P. 1
Endobiogenic Approach (CN)

Endobiogenic Approach (CN)

|Views: 249|Likes:
Published by CPP-library
The Endobiogenic Approach to Health Maintenance and Restoration.
The Endobiogenic Approach to Health Maintenance and Restoration.

More info:

Categories:Types, Presentations
Published by: CPP-library on Sep 24, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

10/28/2015

The Endobiogenic Approach to Health Maintenance and Restoration

as developed by Drs C. Duraffourd and J.-C. Lapraz

The current pathological paradigm: the etiology of the specific:

• Germ • Enzyme • Gene
The organism in its entirety is excluded

Colin Nicholls BA MCPP MNIMH

The evolution of knowledge in medicine
Problem: transition from the pathology of isolated tissues to the physiology of the integrated mechanisms of life: – Globality – Dynamics – Interrelationship

Duraffourd and Lapraz’s mission is to restore to mainstream medicine an integrative, global approach and to demonstrate that such an approach is:

• Consistent with, and supported by, modern
science

• More effective than a reductionist approach
(while not excluding modern medicine)

• Preventative as well as curative • Superior in terms of toxicity

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Fundamental concept
Inherent in the organism there exists an assembly of perpetually dynamic mechanisms intended to maintain the best possible state of equilibrium of terrain for the terrain in question. In sickness or in health, the human being reacts as a systemic unity.
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Definition of the terrain
‘The functional expression of the living whole that constitutes a human being, based on his or her genetic inheritance and its fusion into a certain initial physical state that provides that being’s touchstone of physiological equilibrium.’

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

1

The terrain
• regulates and maintains the functioning of
the organism on a second-by-second basis

The endocrine system as ‘manager’

• guarantees the integrity and reactivity of
the organism in the face of aggression • is omnipresent, at every level • operates via the endocrine and autonomic nervous systems
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

General Adaptation Syndrome
• Stimulation of the corticotropic axis in its • • •
adaptative function – increase in circulating cortisol Ceases together with the aggression If prolonged, yields adaptability, leading to a change of state, involving A modification of the level of equilibrium (generally downwards – this is the price for maintaining balance at a lesser energetic cost)
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Therapeutic modality
The multiplicity, ubiquity, and polymorphous nature of the agents that disrupt normal physiological processes is perfectly matched by the plurality and polymorphous nature of the pharmacological activities of medicinal plants. This explains why we chose, very early on, whole plant extracts—or extracts that are as near as possible to this ideal—in our attempt to grapple with the complex task of maintaining or restoring homoeostasis.

Christian Duraffourd

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

The endobiogenic approach
has implications in terms of:

Parasympathetic system: key features
• Anabolic • Increases movement and secretions of • • • •
digestive tract Increases secretions overall (and sweat) Reduces heart rate More active during childhood, at night, and during and after meals Favours congestion
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

• assessment of the individual patient:
– case history taking – physical exam knowledge of the endobiogenic mechanisms likely to be active – in a particular pathology – at a particular time of day/year/life
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

2

Vagotonic symptoms and signs
• ENT and respiratory problems • Mucus congestion • Hands and feet warm and moist • Slow heart rate • Drowsiness/sweating after meals • Flat chest and bloated abdomen • Enlarged parotids
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Parasympatholytic plants
• Atropa belladonna • Thymus vulgaris • Artemisia dracunculus • Cypressus sempervirens • Hyssopus officinalis • Gentiana lutea
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Alphasympathetic system: key features
• Is response to aggression (inc. cold) • Reduces digestive activity • Contracts sphincters • Causes vasoconstriction of skin, kidneys,
spleen, liver, splanchnic system • Dilates pupils • Inhibits release of insulin
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Alphasympathotonic symptoms and signs
• Cold extremities (esp. feet + knees) • Hypertension • Mydriasis • Constipation • Haemorrhoids/uterine spasms/varicose
veins

• Irritability, anxiety, insomnia
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Alphasympatholytic plants
• Lavandula officinalis • Crataegus oxyacantha • Angelica archangelica • Origanum majorana • Tilia europaea • Valeriana officinalis • Ballota nigra
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Betasympathetic system: key features
• Is stimulated by heat • Increases motoricity • Increases all myocardial activity • Vasodilates principal arteries • Relaxes intestines, uterus, bladder • Dilates bronchi • Increases glycaemia and lipolysis
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

3

Symptoms and signs of sympathetic insufficiency
• • • • • • •
Hypotension Small, weak pulse/bradycardia/syncope Susceptibility to allergies Thinness, lack of muscle bulk Recessed sternum Fatigability, lack of concentration Susceptibility to infections, various stresses

Betasympathomimetic plants
• Ribes nigrum • Menyanthes trifoliata • Cinnamomum zeylanicum • Satureja montana • Salvia officinalis • Hyssopus officinalis
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Sequencing of the ANS
ParaS
congests

Case study 1
Female, 4½, presenting on 23/3/05 with nightly enuresis + accidents during day (mostly trickling). Mother says she leaves it too late because ‘constantly on go’ – too busy. Also ‘doesn’t really listen’ and has lack of concentration, though is very bright and does well academically.

AlphaS →
blocks

BetaS
intensifies and releases

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 1

(cont…)

Case study 1

(cont…)

PMH • Birth weight 7lb 6oz • Born by caesarean (breech) • Breastfed only 3 weeks • Chest infection at 2 (antibiotics)

Clinical features • Is warm and sweaty at night • Difficult to get her to sleep – takes her up to 2 hours to ‘switch off’ • Sleeps v. heavily – doesn’t wake up if wets bed

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

4

Case study 1

(cont…)

Case study 1
Family history

(cont…)

Clinical features (cont…)

• Digestion good, but sometimes complains
of abdominal pain (mother thinks related to stress) • V. sensitive, gets easily upset (e.g. moving house) • Dark hair on legs and in small of back
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

• Paternal grandmother has to take antinausea tablets every day – gets sick at the slightest stress

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 1
Prescription 1:

(cont…)

Case study 1
2g 10 ml

(cont…)

1. EO Lavandula off. 2.
qsp Labrafil 3 gtt in water tds Hypericum perforatum 1:1 Serenoa repens 1:1 aa qsp 100 ml 25 gtt in water tds

Outcome (24/6/05) • Some improvement in bladder by day, but no better at night • Hyperactive behaviour continues, and still hypersensitive to slights

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

ANS influence on the bladder

Case study 1

(cont…)

Filling the bladder: sympathetic system active

Emptying the bladder: parasympathetic system active

Analysis Very strong parasympathetic response to chronically raised alpha: therefore alpha insufficient at night to control para. Strategy • decrease para over course of day • reduce alpha at bedtime
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

5

Case study 1

(cont…)

Case study 1
3.

(cont…)

Prescription 2 (15/8/05):

Prescription 2 (cont…)
Hypericum perforatum 1:1 Serenoa repens 1:1 Bacopa monniera 1:2 aa qsp 200 ml 60 gtt in water tds

1. EO Thymus vulgaris 2.

2g qsp Labrafil 20 ml 10 gtt in water morning and lunchtime EO Lavandula off. EO Origanum majorana aa 1 g qsp Labrafil 20 ml 20 gtt in water at night

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 1
Outcome

(cont…)

The endobiogenic approach
has implications in terms of:

• 10/9/05: 5 dry nights in a row • 31/10/05:
– Only 2 wet nights a week – Improvement in overall behaviour – Sleep latency improved 6/2/06: Only 1 wet night per week 20/3/06: Only 2 wet nights per month, with progressive improvement
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

• assessment of the individual patient:
– case history taking – physical exam knowledge of the endobiogenic mechanisms likely to be active – in a particular pathology – at a particular time of day/year/life
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

• •

Seasonal fluctuation in corticoadrenal and thyroid hormones

Hormonal phases in childhood
4 yrs – stimulation F: 7 yrs of thyroid 12/18 mo M: 9 yrs

Birth

21 dys

30 dys

F: 9 yrs M: 11 yrs

T↑

C/A → G

T → C/A → G

Thyroid phase

Corticoadrenal

Puberty: Genital

Acceleration of structural installation: increase in real needs of organism – Thyroid ↓ → ↑ αΣ → ↑ TSH
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Adaptation phase: change in level of equilibrium

6

Example of endobiogenic imbalance: acne

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Emunctory

• Functional insufficiency of liver →
– increase in cutaneous elimination, which – aggravates local sebaceous imbalance – facilitates risk of infection Liver also plays an important role in maintaining equilibrium of circulating ovarian, glucocorticoid, androgenic and thyroid hormones (key factors in cutaneous imbalance)
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Gonadal axis
There is an apparent, relative hyperandrogeny, which is the result of a hypogenital state

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Gonadal axis
Note: Androgens are the main stimulus of the
sebaceous glands

• In males, a lack of testosterone is compensated
by a rise in adrenal androgens • In females, inadequate secretion of progesterone leads to a hyperstimulation of LH with a rise in ovarian androgens
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

• increasing the number of mitoses • increasing the size of sebaceous cells • increasing the intracellular synthesis of sebum

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Gonadal axis
Note: Progesterone has an anti-androgenic action:

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Corticoadrenal axis
A key factor is

• Competes with testosterone for 5-α-reductase • Inhibits 3-α-androstenediol • Inhibits LH, which
– increases fixation of testosterone and DHT to cytosolic receptors – increases secretion of androgens by ovarian theca cells – stimulates proliferation in its own right
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

• An increase in adrenal androgens, exacerbated
by

• An insufficiency in glucocorticoids, which
– are anti-inflammatory, and – inhibit tissular growth factors, and whose lack – stimulates ACTH
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

7

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Thyroid axis
Plays a role in cystic growth and proliferation TSH • Stimulates cellular multiplication • Is seen as a key factor in acne by Duraffourd & Lapraz

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Thyroid axis
T4

• Increases SHBG → reduction in free androgens,
BUT

• Stimulates secretion of LH, and • Increases the hepatic inactivation of cortisol

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Somatotropic axis
Hyperfunction of GH and prolactin: • Are growth factors in synergy with androgens • Encourage growth and proliferation of the sebaceous cyst

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
Somatotropic axis
There is a reactional hyperinsulinism, linked to:

• The need for an increased supply of energy to the skin,
due to cutaneous hypertrophy, +

• Disturbances in blood sugar regulation, tied to all the
other endocrine and ANS imbalances: subjects are often

fundamentally vagotonic with an exaggerated reaction of the sympathetic system to the vagotonia, to the lack of
glucocorticoids, and to various stresses to which they are often hypersensitive

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Main modifications of the terrain leading to acne
This group of mechanisms explains why acne almost always starts at puberty, since, in the run-up to puberty, hyperfunction of the thyroid is followed by that of the adrenals, and then by that of the pituitary

Clinical data
Example: symptoms & signs of raised GH

• • • • • • •

Hallux valgus, hammer toes Enlargement of foot Thick, rough skin, esp. sole of foot Warts, keloid scars Fungal nail infections Rapid growth Psoriasis (hyper GH)
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

8

Plants to modulate endobiogenic imbalances
• Antigonadotropic: Lithospermum arvense,
Borrago officinalis • Anti-prolactin: Anthriscus cerefolium, Poterium sanguisorba • Anti-GH: Poterium sanguisorba, Fragaria vesca
(rad.)

Plants to modulate endobiogenic imbalances
• Glucocorticoid stimulant: Ribes nigrum (glycerine
macerate of buds)

• Thyroid inhibiting: Brassica oleracea, Fabiana
imbricata

• Thyroid stimulant: Avena sativa

• Luteotropic: Alchemilla vulgaris, Smilax aspera,
Achillea millefolium
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2
Male, 55, presenting on 29/5/02 with chronic prostatitis. This had begun in January 1973, with infectious episodes accompanied by fever and sometimes inflammation (balanitis), as well as the characteristic symptoms of urgency and burning urination.

Case study 2

(cont…)

These episodes at first occurred more or less yearly, but over the years the infections became more and more frequent and recalcitrant, with resistance developing to several of the antibiotics used. At various times different bacteria were identified in the urine: E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae…

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2

(cont…)

Case study 2

(cont…)

At the time of presentation the patient had been on antibiotics virtually uninterruptedly for 6 months.

Clinical features • General exhaustion • Marked pelvic congestion • Marked splanchnic congestion, reflecting participation of pancreas, together with • Extreme liver sensitivity

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

9

Case study 2

(cont…)

Case study 2

(cont…)

Prescription 1 (29/5/02)

Prescription 1 (cont…)
– Agrimonia eupatoria MT Carduus marianus MT Hamamelis virginiana MT aa qsp 125 ml 100 gtt bid – Evacrine (contains dry extract of Zingiber, Viola tricolor, and acerola) 2 tabs bid
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

• Cessation of all antibiotics • Morning and evening, at beginning of meals:
– EO Rosmarinus off. EO Eucalyptus globulus EO Juniperus communis aa 1.5 g qsp Sequoia gigantea 1D 125 ml 50 gtt bid
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2

(cont…)

Case study 2

(cont…)

Prescription 1 (cont…)
– Vitadil (contains dry extract of Juglans regia and Plantago major, with zinc gluconate and vitamin C) 2 tabs bid – Anhydrous magnesium chloride 200 mg 1 caps bid – Infusion of Hamamelis leaves 1 cup bid
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

The patient was also advised to adopt a low-glycaemic-index diet.

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2

(cont…)

Case study 2

(cont…)

Emergency treatment
(3 times a day for 2 days, then twice a day for 5 days, then once a day for 10 days) An enema containing: EO Thymus vulgaris, Melaleuca cajuputii, Satureja montana, Lavandula off. aa 4 g Oligoelements of Au, Ag, Cu aa 2 vials qsp sweet almond oil 150 ml

Outcome (end of August 2002)
First acute infection since beginning of endobiogenic treatment. After use of the emergency prescription, the attack subsided after a few days, with no further complications.

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

10

Case study 2
Outcome (3/2/03)

(cont…)

The Biology of Functions
was developed by Dr C. Duraffourd as a means of objectively quantifying the functionality of the living organism, in order to guarantee its overall equilibrium and homeostasis. It is expressed as a set of indexes (over 200), calculated by a computer program from the results of a series of blood tests.
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

• No further infections of urinary tract • No recurrence of prostatitis • Considerable improvement in general health
As of March 2006, this improvement has been maintained, and the patient no longer suffers from prostatitis.
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

The Biology of Functions: blood tests
Full blood count Erythrocyte sedimentation rate Platelets CPK (or CK) LDH TSH Osteocalcin Total alkaline phosphatase + Alkaline phosphatase iso-enzymes (liver, bone and intestinal fractions [%] – must be supplied even if total AP is normal) Ca K Important: All these tests must be taken in a single draw
Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

INDEX Inflammation Comparative inflammation

19/6/02 125.60 117.23

30/9/02 3.67 3.00

27/1/03 3.99 3.31

Min 0.30 0.20

Max 2.50 2.50

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

INDEX Potential histamine

19/6/02 416.44

30/9/02 47.00

27/1/03 35.64

Min 6.00

Max 12.00

INDEX Oxidation-reduction Oxidation Reduction

19/6/02 506815.39 25078.04 0.05

30/9/02 7.13 86.07 12.08

27/1/03 4.25 118.98 28.00

Min 0.70 1.44 0.72

Max 2.00 81.48 116.40

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

11

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

INDEX Free radicals Adjusted free radicals Comparative free radicals Free radical nocivity

19/6/02 19826.16 19822.45 19819.64 245363.19

30/9/02 1.43 4.08 3.30 19.34

27/1/03 0.63 3.01 1.74 6.30

Min 0.25 1.80 2.00 1.70

Max 0.60 3.50 4.00 3.50

INDEX Necrosis Adjusted necrosis

19/6/02 161.77 36696.12

30/9/02 3.58 795.99

27/1/03 3.59 723.26

Min 2.50 400.00

Max 6.00 1920.00

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

INDEX Apoptosis Adjusted apoptosis B

19/6/02 0.03 0.99

30/9/02 0.23 2.75

27/1/03 0.23 2.75

Min 0.30 5.00

Max 0.70 8.00

INDEX Pro-amyloid Amyloid risk Fibrosis

19/6/02 0.00050 0.00001 0.36

30/9/02 1.96 0.04 3.04

27/1/03 2.96 0.04 4.64

Min 0.54 0.07 6.00

Max 145.50 5.56 8.00

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

INDEX Expansiveness #1 Expansiveness #2 Global expansiveness

19/6/02 10.73 31.59 2.09

30/9/02 1.53 4.38 1.87

27/1/03 1.34 4.43 1.65

Min 0.06 1.00 0.01

Max 2.00 4.00 3.20

INDEX Cancer potential

19/6/02 478105.50

30/9/02 22.01

27/1/03 9.37

Min 6.00

Max 10.00

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

12

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

INDEX Thyroid output

19/6/02 7.33

30/9/02 2.21

27/1/03 2.56

Min 1.50

Max 2.50

INDEX Insulin

19/6/02 25.76

30/9/02 5.00

27/1/03 6.72

Min 1.50

Max 5.00

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

Case study 2: Biology of Functions

INDEX Serotonin

19/6/02 28.81

30/9/02 10.08

27/1/03 10.79

Min 1.50

Max 7.50

INDEX Passive cellular permeability Active intracellular osmolar gradient

19/6/02 281.66 105.56

30/9/02 13.36 13.93

27/1/03 19.10 16.27

Min 4.00 8.00

Max 9.00 12.00

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

Case study 2: Biology of Functions
Conclusion

• The bacteria identified were only an •
epiphenomenon complicating the illness – not its real cause A definitive cure could only be brought about by correction of the endobiogenic imbalances relating to the gonadal, somatotropic and thyroid axes, and of the pelvic congestion.

END
Copyright C Nicholls/SFEM

Copyright © C Nicholls/SFEM

13

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->