4%) are male. GENDER Frequency Male Female TOTAL Percent 203 12 215 94.0 GENDER 300 200 Number of Respondents 100 0 Male Female ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 6 .Table I. or 94.

percentage totals may not always equal 100. the majority of the sample was more than 40 years old.7 38.40 years 41-50 years 51-60 years 61 years and above TOTAL Percent 13 79 82 34 7 215 6. Age As shown in the chart and graph below.1 15.8 3. Thirteen individuals (6%) reported their age as under 30 years old. AGE 100 80 60 Number of Respondents 40 20 0 Under 30 years 31-40 years 41-50 years 61 years and above 51-60 years ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 7 .9* *Due to rounding.3 99. AGE Frequency Under 30 years 31.0 36.Table II.

0 16.5 25. states were grouped into geographic regions.0 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 8 .5 100.Table III. All regions were represented in the sample. Alaska 1 2 4 5 3 Puerto Rico Ha waii LOCATION Frequency 1 2 3 4 5 Total 17 50 33 53 47 200 Percent 8.5 23. Location As shown in the graph below.5 26.

0 EXPERIENCE 120 100 80 Number of Respondents 60 40 20 0 not an AP 1-5 years 6-10 years 11-15 years More than 15 years Less than one year ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 9 .8 21.4 1. Level of Experience The table and graph below present the status of the respondents according to the years of experience they reported.1 100.9 21.Table IV. YEARS OF EXPERIENCE Frequency I’m not an automation professional Less than 1 year 1-5 years 6-10 years 11-15 years More than 15 years TOTAL Percent 3 3 19 47 46 97 215 1. As evidenced by the table and graph.1%) reporting more than 15 years of experience in the field. the respondents tended to be very experienced in the automation profession with 97 individuals (45.4 8.4 45.

6 100.6 17.1* *Due to rounding. PERCENT OF TIME SPENT 160 140 120 100 Number of Respondents 80 60 40 20 0 Not an AP 25-50 percent 76-100 percent 51-75 percent Less than 25 percent ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 10 . Percentage of Time Spent Working as an Automation Professional in Current Position The respondents were asked to provide the percentage of their time spent working as an automation professional in their current position. Over half of the respondents (65.2 65.8 12.6%) reported spending 76 to 100 percent of their time working as an automation professional in their current position PERCENT OF TIME SPENT Frequency I’m not an automation professional Less than 25 percent 25-50 percent 51-75 percent 76-100 percent TOTAL Percent 4 6 27 37 141 215 1. percentage totals may not always equal 100.9 2.Table V.

percentage totals may not always equal 100.0 70. PROCESS AREAS Frequency Discrete (Machine Control) Process (Liguid. CONTROL AREA 200 Number of Respondents 100 0 Discrete Process Both ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 11 .Level VI: Control Areas Worked in on a Daily Basis The majority of the respondents reported working in both discrete/machine control and process/liquid/dry control areas on a daily basis.5 22.1* *Due to rounding.6 100. dry) Both Discrete and Process TOTAL Percent 16 47 151 214 7.

Primary Responsibility in Current Position The majority of respondents (73. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY Frequency Field Engineering Information Systems Operations and Maintenance Project/Systems Engineering Other TOTAL Percent 0 5 24 148 25 202 0.5 11.3 12.1* *Due to rounding. percentage totals may not always equal 100.0 2.3%) reported that Project/Systems Engineering was their primary responsibility in their current position.Table VII.9 73. PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY 160 140 120 100 Number of Respondents 80 60 40 20 0 Information Systems Project/System Eng Other Operations & Maint ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 12 .4 100.

0 3 12 27 4 5 0 2 16 15 22 214 1.1 0.9 7.3 100.8 5. INDUSTRY Frequency Aerospace Automotive Manufacturing Building Automation Chemical Manufacturing Consumer Goods Electrical /Electronic Manufacturing Engineering and Construction Environmental/ Waste Food and Beverage Manufacturing Machinery Manufacturing TOTAL Percent Frequency Metals Manufacturing Petroleum Manufacturing Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Plastics Manufacturing Pulp and Paper Manufacturing Textiles/ Fabrics Manufacturing Transportation Utilities Water/waste Other Percent 1 4 6 25 6 11 26 0 19 10 0.3 0.0 .5 7.6 1.9 2.8 11.0 10.6 12.9 2.1 12.7 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 13 .5 1.7 2.4 5. The responses are provided in the table below and the chart on the following page.9 4.Table VIII: Industry Worked In Respondents were asked to select the responses that best described the industry in which they worked.0 8.

ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 30 20 e er st th a O r/w f e n nu at W i es ati o Ma it rt er til U spo ap P f nu f an d Tr an anu Ma l p M cal Pu ti cs uti uf as ce n Pl rma Ma a m f Ph l eu nu uf f t ro Ma an nu Pe ls M M a a y et er ge M hin ra n e o ac v ti M /B e truc od ns nu F o Co M a s g / i c od En tron Go f r ec e nu n El um Ma ti o a s l on a m C mi c uto uf n he A a C i ng e M i ld tiv Bu mo t o ace Au s p ro Ae 10 0 INDUSTRY 14 Number of Respondents .

CURRENT EMPLOYER 100 80 60 Number of Respondents 40 20 0 Control Sys Supplier Eng/Design Firm Systems Integrators OEM Other End-Users ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 15 . the greatest number (82. or 38.9* *Due to rounding. As shown below.0 99. Current Employer’s Company or Organization The table and graph below present the status of the respondents according to their current employer’s company or organization. responded that their employer did not fit a listed category. or 6.0 38.1 20. percentage totals may not always equal 100.1%) of respondents reported their current employer is best described as end-users.1 6.Table IX.0%. CURRENT EMPLOYER Frequency Control Systems Suppliers End-Users Engineering and Design Firm Original Equipment Manufactur er (OEM) Systems Integrators Other TOTAL Percent 15 82 44 7.5 22 10.2 39 13 215 18. Only 13 individuals.

Certifications/Licenses Respondents were asked to indicate which.Table X. CERTIFICATIONS/LICENSES Frequency CEM CQE CCST CSE MSCE PE PMP Other 1 1 2 10 2 51 3 22 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 16 . certifications and licenses they held. if any.

professional societies. ORGANIZATION MEMBERSHIP Frequency AIChE ASME CSIA IBEW IEEE ISA UA Other 13 3 13 27 27 124 1 32 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 17 . they were a member of. Professional Societies and/or Organizations Respondents were also asked to provide which. if any.Table XI.

4 1.9 100.6%) reported their highest level of education as the bachelor degree. HIGHEST LEVEL OF EDUCATION Frequency High school/Secondary school Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Master’s Degree Doctoral Degree Other TOTAL Percent 15 22 134 36 3 4 214 7.Table XIII.6 16.0 HIGHTEST LEVEL OF EDUCATION 160 140 120 100 Number of Respndents 80 60 40 20 0 High school Bachelor's Degree Doctoral Degree Other Associate degree Master's Degree ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 18 . The responses are provided in Appendix C. Respondents were also asked to provide the major/focus of their highest degree.3 62.0 10. Level of Education The table and chart below show that a significant majority of respondents (62.8 1.

999 More than $110.$110.000 .4%) reported earning an annual income level greater than $110.000 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 19 .000 while 28 individuals (13.000-$49.000 .$49.9 13.000 More than $110.0 ANNUAL SALARY 100 80 60 Number of Respondents 40 20 0 Less than $20.000 TOTAL Percent 3 20 83 75 28 209 1. ANNUAL INCOME Frequency Less than $20.000 $20.999 $50.000.000 $50. Only three individuals (1.000 $20.999 $80.4 100.$79. Annual Income The responses for annual income are provided in the table and graph below.6 39.000 to $110.Table XIV.7 35.999 $80.4 9.000 .4%) reported earning an annual income level of less than $20.000 to $79.

Slightly Important. These scales then were used to collect preliminary validation data from members of the panel of experts and final validation data from survey respondents. Inability to perform tasks within this domain would lead to error with moderate adverse consequences. Participants (panel members and survey respondents) were asked to use four-point scales to express their evaluation of the importance and criticality for each performance domain and task. Evaluation of Performance Domains A. Importance Participants were asked to rate each domain on a rating of importance. The description for frequency is also provided below. 2. Performance of tasks in this domain is only slightly essential to the job performance of the certified automation professional . The rating anchors are provided below. 2. Inability to perform tasks within this performance domain would lead to error with minimal adverse consequences. Moderately Important. the panel considered which scales seemed most appropriate for the automation profession and the purpose of the study. Validation Scales. one for importance. The rating anchors are provided below. 3. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 20 . Criticality Participants were asked to rate each domain on a scale for criticality. Minimal or No Harm. Directions in the survey required respondents to ensure that percentages given for each domain added to 100%. 4. In making its selection. Inability to perform tasks within this domain would definitely lead to error with severe consequences. After considerable discussion and rehearsal using the scales. 4. Very Important. 3.III. Performance of tasks in this domain is absolutely essential to the job performance of the certified automation professional. or the degree to which knowledge in the domain is essential to the minimally competent practice of interior design. 1. Extremely Important. the panel selected three. one for criticality and one for frequency. Performance of tasks in this domain is clearly essential to the job performance of the certified automation professional. Frequency Participants were asked to provide the percent of time the certified automation professional spent performing the duties associated with each domain. Performance of tasks in this domain is only moderately essential to the job performance of the certified automation professional. Moderate Harm. or the degree to which adverse effects (of some type) could result if the certified automation professional is not knowledgeable in the domain. Substantial Harm. The scale anchors for importance and criticality are listed below as a reference. Extreme Harm. with a “4” representing the highest rating. The panel of experts reviewed a number of scales that are often used in job analysis and other validation studies for the purpose of collecting data that would account for how members of the profession evaluate the domains and tasks. 1. Inability to perform tasks within this domain would lead to error with substantial adverse consequences.

1267 .625 . II.1972 .46 .54 3. III. II.2696 . CRITICALITY Domain I.738 . Sample Size (N) Mean Standard Error of Mean Standard Deviation Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 14 14 14 14 14 14 1.722 . Sample Size (N) Mean Standard Error of Mean Standard Deviation Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 14 14 14 14 14 14 1.2993 .216 As shown in the table on the following page.746 .62 3.474 .92 3.120 .31 3.B.92 on the four point scale. The mean ratings ranged from 1.2380 .738 1. IV.1929 .69 2.54 . VI.77 3.606 1. The panelists’ ratings of importance of the domains is provided below.009 The panelists rated the criticality of the domains as seen in the table below. IV.69 2.722 . V. V.69 to 3.1929 .890 1.1972 . VI. Panelists’ Evaluations.77 2. III. Domain V (Deployment) was the area seen as having the greatest potential for harmful results if the automation professional were not competent in the domain.1670 .3251 . IMPORTANCE Domain I. the panelists reported spending the least amount of time in Domain I (Feasibility Study) and the most time in Domain IV (Development).1619 .62 3. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 21 .1993 .38 2.

0470 .50 2. V.1971 3.8070 2. criticality. Domain VI (Operation and Maintenance) was considered to be the least important. VI.9480 1. V.0586 .0424 . Sample Size (N) Mean Standard Error of Mean Standard Deviation Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 217 217 217 217 217 217 3. Survey Respondents’ Evaluations.99 3. Survey respondents employed the scales for importance.796 .0499 .736 .86 25. Their responses are summarized in the tables on the following page. although it was considerably higher than the scale mid-point.999 8.03 3. Domain II (Definition) was considered the second-most important.692 .291 6.00 .5758 1.7444 2.58 . IMPORTANCE Domain I.12 2.36 26.FREQUENCY Domain I.869 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 22 .341 C.509 15. and frequency to evaluate all domains and tasks. VI. As depicted in the table that follows. II. Domain III (System Design) was seen as the most important of the six domains.43 17. Sample Size (N) Mean Standard Error of Mean Standard Deviation Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 15 15 15 15 15 15 6. survey respondents indicated that all domains are very important.863 .625 .0590 .1536 2.35 3. III.883 8. IV.86 12. IV. III.103 6. followed closely by Domain IV (Deployment).21 12.0540 . II.

0498 .4965 . followed closely by Domain V (Deployment).37 9. VI.540 10.758 . II. III.279 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 23 .6373 7.29 14.8668 .06 23.0608 .79 3. V. IV.7265 . Sample Size (N) Mean Standard Error of Mean Standard Deviation Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 217 217 217 217 217 217 2. II.723 .353 9.734 . V. III.896 .0515 .82 .0491 .32 3. Domain I (Feasibility Study) was seen as the least critical. FREQUENCY Domain I.798 .48 .229 7.621 7. VI. Sample Size (N) Mean Standard Error of Mean Standard Deviation Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 212 212 212 212 212 212 10.92 14.04 3.43 2.The respondents considered Domain III (System Design) as the most critical of the six domains.5179 .893 The panelists rated Domain III (System Design) as being the most frequency performed while Domain VI (Operation and Maintenance) was rated as being performed the least often.0542 .21 2. IV.5050 . although it too is well above the scale mid-point.55 27.0606 . CRITICALITY Domain I.578 12.

III.99 3.43 2.35 3. As depicted in the chart that follows.58).02 0.77 3. The evaluations of domains by the panel of experts were compared to the ratings of survey respondents to determine if the results were similar.69 2. IV.62 3. VI.04 3.48 1.79 3.46 0.32 3.62 3.38 2. V. II. IMPORTANCE Domain I.26 0.69 2. IV.21 2.73 -0.58 -0.02 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 24 . III.34 0.92 3.04 The two groups rated the criticality of the domains similarly with Domain IV (Development) having the greatest difference (.77 2. Comparison of Panel Members’ and Respondents’ Evaluations.50 2.66 0.31 3.12 2.48 0. Domain I (Feasibility Study) had the greatest difference in ratings. Survey Panel Difference Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 2. Survey Panel Difference Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 3. II.03 3.04 -0.D.54 1.58 1. CRITICALITY Domain I.01 -0.54 3. VI. both groups rated the importance of the domains similarly. V.93 -0. As shown in the following table.

employer.37 9.29 14.21 12.55 27. V. Although three between-group differences were slightly greater than ten points on the frequency scale. Survey Respondent Subgroups’ Evaluations. time spent working as an automation professional in current position. the mean responses of the various subgroups do not vary to a practical extent. the responses of specific subgroups were compared using the criterion that more than one unit of the four-point scale or 10 points on the frequency scale would indicate the possibility of meaningful difference if any of the calculated values was lower than the scale mid-point.18 E.82 6. With this in mind. IV.69 1. Consequently. level of experience.08 1.86 25. III. Only minor variations occur between the responses. control areas worked in on a daily basis.51 -3. indicating general agreement between and among the different subgroups of participants. VI. When using a survey to collect information regarding a profession.86 12. The greatest difference in the ratings was found in Domain I (Feasibility Study). The following charts illustrate the similarities in means. II. The similarity in the ratings provides support for generalizing from the survey results to the general population of qualified automation professionals.49 -2.00 4.06 23.The panelists and survey respondents also rated the frequency of the domains similarly. for the responses of subgroups of respondents. the possibility that individuals in various settings have differing views of the profession is to be expected.70 -2. or averages. and highest level of education. FREQUENCY Domain I. area of responsibility.43 17.92 14. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 25 . Survey Panel Difference Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 10. Finding meaningful differences in domain or task ratings among the various subgroups might indicate that one should not generalize the survey results from one subgroup to another. the importance and criticality means for the domain ratings were within one scale point for each comparison.36 26. Subgroups were defined by age.

IV. II. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Under 30 years 11.03 61 years and above ** ** ** ** ** ** **Sample size is insufficient to support conclusions.08 3.35 3. IV.03 26.17 2.38 18. IV.53 2. VI.47 3. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance FREQUENCY Domain I. II.18 3.54 3.88 9.07 3.75 3. V.77 31-40 years 10.65 51-60 years 3.41 3.38 3.39 22.39 3.88 3.39 29.37 2.44 51-60 years 10.20 8.18 2.29 3.06 2.69 25.06 3.77 26. VI. V.18 2.98 11.52 2.15 11.75 3.49 41-50 years 3.AGE IMPORTANCE Domain Under 30 years 2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 26 .23 2.88 3.69 31-40 years 2.27 14. III.29 2.53 61 years and above ** ** ** ** ** ** I. VI.88 15.80 14.50 61 years and above ** ** ** ** ** ** I.33 3.24 2.00 3. III.14 26. V. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance CRITICALITY Domain Under 30 years 2.57 51-60 years 2.54 22.47 2.42 12.04 3.01 3.40 41-50 years 2.28 3.15 2.76 3.04 3.46 3.94 14.12 22.04 3.00 2. II.75 2.84 3.46 10.25 3.78 14. III.57 41-50 years 9.67 31-40 years 3.

56 10.06 3.44 2.40 3.63 6-10 years 2.00 3.82 More than 15 years 10.55 9.07 10.05 28.89 3.LEVEL OF EXPERIENCE IMPORTANCE Domain I. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Not an AP ** ** ** ** ** ** Less than 1 year ** ** ** ** ** ** 1-5 years 13.89 3. VI. IV.48 2.84 3.00 2.60 14. V.70 27.13 8.45 3.83 18.05 2.77 13.53 3.24 2.28 2.20 3.22 15.54 3. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance ** ** ** ** ** ** Less than 1 year ** ** ** ** ** ** 1-5 years 2.63 2.61 6-10 years 7.64 12. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Not an AP ** ** ** ** ** ** Less than 1 year ** ** ** ** ** ** 1-5 years 3.10 3.54 11-15 years 2.02 3.79 6-10 years 2.51 3.46 More than 15 years 2. V.57 3.28 26.54 11-15 years 3.10 2.13 3.67 19.93 3. IV.80 24. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 27 .92 22.82 26.49 CRITICALITY Domain Not an AP I. II. VI. III.20 3. II. III.58 2. II.26 2.20 25.32 11-15 years 11.73 More than 15 years 3.13 3.22 2.06 11. V. VI.84 3.39 FREQUENCY Domain I.07 3.11 15.50 2.20 2.88 3.22 2.21 3.49 15.15 2.16 3.84 **Sample size is insufficient to support conclusions.24 3.38 3. III. IV.

12 3.78 51-75 percent 2.54 76-100 percent 2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 28 .61 13. II.47 12.92 3.59 51-75 percent 2.20 16. IV.28 25.07 3.48 2. V.95 3.35 2.78 3.26 2. VI. VI.32 3.57 76-100 percent 3.11 2.24 2.54 FREQUENCY Domain I.68 24.20 **Sample size is insufficient to support conclusions. II.42 2.80 19.35 3. V.15 3.12 7.62 3. III.16 2.03 28.00 29.65 2. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Not an AP ** ** ** ** ** ** Less than 25 percent ** ** ** ** ** ** 25-50 percent 2. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Not an AP ** ** ** ** ** ** Less than 25 percent ** ** ** ** ** ** 25-50 percent 13.78 9. III. II.61 25.04 3.89 3.19 2.89 2.56 2.58 14. IV. III.43 3.93 15.78 3.68 51-75 percent 10. IV.47 3. VI.20 14. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Not an AP ** ** ** ** ** ** Less than 25 percent ** ** ** ** ** ** 25-50 percent 3.86 2.19 2.27 2.01 10.TIME SPENT IMPORTANCE Domain I.46 CRITICALITY Domain I.89 3.33 3.83 76-100 percent 9. V.

10 3. VI.83 3.39 3. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Automation Engineer 7.21 27.88 Process 2.11 25.63 Other 10.93 3.52 15. III.13 2.16 24.81 3.23 3. II.30 22. II.24 3. V.52 FREQUENCY Domain I.49 2.00 2.44 3.66 3.48 2.26 2. V.46 Both 3.75 27.63 16.15 10.56 28.28 15. II.00 3.24 2. VI.40 2. VI. IV.44 3.75 Controls Engineer 11.CONTROL AREA(S) IMPORTANCE Domain I. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Discrete 2. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Discrete 2.13 2.94 1.38 12. III.94 6.56 3. V.62 Both 2.63 3. IV.48 2.00 3.24 14.19 14. IV.38 Process 3.32 9. III.64 CRITICALITY Domain I.13 2.90 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 29 .31 3.32 3.13 2.98 3.06 3.

96 3.36 3.17 25.16 2. VI.04 21. II.96 2.05 2.16 3. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development* Deployment Operation and Maintenance* Field Engineering Information Systems Operations and Maintenance Project/ Systems Engineering Other ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** 9.29 26. V. IV.53 3. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 30 .44 3.43 15.39 *Differences greater than 10 percentage points exist.38 2. VI.12 2.32 3. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Field Engineering Information Systems Operations and Maintenance Project/ Systems Engineering Other ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** 2. **Sample size is insufficient to support conclusions. V.18 2. IV. II.83 3.65 13.27 8.44 FREQUENCY Domain I. V.37 2.72 2.91 9.23 2.48 13.67 2.09 3. IV. III. III.84 3.01 3.24 CRITICALITY Domain I.68 2.75 3.44 13.86 2.82 2.88 2.96 19.AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY IMPORTANCE Domain I. II.51 3. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Field Engineering Information Systems Operations and Maintenance Project/ Systems Engineering Other ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** ** 2.04 17.72 2.11 3.64 3.08 3.40 2.58 14. VI. III.83 28.56 3.87 15.30 12.33 3.33 2.96 27.39 7.

II.80 2.23 3.13 3.82 2.56 26.77 FREQUENCY Domain Control Systems Suppliers 16.59 3.46 25.11 Other 10.67 2.36 3.56 6.92 23.17 I.41 OEM 2.84 3. V.68 3.75 Engineering and Design Firm 3.46 3.09 Systems Integrators 2.00 14.86 Engineering and Design Firm 8.20 22.01 3.59 2.47 2.38 3. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 31 .49 14.33 13.42 12.15 2.90 3.32 Systems Integrators 9.20 3.21 2.98 3.46 3.40 2.20 2.47 12.95 2. VI.82 3. IV.67 18.18 3.32 14.53 3.46 2. III. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Control Systems Suppliers 2.92 3.23 3.07 3. IV.95 2.00 19.07 3.00 3.28 Other 2.59 3.00 25.00 15.75 20.34 2.91 6. III.23 24.59 2.36 Systems Integrators 3.93 2.67 2.86 3.33 3.31 2.93 3.32 3.41 2.67 EndUsers 2.88 12.69 3.92 3.75 Engineering and Design Firm 2. *Differences greater than 10 percentage points exist.15 2.64 15.12 23.49 Other 3.89 32.11 14.67 EndUsers 10.59 29.26 2. VI.45 2.31 3.17 16.08 CRITICALITY Domain I.16 3.20 3.33 7.38 2.88 13.87 3. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development* Deployment Operation and Maintenance . III. VI.26 2. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Control Systems Suppliers 3.84 15.36 3.41 2. V.47 OEM 9.13 EndUsers 2. V.27 OEM 2.36 3. II.72 30.02 8. II.EMPLOYER IMPORTANCE Domain I. IV.09 2.10 2.

97 2.79 2.50 Doctoral degree ** ** ** ** ** ** Other ** ** ** ** ** ** CRITICALITY Domain I.59 7. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 32 .48 Master’s degree 2. IV. II.33 Associate Degree 2.21 3.44 2.60 3.95 3. IV.33 3.44 3.91 16.43 Doctoral degree ** ** ** ** ** ** Other ** ** ** ** ** ** **Sample size is insufficient to support conclusions.57 Associate Degree 2.33 3. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance High school 3. VI. II.41 2.72 3.43 19.79 2.59 20. II.14 2.67 2.32 2.93 2.00 2. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance High school 10.00 3.41 3. VI.14 3.00 14.27 2.60 2.07 2.77 16. III.57 Master’s degree 3.67 Associate Degree 9.67 13.30 2.34 26.95 Bachelor’s degree 9.38 Master’s degree 12.28 2.92 2.53 3.HIGHEST LEVEL OF EDUCATION IMPORTANCE Domain I.69 14.64 Bachelor’s degree 2.33 20. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance High school 2.29 2.55 3.21 3. V. V.79 25.59 30.18 Bachelor’s degree 2.32 3.86 3.86 9.61 Doctoral degree ** ** ** ** ** ** Other ** ** ** ** ** ** FREQUENCY Domain I.48 13. III.81 3.09 12.41 2.13 2.36 14.43 29. V.10 3. IV. III.33 10.67 32.67 8.14 2. VI.86 3.80 3.95 3.

CASTLE and ISA arranged for a special committee to review the lists online using software designed for that purpose in combination with a series of conference calls. III. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 33 . the panel of experts developed a comprehensive list of the knowledge and skills that the qualified automation professional must possess in order to provide competent service in each task area.e. Members of the expert panel drafted these lists at the time that the panel reached consensus on the tasks.7 indicate an unacceptable amount of measurement error. As shown below.9334 Criticality .8437 . and analysis. unreliability). CASTLE facilitated the review meetings.8653 . RELIABILITY Domain I.9639 . V.. Reliability refers to the degree to which tests or surveys are free from measurement error. it would be impossible to reach accurate conclusions.9251 . Reliability Analysis for Domain Scales CASTLE assessed the reliability of the scales in order to determine how consistently the tasks measured the domains of interest.8234 . IV. Delineation of Required Knowledge and Skills Working under the direction of CASTLE.7 to be judged as adequate. which led to the final listing presented in Phase III of this report.8954 . VI.9228 . Skills may be psychomotor or they may involve cognitive skills.8832 .9014 . predominating taxonomies use different levels to describe the learning outcomes desired. It is useful when conducting a job analysis in connection with the content validation of a credentialing examination to understand that knowledge is normally considered a matter of the cognitive domain (Bloom. Knowledge refers to the remembering of previously learned subject matter and a grasp of its meaning. With inconsistency (i. Reliability coefficients range from 0 to 1 and should be above 0. The CAP examination should target the objective of having questions with each cognitive domain.9210 .8870 . Within the cognitive domain. Reliability was estimated as internal consistency (Cronbach’s Alpha) using the respondents’ ratings of importance and criticality for each domain. 1956).IV.8981 . and analysis refers to the ability to break subject matter into component parts in order to reveal its organization and structure. CASTLE then circulated the list throughout the panel of experts and collected revisions and editorial suggestions for each list from the entire panel.8464 . such as critical thinking.9259 Frequency . This calculates the extent to which each task rating within each domain consistently measures what other tasks within that domain measure.9104 Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance V. application. Following the meeting.9169 .. Application is the ability to use subject matter in job-related situations. all domains easily exceed this critical value. II. It is important to understand the consistency of the data along the importance and criticality dimensions in order to draw defensible conclusions. the most common levels are knowledge (which includes recall and comprehension).9352 . Reliability values below 0. For a credentialing examination such as the CAP. Importance . et al.

” Similarly. no differences greater than one scale point were found on the Importance and Criticality ratings. These differences were not unexpected as those respondents who reported working in Operations and Maintenance as their primary area of responsibility reported spending 12. with only one difference greater than one scale point. the survey respondents indicated that all domains are very important. the highest between-group difference exceeded the lowest by greater than ten points on the frequency scale. The final difference was found when examining subgroup differences based on current employer’s company or organization. VII. and skills identified by the job analysis study and given the depth of knowledge and skill implied for protection of the public. competence in the profession can best be assessed using a multiple-choice examination format.71 percent more time in Domain IV (Development) than those individuals reporting their primary area of responsibility as Domain IV. These data support the validity of the six domains as major categories of responsibility in the practice of automation. Conclusion The results of the job analysis survey validate the results of the panel of experts.58 on the four-point rating scale. the respondents considered all domains to be critical. the differences observed were not considered meaningful in terms of influencing test specifications. All subgroups rated the domains within one scale point or ten points on the frequency scale with the exception of three cases. which means that incompetent performance of tasks in each domain could result in “Moderate Harm” to “Substantial Harm” (of some type) to the public. with 2 being “Moderately Important” and 3 being “Very Important.43 on the four-point scale. However. Each of the six domains has an average criticality rating of at least 2. Respondents reporting their primary area of responsibility as Project/Systems Engineering reported spending 10.VI. However.09 percent more time in Domain IV (Development) than those reporting their current employers were best described as Control Systems Suppliers. The respondents reporting their current employers were best described as System Integrators reported spending 14. Of interest in the analysis was the possibility that respondents’ status along biographical dimensions might influence their views about the practice of automation. Each of the six domains has an average importance of at least 2. knowledge.52 percent more time performing duties associated with Domain V (Operations and Maintenance) than did those individuals who reported having another area of primary responsibility. It is of further value to note that the panel of experts and survey respondents agreed on the average ratings for importance and criticality of domains. Differences were found in the ratings of frequency for Domain IV (Development) and Domain VI (Operation and Maintenance). ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 34 . no differences greater than one scale points were found on the Importance and Criticality ratings. This conclusion means that the domains and tasks developed by the job analysis panel constitute an accurate definition of the work of qualified automation professionals Based on a psychometric analysis of the tasks. Therefore. In these three instances. Summary of Results As shown in the charts on the preceding pages. Two of these differences occurred when the area of primary responsibility was examined.

% of Test # of Items on Test Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 11. Test specifications are developed by combining the overall evaluations of importance. and criticality ratings were weighted equally in this computation. VI. and criticality. IV. These percentages are used to determine the number of questions related to each domain and task. TEST BLUEPRINT Domain I. V.60% 15.PHASE III TEST SPECIFICATIONS The final phase of a job analysis study is the development of test specifications which identify the proportion of questions from each domain and task that will appear on the CAP examination.95% 100. and converting the results into percentages.94% 22. III. Importance. frequency. frequency. II.23% 24.04% 15.24% 10.00 20 26 44 39 27 19 175 TOTAL ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 35 .

84 2.88% 11. Domain I. and knowledge and skill statements as delineated by the practice analysis panel of experts and validated with data from the practice analysis survey.09% 1. Domain III..80 1.95% 1. Established work practices 2. tasks.g. TASKS.60% # of Items on Test 4 3 4 3 3 3 20 Domain I: Task 1: Feasibility Study Define the preliminary scope through currently established work practices in order to meet the business need.37 2.84 1.24 2. Automation opportunity identification techniques (e. Domain IV.96% 1.84 1.95% 2.55 2. Domain V. Project management methodology 4. Domain II.39 2. Basic process and/or equipment 3. Control and information technologies (MES) and equipment ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 36 .11 Frequency 1. dynamic performance measures) 5. Domain VI.18 2. Knowledge of: 1.70 % of Items on Test 1.68 2.77% 1.13 2.DOMAINS.88 1.00 2. Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance Performance Domain I: Feasibility Study Evaluation and Allocation of Questions for Domain I RATINGS Task 1 2 3 4 5 6 Importance 2. AND KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL STATEMENTS This section of the report contains the domains.61 1.57 TOTAL Criticality 2.63 2.

3. 4. Task 5: Perform a justification analysis by generating a feasibility cost estimate and using an accepted financial model to determine project viability. Skill in: 1.. 2. 3. 2. 3. Skill in: 1. 5. 2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 37 . Task 4: Conduct technical studies for the preliminary automation strategy by gathering data and conducting an appropriate analysis relative to requirements in order to define development needs and risks. 4. 3. Task 3: Develop a preliminary automation strategy that matches the degree of automation required by considering an array of options and selecting the most reasonable option in order to prepare feasibility estimates. Process control theories Machine control theories and mechatronics Risk assessment techniques Conducting technical studies Conducting risk analyses Defining primary control strategies Knowledge of: 1. Skill in: 1. 2. 3.Skill in: 1.g. 3.g. 2. 2. life cycle analysis) Choosing the degree of automation Estimating the cost of control equipment and software Knowledge of: 1. ROI. Control strategies Principles of measurement Electrical components Control components Various degrees of automation Evaluating different control strategies Selecting appropriate measurements Selecting appropriate components Articulating concepts Knowledge of: 1. Task 2: Automating process and/or equipment Developing value analyses Determine the degree of automation required through cost/benefit analysis in order to meet the business need. Financial models (e. 2. 3. Various degrees of automation Various cost/benefit tools Control and information technologies (MES) and equipment Information technology and equipment Analyzing cost versus benefit (e. NPV) Business drivers Costs of control equipment Estimating techniques Knowledge of: 1. 4. 2.. 4.

85% 2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study .84 % of Items on Test 3. 2.79% 3. 3. 2.94% 15.69 2. Task 6: Estimating the cost of the system Running the financial model Evaluating the results of the financial analysis for the automation portion of the project Create a conceptual summary document by reporting preliminary decisions and assumptions in order to facilitate "go"/"no go" decision making. 2.83 Criticality 2.05 1. Conceptual summary outlines Writing in a technical and effective manner Compiling and summarizing information efficiently Presenting information Knowledge of: 1. Interviewing techniques Different operating strategies Team leadership and alignment Leading a individual or group discussion Communicating effectively Writing in a technical and effective manner 38 Knowledge of: 1.43% 2. 3.23 2. Skill in: 1.23 2.23% # of Items on Test 5 5 6 5 5 26 Domain II: Task 1: Definition Determine operational strategies through discussion with key stakeholders and using appropriate documentation in order to create and communicate design requirements.89 1. 2.23% 2. Performance Domain II: Definition Evaluation and Allocation of Questions for Domain II RATINGS Task 1 2 3 4 5 Importance 3.18 2.35 TOTAL Frequency 2.87 2.10 1.89 2.Skill in: 1.55 2.11 2.60 3. 3. Skill in: 1. 3.

reporting and information needs. drive systems. vendor preferences. 3. 5. 5. and security architecture through established practices in order to form the basis of the design. 6. 6. HMI. 2. 7. control systems. Control system costs Estimating techniques Available templates and tools Creating cost estimate Evaluating project viability Knowledge of: 1. NFPA) Control systems security practices Conducting safety analyses Determining which data is important to capture Selecting applicable standards and codes Identifying new guidelines that need to be developed Defining information needed for reports Completing instrument and equipment data sheets Knowledge of: 1. sensors. 3.g. Network architecture Communication protocols. Automation techniques Control theories Modeling and simulation techniques Basic control elements (e. 4. 3. ANSI. Skill in: 1. standards. communication concepts. including field level Safety concepts Industry standards and codes Security requirements Safety standards (e. machine control) Marketplace products available Process and/or equipment operations Applying and evaluating automation solutions Making intelligent decisions Using the different modeling tools Determining when modeling is needed Knowledge of: 1. Task 4: Generate a project cost estimate by gathering cost information in order to determine continued project viability. 2. Skill in: 1. Skill in: 1. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 39 . 4. Task 2: Building consensus Interpreting the data from interviews Analyze alternative technical solutions by conducting detailed studies in order to define the final automation strategy. 2. 2.. 4. 4. safety concepts. 5. 2. 3. 2.4. Task 3: Establish detailed requirements and data including network architecture.. batch control. instrument and equipment data sheets. ISAM. 6.g. actuators. 3. instruments. 5.

Task 5: Summarize project requirements by creating a basis-of-design document and a userrequirements document in order to launch the design phase. 2. 3. 2. Skill in: 1. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 40 . Basis of design outlines User-requirements document outlines Writing in a technical and effective manner Compiling and summarizing information Making effective presentations Knowledge of: 1.

31 2.66 2.Performance Domain III: System Design Evaluation and Allocation of Questions for Domain III RATINGS Task 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Importance 3. UL/FM. and regulatory compliance assessments by identifying key issues and risks in order to comply with applicable standards.59 2.g.97 2.45 2.04 2. 21 CFR Part 11..94% # of Items on Test 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 44 Domain III: Task 1: System Design Perform safety and/or hazard analyses.26 2..15% 2. electrical equipment. 3.92% 2.98 2.76 2.16 1.83 3.79 3.80 2.22 2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 41 . Applicable standards (e. NEC.80 Criticality 3.26 2.97 2.86 2. and electrical classification standards (e.21 1. policies. enclosure.85% 2.41 2. security analyses.61% 2. 4. ISA S84.97 2. 2. 2. and regulations.01 % of Items on Test 3. Skill in: 1.61% 2.02 1.g. IEC 61508. NEMA) Participating in a Hazard Operability Review Analyzing safety integrity levels Analyzing hazards Assessing security requirements or relevant security issues Applying regulations to design Knowledge of: 1.69 2. 3.68% 2.60% 2.59 TOTAL Frequency 2.67% 24.87% 2.42 2. NFPA) Environmental standards (EPA) Electrical.13 2. 5.

4. 2. 4. 7. 3. 3. 8.. 4. S88) Developing programming standards Selecting and sizing instrument equipment Designing low-voltage electrical systems Preparing drawing using AutoCAD software Knowledge of: 1. 2. 4. 3. 5. 5. 3. 3. Skill in: 1.g. 9. 6. Process Industry Practices (PIP) (Construction Industry Institute) IEC 61131 programming languages Customer standards Vendor standards Template development methodology Field devices Control valves Electrical standards (NEC) Instrument selection and sizing tools ISA standards (e.Task 2: Establish standards. Task 3: Create detailed equipment specifications and instrument data sheets based on vendor selection criteria.g. Task 4: Define the data structure layout and data flow model considering the volume and type of data involved in order to provide specifications for hardware selection and software development. 2. templates. InTools. Data requirements of system to be automated Data structures of control systems Data flow of controls systems Productivity tools and software (e.. 7. AutoCAD) Entity relationship diagrams Knowledge of: 1. 6. regulations. 6. 5. 5. Field devices Control valves Electrical standards (NEC) Instrument selection and sizing tools Vendors' offerings Motor and drive selection sizing tools Selecting and sizing motors and drives Selecting and sizing instrument equipment Designing low-voltage electrical systems Selecting and sizing computers Selecting and sizing control equipment Evaluating vendor alternatives Selecting or sizing of input/output signal devices and/or conditioners Knowledge of: 1. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 42 . Skill in: 1. 2. and guidelines as applied to the automation system using the information gathered in the definition stage and considering human-factor effects in order to satisfy customer design criteria and preferences. characteristics and conditions of the physical environment. 2. 4. and performance requirements in order to purchase equipment and support system design and development. 10.

g. 3. 4. 2. reports) using rules established in the definition stage in order to guide development and programming. Skill in: 1. alarming. 3.Skill in: 1.. Control theory Visualization. 5.g. 3. Relevant test standards Simulation tools Process Industry Practices (PIP) (Construction Industry Institute) General software testing procedures Functional description of the system/equipment to be automated Writing test plans Developing tests that validate that the system works as specified Knowledge of: 1. Task 5: Modeling data Tuning and normalizing databases Select the physical communication media. HMI. 6. Skill in: 1. 2. 4. control scheme. network architecture. Task 7: Design the test plan using chosen methodologies in order to execute appropriate testing relative to functional requirements. 2. Task 6: Vendor protocols Ethernet and other open networks (e. and protocols based on data requirements in order to complete system design and support system development. 7. 2. database/reporting techniques Documentation standards Vendors' capabilities for their hardware and software products General control strategies used within the industry Process/equipment to be automated Operating philosophy Writing functional descriptions Interpreting design specifications and user requirements Communicating the functional description to stakeholders Knowledge of: 1. 6. 3. 2. Devicenet) Physical requirements for networks/media Physical topology rules/limitations Network design Security requirements Backup practices Grounding and bonding practices Designing networks based on chosen protocols Develop a functional description of the automation solution (e. 8. alarms. 7. 5. 5. Knowledge of: 1. 2. 4. Skill in: 1.. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 43 .

visualization devices.Task 8: Perform the detailed design for the project by converting the engineering and system design into purchase requisitions. Task 9: Prepare comprehensive construction work packages by organizing the detailed design information and documents in order to release project for construction. and installation details consistent with the specification and functional descriptions in order to provide detailed information for development and deployment. 2. computers. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 44 . Field devices. 7. 2. 1. 2. drawings. and networks Installation standards and recommended practices Electrical and wiring practices Specific customer preferences Functional requirements of the system/equipment to be automated Applicable construction codes Documentation standards Performing detailed design work Documenting the design Knowledge of: Skill in: 1. 6. Applicable construction practices Documentation standards Assembling construction work packages Knowledge of: 1. control devices. Skill in: 1. 3. panel designs. 5. 4.

63% 2.91% 2.00 2.Performance Domain IV: Development Evaluation and Allocation of Questions for Domain IV RATINGS Task 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Importance 2.73 Criticality 2.35 3.59% 3.23 2.42% 22.22 TOTAL Frequency 2.13 2.75 3. 1.85 % of Items on Test 2. 8.87 2.04% # of Items on Test 5 4 6 5 5 5 5 4 39 Domain IV: Task 1: Knowledge of Development Develop Human Machine Interface (HMI) in accordance with the design documents in order to meet the functional requirements. 3. 9.95 3.75% 2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 45 . 5. 4.53 2.82% 2.61 2.09 1.33 2. 5. 6. 11. 3. 2.18 2.56 2.08 2.78% 2.11 1.91 2.78 3.15% 2. 10. 7.99 2. Specific HMI software products Tag definition schemes Programming structure techniques Network communications Alarming schemes Report configurations Presentation techniques Database fundamentals Computer operating systems Human factors HMI supplier options Presenting data in a logical and aesthetic fashion Creating intuitive navigation menus Implementing connections to remote devices Documenting configuration and programming Programming configurations Skill in: 1.65 2. 4.17 2. 2.95 2.

4. 9. 10. 7. 8. 6. 2. 4. 4. 5. 7. 6.Task 2: Develop database and reporting functions in accordance with the design documents in order to meet the functional requirements. 6. 3. 7. Task 3: Develop control configuration or programming in accordance with the design documents in order to meet the functional requirements. Skill in: 1. 2. 7. 5. 8. 4. 8. 3. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 46 . 11. 6.. Relational database theory Specific database software products Specific reporting products Programming/scripting structure techniques Network communications Structured Query language Report configurations Entity diagram techniques Computer operating systems Data mapping Presenting data in a logical and aesthetic fashion Administrating databases Implementing connections to remote applications Writing queries Creating reports and formatting/printing specifications for report output Documenting database configuration Designing databases Interpreting functional description Knowledge of: 1. 5. 2. 5. Skill in: 1. 10. 3. ISA) Process/equipment to be automated Interpreting functional description Interpreting control strategies and logic drawings Programming and/or configuration capabilities Implementing connections to remote devices Documenting configuration and programs Interpreting P&IDs Interfacing systems Knowledge of: 1. 12. 9. Specific control software products Tag definition schemes Programming structure techniques Network communications Alarming schemes I/O structure Memory addressing schemes Hardware configuration Computer operating systems Processor capabilities Standard nomenclature (e. 2.g. 3.

IR) Computer operating systems Interfacing and gateways Data mapping Analyzing throughput Ensuring data integrity Troubleshooting Documenting configuration Configuring network products Interfacing systems Manipulating data Knowledge of: 1. 6. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 47 . 6. 7. Skill in: 1. fiber. 5. 7.. 2. 2. 3.Task 4: Implement data transfer methodology that maximizes throughput and ensures data integrity using communication protocols and specifications in order to assure efficiency and reliability. 5.g. 9. 2. 4. 7. I/O servers). 5. Network topology Network protocols Physical media specifications (e. Skill in: 1.. 12. RF. Task 5: Implement security methodology in accordance with stakeholder requirements in order to mitigate loss and risk. copper. 11. 3.g. 3.g. 4. Specific control software products Specific HMI software products Specific database software products Specific reporting products Programming structure techniques Network communication Alarming schemes I/O structure Memory addressing schemes Hardware configurations Computer operating systems Defined practices Functional requirements of system/equipment to be automated Knowledge of: 1. 2. ISA) Documenting security configuration Configuring/programming of security system Implementing security features Knowledge of: 1. Specific networking software products (e.. 3. 2. 10. 6. 13. 29 CFR Part 11) Industry standards (e. 3.g. Task 6: Review configuration and programming using defined practices in order to establish compliance with functional requirements.. 8. 4. Basic system/network security techniques Customer security procedures Control user-level access privileges Regulatory expectations (e. 5. 4.

3. 4. Skill in: 1. 8. 12. Task 8: Assemble all required documentation and user manuals created during the development process in order to transfer essential knowledge to customers and end users. 3. 9. 7. 3. 5. 2. 5. Testing techniques Specific control software products Specific HMI software products Specific database software products Specific reporting products Network communications Alarming schemes I/O structure Memory addressing schemes Hardware configurations Computer operating systems Functional requirements of system/equipment to be automated Writing test plans Executing test plans Documenting test results Programming and/or configuration capabilities Implementing connections to remote devices Interpreting functional requirements of system/equipment to be automated Interpreting P&IDs Knowledge of: 1. 7. 11. General understanding of automation systems Computer operating systems Documentation practices Operations procedures Functional requirements of system/equipment to be automated Documenting technical information for non-technical audience Using documentation tools Organizing material for readability Knowledge of: 1. 3. 2. 10. 2. 2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 48 . 4. 6.Skill in: 1. 5. 4. Skill in: 1. 3. 2. 6. Task 7: Programming and/or configuration capabilities Documenting configuration and programs Reviewing programming/configuration for compliance with design requirements Test the automation system using the test plan in order to determine compliance with functional requirements.

Performance Domain V: Deployment Evaluation and Allocation of Questions for Domain V RATINGS Task 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Importance 2.01 2.74 2.83 2.18 2.96 2.21 2.16% 1.25% 1.21% 15.02 2.52 2.74 2.11 2. controllers.51 2.75 2.41% 1.24% # of Items on Test 2 2 2 3 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 27 Domain V: Task 1: Deployment Perform receipt verification of all field devices by comparing vendor records against design specifications in order to ensure that devices are as specified.28% 1.87 3.16 2. Field devices (e.05 2.82 3.14 2.52 3.34 3.28% 1..29 2.01 2.99 3.81 2.46 3. Skill in: 1. variable speed drives.34% 1.86 2.89 2.48% 1. 2.99 1.58 Frequency 2.11 3.74 3. transmitters. 2.51 2. final control valves.g.49 2.06 % of Items on Test 1.24% 1.26% 1. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 49 .97 TOTAL Criticality 2.18% 1. servo motors) Design specifications Interpreting specifications and vendor documents Resolving differences Knowledge of: 1.07 2.15% 1.23 1.

2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 50 . PC) System administration Installing software Verifying software installation Versioning techniques and revision control Troubleshooting (i. DCS. 4.. Task 3: Install configuration and programs by loading them into the target devices in order to prepare for testing.e. field devices. 2. 3. 5. OSHA) Interpreting installation guidelines Knowledge of: 1.Task 2: Perform physical inspection of installed equipment against construction drawings in order to ensure installation in accordance with design drawings and specifications. 2. 2. 3. building codes. 3.. 4. computer hardware.g. Skill in: 1. 3. cabling) Applicable codes and regulations Interpreting construction drawings Comparing physical implementation to drawings Interpreting codes and regulations (e.. configurations. Construction documentation Installation practices (e. system-level testing) Test plan for the system/equipment to be automated System to be tested Applicable regulatory requirements relative to testing Knowledge of: 1.g. Skill in: 1. 2. Troubleshooting techniques Problem-solving strategies Critical thinking Processes. unit-level testing. Task 5: Test configuration and programming in accordance with the design documents by executing the test plan in order to verify that the system operates as specified. Skill in: 1.. 4. 3. 5. resolving issues and retesting) Knowledge of: 1. PLC. Task 4: Solve unforeseen problems identified during installation using troubleshooting skills in order to correct deficiencies. 5. 2. Control system (e. 3. Programming and configuration Test methodology (e. and programming Debugging techniques Solving problems Determining root causes Ferreting out information Communicating with facility personnel Implementing problem solutions Documenting problems and solutions Knowledge of: 1.g.. 4. 4.g. 6. 2. equipment. site acceptance test. NEC. factory acceptance test.

2. 2. Skill in: 1. 4. 2.. resolving issues and retesting) Writing test plans Knowledge of: 1. Task 8: Test all security features by executing test plans in order to ensure that security functions operate as designed.. 6. 4. 4. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study .e. 2. Test methodology Communication networks and protocols Field devices and their performance requirements Regulatory requirements relative to testing Verifying network integrity and data flow integrity Conducting field device tests Comparing test results to design specifications Documenting test results Troubleshooting (i. 2. resolving issues and retesting) Writing test plans Knowledge of: 1. 5. 3. Applicable safety Safety system design Safety elements Test methodology Facility safety procedures Regulatory requirements relative to testing Executing test plans Documenting test results Testing safety systems Troubleshooting (i. 3. 2. resolving issues and retesting) Writing test plans Test communication systems and field devices in accordance with design specifications in order to ensure proper operation. Skill in: 1.. 4.Skill in: 1. 5.e. 6. 4. Skill in: 1. 5. 4. 2. 5. 3. 3. 4. 3. Task 7: Test all safety elements and systems by executing test plans in order to ensure that safety functions operate as designed.e.e. 3.. Applicable security standards Security system design Test methodology Vulnerability assessments Regulatory requirements relative to testing Executing test plans Documenting test results Testing security features Troubleshooting (i. Task 6: Executing test plans Documenting test results Troubleshooting (i. 3. 5. resolving issues and retesting) Writing test plans 51 Knowledge of: 1.

2. 4. Skill in: 1. and programming Solving problems Determining root causes Communicating with facility personnel Implementing problem solutions Documenting test results Knowledge of: 1. Troubleshooting techniques Processes.Task 9: Provide initial training for facility personnel in system operation and maintenance through classroom and hands-on training in order to ensure proper use of the system. resolving issues and retesting) Writing test plans Knowledge of: 1. 3. 2. 2. equipment. 3.. Instructional techniques Automation systems Networking and data communications Automation maintenance techniques System/equipment to be automated Operating and maintenance procedures Communicating with trainees Organizing instructional materials Instructing Knowledge of: 1. 2. 3. 2. Test methodology Field devices System/equipment to be automated Networking and data communications Safety systems Security systems Regulatory requirements relative to testing Executing test plans Documenting test results Testing of entire systems Communicating final results to facility personnel Troubleshooting (i. 6. 2. 7. Task 10: Execute system-level tests in accordance with the test plan in order to ensure the entire system functions as designed. 3. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 52 .e. 5. 6. 4. 5. 5. 5. Task 11: Troubleshoot problems identified during testing using a structured methodology in order to correct system deficiencies. configurations. 4. 4. Skill in: 1. Skill in: 1. 6. 3.

5. 4. 2. Loop tuning methods/control theory Control system hardware Computer system performance tuning User requirements System/equipment to be automated Tuning control loops Adjusting final control elements Optimizing software performance Communicating final system performance results Knowledge of: 1. 2. 4.Task 12: Make necessary adjustments using applicable tools and techniques in order to demonstrate system performance and turn the automated system over to operations. 3. Skill in: 1. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 53 . 3.

95% 0.88% 1.15 1.89 1.88 1. regulations.39 2.10 2.00% 1.91% 1.91 2.76 2.87 2. 3.49 2.78 1.07% 10. 4.90% 0.39 2.84% 0.84% 0.65 2.51 TOTAL Frequency 1.45 1.66 2. 2.44 1.87% 0.13 1.77 Criticality 2.81 1.42 1.94 1.62 1.39 1. Applicable standards Performance metrics and acceptable limits Records and record locations Established procedures and purposes of procedures Communicating orally and written Auditing the system/equipment Analyzing data and drawing conclusions Knowledge of: 1.34 1.41 2. 3.20 2.39 2. Skill in: 1.95 % of Items on Test 0. 54 ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study .34 2.17 2.81% 0. and best practices.33 2.56 1.82% 0.26 1.06% 0.95% # of Items on Test 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 19 Domain VI: Task 1: Operation and Maintenance Verify system performance and records periodically using established procedures in order to ensure compliance with standards.Performance Domain VI: Operation and Maintenance Evaluation and Allocation of Questions for Domain VI RATINGS Task 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Importance 2.05 2.16 2.47 2. 2. Task 2: Provide technical support for facility personnel by applying system expertise in order to maximize system availability.

2. 4. 4. 6. 3. 5. 3. Task 5: Monitor performance using software and hardware diagnostic tools in order to support early detection of potential problems. 5. Skill in: 1. 2. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 55 . 3. 2. securing space) Delivering training effectively Answering questions effectively Knowledge of: 1. Automation systems Performance metrics Software and hardware diagnostic tools Potential problem indicators Baseline/normal system performance Acceptable performance limits Knowledge of: 1. 4. 5. Task 3: All system components Processes and equipment Automation system functionality Other support resources Control systems theories and applications Analytical troubleshooting and root-cause analyses Troubleshooting (i.. 2. resolving issues and retesting) Investigating and listening Programming and configuring automation system components Perform training needs analysis periodically for facility personnel using skill assessments in order to establish objectives for the training program. preparing materials. 2. 4.Knowledge of: 1. 3. Personnel training requirements Automation system technology Assessment frequency Assessment methodologies Interviewing Assessing level of skills Knowledge of: 1. 2. Skill in: 1.. 6. securing demos. Training resources Subject matter and training objectives Teaching methodology Writing training objectives Creating the training Organizing training classes (e. 3. Task 4: Provide training for facility personnel by addressing identified objectives in order to ensure the skill level of personnel is adequate for the technology and products used in the system. Skill in: 1.g.e. 3. 2.

4. and/or efficiency. 2. 5. Performance metrics Control theories System/equipment operations Business needs Optimization tools and methods Analyzing data Programming and configuring Communicating effectively with others Implementing continuous improvement procedures Knowledge of: 1. 4. 3. 4. 2. 3.Skill in: 1. Performance requirements Inspection and test methodologies Acceptable standards Testing and inspecting Analyzing test results Communicating effectively with others in written or oral form Knowledge of: 1.e. Skill in: 1. Task 8: Document lessons learned by reviewing the project with all stakeholders in order to improve future projects. Project review methodology Project history Project methodology and work processes Project metrics Communicating effectively with others Configuring and programming Documenting lessons learned Writing and summarizing Knowledge of: 1. Task 7: Perform continuous improvement by working with facility personnel in order to increase capacity. 3. Skill in: 1. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 56 . 2. 2. 3. 2. 3. 2. Task 6: Using the software and hardware diagnostic tools Analyzing data Troubleshooting (i. 4. reliability. Skill in: 1. 3. 2.. 3. resolving issues and retesting) Perform periodic inspections and tests in accordance with written standards and procedures in order to verify system or component performance against requirements.

4.e.. 4. 2. Critical system components Installed base of system equipment and software Component availability Reliability analysis Sourcing of spare parts Acquiring and organizing information Analyzing data Knowledge of: 1. and service contracts for software and equipment by reviewing both internal and external options in order to meet expectations for capability and availability. Skill in: 1. 3. 3. 5.g. 2. 3. Task 11: Provide a system management plan by performing preventive maintenance. Task 10: Determine the need for spare parts based on an assessment of installed base and probability of failure in order to maximize system availability and minimize cost..Task 9: Maintain licenses. 3. Installed base of system equipment and software Support agreements Internal and external support resources Lifecycle state and support level (including vendor product plans and future changes) Organizing and scheduling Programming and configuring Applying software updates (i. and designing recovery plans in order to avoid and recover from system failures. 4. 3. keys. Automation systems Acceptable system downtime Preventative and maintenance procedures Backup practices (e. storage location) Acquiring and organizing Leading Managing crises Performing backups and restores Using system tools Knowledge of: 1. storage media. 2. updates. implementing backups. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 57 . frequency. 2. patches) Knowledge of: 1. 2. 2. 5. Skill in: 1. 4. Skill in: 1.

Management of change procedures Automation systems and documentation Configuration management practices Programming and configuring Updating documentation Knowledge of: 1. 3. Skill in: 1. ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 58 .Task 12: Follow a process for authorization and implementation of changes in accordance with established standards or practices in order to safeguard system and documentation integrity. 2. 2.

President Maverick Technologies. AB Joe Ruder.. MN Alan Carty. Automation Engineer Rockwell Automation. Principal Consultant Control & Integration Management . Principal Engineer Emerson Process Management. NJ George Skene. Gerald Cockrell. CA Art Pietrzyk. VP Americas Project Excellence Emerson Process Management. Professor Indiana State University. TN Ron Lutes. Inc. Control Engineer E I du Pont. President Automationtechies. CAP Steering Team: Vernon Trevathan. IN Dan Bielski. Inc. Inc.LLC. OH Gavin Jacobs. Director Design Engineering – Control Systems Fluor Corporation. IN Skip Holmes. TX Doug Ratzlaff. IA ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 59 .Appendix A: Contributors ISA would like to thank these individuals and their employers for their contribution of time. Principal Documentation & Engineering Services. OH Jonathan Pollet. MO Ken Baker (retired) Eli Lilly. IL Additional Contributors: Dave Adler. and enthusiasm for the Certified Automation Professional (CAP) program. Senior Project Manager Aerospace Testing Alliance. Manager of Applications Engineering Rockwell Automation. TX Jeff White.. Chair. MO Nicholas Sands. Corporate Engineering Technologies Proctor & Gamble. Environmental Specialist Sempra Energy Solutions. Vice President Performance Solutions COMPEX. OH Bob Lindeman. expertise. Associate Director – Control & Information Systems. MI Chris Stephens. Vice President Benham Systems. Design Engineer III Fluor Corporation.. IA Dave Panish. Principal Controls Engineer Nestle' Purina Petcare. AB Lee Lane. CA Brent Carlson. President Enterprise Automation. TX Ken Valentine. Senior Controls Engineer The Benham Companies. Technical Section Head P&G. Systems Engineer 3M.. MO Paul Maurath. OH Greg McMillan (retired) Austin. MI Joe Bingham. Inc. MN Dr. IN Gerald Wilbanks. TX Jeff Miller. Director of Project Management Interstates Control Systems. AL Paul Galeski. Senior Engineering Consultant Eli Lilly. Control Engineer Interstates Control Systems. President PlantData Technologies. LLC.com.

Project management commish. research and development Sales and Marketing Sales Management Senior management Staff Engineer System construction. not certified in canada P. contractorjourneyman electrician electrical contractor NARTE Electro-mechanical tech Process Control Technologi FCC MCP MCSA MCDBA CCNA MIChemE CEng N3 & T1 + 28years Exp.Vendor Manufacturing .Appendix B: Other Responses Table VII. Software consultancy Systems Integration (all industries) Table IX. System Design Systems Design Technical support Table VIII: Other Industry Worked In all Amunition/Exsplosives Bulding Materials education Education Food/PHarm/SPecialty Chemical Industrial gas Management Manufacturer . from Ontario Canada PhD Chem Eng RPT (Eng) WTP & WWTP Operator Licenses Table XI. Other Primary Responsibility in Current Position automation sales/support Control System Engineering Corp Controls Manager & Tech Direction Setting Corporate management Corporate Management CSE design consultant Engineering Consultant Engineering Management Engineering Research Environmental Engineering General Management Instrumentation Sales Management (2) Management of automation teams across the US Manufacturing systems and Computer systems validat Project Manufacturing Eng.field control Process Automation Supplier ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study Semiconductor (2) Semiconductor manuf. Other Certifications and Licenses Chartered Eng Chartered Engineer (UK) CPNE CSAT (Previously) CSVA EIT (4) Elec.general mining Mining Mining and Metals mining and refining Non-Metals Mining oil and gas pipelines and facilities oil well./inhouse const.E. Other Employer’s Company or Organization Automation distributor Cable TV Central Engineering Combonation of End User and OEM Consultant Control Systems Manufacturer Education Instrument systems calibrations to NIST Manufacturing Pharmaceutical Manufacturer Pharmaceutical Mfg Semiconductor Process Manufacturing University Table X. Other Professional Societies and/or Organizations ACM APEGGA APEO ashrae 60 .

S. Other Level of Education 3 year college diploma A. MSEE and MBA Technical College/Technicon ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 61 .T.E.ASHRAE ASME AWWA British IChemE control engineering CPNE IChemE (UK) IChemE WBF ispe ISPE (4) ISPE ACM MBAA NFPA NSPE NSPE ISPE ASQ PDA PMI (2) SEMI Sematech SME (2) SME NSPE WBF (2) WEF Table XIII.I.A. with approx. 3 years toward a B.S.

engHVAC sub-specialty Mechanical Engineering (11) mechanical engineering (Automatic Controls) metallurgical engineering Nuclear Engineering Operations Physics Power Electronics process control Process Control Science & Mathematics Thermal/Fluid Sciences Welding ISA Certified Automation Professional Job Analysis Study 62 .Appendix C: Major/Focus of Highest Degree Accounting (2) Aircraft Maintenance Architectural Automation (2) automation engineering biological sciences Bioscience Business (2) Business Administration (9) Business Management ChE Chemical Engineering (28) Chemistry civil engineer Computer engineering Computer Engineering computer information systems computer integrated manufacturing Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technology Computer Science (2) Computers Science control Control Engineering Control System Engineering control systems Control Systems control systems engineering Controls Engineering Drafting&Design education EE (2) EE/control systems EET electrical & computer Engineering ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING Electrical Engineering (68) electronic engineering technology Electronics (2) Electronics Engineering Electronics Engineering Technology Electronics Technology Electroninc Technology Engineering Mgmt Engineering Science-Control Systems option Environmental environmental science Environmental Sciences Forestry Industrial Maintenace Industrial Technology w/ Electronics minor Information Systems Information Technology Information Technology & Management instrumentation Instrumentation Instrumentation & Control (from DeVry Technical) Instrumentation and control engineering management information systems Manufacturing Systems Engineering Manufacturing Systems. MBA MBA (3) Measurement Mech.

We suggest that you review the Definition of Terms before responding to any survey questions. Systems. We appreciate your time in completing this survey and we value your important input. and Automation Society CAP Survey . SYSTEMS. and Automation Society Role Delineation Survey for the Certified Automation Professional This booklet contains the ISA – The Instrumentation. In Section A.March 2004 63 . Systems. ISA – The Instrumentation. we have provided you with a list of definitions and terms that are used throughout the survey. In Section B. you are asked to complete a Confidential Survey. and Automation Society is developing a new certification for automation professionals to cover the entire field of automation application. AND AUTOMATION SOCIETY CERTIFIED AUTOMATION PROFESSIONAL ROLE DELINEATION SURVEY MARCH 2004 Instructions for Completing the Instrumentation. which provides us with the demographic information necessary to ensure that automation professionals working in various settings with differing backgrounds are represented in the data collection.Appendix D: Practice Analysis Survey ISA – THE INSTRUMENTATION. and Automation Society role delineation survey for the Certified Automation Professional along with instructional materials to aid you in completing it. ISA-The Instrumentation. Systems. Directions are provided at the beginning of each section of the survey. Systems.

In Section C, you are asked to review the Task Statements required for competent performance in each performance domain by the Certified Automation Professional, and rate each for importance, criticality, and frequency as they pertain to the role of the Certified Automation Professional. In Section D, you are asked to review the Performance Domains that define the role of the Certified Automation Professional. We ask that you rate the importance, criticality, and frequency of these domains as they pertain to the role of the Certified Automation Professional. Please review the entire booklet before responding to any of the questions. Your review will help you to understand our terminology and the structure of the role delineation survey. Please mark your responses directly in this booklet. Please return your completed survey by 2 April 2004 in the enclosed, self-addressed, stamped envelope to: CASTLE Worldwide, Inc. Post Office Box 570 Morrisville, North Carolina 27560-0570

Thank you in advance for your help with this very important project. ISA will use your responses to help determine the blueprint for the ISA Certified Automation Professional Examination.

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Section A Confidential Survey
Please fill in the following demographic information, which will be used to ensure that automation professionals working in various settings with differing backgrounds are represented in the data collection. All responses are kept strictly confidential by CASTLE Worldwide, Inc. Computer programs are used to sort the data. Neither individual persons or companies nor their particular data will be identifiable in any report generated using information obtained through this survey. Please check the appropriate boxes, or print your responses. 1. Gender (Please select one.)
‰

Male

‰

Female

2. Age (Please select one.)
‰ ‰

Under 30 years 31-40 years

‰ ‰

41-50 years 51-60 years

‰

61 years and above

3. In which state/province do you work? (Please list one.) ____________________________________________________________________________________ 4. How much experience do you have as an automation professional? (Please select one.)
‰ ‰ ‰

I am not an automation professional. Less than 1 year 1-5 years

‰ ‰ ‰

6-10 years 11-15 years More than 15 years

5. What percentage of your time do you spend working as an automation professional in your current position? (Please select one.)
‰ ‰ ‰

I am not an automation professional. Less than 25 percent 25-50 percent

‰ ‰

51-75 percent 76-100 percent

6. Which control area(s) do you work in on a daily basis? (Please select one.)
‰ ‰

Discrete/Machine Control Process/Liquid/Dry

‰

Both Discrete/Machine Control and Process/Liquid/Dry

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7. What is your primary responsibility in your current position? (Please select one.)
‰ ‰ ‰

Field Engineering Information Systems Operations and Maintenance

‰ ‰

Project/System Engineering Other (Please specify.) ___________________________________

8. Which of the following best describes the industry in which you work? (Please select one.)
‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

Aerospace Automotive Manufacturing Building Automation Chemical Manufacturing Consumer Goods Electrical/Electronic Manufacturing Engineering and Construction Environmental/Waste Food and Beverage Manufacturing Machinery Manufacturing Metals Manufacturing

‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

Petroleum Manufacturing Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Plastics Manufacturing Pulp and Paper Manufacturing Textiles/Fabrics Manufacturing Transportation Utilities Water/Waste Other (Please specify.) ___________________________________

9. Which of the following best describes your current employer's company or organization? (Please select one.)
‰ ‰

Control Systems Suppliers End-Users (petro-chem, food and beverage, pulp and paper) Engineering and Design Firm

‰ ‰ ‰

Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Systems Integrators Other (Please specify.)

‰

10. What certifications/licenses do you currently hold? (Please select all that apply.)
‰ ‰ ‰

CEM CQE CCST

‰ ‰ ‰

CSE MSCE PE

‰ ‰

PMP Other (Please specify.) ___________________

11. In which professional societies and/or organizations do you currently hold membership? (Please select all that apply.)
‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

AIChE ASME CSIA IBEW IEEE

‰ ‰ ‰

ISA UA Other (Please specify.) ___________________________________

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manufacturing information systems. Systems. measurement. software. systems integration. What is your highest level of education? (Please select one.) ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ High School/Secondary School Associate Degree Bachelor’s Degree Master’s Degree ‰ ‰ Doctoral Degree Other (Please specify.g. documentation. What is your annual income? (Please select one. Performance Domain: The performance domains are the major responsibilities or duties that define the role of the Certified Automation Professional. CAPs are responsible for the direction. and support of systems.000 $20. mechanical engineering.000 to $49. electrical engineering) __________________________________________________________________________________ 14.000 to $110. design.000 to $79.12. deployment.. definition.March 2004 . There are six performance domains included in this survey. and equipment used in control systems. business administration. and Automation Society CAP Survey . What is the major/focus of study of your highest degree? (e.000 Section B Definition of Terms Below are definitions of the terms found in this role delineation survey.999 ‰ ‰ $80. * There may be a variety of ways to combine education and experience to satisfy eligibility requirements for an introductory two-year period.000 More than $110.) ___________________________________ 13. development/application.999 $50. Each performance domain may be considered a major heading in an outline and may include a brief behavioral description. and operational consulting. Certified Automation Professional (CAP): The ISA Certified Automation Professional (CAP) has completed a four-year technical degree* and five years of experience working in automation. as identified by an expert panel: • • • • • • Feasibility Study Definition System Design Development Deployment Operation and Maintenance 67 ISA-The Instrumentation.) ‰ ‰ ‰ Less than $20.

Typically. Systems. task statements answer such questions as: • • • • What activity did you perform? To whom or to what was your activity directed? Why did you perform that activity? How did you accomplish the activity? ISA-The Instrumentation.Task Statement: A task is an activity performed within a performance domain.March 2004 68 . Each performance domain consists of a series of tasks that collectively form a comprehensive and detailed description of each performance domain. and Automation Society CAP Survey .

2 = Moderately Important. A task is an activity performed within a performance domain. System Design 4. as identified by an expert panel. In this section. Operation and Maintenance ISA-The Instrumentation.March 2004 69 . Deployment 6. Please remember. Definition 3. Each performance domain may be considered a major heading in an outline. Rate each of the six performance domains by using the scale below. Indicate how important each performance domain is to the Certified Automation Professional. Each performance domain consists of a series of tasks that collectively form a comprehensive and detailed description of each performance domain. Select the number of the description below that best exemplifies your rating for each performance domain. If you are unclear what areas a performance domain covers. DO NOT RANK THE DOMAINS. Please assign each performance domain only one rating. the performance domains are the major responsibilities or duties that define the role of the Certified Automation Professional. Performance of tasks in this domain is only moderately essential to the job performance of the Certified Automation Professional. criticality. and write that number in the space provided next to each performance domain.Section C Evaluation of Performance Domains Instructions: You will be rating each performance domain identified by an expert panel on three dimensions: importance. you will validate the performance domains. Performance of tasks in this domain is only slightly essential to the job performance of the Certified Automation Professional. Performance of tasks in this domain is absolutely essential to the job performance of the Certified Automation Professional. and frequency. Feasibility Study 2. 3 = Very Important. There are six performance domains included in this survey. Performance of tasks in this domain is clearly essential to the job performance of the Certified Automation Professional. Rating of Importance Performance Domain 1. please review Section D. Importance: Importance is defined as the degree to which knowledge in the performance domain is essential to the role of the Certified Automation Professional. 4 = Extremely Important. 1 = Slightly Important. and Automation Society CAP Survey . Systems. Development 5.

Criticality: Criticality is defined as the potential for harmful consequences to occur if the Certified Automation Professional is not knowledgeable in the performance domain. 3 = Substantial Harm. Harm may be physical. Definition 3. Rate each of the six performance domains by using the scale below. Inability to perform tasks within this performance domain would definitely lead to error with severe adverse consequences. Operation and Maintenance Frequency: What percent of time does the Certified Automation Professional spend performing duties associated with each domain? Write the percentage in the space provided next to each domain. and Automation Society CAP Survey . Rating of Criticality Performance Domain 1. Operation and Maintenance 100% ISA-The Instrumentation. 4 = Extreme Harm. Please assign each performance domain only one rating. Inability to perform tasks within this performance domain would lead to error with minimal adverse consequences. etc. System Design 4. DO NOT RANK THE DOMAINS.March 2004 70 . Definition 3. employees. Inability to perform tasks within this performance domain would lead to error with moderate adverse consequences. Feasibility Study 2. emotional. The total must equal 100 percent. Development 5. Feasibility Study 2. 1 = Minimal or No Harm. the public. and/or other relevant stakeholders. Percent of Time Performance Domain 1. financial. Inability to perform tasks within this performance domain would lead to error with substantial adverse consequences. Deployment 6. Development 5. Systems. and write that number in the space provided next to each performance domain. Select the number of the description that best exemplifies your rating for each performance domain. System Design 4. 2 = Moderate Harm. Indicate the degree to which the inability of the Certified Automation Professional to perform tasks within the performance domain would be seen as causing harm to employers. Deployment 6.

and Frequency rating for each task statement. Systems. Task 2: Determine the degree of automation required through cost/benefit analysis in order to meet the business need. you will validate the tasks. Circle the number corresponding to the Importance. _____________________________________________________________________________________ __________ DOMAIN I: FEASIBILITY STUDY Task 1: Define the preliminary scope through currently established work practices in order to meet the business need. Task 4: Conduct technical studies for the preliminary automation strategy by gathering data and conducting an appropriate analysis relative to requirements in order to define development needs and risks Task 5: Perform a justification analysis by generating a feasibility cost estimate and using an accepted financial model in order to determine project viability. criticality. and Automation Society CAP Survey . As previously discussed. please review Section C. Criticality.Section D Evaluation of Task Statements In this section you will rate the task statements associated with each of the six domains on three dimensions – importance. In this section. IMPORTANCE 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 CRITICALITY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 FREQUENCY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 ISA-The Instrumentation. and frequency – according to the scales below. If you are unclear about the relationship between the performance domains and the tasks. the performance domains are the major responsibilities and duties that define the role of the Certified Automation Professional. Please remember. Task 3: Develop a preliminary automation strategy that matches the degree of automation required by considering an array of options and selecting the most reasonable in order to prepare feasibility estimates. Task 6: Create a conceptual summary document by reporting preliminary decisions and assumptions in order to facilitate "go"/"no go" decision making. Rating Scales Importance 1 – Slightly Important 2 – Moderately Important 3 – Very Important 4 – Extremely Important Criticality* 1 – Causing Minimal or No Harm 2 – Causing Moderate Harm 3 – Causing Substantial Harm 4 – Causing Extreme Harm Frequency 1 – About Once Per Year or Never 2 – About Once Per Month 3 – About Once Per Week 4 – About Once Per Day or More Often *The amount of harm that could be caused by performing the task incompetently.March 2004 71 . a task is an activity performed within a performance domain.

IMPORTANCE 1 2 3 4 CRITICALITY 1 2 3 4 FREQUENCY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Please list any tasks related to Domain II that you think may have been overlooked.Please list any tasks related to Domain I that you think may have been overlooked. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ ISA-The Instrumentation. communication concepts. Systems. Task 5: Summarize project requirements by creating a basis-ofdesign document and a user-requirements document in order to launch the design phase. Task 4: Generate a project cost estimate by gathering cost information in order to determine continued project viability.March 2004 72 . Task 3: Establish detailed requirements and data including network architecture. reporting and information needs. standards. and security architecture through established practices in order to form the basis of the design. safety concepts. IMPORTANCE 1 2 3 4 CRITICALITY 1 2 3 4 FREQUENCY 1 2 3 4 Rating Scales Importance 1 – Slightly Important 2 – Moderately Important 3 – Very Important 4 – Extremely Important Criticality* 1 – Causing Minimal or No Harm 2 – Causing Moderate Harm 3 – Causing Substantial Harm 4 – Causing Extreme Harm Frequency 1 – About Once Per Year or Never 2 – About Once Per Month 3 – About Once Per Week 4 – About Once Per Day or More Often *The amount of harm that could be caused by performing the task incompetently. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ DOMAIN II: DEFINITION Task 1: Determine operational strategies through discussion with key stakeholders and using appropriate documentation in order to create and communicate design requirements. instrument and equipment data sheets. vendor preferences. and Automation Society CAP Survey . DOMAIN II: DEFINITION (CONTINUED) Task 2: Analyze alternative technical solutions by conducting detailed studies in order to define the final automation strategy.

control scheme. Task 7: Design the test plan using chosen methodologies in order to execute appropriate testing relative to functional requirements.g. and Automation Society CAP Survey . Task 2: Establish standards. and protocols based on data requirements in order to complete system design and support system development. and regulatory compliance assessments by identifying key issues and risks in order to comply with applicable standards. network architecture. Systems.. templates. security analyses. Task 6: Develop a functional description of the automation solution (e. ISA-The Instrumentation. policies.DOMAIN III: SYSTEM DESIGN Task 1: Perform safety and/or hazard analyses. Task 5: Select the physical communication media.March 2004 73 . and guidelines as applied to the automation system using the information gathered in the definition stage and considering human-factor effects in order to satisfy customer design criteria and preferences. and performance requirements in order to purchase equipment and support system design and development. IMPORTANCE CRITICALITY FREQUENCY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Rating Scales Importance 1 – Slightly Important 2 – Moderately Important 3 – Very Important 4 – Extremely Important Criticality* 1 – Causing Minimal or No Harm 2 – Causing Moderate Harm 3 – Causing Substantial Harm 4 – Causing Extreme Harm Frequency 1 – About Once Per Year or Never 2 – About Once Per Month 3 – About Once Per Week 4 – About Once Per Day or More Often *The amount of harm that could be caused by performing the task incompetently. characteristics and conditions of the physical environment. Task 3: Create detailed equipment specifications and instrument data sheets based on vendor selection criteria. reports) using rules established in the definition stage in order to guide development and programming. alarms. regulations. HMI. Task 4: Define the data structure layout and data flow model considering the volume and type of data involved in order to provide specifications for hardware selection and software development. and regulations.

and installation details consistent with the specification and functional descriptions in order to provide detailed information for development and deployment. Task 5: Implement security methodology in accordance with stakeholder requirements in order to mitigate loss and risk. and Automation Society CAP Survey . _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ ISA-The Instrumentation. Task 6: Review configuration and programming using defined practices in order to establish compliance with all design requirements. drawings. IMPORTANCE CRITICALITY FREQUENCY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Please list any tasks related to Domain III that you think may have been overlooked. Task 8: Assemble all required documentation and user manuals created during the development process in order to transfer essential knowledge to customers and end users. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ DOMAIN IV: DEVELOPMENT Task 1: Develop Human Machine Interface (HMI) in accordance with the design documents in order to meet the functional requirements. Systems. Task 3: Develop control configuration or programming in accordance with the design documents in order to meet the functional requirements. Task 4: Implement data transfer methodology that maximizes throughput and ensures data integrity using communication protocols and specifications in order to assure efficiency and reliability.DOMAIN III: SYSTEM DESIGN (CONTINUED) Task 8: Perform the detailed design for the project by converting the engineering and system design into purchase requisitions. IMPORTANCE 1 2 3 4 CRITICALITY 1 2 3 4 FREQUENCY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Please list any tasks related to Domain IV that you think may have been overlooked. Task 2: Develop database and reporting functions in accordance with the design documents in order to meet the functional requirements. Task 7: Test the automation system using the test plan in order to determine compliance with functional requirements. Task 9: Prepare comprehensive construction work packages by organizing the detailed design information and documents in order to release project for construction. panel designs.March 2004 74 .

IMPORTANCE 1 2 3 4 CRITICALITY 1 2 3 4 FREQUENCY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Please list any tasks related to Domain V that you think may have been overlooked.March 2004 75 . Task 5: Test configuration and programming in accordance with the design documents by executing the test plan in order to verify that the system operates as specified. Task 2: Perform physical inspection of installed equipment against construction drawings in order to ensure installation in accordance with design drawings and specifications. Task 7: Test all safety elements and systems by executing test plans in order to ensure that safety functions operate as designed. Task 4: Solve unforeseen problems identified during installation using troubleshooting skills in order to correct deficiencies. Task 8: Test all security features by executing test plans in order to ensure that security functions operate as designed. Task 12:Make necessary adjustments using applicable tools and techniques in order to demonstrate system performance and turn the automated system over to operations. Task 11:Troubleshoot problems identified during testing using a structured methodology in order to correct system deficiencies. Task 10:Execute system-level tests in accordance with the test plan in order to ensure the entire system functions as designed. _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ ISA-The Instrumentation. Task 3: Install configuration and programs by loading them into the target devices in order to prepare for testing. and Automation Society CAP Survey . Task 9: Provide initial training for facility personnel in system operation and maintenance through classroom and handson training in order to ensure proper use of the system.Rating Scales Importance 1 – Slightly Important 2 – Moderately Important 3 – Very Important 4 – Extremely Important Criticality* 1 – Causing Minimal or No Harm 2 – Causing Moderate Harm 3 – Causing Substantial Harm 4 – Causing Extreme Harm Frequency 1 – About Once Per Year or Never 2 – About Once Per Month 3 – About Once Per Week 4 – About Once Per Day or More Often *The amount of harm that could be caused by performing the task incompetently. DOMAIN V: DEPLOYMENT Task 1: Perform receipt verification of all field devices by comparing vendor records against design specifications in order to ensure that devices are as specified. Task 6: Test communication systems and field devices in accordance with design specifications in order to ensure proper operation. Systems.

Task 3: Perform training needs analysis periodically for facility personnel using skill assessments in order to establish objectives for the training program.Rating Scales Importance 1 – Slightly Important 2 – Moderately Important 3 – Very Important 4 – Extremely Important Criticality* 1 – Causing Minimal or No Harm 2 – Causing Moderate Harm 3 – Causing Substantial Harm 4 – Causing Extreme Harm Frequency 1 – About Once Per Year or Never 2 – About Once Per Month 3 – About Once Per Week 4 – About Once Per Day or More Often *The amount of harm that could be caused by performing the task incompetently. Task 6: Perform periodic inspections and tests in accordance with written standards and procedures in order to verify system or component performance against requirements. Task 8: Document lessons learned by reviewing the project with all stakeholders in order to improve future projects. Task 9: Maintain licenses. and/or efficiency.March 2004 76 . Systems. Task 2: Provide technical support for facility personnel by applying system expertise in order to maximize system availability. and service contracts for software and equipment by reviewing both internal and external options in order to meet expectations for capability and availability. and best practices. Task 4: Provide training for facility personnel by addressing identified objectives in order to ensure the skill level of personnel is adequate for the technology and products used in the system. and designing recovery plans in order to avoid and recover from system failures. Task10:Determine the need for spare parts based on an assessment of installed base and probability of failure in order to maximize system availability and minimize cost. reliability. DOMAIN VI: OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Task 1: Verify system performance and records periodically using established procedures in order to ensure compliance with standards. implementing backups. IMPORTANCE 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 CRITICALITY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 FREQUENCY 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 ISA-The Instrumentation. Task 11:Provide a system management plan by performing preventive maintenance. regulations. Task 7: Perform continuous improvement by working with facility personnel in order to increase capacity. Task 5: Monitor performance using software and hardware diagnostic tools in order to support early detection of potential problems. updates. and Automation Society CAP Survey .

March 2004 77 . and Automation Society CAP Survey . Systems.Task 12:Follow a process for authorization and implementation of changes in accordance with established standards or practices in order to safeguard system and documentation integrity. 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Please list any tasks related to Domain VI that you think may have been overlooked. _____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ ISA-The Instrumentation.

1-55617-903-0 .ISBN .

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