Version 11.

5

Module 3
Basics & Functions

Training Manual

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Copyright 2003 AVEVA Limited

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Contents
Session 1 ................................................................. 1-1
The Principles of PDMS ............................................................................... 1-1 Objectives .................................................................................................. 1-1 Must Know Points ...................................................................................... 1-1 How PDMS Can Help You ......................................................................... 1-2 How PDMS is Structured ........................................................................... 1-5 PDMS Databases....................................................................................... 1-9 How PDMS Data is Stored....................................................................... 1-10 Navigating Around the Database ............................................................. 1-14 Attributes in PDMS................................................................................... 1-17 UDA (User Defined Attributes) ................................................................. 1-21

Session 2 ................................................................. 2-1
Controlling PDMS......................................................................................... 2-1 Objectives .................................................................................................. 2-1 Must Know Points ...................................................................................... 2-1 Accessing the Design Environment............................................................ 2-2 Window Setup ............................................................................................ 2-3 Using the Mouse ........................................................................................ 2-4 Using Menus .............................................................................................. 2-5 Using Forms............................................................................................... 2-7 Accessing On-line Help............................................................................ 2-11 Saving Your Work .................................................................................... 2-12 Leaving PDMS ......................................................................................... 2-12 Exercise 1 ................................................................................................ 2-13

Session 3 ................................................................. 3-1
Displaying Modelled Elements.................................................................... 3-1 Objectives .................................................................................................. 3-1 Must Know Points ...................................................................................... 3-1 Principles of the 3D Display ....................................................................... 3-2 Building the Draw List ................................................................................ 3-3 Setting the View Limits............................................................................. 3-10 Setting the View Direction ........................................................................ 3-15 Exercise 2 ................................................................................................ 3-17

Session 4 ................................................................. 4-1
Working with the 3D View............................................................................ 4-1 Objectives .................................................................................................. 4-1 Must Know Points ...................................................................................... 4-1 Multiple 3D Views....................................................................................... 4-2 Manipulating the View ................................................................................ 4-4

Module 3 Basics & Functions

Contents-i

.................................. 5-1 The Model Editor........................................................5-2 Element Selection..................................................................................5-38 ii Module 3 Basics & Functions ................................5-17 Positioning and Orientation Using the Edit Menu ......................................5-9 Positioning and Orientation using the Locator Handle ....................4-22 Session 5 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................4-11 Exercise 3..................................................5-1 Must Know Points .......................................5-1 Model Editor Mode...................................................5-33 Selectable Items ...........................................................................Contents View Representation....................................................................5-1 Objectives..............................................................

Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-1 . How to Navigate around the database. Origin points and axes. Must Know Points It is important to understand the following points about The Principles of PDMS: • • • • The basic Hierarchy. Describe how design data is stored. Basic understanding of the concepts of attributes. Navigate around the database. Explain attributes in PDMS. Describe the database structure of PDMS.Session The Principles of PDMS Objectives At the end of this session you will be able to: • • • • • • 1 Explain some of the advantages of using PDMS to control and execute your designs. and the elements that can be created under different owner types. Explain UDAs (User Defined Attributes).

the main form of communication between the designer and those who build the plant remains the drawings. ranging from complex 3D illustrations to fully dimensioned arrangement drawings and piping isometrics. This model becomes a single source of engineering data for all of the sections and disciplines involved in a design project.The Principles of PDMS How PDMS Can Help You The Vantage Plant Design Management System (PDMS) is a multi-discipline 3D modelling system that allow you to simulate a detailed. 1-2 Module 3 Basics & Functions . size. fully annotated and dimensioned engineering drawings. to full colour–shaded 3D walk–through capabilities which allow you to visualise the complete design model. In the model you can store huge amounts of data referring to position. Different types of output from PDMS Even with the advanced features of PDMS. All this information is stored in databases. There are many different output channels from the databases through which information can be disseminated. PDMS can produce numerous types of drawing. To meet this need requirement. full–size model of all the significant parts of a process plant. These range from reports on data stored in the databases. part numbers and geometric relationships for the various parts of the plant. adding an unprecedented level of realism to drawing office techniques. Without engineering drawings the task of building a plant almost would be impossible. PDMS allows you to see a full colour–shaded representation of the plant model as your design progresses.

piping isometrics and reports. cabletrays and steelwork all use specifications to control component selection. will always be the latest available as it is stored only in one source. it would be pointless to develop such a large computer system if it could not improve on existing techniques. By viewing the design interactively during the design process. traditional drawing office techniques are still subject to human error. the size of each fitting must be decided before it can be drawn. which are only found during the erection stage of the project. • Avoids component interferences Despite a wealth of skill and experience in plant design. PDMS can check all of these using data consistency procedures built into the system to check all or individual parts of the design model. using 2D drawing techniques. information is constantly Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-3 . • Adheres to definable engineering specifications Piping specifications and steelwork catalogues stating precisely the components to be used are compiled for the purpose of ensuring consistent. which are trying to share the same physical space. or simple alignment errors. this can be done interactively or retrospectively. inevitably leads to clashes between elements. hvac. such as arrangement drawings. 2. incompatible flange ratings. PDMS enables you to avoid such problems in two ways: 1. and general arrangements in confined areas using conventional 2D methods. all piping component sizes and geometry are predefined and stored in a catalogue. This ensures that all items are true to size and are consistent throughout the design. which cannot be changed by the designer. no matter how many users there are on the project. By using the powerful clash checking facility within PDMS. PDMS contributes to the quality of the design in the following ways: • Ensures consistent and reliable component data In a conventional design environment. With PDMS. safe and economic design. allowing visual checks on the model from different viewpoints and resolves any potential problems as they arise. • Annotation and dimensions obtained directly from the design database Extracted information from the PDMS database.The Principles of PDMS All the data in a PDMS design would be of little value without the ability to ensure the quality of the design information. such as incorrect fitting lengths. which will detect clashes anywhere in the plant. This is a time consuming process that often leads to expensive errors. • Ensures correct geometry and connectivity There are many different ways of making design errors. Laying out complex pipe runs. Design applications for piping. Indeed. Through the course of a project.

The Principles of PDMS changing and drawings need to be reissued. reports etc can be updated and reissued with the minimum of effort. When this happens. drawings. 1-4 Module 3 Basics & Functions .

or 2D annotation such as drawing notes. project timing. Each module accesses the databases for a different purpose. tables. Component selection is provided through specifications that dictate which catalogue components can be used. lines etc. The annotation can be in the form of labels attached to design elements. Interrogate and View the design model interactively by graphical manipulation. DRAFT DRAFT is used to create and manipulate drawings. Run a Clash detection application to check interference between design elements. Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-5 . DESIGN DRAFT ISODRAFT ADMIN PARAGON SPECON PROPCON LEXICON 3D Model Design 2D Drawing Production Isometric Drawing Production Project/User Control Catalogue Construction Specification Construction Properties Construction User Defined Attributes DESIGN DESIGN is the main. The databases contain a three-dimensional description of all items in the plant. In this module the plant model is built and the data stored in one or more databases. PDMS is subdivided into a number of functional modules. Modify existing design elements. customisation of user defined requirements etc. project pricing. or drawing frames. annotation and dimensioning. The modules and their purpose are listed below. The main features: • • • • • Create new design elements. graphically driven constructor module within PDMS.The Principles of PDMS How PDMS is Structured Because of its large overall size. Create Reports to detail MTO.

but it cannot be changed from within the DRAFT module. as required. Its facilities include: • • • Full material lists. This module produces isometric drawings in various formats. Example DRAFT output ISODRAFT ISODRAFT produces dimensioned symbolic piping isometrics for construction and erection purposes. 1-6 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The design database can be interrogated through the drawing database. Dimensions are projected distances between connecting points (P-Point) in the 3D design. The dimension itself is calculated automatically and is recalculated every time the drawing is updated.The Principles of PDMS Annotation attached to a design data element on the drawing will move if the3D position of the element changes. Automatic splitting of complex drawings. Automatic spool identification.

The Principles of PDMS • • User-defined drawing sheets. depending on the physical size. PDMS has Teams. Many other options that can be selected at the production stage. Example ISODRAFT output ADMIN Large plants designed using PDMS will usually be broken down into individual areas (either physical areas or design areas).). draughtspeople. etc. In much the same way as in a design office (with its section leader. complexity and configuration of the plant. the System Administrator will first agree with Project and Design Management. Form reasonable design subdivisions with sensible match-lines and design content. On a large Project. the members of which are called Users. the breakdown of the PDMS project into sections which: Are relevant to the needs of project reporting and control. Enable enough designers to work in parallel with simultaneous access to carry out their design tasks. These Teams can consist of any number of Users and can be organised by discipline or physical work areas. Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-7 .

This module is used to construct the component catalogue just as DESIGN is used to construct the design data.The Principles of PDMS The main features are: Access Control (Teams and Users) Databases (DB’s) Multiple Databases (MDBs) Database management functionality PARAGON PARAGON is used to input and modify the component catalogue stored in the project database. PROPCON This module is used to construct a Properties database. Component data. The catalogue data is held in a hierarchical manner and special database. For example. obstruction and detailing data of steelwork. The database contains data for use with design databases as well as stress analysis packages and includes: • • Material properties. which you would refer to when using conventional design methods. LEXICON This module enables User Definable Attributes (UDA’s) to be assigned to PDMS elements so that additional information may be stored in the databases and extracted into drawings and reports. connection information. piping. catalogues and specifications may be specific to a company but general to a number of projects in that company. and HVAC and cable tray components. 1-8 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The catalogues in PDMS serve a similar purpose to the manufacturers’ catalogues. The PDMS component catalogue is used to specify the geometry. It should be noted that. the same catalogue component may also appear in other designs proceeding at the same time. where the design data is specific to a particular design.

Multi Write. where a number of users work in the same database. In order that each user can see the required design components modelled by other users and refer to the common catalogue. property and user defined attribute data. therefore. each user will refer to a common set of data for the project. may consist of a number of Design databases for each discipline. Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-9 .The Principles of PDMS PDMS Databases The heart of PDMS consists of a set of hierarchical databases that store the model data. The database system is called Dabacon and is exclusive to AVEVA. the Design and Reference databases are grouped together into a Multiple Database (MDB). When constructing the model references are made to catalogue. for users with different tasks to perform. Design databases. As this data is common to all users of each discipline. The databases are structured specifically for plant design data storage and each type of database stores different data. These databases are called Reference databases. Update. each defining specific groups of databases. can be of two types: 1. where each user has their own database to work in 2. A project. where data for the model you construct in the Design module is stored. There may be several MDB’s for a project. Generally multi-discipline projects are executed using discipline specific designers who will use specific applications in PDMS to construct the model components for their specific discipline. property and user defined attribute data that is held in different types of databases.

g.e.g. as illustrated below: The PDMS Design Database Hierarchy In this hierarchical structure all elements are owned by other elements. Elements that are owned by another element. the database is structured in a very simple and logical form. e. The database is hierarchical. Most element types are abbreviated when they appear in the hierarchy. e. The ZONE is a member of the SITE. a ZONE is owned by a SITE. with the exception of the WORLD. the abbreviations are shown in parenthesis. a tree like structure. 1-10 Module 3 Basics & Functions . are said to be members of the owning element. i.The Principles of PDMS How PDMS Data is Stored Despite the huge power and potential of PDMS.

it is more likely to store similar types of item for easy reference. There are many types of primitive. i. A SITE may be considered as a significant collection of plant. Again. The primitives may be owned directly by the EQUI element or by a SubEquipment element. You can have as many SITEs within a PDMS project as required for data organisation. They are used by other disciplines to create catalogue components. Below ZONE level the hierarchy is discipline dependent. it is empty except for a single element named the WORLD. whose size is not necessarily determined by physical area. or one part of a large project. the elements depend on which discipline you are modelling. Each piece of equipment can comprise any number of primitive shapes positioned to form the item. each with its own features which when combined with other primitives can represent complex shapes. SITE and ZONE elements are common to all disciplines. the second level of the hierarchy is SITE. SITE Below the WORLD. and so on. SUB-EQUIPMENT (SUBE) A SUBE is an optional element to further sub-divide an EQUI. box (BOX). Each database has its own WORLD element as the first element in the hierarchy. ZONE The next level below a SITE is a ZONE.The Principles of PDMS WORLD When the database is first built. such as a piping system in one ZONE. cylinders (CYLI) and pyramids (PYRA). It may. Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-11 . related equipment in another. PRIMITIVES Primitives are the basic building blocks of PDMS.e. but by practical considerations. You can have as many ZONEs owned by a site as required for data organisation. a ZONE is not necessarily used to define a physical area. The SUBE can own primitive elements. for example be the whole project. Examples of primitives are nozzle (NOZZ). EQUIPMENT (EQUI) Equipment items are built up in PDMS using elements known as primitives.

BRANCH (BRAN) Branch elements are sections of a pipe. They may run between several end connection points and are usually grouped by a common specification and process. to be done more efficiently. PIPING COMPONENTS A BRAN can own a wide variety of components such as gaskets (GASK). These form the shape and geometry of the BRAN and ultimately the pipeline itself. A complex structure can be divided into logical frameworks. PIPE Pipes may be considered like lines on a flowsheet. valves (VALV). FRAMEWORK (FRMW) FRMW elements are used to store structural components in the model. Structural components may also be owned by a SubFramework element. which have known start and finish points. SUB-FRAMEWORK (SBFR) A SBFR is an optional element that can own structural components. STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS Structural profiles are represented in PDMS by section (SCTN) elements. They are used to further sub-divide complex projects or for modelling sub-assemblies within a framework. or left open ended. they exist to own FRAMEWORK elements. 1-12 Module 3 Basics & Functions . tees (TEE). In PDMS the start and finish points are called the Head and Tail. tees or other Heads and tails. by copying a complete FRMW. e. Dividing the structure in this way allows structural modelling. i. Heads and tails may be connected to nozzles. etc. Plate elements are represented by panel (PANE) elements and curved profiles are modelled using a general section (GENSEC) component. flanges (FLAN). elbows (ELBO).e. and allow the plant structures to be separated for ease of modelling and reporting. depending on the configuration of the pipe. and also reporting.The Principles of PDMS STRUCTURES (STRU) STRU elements are administrative elements. Profile sizes are selected using a section specification that references standard catalogue data for section sizes complying with various national standards.g.

each time you want to use a 100mm bore elbow. For example. The data for this remains constant no matter how many 100mm bore elbows are used in the design. Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-13 . PDMS always accesses the data for it from the component catalogue.The Principles of PDMS Piping components are selected using Piping Specifications that reference standard catalogue data.

(sometimes referred to as CE in the text and on user interface forms) is that element of the design you are currently positioned at. the Design Explorer. The expression. Design Explorer provides a ‘Tree View’ display of database elements in the current MDB. where applicable. and the Members List. This pulldown is called the History List and contains a list of recently visited items.The Principles of PDMS Navigating Around the Database Navigation in PDMS refers to moving around within the database hierarchy. 1-14 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The icons in the Tree View opposite the element names represent the different database element types. The Current Element can be identified in the Design Explorer as the highlighted item in the Tree View and is displayed in the pull-down at the top of the form. which can be expanded and contracted.5. introduced at PDMS 11. Current Element. by clicking the + or – icons. Design Explorer The Design Explorer provides an easy-to-use graphical method of exploring the Design databases and is displayed when PDMS is opened. In the Design module PDMS provides two methods of navigating through the hierarchy.

The Principles of PDMS Clicking on an element in the list will navigate to the selected element. the Members List displays the database elements in the current MDB and is displayed by selecting Display>Members… from the main menu. Members List As with the Design Explorer. The left and right arrows next to the history list will navigate up and down the list one element at a time. Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-15 .

The right and left arrows at the top of the Members List allow navigation up and down the list at the level of the current element.e. this will navigate to the owner of the CE. are owned by another element. selecting the right hand arrow would move to the next EQUI element in the list. only one element can be accessed at a time. deleting. Selecting the left hand arrow would move back to the previous EQUI element. First select this menu. say. with the exception of the WORLD. then select the Owner option.The Principles of PDMS There are a number of ways to navigate from one item to another. however. Choosing the Goto>Reference option will give a list of further options depending on the Current Element. if positioned on an EQUI element. i. Goto>Reference at EQUI level will only navigate to it’s owner. PDMS databases may contain many thousands of elements. a ZONE would cause everything owned by that ZONE to be deleted as well. The Goto menu at the top of the form can also be used. a ZONE. For example. If the current element were a nozzle (NOZZ) then Goto>Reference would allow navigation inside the catalogue database via the NOZZ’s Catref attribute. 1-16 Module 3 Basics & Functions . As all elements.

For example. a cylinder (CYLI) has Height and Diameter attributes whilst the size of a box (BOX) is determined by Xlength. Some attributes are common throughout the range of elements while others differ according to the type of element involved. Ylength and Zlength attributes. a cylinder has the following attributes: Attribute Name Type Lock Owner Position Orientation Default Value Name if specified or hierarchy description CYLI false (the element is not locked) the name of the owning element or its hierarchy description N 0mm E 0mm U 0mm (relative to its owner) Y is N and Z is U (relative to its owner) Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-17 . as illustrated below. a set of appropriate attributes are entered into the database. For example. When you create an element. The attributes will vary according to the type of element but essentially the process is the same.The Principles of PDMS Attributes in PDMS Every element in a PDMS database has a fixed set of properties known as its attributes.

Internally PDMS uses the reference number since this cannot change. For example. A table of names against reference numbers is maintained for this purpose.e.g. its LOCK attribute is set to the value TRUE. LOCK The LOCK attribute determines if an element may be changed or not. /* Names cannot contain spaces and are case sensitive. /E1302A is a different name from /E1302a or /e1302A. All PDMS names begin with a forward slash character (/) and is considered to be part of the name. NAME Every element in PDMS can be named. as shown in the diagram below: 1-18 Module 3 Basics & Functions . while a CYLI might well be one of the EQUIs members. EQUI is an equipment type. they cannot have the same name or reference number. preventing it from being modified until unlocked. all of the forms you encounter will add the forward slash for you when you press the Return or Enter key after typing a name. then a hierarchy description will be displayed in the Design Explorer or Members List. TYPE This attribute refers to the specific type of element it is. Whether named or not every element will have a unique system generated reference number. An EQUI will have ZONE as its owner. By default. The forward slash character is not shown in the Design Explorer or Members List. If a name is not specified. and all cylinders in the database will have precisely the same number of attributes. LOCK is false. If an element is locked. Elements in a PDMS database are unique. The WORLD has a special name in PDMS. In order to save you the effort of typing this. e.The Principles of PDMS Level Obstruction Diameter Height 0 10 (this is a representation level setting) 2 (it is a solid hard element for clashing purposes) 0 mm 0 mm These are all of the attributes of a cylinder. The owner is that element which is directly related to the current element at the next level up in the hierarchy. OWNER The different levels in the hierarchy are maintained by an Owner-Member relationship. i.

All primitives have a position attribute which relates to the its Point of Origin.The Principles of PDMS The element on the upper level is the Owner of those elements directly below it. As each primitive has a different Point of Origin changing the position attribute will have the effect of moving the cylinder to some other position with its Point of Origin positioned on the new co-ordinates. Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-19 . the EQUI is a member of the ZONE. e. e.g.g. the equipment (EQUI) owns the primitive (CYLI). The lower level elements are Members of the owning element. POSITION Many items in a database have a POSITION attribute which is the position of the element in relation to its owner.

steelwork profiles can be represented by centreline (stick representation) only or by the full detail of the section profile. Obstructions can be declared as Hard. 1 results in a Soft obstruction (used for walkways. with one of its ends facing up. Soft or No Obstruction.) and 0 is for No Obstruction (used to save computing time when elements are enclosed in another element which acts as an overall obstruction). The default value of 2 results in a Hard obstruction. For example. LEVEL PDMS can produce different representations of an item. a cylinder is created in a vertical direction. By manipulating level settings it is. that is. depending on how it has been modelled and the representation levels used. therefore. The default level is 0 to 10 but levels can be set beyond this range if needed. possible to have simple or complex representation of elements for Design display or Draft drawings. The orientation attribute allows this to be changed to any angle on any axis.The Principles of PDMS Point of Origin of a CYLI ORIENTATION By default. maintenance access etc. 1-20 Module 3 Basics & Functions . depending on the value of the OBSTRUCTION attribute. OBSTRUCTION The OBSTRUCTION attribute is used to declare whether an element is solid or not.

The Principles of PDMS HEIGHT The height of the cylinder. DIAMETER The diameter of the cylinder. User Defined Attributes can be recognised by the colon placed in front of it. The setting of the UDA is up to the user. :COLOUR HEIGHT (User Defined Attribute) (Normal Attribute) Module 3 Basics & Functions 1-21 . Changing this is the same as with all other attributes. although it may have been set to a default value. UDA (User Defined Attributes) This type of attribute is defined and assigned to elements using the Lexicon module by the System or Project Administrator. A UDA is just like any other attribute but may be specific to the company or the particular project. Their current values may be found by querying the items attributes.

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Explain the difference between loading from macro or binary files. Know how to use the on line Help facilities. Understand the default window setup of the Design Module. you will able to: • • • • • 2 Access the Design module and explain the different features of the VANTAGE PDMS Login form.Session Controlling PDMS Objectives At the end of this session. • How to use all the mouse functionality. Use all the mouse functions and understand how the Menus and Forms are accessed and used. Must Know Points The following points need to be understood by the trainees • How to access PDMS and the Design module. • The principles and working practises of Forms and Menus input Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-1 .

whichever option is selected.g. for example. Loading from Macro Files builds the user interface from all its associated program macro files. Default Binary and Select Binary. /TRAINA. The Load From pull-down gives options of Macro Files. The options are determined by the project set-up ‘triggered’ when PDMS is initialised. this must be known before entry can proceed. A Multiple Database (MDB). must be selected for all modules except Admin. After the initial start-up windows have appeared. e. whilst the Password must be entered using the keyboard.5>Run PDMS Windows menu option. the VANTAGE PDMS Login form is displayed: The Project. Clicking the OK button will enter PDMS whilst clicking Cancel will abort the login process. 2-2 Module 3 Basics & Functions . will load display files saved in a previous PDMS session. Loading from a binary file. There is no choice for password. Design. User’s Binary. Username and MDB are chosen by using the option arrows adjacent to each entry. The required PDMS module.Controlling PDMS Accessing the Design Environment PDMS is started by double clicking the shortcut icon on the desktop or by selecting Start >Programs>AVEVA>VANTAGE PDMS 11. is selected by clicking on the Module list.

contains application command menus. Prompts are displayed here when graphical interaction is required. Status Area . 3D View Window. This window has horizontal and vertical tool bars.the window in which the design model will be displayed. It is suggested that you do not close them from the window controls – select the “dismiss” and “close” option.Controlling PDMS Window Setup Entering PDMS the main window is displayed: The features of the main window shown at this stage are: • • • • Main Menu .displays viewing parameter status information. Prompt Area – the main prompts are displayed here. Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-3 . You can reposition or minimise the main window at any time by using the standard window management facilities provided by your workstation.

where the pointer is positioned. Clicking and Dragging: There are two techniques when operating the mouse buttons. A three button mouse is required for PDMS. clicking the left–hand button with the pointer over a design element results in that element becoming the current element. The Right Button: Clicking the right mouse button displays a screen menu. In a sequence of menus. and for selecting lines in scrollable lists. 2-4 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The screen menu options depend on the current module. for ‘pressing’ buttons on forms. and the position within the window. the effect depends on the type of selections that are being made. The buttons perform different tasks depending on the type of window. The Middle Button: The principal use of the middle mouse button in the Design module is to manipulate the 3D graphical view. dragging with the left mouse button activates the command represented by the highlighted menu option when the button is released. Clicking . In the Design module the choices relate to view manipulation.Controlling PDMS Using the Mouse The mouse steers the graphics pointer around the screen and is also used to select or ‘pick’ items by using the mouse buttons. On a form. The functions of each of the buttons are described below. Dragging .the pointer is positioned over a specific point on the screen and then picks whatever is displayed at that point by quickly pressing and releasing a mouse button. The appearance of the pointer will change according to the type of display item that is underneath it. This is used to identify items in graphical views. On a graphical view. Clicking and Dragging: 1. 2. The Left Button: The left mouse button is the main button for selecting items. and for moving complete windows about on the screen.place the pointer over a specific point on the screen and then click and hold down a mouse button while moving the pointer. To complete the operation release the button when the pointer is positioned over a second specific point on the screen. Mainly used for manipulating the design model in graphical views.

Controlling PDMS Using Menus There are two types of menu. Option shown as plain text: When this type of option is highlighted clicking the left mouse button will directly perform the action described in the menu item. Pull-down Menus and Sub-menus. Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-5 . Option followed by three dots: When this type of option is highlighted clicking the lefthand mouse button will dismiss the pull-down menu and display a form for data entry or modification. If no menu item is required. There are three types of options on a pull-down menu which result in different actions: Options followed by a triangular pointer: When this type of option is highlighted moving the pointer to the right. keeping the option highlighted. Pull-down Menus Clicking an item on the menu bar with the left mouse button will display the pull-down menu items: As the pointer is passed over the menu items they are highlighted in turn. will display a Sub-menu. clicking the left mouse button in the 3D View Window will dismiss the pull-down menu.

highlighting a menu item which is followed by a triangular pointer and moving the pointer to the right will display a sub-menu: Sub-menus may contain any of the three menu options described above. Alternatively. highlighting another option on the pull-down menu will dismiss the sub-menu. clicking the left mouse button in the 3D View Window will dismiss the pull-down as well as the sub-menu. If none of the menu items are required. 2-6 Module 3 Basics & Functions .Controlling PDMS Sub-menus As described above.

enter data and to modify data. reset to initial values. the radio button with the black dot in the centre. the mouse being used to select the appropriate controls and the keyboard to enter the data. settings can be changed. Radio Buttons. Forms typically comprise an arrangement of Buttons. To set the radio button ON move the pointer over the radio button or associated text and click the left mouse button. Radio Buttons Radio buttons are combined in groups and only permit one selection of the group to be set ON. i. When a form is displayed.Controlling PDMS Using Forms Forms are used to display information. accept and act on data input. Check Boxes and Scrollable Lists (sometimes collectively referred to as controls). depending on the design of the form. often about current data settings. Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-7 . Input to a form is usually via a combination of mouse and keyboard. or cancelled without applying any changes. Text Boxes.e.

a checkmark (tick) is displayed in the box. a horizontal scroll bar along the bottom of the list.. A text box often contains a default entry when first displayed. The Backspace key will clear the box of any content. 2-8 Module 3 Basics & Functions . etc. Scrollable Lists A scrollable list is displayed as a vertical list of options within a form. to set it ON or OFF. Check Boxes A check box may be either ON. if appropriate. i.g. dimensions. type in the required data. Text Boxes Text boxes are the areas where alphanumeric data. i. i.e. the box has no checkmark displayed. or OFF. A text box will generally have a label describing or qualifying the data required. values. When first displaying a form containing text boxes.e. names. can be entered. the first text box on the form will be current and a text pointer (a vertical bar) will be displayed in the box. If the list contents can be displayed within the limits of the list the scroll bar(s) will be greyed out. When complete. To change the status of a check box. Some text boxes will accept only text or only numeric data. move the pointer over the check box or associated text and click the left mouse button. e. acceptance of the input is confirmed the by pressing the Return (or Enter) key. editing any existing entry as necessary. with vertical scroll bar on the right hand side of the list and. Using the keyboard.Controlling PDMS Turning a radio button on will automatically turn the other radio button(s) in the group OFF. To select an option from a scrollable list. move the pointer into the box and click the left–hand mouse button.e. Check boxes do not interact so any combination of check boxes on a form may be ON or OFF. click with the left mouse button on the list to display the list items. and entries with the wrong type of data will not be accepted. To enter data into a text box.

Some scrollable lists allow only a single selection.Controlling PDMS Moving the pointer up and down the list highlights each list item in turn. Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-9 . Buttons Buttons are raised areas of the form with a text label. so that selecting any option deselects all others automatically. that conveys the purpose of the button. The button may either take direct action when activated or may display a further form. Form Menus Some forms contain a menu bar across the top of the form. To select a list item click the required selection with the left mouse button. click on it again. Repeated clicks toggle a selection on and off. described previously. To de-select a highlighted option on a multi-item list. with the same options. with all selected options highlighted simultaneously. Other lists allow multiple selections. Buttons are activated by moving the pointer over the button and clicking the left mouse button. either on the button or adjacent to it. Form menus act in the same way as the main menu bar.

The Cancel and Reset buttons cancel any changes made to the settings of the form. 2-10 Module 3 Basics & Functions . e. the Goto. prompts and requests for confirmation of changes. OK also closes the form whereas Apply leaves the form displayed further input. The OK and Apply buttons enter the current form settings as command inputs. which carry out particular command options (extensions of the Apply concept). Cancel also closes the form. Some forms contain more specific types of control buttons.Controlling PDMS Actioning Form Inputs Most forms include at least one control button which is used either to enter the command option represented by the current form setting. or to close the form. This pull-down menu will contain a close option which dismisses the form. The Dismiss button simply closes the form. Where a form does not contain a Dismiss button a Control form menu item is usually provided. Where neither a Dismiss button or Control pull-down menu are provided the form may be dismissed by clicking the Close icon in the top right-hand side of the form with the left mouse button. Alert Forms An Alert form is used to display information such as error messages. The form will usually have to be acknowledged before proceeding. to cancel any changes made to the form since initially opened. This should only be where no other option to dismiss the form is provided.g. Add and Remove buttons.

About This displays information about the current operating system on the computer.Controlling PDMS Accessing On-line Help Most bar menus end with the Help option. with search facilities incorporated. This is effectively a Contents List for the whole of the on–line help documentation. Contents This option displays a list of all topics for which on–line help is available. Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-11 . on–line help gives detailed instructions on the use of forms and menus that drive each application. Selecting Help on the Main Menu displays the Help menu: On Context This option gives help on any window currently visible in the display. Index This option is similar to Contents. Moving the pointer into the window on which help is required and click the left mouse button opens the appropriate help window. the version of PDMS and its applications. but displays and index of keywords within the help. When selecting this option a question mark (?) is added to the pointer. Where available.

Controlling PDMS Saving Your Work When you make changes to the Design database. changing attributes or deleting elements. by adding elements to the model. If changes have been made to the Design databases since your last save. If no changes have been made to the Design databases you will be prompted to confirm your selection with the following form: Selecting YES will exit PDMS and selecting NO will abort the exit command. 2-12 Module 3 Basics & Functions . i. Work should be saved regularly to avoid any loss of data due to unforeseen circumstances such as cut in the power supply to your computer. selecting Design>Exit will display the following form: Selecting YES will save the changes before exiting PDMS.e. the changes must be saved. moving elements. Selecting NO will discard the changes before exiting PDMS and selecting CANCEL will abort the exit command. To save your work select Design>Save Work from the Main Menu or click the Save Work icon: Leaving PDMS To exit PDMS select Design>Exit from the Main Menu.

5>Run PDMS 2. Double click the PDMS icon on your desktop or use Start>Programs>AVEVA>VANTAGE PDMS 11. When the VANTAGE PDMS Login form appears: 3.Controlling PDMS Exercise 1 Project Name: SAM User Name: Password: MDB: Entering PDMS 1. Select the Arrow icon to the right of the Project text box to display a list of available projects: Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-13 .

5. Select the your username from the list by clicking the entry with the left mouse button. Select the Arrow icon to the right of the Username text box to display a list of available usernames in the project: : 6. 7. 2-14 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The pointer will appear as a flashing vertical bar in the Password text box. Type in your password and press the Return key on the keyboard.Controlling PDMS 4. Select SAM from the list by clicking the entry with the left mouse button.

13. 12. Your screen layout should look like this: Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-15 . Your login form should now look similar to this: 11. Make sure that the Module selector reads Design and that the Load from selector reads Macro Files. Select the MDB you are going to use from the list by clicking the entry with the left mouse button. Select the Arrow icon to the right of the MDB text box to display a list of available MDBs in the project: 9. 10.Controlling PDMS 8. Click the OK button with the left mouse button to enter PDMS in the Design module.

1.Controlling PDMS Accessing Applications Now that you have entered PDMS you can enter the various discipline applications within the Design module. Click on the Design item on the Main Menu to access the pull-down menu: 2-16 Module 3 Basics & Functions .

5. Module 3 Basics & Functions 2-17 . These are specific menus and icons for the Equipment application. Move the pointer to highlight the Equipment… item on the menu and select it by clicking the left mouse button. 4. Expand some of the differing element types in the ZONEs to see what type of elements they own. 4. In the Design Explorer click on the + icon adjacent to the TRA. 2. Expand the ZONE entries to show the Members of each ZONE and note the element types contained within. 3.Controlling PDMS 2. PDMS will now load the Equipment modelling application. Try Navigating to various elements in the Design Explorer.SITE entry and note how the Tree View expands to show the ZONEs owned by the SITE. 3. 6. Select Display>Members… from the Main Menu to display the Members List. Select other applications and note how the Main Menu and icon menus change. Note the message in the Status Area. Compare the entries in the Members List to the Design Explorer. note how the Main Menu and icon menus have changed. When the application has loaded. Navigating the Hierarchy 1. 5.

Controlling PDMS

7. Click on the TRA.SITE and its members in the members List and note the different behaviour of the Members List to the Design Explorer.

2-18

Module 3 Basics & Functions

Session
Displaying Modelled Elements
Objectives
At the end of this session, you will able to:
• • • •

3

Explain the principles behind the 3D display. Add and remove elements from the display. Scale elements to fit the display. Set and modify the viewing direction.

Must Know Points
The following points need to be understood by the trainees
• • • •

How to access the 3D display. Building and modifying the Draw List. Setting the view limits Setting a viewing direction.

Module 3 Basics & Functions

3-1

Displaying Modelled Elements

Principles of the 3D Display
In order to view your design in the 3D View Window, there are three basic things to consider:
• Which elements are required to be viewed, i.e. Building the Draw List. • Scaling the required elements to fit the 3D View Window, i.e. Setting the View

Limits.
• Which direction are the elements to be viewed from, i.e. Setting the View

Direction. PDMS uses a Draw List to hold the Design elements to be displayed. All elements in the Draw List must be in the Members List, however, not all elements in the Members List need to be in the Draw List. Before any element can be displayed in the 3D View Window it must be added to the Draw List. This may be a single equipment item, a number of items or a complete SITE. Elements can be ‘added’ or ‘removed’ from the Draw List at any time during a Design session.

3-2

Module 3 Basics & Functions

Connected adds the current element plus any connected elements to the Draw List. Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-3 .Displaying Modelled Elements Building the Draw List The Draw List can be built in a number of ways: 1. Within Volume adds the current element to the Draw List plus any elements that are partially within the volume of the current element. The Add To Draw List item has a sub-menu: Element adds the current element to the Draw List. From the Design Explorer Click any element in the Design Explorer Window with the right mouse button to display the Draw List sub-menu. From the Icon Menus 2.

removing it from the display or adding back if not displayed. Left clicking the check box will change the status of the element.Displaying Modelled Elements Elements may be removed from the Draw List by selecting the Remove from Draw List menu item. The Design Explorer contains a Draw List panel that displays the elements currently in the Draw List. The check box adjacent to each element in the Draw List panel enables the element to be temporarily removed from the display. Clicking an item with the right mouse button in the Draw List panel gives access to a sub-menu: 3-4 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The element is not removed or added to the Draw List but its graphics are removed from the 3D View Window. The additional viewing controls on the Draw List panel are covered later in this manual.

Show adds the selected element to the display. Clicking the down arrow on the list shows the Reference List menu item. The Draw List panel contains a scrollable list that by default is set to Draw List. Remove From Draw List removes the selected element from the Draw List. connected to the current element. the Reference List for an EQUI element would contain BRAN elements connected to the EQUI’s nozzles.Displaying Modelled Elements Navigate To makes the selected element in the Draw List display the current element.g. the same as checking the check box. The Reference List shows all items. Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-5 . If the current has no connected items the Reference List is empty. e. the same as unchecking the check box. Hide removes the selected element from the display. if applicable.

Displaying Modelled Elements Clicking an item in Reference List with the right mouse button displays a sub-menu: 3-6 Module 3 Basics & Functions .

3.Displaying Modelled Elements Navigate To makes the selected element in the Draw List display the current element. Add Connections to Draw List adds all elements connected to the selected element to the Draw List. Add To Draw List adds the selected element to the Draw List. From the Members+Draw Form Selecting Display>Drawlist… from the Main Menu or selecting Control>Drawlist… from the Members List form menu displays the Members+Draw form: Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-7 . 4. Remove All removes all elements from the Draw List. Add CE with Colour… adds the current element to the Draw List with a colour selected from a colour palette. Colour settings are covered later in this manual. From the Members List Selecting Drawlist from the Members List form menu displays a sub-menu: Add CE adds the current element to the Draw List. Add Owner adds the owner of the current element and all its members to the Draw List. Remove Owner removes the owner of the current element and all its members from the Draw List. Remove CE removes the current element from the Draw List.

through various methods.Displaying Modelled Elements The additional viewing controls on the Draw List panel are covered later in this manual. The Add CE button adds the current element. The form adds a Draw List panel to the standard Members List form. to the Draw List and displays the element name in the Drawlist window. the opposing corners of a ‘Limits Box’ which will add all the elements within the box to the Draw List. The Id button prompts you to identify the item(s) in the 3D View Window to be removed from the Draw List. After clicking the button items selected in the 3D View 3-8 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The Item button removes the item highlighted in the Draw List panel from the Draw List. highlighted in the Members List. The Volume… button displays the Add Within Volume form which enables you to select.

Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-9 . Pressing the Esc key on the keyboard terminates the selection process and the selected items are removed from the Draw List. The All button removes all elements from the Draw List. The CE button removes the current element from the Draw List.Displaying Modelled Elements Window will be highlighted.

or a selection of items. The limits of an item. whether it is a single item. a selection of items or an entire model. There are several ways by which the elements to be viewed can be scaled to fit the screen: • Using the Icons in the 3D View Window At the top of the left-hand side there are three icons which can be used to scale elements to the screen: Limits CE & Options sets the display limits to the current elements. Scaling of the items is performed automatically by PDMS once the limits of the items to be displayed are known. Zoom to Selection fills the 3D View Window with the current element or graphical selection. 3-10 Module 3 Basics & Functions . can be thought of as a box completely encapsulating the item(s) to be viewed.Displaying Modelled Elements Setting the View Limits In order to display items on the screen. the elements have to be scaled to fit the screen. if one exists.

Displaying Modelled Elements Walk to Draw List zooms and centres the display with all the elements in the Draw List. NOTE: Graphical selections are covered in Session 6. using the From and To options on the form list. The Select form menu enables you to select elements or their owner to define the limits: Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-11 .Design [1] form that enables display limits to be set explicitly using co-ordinates: The volume is defined by setting 3D co-ordinates for the opposing corners of a box that defines the limits you wish to display. The Limits CE & Options icon has a sub-menu: The Explicit… menu item displays the Volume .

Pick Owner sets the limits to the owner of a selected element. Pick sets the limits to a selected element. however. the Zoom To and Walk To items concern the view limits.Displaying Modelled Elements CE set the limits to the current element. Having made a selection the limit co-ordinates are displayed on the form and may be adjusted manually. Owner sets the limits to the owner of the current element. • Using the View Menu Selecting View from the Main Menu displays the View pull-down menu: The majority of the menu items are covered later in the manual. Both items have sub-menus: 3-12 Module 3 Basics & Functions .

Displaying Modelled Elements Selection fills the 3D View Window with the current element or current graphical selection. if one exists. NOTE: Graphical selections are covered in Session 5. Items in the immediate vicinity of the target item will continue to be displayed. so it may be necessary to remove items still obscuring the target item by removing them from the Draw List. Identify Element… allows you to graphical identify an element. also Walk To removes items between your eye position and the target item that are not in the immediate vicinity of the target item. Walk To differs from Zoom To in that it sets the viewing limits. Graphically identifying an element in this context does not set the selected element to be the current element. by clicking on it with the left mouse button. Entire Draw List fills the 3D View Window with all elements in the Draw List and centres the view. then fills the 3D View Window with the identified element. • Using the 3D View Shortcut Menu Clicking the right mouse button with the pointer in the 3D View Window displays the 3D View Shortcut Menu: Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-13 .

3-14 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The Zoom To and Walk To items have identical sub-menus to the View menu and operate in the same way.Displaying Modelled Elements This menu is similar to the View menu on that Main Menu bar except that some menu options are excluded.

Using the 3D Shortcut View Menu Clicking the right mouse button with the pointer anywhere in the 3D View Window displays the 3D View Shortcut Menu: Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-15 . top left and bottom left of the screen: 2. top right. Plan displays a sub-menu with four cardinal directions. Each direction corresponds to North pointing towards bottom right. Selecting a direction will set the view direction to one selected. Selecting a direction will set the view to a plan view with the selected cardinal direction pointing up the screen. 1.Displaying Modelled Elements Setting the View Direction The viewing direction can be set using the View menu on the Main Menu bar or from the 3D View Shortcut Menu. Isometric displays a sub-menu containing four pre-set isometric view directions. Using the View menu The following choices on the View menu concern setting the view direction: Look displays a sub-menu with six viewing directions.

A direction of n90d is the the default viewing direction and is the direction obtained when View >Plan>North is selected. Plan and Isometric sub-menus are the same as those on the View menu and the options operate in exactly the same way. The current viewing direction is displayed in the Status Area of the 3D View: e45n35d means a viewing direction of East 45 degrees North 35 degrees Down.Displaying Modelled Elements The Look. 3-16 Module 3 Basics & Functions . which is the direction of an Iso 3 view.

TANK2-STRU and all the SCTN elements owned by STRU to the Draw List and the display as they are within touching the volume of the equipment item. expand the element named TRA. Note that the equipment name has been added to the Draw List. Highlight the equipment item TANK1 and click with the right mouse button to display the menu. Add the PIPE. Click on TANK1 in the Design Explorer with the right mouse button and select Add To Draw List>Connected from the sub-menu. Highlight the equipment item PUMP1 and add it to the Draw List using the same method.ZONE were already in the Draw List only the remaining equipment item has been added.Displaying Modelled Elements Exercise 2 Building the Draw List 1. As the other equipment items owned by the EQUI. In the Design Explorer.ZONE. 2. The equipment item should also be visible in the display. Click on TANK2 in the Design Explorer with the right mouse button and select Add To Draw List>Within Volume. 5. Highlight the EQUIP. 7. This will add pipe2-b1.ZONE to the Draw List to display the remainder of the pipes. 6. Note that the equipment element TANK2 is added to the Draw List and the display.SITE to show the ZONE elements and expand the EQUIP. 8. This will add pipe1-b1 to the Draw List and display as the pipe is connected to the equipment item. Select Add To Draw List>Element from the sub-menu using the left mouse button.ZONE element and add it to the Draw List. 4. 3. Your 3D View should now look like this: Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-17 .

e. etc. Using the Design Explorer or the Members List. navigate to various elements adding and removing them from the Draw List using the Add CE to Drawlist and Remove CE from Drawlist icons on the menu bar. Note that the owner. 14. Experiment by removing and adding items from the Draw List and hiding and showing items already in the Draw List.SITE element and remove the BASE element in the CIVILS. i. Display the Members List by selecting Display>Members from the Main Menu. 15. CYLI. 13. NOZZ. Click on the checkbox next to TANK1 in the Draw List panel and note that the equipment item is now removed from the display. Note that the equipment item is now displayed again and that the checkbox is now checked. 16. noting the elements displayed in the Drawlist panel. Note that the equipment item has been added to the display. 11. 12.Displaying Modelled Elements 9. 2. the EQUI element is removed from the Draw List and display. Click on TANK1 in the Draw List panel with the right mouse button and select Show from the menu. 3-18 Module 3 Basics & Functions .SITE element from the Draw List and note that the Draw List is now empty and no elements are displayed. Note that the equipment element now fills the 3D View. Select View>Walk To>Entire Draw List from the Main Menu and note that the elements in the Draw List now fill the 3D View. i. Remove the TRA. 19.e. The current element is used as the selection as no graphical selection exists. 10. Navigate to TANK1 in Design Explorer or the Members List and select View>Walk To>Selection from the Main Menu. Add the remaining equipment in the EQUI. 18. Navigate to the equipment item TANK1 and add it to the Draw List by selecting Drawlist>Add CE from the Members List form menu.ZONE to the Draw List by selecting Drawlist>Add Owner from the form menu. Clear the Draw List and add the TRA.ZONE. Remove TANK2 from the Draw List by clicking on the element in the Draw List panel with the right mouse button and selecting Remove From Draw List from the menu. 3. owned by one of the equipment items and remove it from the Draw List by selecting Drawlist>Remove CE from the form menu. Setting the View Limits 1. Navigate to one of the primitives. Display the Members+Draw form by selecting Control>Drawlist… from the Members List form menu. 17. BOX. noting the effects of your actions on the display. Use the Add CE button and various Remove From Drawlist buttons to add and remove items from the Draw List.

6. Display the entire Draw List again by clicking the Walk to Draw List icon on the right-hand side of the 3D View. Click the Dismiss button on the from to dismiss the form an remove the limits box from the display. 7. Select the different options from the View>Isometric sub-menu. Note that the equipment item now fills the 3D View. Navigate to various elements and set the view limits using a combination of the View menu. 5.Displaying Modelled Elements 4. Select Select>Owner from the form menu and note the co-ordinates change on the form. Click the Apply button on the form and note that the 3D View now displays all the equipment items and a limits box around the owner. i.e. Click the Walk To Draw List icon to view the entire Draw List. Navigate to PUMP1 in the Design Explorer and set the limits to the current element by clicking the Limits CE & Options icon on the right-hand side of the 3D View. Select View>Isometric>Iso 3 from the Main Menu. Module 3 Basics & Functions 3-19 . 4. the EQUI. Click the Limits CE & Options icon with the right mouse button and select Explicit… from the menu to display the Volume – Design [1] form. 2. Setting the View Direction 1. Select the different options from the 3D View Shortcut Menu>Plan sub-menu. Select the different options from the View>Look sub-menu. 5. 3. the 3D View Shortcut Menu and the appropriate icons on the righthand side of the 3D View.ZONE.

.

How to change the graphical representation of the model. Print a view of the 3D View. Must Know Points The following points need to be understood by the trainees • • How to use the various view manipulation tools. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-1 . Copy a 3D View to the clipboard.Session Working with the 3D View Objectives At the end of this session. you will able to: • • • • 4 Manipulate the model to achieve any view you require. Change the graphical representation model elements including colours.

All 3D Views use the same Draw List. Selecting Display>Graphical View from the Main Menu bar creates a new 3D View. however. Each 3D View is numbered in top bar of the window and has a full set of view manipulation icons on the left-hand side of the view. the number of views will probably be limited by the physical size of your display. Additional 3D Views may also be created and deleted by selecting Display>View Control… from the Main Menu bar and selecting the appropriate option from the form menu of the displayed 3D View Control form. The new view initially fills the main PDMS window but may be modified in size and shape by dragging the view corners or edges. 4-2 Module 3 Basics & Functions . however.Working with the 3D View Multiple 3D Views PDMS provides the ability to view the model in multiple 3D Views. as in standard Windows operations. each view is independent in terms of view manipulation and representation.

A view may be made current by clicking the top bar. clicking anywhere in the view with the left mouse button or by selecting Window>3D View (x). containing the view number. the currently active view being the one whose top bar. is highlighted. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-3 . where x is the view number.Working with the 3D View Only one 3D View can be active at any one time. from the Main Menu bar.

Note: Zoom Rectangle is not available on the function keys. 4-4 Module 3 Basics & Functions . Using the 3D View Shortcut Menu Clicking in the 3D View with the right mouse button displays the 3D View Shortcut Menu. Each of the three modes uses the middle mouse button or scroll wheel and may accessed in a number of ways: Using the View menu Selecting View>Middle Button Drag from the Main Menu displays a sub-menu: The desired mode may be selected from the sub-menu and a check mark (tick) appears next to the selected mode the next time the sub-menu is accessed. Selecting Middle Button Drag displays the same menu as above.Working with the 3D View Manipulating the View Overview The 3D view can be interactively manipulated using the mouse by Zooming. Using the Keyboard Function Keys Pressing F2 sets the ZOOM mode. Pressing F3 sets the PAN mode. Panning and Rotating to achieve the desired viewing direction. Pressing F5 sets the ROTATE mode Pressing F6 sets the WALK mode.

Click in the 3D View.e. e. 2. All modes are persistent. 4.Working with the 3D View Using the 3D View Icons On the left-hand side of the 3D View there are the following icons: Clicking an icon will set the appropriate mode. the appropriate icon will appear ‘depressed’.g. Zoom Rectangle and Zoom In/Out. using the middle mouse button. the mode will remain in operation until you change it. Identify the item or area you wish to zoom in to. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-5 . 3. The current mode is displayed in the Status Area in the bottom right corner of the 3D view: ZOOM Zoom mode has two options. The ‘depressed’ icon depicts the current mode. i. Move the pointer to the desired location and release the middle mouse button. Zoom Rectangle This option allows you to drag a rectangle in the 3D View around the item you wish to zoom in to. Zoom Rectangle in the picture above. at a point to the left and below the item or area. The sequence of operation is as follows: 1. Hold down the middle mouse button and move the pointer up and to the right to display a rectangle. If a mode is set using any of the other methods described.

PAN Pan mode enables you to move across the 3D View in by clicking and holding down the middle mouse button. Holding down the Shift while performing a scroll wheel zoom makes the zoom faster. whilst moving the pointer down the screen zooms out. The view will pan in the opposite direction to the pointer in direct correlation to the amount the pointer is moved. Panning may also be achieved by setting the Centre of Interest of the 3D view. zooming may be performed with the mouse scroll wheel. Moving the pointer up the screen zooms in. Rolling the scroll wheel forward zooms in and rolling the scroll wheel backwards zooms out. Zooming with the mouse scroll wheel In addition to the two middle mouse button zoom options described above. Zooming with the scroll wheel can be performed in any of the middle mouse button drag modes. The Zoom To options available from the View menu are covered in Session 3. The 3D View will zoom in to the rectangle. anywhere in the 3D View. and moving the pointer in any direction. Holding down the Ctrl key while performing a scroll wheel zoom makes the zoom slower.Working with the 3D View 5. Note: The rectangle may be started at any corner. Positioning the pointer anywhere and in the 3D view and Clicking the middle mouse 4-6 Module 3 Basics & Functions . anywhere in the 3D View. and moving the pointer up or down the screen. Zoom In/Out This option enables you to zoom in and out by clicking and holding down the middle mouse button.

If the status reads Eye the model will be rotated around the eye. anywhere in the 3D View. or the eye may be rotated around the model. The view will pan by the distance between the picked point and the centre of the view. The model may be rotated around the eye point. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-7 . ROTATE Rotate mode enables the elements in the 3D view to be rotated around a vertical or horizontal axis by clicking and holding down the middle mouse button. whilst moving the pointer up or down rotates the view around a horizontal axis. and move the pointer up and down or left and right. or set Model if the option is currently checked. The method of operation depends on the setting displayed in the Status Area in the bottom right hand corner of the 3D View. See Setting the View Centre for other options that set the centre of rotation. Keeping the pointer in the same location and repeatedly clicking the middle mouse button will keep panning the view. the position from which the model is being viewed. If the status reads Model the eye is rotated around the model.Working with the 3D View button will move the selected to the centre of the view. thus effectively panning the view. Moving the pointer left or right rotates the view around a vertical axis. Function key F7 also toggles between Model and Eye When the Model option is set the centre of rotation is the centre of the 3D view. Selecting View>Settings>Eye will set Eye if the option is currently unchecked.

Function key F9 also toggles the sliders on and off. i. Selecting View>Settings>Perspective will set Perspective if the option is currently unchecked or set Model if the option is currently checked. clicking and holding down the middle mouse button and moving the pointer up walks the eye point forward. WALK In Walk mode the eye point moves towards or away from the model. Clicking and holding down the left mouse button on the appropriate slider and moving the pointer in the required direction will rotate the view. 4-8 Module 3 Basics & Functions .e. away from the model. Walk mode only works in perspective views.e. Function key F4 also toggles between Perspective and Parallel. Selecting View>Settings>Borders will turn the sliders on if the option is currently unchecked and turn them off if the option is currently checked. The slider along the bottom of the view rotates the view around the vertical axis and the slider on the right-hand side of the view rotates the view around the horizontal axis. i. When in Walk mode. towards the model. whilst moving the pointer down walks the eye point backwards.Working with the 3D View Rotating may also be performed using sliders along the bottom and right-hand edges of the 3D View.

This option does not make the selected element the current element.Working with the 3D View The current setting is displayed in the Status Area: Setting the View Centre Selecting any of the Walk To and Zoom To options. or Set Centre of View from the 3D View Shortcut menu. or clicking the Walk To Draw List and Zoom to Selection icons in the 3D View. Having selected the option. click on any element in the 3D View with the left mouse button and that element will be centred in the view. The view centre may also be set on a selected element. to display a sub-menu: Selection This option centres the view on the current element or the graphical selection. either from the View menu or 3D View Shortcut menu. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-9 . will set the centre of the view to the relevant selection. Identify Element… This option enables you to select an element to centre the view on. if one exits. a graphical selection or a screen pick by selecting View>Set Centre of View from the Main Menu.

the centre of rotation is also reset to the view centre.Working with the 3D View Screen Pick… This option enables you to pick a point anywhere in the 3D View with the left mouse button. When any method described above is used to set the centre of the view. 4-10 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The picked point will become the centre of the view.

select the number of copies and set properties for the print. Selecting View>Print Graphics… displays a standard Windows print form giving you the ability to select a printer. Selecting View>Copy Image displays a sub-menu containing standard image resolutions from 640x480 to 1600x1200.Working with the 3D View View Representation As well as providing functionality to manipulate the 3D view. PDMS provides tools that enable you to modify the view representation Other View Menu Options Additional options to those described previously are available from the View menu on the Main Menu bar: Print Graphics… This option enables you to output the contents of the active 3D View to a printer. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-11 . Copy Image This option enables you to copy the contents of the 3D View Window to the Windows paste buffer so that it can be pasted into any Windows application that supports picture objects.

As with the sub-menu any Save View options have not been selected the corresponded Restore View icon will remain greyed out. Settings>Black Background/White Background These options on the Settings sub-menu enable you to select between a black or white background for the currently active 3D View. Restore View This option enables you to restore one of the four saved views. The sub-menu allows you to select one of the four views to be restored. 4-12 Module 3 Basics & Functions . the corresponding Restore View icon is highlighted. White can be the best choice of background colour if the view is to be printed or its contents copied to another application. The sub-menu allows you to select up to four views to be saved: If View 1 has already been saved. When a view is saved.Working with the 3D View Save View This option enables you to save the current state of a 3D View so that the direction and magnification can be restored when required. selecting it again will overwrite the previous view and save the new one. If any of the Save View options have not been selected the corresponding Restore View option will be greyed out: Restore View is also available from the icons on the left-hand side of the 3D View. Settings>High Quality This option on the Settings sub-menu can be used to toggle between ‘high’ and ‘standard’ quality image(s) of the Design module.

Animations This option on the Settings sub-menu toggles smooth pan and zoom operations in the 3D view when the Zoom To or Walk To options are used. the name of the element under the pointer will be displayed in the Tooltip. Animation only operates if the system determines that the hardware is capable of performing a smooth pan or zoom with the size of the model displayed in the 3D View. Settings>Show Tooltips This option on the settings sub-menu enables you to toggle Tooltips on or off. however. Selecting View>Settings>Shaded will set shaded mode if the option is currently unchecked and set wire-line mode if the option is currently checked. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-13 . in some circumstances it may be more beneficial to work in wire-line mode. Some of the options described above are also available by selecting Settings>Graphics>View… to display the 3D View Options form. Solid shaded and wire-line modes may also be toggled by selecting Settings>Graphics>View… from the Main Menu bar to display the 3D View Options form and checking or un-checking the Shaded checkbox. When set on.Working with the 3D View A high quality image will be slower to draw and manipulate than a standard quality one. Function key F8 also toggles between Shaded and Wire-line modes. Shading Usually the model is viewed in solid shaded colour. The pan or zoom operation is animated to show the transition from the original view definition to the final view definition.

Translucency and Show Edges. Translucency may be set in two ways: 1. The current setting is displayed in the bottom right-hand corner. Viewing of the visual properties can be toggled on or off by clicking either the Show Visual Properties or Hide Visual Properties button on the panel. 4-14 Module 3 Basics & Functions . From the Design Explorer The visual properties of an element in the Draw List can be displayed at the bottom of the Draw List panel of the Design Explorer. The visual properties shown are those of the element highlighted in the Draw List.Working with the 3D View Elements may also be displayed with a variable level of translucency. which may not be the current element. The available visual properties are Colour (covered in the next section). Clicking the down arrow icon on the right of the Translucency text box displays a form that enables the percentage translucency to be set: Clicking the slider with the left mouse button and moving it along the scale sets the percentage of translucency.

Clicking the translucency list displays the percentage options available. It should be noted that the properties can only be set for the current element and not elements displayed in the Draw List panel of the form.Working with the 3D View Clicking the Show Edges list enables you to toggle the display of the elements edges ON and OFF 2. clicking the Add CE button will alter the display to the chosen options. From the Members+Draw Form The centre panel of the Members+Draw form enables you to set the Colour (covered in the next section). Colours By default PDMS displays elements in the 3D View using default Autocolour rules which colour elements depending on the element type. Translucency and Show Edges properties of the current element. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-15 . whilst checking or un-checking the Edges checkbox toggles the Show Edges property ON or OFF. Having selected the appropriate options.

It should be noted that the element will not be initially displayed in the selected colour as its colour property is set to the CE Colour (see below). However. Making another element the CE will display the added element in the selected colour. Clicking the More>> button on the palette displays a further palette with additional colours: Clicking one of the colour buttons in either o f the palettes sets the colour property for the element highlighted in the Draw List. see M4 Equipment Modelling or M6 Basic Steelwork Design. 2. From the Design Explorer Clicking on the Colour list of the visual properties in the Draw List panel of the Design Explorer displays a colour palette. From the Members List Selecting Drawlist>Add CE with Colour from the Members List form menu displays the Add Current Element form: Selecting a colour button from this form adds the current element to the 3D View using the selected colour. From the Members+Draw Form Clicking the Colour button on the Members+Draw form displays the Drawlist Element Add Colour form: 4-16 Module 3 Basics & Functions .Working with the 3D View Modifying the Autocolour rules is not covered in this manual. 3. colours of individual elements. may be changed in three ways: 1. or groups of elements.

say. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-17 . modelling aids and highlighting.Working with the 3D View Selecting one of the colour buttons on this form changes the colour of the Colour button. Active is the colour used for elements associated with the current element. associated elements. Visible is the colour used for all other elements in the 3D view Aids is the colour used for design aids. the added element will not be initially displayed in the selected colour. Apart from the default Autocolour settings. Clicking the Add CE button on the Members+Draw form will add the current element in the selected colour. PDMS sets colours for the current element. These colours enable you to distinguish. As with the Members List. Clicking Settings>Graphics>Colour… on the Main Menu bar displays the Colours form: CE is the colour used for the current element. the current element from other elements in the 3D View.

Clicking any of the colour buttons displays a colour form appropriate to the selection: Selecting a colour button from the palette sets the colour for the selected item. of elements in a 3D View. Selecting Settings>Graphics>Representation… displays the Representation form: 4-18 Module 3 Basics & Functions .Working with the 3D View Highlight is the colour used for highlighting selected items. apart from colour and translucency previously described. can be controlled using the Representation form. e. for deleting.g. Note: Active and Visible colours are used when Auto Colour is turned off. Representation Additional representation properties. The Autocolour rules can be toggled ON or OFF by checking or un-checking the Auto Colour On/Off checkbox.

Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-19 . If Holes Drawn is OFF the negative primitives as shown as black lines in a shaded view. Clicking the Insulation list and selecting a value turns the insulation representation ON. e. Obstruction This option is similar to Insulation except that it controls the representation of Obstruction volumes. Insulation This option allows Insulation for piping components and tubing.Working with the 3D View The General section of the Representation form enables you to set: Tube and Centreline representation These options apply to piping components.g. If Holes Drawn is ON the negative primitives will be shown cutting the appropriate model elements Holes Draw is toggled on and off by checking and un-checking the Holes Drawn checkbox. Obstruction volumes are used to represent areas in the model which must be kept clear of obstructions . A percentage of translucency can be applied to the insulation representation by selecting an appropriate value from the list. Holes Drawn This option determines how negative primitives. escape routes..e. are represented in the 3D View.g. e. as defined in the catalogue. to be displayed. If Centreline is ON the components and tubing are displayed as single line representation.. If Tube is ON the components and tubing are displayed as double line representation. holes. etc. access volumes for valves and instruments. i. colour shaded. cut-outs. etc. walkways.

will be represented. panels.g. inclusive.Working with the 3D View Arc Tolerance This option sets the tolerance for the representation of arcs. whilst entering a value of 4 to 10. • Mass is used to determine the representation used when calculating mass properties. a simple representation of a pump may be constructed of primitives with a Level attribute set to a range of 0 to 3. All elements used for building Plant items in the catalogue.. checking the update all Graphics checkbox and clicking the OK button modifies the representation. etc. When the desired values have been set. piping components. or in Design. equipment. 4-20 Module 3 Basics & Functions . inclusive. The representation Level is set by entering a value in the appropriate text box. the ‘smoothness’ of curved surfaces. etc. A value of 1. For example.. e. whilst a more detailed representation of the pump may be constructed of primitives with a Level attribute set to a range of 4 to 10. structural profiles. • Pipe is used for piping components and tubing • Nozzle is used for equipment nozzles • Structure is used for structural profiles • Others is used for all other appropriate elements. The Level section of the Representation form enables different drawing levels to be set for groups of elements. Entering a value of 0 to 3. i. have a Level attribute. e. will display the detailed representation. Different representations of a Plant item can be made and assigned to different levels such that modifying the level displayed in the 3D View will change the representation of the Plant item.e. The Arc Tolerance value is set by entering a number in the text box.g. on the Representation form will display the simple representation of the pump.0 will give the ‘smoothest’ arcs.

Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-21 . Ppoints and Plines are covered in discipline training course manuals. when the desired values for Level have been entered. checking the update all Graphics checkbox and clicking the OK button modifies the representation. The Specific section of the Representation form is used to set and modify the representation of Ppoints and Plines in discipline specific operations and is outside the scope of this manual.Working with the 3D View As with the General section of the form.

Click the Restore Down icon on the 3D View to make the view window smaller and move 3D View (2) to reveal 3D View(1) beneath. Select Display>Graphical View from the Main Menu. Note the main Window header bar now reads Design – General Application – VANTAGE PDMS – [3D View (2)]. using standard Windows dragging techniques. Select Create>Standard Design View… from the form menu to create 3D View (3). Select Display>View Control from the Main Menu to display the 3D View Control form. 4.Working with the 3D View Exercise 3 Multiple Views 1. so that your display looks like this: 4-22 Module 3 Basics & Functions . 2. Adjust the 3D View windows. make the view smaller and move it to reveal all three 3D Views. 3.

7. highlighting the views in the displayed View Control form and selecting Delete>Selected from the form menu. into the Draw List. Press the F7 function key to set Eye in the Status Area and repeat the rotate actions noting the difference from the Model setting. Make the other 3D Views current in turn and adjust their viewing direction. 4. using the middle mouse button. Drag a rectangle. 6. around TANK1 and release the mouse button. If you have a scroll wheel on your mouse. Release the middle mouse button and repeat the action but this time move the pointer up and down the screen to rotate around the horizontal axis. 2. 8. Select View>Middle Button Drag>Walk from the Main Menu to set Walk mode. Click the Walk to Draw List icon. Repeat the action with the right-hand slider. 5. 3. Note the change from ZOOM in the Status Area. Manipulating the View 1. Remove some items from the Draw List and note that the items are removed from the display in each 3D View.Working with the 3D View 5. except the CIVILS. Select Middle Button Drag>Pan from the 3D View Shortcut Menu. Clicjk the middle mouse button several times with the pointer in the same place to maintain to pan the view. Press the F4 function key to set the view to Perspective. moving the pointer up and down to rotate the model. 9. Click on the bottom slider with the left mouse button and hold it down while moving the slider left and right to rotate the model. noting the change in the Status Area. Delete 3D View(2) and 3D View (3) by selecting Display>View Control… from the Main Menu. noting the panning effect.ZONE. noting the panning effect of this action. click and hold down the middle mouse button and move the pointer left and right across the view to rotate around the vertical axis. Click the Zoom In/Out icon on the left-hand side of the 3D View. Click anywhere in 3D View(1) to make it the current view and modify the view direction. 7. Restore 3D View (1) to fill the window by clicking the Maximise icon on the view. Put the whole TRA.SITE. Click and hold down the middle mouse button and move the pointer around the screen. noting the centre of rotation. rotate the wheel each way and note the zoom effect. 10. Select View>Middle Button Drag>Zoom Rectangle from the Main Menu. Click and hold down the middle mouse button and move the pointer doen the screen to zoom out. The equipment item will fill the view. set the limits to the Draw List and set an Iso 3 view direction. 6. Click and hold down the middle mouse button and move the pointer Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-23 . Press the F7 function key again to return to the Model setting and press the F9 function key to display the rotation sliders on the bottom and right-hand side of the 3D View. Click the middle mouse button with the pointer away from the centre of the 3D View to set the centre of interest. Click the Rotate icon on the left-hand side of the 3D View.

3. 4-24 Module 3 Basics & Functions . Select Set Centre of View>Identify Element… from the 3D View Shortcut Menu and select any primitive on the PUMP1 equipment item. Note that the view adjusts to move the equipment item at the centre of the view. Select Set Centre of View>Screen Pick… from the 3D View Shortcut Menu and click anywhere in the 3D View with the left mouse button. Select the Restore View 3 icon from the left-hand side of the 3D View. Move the pointer down the screen to walk the eye point backwards. Toggle Show Edges On and OFF on some of your translucent selections and note the differences. toggling the Edges checkbox on some selections before clicking the Add CE button. 5. Set the Translucency to approximately 50%. Select Restore View>View 1 from the 3D View Shortcut Menu. Make any element the CE. Select View>Settings>Shaded from the Main Menu and note that the view is now displayed in Wire-line mode. 6. 11. select TANK1 and make sure the visual properties are displayed at the bottom of the form. Rotate the model and note the rotation centre. noting that the second saved view has been restored. Try different percentage translucency on other elements in the Draw List. 7.Working with the 3D View up the screen to walk the eye point forward. View Representation 1. Modify the view by zooming. 8. Press the F8 function key to restore Shaded mode. 2. Select View>Save View> View 1 from the Main Menu. panning and rotating. Note that the first Restore View icon on the left-hand side of the 3D View is highlighted whilst the others remain greyed out. noting that the first saved view has been restored. Make TANK2 the current element and select View>Set Centre of View>Selection from the Main Menu. 9. Rotate the model and note the rotation centre. 12. Press the F4 function key to set the view to Parallel. Display the Members+Draw form. make TANK2 the current element and select a translucent percentage from the list. Note that the pointer location when you clicked has moved to the centre of the view. Set various translucency percentages for various items. Click the Translucency list to display the Translucency form and click the slider with the left mouse button and hold it down while dragging the slider to the right. Click the Colour button on the Members+Draw form and select a colour from the displayed Drawlist Element Add Colour form. Walk To the entire Draw List and set an Iso 3 view direction. Click the Add CE button on the form and note the changes in the equipment item. 13. In the Draw List panel of the Design Explorer. release the mouse button and note the effects on TANK1. 4. Modify the view again by zooming panning and rotating. Set the view to an Iso 3 view direction. Select Save View>View 3 from the 3D Shortcut Menu.

15.0. Remove the PIPE. Uncheck the Tube checkbox and check the Centreline and update all Graphics checkboxes. 10. Turn the obstruction volume representation Off. 14. Select 50% from the Obstruction scrollable list and click the OK button on the form. Click the OK button on the form and note the holes in the ends of the pump nozzles rather than the black lines of the negative geometry. 13. Modify the colours of other elements using the visual properties on the Design Explorer. 16. 12. set the view to an Iso 3 direction and zoom in on PUMP1. Display the Representation form again and change the Arc Tolerance setting to 1. Display the Representation form again and check the Holes Drawn checkbox. Make any element the CE and note that it is displayed in the selected colour.Working with the 3D View Dismiss the form and click the Add CE button to add the current element in the selected colour. Select Settings>Graphics>Colour… from the Main Menu to display the Colours form. Click on the colour button next to CE to display the Colour for Current Element form and select a brightred from the palette. Note the ‘faceted’ reprsentation of the nozzles. Click the OK button on the form and note that the pump nozzles are now displayed as perfect circles. Dismiss the form and click the OK button on the Colours form. 11. Click the OK button on the form and note the changes to the colours in the 3D View. Display the Colours form again and un-check the Auto Colour On/Off checkbox.ZONE from the Draw List. Select Settings>Graphics>Representation… from the Main Menu to display the Representation form. Note how the piping elements in the model are represented. Module 3 Basics & Functions 4-25 . Display the Representation form again and check the Tube checkbox. Note the obstruction volumes displayed around the valves in the model.

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you will able to: • 5 Explain the principles behind the 3D display. Must Know Points The following points need to be understood by the trainees • How to access the 3D display.Session The Model Editor Objectives At the end of this session. Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-1 .

5-2 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The Model Editor is a general editor. The features described here for selecting. moving and rotating items by using the mouse are available only in the Model Editor. The Save Work operation also exists Model Editor mode.The Model Editor Model Editor Mode The Model Editor is a mode of operation in the Design module that enables you to reposition selected Plant items using the mouse pointer. a 3D View that can be switched into Model Editor mode is called a 3D Model Editor View. it is not discipline specific. i. You enter Model Editor mode by clicking the Model Editor button on the toolbar. Alternatively. the Edit>Model Editor menu selection may be used to enter and leave Model Editor mode. and the same principles can be to appropriate items from all disciplines in PDMS.e. In this manual. and return from the Model Editor to Design Navigate mode by clicking the button again.

The Model Editor Element Selection in the Model Editor Groups of selected Plant Items can be moved or rotated in a single operation. This is useful if accidentally using a clear selection operation or beginning another selection has lost the Graphical Selection. You can define whether to select only those elements that are wholly within the rectangle or to include those that are partially within the rectangle. A Locator Handle appears when a Graphical Selection is present. See Selectable Items at the end of this Session for a list of Plant items that can be selected and modified using the Model Editor. Drag rectangle (Fence) selection allows groups of elements to be selected easily. A Re-Select function is provided to go back to the previous Graphical Selection. This is used to manipulate the position and orientation of the entire Graphical Selection. Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-3 . The collection of selected plant items is called the Graphical Selection. Selection facilities are provided which allow you to select groups of related items in a single selection operation. Clicking in blank space in a 3D Model Editor View. Plant items can be added to or removed from the current Graphical Selection by picking them using the mouse pointer. or using De-Select All on element shortcut menus clears the Graphical Selection.

Movement A Graphical Selection is moved using linear and planar handles on the Locator Handle.The Model Editor The Locator Handle The Locator Handle is a collection of individual graphical manipulation handles grouped together. Dragging a linear or planar handle with the mouse pointer moves the current Graphical Selection. or by dragging with Feature Identification mode switched on. or rotate the selection about an axis. or by using the Edit menu. See Positioning and Orientation using the Locator Handle for details of using the locator handle. Clicking and dragging one of the three Linear Movement Handles constrains the movement of the selection to be in the direction of the selected axis. The movement is made in steps. The Locator Handle can be used to drag the entire Graphical Selection to a new position or rotate the entire Graphical Selection through an angle about a selected axis. the size of which can be controlled by you (the Movement Increment). This allows the Graphical Selection to be positioned accurately in relation to its original position. This combination of direct graphical manipulation handles offers you the ability to move selected items constrained in a direction or to lie in a plane. the Edit menu. 5-4 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The Graphical Selection can be moved until it is aligned with another item in the display by using Locator Handle shortcut menus.

The Model Editor Clicking and dragging one of the three Planar Movement Handles constrains the movement of the selection to be in the plane of the selected planar handle. Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-5 .

This allows the Graphical Selection to be rotated accurately from its original orientation. The Graphical Selection can be rotated until an axis of the Locator Handle is aligned with another item in the display by using Locator Handle shortcut menus. the size of which can be controlled by you (the Rotation Increment). The selection rotates in angular steps as it is dragged with the mouse. or by dragging with Feature Identification switched on (see section 0).The Model Editor Rotation The Graphical Selection is rotated using a Rotation handle. 5-6 Module 3 Basics & Functions . Clicking and dragging one of the three Rotation Handles constrains the rotation of the selection to be about the axis corresponding to the selected rotation handle.

The origin of the Locator Handle is the reference datum for aligning the Graphical Selection. the target points and lines are called features. Movement and rotation feedback for freehand operations is displayed both in the 3D View and on the status bar. Locator Handle as a Frame of Reference The Locator Handle can be moved or rotated independently of the Graphical Selection. or to set an axis of rotation about which the Graphical Selection will be rotated. In this document. Feedback The locator handle changes shape to show movement or rotation constraints. P-line or straight line (edge) in the model. P-point. The distance values are output in the style and Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-7 . This allows both world position and displacement from the starting position to be shown. This allows you to set a datum for movement and alignment operations.The Model Editor Alignment The Graphical Selection can be moved or rotated until it aligns with a point.

• Avoid drawing the model with high levels of detail. it is sometimes necessary to specify a new position without any constraints applied to movement of the Graphical Selection. do not use a fine arc tolerance. feedback is given on features as the mouse pointer passes over them. the display is continuously redrawn. it is advisable to minimise the size and complexity of the displayed model in order to obtain good interactive feedback from the system. 5-8 Module 3 Basics & Functions . Unconstrained Positioning The Locator Handle provides functions for positioning the Graphical Selection constrained in a given direction or in a plane. • Avoid using large graphical selections. Performance tips when using Model Editor: • Display only those elements that are necessary for the modification that you are performing. and graphical feedback is provided to help achieve the correct alignment in a 3D model. Undo and Redo Undo and Redo functions allow you to step backwards or forwards through one or more movement or rotation operations. Generally. or by snapping to a Point feature. An unconstrained position can be specified by typing world co-ordinates into a form. For example. by typing a 3D offset from the current Location Handle position. Undo and Redo operate only on a sequence of direct graphical manipulation operations in the Model Editor. and on the complexity of the model displayed in the 3D View. Any operation using the DESIGN forms or command line disables the Undo and Redo functions. If feature alignment is in use. It may be better to make bulk moves in small groups. do not display the model with holes drawn.The Model Editor units set on the Current Session Units form. accessed by selecting Settings>Units… from the Main Menu bar. However. As you drag a graphical selection on the screen. • Avoid drawing the model with P-points switched on. Performance The speed of interactive selection and dragging operations is dependent on both the specification of the hardware being used.

The Model Editor

Element Selection
In order to move or rotate plant items, you must first select plant items to modify. The collection of selected items is called the Graphical Selection. Plant items may be added to or removed from the current Graphical Selection by various selection methods: • • • • picking with the mouse pointer dragging a rectangular fence around items to be selected using selection operations to select related groups of items clearing the Graphical Selection.

The Design database elements that can be selected and modified using the Model Editor are listed in Selectable Items at the end of this Session. Selection Feedback Selected elements are highlighted so that they stand out from all the other elements in the graphics display. A Locator Handle appears when a Graphical Selection is present. This can be used to manipulate the position and orientation of the entire Graphical Selection. Modifiable and non-modifiable elements Elements that can be moved or rotated by you are highlighted with a green wire-line highlight when you click on them in Model Editor mode. If you do not have permission to move or rotate an element, it is highlighted in a red wire-line. It is not always possible to determine whether a move or rotation operation can be carried out when items are selected. It is possible that a move or rotation operation could be rejected if PDMS Data Access Control determines that the current user is not permitted carry out the operation. Selecting Items Using the Mouse Pointer Plant items are selected by clicking on the item with the left mouse button in the 3D graphics view. The Ctrl key is used to add unselected items to the current selection or remove selected items from the Graphical Selection. Available selection methods are: ● Single click on an unselected item creates a new Graphical Selection containing that one item. ● Single Ctrl-click on an unselected item to add it to the current Graphical Selection. ● Single Ctrl-click on a selected item to remove it from the current Graphical Selection.

Module 3 Basics & Functions

5-9

The Model Editor

● Picking implied tube, or using a Select Leg operation on a Piping Item selects a Pipe leg. Using the Ctrl key with a Pipe leg selection adds to the Graphical Selection if an unselected item is picked. Ctrl with selected implied tube pick removes the Pipe leg . Note that Ctrl with a shortcut menu selection on a selected item does not remove the selection from the list. Fence Selection A group of Plant items can be selected by using a fence selection. There are two fence selection options: 1. Wholly Within selects items that are entirely contained inside the rectangular boundary of a fence selection. 2. Wholly And Partially Within selects both items that are entirely contained inside the rectangular boundary of a fence selection, and items that cross the boundary. Fence selection can be made with either the right or left mouse button. Fence selection using the left mouse button Drag a rectangle surrounding the items to be selected by clicking and holding down the left mouse button at one corner of the rectangle, and drag the mouse pointer to the opposite corner. The selection will take place when the mouse button is released. The items selected depend on the current setting of Selection>Select Rectangle on the Main Menu bar. The following illustrations the effects of each selection.

5-10

Module 3 Basics & Functions

The Model Editor

Pressing the Esc key during the drag will abort the selection.

Fence selection using the right mouse button Drag a rectangle surrounding the items to be selected by clicking and holding down the right mouse button at one corner of the rectangle, and drag the mouse pointer to the opposite corner. The shortcut menu shown in the picture below will appear when the mouse button is released.

The selection takes place when one of the options on the shortcut menu is selected. Pressing the Esc key during the drag or prior to selecting from the shortcut menu aborts the selection. Clicking away from the shortcut menu or selecting Cancel on the menu also aborts the selection. Adding to an existing Graphical Selection with a fence selection Holding the Ctrl key down while performing a fence selection adds the selected items to the existing Graphical Selection.

Module 3 Basics & Functions

5-11

The Model Editor Removing selected items from an existing Graphical Selection with a fence selection. Clicking the right mouse button on a graphical selection accesses the item specific sub-menus. Holding the Shift key down while performing a fence selection removes the selected items from the existing Graphical Selection. Select>Connected Select>Connected is a special piping selection that selects a group of connected piping items. Item-Specific Selection Operations Item-specific selection operations can be found on sub-menus on some Plant items. Using the Ctrl button with Select>Connected adds to the Graphical Selection if an unselected item is picked. the gaskets and flanges connected to the Valve would be added to the Graphical Selection along with the Valve. 5-12 Module 3 Basics & Functions . or using the Select>Leg shortcut menu selection on a Piping. HVAC or Cable Tray component will select a leg of a Branch. In the picture above. Select>Leg Picking implied tube.

The Model Editor Select>Leg selects those components in a Branch that are in-line with the selected component or implied tube. Selecting either option will add all PIPE or BRANCH elements to the selection. Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-13 .g. A change in direction of the Branch (e. The illustrations below show examples of the use of these two options: Select>PIPE and Select>BRAN Select>PIPE and Select>BRAN show the names of the PIPE or BRANCH that own the selected item. at an elbow) is regarded as the end of a Pipe leg.

and any sections connected to it via joints will be selected. Select>FRMW and Select>SBFR are similar to Select> PIPE and Select>BRAN described above. Select>Attached is a special steelwork selection to select a group of connected steel SCTN items. The selected item. Choosing these options will add either all the members of the FRMW or SBFR that own the selected SCTN.The Model Editor The picture above shows the name of the Branch and Pipe that own the selected component in the Select menu. 5-14 Module 3 Basics & Functions . Using the Ctrl key with Select>Attached adds to the Graphical Selection if an unselected item is picked.

Leave Model Editor mode. Reinstating the Previous Graphical Selection If a Graphical Selection has been lost accidentally by clearing the selection or by starting a new selection. Select De-Select All on a shortcut menu on an element in the 3D view. but you can reinstate the last Graphical Selection on return to Model Editor mode by using Edit>Re-Select. so no part of the 3D view background can be seen.The Model Editor Clearing the Graphical Selection There are three methods to clear a Graphical Selection: 1. Feature Identification Mode is described in Positioning and Orientation using the Locator Handle. Leaving Model Editor mode clears the Graphical Selection. If the mouse pointer is over a 3D Model Editor view. and the Model Editor is active. pressing the F key on the keyboard toggles between feature identification mode being switched on or off. The Selection Menu The Selection menu on the Main Menu bar contains commands for setting properties of the Locator Handle and the Graphical Selection. 2. (This is provided for the case where the 3D view is full. Set Increments shows the Select Increments form for setting the active movement or rotation increments: Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-15 . Feature Highlighting enables or disables Feature Identification Mode.) 3. Click in blank space in the graphics 3D view. the previous selection can be reinstated by selecting Edit>Re-Select from the main menu bar.

Drag Image During a drag operation using the Locator Handle. 5-16 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The list of available colours is shown on the submenu. or units can be specified by using PDMS units of measure syntax. Select Rectangle sets the mode of operation of Select Rectangle on the left mouse button to be Wholly Within or Wholly And Partially Within. Set Handle Colour enables you to change the colour of the Locator Handle.The Model Editor The Linear increment is specified in the currently active units. an image of the Graphical Selection follows a constrained path defined by the current mouse pointer position. The style of feedback for all items in the Graphical Selection can be selected from the submenu list.

The Model Editor

Positioning and Orientation using the Locator Handle
This section describes how to move or rotate the current Graphical Selection using the Locator Handle. Overview The Locator Handle provides three ways to move or rotate a Graphical Selection: 1. Dragging the linear, planar or rotation handles freehand with the mouse pointer 2. Aligning with points, P-points, P-lines or straight lines (edges) on other displayed plant items 3. Typing in offset distance or angular displacement values Aligning the Graphical Selection with points or lines on other displayed items When aligning a Graphical Selection with other plant items in the displayed model, you enter feature identification mode, where the mouse pointer is sensitive to finding features on the Design graphics. Features are points, straight lines (edges), P-points or P-lines. Points are located at vertices on the model, such as the corner of a box, and at the mid-point of lines. Lines are straight edges on the model (Design Aid graphics cannot be used as a feature). Feature identification mode is turned on and off by selecting Feature Highlighting on the Selection menu, or by pressing the F key when the mouse pointer is over a 3D Model Editor View, and the Model Editor is active. Some operations turn on feature identification mode temporarily to allow you to pick a feature. For example, Edit>Move Selection>Snap To Point. Once the required feature is identified, the mode will revert to its state before the command was actioned. Automatic scrolling If the target location for a drag operation is outside of the 3D view, the mouse pointer can be moved to an edge of the view, where the view will pan automatically up, down, left or right according to the 3D view edge that the mouse pointer hits. The mouse pointer must move in order for the panning to continue. This may necessitate you making a small movement of the pointer near to the view edge to keep the pan operation going. This technique for panning the view is appropriate for locating a target position that is just out of view.

Module 3 Basics & Functions

5-17

The Model Editor

Linear Movement Handle The Linear Movement handle allows you to move the Graphical Selection constrained in the direction of the Linear handle axis. The size of each step of the movement is defined by the current movement increment. Dragging a linear handle with the left mouse button moves the Locator Handle and Graphical Selection in the direction of the linear handle. To initiate a linear drag, press the left mouse button down over one of the linear movement handles. With the left button still pressed, moving the mouse drags the Graphical Selection constrained in the selected direction, in steps defined by the movement increment. Moving one movement increment at a time If the movement increment is small relative to the magnification of the 3D view, it can be difficult to move the mouse freehand to a precise displacement from the Locator Handle’s original position. Fine control over positioning can be achieved by dragging with a linear handle so that it is close to the required position then, while continuing to hold down the mouse button, press the plus (+) or minus (-) key on the numeric keypad. This moves the Graphical Selection by one movement increment in the direction of the linear handle if + is pressed, or in the opposite direction if - is pressed. Feedback When moving a selection in a constrained direction, the Locator Handle changes to a cut-down version of the full handle to show the direction of movement, as shown below. The current World position of the Locator Handle is displayed on the status bar, and an offset from the original position of the handle is displayed on the 3D View.

As the mouse moves over a linear handle, the pointer symbol changes to the linear drag pointer.

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Module 3 Basics & Functions

The Model Editor

Linear Handle Shortcut menu A Linear Handle has the following movement operations on its shortcut menu:

Enter Value… shows the following form:

The field corresponding to the selected axis is activated for input. In this case, entering 2500 in the X field tells the Graphical Selection to move by 2500mm in the X direction of the Locator Handle. Align with Feature…

Module 3 Basics & Functions

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This highlights the target feature. and the mouse pointer changes shape to indicate that the Graphical Selection will be aligned with the target position if the mouse button is clicked. Any position along the feature line will project onto the same point on the movement line. The sequence of operations is as follows: • Make a Graphical Selection. Linear drag can align with a point feature or a line feature. 5-20 Module 3 Basics & Functions . • Select Align with Feature on the linear handle shortcut menu. then the point chosen is the nearest point on the line of movement to the extended feature line. • Move the mouse to the target feature. • Optional: Position the Locator Handle at the required datum position. If the extended feature line and the movement line do not intersect in 3D. Point feature Alignment When positioning the Graphical Selection to a point feature. Selected line feature is orthogonal to the line of movement If the line selected line feature is orthogonal to the line of movement.The Model Editor This method allows you to position the Graphical Selection in relation to another object on the screen. then the feature line is treated as a feature point. • Click the left mouse button to move the Graphical Selection to the target position. the origin of the Locator Handle is aligned with the target point such that the target point is projected onto the line of movement. then the intersection of the extended feature line with the line of movement becomes the new Locator Handle origin position. This situation is illustrated below (in two dimensions): Alignment with a Line or P-line Feature There are two cases to consider: 1. Selected line feature not orthogonal to the line of movement If the line selected line feature is not orthogonal to the line of movement. but forces the Graphical Selection to move only along the selected axis. 2.

Ppoint as point feature A P-point feature may be treated as a point feature. then the intersection of the Ppoint direction with the line of movement becomes the new Locator Handle origin position. then the point chosen is the nearest point on the line of movement to a line projected from the Ppoint position in the Ppoint direction. and will work as described above for points. Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-21 . 2. If the Ppoint direction and the movement line do not intersect in 3D.The Model Editor This situation is illustrated below (in two dimensions): Alignment with a Ppoint Feature There are two cases to consider: 1. If the mouse pointer is moved over the Ppoint arrow. which is indicated by the arrow on a Ppoint feature symbol. Ppoint as a Line feature A Ppoint has a direction.

5-22 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The Locator Handle may be moved independently of the Graphical Selection in order to change the datum position for the next operation on the Graphical Selection. See Positioning and Orientation Using the Edit Menu. They do not move the Graphical Selection. The handle moves in steps determined by the current Movement Increment setting. The Graphical Selection is not constrained to move along the direction of the Linear Handle. Move Handle The Move Handle sub-menu provides the same movement commands as the main Linear Handle menu. but these commands move the Locator Handle only.The Model Editor Snap To Point… Snap To Point allows the Graphical Selection to be moved to a Point feature. Planar Movement Handles Each of the planar movement handles constrains the drag operation such that the Graphical Selection moves only in the plane of the selected handle.

With the left button still pressed. The Locator Handle changes to a simple version of the full handle to show the plane of movement as shown: As the mouse moves over a planar handle the pointer symbol changes to the planar drag symbol. All values are shown in the current selected units. Feedback A triangle is displayed on the current constraint plane. between the original position of the handle and the current position.The Model Editor To initiate a planar drag. moving the mouse drags the Graphical Selection constrained in the selected plane. Planar Handle Shortcut menu A Planar Handle has the following movement operations on its shortcut menu: Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-23 . in steps defined by the movement increment. you press the left mouse button down over one of the planar movement handles. The current World position of the Locator Handle is displayed on the status bar. The relative movement distances are shown on the sides of the triangle.

The fields corresponding to the selected plane are activated for input. but forces the Graphical Selection to move only in the selected plane. In this case. The sequence of operations is as follows: 5-24 Module 3 Basics & Functions .The Model Editor Enter Values… This command shows the following form. Align with Feature… This facility allows you to position the Graphical Selection in relation to another object on the screen. entering 8000 in the X field and 4000 in the Z field tells the Graphical Selection to move by X8000mm Z4000mm in the XZ plane of the Locator Handle.

Optional: Position the Locator Handle at the required datum position. then the Locator Handle origin is placed where the extended feature line or Ppoint direction intersects with the movement plane. and the mouse pointer changes shape to indicate that the Graphical Selection will be aligned with the target position if the left mouse button is clicked. 3. The feature selected is an edge on the top of the stringer. Click the left mouse button to move the Graphical Selection to the target position.The Model Editor 1. For example. 5. the handrail is dragged in a horizontal plane. Point feature Alignment When positioning the Graphical Selection to a point feature. A marker appears at the target point. 4. For example. in the following picture. Move the mouse to the target feature. 2. with the bottom of the first post positioned where the top of the stringer intersects with the plane. Make a Graphical Selection. Select Align with Feature… from the planar handle shortcut menu. Alignment with a Line or Pline Feature If a planar move is to be aligned with a line feature. the origin of the Locator Handle is aligned with the target point such that the target point is projected onto the plane of movement. the picture above shows the target P1 P-point position being projected onto the plane of movement of the Graphical Selection. Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-25 .

To perform a rotation. The Graphical Selection is not constrained to move in the plane of the Linear Handle. Move Handle The Move Handle sub-menu provides the same movement commands as the main Planar Handle menu. but these commands move the Locator Handle only. press the left mouse button over the relevant rotation handle. The Locator Handle may be moved independently of the Graphical Selection in order to change the datum position for the next operation on the Graphical Selection. With the left button still depressed. 5-26 Module 3 Basics & Functions . drag the mouse to perform the rotation. See Positioning and Orientation Using the Edit Menu.The Model Editor Snap To Point… Snap To Point… allows the Graphical Selection to be moved to a Point feature. They do not move the Graphical Selection. Dragging a Rotation handle with the left mouse button rotates the handle and the Graphical Selection about the axis of rotation. Rotation Handle The rotation handles allow you to rotate the Graphical Selection around the relevant axis using the current angular increment to control the angular step size.

The Model Editor Feedback The angular movement from the original orientation is shown as the Locator Handle is rotated. Rotation Handle Shortcut menu A Rotation Handle has the following movement operations on its shortcut menu: Enter Value… This allows the Graphical Selection to be rotated about one of the Locator Handle axes. This feedback indicates which of the axes will be aligned with a feature when feature alignment is used. As the mouse moves over a rotation handle. Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-27 . The angular displacement is also shown in the status bar. and half of the Rotation Handle arc changes to show two arrows. the pointer symbol changes to the rotation drag symbol.

Select Orient to Point… from the Rotation handle shortcut menu 4. Align with Direction… 5-28 Module 3 Basics & Functions . Move the mouse to the target point. 5. The mouse pointer changes to indicate that a point has been located.The Model Editor Orient to Point… The sequence of operations is as follows: 1. Click the primary mouse button to rotate the Graphical Selection to the target orientation. and the axis is directed towards the point. Optional: Position the Locator Handle at the required datum position 3. Make a Graphical Selection 2.

Move the mouse to the target line (edge) or P-point direction. Align with… Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-29 . Select Align with Direction… from the Rotation Handle shortcut menu. Make a Graphical Selection 2. On a P-point. Click the left mouse button to rotate the Graphical Selection to the target orientation. this can be achieved by choosing one of the arrows on the P-point feature. 4.The Model Editor The sequence of operations is as follows: 1. If the Graphical Selection is shown 180 degrees out of alignment. press the key to get the alternate alignment. Optional: Position the Locator Handle at the required datum position 3. The mouse pointer will change to indicate that the axis will be directed parallel to the edge. 5.

If Feature Snapping is on. There is an alternative method to select a feature. Pressing the right mouse button over a highlighted feature shows a menu that allows the Graphical Selection or the Locator Handle to be moved to the selected position. 5-30 Module 3 Basics & Functions . If the Graphical Selection is dragged using the Locator Handle while Feature Snapping is on. The Locator Handle may be rotated independently of the Graphical Selection in order to change the frame of reference for the next operation on the Graphical Selection. it will align itself with key features on the displayed model as the mouse pointer passes over them. They do not rotate the Graphical Selection. the F key can be used to toggle feature identification on and off if it is pressed over the 3D View while in Model Editor mode. The Graphical Selection is rotated about one of the Locator handle axes.The Model Editor Rotates the selection until the chosen axis points towards the given direction. Rotate Handle>To World This command aligns the Locator Handle with the World co-ordinate system. use Selection>Feature Highlighting to switch into a mode where features are identified as the mouse pointer passes over them on a 3D view. such that the chosen axis points as close to the direction specified as possible. but these commands rotate the Locator Handle only. selecting it again will switch feature snapping off. See the sections on Linear. Planar and Rotation Handles for a description of how feature snapping works for each handle. Rotate Handle The Rotate Handle sub-menu provides the same rotation commands as the main Rotation Handle menu. and the Z axis points Up. The Locator Handle Y axis points North. Feature Snapping Having made a graphical selection in Model Editor mode. Moving the mouse over the 3D model without dragging the locator handle still highlights features. Alternatively. without rotating the Graphical Selection.

it is necessary to move the mouse pointer over the item before features are shown. it is necessary to make sure that the mouse pointer first passes over the associated plant item. In the few cases where the P-point or P-line is outside of the plant item. In order to select features of a Plant item. On steelwork items with P-lines. In most cases. Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-31 . or partly obscured by another item in the scene. the Justification Line (JUSL) P-line is shown as a feature. a plant item. or inside. because the selected items are shown in their new location when a reference point is found.The Model Editor Selecting Move Handle Here in the picture above will move the handle to the selected point. so selecting a feature is straightforward. the target P-point or P-line lies on. The Graphical Selection cannot be moved to a reference point on selected items. Feature identification: The Locator Handle can be moved to features on selected or unselected items.

select the linear. you can cancel the drag operation by pressing the Esc key. and then press the H key on the keyboard. planar or rotation handle by pressing the left mouse button down. Moving the Locator Handle Independently of the Graphical Selection A Locator Handle can be moved independently of the Graphical Selection. and moving the Graphical Selection with the Locator Handle. This is a standard way of cancelling a drag operation on Windows. The Locator Handle shortcut menus and the Edit menu provide commands for moving and rotating the Locator Handle on its own. or an axis of rotation to be set for subsequent rotation operations.The Model Editor Cancelling the drag At any point of the move. This allows a datum position to be set for subsequent move operations. When the drag is cancelled the selection reverts to its original position and remains selected. This detaches the Locator Handle from the Graphical Selection. 5-32 Module 3 Basics & Functions . The H key can be used to toggle between moving the Locator Handle on its own. In order to drag the Locator Handle without the Graphical Selection.

Switching in or out of Modify mode resets the undo state. Usually these are spotted immediately and you are able to undo the change and restore the previous state. You may step back through undo states one at a time. There are three types of activity that are recognised while you are in Model Editor mode. Using the standard Undo and Redo icons on the main toolbar. Following an undo. stepping forward one state at a time until the sequence of changes that were undone are restored. The position/orientation of the Locator Handle at the last database change is saved. the re-do option is no longer available and the corresponding icons/menu options will become inactive. and all undo/re-do icons and menu options become inactive. the current state is saved before the change in order that it may be restored by a subsequent Undo. Switching between applications in DESIGN will Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-33 .The Model Editor Positioning and Orientation Using the Edit Menu Selecting Edit from the Main Menu bar displays the Edit menu: Undo and Re-do The ease with which you can manipulate the model using the graphical techniques provided in PDMS Design means you are more prone to make mistakes. Changes to the database as a result of manipulating the Graphical Selection either by direct graphical manipulation or from the context sensitive menus. For each of these. 3. 2. 2. There are two ways you may undo an activity: 1. 1. Using the Undo and Redo options on the Edit pull-down menu. Selection Set. you can then choose to re-do the sequence. The selection set in use at the last database change is saved. If you do one or more undos and then save a new state. Locator Handle.

Move Selection and Move Handle have identical sub-menus: The operations described below apply to both Move Selection and Move Handle. The position of the Graphical Selection will only change if OK is clicked.The Model Editor also cause the Modify mode button to be switched off and the undo/redo states to be re-initialised. This will not become apparent until you press the Undo icon and the undo does not occur as the Undo/Redo icons are greyed out. in the coordinate system of the Locator Handle. If you modify the database by any means other than using the features of Model Editor mode. Move Selection/Handle>Offset in 3D… The Graphical Selection can be moved relative to its original position. 5-34 Module 3 Basics & Functions . then it will no longer be possible to undo previous database changes made using graphical manipulation. Move Selection and Move Handle Move Selection moves the Graphical Selection and Move Handle moves the Locator Handle only.

The Model Editor Move Selection/Handle Set 3D Position… This form shows the current position of the Locator Handle in World co-ordinates. Changing the settings and clicking OK will move the selection to the specified world co-ordinates. Select Move Selection/Handle>Snap to Point from the Edit menu Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-35 . The sequence of operations is: 1. Add one or more plant items into a Graphical Selection 2. Optional: Position the Locator Handle at the required datum position 3. Move Selection/Handle>Snap to Point This facility allows you to position the Graphical Selection at a selected position in relation to another object on the screen.

and the Z axis points in the World Up direction. Rotate Selection/Handle>To World This operation re-orientates the Locator Handle and Graphical Selection such that the Y axis of the Locator Handle points in the World North direction. 5-36 Module 3 Basics & Functions .The Model Editor 4. Rotate Selection and Rotate Handle have identical sub-menus: Rotate Selection rotates the Graphical Selection. Rotate Selection/Handle>About X/Y/Z These three operations show the Rotate Selection/Handle About X/Y/Z form for the selected axis. The operations described below apply to both Rotate Selection and Rotate Handle. Click the left mouse button to move the Graphical Selection to the target position. Move the mouse pointer to the target position. Rotate Selection and Rotate Handle Rotate Selection rotates the Graphical Selection and Rotate Handle rotates the Locator Handle only. The pointer will change to indicate that the Graphical Selection will snap to the target feature 5. Rotate Handle rotates the Locator Handle only.

Note:You will be asked to confirm the deletion Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-37 . Delete Selection Delete Selection on the Edit menu deletes all items in the Graphical Selection from the database.The Model Editor Entering a value enables the Graphical Selection to be rotated about one of the Locator Handle axes. This command is only available while a Graphical Selection exists.

Plant Item EQUIPMENT Selectable Elements SITE>ZONE>EQUI PIPE (and CABLE TRAY) PIPE/CABLE TRAY BRANCH Pipe component SITE>ZONE>PIPE using the Select Owners operation SITE>ZONE>PIPE>BRAN using Select Owners operation SITE>ZONE>PIPE>BRAN>(any component) HVAC HVAC BRANCH HVAC component SITE>ZONE>HVAC using Select Owners operation SITE>ZONE>HVAC>BRAN using Select Owners operation SITE>ZONE>HVAC>BRAN>(any component) HANGERS RESTRAINT HANGER …PIPE>REST & …HVAC>REST using Select Owners operation …PIPE>REST>HANG & …HVAC>REST>HANG PIPE TRACK SITE>ZONE>PTRA ROUTING PLANE SITE>ZONE>RPLA or SITE>ZONE>STRU>RPLA RPLA also exists under EQUI. A SCTN element can be selected and moved if it belongs to a FRMW or SBFR element. SUBS – RPLA is NOT a significant element in these situations PENALTY VOLUME SITE>ZONE>PVOL or SITE> ZONE>STRU>PVOL Note: PVOL also exists under EQUI.The Model Editor Selectable Items The following table lists element types that can be selected and modified using the Model Editor. PTRA. Note that some types of element can be modified if they belong to an administrative element such as a ZONE or FRMW. but not if it belongs to a TMPL element. but they cannot be individually modified if they belong to a Plant Item. SUBE. For example. PTRA. SUBE. SUBS – PVOL is not a significant Model Editor element in these situations 5-38 Module 3 Basics & Functions .

Module 3 Basics & Functions 5-39 . PTRA.The Model Editor Plant Item STRUCTURES Primitive owned directly by STRU SUBSTRUCTURE FRAMEWORK SUBFRAMEWORK Collection of FLOOR Collection of WALL Collection of SCREED Selectable Elements SITE>ZONE>STRU>(Primitive) SITE>ZONE>STRU>SUBS …STRU>FRMW using Select Owners operation …STRU>FRMW>SBFR using Select Owners operation …STRU>FRMW>CFLOOR using Select Owners operation …STRU>FRMW>CWALL using Select Owners operation …STRU>FRMW>CSCREED using Select Owners operation Note: The following elements may be owned by FRMW. CFLOOR. SBFR. CWALL or CSCREED GENSEC WALL PANEL FLOOR GWALL SCREED PNODE SCTN STWALL PALJ DRAW GENSEC WALL PANE FLOOR GWALL SCREED PNOD SCTN STWALL PALJ SITE>DRAW or SITE>ZONE>DRAW Note: DRAW also exists under EQUI. See selection rules for those element types BOUNDARY SITE>BOUN or SITE>ZONE>BOUN GROUND MODEL SITE>GRDM DATUM SITE>ZONE>DATU Note that the Model Editor does not work with Design Template elements in the Template World. It is not possible to selected elements owned by a TPWL>TMAR>TMPL hierarchy. SUBS – DRAW is NOT a significant element in these situations. SUBE.

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