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Mr.

Knightley
universally
acknowledged that
a single man in
possession of
a good fortune must
be in want of
a warm vest
J ANEAUSTENKNI TS. COM
2011
What
would
Knit?
Jane
KNIT
35
INSPIRED PROJECTS
2
J
A HANDSOME
VEST
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2 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 1
5 SOCK PATTERNS! From classic cables and lovely lace to
stranded colorwork these sock patterns include toe-up and
top-down construction.
SOCK RX! Learn how to save your hand-knitted socks with
tips for the right tools and techniques for mending holes.
TOPNOTCH SOCK DESIGNERS! SpillyJane, Lorna Miser,
Chrissy Gardiner, Kirsten Kapur, and Ann Budd band to-
gether in this issue for fun, functional sock patterns and
designer insight.
CUSTOMIZING IDEAS! Learn to invert a stitch pattern so
you can design and knit your socks from the top, or the toe.
VIDEOS AND INTERACTIVE GALLERIES! Watch technique
videos frsthand for the ultimate learning experience.
AND MORE!
Sockupied Fall 2011
also includes interactive
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and even some fun sock
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DOWNLOAD your copy of the revolutionary Sockupied
Fall 2011 eMag today, online at shop.knittingdaily.com.
Sockupied Fall 2011 includes:
With even more sock-knitting tips, techniques & patterns,
the latest Sockupied eMag has many reasons to keep your feet happy.
Fall 2011 is here!
PLUS!
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78
Garden
78 Northanger Abbey Hood
Catherine Salter Bayar Instructions page 82
79 Elinor Tunic
Kristi Schueler Instructions page 85
79 Scarlet Capelet
Heather Zoppetti Instructions page 87
79 Chawton Mittens
Anne Blayney Instructions page 96
80 Lydia Military Spencer
Annie Modesitt Instructions page 90
80 Mr. Knightleys Vest
Jenny Sorensen Instructions page 92
80 Frederick & Anne Scarf
Kirsti Johanson Instructions page 95
81 Leafy Muff
Karen Holmes Instructions page 101
81 Theme Scarf
Stephenie Gaustad Instructions page 103
81 Variation Scarf
Stephenie Gaustad Instructions page 104
T
56
34
Contents
KNITTING TO AUSTEN
Amy ONeill Houck 10
THE MIGHTY MUSLIN
Susan Forgue 12
JANES WORLD IN HISTORY
Susan Forgue 14
SENSE AND SENSIBILITY
PATTERN COMPANY
Joanna Johnson 16
JANE AND KNITTING
Sheryl Craig 20
REGENCY FASHION
IN COLOR
Meghan Fernandes 24
WHAT WOULD JANE KNIT?
Larissa Brown 28
JANE AUSTEN, MULTITASKER
Rebecca Dickson 144
Manor
56 Woodhouse Spencer
Jennifer Wood Instructions page 61
57 Marianne Dashwood Stockings
Ann Kingstone Instructions page 60
57 Lambton Top
Theressa Silver Instructions page 65
58 Barton Cottage Shrug
Kristi Schueler Instructions page 69
59 Elinors Tea Cozy
Anne Berk, Valerie Allen, Jill Betts,
and Elaine Blatt Instructions page 67
59 Flower and Lace Cuffs
Carol Huebscher Rhoades Instructions page 70
59 Fiori Pullover
Mary Annarella Instructions page 72
Country
30 Linen Work Apron
Annie Modesitt Instructions page 36
31 Short Stays
Larissa Brown Instructions page 38
31 Fitz Fingerless Mitts
Catherine Shields Instructions page 45
32 Pemberley Slippers
Kristi Schueler Instructions page 46
32 Lydia Bennet Secret Stockings
Susan Strawn Instructions page 54
33 An Aran for Frederick
Kathleen Dames Instructions page 40
34 Georgiana Shawlette
Susanna IC Instructions page 52
35 Modern Reticule
Heather Zoppetti Instructions page 48
35 Frivolous Socks
Katie Franceschi Instructions page 50
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On the Cover: Teme Scarf by Stephenie Gaustad, page 81.
Town
106 Emma Shrug
Tian Connaughton Instructions page 120
107 Josephine Shawl
Rebecca Blair Instructions page 110
107 Meryton Coat
Stephanie Earp Instructions page 113
107 Kensington Mitts
Annie Modesitt Instructions page 122
108 Miss Morlands Neckcloth
Kendra Nitta Instructions page 119
108 Miss Bennets Beaded Bag
Joanna Johnson Instructions page 124
108 Sense and Fashion Handwarmers
Hannah Poon Instructions page 125
108 Diamond and Cross Reticule
Kendra Nitta Instructions page 127
109 Evening Spencer
Corrina Ferguson Instructions page 116
109 Picturesque Cape
Sharon Fuller Instructions page 128
80
106 56
108 34
4 Editors Page
6 Dry Goods
132 Glossary/Abbreviations
141 Advertisers Index
142 Project Index
DEPARTMENTS
Jane Austen
KNI TS Special Issue 2011
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4 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
reveal in her tenth grade literature class that I had tried to read Pride
and Prejudice in one night and couldnt keep all the characters
straight. Fortunately, I rediscovered Jane Austens work during
college with the help of my sister, Julia (who shares a birthday with
Jane), and the 1995 BBC production of Pride and Prejudice. After
that, it was a slippery slope, and I fnd that many of my furniture
and clothing purchases (in addition to books) have been infuenced
by my love of Jane Austen. For instance, I bought an antique writing
desk for my living room where I handwrite letters on occasionit is
also where my Jane Austen action fgure (a birthday gift from my
sister) resides. We used a number of my frocks as the undergar-
ments for the photo shoot (however, in this I was outdone, as Joan-
na Johnsonwho helped hugely with the yarn selection and photo
shoothad sewn Regency-era gowns so that she could attend a
reenactment of a Regency ball).
Once this issue is put to bed, Im looking forward to casting on
for a spencer, or at least my very own reticule, and listening to
Sense and Sensibility (a favorite for the portrayal of sisters) while I
enjoy a cup of Earl Grey tea.
Happy knitting,
Amy Clarke Moore, editor
aclarkemoore@interweave.com
LI TERATURE AND
KNI TTI NG seem to be a perfect
pairingespecially when you consider
the work of Jane Austen. Perhaps this is
because knitting, like reading, has a
meditative, quiet quality to it. Jane
Austens novels resonate with knitters for
the same reason that they have resonated
with readers around the world for
centuriesJane Austen captures the
essence of humanity: quietly, succinctly, and with rich humor.
Her stories are timeless. Trough them we gain insight into a
world (specifcally the Regency era, 17951837, in England) that
was governed by social class and strict rules of decorum. But at the
same time, Jane Austen weaves narratives about people pursuing
happiness despite obstacles, remaining true to themselves while still
loyal to their family and friends, and struggling to know
themselvesstories that transcend time, place, and situation.
For knitters, the flms inspired by her books are the perfect
companions as we snuggle into blankets on the couch with a cup of
steaming tea as the snow piles up outside, adding stitches to the
garments that hold our dreams and wishes. Immersed in the
narratives, we are allowed to escape to a seemingly simpler time and
imagine quiet moments to create and contemplate.
On a personal level, I cant say that I always loved Jane Austen as
well as I do nowmy English teacher Ms. Winters probably doesnt
remember quite as clearly as I do that I burst into tears when I had to
FOUNDER Linda Ligon

CEO Clay B. Hall

CFO Troy Wells

SENIOR VPs John P. Bolton, Bob Kaslik, Stephen Koenig


VP EVENTS & EDUCATION Sara Dumford

VP PRODUCTION Trish Faubion

VP TECHNOLOGY T.J. Harty


VP PEOPLE OPERATIONS Aaron Wilmot
Independent Publishers Since 1975
FROM THE EDITOR
CALL FOR
ENTRIES
In our attempt to capture the essence
of Jane Austen for this issue, we
aspired to reference her infuence
without getting too bogged down in the
details, such as period-specifc props
or costumes. Our hope was to create a
knitting magazine with garments
inspired by Jane Austens narratives
that could be worn with ease and
comfort in our current time. When we
put out our call for entries, we were
overwhelmed by the responsewe
received enough high-quality
submissions to fll three magazines.
Designers, writers, and Regency-era
historians, please check our website,
janeaustenknits.com, for our call for
entries for Jane Austen Knits 2012.
Miss Bennet, there seemed to be a prettyish kind of a little wilderness on one side of your
lawn. I should be glad to take a turn in it, if you will favour me with your company.
LADY CATHERINE DE BOURGH, PRIDE AND PREJUDICE
While northern Colorado may not be the frst landscape to consider when looking for
locations to shoot garments for a Jane Austeninspired knitting magazine, we were able
to capture the essence with the help of two locations. We shot the images for the
Country and Manor sections of the magazine on location at the Timberlane Farm and
Museum in Loveland, Colorado (www.timberlanefarmmuseum.org). Te images for the
Garden and Town sections were shot at the private residence of Tom Lundberg and Dick
Christensen in Fort Collins, Colorado. We are so grateful to both for the use of their
beautiful landscapes.
J
O
E

C
O
C
A
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 5
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Linda Ligon
EDITOR Amy Clarke Moore
MANAGING EDITOR Liz Good
TECHNICAL EDITORS Sheryl Craig, Karen Frisa,
Lori Gayle, Kristen TenDyke
COPY EDITOR AND PROOFREADER Katie Bright
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Kathy Mallo, Joanna Johnson
DESIGNER Sarah Chesnutt
PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Trish Faubion
PRODUCTION COORDINATORS Janice Tapia, Marc McCoy Owens
PRODUCTION EDITOR Nancy Arndt
PHOTOGRAPHY Christa Tippmann, Ann Sabin Swanson
PHOTO STYLING Ann Sabin Swanson
HAIR AND MAKEUP Kathy Eckmann
ILLUSTRATION Sarah Chesnutt, Gayle Ford,
Susan Strawn, Ann Sabin Swanson
PUBLISHER John P. Bolton
MEDIA SALES DIRECTOR Julie Macdonald
ADVERTISING MANAGER Sarah Rovelli
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Stephanie Griess
AD TRAFFICKER Melissa Brown
MARKETING SPECIALIST Whitney Dorband
CIRCULATION MANAGER Barbara Naslund
Jane Austen Knits is a special issue of Spin
.
Of magazine. Spin
.
Of (ISSN
0198-8239) is published bimonthly by Interweave Press LLC, 201 E. 4th
St., Loveland, CO 80537. (970) 669-7672. Periodicals postage paid at
Loveland, CO 80538 and additional mailing of ces. All contents of this
issue of Jane Austen Knits Interweave Press LLC, 2011. Reproduction
in whole or in part is prohibited, except by permission of the publisher.
Printed in the U.S.A.
Projects and information are for inspiration and personal use only. Weve
made every efort to ensure the accuracy of the contents of this publica-
tion. However, human errors do occur. If you have questions regarding a
pattern in this issue, please visit us online at janeaustenknits.com.
Spin
.
Of magazine does not recommend, approve, or endorse any of the
advertisers, products, services, or views advertised in Jane Austen Knits.
Nor does Spin-Of evaluate the advertisers claims in any way. You should,
therefore, use your own judgment in evaluating the advertisers, products,
services, and views advertised in Jane Austen Knits.
CONTACT US
Advertising: Sarah Rovelli (770) 683-4714, srovelli@interweave.com;
Stephanie Griess (877) 613-4630, sgriess@interweave.com.
Retail sales: (800) 272-2193, sales@interweave.com.
Editorial inquiries: (970) 776-1436, spinof@interweave.com or visit
janeaustenknits.com.
oenig
Harty
Interweave Press LLC
201 East Fourth Street
Loveland, Colorado 80537
(970) 669-7672
Visit our website interweave.com
Special Issue 2011
Inspired by the Gothic Windows in
Jane Austens Northanger Abbey
Nazli Gelin Garden Size 10 Cotton Thread
The Perfect Choice For All Your Thread Projects
PC 529
The Northanger Abbey Shawl
Available only in ne yarn stores. Distributed by Universal Yarn.
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Scan this QRcode with
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Universal Yarn website
where you can nd
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The Northanger Abbey Shawl
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6 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
Item
Ro
ost
qui
la a
Imported directly from Chawton Cottage by One
Garden at a Time, each laminated bookmark depicts a
fower from the Jane Austen Garden along with an
image of Chawton Cottage and Jane Austens silhouette.
Te back includes a bibliography of Janes novels so you
can plan what to read next. $4. www.onegardenatatime
.biz/jane_austen_garden_gifts.htm.
Austentatious Crochet: 32 Contemporary Designs from the World of
Jane Austen by Melissa Horozewski. Need we say more? Tis new
book was just released in October. Philadelphia: Running Press,
2011. Paperbound, 208 pages, ISBN 978-0-7624-4146-4. $16.
www.runningpress.com.
PRODUCTS
From the Jane Austen Centre in Bath, England, this
charming thimble features the Jane Austen
silhouette and a quote from Northanger Abbey: Oh,
who could ever be tired of Bath? 5 (~$8).
www.janeaustengiftshop.co.uk.
DRY
GOODS
Gifts
What Janeite
wouldnt love a present
with Mr. Darcy all over it!
Imported directly from Chawton
Cottage by One Garden at a Time, this
wrapping paper comes in 28 x 20 sheets
and is also available in foral patterns and
with illustrations of the Jane Austen House
Museum in Chawton. $4 per sheet.
www.onegardenatatime.biz/jane_austen
_garden_gifts.htm.
Although Maison Sajou wasnt founded
until 1830, these precious sewing boxes
from Sajou hearken back to a time of
sewing in the parlor with close friends
and family just as in the time of Jane
Austen. A variety of small kits are
available featuring diferent illustrations
and contents. $50$80.
www.bagsmith.com/categories/sajou.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 7
Naturally Undyed Fibers
Knoll Skirt, knit in Vista yarn
from booklet #9148
With Laura Bryants
guidance youll be
pulling your stash off
the shelf, making
rivers of color from
light to dark, creating
color wraps that really
work, and learning
to manage color
juxtapositions that will
take your work beyond
the ordinary.
Uncover a WholeNew World
as You Experiment with
Color in Fiber!
(866) 949-1646
Take a Look at
interweave.com

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8 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
PRODUCTS
Tese polymer clay stitch markers each
feature a diferent novel by Jane Austen.
Tey are painstakingly handmade and
feature the covers from Megan Wilsons
Vintage Classics editions of the books. $50.
www.maryfaithpeace.etsy.com.
Add a little whimsy to your knitting with the
wide variety of charming Austen-themed stitch
markers from Knit Girl in Idaho. $6$12.
www.knitgirlinidaho.etsy.com.
Marianne Dashwood (above) 100% superwash
Merino (sportweight yarn and roving for
handspinning) and Elizabeth Bennet (below) 65%
superwash Merino, 20% bamboo, and 15% silk
(fngering-weight yarn) from Yarn Love are inspired
by Jane Austens beloved characters. All of the Yarn
Love yarns are named after fctional and historical
women. Marianne Dashwood, $23/4 oz (yarn),
$18/4 oz (roving); Elizabeth Bennet, $13/50g.
www.etsy.com/shop/shopyarnlove;
www.shopyarnlove.com
DRY
GOODS
Supplies
T ese handmade porcelain buttons
exclusive to the Jane Austen Centre are
ideal for creating historically accurate
Regency garments. Te buttons are
made at Shamrock Cottage using
Sugarcraft cutters and a real shell to
imprint the shell buttons. 10 (~$16).
www.janeaustengiftshop.co.uk.
Silk Treasure
Boxes of Hanah
Silk exquisite hand-
dyed ribbons are perfect
for the trimming of your
handknits. Each box includes
10 to 15 pieces of 3- to 4-foot-
long ribbons in various widths.
$25/ oz. www.artemisinc.com.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 9
available in Anne or Heather
www.schaeferyarn.com
for a store near you or online source
meet Jane Austen
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10 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
starring Gwyneth Paltrow. Luckily, there are many
lesser-known adaptations, some of which you may not
even recognize as Austen-inspired.
When Im watching a flm adaptation of a beloved
book, I usually try to see it as its own artistic
experience. I try not to judge how a flm stays true
to the novel and instead enjoy how a director has
interpreted the original work according to her own
artistic sensibilities. With that in mind, here are a few
of my favorite Austen adaptations.
Are you a fan of Bollywood? Te Indian cinema,
famous for its singing and dancing spectacles has
produced its own version of the Pride and Prejudice
story called Bride and Prejudice. Tis upbeat flm
follows the general story line of the novel, updating it
for a modern cross-cultural romance between an Indian
woman and a California businessman. Te resulting
movie is campy and fun.
Te latest Austen flm adaptation was released
just this year and puts a Latin twist on Sense and
Sensibility. In From Prada to Nada the Miss
Dashwoods are transformed into the Dominguez
sisters: one brainy and one shopaholic. Set in Beverly
Hills and East L.A., Mr. Willoughby becomes a
swarthy literature PhD candidate cheating on his
Mexican wife, and Colonel Brandon becomes a barrio
artist who looks after the Dominguez sisters and their
aunt. Te core of the story stays true to the novel. Tis
light romantic comedy lacks the real dramatic moments
K NI T T I NG TO Austen
by Amy ONeill Houck
S
ometimes a rainy afternoon is the only excuse
I need to make some tea, grab my knitting, and
curl up to watch an oft-played DVD. As many
times as Ive watched the adaptations of Jane Austens
novels, I never get tired of them. At times theyve even
provided knitting inspirationthe costumes alone
can be fascinating. I know Im not alone in my love
of Austen flms. Jane Austens novels are flled with
references to embroidery, hatmaking, painting screens,
and other fne crafts, but references to knitting are few
and far between. Nevertheless, knitters
the world over have a soft spot for
Austens novels. If youre like me, youll
fnd it hard to read an actual paper
book whilst knitting. Instead, I get
my Austen fx by watching flms. Or I
enjoy the books by listening to audio
recordings on my iPod.
If youre a Janeite, youve probably
already seen the most well-known
flm adaptations of
her movies: maybe
you love the 1995
BBC version of
Pride and Prejudice
starring Colin
Firth as Mr. Darcy
or the 1996 flm
version of Emma
reco
If
alre
f
h
y
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 11
part of the narrative.
When Im listening,
I hear every word
no matter what.
Te narrator can
make or break an
audiobook. Once
you fnd narrators
you like, you may
seek them out and pick
books based on whos reading
it instead of the content of the
novel. Its no surprise that Pride and
Prejudice is a novel I love rereading and
rehearing practically every year. My favorite audio
recording is read by Josephine Bailey. If youve read all
the novels recently and want more, you can hear Fiona
Shaw read The Letters of Jane Austen. Susannah
Harker gives a lovely reading of Sense and Sensibility.
Since taste varies, you may want to hear a reading
before committing to buying it or checking it out from
the library. Te website www.audible.com provides long
previews of all the books so you can decide if a reader is
right for you.
Amy ONeill Houck is the author of Knits for Bears to Wear; she
has published patterns in many books and magazines including
Interweave Crochet. Amy lives in Juneau, Alaska, where she can
wear wool year-round. She blogs at www.thehookandi.com.
Resources
There are lots of ways to discover more Austen
films and audio experiences, including BBC radio
dramatizations (www.bbc.co.uk/radio/). For books
in all formats and movies, too, dont forget about
your local public library.
For videos on demand and in DVD format, visit www.amazon
.com and www.netfix.com.
For audiobooks, visit www.librivox.com, www.gutenberg.org, and
www.audible.com.
For a rather exhaustive list of Austen flm adaptions dating back
to the 1940s, visit Ellen Moodys webpage, A Filmography of
the Austen Movies by Source, www.jimandellen.org/austen/
SourceFilmography.html.
Te Internet Movie Database (www.imdb.com) is a great place
to gather information about flms even before they are released.
Its especially fun to search for a particular favorite actor and
follow the trail to other flms he or she has been in.
of the original story but remains an entertaining
modernization of Sense and Sensibility.
In 1996, Alicia Silverstone starred in a flm about
teens, class, and social status in high school. Clueless
was a hit, and Im sure many if not most viewers had
no idea it was inspired by Jane Austens Emma. Te
flm is great at creating a 1990s American analog to
nineteenth-century British society. And Silverstones
character, Cher, is every bit as charming as Austens
Emma.
If youve ever imagined yourself a character in a
Regency novel, youll be happy to discover Lost in
Austen. In this miniseries, protagonist Amanda Price
unwittingly swaps places with Elizabeth Bennet and
has to fnd her way in the nineteenth century as a
houseguest of the Bennet family. Te series is complete
and now is available on DVD.
Northanger Abbey is not one of the most popular
Jane Austen novels, but its one of my favorites. It is
Janes take on a gothic romance, and its neither as dark
nor as romantic as, say, a Bront novel, but it keeps you
turning the pages. Tere are only two flm adaptations
of Northanger Abbey, made twenty years apart in 1987
and 2007. I like them both. Te older flm can come
across as a little overly dramatic, but I think that suits
the novels intent. Te 2007 flm is not lacking in gothic
elements, but the cinematography is probably more
appealing to a modern audience.
Tere are times when its not convenient to knit to
a movieor if youre like me, you may fnd the flm
draws you in and your stitches slow if youre watching
something really good. When I just have to get some
knitting done, I turn to audiobooks. I fnd I can dive
into the world of a novel while still concentrating on
my projecta perfect escape. Tere are dozens of
versions of Jane Austen in audio format. Many are
available for free. Austens work is old enough that
it is in the public domain. Tat means that anyone
can create and distribute an audio recording of her
work without paying royalties. Organizations such as
Librivox and Project Gutenberg are nonprofts that
work to make public domain literature available free
online in audio and electronic format.
When Im choosing an audio version of a book, I
limit my search to unabridged versions. I want to hear
the whole book. I often fnd I get more out of listening
to a novel than I do reading it, since, when reading, Im
able to skim if my eyes get tired or I come to a slow
and
ng and
JAK_010-011_Knitting.indd 11 9/28/11 2:33 PM
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...S
o the novels hero Henry Tilney
brags to characters Mrs. Allen and
Catherine Morland. Te most
popular fabric of the period, muslin, refers to any
of a fne, lightweight, semitransparent cotton textile
which was, as Catherine ponders about her wardrobe
later, manufactured in many variations. Here, Henrys
mention of Indian muslin is a not so subtle boast of
both his wealth and good taste, as Indian muslins were
costlier than ones woven in England, and the texture
was softer and silkier.
In 1798, when Northanger Abbey was frst written as
Susan, muslin was an extremely popular fabric for both
day and evening fashions and was used for every type of
dress except for those worn in the coldest of weathers.
It supplanted silk, as this French fabric was blockaded
during the Napoleonic Wars along with other luxury
items like champagne and cognac. Tere were some
who paid infated prices for smuggled goods, but with
high-quality muslin increasingly woven in both India
and England, muslin became, for many years, the fabric
of choice in Britain.
Te 1798 print from the Journal des Dames et des
12 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
by Susan Forgue
THE MI GHTY Muslin
I always buy my own cravats, and am allowed to be an excellent judge; and
my sister has often trusted me in the choice of a gown. I bought one for her the
other day, and it was pronounced to be a prodigious bargain by every lady who
saw it. I gave but fve shillings a yard for it, and a true Indian muslin . . .
NORTHANGER ABBEY
Modes on page 13 clearly displays the infuences of
ancient Greece and Rome that were highly emulated
during the Directoire period in fashion history.
Tis dress has a togalike appearance in shape, and a
preference for a white dress color was another reference
to Grecian and Roman antiquity, as it mimicked
COMMON REGENCY FABRICS
FIGURED FABRIC with a repeating pattern or design
woven into it.
JACKONET OR JACONET A semitransparent cotton with a
coarser woven structure than mull, glazed on one side.
MULL A sheer cotton cloth, with a silky texture similar to
the Indian muslins.
SPOTTED Fabric with a repeating pattern of small dots
printed on it.
SPRIGGED Fabric with a repeating pattern of small
sprays of fowers or leaves printed on it.
TAMBOURED Fabric with a handembroidered design on
it, so called because the frame holding the fabric taut
was called a tambour.
H
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G
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1818 Walking Dress
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classical statuary. White was also
the most popular color because it
was easiest to launder, and being
seen in white muslin was not only
thought the most modest color
choice for unmarried females, but
it also proclaimed ones status as
a lady of the gentry or aristocracy
who had servants to worry about
removing stains from clothes.
Twenty years later, when
Northanger Abbey was published
posthumously, muslins were
still very popular, but silk had
regained its former predominance for evening wear.
Tis is another of those many details that date the
composition of Northanger Abbey to an earlier period
than when it was published. Te print on page 12
from Ackermanns Repository of Arts, Literature,
Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions and Politics shows
how much fashions had changed in twenty years.
While the gown is still white muslin with the Empire
waist, all elements of classical antiquity have totally
disappeared. Gothic decoration, such as the deep
trimming at the hem and the puf ngs on the sleeves of
the spencer, dominate this later design.
Muslin continued to be a very important fabric in a
ladys wardrobe for many years and throughout Jane
Austens life. Not only were dresses fashioned from it
but also pelisses, spencers, caps, bonnets, veils, shawls,
aprons, and for men, as Henry tells us, cravats.
Nonfashion applications included everything from
bandages to subcurtains. No other fabric available in
the Regency period was as versatile as the mighty
muslin.
Jane Austen Society of North America life member, Chicago
chapter board member, and an accountant by trade, Susan
Forgue is also the creator and webmistress of the research
website, The Regency Encyclopedia (www.reg-ency.comUser
ID: JAScholar, Password: Academiaboth case sensitive).
She continues to lecture and write about the Regency era and
Jane Austens characters, while maintaining and updating
her website. This article was reprinted with permission from
JASNA News: The Newsletter of the Jane Austen Society of
North America 26, no. 1 (Winter 2010).
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14 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
Janes World in History by Susan Forgue
1775
Jane Austen
is born in Steventon,
Hampshire, on December
16.
1776
Declaration of
Independence is signed in
the colonies.
1779
Samuel Crompton
invents the spinning mule,
which twists fbers into yarn.
1781
Cornwallis
surrenders to George
Washington at Yorktown,
Virginia, ending the fnal
battle of the Revolutionary
War.
1783
The Treaty of Paris
formally ends the American
War of Independence.
1785
Edmund Cartwright
patents the power loom.
1786
The frst stories are
written that later become the
Juvenilia.
1788
George IIIs frst
attack of mental illness
in November provokes a
Regency Crisis in Parliament.
1789
George III recovers
in March, ending the frst
Regency Crisis; the storming
of the Bastille occurs and
the Reign of Terror begins in
France.
1790
Richard Arkwright
builds the frst steam-
powered textile factory in
Nottingham.
1791
American Eli
Whitney invents the cotton
gin.
1793
The last story
is added to the Juvenilia.
France declares war on Great
Britain and the Netherlands,
beginning the Napoleonic
Wars.
1794
The novella Lady
Susan might have been
written in 1794. The cotton
gin is patented. George,
Prince of Wales, marries
Caroline of Brunswick on
April 8.
1795
Elinor and
Marianne is begun, later to
be revised into Sense and
Sensibility.
1796
First Impressions,
much later to be lopped
and cropped into Pride and
Prejudice, is started.
1797
First Impressions
is completed and offered to
a publisher, who rejects it
sight unseen.
1798
Susan, later to
become Northanger Abbey,
is probably started. Mary
Linwood frst exhibits her
copies of paintings in
crewel yarn in London. This
exhibition is a must-see for
the next forty years.
1800
The Art of Knitting
in Its Entire Extent, the
earliest existing book
speaking of knitting as
something other than a
trade, is published in
Leipzig, Germany.

Great
Britain passes the Act of
Union to combine Great
Britain and Ireland into the
United Kingdom (to take
effect on January 1, 1801).
Treaty of Ghent offcially
ends the War of 1812;
Napoleon abdicates and is
exiled to Elba.
1801
Jane Austens
father retires and the
Austen family leaves for
Bath. Jacquard loom, which
uses punch cards to create
complicated woven designs,
is invented in France.
1802
Jane Austen
accepts an offer of marriage
from Harris Bigg-Wither, only
to change her mind the next
day.

Peace of Amiens briefy
ends (for fourteen months)
the Napoleonic Wars.
1804
The Watsons is
begun and abandoned.
1805
Admiral Horatio
Nelson dies at the Battle of
Trafalgar.
1806
The widowed
Mrs. Austen and the Misses
Austen leave Bath and settle
in Southampton. Pierre
Jeandeau patents the frst
latch needle (for use on a
knitting machine).

1807
The Slave Trade
Act abolishes the slave trade
in the British Empire.

1809
Jane Austen makes
an unsuccessful attempt to
publish Susan (published
posthumously as Northanger
Abbey); Mrs. Austen and her
daughters move to Chawton
Cottage, Hampshire.
1810
Thomas Egerton
accepts Sense and
Sensibility for publication.
George III suffers a complete
mental incapacity in
December after the death of
his daughter and is confned
in Windsor Castle.
1811
Sense and
Sensibility is published on
October 30; revisions are
made on First Impressions
(Pride and Prejudice) and
planning of Mansfeld
Park begins. The Luddite
movement begins in
response to the loss of jobs
for skilled textile workers.
The Regency Bill passes and
establishes the Prince of
Wales as Regent for his mad
father.

1812
Egerton buys
the copyright to Pride and
Prejudice. United States
declares war on Great
Britain. Luddites burn down
mills and smash looms and
are fnally supressed by the
British Army.
1813
Pride and
Prejudice is published on
January 28; Mansfeld Park
is completed and sold to
Egerton.
EDITORS NOTE: Jane Austens lifetime (17751817) coincided with a signifcant period in Englands
and consequently, the worlds, history. It was a time of great upheaval with revolutionary wars occurring in
the colonies (soon to become the United States) and Franceas well as the Industrial Revolution, which
changed the way yarn, fabric, and clothing were made. To help put these events into context, we asked
historian Susan Forgue to put together this timeline, which notes events from Janes lifetime and novels in
red, events in textile history in blue, and relevant world history in these years in brown.
JAK_012-015_MightyTimeline.indd 14 9/29/11 2:04 PM
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 15
1814
Mansfeld Park is
published on May 9; work
on Emma begins.

Treaty of
Ghent offcially ends the
War of 1812; Napoleon
abdicates and is exiled to
Elba.
1815
Emma is
published in December by
John Murray; Persuasion is
started. Battle of Waterloo
ends the Napoleonic Wars.
Napoleon is exiled to St.
Helena.
1816
Persuasion is
completed. Leopold of Saxe-
Coburg marries Charlotte
Augusta, daughter of the
Prince Regent.
1817
Sanditon is
started and abandoned
when Austen is too ill
to work; Austen dies in
Winchester, Hampshire,
on July 18; Northanger
Abbey and Persuasion are
published posthumously.
Princess Charlotte dies in
childbirth; a succession
crisis ensues in which the
kings elderly brothers put
aside their mistresses to
sire a legitimate heir to the
throne.
1819
Queen Victoria is
born on May 24.
1820
An industrial spy
brings the secret of the
Jacquard loom technology
to England. George III
dies; George IV ascends the
throne.
1821
In the Quarterly
Review, the English writer
and theologian Richard
Whately publishes the most
serious and enthusiastic
early posthumous review
of Austens work. A similar
system to the Jacquard
loom is patented in
England.
1822
George IV visits
Scotland, the frst state visit
by a British monarch since
the 1630s.
1826
University College
London is founded under
the name University of
London.
1828
The London Zoo,
the worlds oldest scientifc
zoo, is established but not
open to the public until
1847.
1830
The Roberts
Loom is introduced, which
becomes the standard
power loom because of its
reliability and changes the
industry by making weaving
a semiskilled occupation.
George IV dies; William IV
ascends the throne.
1832
Austens novels
are frst published in the
United States by Richard
Bentley in the Standard
Novels series. The response
is underwhelming.
1833
The British
Parliament passes the
Slavery Abolition Act, giving
all slaves in the British
Empire their freedom.
1835
Handknitting once
again becomes popular in
England.
1836
The earliest
Victorian patterns are
published by Jane Gaugain.
1837
William IV dies;
Victoria ascends the
throne.

1856
William Henry
Perkin develops mauveine,
the frst synthetic dye.
www.TheBuffaloWoolCo.Com
817-330-9276
My Romance
by Shannon Mullet-Bowlsby
In Buffalo Gold Lux
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16 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
F
or nearly ffteen years, Jennie Chancey, owner
of Sense and Sensibility Patterns (http://
sensibility.com/), has been designing winsome
clothing with an old-fashioned appeal. She has shared
her love of historical gowns with sewists around the
world through her period-correct dress patterns, online
sewing courses, and fashion tours through England. I
was fortunate enough to have an opportunity to chat
with Jennie about her unique approach to designing
historical gowns.
Lets start at the beginning, when you frst discovered
your passion for sewing. How did you start sewing
and making dresses in particular? Do you have formal
training in fashion design?
My mother began teaching me to sew on the sewing
machine when I was eight, but I was a perfectionist
and got discouraged by the smallest mistakes. I fnally
quit on her, convinced Id never be a good seamstress.
Ten, when I was about thirteen years old, I saw the
Anne of Green Gables miniseries and fell in love with
the gorgeous costumes. I told Mom I wanted to make
a whole wardrobe of Edwardian skirts, blouses, and
dresses. She serenely pointed to the sewing machine
and said it was time to learn! I was very motivated at
that point, so I jumped in and have never looked back.
Mom taught me to make patterns from photographs
or vintage drawings, and I began collecting vintage
Sense
&

S
ensibility
PAT TE R N C OMPA NY
by Joanna Johnson
Jennie Chancey at Jane Austens House Museum in Chawton,
Hampshire, England.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 17
my own. I never dreamed Id later sell that pattern! I
only intended to use it to make gowns for customers.
But two years later, after repeated customer requests, I
published the original Regency Gown pattern, which
is still my best-selling pattern. My husband, Matt
Chancey, actually hit upon the name for my business.
Knowing my love for all things Jane Austen, he
suggested Sense and Sensibility for my line of custom
gowns, which was both practical (the sense part) and
romantic (theres the sensibility!).
I frst discovered your patterns while looking for the
perfect Regency gown to sew for an English country
dance I attended a few years ago. Looking through the
Simplicity Pattern Book at our sewing shop, I found
the oneand it was yours! What was it like for an
independent home-based designer to have a pattern
licensed by Simplicity?
sewing manuals from the late nineteenth century
through about the 1950s. Tey are a treasure trove of
information. I did not pursue formal training in fashion
design, as I was just able to jump into doing what I
wanted to do with the skills my mother gave me.
Te name of your company, Sense and Sensibility
Pattern Company, is inspired by one of Jane Austens
most-loved novels. How did your gown pattern
company begin, and how was your Regency Gown
pattern a part of that creative process?
As a newlywed, I began sewing Regency gowns and
Regency-inspired blouses and dresses for friends.
Word spread, and I had a good friend make a small
black-and-white catalog that I could hand out. Because
I couldnt fnd patterns out there that looked close
to the beautiful designs Id seen on Regency fashion
plates and in fashion history books, I decided to create
Jennie Chanceys frst sewing pattern, the Regency Gown.
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18 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
Well, it was a huge surprise when I got the letter from
Simplicity. I actually thought it was a joke at frst.
It wasnt until I called the number on the letterhead
and spoke with the director that I realized they truly
wanted to license my pattern! I was delighted, and it is
still amazing to me to see my baby in one of the big
pattern catalogs.
Do you have favorite fabrics for your Regency Gown
pattern? I made mine out of a simple cotton dotted
swiss but would love to hear what other fabrics and
trimmings work well with your design.
Just about any lightweight cotton
will work beautifully, and there
are some knockout Regency
cotton prints available from
www.reproductionfabrics.com.
My husband actually bought
me about 25 yards of Egyptian
muslin a couple of years ago
when he was in Africa, and it is
identical to late-eighteenth-century
English muslinvery gauzy and
lightweight. It can be dif cult to
sew with because it is so delicate,
but the results are breathtaking. I
also love voile, organdy, and silk for
ball gowns. Scrumptious!
Can you describe for our readers
some of the other period-correct
historical gown patterns you have
designed? What inspires your
decisions to create a gown pattern from a particular
time period?
Ive branched out to cover the late Georgian era (1780s),
the Edwardian era (19021910), the 1910s (Titanic
era), and the 1940s. My most recent designs are my
Ladies and Girls 1780s Portrait Dress patterns. At frst I
just designed what I fell in love with, but as my customer
base grew, I began receiving lots of requests and
suggestions for new time periods. Te 1780s patterns
were a direct result of customer requests, and I really
enjoyed creating those. I get my inspiration from period
portraits, fashion plates, and extant gowns. Ive had the
privilege of studying historical fashion up close in many
museums, including the Daughters of the American
Revolution Museum in Washington, D.C.; the Valentine
Museum in Richmond, Virginia; the DeWitt Wallace
Museum in Williamsburg, Virginia; the Victoria
& Albert Museum in London; and the renowned
Snowshill collection housed in Hereford, England. Tere
is really nothing like seeing these works of art up close to
inspire a new design!
Your website is a great resource for researching
historical fashions, fabrics, vintage images, and
accessories. I am particularly interested in the digital
downloads and online classes you ofer through your
site. Could you tell me a little
more about them?
When I started out, there really
wasnt much online for historical
fashion enthusiasts (the Internet
was still in its infancy in 1997!).
So I decided to build a site based
on what I wished I could fnd
online. I scanned images from my
own vintage catalog and photo
collection to share, including as
much information as I had about
each item. As my collection of
original fashion plates, catalogs,
and sewing books grew, I decided
to make high-resolution scans of
the ones in the public domain so
I could ofer them as eBooks and
dollar downloads. Being able to
see original sources is so helpful
when it comes to researching styles, colors, and patterns
from a particular era. Te classes came at the request
of my friend and fellow costume enthusiast Penny
Ladnier of www.costumegallery.com, who hit upon
the idea of online sewing classes around 1999. I took
my most popular patterns and built weekly lessons to
take students through each design step by step. Ive had
almost a thousand students go through my classes in
the past twelve years, and that just thrills me!
I see that you are preparing for your third historical
fashion tour through England and admit I am jealous!
How did you decide to plan your frst tour, and would
you please share some Jane Austen highlights with us?
Jennie Chanceys Regency Spencer pattern.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 19
a dip into Derbyshire this time to show why Lizzie
Bennet fell in love with the countryside there.
What do you have planned for the future? I have sewn
three of your patterns and enjoyed each one immensely; I
would love to know what you are working on these days.
Right now, Im working on some revisions to my
earliest patterns for girls. I began the girls patterns
when my oldest daughter was a baby. Now that she is
eight, Ive discovered areas where I can tweak those
patterns to make them even better. Once those are
fnished, I hope to complete work on a late Victorian/
early Edwardian underthings pattern, which will
include drawers, petticoats, and corset covers. After
that, I have plans to dive into the 1950s, thanks to
multiple customer requests!
Joanna Johnson of northern Colorado, has a BA in literature
from Drew University and has greatly enjoyed writing the stories
and designing the knitting patterns for the knitting picture books
that she writes and that her husband, Eric Johnson, illustrates
for their independent book-publishing company, Slate Falls
Press (www.slatefallspress.com).
Once again, I must credit my wonderful husband,
Matt, for this idea! He took me on a grand tour of
England for our tenth anniversary in 2006, stopping
of at Jane Austens house in Chawton, her grave in
Winchester Cathedral, the places she visited in Bath,
and then the gorgeous countryside of Derbyshire (we
just had to see if we could fnd Pemberley!). While
on that trip, Matt suggested that I put together a
tour package to share these favorite places with my
customers. Suzi Clarke, a good friend and fellow
costumier in London (see www.suziclarke.co.uk), had
contacts at United Kingdom museums who would
help us get backstage tours of important costume
collections, so we began working together to create an
itinerary. Te 2009 tour centered in London with an
extension to Chawton and Bath for the opening of the
Jane Austen Festival. It was such a success that I had
a crammed waiting list of folks wanting to go the next
year. Our second tour in 2010 took us from London
to Bath to Hereford and Devon, where we visited
several costume collections and also had our fll of
Austen-related delights (including participation in the
costumed promenade in Bath for the festival). Im now
busily planning the 2012 tour, and we hope to include
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20 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
most people at least occasionally bought handknitted
stockings to fll in the gaps in their own production.
Troughout Janes lifetime (17751817), knitting
stockings for sale was an enormous cottage industry,
and men, women, and children all over Britain
fnancially supported themselves or added to their
incomes with their knitting needles.
Of course, the wealthy paid other people to make all
of their clothing for them, so among the aristocracy,
knitting was considered to be a tedious, mundane
activity, an obviously practical pursuit but something
that anyone would avoid if she could aford to do so.
To be seen knitting was just so working class. Although
women like Janes mother enjoyed knitting, pretentious
upstarts like Pride and Prejudices Caroline Bingley or
Sense and Sensibilitys Fanny Dashwood would have
shunned knitting, at least until 1837twenty years
after Janes deathwhen knitting suddenly became a
fashionable pastime for aristocrats.
In Her Novels
Tere is no mention of anyone knitting in Jane Austens
frst four novels, although the wealthy Mrs. Jennings in
Sense and Sensibility must be a knitter as she is planning
a knitting project. Mrs. Jenningss knitting is perfectly
in keeping with her character as just one more example
of her indiference to upper-class notions of propriety.
Janes fnal two novels contain three characters who
knit: Mrs. Bates and Jane Fairfax in Emma and Mrs.
J
ane Austen, her mother, and her sister all knitted,
but this was only to be expected. In Georgian
England, everyone but the very wealthy spun
wool yarn and knitted. But even so, keeping a family
supplied with clothing was an ongoing challenge, and
Wensley Dale knitters from The Costumes of Yorkshire in 1814
by George Walker (Leeds, England: Richard Jackson, 1885).
by Sheryl Craig
K NI T T I NG Jane
&
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 21
of a workingmans income. One person knitting
continuously for ten to twelve hours a day could
barely earn sixpence, so such high wages suggest that
at least two family members were employed more
or less constantly with their knitting needles. Entire
families, even whole villages, were employed in knitting
and gathered together to work on their stockings. In
fne weather, people usually knitted outdoors to take
advantage of the daylight. In their cottages, knitting
neighbors clustered around a window, a candle, or a
hearth to share the light as they worked. Larger groups
of knitters generally congregated in the village church
where they chatted, told stories, recited poetry, read
novels and newspapers aloud, or sang songs to help
pass the time while busy needles clicked in rhythm.
Children as young as seven or eight were employed
knitting stockings, although they might require
assistance to turn the heel or the toe, and knitting was
often the only job option available for the frail or the
elderly. Past almost everything but
tea and quadrille, Emmas Mrs. Bates
still knits. People with poor eyesight,
like Mrs. Bates, could knit even when
they could not see well enough to
thread a needle or to sew a seam.
(When Jane Austens mother was having trouble with
her eyesight, Janes mother wrote to her granddaughter
that she could do hardly any work but knitting white
yarn, but even the blind could knit.) Although Mrs.
Bates is rarely seen without her usual employment,
she does not seem to be knitting for herself, as her
granddaughter Jane Fairfax knit a pair of garters for
her grandmother. Tis little tidbit of information was
no doubt a hint to Emmas original readers that the
elderly Mrs. Bates was a working woman.
Village shops, like Fords in Emmas Highbury,
dispensed wool and paid knitters who brought back
fnished stockings and gloves. Knitters were usually
paid on account creating a barter system of exchange
for tea, sugar, soap, candles, needles, and thread. In a
letter, Jane Austen wrote of her charities to the poor,
which mostly involved distributing Worsted Stockings
to some impoverished women in her village. As Jane
recorded the expense involved, she apparently bought
the stockings ready-made and locally knitted. By
purchasing rather than knitting the stockings herself,
Jane enriched both the villages knitters and the needy
recipients of their knitting.
Smith in Persuasion. All three characters live in reduced
circumstances, and their knitting serves as a clue to
their precarious fnances.
During Janes life, knitting stockings for sale was
considered to be the ideal employment for the
poor. Pamphlets and articles written by clergymen,
magistrates, and charitable societies extolled the virtues
of knitting for an income. Workhouses, poorhouses,
and charity hospitals all taught knitting with the
idea that the poor in their care were learning a trade.
Orphanages and charity schools also taught knitting
and usually presented their female charges with a set
of knitting needles when they were discharged, with
the understanding that the young women could now
fnancially support themselves.
Bread-and-Butter
Tough no one was ever going to become prosperous
from knitting stockings, an industrious knitter could
perhaps keep bread on the table,
no small accomplishment for
widows, orphans, and the elderly. In
retrospect, we can now see that the
cottage industry of handknitting
was beginning its decline in the
early nineteenth century, but that conclusion was not so
evident at the time. In 1799, in Janes home county of
Hampshire, ten thousand people in Christchurch parish
alone were employed full-time in knitting stockings.
As the invalid Mrs. Smith in Persuasion demonstrates,
knitting was also a convenient part-time job.
Women with families could knit while they tended
to their children, stirred the soup, and otherwise kept
the home fres burning, but men knitted as well. Wagon
drivers were particularly known for knitting as their
horses learned their regular routes and did not require
much supervision, leaving the wagon drivers hands
free to work his needles. Shepherds knitted as their
focks grazed, and although most knitters sat to work,
period illustrations also show people knitting as they
stood or walked about the village. People who knitted
incessantly were referred to as terrible knitters, terrible
meaning compulsively hardworking in this case. Other
people knitted only during idle hours. Farm laborers
knitted in the evenings and on Sundays to supplement
their wages.
In 1820, a Sussex family could earn twelve to
twenty pounds a year by knittingup to two-thirds
She Taught Me to Knit, which
has been a great amusement.
MRS. SMITH IN PERSUASION
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22 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
apparently more acceptable to
consumers, but the vast majority
of British feet were clad in wool.
Worn Out
Although they were common
enough at the time, knitted items
from the Georgian period are
very rare today, as few survived
the ravages of use. Knitted
clothing was generally worn
until it was literally worn out.
When Jane paid a social call at a
friends house, she recorded that
her friends mother sat darning
a pair of Stockings the whole
of my visit. Jane apparently
found this a bit embarrassing,
although she acknowledged that
her mother might well have
done the same thing. Had the
woman been knitting a new pair
of stockings rather than patching
old ones, and thus exposing her
familys need for economy, there
would presumably have been no embarrassment at
all. Te kindly Mr. and Mrs. Musgrove in Persuasion
fnd darning their familys stockings to be a full-time
occupation for their elderly servant. Once stockings
were beyond repair, any salvageable yarn was unraveled
and recycled. Even little bits of yarn were worked into
new garments or used to mend old ones.
Although she lived in rural England where sheep
dotted the nearby felds, when Jane traveled to London,
she purchased Lambswool. Probably, she was able to
fnd a larger variety of colors in the city and perhaps
unusual textures from the wool of diferent breeds of
sheep. Janes mother particularly enjoyed knitting, as
Jane recorded in her letters: My Mother is very well
& fnds great amusement in glove-knitting; when this
pair is fnished, she means to knit another, & at present
wants no other work. Mrs. Austen also knitted rugs.
Jane wrote to her sister that their mother promised to
knit one for you, as soon as you return to chuse the
colours & pattern.
Te term rug is a bit misleading for modern
Americans. A knitted wool rug referred to a large, heavy
shawl, or what we might refer to as an afghan, a warm
A pair of worsted stockings sold for two to two and a
half shillings in the shop, and the knitter was paid one
shilling in coin or credit for a fnished pair. A shilling
was a days wages for the average workingman. In 1799,
the typical Hampshire knitter earned four shillings a
week. For someone like Mrs. Bates, who lives in a very
small way, four shillings would buy the groceries. In
1801, the Kendal Market sold on average 2,400 pairs
of handknitted, wool stockings each week. Rural areas
supplied the London market, and British stockings
were also exported for sale in Europe.
Color illustrations from the time show a 3- to 4-inch
white band at the top cuf of the stocking and the
rest of the stocking knitted in a contrasting, usually
dark, color. Georgian knitting needles were normally
made of relatively soft metal. Steel needles were not
available until the Victorian age, and wooden needles
had to be handcrafted. Te most up-to-date in early-
nineteenth-century technology was a knitting frame
which produced machine-knitted stockings, but at the
time people considered clothing knitted by machines
to be shoddy merchandise and refused to buy the
items. Machine-knitted cotton or silk stockings were
More Wensley Dale knitters from The Costumes of Yorkshire in 1814 by George Waker (Leeds,
England: Richard Jackson, 1885).
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 23
wrap for a chilly room in the days before central heating. In Sense and
Sensibility, Mrs. Jennings is busily employed in measuring lengths
of worsted for her rug, probably determining the best way to use
remnants of yarn. When Jane suggested that her niece work a rug for
Uncle Johns Cofee urn, she was referring to a knitted tea cozy. Te
knitters personal touch was obviously a valued part of the gift.
Janes Spinning Wheel
Because women spent so much of their lives spinning and knitting,
a womans spinning wheel and her knitting needles were considered
very personal possessions. An antique spinning wheel usually bears the
impression of the original owners foot on the treadle, and old knitting
needles are often bent by the individual owners grip. In 1811, when an
elderly relative proposed giving her spinning wheel to Jane, the author
was both touched and appalled by the suggestion: I cannot endure
the idea of her giving away her own wheel, & have told her no more
than the truth, in saying that I could never use it with comfort;I
had a great mind to add that if she persisted in giving it, I would spin
nothing with it but a Rope to hang myselfbut I was afraid of making
it appear a less serious matter of feeling than it really is.
Aristocrats Knitting
Knitting was such a routine part of most peoples lives in Britain that
Jane would have been surprised to learn that twenty years after her
death, knitting became positively chic. In other parts of Europe, there
was no social stigma against knitting, and aristocratic German ladies
routinely knitted in public, even on formal occasions such as at the
opera. As a child, Queen Victoria had been taught to knit by her
German mother (the Duchess of Kent) and her German governess.
When she inherited the throne in 1837, the young queen instantly
became a trendsetter, and whatever she did was suddenly fashionable.
Te new monarch enjoyed knitting, and she continued to knit in the
German tradition, when and where and before whomever she pleased,
for the rest of her long and infuential life. Te queens hobby turned
knitting needles into trendy fashion accessories. Te frst knitting
patterns in England were published in the mid-1830s, just as Victoria
ascended to her uncles throne. By the 1840s, knitting books with
instructions and patterns were extremely popular, and many went
through successions of reprints. If Jane had lived long enough to see
knitting become all the rage among the upper class, she would no
doubt have echoed Caroline Bingley in Pride and Prejudice: I am all
astonishment.
Sheryl Craig has a PhD in nineteenth-century British literature from the Univer-
sity of Kansas, and she teaches English at the University of Central Missouri.
She has published dozens of articles in Jane Austens Regency World magazine
and writes flm reviews for the Jane Austen Centre in Bath, England. Sheryl is a
life member of the Jane Austen Society of North America.
MistyVales Stole
More exquisite lace,
patterns and yarn at
www.fiddlesticksknitting.com
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24 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
T
he Regency era (17951837) was an exciting
time for color in textiles, as by this time, ships
from the European colonies in the New
World (the Americas) and Asia were bringing back
vibrant new fabrics and dyesalthough it wouldnt be
until 1856 that synthetic dyes were invented. All the
colors described in Jane Austen novels were extracted
from nature. Jane Austens descriptions of clothing
in her novels and letters, as well as descriptions in
fashion magazines from the period (the frst of their
kind in England) ofer us pleasant characterizations
of popular Regency colors. Te fashion periodicals
were expensive and exclusivethe twenty or so
names of the subscribers were printed in the back and
often included a princess or a countess. One of the
most notable of these magazines was Te Gallery of
Fashiona monthly that featured hand-illustrated
plates with detailed descriptions of the latest fashions
for ladies. Luckily for us, the descriptions are rich and
very specifcthe many shades of red are described
as coquelicot, scarlet, and crimson, while yellows are
primrose, jonquille, gold, and straw. Tere are also
many other delightfully named shades: carmelite (a rich
brown named for the order of monks who wore the
color), puce (a deep purpley red often also seen in china
patterns and a favorite of Marie Antoinette), and dove
(a drab grayish purple); in addition there are those we
are still familiar with: silver, lilac, olive, salmon, lead,
lemon, and morone (which we now spell maroon).
Regency Fashion
by Meghan Fernandes
I N C OL OR
The family embarksSt. Mary-le-Bow, Cheapside. An
illustration by Randolph Caldecott from The Diverting History of
John Gilpin (London: George Routledge & Sons) 1881.

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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 25
Army began wearing the famous red coats, which
were originally dyed with madder. Tough at times
European (and later, American) governments chose
the color of their militaries uniforms according to the
economics of dye prices, it is often said that red was
chosen for the British Army because of its ability to
hide another source of the color redblood.
Te particular cochineal dye used for the
army was frst produced by a Dutch
scientist living in London who accidentally
mixed cochineal with tin chloride. He
manufactured it for the British Army in
a neighborhood of London called Bow,
and the color of the dye for the uniforms
was henceforth called Bow red and was still
in use into the 1950s. By the end of the
eighteenth century, Britain was importing
nearly one-ffth of New Spains cochineal
dye for its expanding colonial army. Also,
men declared their political af liations by
the color of their jacketsred was the
color of the Tory party, while blue was the
color of the Whigs.
Blue and other colors
Blue was another popular color for
mens clothing, and suiting in particular
was often blue because of the relative
colorfastness of indigo dye, which
was sourced from India during the
Regency. Both Mr. Wickham and Mr.
Bingley in Pride and Prejudice are seen
in blue coats, and Charles and Frank
Austen (Austens seafaring brothers)
would have worn what we know as
navy bluewhich King George II
declared should be used for naval
of cers uniforms after admiring the
Duchess of Bedford in a dark blue
riding habit.
In womens fashion, some colors
were common to particular items
of clothing or accessories. More often than not, the
parasols featured in Regency fashion illustrations are
greenperhaps because the blue/yellow combination
they were dyed with would have been less likely to fade
Buff
Another popular color from the period that we can
easily identify today is buf, and it has an interesting
history. Te name comes from the word bufalo, so it
wasnt in use until after the French encountered the
animal in the Americas. In Britain, the tough bufalo
skins were used in military uniforms as a sort of armor,
and the name stuck and came
to be used even when the item
described was not necessarily
made of leather. One dyer
from the period went as far
as to say that a good buf
was as dif cult to dye as a
good scarlet, and it was so
complex that some dyers
specialized in buf.
Red
As for reds, the tiny, dye-producing
bug cochineal was brought to
Europe by the Spanish from
Mexico in the sixteenth century,
and it soon overtook madder as
the red dye of choice. Cochineal
was more concentrated than
madder and was the cause of
much international furor while
the Spanish kept its source a
secret and charged exorbitant
fees for the dye. Te French
fnally uncovered its mystery
in 1777 when the botanist
Tiry de Menonville
undertook a dangerous
undercover mission in
Mexico. After the espionage,
it became much easier for
Regency ladies, like those
described in Austens
novels, to wear scarlet
spencers, coquelicot
ribbons, or crimson caps.
Of course, many a Regency gentleman also wore
redMr. Wickham cutting a dashing fgure in his
uniform in Pride and Prejudice comes to mind. And
it was only about 150 years earlier that the British
JAK_024-026_Regency.indd 25 9/29/11 1:48 PM
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26 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
and required servants to launder it properly. A spencer,
or short jacket, would often be worn in a stronger
color to contrast with a white or pale gown. Austen
herself appears in more than one portrait wearing light
blue. She depicts Miss Smith in Emma and Isabella
Torpe in Northanger Abbey as wearing yellow. Isabella
appears again describing her purple gowns as well as
her acquaintance Miss Andrews puce sarcenet (a
silk fabric). As several of Austens letters to her sister
Cassandra attest, women often had their clothes dyed
to keep up with the latest fashion, so an old white dress
might become new again in another color or be dyed
black for mourning.
Just as Austen gave us insight into a characters inner
workings by sharing details of his or her wardrobe with us,
we can choose the colors and textures that arouse our
creativity when we create handknits inspired by her
worksan olive shawl la Mrs. Bates in Emma? Or
perhaps a spencer in James Morlands favorite shade of
purple from Northanger Abbey? Te choice is yours.
Meghan Fernandes is an American living in the Bow neighbor-
hood of London, England, where she teaches, designs, and
writes about knitting and textiles. She has a masters degree
in writing, gender, and culture from Kings College, University
of London.
when the parasols were exposed to the sun. By contrast,
items such as elbow-length gloves and ribbon trims
are depicted in light shades such as pink, light blue, or
yellow. Shawls, however, appear in a wide variety of
colors, including green with a crimson border, silver, very
deep black, light blue, and, of course, white.
White
White was undeniably the most popular color for
dresses of the era, and this certainly did not escape
Austen, who writes in Mansfeld Park, A woman can
never be too fne while she is all in white. White also
plays a symbolic role in Northanger Abbey, in which
Eleanor Tilney, idolized by Catherine Morland as the
ideal young lady and friend, is never seen in anything
else. Catherines chaperone, excited by the idea that she
will be associating with the elegant Miss Tilney, tells
her, Go, by all means, my dear; only put on a white
gown; Miss Tilney always wears white.
Of course, women did wear dresses in other colors.
Lighter colors were more popular than in previous
eras; however, the new fabrics available washed better
and were therefore less prone to fading. A lady would
be more likely to wear a colored dress during the day
than in the evening, however, as colors were more
practical than white because white was easily stained
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JAK_024-026_Regency.indd 26 9/29/11 1:48 PM
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 27
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projects with cultural and historical context, taking you to the
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Y Focuses on techniques ranging from lace and colorwork to heel
treatments of the 16th century, with various projects like stockings,
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28 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
Everyone was wearing the
little white dress, so the shawl
could really set you apart, says
author Mary Robinette Kowal
whose novel Shades of Milk
and Honey imagines a Regency
era in which magic exists. She
says that for ladies of quality
shawls were showpieces, and
their employment at balls and
in society had little to do with
warmth. One of the things
you were judged on was the
way in which you wore the
shawlyour ability to manage
it gracefully. For me, it brought
to mind the current shawlette craze and knitters who
stage backyard photo shoots to show of their work to
lovely efect.
A popular thing to do was wear an overdress of
net, in some color like a brilliant scarlet, over the little
white dress, Kowal says. It would mirror the shape of
the dress perfectly. While Jane herself wouldnt have
knitted such a concoction, Kowal believes a dream
version could be made by an Austen fan today.
Others picture far smaller knitted works of art.
Teater historian and Regency-era expert Sarah
Grace Marsh says, If I were to imagine her creating
something, it would be knotty, complex lacework. For
by Larissa Brown
I
t seems like a
straightforward
questiona question
seductive in its simplicity and
an invitation to dream. So
I set out to answer it. What
would Jane knit? I asked a lot
of knowledgeable and creative
people, and I got an answer
right away: We just dont know.
We have little evidence to tell
us what Jane personally knitted,
says designer and Austen devotee
Kristen Hanley Cardozo. But
from her surviving letters to her
sister, Cassandra, we can piece
together possible clues. She points to an 1807 letter in
which Jane writes about a fnished project. Te author is
vague about her hand in the matter, but we can infer that
Jane probably knitted a lap rug.
Despite such scant detail, I persisted with my question.
I asked my experts for hypotheticals, speculations,
visions. After all, many knitters are Austen fans or even
rabid Janeites. I wanted to fnd what knitters today might
have in common with a long-gone author they adore. I
found myself making unexpected connections.
Shawls, for example. Te knitting world today is
obsessed with them, and they were the crucial accessory
in Janes time, too.
WHAT WOUL D Jane K NI T?

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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 29
yet lacy fchus, and small shawlsquick and unobtrusive
projects she could bestow on her near and dear.
Tis combination of generosity, grace, and usefulness
is something a contemporary knitter would be proud
to possess. It conjures up images of knitters creating
woolly hats for strangers or colorful, washable afghans
for children in need. It brings to mind tender moments
of hope and givinga knitter considering a ball of
softest organic cotton for an expected baby.
Its that kind of private moment that sticks in my
mind as I consider my original question. As much as
we share knitting with our friends and family, it can
also be an anonymous good deed, a secret indulgence,
a hidden pleasure. Some of the most exquisite knitting
moments are the quiet ones.
Austens world and personality led her to keep her
writing close. None of us know what other creativity
Jane might have been hiding. So none of us really know
the answer to what she would knit. But we can imagine
a number of ways she might be just like us.
Larissa Brown is an author and designer who writes about the
relationships knitters form with family, friends, history, and
special places. Her latest book is
My Grandmothers Knitting
(STC Crafts/Melanie Falick
Books, 2011).
reasons unknown to me, I think of spiderwebs. Not
freaky, Gothic ones, but taking her inspiration from
them. Lines and angles taken from an organic source.
Kristen Hanley Cardozo also thinks Janes knitting
would be small and intricate. She describes purses of a
type that ladies then crafted. Tese were often knitted
with metallic threads, beads, or delicate colorwork, and
closed by a drawstring or a metal clasp, she says. A
genteel but not especially well-of lady like Jane might
have knitted some gloves to wear during her frequent
and much-enjoyed trips to the theater.
A small project might have had special appeal to a writer
and keen observer like Jane. Designer and literary blogger
Emily Johnson imagines her working on low-profle
projects that she could use as a screen, keeping her hands
busy while she observed the interactions around her. Tis
isnt far diferent from the way we employ our craft when
meeting with knitting groups at cafs and LYSs (otherwise
known as local yarn stores). We listen, our hands work,
and we learn about one another.
Most of all, I heard themes of usefulness, modesty,
and generosity. Designer and Austen fan Kristin
Spurkland says, I fnd myself imposing the traits of
Austens heroines onto Jane herself. I think of Jane as a
version of Elizabeth Bennetsmart, no-nonsense.
Spurkland believes Jane would have been an
unpretentious knitter. When complimented, I dont
think she would be one of those knitters who defects
by pointing out the faws in a project. I think she would
smile and modestly accept the praise. Johnson, too,
believes Austen would be unassuming. Speaking of
how Austen purportedly hid her writing from those
outside her family, Johnson says, She strikes me as
someone who didnt like to obtrude her own projects
on the attention of others.
Everyone I spoke with thought Jane would be
generous. If she knitted, she would have frst knitted
scarves and gloves for her two brothers, who were
career naval of cers and spent much time at sea,
speculates Dr. Joan Klingel Ray, former president of the
Jane Austen Society of North America and author of
Jane Austen For Dummies.
Emily Johnson keys into a similar attachment to
family. She was so close with her sister, Cassandra,
and her novels are full of important female friendships
and sisterhoods, she says. It strikes me that much of
Austens hypothetical knitting would be items for family
members and female friendslittle reticule bags, simple
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LINEN WORK
APRON
Designed by ANNIE
MODESITT. PAGE 36.
YARN: Louet Eurofax
Sport Weight.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 31
SHORT STAYS
Designed by LARISSA
BROWN. PAGE 38.
YARN: Shibui Knits
Merino Alpaca.
FITZ
FINGERLESS
MITTS
Designed by CATHERINE
SHIELDS. PAGE 45.
YARN: Jamiesons
Shetland Spindrift.
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32 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
PEMBERLEY SLIPPERS
Designed by KRISTI SCHUELER.
PAGE 46. YARN: Louet Gems Sport Weight.
LYDIA BENNET SECRET STOCKINGS
Designed by SUSAN STRAWN.
PAGE 54. YARN: Shibui Knits Staccato.
JAK_030-055_Country.indd 32 9/29/11 1:20 PM
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 33
AN ARAN FOR
FREDERICK
Designed by KATHLEEN DAMES.
PAGE 40. YARN: Brooklyn Tweed
Shelter.
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GEORGIANA
SHAWLETTE
Designed by SUSANNA IC.
PAGE 52. YARN: Madelinetosh
Tosh Sock.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 35
FRIVOLOUS
SOCKS
Designed by KATIE
FRANCESCHI. PAGE 50.
YARN: Yarn Love Joan of Arc.
MODERN
RETICULE
Designed by HEATHER
ZOPPETTI. PAGE 48.
YARN: Lana Grossa Setanova.
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36 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
C
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LINEN WORK
APRON
Annie Modesitt
T
o sit in the shade on a fne day
and look upon verdure is the most
perfect refreshment.
Jane Austen
What better to wear, and work, in a
garden than a useful linen apron? It
protects the clothing and grows softer
and more beautiful with each washing.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 17
3
4 (20, 22
1
4,
24
3
4, 27)" wide at waist and 31
3
4 (32
3
4,
33
3
4, 34
3
4, 35
3
4)" from top of bib to
lower edge. Apron shown measures 20".
YARN Louet Eurofax Sport Weight
(100% linen; 270 yd [247 m]/100 g):
#57 French blue, 3 (3, 3, 4, 4) skeins.
NEEDLES Sizes 5 (3.75 mm) and 7
(4.5 mm). Adjust needle sizes if neces-
sary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch
holder; tapestry needle.
GAUGE 20 sts and 25 rows = 4" in St
st on smaller needles.
NOTE
Te double-knit slipped-stitch edge is
worked on each edge of the entire apron
and is worked over the frst and last 3
stitches of each row. Tese stitches are
shown on the charts.
Stitch Guide
Large Bobble:
[Knit into center of st below next st
but do not drop st from left needle,
then knit next st but do not drop st
from left needle] 3 times, drop st from
left needle6 sts on right needle.
[Pass 2nd st on right needle over frst
st and of needle] 5 times1 st on
right needle.
Small Bobble:
Knit into front, back, and front of next st
on left needle3 sts on right needle. [Pass
2nd st on right needle over frst st and of
needle] 2 times1 st on right needle.
Double-Knit Slipped-Stitch Edge
(DKSS):
RS rows: K1, sl 1 pwise with yarn in
front (wyf), k1, work in patt to last 3
sts, k1, sl 1 pwise wyf, k1.
WS rows: Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, sl 1 pwise
wyf, work in patt to last 3 sts, sl 1 pwise
wyf, k1, sl 1 pwise wyf.
APRON
With smaller needles, CO 148 (168,
188, 208, 228) sts. Lace edging: Work
Rows 122 of Bobble Lace chart once.
Next row: (RS) DKSS (see Stitch
Guide), p1, knit to last 4 sts, p1, DKSS.
Next row: (WS) DKSS, knit to last 3
sts, DKSS. Rep last 2 rows once more.
Work Rows 14 of Openwork chart
once134 (152, 170, 188, 206) sts rem.
Next row: (RS) DKSS, p1, knit to last 4
sts, p1, DKSS. Next row: (WS) DKSS,
knit to last 3 sts, DKSS. Rep last 2
rows once more.
Wide Rib:
Row 1: (RS) DKSS, p4 (3, 2, 1, 0), [p1,
k10 (12, 14, 16, 18), p1] 10 times, p4 (3,
2, 1, 0), DKSS.
Row 2: DKSS, k4 (3, 2, 1, 0), [k1, p10
(12, 14, 16, 18), k1] 10 times, k4 (3, 2, 1,
0), DKSS.
Rep last 2 rows until piece measures
24 (25, 26, 27, 28)" from CO or desired
length, ending with a WS row. Waist-
band: Dec row: (RS) K32 (36, 40, 44,
48), [ssk] 35 (40, 45, 50, 55) times, k32
(36, 40, 44, 48)99 (112, 125, 138,
151) sts rem. Next row: DKSS, *k1tbl;
rep from * to last 3 sts, DKSS. Rep
last row 8 more times. Next row: (RS)
DKSS, [k1tbl] 23 (30, 36, 43, 49) times,
pm, k46, pm, [k1tbl] 24 (30, 37, 43, 50)
times, DKSS. Next row: (WS) DKSS,
[k1tbl] 24 (30, 37, 43, 50) times, p46,
[k1tbl] 23 (30, 36, 43, 49) times, DKSS.
Waistband I-cord bind-off: Rearrange
frst 2 sts on needle so frst st becomes
2nd and 2nd st becomes frst. [K3,
transfer 3 sts from right needle to left
needle] 2 times, *k2, ssk, transfer 3 sts
from right needle to left needle; rep from
* to 4 sts before m, k2, ssk, remove m,
[p2, k9] 4 times, p2, remove m, cable

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09292011132806
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 37
Apron
28
1
2 (32
1
2, 36
1
2, 40
1
2, 44
1
2)"
72.5 (82.5, 92.5, 103, 113) cm
17
3
4 (20, 22
1
4, 24
3
4, 27)"
45 (51, 56.5, 63, 68.5) cm
25 (26, 27, 28, 29)"
63.5 (66, 68.5, 71, 73.5) cm
6
3
4"
17 cm
8"
20.5 cm
k on RS; p on WS
p on RS; k on WS
yo
k2tog on RS; p2tog on WS
ssk
k3tog
sssk
sl 2 as if to k2tog, k1, p2sso
sl 1 wyb on RS; sl 1 wyf on WS
sl 1 wyf on RS; sl 1 wyb on WS
small bobble (see Stitch Guide)
large bobble (see Stitch Guide)
pattern repeat
CO (see Glossary) 3 sts onto left needle,
*k2, ssk, transfer 3 sts from right needle
to left needle; rep from * until 6 sts rem
on left needle, k1, s2kp2, transfer 2
sts from right needle to left needle, k1,
s2kp2, transfer 2 sts from right needle to
left needle, k2tog; break yarn; fasten of
last st49 sts rem: 46 bib sts and 3 sts
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Bobble Lace
10-st repeat
3
1
Openwork
11
9
7
5
3
1
Wheat Lace
22-st repeat
from I-cord BO. Bib: With RS facing,
insert tip of right needle into 3 cable
CO sts52 sts total. With WS facing,
rejoin yarn. Next row: (WS) DKSS,
[k2, p9] 4 times, k2, DKSS. Rep Rows
112 of Wheat Lace chart until piece
measures 6" from top of waistband, or
desired bib length, ending with Row 6
or 12. Bib bind-off and right strap: Next
row: (RS) DKSS, p2, k4, p2, place last
11 sts on holder for left strap, cable CO
3 sts onto left needle, *k2, ssk, transfer 3
sts from right needle to left needle; rep
from * until 15 sts rem on left needle,
k2, ssk, p2, k4, p2, DKSS14 sts rem.
Next row: (WS) DKSS, k8, DKSS. Next
row: (RS) DKSS, p2, k4, p2, DKSS.
Rep last 2 rows until piece measures
27 (28, 28, 29, 29
1
2)" from top of bib,
or reaches comfortably over shoulder
and across back to left waistband edge.
Do not BO. With empty needle, pick
up (but do not knit) 14 sts along left
waistband edge. With RS tog and larger
needle in right hand, being careful that
strap isnt twisted, join picked-up sts
to end of strap using 3-needle bind-of
(see Glossary). Left strap: Transfer 11
sts from holder to needle and, with RS
facing, insert tip of right needle into 3
cable CO sts at edge of strap14 sts
total. Work left strap as for right strap,
joining to right edge of waistband so
straps crisscross in back.
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends and steam-block
apron. A good washing and pressing
will bring out the natural softness of
the linen fabric and will block the piece
beautifully! Te more you wash and use
the apron, the softer it will become.
Annie Modesitt lives in St. Paul, Minneso-
ta, with her husband, children, pets and
many, many books. She agrees with Miss
Austen that the person, be it gentleman
or lady, who has not pleasure in a good
novel, must be intolerably stupid.
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38 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
C
o
u
n
t
r
y
K1f&b 3 times6 sts. Work tubular
stitch until piece measures 22" from
CO edge. Place locking marker into
fabric. Continue in tubular stitch until
piece measures 57 (60, 63, 67)"
from CO edge. Place locking marker
into fabric. Continue in tubular stitch
until piece measures 79 (82, 85,
89)" from CO edge. BO all sts. With
larger needles, beg at the right m, pick
up and knit 166 (182, 198, 214) sts
across the center of the tie to the second
marker. About 22" of ties should hang
free at each end of the picked-up sts.
Remove m. Turn work to begin body.
BODY
With larger needles, work the frst WS
row, dividing it into 9 sections as foll:
Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, p8 (10, 13, 16), pm,
k15, pm, p23 (25, 27, 30), pm, k7, pm,
p12 (17, 18, 20), pm, k19 (19, 23, 23),
pm, p25 (28, 29, 31), pm, k7, pm, p to
last 2 sts, k2.
From this point forward, always main-
tain the following 3-st border at the beg
of all WS rows: Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, p1;
and the following 3-st border at the end
of all WS rows: P1, k2. Establish patt
and shape front neck: (RS) Sl 1 pwise
wyf, k1, ssk, [work in St st to m, work
shadow rib to m] 4 times, k to last 4
sts, k2tog, k22 sts decd. Next row:
(WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, [p to m, work
shadow rib to m] 4 times, p to last 2
sts, k2.
Rep the last 2 rows 6 (5, 4, 3) more
times152 (170, 188, 206) sts rem.
NEEDLES TiesSize 4 (3.5 mm):
double-pointed (dpn), bodySize 6 (4
mm): 36" or longer circular (cir), double-
pointed (dpn). Adjust needle sizes if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS 10 stitch markers (m), 8
to denote shadow rib, 2 locking mark-
ers for ties and darts; tapestry needle;
waste yarn or stitch holders.
GAUGE 19 sts and 26 rows = 4" in St
st on larger needles; 6 sts =
3
4" in tubular
stitch on smaller needles. In particular,
the row gauge of the tubular stitch should
match the stitch gauge of the St st.
NOTES
Long ties are worked frst. Stitches
are picked up along the ties to form
the lower edge of the body.
Te body is worked in one piece
to armholes and then separated to
complete fronts, shoulder, and neck
shaping.
Stitch Guide
Tubular Stitch:
Row 1 and all subsequent rows: *K1, sl
1 pwise wyf; rep from * to end of row.
Shadow Rib: (multiple of 4 sts + 3)
Row 1: (RS) *P3, k1tbl; rep from * to
last 3 sts, p3.
Row 2: Knit.
Rep Rows 1 and 2.
TIES
With smaller dpn, CO 3 sts. Do not
join, work back and forth in rows.
SHORT STAYS
Larissa Brown
S
hort stays were a form of corset
worn in the Regency era. They
ended immediately under the bust and
were worn between layers, underneath
the public dress. This top turns this
fattering form into outerwear. Crossed
in front and tied in back, its ftted
shape would look wonderful over a
fowing blouse, simple T-shirt, or
Empire-waist dress like those worn in
Janes day. It brings the sweet shaping
of short stays out into the light.
SI ZES 32 (36, 39, 41)".
FI NI SHED SI ZE Back width,
measured between armhole seams
13 (15, 16, 17)" to ft actual
back width of 13 (15, 16, 17)".
Roughly corresponds with bust sizes 32
(36, 39, 41)". Project shown measures
36".
YARN Shibui Knits Merino Alpaca
(50% merino, 50% alpaca; 132 yd
[121 m]/100 g): #220 peony, 3 (3, 3, 3)
skeins.
Left Front
Back
Right Front
10 (11
3
4, 11
3
4, 12
1
4)"
25.5 (29.75, 29.75, 31) cm
7 (8
1
4, 7
3
4, 8
1
4)"
17.75 (21, 19.75, 21) cm
1
1
2 (1
3
4, 2, 2)"
3.75 (4.5, 5, 5) cm
2 (2
1
4, 2
3
4, 2
3
4)"
5 (5.75, 7, 7) cm
13
1
2 (15
1
4, 16
1
2, 17
1
4)"
34.25 (38.75, 42,
43.75) cm
10
3
4 (11
1
2, 12
1
2, 14)"
27.25 (29.25, 31.75,
35.5) cm
10
3
4 (11
1
2, 12
1
2, 14)"
27.25 (29.25, 31.75,
35.5) cm
22"
55.75 cm
22"
55.75 cm
4
1

2

(
4
1

2
,

4
1

4
,

3
3

4
)
"
1
1
.
5

(
1
1
.
5
,

1
0
.
7
5
,

9
.
5
)

c
m
8
1

4

(
8
1

2
,

8
3

4
,

9
)
"
2
1

(
2
1
.
5
,

2
2
.
2
5
,

2
2
.
7
5
)

c
m
3

4
"
2

c
m
JAK_030-055_Country.indd 38 9/29/11 1:21 PM
09292011132806
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 39
decd. Rep the last 2 rows 1 (1, 2, 2)
more time(s)20 (25, 29, 37) sts rem.
Work 1 WS row even as established.
Neck dec row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1,
sssk, work to end as established2 sts
decd. Rep the last 4 rows 1 (1, 2, 2)
more time(s)16 (21, 23, 31) sts rem.
Rep the last 2 rows 3 (5, 5, 9) more
times10 (11, 13, 13) sts rem. Work
even in patt until armhole measures
8 (8, 8, 9)", ending after a RS
row. Shape shoulder: (WS) BO 7 (8,
10, 10) sts3 sts rem. Place these 3
sts on waste yarn or holder. Keep yarn
attached.
BACK
Place back sts on larger needles and join
yarn preparing to work a WS row. Next
row: (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, work as
established to last 2 sts, k2. Armhole
dec row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, ssk,
work as established to last 4 sts, k2tog,
k22 sts decd.
Work armhole dec row every other
row 1 (1, 2, 2) more time(s), then every
fourth row 1 (1, 2, 2) time(s)48 (56,
56, 58) sts rem. Work even in patt until
armholes measure 5
1
2 (5
3
4, 6, 6
1
4)",
ending after a WS row. Shape neck and
left shoulder: (RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k15
(16, 18, 18), BO 16 (22, 18, 20), knit to
BO 9 (9, 11, 13), work 54 (62, 66, 68)
back sts as established, BO 9 (9, 11, 13),
work as established to last 5 sts, k3tog,
k226 (31, 38, 46) sts rem each front;
54 (62, 66, 68) sts rem for back. Turn
to work left front. Place back and right
front sts on waste yarn or holder.
LEFT FRONT
Next row: (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, p to
last 2 sts, k2.
Armhole and neck dec row: (RS) Sl 1
pwise wyf, k1, ssk, k to last 5 sts, k3tog,
k23 sts decd.
Rep the last 2 rows 1 (1, 2, 2) more
time(s)20 (25, 29, 37) sts rem.
Work 1 WS row even as established.
Neck dec row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k to
last 5 sts, k3tog, k22 sts decd.
Rep the last 4 rows 1 (1, 2, 2) more
time(s)16 (21, 23, 31) sts rem.
Rep the last 2 rows 3 (5, 5, 9) more
times10 (11, 13, 13) sts rem. Work
even in patt until armhole measures 8
(8, 8, 9)", ending after a WS row.
Shape shoulder: (RS) BO 7 (8, 10, 10)
sts3 sts rem. Place these 3 sts on
waste yarn or holder. Break yarn.
RIGHT FRONT
Place right front sts on larger needles and
join yarn preparing to work a WS row.
Next row: (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1,
purl to last 2 sts, k2. Armhole and
neck dec row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1,
sssk, k to last 4 sts, k2tog, k23 sts
Neck dec row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1,
sssk, work as established to last 5 sts,
k3tog, k24 sts decd. Work 1 WS
row even as established. Rep the last 2
rows 1 (2, 2, 0) more time(s)144 (158,
176, 202) sts rem. Shape bust darts:
(RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, sssk, k19 (20,
24, 33), M1R (see Glossary), pm for
dart, k1, M1L (see Glossary), [k to m,
work shadow rib to m] 3 times, k12 (14,
16, 18), M1R, k1, pm for dart, M1L,
work to last 5 sts as established, k3tog,
k2st count remains the same. Work
1 WS row even as established.Dart row:
(RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1, sssk, work to
dart m, M1R, sl m, k1, M1L, work as
established to 1 st before next dart m,
M1R, k1, sl m, M1L, work to last 5 sts,
k3tog, k2.
Work 1 WS row even as established.
Rep the last 2 rows 0 (1, 1, 1) more
time(s). Neck dec row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise
wyf, k1, sssk, work as established to last
5 sts, k3tog, k24 sts decd. Work 1
WS row even as established.
Sizes 32 (36, , ) only:
Rep neck dec row. Work 1 row even.
Rep the last 2 rows 0 (1, , ) more
time128 (146, , ) sts rem.
Sizes (, 39, 41) only:
Rep dart row. Work 1 row even. Rep
neck dec row. Work 1 row even. Rep
the last 4 rows (, 0, 1) more time
(, 168, 190) sts rem.
All sizes: Divide for armholes: (RS) Sl
1 pwise wyf, k1, sssk, k23 (28, 35, 43),
JAK_030-055_Country.indd 39 9/29/11 1:21 PM
09292011132806
40 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
C
o
u
n
t
r
y
makes a fattering pullover for any
man. To modernize, body and sleeves
begin the cable patterns immediately,
and it is fnished with a simple rolled
neck so as not to distract from this
cable tour de force.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 37 (43, 49,
53, 59)" chest circumference.
Sweater shown measures 43".
YARN Brooklyn Tweed Shelter
(100% wool; 140 yd [128 m]/50 g): #16
nest, 8 (10, 12, 14, 15) skeins.
NEEDLES Size 6 (4 mm): 16" and
29" circular (cir) and set of double-
pointed (dpn). Adjust needle size if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); cable needle
(cn); locking markers; stitch holders or
waste yarn; tapestry needle.
GAUGE 15 sts and 27 rnds = 4" in
seed st; 18 sts of Double Wave chart =
3"; 10 sts of OXO chart = 2"; 28 sts
of Celtic Flourish chart = 6"; 22 sts of
Ensigns Braid chart = 2".
NOTES
Cabling without a cable needle is
brilliant.
Spit splicing this yarn works like a
dream and will almost eliminate ends
to weave in.
Front and back stitch counts do not
include increased stitches on Rows
822 of Celtic Flourish chart and
Back Saddle chart.
Stitch Guide
4-st Dec: (RS or WS row) [Sl 1 st
kwise] 2 times, *sl 1 st pwise, pass 2nd
st on right needle over frst, transfer st
from right needle to left needle, pass
2nd st on left needle over frst; rep from
* once more, sl 1 pwise4 sts decd.
Seed Stitch: (odd number of sts)
Rnd 1: *K1, p1; rep from * to last st, k1.
On following rows, knit the purls and
purl the knits.
K2tog tbl Bind-Off: K1, *k1, insert
left needle into fronts of 2 sts on right
needle and work k2tog through back
loop (tbl) from this position; rep from
* around.
Use Kitchener st (see Glossary) to graft
neck edging together.
Larissa Brown is the author of My
Grandmothers Knitting: Family Stories
and Inspired Knits from Top Designers
(STC Craft/Melanie Falick Books, 2011).
She learned to knit on the chenille couch
in her grandmothers suburban New
Jersey home. Today, she lives and knits in
Portland, Oregon.
AN ARAN FOR
FREDERICK
Kathleen Dames
A
well-looking man, said Sir Walter,
a very well-looking man.
A very fne young man indeed! said
Lady Dalrymple. More air than one
often sees in Bath. Irish, I dare say.
No. I just know his name. A bowing
acquaintance. WentworthCaptain
Wentworth of the navy.
Persuasion
Though Captain Frederick Wentworth
may not be Irish, this handsome
captain, who stole Anne Elliots heart
before the beginning of Jane Austens
Persuasion, is certainly worthy of his
own Aran sweater. This cabled
pullover is worked in the round, with a
hybrid yoke to highlight the Celtic
fourish cable running up the center
back and front, fanked by OXO and
superimposed double wave cables,
and Ensigns Braids (Ensigns were
junior offcers in the infantry and navy
at the time, and Frederick would have
been one when he frst met Anne)
running up the sleeves and along the
shoulder saddles. This yoke style
end. Turn to work left shoulder, leaving
right shoulder sts to rest on needle or
waste yarn. Next row: (WS) Sl 1 pwise
wyf, k1, p to end. Dec row: (RS) K2,
ssk, work to end1 st decd. Rep the
last 2 rows 8 more times7 (8, 10, 10)
sts rem. If necessary, work even in pat-
tern until armhole measures 8 (8,
8, 9)". BO all sts.
RIGHT SHOULDER
Place right shoulder sts on larger
needles and join yarn preparing to work
a WS row.
Next row: (WS) Work as established to
last 2 sts, k2. Dec row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise
wyf, work to last 4 sts, k2tog, k21
st decd. Rep the last 2 rows 8 more
times7 (8, 9, 9) sts rem. If neces-
sary, work even in patt until armhole
measures 8 (8, 8, 9)". BO all sts.
FINISHING
Block to measurements. Sew shoulder
seams, leaving 3 held front sts un-
seamed. Weave in all ends, closing any
gaps where underarm BO began or
ended. Finish back neck: Starting at
right front shoulder, place 3 held sts on
larger dpn. Beg with RS row: Sl 1 pwise
wyf, k2tog, pick up and knit 1 st from
neck edge. Turn work. Row 2 and all
WS rows: K3. Rep the last 2 rows until
work meets 3 held sts from left front
shoulder. Place those 3 sts on a dpn.

JAK_030-055_Country.indd 40 9/29/11 1:21 PM


09292011132806
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 41
BODY
With longer cir needle, CO 180 (204,
224, 240, 264) sts. Place marker and
join in the rnd. Next rnd: Beg and
ending each chart as indicated for
your size, work 3 (9, 9, 13, 19) sts in
seed st (see Stitch Guide), pm, work
Double Wave chart over 18 (18, 20,
20, 20) sts, pm, work OXO chart
over 10 (10, 12, 12, 12) sts, pm, work
Celtic Flourish chart over 28 (28,
30, 30, 30) sts, pm, work OXO chart
over 10 (10, 12, 12, 12) sts, pm, work
Double Wave chart over 18 (18, 20,
20, 20) sts, pm, work 3 (9, 9, 13, 19)
sts in seed st, pm for side, cont in seed
st over 3 (9, 9, 13, 19) sts, pm, work
Double Wave chart over 18 (18, 20,
20, 20) sts, pm, work OXO chart
over 10 (10, 12, 12, 12) sts, pm, work
k on RS; p on WS
p on RS; k on WS
M1R (see Glossary)
M1L (see Glossary)
(k1, p1, k1) in same st
4-st dec (see Stitch Guide)
no stitch
sl 1 st onto cn, hold in back, k2, p1 from cn
sl 2 sts onto cn, hold in front, p1, k2 from cn
sl 1 st onto cn, hold in back, k3, p1 from cn
sl 3 sts onto cn, hold in front, p1, k3 from cn
sl 2 sts onto cn, hold in back, k2, p2 from cn
sl 2 sts onto cn, hold in front, p2, k2 from cn
sl 2 sts onto cn, hold in back, k2, k2 from cn
sl 2 sts onto cn, hold in front, k2, k2 from cn
sl 3 sts onto cn, hold in back, k2, sl last st
from cn to left needle, p1, k2 from cn
sl 3 sts onto cn, hold in back, k3, k3 from cn
sl 3 sts onto cn, hold in front, k3, k3 from cn
MR
ML
5
32
30
28
26
24
22
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
Double Wave
end
49"
53
1
4"
59
1
2"
end
37
1
4"
43
1
2"
beg
37
1
4"
43
1
2"
beg
49"
53
1
4"
59
1
2"
JAK_030-055_Country.indd 41 9/29/11 1:21 PM
09292011132807
42 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
C
o
u
n
t
r
y
24
22
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
ML MR ML MR
5 5
end
59
1
2"
end
53
1
4"
beg
59
1
2"
end
49"
end
43
1
2"
end
37
1
4"
beg
53
1
4"
beg
49"
beg
43
1
2"
beg
37
1
4"
Back Saddle
24
22
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
ML MR ML MR
5 5
Celtic Flourish
end
49"
53
1
4"
59
1
2"
end
37
1
4"
43
1
2"
beg
37
1
4"
43
1
2"
beg
49"
53
1
4"
59
1
2"
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
OXO
end
49"
53
1
4"
59
1
2"
end
37
1
4"
43
1
2"
beg
37
1
4"
43
1
2"
beg
49"
53
1
4"
59
1
2"
JAK_030-055_Country.indd 42 9/29/11 1:21 PM
09292011132807
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 43
24
22
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
Ensigns Braid
end
49"
53
1
4"
59
1
2"
end
37
1
4"
43
1
2"
beg
37
1
4"
43
1
2"
beg
49"
53
1
4"
59
1
2"
Body
37 (43, 49, 53, 59)"
94.5 (110.5, 124.5, 135.5, 151) cm
10 (13, 15, 17, 18)"
26 (33, 38, 44, 47.5) cm
7

(
9

,

1
0

,

1
1

,

1
3
)
"
1
8

(
2
3
.
5
,

2
7
.
5
,

3
0
,

3
3
)

c
m
17 (18, 19, 19, 20)"
44.5 (45.5, 48.5, 49.5, 51) cm
4 (4, 5, 5, 6)"
11 (12, 13.5, 14, 15) cm
4 (4, 5, 5, 6)"
11 (11.5, 14, 14, 16.5) cm
4 (5, 6, 6, 6)"
11.5 (14, 15, 17, 17) cm
2 (2, 3, 4, 4)"
5.5 (7, 9, 10, 11.5) cm
16 (17, 17, 17, 18)"
40.5 (43, 44.5, 44.5, 45.5) cm
Celtic Flourish chart over 28 (28,
30, 30, 30) sts, pm, work OXO chart
over 10 (10, 12, 12, 12) sts, pm, work
Double Wave chart over 18 (18, 20,
20, 20) sts, pm, work 3 (9, 9, 13, 19)
sts in seed st. Cont in patt until piece
measures 16 (17, 17, 17, 18)" from
CO, ending with an even-numbered
rnd. Next rnd: Work 86 (97, 106, 114,
125) sts in patt, place next 8 (10,
12, 12, 14) sts on holder (removing
m), work 82 (92, 100, 108, 118) sts
in patt, place next 8 (10, 12, 12, 14)
sts on holder (removing m)164
(184, 200, 216, 236) sts rem for body.
Break yarn and set aside.
SLEEVES
With dpn, CO 44 (52, 58, 62, 66) sts.
Place marker and join in the rnd. Work
1 (5, 5, 7, 9) st(s) in seed st, pm, work
OXO chart over 10 (10, 12, 12, 12) sts,
pm, work Ensigns Braid chart over 22
(22, 24, 24, 24) sts, pm, work OXO
chart over 10 (10, 12, 12, 12) sts, pm,
work 1 (5, 5, 7, 9) st(s) in seed st. Work
5 rnds in patt. Inc rnd: Work 0 (1, 1, 1,
1) st(s) in seed st as established, M1L
(see Glossary), work in patt to last 0 (1,
1, 1, 1) st(s), M1R (see Glossary), work
0 (1, 1, 1, 1) st(s) in seed st46 (54, 60,
64, 68) sts. Work 5 rnds in patt, work-
ing new sts into seed st patt. Inc rnd:
Work 1 st in seed st, M1L, work in patt
to last st, M1R, work 1 st in seed st2
sts incd. Rep last 6 rnds 4 (5, 6, 8, 9)
more times56 (66, 74, 82, 88) sts.
Work even until piece measures 17
(18, 19, 19, 20)" from CO, ending
with an even-numbered rnd. Next rnd:
Work 52 (61, 68, 76, 81) sts, place next
8 (10, 12, 12, 14) sts on holder (remov-
ing m)48 (56, 62, 70, 74) sts rem.
Break yarn and set aside, placing frst
sleeve on shorter cir needle and leaving
2nd sleeve on dpn in preparation for
joining sleeves to body.
YOKE
With longer needle and cont in patt,
work 48 (56, 62, 70, 74) sts of frst
sleeve, work 82 (92, 100, 108, 118)
back sts, placing locking m in frst and
last st of back, work 48 (56, 62, 70, 74)
sleeve sts, work 82 (92, 100, 108, 118)
front sts, placing locking m in frst and
last st of front, pm for beg of rnd260
(296, 324, 356, 384) sts total. Work 2
rnds even in patt. Dec rnd: *Work to 1
st before marked st, s2kp2; rep from *
3 more times, removing end-of-rnd m
to work last s2kp2 and replacing after
dec8 sts decd. Note: When marked
sts are incorporated into cables, move m
to new st in marked position. Rep last 3
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rnds 9 (11, 12, 14, 14) more times180
(200, 220, 236, 264) sts rem: 62 (68, 74,
78, 88) sts for each of front and back,
28 (32, 36, 40, 44) sts for each sleeve.
If fnal dec rnd is an even rnd, work an
odd rnd. Make note of last row worked
on Celtic Flourish chart. Right shoulder
saddle: Work back and forth over 28
(32, 36, 40, 44) sleeve sts plus 1 marked
st at each edge of sleeve30 (34, 38, 42,
46) sts total. Next row: (RS) P3 (5, 6, 8,
10), cont Ensigns Braid chart over 22
(22, 24, 24, 24) sts, p3 (5, 6, 8, 10), ssk
(marked st and next st from back), turn.
Next row: (WS) Sl 1 pwise with yarn in
front (wyf), k3 (5, 6, 8, 10), cont chart
over 22 (22, 24, 24, 24) sts, k3 (5, 6, 8,
10), p2tog (marked st and next st from
front), turn. Next row: (RS) Sl 1 kwise
with yarn in back (wyb), p3 (5, 6, 8, 10),
cont chart over 22 (22, 24, 24, 24) sts,
p3 (5, 6, 8, 10), ssk (last st from saddle
and next st from back), turn. Rep last
2 rows 18 (20, 22, 23, 27) more times,
then work WS row once more40 (44,
48, 51, 57) sts rem for each of front and
back, excluding marked sts. Break yarn.
Left shoulder saddle: With RS facing,
sl 70 (78, 86, 93, 103) sts to arrive at
marked st before left sleeve. Next row:
(RS) Sl 1 kwise wyb, p3 (5, 6, 8, 10),
cont Ensigns Braid chart over 22 (22,
24, 24, 24) sts, p3 (5, 6, 8, 10), ssk (last
st from saddle and next st from front),
turn. Next row: (WS) Sl 1 pwise with
yarn in front (wyf), k3 (5, 6, 8, 10), cont
chart over 22 (22, 24, 24, 24) sts, k3
(5, 6, 8, 10), p2tog (marked st and next
st from back), turn. Rep last 2 rows 19
(21, 23, 24, 28) more times20 (22,
24, 26, 28) sts rem for each of front and
back, excluding marked sts. Break yarn.
Back saddle: With WS facing, sl 20
(22, 24, 26, 28) sts to arrive at marked
st of right sleeve; turn. Work back and
forth over 20 (22, 24, 26, 28) back sts,
beg Back Saddle chart on row after last
row worked of Celtic Flourish chart.
Note: If you will not complete Row 23
of Back Saddle chart in the course of the
back saddle (there are 28 [32, 36, 40,
44] total back saddle rows), do not work
increases on Row 8 and maintain center
cable instead, working rem sts on each
side in rev St st (purl on RS, knit on WS).
Next row: (RS) Sl 1 kwise wyb, work
Back Saddle chart to last st, ssk (last st
from back saddle and next st from left
sleeve saddle), turn. Next row: (WS) Sl
1 pwise wyf, work Back Saddle chart to
last st, p2tog (last st from back saddle
and next st from right sleeve saddle),
turn. Rep last 2 rows 13 (15, 17, 19, 21)
more times16 (18, 20, 22, 24) sts rem
for each sleeve. Neck: With shorter cir
needle and RS facing, sl 1 pwise wyb,
k18 (20, 22, 24, 26), ssk, k14 (16, 18,
20, 22), ssk, k18 (20, 22, 24, 26), k2tog,
k14 (16, 18, 20, 22), k2tog (last st of
rnd and frst st of rnd)68 (76, 84, 92,
100) sts rem. Knit 12 rnds. Using the
k2tog tbl method (see Stitch Guide),
BO all sts.
FINISHING
Graft held sts at underarm tog using
Kitchener st (see Glossary). Weave in
loose ends and block.
Kathleen Dames lives and knits in New
York City and Bath, Maine, while
wrangling three young children with her
own Frederick (Nick), a professor of
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and join to work in rnds. Work mock
cable rib (see Stitch Guide) until piece
measures 2 (3, 3)". Switch to larger
dpn and work 1 inc rnd as foll: *k2, p1,
M1P (see Glossary); rep from * to end
of rnd80 (88, 96) sts. Work in Mini-
Cable Lattice chart until piece measures
5 (6, 6)" from CO edge, ending after
an odd-numbered rnd. Thumbhole:
With scrap yarn, k12 (14, 16) sts, then
sl these sts back to right needle. With
working yarn, k12 (14, 16) scrap yarn
sts, work in patt to end of rnd. Resume
working in Mini-Cable Lattice chart for
1 (2, 2)" after thumb gusset, ending
after an odd-numbered rnd. Work 1
dec rnd as foll: If last rnd worked was
1 or 3: P1, *k2, p2tog, rep from * to
3 sts before end of rnd, k2, p last and
1st sts of rnd together; this st will be
considered the last st in the rnd for the
remainder of the mitt. If last rnd worked
was 5: K1, p2tog, *k2, p2tog; rep from
* to 1 st before end of rnd, slip last
stitch to the left of marker; this stitch
will be considered the frst stitch of the
rnd for the remainder of the mitt. If last
rnd worked was 7: *k2, p2tog, rep from
* to end of rnd. After decrease rnd,
60 (66, 72) sts on needles. Switch to
smaller needles and work in mock cable
rib for " beg with Rnd 2. BO all sts.
double-pointed needle or cable needle;
12" scrap yarn in a contrasting color for
thumb gusset; tapestry needle.
GAUGE 42 sts and 44 rows = 4" in
mini-cable lattice stitch on larger needles.
NOTE
To achieve continuous pattern around
the mitt, note that one stitch switches
between the beginning and end of the
rnd when working the Mini-Cable
Lattice chart. At the end of Rnd 1,
1 stitch is moved to the right of the
marker denoting the beginning of the
rnd, this stitch is moved back to the left
of the marker at the end of Rnd 6.
Stitch Guide
Mock Cable Rib: (multiple of 3 sts,
worked in the round)
Rnd 1: *K2, p1; rep from * around.
Rnd 2: *K2tog, but leave sts on needle,
insert right needle between the 2 sts
just knitted together and knit 1st st
again, sl both sts from needle, p1; rep
from * around.
Rep Rnds 1 and 2 for patt.
MITTS (MAKE 2)
With smaller needles, CO 60 (66,
72) sts. Divide sts evenly among 3
dpn. Place marker to mark beg of rnd
Victorian literature. Persuasion is her
favorite Jane Austen novel because it
is closest to her own story: After dating
through college and into graduate
school, she and Nick parted ways but
reconnected when he found her
knitting blog a few years agonot the
same as his brother-in-law renting her
fathers house, but they dont mind.
See more of her work, including her
frst booklet Avast No. 1 and other
self-published patterns at kathleen
dames.blogspot.com.
FITZ FINGERLESS
MITTS
Catherine Shields
I
nspired by Jane Austens most
famous romantic interest, Fitz is a
sturdy fngerless mitt perfect for your
own Mr. Darcy. Like Mr. Darcy, these
mitts have more depth than may
initially meet the eye. A mock cable
border fows smoothly into a subtle
allover mini-cable lattice. The stitch
pattern is simple and easy to memo-
rize, providing a good opportunity to
practice cables if you are unfamiliar
with them.
FI NI SHED SI ZE Finished circum-
ference around palm of hand is 7
(8, 9)". Mitts shown measure 8".
Finished length is 8 (8, 9)".
YARN Jamiesons Shetland Spindrift
(100% Shetland wool, 115 yd [105 m]/
25 g): #236 rosewood, 2 (2, 3) balls.
NEEDLES Size 2 (2.75 mm)
double-pointed (dpn); ribbingSize 1
(2.25 mm) double-pointed (dpn). Ad-
just needle sizes if necessary to obtain
the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Marker (m); extra
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knit
purl
Replace m 1 st before end of rnd,
shifting 1 st to the right
Last st of rnd becomes frst st of
Rnd 7
sl 1 st to cn and hold in from of
work, k1, then k the st from the cn
sl 1 st to cn and hold in back of
work, k1, then k the st from the cn
sl 1 st to cn and hold in front of
work, p1, then k the st from the cn
sl 1 st to cn and hold in back of
work, k1, then p the st from the cn
pattern repeat
sl 1 st to cn and hold in back of
work, k1, then p the st from the cn,
removing m, replace m after BC,
shifting 1 st to the left
THUMB
Use 2 smaller dpn to pick up 12 (14, 16)
sts from above and 12 (14, 16) sts from
below section of sts knitted with scrap
yarn. Ravel scrap yarn to form thumb
opening. Pick up 2 sts at each end of
the opening; 28 (32, 36) sts total, divide
sts over 3 dpn. Dec rnd: *K2, p2tog; rep
from * to end of rnd, 21 (24, 27) sts on
needles. Beg with Rnd 2, work in mock
cable rib for 1 (2, 2)".
BO all sts.
FINISHING
With tapestry needle, sew in all ends.
You may also wish to thread yarn on
tapestry needle and neaten up the area
around the thumb gusset. Wet-block-
ing is recommended.
viewed from the right side of the fabric.
Te slippers split edgings mirror each
other, so right and left as applied to the
slipper refer to the foot on which the
slipper is placed if worn with the split
to the inside of the foot. (Te slippers
may also be worn with the split to the
outside if desired.)
SLIPPER
Heel tab: CO 6 (6, 8) sts. Do not join.
Row 1: (WS) Sl 1 pwise with yarn in
front (wyf), purl to end.
Row 2: Sl 1 pwise with yarn in back
(wyb), knit to end.
Rep last 2 rows 2 more times. Knit
1 WS row for turning ridge. Work 6
rows in St st, sl frst st as established.
Fold piece along turning ridge with
WS tog. Joining row: (RS) *Pick up
(but do not knit) 1 st from CO edge
and knit it tog with 1 st on needle; rep
from * 5 (5, 7) more times6 (6, 8)
sts. For remainder of piece, do not sl
frst st of row. Heel fap: Set-up row:
(WS) P1, p1f&b, purl to last 2 sts,
p1f&b, p18 (8, 10) sts. Work 20
(24, 26) rows in St st. Foot: Set-up row
1: (RS) Knit to last 2 sts, ssk; with an
empty needle, pick up and knit 16 (19,
22) sts along side of heel fap, pm, using
the backward-loop method (see Glos-
sary), CO 9 sts32 (35, 40) sts total.
Set-up row 2: (WS) K9, purl to last 2
sts, p2tog; with an empty needle, pick
up and purl 16 (19, 22) sts along side of
heel fap, pm, using the backward-loop
method, CO 9 sts56 (62, 70) sts total.
Next row: (RS) Knit. Next row: K9, purl
to last 9 sts, k9. Next row: (RS) Set up
for Aspen Leaf Edging Right chart as
foll: K1, [k2tog, (yo) 2 times] 2 times,
k2tog, yo, k2, sl m, knit to m, work
Row 1 of Aspen Leaf Edging Left chart
over 9 sts. Next row: (WS) Work Row
2 of Aspen Leaf Edging Left chart to
m, purl to m, work Row 2 of Aspen
Leaf Edging Right chart. Cont in patt,
changing to 16" cir needle after 12"
if desired. Work even until 5 (6, 7) reps
of Aspen Leaf Edging charts are com-
plete, then work Rows 17 once more,
or work until piece measures about 2
(2, 2)" less than desired fnished
length, ending with Row 7 of charts.
Catherine Shields enjoys reading Jane
Austen and all sorts of other classic
books, preferably in a modern digital
format to allow for knitting at the same
time. She also enjoys gardening and
experimenting in the kitchen. Catherine
blogs about knitting and the rest of her
interests at www.studiomarlowe.com.
PEMBERLEY
SLIPPERS
Kristi Schueler
M
r. Darcys estate in Pride and
Prejudice for which this slipper is
named is well known for its lush woods
and gardens. Therefore, the garter
stitchbased lace that is worked
simultaneously with the body of the
slipper for minimal fnishing has a leaf
motif. Those familiar with intarsia
knitting may wish to work the edging
with a contrasting color.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 7 (8, 9)" foot cir-
cumference and 7 (8, 9)" long from back
of heel to tip of toe. Slippers shown
measure 8".
YARN Louet Gems Sport Weight
(100% Merino wool; 225 yd [206 m]/
100 g): #68 steel grey, 1 skein.
NEEDLES Size 1 (2.5 mm): set of
5 double-pointed (dpn) and 16" circular
(cir) (optional). Adjust needle size if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch hold-
ers; tapestry needle.
GAUGE 32 sts and 44 rows = 4" in
St st.
NOTE
Right and left as applied to the aspen
leaf edging refer to the edges of the
knitting they are placed on when
Mini-Cable Lattice
7
5
3
1
Multiple of 4 sts, worked in the round.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 47
7
5
3
1
Aspen Leaf Edging Left
k on RS; p on WS
p on RS; k on WS
yo
k2tog on RS
ssk on RS
k2tog on WS
ssk on WS
bind off 1 st
st on needle after BO
Vamp edging: Left slipper only: Next
row: (WS) BO all sts to m, purl to m
and place last 38 (44, 52) sts on holder,
work Row 8 of Aspen Leaf Edging
Right chart, working k2 in place of
k2tog16 sts rem. Next row: (RS)
Work Aspen Leaf Edging Right chart
to last st, k1. Next row: P1, work chart
to end. Cont in patt until 3 (3, 4) more
patt reps are complete. BO all sts.
Right slipper only: Work 1 WS row in
patt. Next row: (RS) BO all sts to m,
knit to m and place last 38 (44, 52) sts
on holder, work Row 1 of Aspen Leaf
Edging Left chart, working k1f&b in
place of frst knitted st12 sts rem.
Next row: (WS) Work Aspen Leaf
Edging Left chart to last st, p1. Next
row: (RS) K1, work chart to end. Cont
in patt until 3 (3, 4) more patt reps are
complete. BO all sts.
Both slippers: Toe: Transfer held sts to
2 dpn, placing 19 (22, 26) sts on each.
With RS facing, join yarn and knit
these sts; with a 3rd dpn, pick up and
knit 18 (20, 20) sts evenly spaced along
vamp edging, being careful not to twist
edging56 (64, 72) sts total. Rear-
range sts as foll: K5 (6, 8) from frst dpn
onto 3rd, sl last 5 (6, 8) sts of 2nd dpn
and frst 9 (10, 10) sts of 3rd dpn onto
an empty needle; with an empty needle,
k14 (16, 18)14 (16, 18) sts on each of
4 dpn; rnd beg at center of sole. Work
in St st for 1", or until piece measures
1 (1, 1)" less than desired fnished
length. Shape toe: Dec rnd: *K2tog,
knit to last 2 sts of needle, ssk; rep
from * 3 more times8 sts decd. Rep
dec rnd every other rnd 5 (6, 7) more
times8 sts rem.
FINISHING
Cut yarn, leaving a 12" tail. Tread tail
onto tapestry needle and draw through
rem sts 2 times. Pull tight to gather
sts and fasten of on WS. Weave in
loose ends. Wash according to yarn
manufacturers suggestions and lay fat
to dry. Block folded edging with steam
if desired.
Kristi Schueler is a knitwear designer
and handspinner living along the front
range of the Colorado Rocky Mountains
where she can frequently be found
cuddled up with her knitting in the
company of a BBC production of Jane
Austens work. She could not resist the
opportunity to grow her line of Pride
and Prejudice footwear, which includes
Longbourn and Netherfeld socks. Kristi
is the author of a recently released eB-
ook pairing twelve patterns with twelve
recipes entitled Nourishing Knits: 24
Projects to Gift and Entertain. She blogs
about her fber adventures at http://blog.
designedlykristi.com.
Aspen Leaf Edging Right
1
7
5
3
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MODERN RETICULE
Heather Zoppetti
R
eticules became fashionable
during the Regency era. These
small bags were necessary to carry a
ladys small objects, as the dresses
during this time were too delicate to
have pockets. Although reticules
typically had drawstring closures, this
one has been updated with loop-
through handles. Construction begins
at the bottom of the bag with a square
knitted in a herringbone pattern. The
sides are picked up and knitted in the
round. Handles are knitted separately
and sewn on.
FI NI SHED SI ZE About 13"
circumference and 5" tall, without
handles.
YARN Lana Grossa Setanova (60%
silk, 40% cotton; 164 yd [150 m]/50 g):
#015 eggshell, 2 skeins.
NEEDLES Size 2 (2.75 mm): 16"
circular (cir) or double-pointed (dpn).
Adjust needle size if necessary to
obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); tapestry
needle.
GAUGE 29 sts and 48 rows = 4"
in little arrowhead patt; 51 sts and 41
rows = 4" in little herringbone patt.
NOTE
Te little herringbone pattern is extra
dense and creates a great bag bottom.
However, it does not lend itself to
working in the round. Terefore the
top edging is worked back and forth,
requiring a seam.
Stitch Guide
Little Herringbone:
Row 1: (WS) *P2tog, leave both sts on
needle, purl frst st again, drop both
from needle; rep from * to last st, p1.
Row 2: *Sl 1 pwise wyb, k1, lift sl st as
if to pass but knit tbl; rep from * to last
st, k1.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 for patt.
BASE
CO 51 sts. Do not join; work back and
forth in rows. Work little herringbone
(see Stitch Guide) until piece measures
4" from CO edge, ending after a WS
row. BO as foll: K2tog, *k2tog, pass 1st
st over second and of needle; rep from
* to last st, k1, pass 1st st over 2nd and
of needle. Cut yarn and draw through
last st.
BODY
With RS facing and starting at any
corner of the base, pick up and knit
25 sts on each side of the base square
separating sides with m100 sts. Join
to work in rnds. Work 4 rnds of little
arrowhead chart between markers 12
times, then work Rnd 1 once more.
EDGE
Set-up row: *K5, yo; rep from * to last
5 sts removing m as you come to them,
k5119 sts. Work back and forth:
Starting with RS row 2, work little
herringbone until edge measures 1" tall,
end after WS row 1. BO as for base.
LONG HANDLE
CO 15 sts. Work little herringbone un-
til strap measures 9". BO as for base.
SHORT HANDLE
CO 15 sts. Work little herringbone un-
til strap measures 4". BO as for base.
FINISHING
With yarn threaded on a tapestry
needle, sew edge seam at top. Sew
straps to edge. Weave in ends.
Heather Zoppetti is the creative director
for the Alpaca Yarn Company. She has
been obsessed with the fber arts for the
last ten years and can always be found
holding needles, a spindle, or a hook.
Heather teaches at several local yarn
shops and self-publishes patterns on her
website, www.digitalnabi.com.
Little Arrowhead
3
1
knit
yo
ssk
k2tog
sk2p
pattern repeat
Multiple of 6 sts + 1.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 49
T
his is not a typical history lesson; this is
a breathtaking look into the last 200 years
of knittings past.
Susan Strawn has scrounged through antique stores
and fea markets, tapped into her museum connections,
and accepted the generosity of strangers to come up
with the intriguing range of knitted objects in this
video. From 15th century child`s mittens to a 20th
century patented design system, she offers fascinating
insights and observations on what we knit and why
we knit. Heavens, you`ll even see radioactive knitting
needles!
In addition to the old knitted items, Susan demon-
strates how to interpret a 1930s drop-stitch pattern,
how to make an Amana-style picot edge for socks, and
how to start a starburst panel for a knitted cap. She
shares, via downloadable PDFs, patterns for a pair of
late-medieval mittens and knee-high lacy stockings.
Knitting History Comes
to Life with Knits of Yore
Cherish the treasures of the past, order your DVD today!
(866) 949-1646
shop. kni t t i ngdai l y. com
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FRIVOLOUS SOCKS
Katie Franceschi
F
eminine. Decadent. Opulent. Each
Frivolous sock starts at the toe and
is decorated with an allover lattice
stitch. A daring gusset pattern is a
secret indulgence. The glass beads
dotting the cuff add a shimmer just
below the futtering silk ribbon
crowning the cuff. Slip into these
remarkable beauties and youll feel as
singular as Emma Woodhouse.
While the overall look is complex, the
working of these socks has been
streamlined as much as possible. A
small steel crochet hook is used to
place a bead on individual stitches,
eliminating the need to string the beads
before knitting commences. The overall
stitch pattern is easily memorized, and
the gusset cable can be worked without
a cable needle, if you choose.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 7 (8, 8)" foot
circumference at ball of foot and 8
(9, 9)" long from back of heel to tip of
toe. Socks shown measure 8".
YARN Yarn Love Joan of Arc (50%
superwash Merino wool, 50% Tencel;
410 yd [375 m]/4 oz [113 g]): antique
teal, 1 skein. (See Notes.)
NEEDLES Size 0 (2 mm). (See
Notes.) Adjust needle size if necessary
to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); cable
needle (cn); tapestry needle; about
100 (depending on leg length) size 6
amethyst seed beads; 2 yd of 1" wide
silk ribbon; steel crochet hook size 12
(or size that easily slips through hole in
bead); Fray Check (optional).
GAUGE 40 sts and 48 rnds = 4" in
St st.
NOTES
For best results, choose a medium
to lightly saturated yarn and beads
that contrast well to the yarn. If the
yarn and beads are too close in color,
they will not show up well. Opaque
beads provide the most contrast. Use
a color wheel to fnd the complement
(the color on the opposite side of the
color wheel) to your yarn color to
add some pizzazz to your socks. Add
beads to your swatch; this will give
you the best preview of your yarn and
bead combination.
Tese socks can be worked using a
set of 4 or 5 double-pointed needles,
2 circular needles, 1 long circular
needle for the Magic Loop method,
or 1 short circular needle.
Tis foot is quite a bit shorter than
many sock patterns indicate, and this
was done intentionally to show the
stitch patterns and gusset patterns
to their best advantage. Te fnished
length of the foot of the sock should
be about
3
4-1" shorter than your
actual foot length.
If the leg fts too snugly, change to a
needle one or two sizes larger. Te
leg wont get as much tough wear as
the foot, so the fabric doesnt need to
be quite as dense. Be sure to try on
the leg, as the stitch pattern draws in
naturally but is also quite stretchy.
Stitch Guide
Place Bead (pb): Insert crochet hook
into center of bead, sl indicated st onto
hook, slide bead down hook onto st,
return st to right needle.
SOCKS
Toe: Using Judys Magic CO (see Glos-
sary), CO 26 (24, 26) sts13 (12, 13)
sts on each needle. Place marker and
join in the rnd. Next rnd: K13 (12, 13),
pm, k13 (12, 13). Inc rnd: *K3, LLI
(see Glossary), knit to 3 sts before m,
RLI (see Glossary), k3; rep from * once
more4 sts incd. Rep inc rnd every
other rnd 6 (8, 9) more times54 (60,
66) sts. Next rnd: K27 (30, 33), remove
m, k3 (0, 3), pm for beg of gusset, k2,
pm for end of gusset, knit to last 2 sts,
pm for beg of gusset, k2. Work even
until piece measures 2" from CO. Foot:
Next rnd: Work Instep chart over 30
(30, 36) sts, sl m, work Gusset chart
over 2 sts, sl m, work in St st to m,
work Gusset chart over 2 sts. Cont in
patt until piece measures 6 (7, 7)"
from tip of toe, or 1" less than desired
fnished length (see Notes), rep Rows
118 of Instep chart as needed, work
Rows 137 of Gusset chart once, then
rep Row 38 as needed86 (92, 98) sts.
Heel: Next rnd: Work instep and frst
gusset sts in patt to arrive at sole sts.
Make note of last row worked of Instep
chart. Heel is worked back and forth
over 20 (26, 26) sole sts using short-
rows as foll:
Row 1: (RS) K19 (25, 25), w&t (see
Glossary).
Row 2: (WS) Purl to 1 st before gusset
m, w&t.
Row 3: Knit to 1 st before previously
wrapped st, w&t.
Row 4: Purl to 1 st before previously
wrapped st, w&t.
Rep Rows 3 and 4 four (6, 6) more
times6 (8, 8) wrapped sts at each
end of heel; 8 (10, 10) unwrapped sts at
center. Next row: (RS) Knit to wrapped
st, *work wrap tog with wrapped st;
rep from * 5 (7, 7) more times, turn.
Next row: (WS) Sl 1, purl to wrapped
st, *work wrap tog with wrapped st; rep
from * 5 (7, 7) more times, turnno
wrapped sts rem. Heel fap: Note:
Remove gusset m as you come to them.
Row 1: Sl 1, k18 (24, 24), ssk, turn.
Row 2: Sl 1, p18 (24, 24), p2tog, turn.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 51
knit
purl
k2tog
sl 1, k2tog, psso
sl 1, k2tog, psso, then
pb (see Stitch Guide)
p3tog
M1 pwise
RLI
k1f&b
(k1, yo, k1) in same st
no stitch
pattern repeat
sl 1 st onto cn, hold in back, k1, p1 from cn
sl 1 st onto cn, hold in front, p1, k1 from cn
sl 1 st onto cn, hold in back, k1, k1 from cn
MP
2
37
35
33
31
29
27
25
23
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
1
5
3
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
MP
Gusset
*
*
* Work as given in directions
18
17
15
13
11
10
9
7
5
3
1
Leg
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
2
Instep
6-st repeat
Rep last 2 rows 15 more times54 (60,
66) sts rem. Knit to end of rnd. Leg:
Beg with row after last row worked of
Instep chart, work Leg chart until piece
measures 1" from top of heel fap,
omitting beads and working indicated
rows as foll:
Row 10: Remove m, k1, pm for new beg
of rnd, work in patt to end.
Row 18: Work in patt to last st, pm for
new beg of rnd (remove old beg-of-rnd
m when you come to it).
After 1" is complete, cont in patt
(including special instructions for Rows
10 and 18) and pb as indicated on chart.
Work even until leg measures 4" from
top of heel fap, or 1" less than desired
fnished length. Eyelet band:
Rnd 1: Purl, inc 2 (4, 2) sts evenly
spaced56 (64, 68) sts.
Rnds 2 and 3: Purl.
Rnd 4: Knit.
Rnd 5: *K2tog, yo, k2; rep from *
around.
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C
o
u
n
t
r
y
Rnd 6: Knit.
Rnds 79: Purl.
Picot Hem:
Rnds 15: Knit.
Turning rnd: *K2, k2tog, yo; rep from *
around.
Rnds 710: Knit.
Loosely BO all sts. Cut yarn, leaving a
30" tail. Fold picot hem to WS along
turning rnd and whipstitch (see Glos-
sary) in place.
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends. Cut ribbon in half,
angling each end. Apply Fray Check
to cut ends to prevent fraying or hem
each cut end. With ribbon threaded on
a tapestry needle and beg at outside of
ankle, weave ribbon through eyelets,
leaving a long tail. Even out ribbon tails
and tie in a bow. Remove ribbon when
washing socks and wash separately.
Press ribbon fat after washing.
Katie Franceschi splits her time between
designing patterns and dyeing yarn for
Yarn Love. She is especially addicted
to sock knitting. When shes not knit-
ting, she enjoys spending time with her
husband and children, reading, watching
flms, and roasting coffee.
GEORGIANA
Susanna IC
F
ashionable women of the Regency
period favored beautifully draped
sheer gowns in delicate shades of white
and pale pastels. The necklines of their
evening dresses were often cut quite
low in the French fashion to highlight
the chest area, and young British
women would use diaphanous scarves
trimmed with delicate lace to tuck into
their bodices and cover their shoulders
in the more modest, and warmer,
British style. These gossamer scarves
serve as an inspiration for Georgiana.
Named for Mr. Darcys beautiful
younger sister, Georgiana is worked in
colorful fngering-weight yarn for a
modern twist. The open lace is framed
by two areas of more solid stitches
the fan lace, which shapes the bottom
edge, and the short-row stockinette
section at the neck. The shawlette is
worked in one piece starting with the
cast-on at the bottom edge of the lace
panels, followed by short-rows that
shape its crescent form.
FI NI SHED SI ZE About 36" wide at
neck edge, 100" wide at lower edge, and
16" tall at center point.
YARN Madelinetosh Tosh Sock
(100% superwash Merino wool; 395 yd
[361 m]/100 g): grove, 2 skeins.
NEEDLES Sizes 8, 9, and 10 (5, 5.5,
and 6 mm): 32" circular (cir). Adjust
needle sizes if necessary to obtain the
correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Tapestry needle; blocking
pins; markers (optional).
GAUGE 14 sts and 35 rows = 4" in St
st on smallest needle, after blocking.
SHAWLETTE
With largest needle, loosely CO 368 sts.
Do not join. Change to middle-size needle.
Rows 1 and 2: Purl.
Row 3: (RS) *K2tog, yo; rep from * to
last 2 sts, k2tog367 sts rem.
Rows 46: Purl.
Change to smallest needle. Work Rows
122 of Lower Border A chart211
sts rem. Work Rows 116 of Lower
Border B chart. Shape shawl using
short-rows as foll: Note: Do not wrap st
before turning.
Row 1: K110, turn.
Row 2: Sl 1, p8, turn.
Row 3: Sl 1, k7, ssk, k3, turn.
Row 4: Sl 1, p10, p2tog, p3, turn.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 53
k on RS; p on WS
yo
k2tog
ssk
sl 2 as if to k2tog, k1, p2sso
(p1, k1) in same st
no stitch
pattern repeat
2
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
2
2
2
Lower Border A
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
2
Lower Border B
9
7
5
3
1
2
Upper Border
12"
46"
19"
45"
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54 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
C
o
u
n
t
r
y
Row 5: Sl 1, k13, ssk, k3, turn.
Row 6: Sl 1, p16, p2tog, p3, turn.
Row 7: Sl 1, k19, ssk, k3, turn.
Row 8: Sl 1, p22, p2tog, p3, turn.
Cont short-rows as established, work-
ing 3 more sts on each row before
working ssk, or p2tog, then work 3
sts after dec before turning, work 42
more short-rows, ending with a WS
row163 sts rem. Next row: (RS) Sl
1, k151, ssk, k4, turn. Next row: Sl 1,
p155, p2tog, p4, turn161 sts rem; no
sts rem unworked at end of row. Work
Rows 110 of Upper Border chart.
Upper edge:
Rows 1 and 2: Purl.
Row 3: (RS) *K2tog, yo; rep from * to
last 2 sts, k2tog160 sts rem.
Rows 4 and 5: Knit.
With WS facing, BO as foll: *K2tog,
return st to left needle; rep from * to end.
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends. Block piece to
measurements and shape as shown in
blocking schematic, beg with two short
sides, foll by center point, then pinning
out rem points along long edge. Piece
will relax to fnished size measurements.
Susanna IC has an extensive background
in studio arts and art history, which
inspires much of her knitting. Her proj-
ects and designs can be found on www
.ravelry.com, user name zuzusus, and
at www.artqualia.com.
LYDIA BENNET
SECRET STOCKINGS
Susan Strawn
R
eading Pride and Prejudice, I
always feel a bit sad for Catherine
(Kitty) Bennet. Jane Austen attributed
particular qualities to the other Bennet
girls: Jane is beautiful and sweet-
tempered, Elizabeth intelligent and
quick-witted, Mary accomplished
(well, perhaps), and Lydia silly and idle,
although she is Mrs. Bennets favorite.
Kitty, however, seems an ordinary girl,
destined to be teased and forever in
the shadow of her vain and thoughtless
younger sister, Lydia. When Lydia
plotted her secret elopement with the
scandalous Mr. Wickham, she took only
the hapless Kitty into her confdence.
How did Kitty manage to keep silent
such a secret from the rest of the
Bennet household? The answer lies in
the recently discovered pattern for
Lydia Bennet Secret Stockings.
It is a little-known fact that Kitty was
a profcient knitter perfectly capable of
knitting secret messages into stocking
stitches. In her pattern for Secret
Stockings, Kitty adapted a classic lace
pattern called horseshoe prints, a
subtle reference to the planned
elopement in Mr. Wickhams horse-
drawn carriage. She incorporated
textured heart shapes into the border,
inverting some hearts to disguise the
obvious reference to romance. When-
ever tempted to reveal Lydias wild
behavior, Kitty stuck to her knitting.
She found the pattern engaging, yet
repetitive and soothing. Lydia, of
course, had no patience for needle-
work but felt entitled to have Kitty knit
luxurious, elegant stockings suitable
for her elevated status as a married
woman. Lydia knew that the striking
butter yellow would enhance Wick-
hams tantalizing glimpse of her
ankles. And Kitty would, after all, have
nothing better to do. However,
considering the prospect of a precari-
ous life with Wickham, Lydia would
need Kittys practical gift of pretty
stockings.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 8" foot circumfer-
ence and 8" long from back of heel to
tip of toe.
YARN Shibui Knits Staccato (65%
superwash Merino, 30% silk, 5% nylon;
191 yd [175 m]/50 g): #102 butter, 3
skeins.
NEEDLES Body and footsize
1 (2.25 mm): set of double-pointed
(dpn). Anklesize 0 (2 mm): set of
dpn. Adjust needle size if necessary to
obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); tapestry
needle.
GAUGE 32 sts and 46 rnds = 4" in
St st on larger needles; 40 sts and 46
rnds = 4" in horseshoe prints patt on
larger needles.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 55
knit
purl
yo
sl 1, k2tog, psso
pattern repeat
7
5
3
1
Horseshoe Prints
10-st repeat
9
7
5
3
1
Border
24-st repeat
NOTES
Use smaller needles to work the ankles
for a better ft.
STOCKING
With larger needles, CO 72 sts. Place
marker and join in the rnd.
Rnds 18: Knit.
Rnd 9: *K2tog, yo; rep from * around.
Rnds 1018: Knit.
Rnd 19: *Pick up (but do not knit) 1 st
from CO edge and knit it tog with 1 st
on needle; rep from * around72 sts.
Rnds 2023: Knit.
Rnd 24: Purl.
Rnds 2527: Knit.
Work Rows 19 of Border chart. Knit
3 rnds. Purl 1 rnd. Knit 5 rnds. Next
rnd: Knit, dec 2 sts at random70 sts
rem. Work Rows 18 of Horseshoe
Prints chart 5 times, working rep sts
only (omit frst st of each chart row).
Change to smaller needles. Work
Rows 18 of Horseshoe Prints chart 3
times, working rep sts only. Heel fap:
Change to larger needles. Heel fap is
worked back and forth on frst 29 sts of
rnd; rem 41 sts will be worked later for
instep.
Row 1: (RS) Sl 1 kwise, k1, *sl 1 pwise,
k1; rep from * 12 more times, k1, turn.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 pwise, p28, turn.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 until heel fap
measures 2", ending with a WS row.
Turn heel:
Row 1: (RS) Sl 1 kwise, k15, ssk, k1,
turn.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 pwise, p4, p2tog, p1,
turn.
Row 3: Sl 1 kwise, k5, ssk, k1, turn.
Row 4: Sl 1 pwise, p6, p2tog, p1, turn.
Row 5: Sl 1 kwise, k7, ssk, k1, turn.
Row 6: Sl 1 pwise, p8, p2tog, p1, turn.
Row 7: Sl 1 kwise, k9, ssk, k1, turn.
Row 8: Sl 1 pwise, p10, p2tog, p1, turn.
Row 9: Sl 1 kwise, k11, ssk, k1, turn.
Row 10: Sl 1 pwise, p12, p2tog, p1, turn.
Row 11: Sl 1 kwise, k13, ssk, k1, turn.
Row 12: Sl 1 pwise, p14, p2tog, p1,
turn17 heel sts rem.
Gusset: K17 heel sts, pick up and knit
17 sts along heel fap, pm, work 41
instep sts in patt (including frst st
of chart), pm, pick up and knit 17 sts
along side of heel fap, k8 heel sts92
sts total; rnd beg at center of sole.
Work 1 rnd even. Dec rnd: Knit to 3
sts before m, k2tog, k1, work in patt
to m, k1, ssk, knit to end2 sts decd.
Rep dec rnd every other rnd 9 more
times72 sts rem. Foot: Work even
until piece measures 7" from back of
heel, or 1" less than desired fnished
length. Toe: Knit 3 rnds. Dec rnd:
*K7, k2tog; rep from * around64
sts rem. Knit 1 rnd. Dec rnd: *K6,
k2tog; rep from * around56 sts
rem. Knit 1 rnd. Dec rnd: *K5, k2tog;
rep from * around48 sts rem.
Knit 1 rnd. Dec rnd: *K4, k2tog; rep
from * around40 sts rem. Knit 1
rnd. Dec rnd: *K3, k2tog; rep from
* around32 sts rem. Knit 1 rnd.
Dec rnd: *K2, k2tog; rep from *
around24 sts rem. Knit 1 rnd.
Dec rnd: *K1, k2tog; rep from *
around16 sts rem. Dec rnd: *K2tog;
rep from * around8 sts rem. Break
yarn, leaving an 8" tail. Tread tail
onto tapestry needle and draw through
rem sts. Pull tight to gather sts and
fasten of on WS.
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends. Block lightly.
Susan Strawn thinks she has been taking
research and writing about the history of
knitting entirely too seriously for several
years now, so she enjoyed making up this
bit of fantasy for Jane Austen Knits. She
lives in Oak Park, Illinois, where she is
a professor at Dominican University in
River Forest. During summers, she knits
in Seattle. She is the author of Knitting
America: A Glorious Heritage from Warm
Socks to High Art (Voyageur Press, 2007).
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WOODHOUSE
SPENCER
Designed by JENNIFER WOOD.
PAGE 61. YARN: Rowan Wool Cotton.
Manor
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LAMBTON TOP
Designed by THERESSA SILVER.
PAGE 65. YARN: The Sanguine Gryphon
Traveller and The Sanguine Gryphon
Little Traveller.
MARIANNE
DASHWOOD STOCKINGS
Designed by ANN KINGSTONE.
PAGE 60. YARN: Natural Dye
Studio Dazzling.
Woodhouse Spencer,
Page 61
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 57
JAK_056-077_Manor.indd 57 9/29/11 1:12 PM
09292011131844
BARTON COTTAGE SHRUG
Designed by Kristi Schueler. PAGE 69. YARN:
Lornas Laces Helens Lace.
Lambton Top, Page 65
58 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
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FIORI
PULLOVER
Designed by MARY
ANNARELLA. PAGE 72.
YARN: Schaefer Audrey.
ELINORS TEA COZY
Designed by ANNE BERK, VALERIE
ALLEN, JILL BETTS, AND ELAINE
BLATT. PAGE 67. YARN: Cascade Yarns 220
Superwash and Cascade Yarns 220
Superwash Paints.
FLOWER
AND LACE
CUFFS
Designed by CAROL
HUEBSCHER
RHOADES. PAGE 70.
YARN: Isager Alpaca 2.
Barton Cottage
Shrug, Page 69
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 59
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09292011131845
M
a
n
o
r
MARIANNE
DASHWOOD
STOCKINGS
Ann Kingstone
T
wo delightful twilight walks . . .
where the trees were the oldest
and the grass was the longest and
wettest, hadassisted by the still
greater imprudence of sitting in her
wet shoes and stockingsgiven
Marianne a cold so violent, as, though
for a day or two trifed with or denied,
would force itself by increasing
ailments, on the concern of everybody,
and the notice of herself.
Chapter 42,
Sense and Sensibility
In Regency England, all socks were
known as stockings, no matter what
their length. Silk stockings, knitted at
a very fne gauge, were prized by the
landed gentry, while the middle and
lower classes had to make do with
wool. Indeed the production of
handknitted wool stockings was
essential to the economy of many of
Englands most rural communities and
continued to be so until after the
Napoleonic Wars (18031815) during
which wool stockings were in high
demand for the militia.
Ladies stockings were invariably
worn with a garter, a knitted or silk
ribbon tied either just above or just
below the knee to hold the stockings
up. While most stockings were plain,
many had clocks, embroidered or
integral lace decorations on the inner
and outer legs.
These two elements of Regency
stockings, garters and clocks, feature
prominently in the Marianne Dashwood
stockings. A picot hem creates the
casing for a pretty ribbon garter, while
the lace clocks elegantly grace the leg,
and Mariannes passionate personality
is simply represented in the lace hearts
that punctuate the tops of the clocks.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 6 (7, 8)"
foot circumference, 9 (11, 12)"
calf circumference, and 8 (8, 9)"
long from back of heel to tip of toe (see
Notes). Stockings shown measure 7".
YARN Natural Dye Studio Dazzling
(55% British Bluefaced Leicester, 45%
silk; 437 yd [400 m]/100 g): lilac C17,
2 skeins.
NEEDLES Sizes 0 and 1 (2 and
2.25 mm). (See Notes.) Adjust needle sizes
if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch
holder or waste yarn; 1 yd of waste yarn
for provisional CO; tapestry needle;
1 yd of " ribbon.
GAUGE 35 sts and 48 rnds = 4" in St
st on larger needles.
NOTES
Tese stockings are intended to worn
with about 10% negative ease.
Tese socks can be worked using a
set of 4 or 5 double-pointed needles,
2 circular needles, 1 long circular
needle for the Magic Loop method,
or 1 short circular needle.
In keeping with the traditional
stocking-knitting styles of Regency
England, the socks include a false
seam at the back of the leg, created
by purling the center back stitch in
every round.
During the gusset setup, a neat fnish
is obtained by knitting into the back
of each stitch picked up from the
edges of the heel fap.
STOCKINGS
Cuff: With smaller needles and using a
provisional method (see Glossary), CO
84 (98, 112) sts. Place marker (pm) and
join in the rnd. Knit 10 rnds. Picot rnd:
*Yo, k2tog; rep from * around. Change
to larger needles. Knit 6 rnds. Eyelet
rnd: *Yo, k2tog, k5; rep from * around.
Knit 3 rnds. Remove provisional CO
and place sts onto smaller needles. Fold
cuf at picot rnd with WS tog. Joining
rnd: Holding provisional sts behind
working needles, *k2tog (1 st from
front needle and 1 st from back needle);
rep from * around84 (98, 112) sts.
Leg:
Size 6" only: Next rnd: P1, M1, k42,
M1, knit to end86 sts.
Size 7" only: Next rnd: P1, knit to end.
Size 8" only: Next rnd: P1, k2tog, k54,
k2tog, knit to end110 sts rem.
All sizes: Next rnd: P1, knit to end. Cont
in patt until piece measures 4" from
top of cuf. Lace clocks: Set-up rnd: P1,
k14 (17, 20), pm, k15, pm, k27 (33, 39),
pm, k15, pm for new beg-of-rnd (leave
old beg-of-rnd m in place). Next rnd:
Knit to m, p1, knit to m, work Row 1 of
Lace Clock chart over 15 sts, sl m, knit
to m, work Row 1 of Lace Clock chart
over 15 sts. Cont in patt through Row
15 of chart. Shape leg as foll and, at the
same time, work Rows 1620 of chart
once, then rep Rows 2124 as needed.
Dec rnd: Knit to 2 sts before m, ssk, p1,
k2tog, knit to m, work lace patt to m,
k2tog, knit to 2 sts before m, ssk, work
lace patt to m4 sts decd. Rep dec rnd
every 8th rnd 6 (7, 8) more times58
(66, 74) sts rem. Work even in patt until
piece measures about 14" from top of
cuf, or desired length to heel, ending
with Row 24 of chart. Heel fap: Set-up

60 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com


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WOODHOUSE
SPENCER
Jennifer Wood
I
thought of Emma Woodhouse when
I designed this spencer jacket.
Always wearing the latest fashions,
the stylish socialite Emma gads about
town, visiting neighbors or having tea
with friends. Today, we might wear
the Woodhouse Spencer to have
coffee with friends or to an evening
cocktail party. It is constructed from
the top down in one piece with
short-row shaping for the shoulders
and set-in sleeves. The moss-stitch
collar is worked separately and then
attached by single crochet.
FINISHED SIZE 32 (36, 38, 40
1
2,
45)" bust circumference, buttoned.
Cardigan shown measures 36". This
jacket was designed for the V-neck
shaping to end right under the bust.
For a classic, close-to-the-body fit,
pick a size that is slightly smaller
than your bust measurement. For
example, if your bust measures 37",
choose finished size 36".
m, k2tog, k2, ssk, knit to the last 3 sts,
k2tog, k14 sts decd. Next rnd: Knit.
Rep last 2 rnds 6 (7, 8) more times30
(34, 38) sts rem. Work dec rnd only 3
(4, 5) times18 sts rem.
FINISHING
Break yarn, leaving a 12" tail. Graft
toe using Kitchener st (see Glossary).
Weave in loose ends. Block by soaking
socks in lukewarm water until they are
thoroughly wet, then gently pressing
out excess water. Stretch damp socks
on sock blockers or pin out to shape un-
til dry. Cut ribbon in half. Tread each
piece through eyelets at top of sock.
Ann Kingstone is a British designer living
in the beautiful county of Yorkshire, her
lifelong home. Her designs include many
that were inspired by works of British
literature, beautifully presented in Novel
Knits, Anns frst book. More details of
this and Anns full pattern range may be
found at her website, www.annkingstone
.com.
row: K7 (9, 11), p1, k7 (9, 11), sl m, work
Row 1 of Fagoting chart, pm, k3, then
place next 29 (33, 37) sts onto holder or
waste yarn for instep29 (33, 37) sts
rem for heel fap. Work back and forth
on these sts as foll:
Row 1: (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, p2, work
Row 2 of Fagoting chart, p7 (9, 11),
k1, p7 (9, 11), work Row 2 of Fagoting
chart, pm, p3.
Row 2: (RS) Sl 1 kwise wyb, k2, work
Row 1 of chart, k7 (9, 11), p1, k7 (9, 11),
work Row 1 of chart, k3.
Rep last 2 rows 11 (13, 15) more times,
then work Row 1 once more. Heel turn:
Note: Remove m as you come to them.
Set-up row 1: (RS) Sl 1 kwise wyb, k16
(18, 20), ssk, k1, turn.
Set-up row 2: (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, p6,
p2tog, p1, turn.
Row 1: (RS) Sl 1 kwise wyb, knit to 1 st
before gap, ssk, k1, turn.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, purl to 1
st before gap, p2tog, p1, turn.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 three (4, 5) more
times19 (21, 23) heel sts rem. Next
row: (RS) Sl 1 kwise wyb, knit to 1

st
before gap, ssk, turn. Next row: (WS)
Sl 1 pwise wyf, purl to 1 st before gap,
p2tog, turn17 (19, 21) heel sts rem.
Gusset: Set-up row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise
wyb, k16 (18, 20) heel sts, pick up and
knit 12 (14, 16) sts along side of heel
fap, work held instep sts as foll: K4,
pm, work Row 2 of Fagoting chart, k13
(17, 21), work Row 1 of Fagoting chart,
pm, k4; pick up and knit 12 (14, 16) sts
along side of heel fap, k17 (19, 21) heel
sts, k12 (14, 16) gusset sts (see Notes),
pm for new beg of rnd70 (80, 90) sts
total.
Dec rnd 1: Work in patt to last 3 sts,
k2tog, k11 st decd.
Dec rnd 2: Work 29 (33, 37) sts in patt,
k1, ssk, knit to end1 st decd.
Rep last 2 rnds 5 (6, 7) more times58
(66, 74) sts rem. Foot: Work even in
patt until piece measures 1" from end
of gusset. Change to St st. Next rnd:
Remove all m except beg-of-rnd m and
pm as foll: K29 (33, 37), pm, knit to
end. Work even until piece measures
6 (6, 7)" from back of heel, or 2"
less than desired fnished length. Toe:
Dec rnd: K1, ssk, knit to 3 sts before
23
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Lace Clock
k on RS; p on WS
yo
k2tog
ssk on RS; ssp on WS
sl 2 as if to k2tog, k1, p2sso
1
Fagoting
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M
a
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o
r
stitches picked up from the provisional
CO are twisted, work them through the
back loops to untwist them.
Place locking markers at each armhole
edge to designate shoulder line at start
of front sts. With RS facing, carefully
remove waste yarn from provisional CO
and place 76 (84, 88, 92, 96) sts from
provisional CO on smaller cir needle.
Set-up row: (RS) K22 (24, 25, 27, 28),
join a second ball of yarn, bind of
center 32 (36, 38, 38, 40) sts, k22 (24,
25, 27, 28) sts.
Purl 1 WS row.
Short-row 1: (RS) For right front, knit
to end; for left front, k5 (4, 4, 6, 6) w&t.
Short-row 2: (WS) For left front, purl to
end; for right front, p5 (4, 4, 6, 6) sts, w&t.
Short-rows 3 and 4: For frst group of
sts, work to neck edge; for second group
of sts, work to wrapped st, hide wrap,
work 3 (4, 4, 4, 4) sts, w&t.
Short-rows 58: Rep Short-rows 3 and
4 two more times.
Short-rows 9 and 10: For frst group
of sts, work to neck edge; for second
group of sts, work to wrapped st, hide
wrap, work 4 (4, 5, 5, 6) sts to end of
row, turnall wraps have been worked;
piece measures about 1
1
2" from shoul-
der line at neck edge. Work even in St
st until piece measures 3" from shoulder
line at armhole edges, and about 4
1
2"
from CO at neck edges. Break yarn
attached to right front sts.
UPPER BODY AND
SLEEVE CAPS
Sl right front sts from left needle to
right needle as if to purl without work-
ing them.
Joining Row: Using yarn attached to
left front and beg at left front neck
edge, k22 (24, 25, 27, 28) left front sts
to armhole edge, pm, pick up and knit
16 sts along left front armhole edge to
m at shoulder line, pick up and knit
16 sts along left back armhole edge,
knit across 76 (84, 88, 92, 96) back sts,
pm, pick up and knit 16 sts along right
back armhole edge to m at shoulder
line, pick up and knit 16 sts along right
front armhole edge, then k22 (24, 25,
27, 28) right front sts184 (196, 202,
210, 216) sts total: 22 (24, 25, 27, 28)
back of the stitch two stitches below
the last st on the right needle. Lift the
loop onto the left needle and knit it1
st incd.
Moss Stitch: (worked over an odd
number of sts)
Rows 1 and 4: K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to
end of row.
Rows 2 and 3: P1, *k1, p1; rep from * to
end of row.
Rep Rows 14 for patt.
Moss Stitch: (worked over an even
number of sts)
Rows 1 and 2: *K1, p1; rep from * to
end of row.
Rows 3 and 4: *P1, k1; rep from * to
end of row.
Rep Rows 14 for patt.
BACK
With smaller cir needle and waste yarn,
use the invisible provisional method
(see Glossary) to CO 76 (84, 88, 92, 96)
sts. Knit 1 RS row.
Set-up row: (WS) P22 (24, 25, 27, 28)
sts, pm, p32 (36, 38, 38, 40), pm, purl
to end.
Short-row 1: (RS) Knit to frst m, sl m,
knit across back neck to second m, sl m,
k5 (4, 4, 6, 6), w&t (see Glossary).
Short-row 2: (WS) Purl to second m, sl
m, p5 (4, 4, 6, 6), w&t.
Short-rows 3 and 4: Work to wrapped
st, hide wrap (see Stitch Guide), work 3
(4, 4, 4, 4) sts, w&t.
Short-rows 58: Rep Short-rows 3 and
4 two more times.
Short-rows 9 and 10: Work to wrapped
st, hide wrap, work 4 (4, 5, 5, 6) sts to
end of row, turnall wraps have been
worked; piece measures about 1
1
2" from
center back neck.
Work even in St st until piece mea-
sures 3" from CO at armhole edges,
and about 4
1
2" from CO at center back
neck. Break yarn and put sts on spare
cir needle, or allow back sts to rest in
center of needle while working fronts
(see Notes).
FRONT
Notes: Both fronts are worked simultane-
ously using separate balls of yarn. If any
YARN Rowan Wool Cotton (50%
Merino wool, 50% cotton; 123 yd [113 m]
/50 g): #965 mocha, 6 (7, 8, 9, 10) skeins.
NEEDLES Body and sleevessize
5 (3.75 mm): 24" circular needle (cir)
and set of 4 or 5 double-pointed (dpn).
Ruf e and collarsize 7 (4.5 mm): 24"
cir or straight. Adjust needle sizes if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m; two diferent
colors and locking markers); stitch hold-
ers; tapestry needle; size F/5 (3.75 mm)
crochet hook; one
1
2" button, waste yarn.
GAUGE 21 sts and 30 rows = 4" in
St st on smaller needles; 18 sts and 22
rows = 4" in moss st on larger needles.
NOTES
If you have a long enough circular
needle, you can leave the back
stitches on the needle while working
the fronts. Just push the back stitches
to the center of the needle so the tips
are free to work the front stitches.
Te frst and last stitches of the
collar are selvedge stitches; work
all increases inside these selvedge
stitches. Work new stitches as either
knit or purl as required to maintain
the established moss stitch pattern.
To make working the short-rows at
the lower back easier, use a diferent
color for the back dart markers.
Stitch Guide
Hide Wrap:
Knitting a wrapped stitch: With RS of
the fabric facing you, insert right needle
into the bottom of the wrap front to
back and lift the wrap onto the left
needle. Knit the wrap together with the
wrapped st through the back loops.
Purling a wrapped stitch: With WS of the
fabric facing you, insert right needle into
the bottom of the wrap from back to front
and lift the wrap onto the left needle. Purl
the wrap together with the wrapped st.
Right Lifted Increase (RLI): Insert the
right needle tip from front to back into
the stitch below the next stitch on the
left needle. Lift the loop onto the left
needle and knit it1 st incd.
Left Lifted Increase (LLI): Insert the left
needle tip from front to back into the
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116) back sts. Neck edge inc row: K2,
M1L, knit to last 2 sts, M1R, k22
sts incd; 1 st each front. Purl 1 WS
row. Rep the last 2 rows 4 (5, 6, 8, 9)
times164 (188, 208, 230, 264) sts
total: 42 (49, 55, 63, 74) sts each front;
80 (90, 98, 104, 116) back sts; lower
body measures 2
1
4 (2
1
2, 2
1
2, 3, 3
1
4)"
from dividing row. Next row: (RS) Knit
to end, CO 7 sts for buttonhole facing.
Next row: (WS) P6, k1, purl to right
side m, sl m, p27 (30, 33, 35, 40), pm
in color for left back dart (see Notes),
p26 (30, 32, 34, 36) center back sts,
pm in color for right back dart, purl to
end, CO 7 sts for button facing49
(56, 62, 70, 81) sts each front, includ-
ing 7-st facing; no change to back sts.
Back dec row: (RS) K6, p1, knit to side
m, sl m, knit to 3 sts before dart m,
ssk, k1, sl m, k2tog, knit to 2 sts before
next dart m, ssk, sl m, k1, k2tog, knit
to side m, sl m, knit to last 7 sts, p1,
k6174 (198, 218, 240, 274) sts total:
49 (56, 62, 70, 81) sts each front; 76
(86, 94, 100, 112) back sts. Buttonhole
row: (WS) P2, ssp, yo, p2, k1, p2, yo,
p2tog, purl to last 7 sts, k1, p6. Front
dec row: (RS) K6, p1, k13 (17, 23, 26,
30), ssk 5 (5, 4, 5, 6) times, k1, k2tog
5 (5, 4, 5, 6) times, k8 (11, 15, 16, 19),
sl left side m, knit across all back sts,
sl right side m, k8 (11, 15, 16, 19), ssk
5 (5, 4, 5, 6) times, k1, k2tog 5 (5, 4,
5, 6) times, k13 (17, 23, 26, 30), p1,
k6154 (178, 202, 220, 250) sts total:
39 (46, 54, 60, 69) sts each front; 76
(86, 94, 100, 112) back sts. Next row:
(WS) P6, k1, purl to last 7 sts, k1,
p6lower body measures about 3
(3
1
4, 3
1
4, 3
3
4, 4)" from dividing row.
Work short-rows to shape the lower
back curve as follows:
Short-row 1: (RS) Knit to second dart
m, sl m, k6 (8, 9, 11, 12), w&t.
Short-row 2: (WS) Purl to dart m, sl m,
purl to next dart m, sl m, p6 (8, 9, 11,
12), w&t.
Short-rows 3 and 4: Work to wrapped st,
hide wrap, work 5 (7, 8, 10, 11) sts, w&t.
Short-row 5: Knit to 3 sts before frst dart
m, ssk, k1, sl m, k2tog, knit to 2 sts before
second dart m, ssk, sl m, k1, k2tog, knit
to wrapped st, hide wrap, work 5 (7, 8, 10,
11) sts, w&t4 back sts decd.
row266 (300, 328, 358, 410) sts total:
35 (41, 46, 52, 62) sts each front; 58
(64, 70, 76, 86) sts each sleeve; 80 (90,
96, 102, 114) back sts; back and fronts
measure 6
3
4 (7
1
2, 8
1
4, 9, 10
1
2)" from
shoulder line along armhole edges.
LOWER BODY
Dividing row: (RS) K2, M1L, knit to
sleeve m, put 58 (64, 70, 76, 86) left
sleeve sts on holder and remove sleeve
m, CO 1 left armhole st, pm for left
side, CO 2 more left armhole sts, knit
to sleeve m, put 58 (64, 70, 76, 86)
right sleeve sts on holder and remove
sleeve m, CO 2 right armhole sts,
pm for right side, CO 1 more right
armhole st, knit to last 2 sts, M1R,
k2158 (180, 196, 214, 246) sts total:
37 (43, 48, 54, 64) sts each front; 84
(94, 100, 106, 118) back sts. Purl 1
WS row. Side dec and front inc row:
(RS) K2, M1L, knit to 2 sts before left
side m, ssk, sl m, k1, k2tog, knit to 3
sts before right side m, ssk, k1, sl m,
k2tog, knit to last 2 sts, M1R, k22
sts decd from back; no change to front
st counts inc at neck edge is balanced
by a side dec. Purl 1 WS row. Rep
the last 2 rows 1 (1, 0, 0, 0) time(s),
ending with a WS row154 (176,
194, 212, 244) sts total: 37 (43, 48,
54, 64) sts each front; 80 (90, 98, 104,
sts each front; 32 sts each sleeve; 76 (84,
88, 92, 96) back sts. Purl 1 WS row.
Sleeve inc row: (RS) *Knit to sleeve m,
sl m, RLI (see Stitch Guide), knit to
sleeve m, LLI (see Stitch Guide), sl m;
rep from * once more, knit to end of
row4 sts incd; 2 sts for each sleeve.
Purl 1 WS row Rep the last 2 rows
once more, ending with a WS row36
sts each sleeve; no change to st counts
for fronts and back.
Sleeve and neck inc row: (RS) K2,
M1L (see Glossary), *knit to sleeve m,
sl m, RLI, knit to sleeve m, LLI, sl m;
rep from * once more, knit to last 2 sts,
M1R (see Glossary), k26 sts incd: 2
sts for each sleeve; 1 st for each front.
Purl 1 WS row. Rep the last 2 rows 8
(10, 12, 14, 15) more times, ending with
a WS row246 (270, 288, 308, 320)
sts total: 31 (35, 38, 42, 44) sts each
front; 54 (58, 62, 66, 68) sts each sleeve;
76 (84, 88, 92, 96) back sts; piece mea-
sures 6
1
4 (6
3
4, 7
1
4, 7
3
4, 8)" from shoulder
line along armhole edges.
Sleeve, neck, and body row: (RS) K2,
M1L, *knit to 1 st before sleeve m, LLI,
k1, sl m, RLI, knit to next sleeve m, LLI,
sl m, k1, RLI; rep from * once more, knit
to last 2 sts, M1R, k210 sts incd: 2 sts
each front; 2 sts each sleeve; 2 back sts.
Purl 1 WS row. Rep the last 2 rows 1
(2, 3, 4, 8) time(s), ending with a WS
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M
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r
Row 1: (RS) K1 (selvedge st, knitted ev-
ery row), work Row 1 of moss st to last
st, k1 (selvedge st, knitted every row).
Row 2: (WS) K1, inc 1 st in patt by
working an M1 (R or L as you prefer)
or M1P (see Glossary) as necessary to
maintain patt, work in patt to last st,
inc 1 st in patt by working M1 or M1P,
k12 sts incd.
Rows 38: Rep Row 2 six more
times174 (185, 199, 217, 266) sts; col-
lar measures about 1
1
2" from CO.
BO loosely in patt. Match center of collar
CO edge with center back neck and pin
in place. Align ends of collar with the last
inc row at base of V-neck on each side
and pin in place. Using crochet hook with
WS facing, attach the collar by working
1 row of single crochet (see Glossary)
9) times43 (49, 53, 59, 67) sts. Work 8
(8, 4, 4, 4) rnds evensleeve measures 10
(10, 10
3
4, 10
3
4, 11
3
4)" from dividing row.
Next rnd: [K7, k2tog] 4 (5, 5, 6, 7) times,
k7 (4, 8, 5, 4)39 (44, 48, 53, 60) sts.
Work moss st in the rnd as foll:
Rnds 1 and 2: *K1, p1; rep from * to
last 1 (0, 0, 1, 0) st, k1 (0, 0, 1, 0).
Rnds 3 and 4: *P1, k1; rep from * to
last 1 (0, 0, 1, 0) st, p1 (0, 0, 1, 0).
Rnds 5 and 6: Rep Rnds 1 and 2
sleeve measures 11 (11, 11
3
4, 11
3
4, 12
3
4)"
from dividing row.
BO in patt.
FINISHING
Collar
With larger cir needle, CO 160 (171,
185, 203, 252) sts.
Short-row 6: Work to wrapped st, hide
wrap, work 5 (7, 8, 10, 11) sts, w&t.
Short-rows 712: Rep Short-rows 3 and
4 three times.
Short-rows 13 and 14: Rep Short-rows
5 and 6146 (170, 194, 212, 242) sts
total: 39 (46, 54, 60, 69) sts each front,
including 7-st facing; 68 (78, 86, 92,
104) back sts.
Embossed Ridge
Row 1: (RS) Knit to wrapped st, hide
wrap, knit to end.
Row 2: (WS) BO 7 facing sts, purl to
end, hiding rem wrap.
Row 3: BO 7 facing sts, purl to
end132 (156, 180, 198, 228) sts total:
32 (39, 47, 53, 62) sts each front; 68 (78,
86, 92, 104) back sts.
Rows 4 and 5: Knit 1 WS row, then
purl 1 RS row, removing side and dart
m as you come to them.
Row 6: (WS) *Insert the right needle
into purl bump from Row 2 directly
below the next st on left needle, lift the
bump onto the left needle, then work
the lifted loop tog with the st after it as
p2tog; rep from * to end of rowem-
bossed ridge measures about
1
2" high.
Ruffe
Change to larger cir needle.
Inc row: (RS) *K4, k1f&b, repeat from
* to last 2 (1, 5, 3, 3) st(s), k2 (1, 5, 3,
3)158 (187, 215, 237, 273) sts. Beg
with WS Row 2, work 5 rows of moss
st (see Stitch Guide)ruf e measures
about 1" high; lower body measures 4
1
2
(4
3
4, 4
3
4, 5
1
4, 5
1
2)" from dividing row at
front edges, and about 2" longer at center
back. BO loosely in patt.
SLEEVES
Place 58 (64, 70, 76, 86) held sleeve sts on
dpn and join yarn with RS facing. Knit
across sleeve sts, then pick up and knit
1 st from armhole CO, pm in center of
underarm, then pick up and knit 2 more
sts from armhole CO61 (67, 73, 79,
89) sts. Join for working in the rnd. Knit
1 rnd, ending at m in center of underarm.
Dec rnd: K1, k2tog, knit to last 2 sts,
ssk2 sts decd. Rep the last 2 rnds once
more57 (63, 69, 75, 85) sts. [Work 8
rnds even, then rep the dec rnd] 7 (7, 8, 8,
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280 yd [256 m]/4 oz): delft (A), 3 (4, 4,
5, 5) skeins.
Te Sanguine Gryphon Little Traveller
(100% superwash Merino wool; 560 yd
[512 m]/4 oz): delft (B), 1 skein.
NEEDLES Body and sleevessize
6 (4 mm): 24" circular (cir) and set of
double-pointed (dpn). Shirred panel
size 8 (5 mm): 24" cir and set of dpn.
Adjust needle size if necessary to obtain
the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch holders;
tapestry needle.
GAUGE 21 sts and 30 rnds = 4" in St
st with A on smaller needle.
NOTES
Te sweater is worked from the top
down, in the round.
Short-rows are used to create sleeve
caps and are worked fat.
Stitch Guide
Shirred Panel:
With A and smaller needle, work as foll:
Rnd 1: Purl.
Rnd 2: Knit.
Rnd 3: Purl.
Change to B and larger needle.
Rnd 4: *K1f&b; rep from * around.
Rnds 57: Knit.
Change to A and smaller needle.
Rnd 8: *K2tog; rep from * around.
(Raglan inc in this row only is made 2
sts before and 2 sts after each m.)
Rnd 9: Purl.
Rnd 10: Knit.
Rnd 11: Purl.
Change to B and larger needle.
Rnds 1219: Rep Rnds 411 once more.
Slip-Stitch Pattern: (multiple of 6 sts)
Rnd 1: Knit.
Rnd 2: *K5, sl 1 pwise with yarn in
back (wyb); rep from * around.
Rep Rnds 1 and 2 for patt.
SWEATER
Yoke: With A and smaller cir needle,
CO 18 (19, 20, 20, 21) sts, pm for beg
of sleeve, CO 50 (52, 54, 58, 60) sts, pm
for beg of front, CO 36 (38, 40, 40, 42)
sts, pm for beg of sleeve, CO 50 (52, 54,
58, 60) sts, pm for beg of back, CO 18
(19, 20, 20, 21) sts172 (180, 188, 196,
LAMBTON TOP
Theressa Silver
I
nspired by Mr. Darcys estate,
Pemberley, near the fctional town
of Lambton, this top references the
lovely empire-waisted gowns of the
Regency period. It has a square
neckline and a lightly ftted bodice.
Shirred panels knitted of laceweight
yarn at the neckline, cuffs, and waist
create a soft, delicate look. The
sleeves are slightly puffed with a small
ruffe at the cuff. The body section
has a slip-stitch pattern to add texture
and to create fattering vertical lines.
The top is a seamless top-down raglan
making it quick and easy to knit with
no seams to fnish. Short-rows are
added to the tops of the sleeves for a
better ft and added fullness.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 34 (38,
42, 46, 50)" bust circumference.
Sweater shown measures 34".
YARN Te Sanguine Gryphon Trav-
eller (100% superwash Merino wool;
through both layers on the WS of the
garment, easing collar to ft as necessary.
Fold front facings to WS along single-st
rev St st columns and sew invisibly in
place with yarn threaded on a tapestry
needle. Work buttonhole stitch (see
Glossary) to join both layers around
buttonhole opening. Weave in loose
ends. Overlap right front over left
front and determine where best ft is
achieved; garment should ft snugly
beneath the bust. Sew button in place
to RS of left front, underneath but-
tonhole. Steam-block if desired.
Jennifer Wood lives with her family in
the beautiful foothills of East Tennes-
see where she knits at every available
opportunity. She is the creator and
owner of Wood House Knits. Jennifer
has been an avid reader since child-
hood and really enjoys the classics. Af-
ter reading Sense and Sensibility, she
quickly read all of Jane Austens other
novels and is very excited about being
a part of this project. Her website is
www.woodhouseknits.com.
6 (7, 7
1
4, 7
1
4, 7
1
2)"
15 (18, 18.5, 18.5, 19) cm
16 (18, 19, 20
1
4, 22
1
2)"
40.5 (45.5, 48.5, 51.5, 57) cm
Back
&
Fronts
1
1
2" (3.8 cm)
13 (14
3
4, 16
1
2, 17
1
2, 19
3
4)"
33 (37.5, 42, 44.5, 50) cm
4
1
4 (4
1
2, 4
3
4, 5, 5
1
4)"
11 (11.5, 12, 12.5, 13.5) cm
11 (11, 11
3
4, 11
3
4, 12
3
4)"
28 (28, 30, 30, 32.5) cm
11
1
2 (12
3
4, 14, 15, 17)"
29 (32.5, 35.5, 38, 43) cm
S
l
e
e
v
e
6
3
4 (7
1
2, 8
1
4, 9, 10
1
2)"
17 (19, 21, 23, 26.5) cm
3 (3
1
4, 3
1
4, 3
3
4, 4)"
7.5 (8.5, 8.5, 9.5, 10) cm
3
1
2" (9 cm)
7
1
2 (8
1
4, 9
1
4,
10, 11
1
2)"
19 (21, 23.5,
25.5, 29) cm
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dec 28 (28, 22, 18, 14) sts evenly spaced
and remove dart m142 (162, 184, 204,
226) sts rem. Work Rnds 119 of shirred
panel. Change to slip stitch patt (see
Stitch Guide) and set up as foll: Work
in patt to 1 (0, 2, 1, 1) st(s) before m, k1
(0, 2, 1, 1), sl m, k0 (0, 2, 1, 0), [sl 1 pwise
wyb] 1 (0, 1, 1, 1) time, work in patt to 1
(0, 2, 1, 0) st(s) before m, k1 (0, 2, 1, 0),
sl m, k0 (0, 2, 1, 1), [sl 1 pwise wyb] 1 (0,
1, 1, 1) time(s), work in patt to end. Inc
rnd 1: *Work to m, M1, sl m; rep from
* once more, work to end of rnd2 sts
incd. Work 2 rnds even, working new
sts into patt. Inc rnd 2: *Work to m, sl
m, M1; rep from * once more, work to
end of rnd2 sts incd. Work 2 rnds
even, working new sts into patt. Rep last
6 rnds 10 (10, 10, 11, 11) more times,
then work [inc rnd 1, then 2 rnds even] 0
(0, 1, 0, 1) more time(s)186 (206, 230,
252, 276) sts. Work in garter st (purl 1
rnd, knit 1 rnd) for 1". BO all sts.
SLEEVES
Place 104 (109, 116, 124, 129) held
sleeve sts onto smaller cir needle. With
RS facing, shape sleeve cap using short-
rows as foll:
Row 1: (RS) Sl 48 (51, 54, 57, 60) sts
pwise, rejoin A, k8 (7, 8, 10, 9), wrap
next st, turn.
Row 2: (WS) P11 (10, 11, 13, 12), wrap
next st, turn.
Row 3: Knit to wrapped st, work wrap tog
with wrapped st, k2, wrap next st, turn.
Row 4: Purl to wrapped st, work wrap tog
(removing m); rep from * once more,
knit to end164 (184, 204, 220, 238) sts
for body. Next rnd: *Knit to sleeve, CO 4
(5, 5, 6, 7) sts for underarm, pm, CO 4 (5,
5, 6, 7) sts for underarm; rep from * once
more, knit to end of rnd180 (204, 224,
244, 266) sts. Body: Next rnd: Knit to m,
k33 (37, 41, 45, 49), pm for dart, k32 (38,
42, 46, 50), pm for dart, knit to end of
rnd. Work even in St st for 11 (9, 7, 5, 3)
rnds. Dec rnd: Knit to 2 sts before dart
m, k2tog, knit to next dart m, ssk, knit to
end2 sts decd. Rep dec rnd every other
rnd 4 (6, 8, 10, 12) more times170 (190,
206, 222, 240) sts rem. Next rnd: Knit,
204) sts total. Place marker and join in
the rnd; rnd beg at center back. Work
Rnds 119 of shirred panel (see Stitch
Guide) and at the same time, work
raglan inc rnd on all even-numbered
rnds as foll: *Work to 1 st before m,
M1, work 1 st, sl m, work 1 st, M1; rep
from * 3 more times, work to end of
rnd8 sts incd; 228 (236, 244, 252,
260) sts when panel is complete: 50
(52, 54, 54, 56) sts each for front and
back, 64 (66, 68, 72, 74) sts for each
sleeve. Next rnd: Rep raglan inc rnd and
at the same time, inc 8 (10, 11, 13, 15)
sts evenly spaced in frst back section,
32 (33, 34, 36, 37) sts evenly spaced in
sleeve section, 32 (40, 46, 54, 60) sts
evenly spaced in front section, 32 (33,
34, 36, 37) sts evenly spaced in sleeve
section, and 8 (10, 11, 13, 15) sts evenly
spaced in second back section348
(370, 388, 412, 432) sts total: 84 (94,
102, 110, 118) sts for front, 68 (74, 78,
82, 88) sts total for back, 98 (101, 104,
110, 113) sts for each sleeve. Knit 1 rnd.
Rep raglan inc rnd. Rep last 2 rnds 2
(3, 5, 6, 7) more times372 (402, 436,
468, 496) sts: 90 (102, 114, 124, 134)
sts for front, 74 (82, 90, 96, 104) sts to-
tal for back, 104 (109, 116, 124, 129) sts
for each sleeve. Divide body and sleeves:
*Knit to 2nd m and place last 104 (109,
116, 124, 129) sts on holder for sleeve
Body
35 (39, 43, 48, 52)"
90 (99.5, 111, 122, 133.5) cm
6 (7, 7, 7, 8)"
17 (18.5, 19, 19, 20.5) cm
12 (13, 14, 15, 16)"
32.5 (34.5, 37, 38.5, 41.5) cm
10 (11, 11, 12, 12)"
26.5 (28, 29, 30.5, 31.5) cm
34 (38, 42, 46, 50)"
87 (98.5, 108.5, 118, 129) cm
27 (30, 35, 38, 43)"
68.5 (78, 89, 98.5, 109) cm
4 (5, 5, 5, 5)"
12 (12.5, 13.5, 14, 14.5) cm
3 (3, 3, 4, 4)"
7.5 (8.5, 9.5, 10, 11) cm
15 (15, 16, 17, 17)"
38.5 (40, 41.5, 43, 45) cm
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3/3 RC: Sl 3 sts onto cn and hold in
back, k3, k3 from cn.
LINING
With A and cir needle, CO 96 sts.
Place marker and join in the rnd, being
careful not to twist sts. Knit 6 rnds.
Divide for spout and handle: Place last
48 sts of rnd on holder. Work back and
forth in rows as foll:
Row 1: K48, turn work.
Row 2: P48, turn work.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 twenty more
times42 rows total. Place sts on
holder. Transfer 48 held sts to needle.
With RS facing, join A. Work Rows
1 and 2 twenty-one times42 rows
total.
Join for top: Transfer 48 held sts to
needle. With RS facing, join A at beg
of rnd.
Shape top:
Rnd 1: *K6, k2tog; rep from *
around84 sts rem.
Rnds 2, 4, and 6: Knit.
Rnd 3: *K5, k2tog; rep from *
around72 sts rem.
Rnd 5: *K4, k2tog; rep from *
around60 sts rem.
Rnd 7: *K3, k2tog; rep from *
around48 sts rem.
a cozy cottage that had been converted
to a yarn shop. Sensible Elinor of
Austens Sense and Sensibility inspired
us to design and knit this simple,
utilitarian tea cozy.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 20" circumference
and 10
3
4" tall.
YARN Cascade Yarns 220 Super-
wash (100% superwash wool; 220 yd
[201 m]/100 g): #817 cream (A) and
#890 teal (B), 1 skein each. Cascade
Yarns 220 Superwash Paints (100%
superwash wool; 220 yd [201 m]/100 g):
#9859 orange/pink variegated (C), 1
skein.
NEEDLES Tea Cozysize 7
(4.5 mm): 16" circular (cir) and set of
double-pointed (dpn). Flowersize 5
(3.75 mm): set of dpn. Adjust needle
sizes if necessary to obtain the correct
gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); cable needle
(cn); stitch holders; tapestry needle; 40"
of
3
8" wide ribbon.
GAUGE 20 sts and 28 rnds = 4" in St
st on larger needle.
Stitch Guide
3/3 LC: Sl 3 sts onto cn and hold in
front, k3, k3 from cn.
with wrapped st, p2, wrap next st, turn.
Rep 3rd and 4th rows 13 (14, 15, 16, 17)
more times2 sts before wrap at beg of
row and 5 sts after wrap at end of row.
With RS facing, knit to wrapped st,
work wrap tog with wrapped st, knit to
end of row, then pick up and knit 4 (5, 5,
6, 7) sts along CO sts at underarm, pm
for beg of rnd, pick up and knit 4 (5, 5, 6,
7) sts along underarm, knit to wrapped
st, work wrap tog with wrapped st,
knit to end of rnd112 (119, 126, 136,
143) sts total. Dec rnd: K1, ssk, knit to
last 3 sts, k2tog, k12 sts decd. Rep
dec rnd every other rnd 10 (11, 12, 13,
14) more times, changing to dpn when
necessary90 (95, 100, 108, 113) sts
rem. Knit 1 rnd, dec 35 (37, 40, 45, 47)
sts evenly spaced55 (58, 60, 63, 66) sts
rem. Work Rnds 119 of shirred panel.
Ruffe:
Rnd 1: Knit.
Rnd 2: *Yo, k1; rep from * to end of
rnd110 (116, 120, 126, 132) sts.
BO all sts.
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends. Block to
measurements.
Theressa Silver has been designing
clothes for herself and others for most
of her life. She lives in Oregon with her
husband, son, fve cats, and a dog, who
all participate one way or another in the
knitting process.
ELINOR S TEA COZY
Anne Berk, Valerie Allen,
Jill Betts, Elaine Blatt
W
e are a group of Jane-obsessed
ladies of different backgrounds,
ages, and knitting abilities who met in
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Row 8: P1, p1f&b, purl to end6 sts.
Row 10: P1, p1f&b, purl to end7 sts.
Row 12: P1, p1f&b, purl to end8 sts.
Rows 1317: Work even in St st.
Row 18: P1, p2tog, p57 sts rem.
Row 20: P1, p2tog, purl to end6 sts rem.
Row 22: P1, p2tog, purl to end5 sts rem.
Row 24: P1, p2tog, purl to end4 sts rem.
Row 26: P1, p2tog, p13 sts rem.
Row 28: P1, p2tog2 sts rem.
Row 29: K2.
Rep Rows 229 three more times4
petals total. BO all sts, leaving a long
tail for seaming.
FINISHING
Tread tail onto tapestry needle and
draw through frst row of sts along
fower edge opposite curved petals,
gathering and overlapping to create
fower. Fasten yarn, but do not cut.
With CO tail, work along same row in
opposite direction, tightening center
of fower. Stamen: With C and smaller
dpn, CO 6 sts. Work I-cord (see Glos-
sary) until piece measures 1
1
2" from
CO. Cut yarn, leaving a 6" tail. Thread
tail onto tapestry needle and draw
through all sts, then draw tail through
center of I-cord and fasten to CO edge,
folding stamen in half. Sew to center of
flower. Weave in loose ends.
Block pieces to measurements. Tread
ribbon through eyelets and tie in a bow.
Sew fower to ruf e above bow. Sew
sides if needed to accommodate spout
and handle of teapot. Weave in loose
ends. Tack lining to cozy at base and
sides.
Designer Anne Berk (www.annetarsia
.com) is an optometrist in private practice
in Portland, Oregon. She was awarded
Master Knitter status in April 2005 by
The Knitting Guild of America (TKGA)
and teaches locally and nationally. Elaine
Blatt, Valerie Allen, and Jill Betts are
passionate knitters and contributed to the
design and knitting of the project.
Row 4: P50, turn work.
Change to A and rep Rows 14.
Change to B. Rep last 8 rows 3 more
times, then work Rows 14 once
more5 stripes with B. Place sts on
holder. Transfer 50 held sts to needle.
With RS facing, join B. Work Rows
14. Change to A and rep Rows 14.
Change to B. Rep last 8 rows 3 more
times, then work Rows 14 once
more5 stripes with B. Join for top:
Transfer 50 held sts to needle. With
RS facing, join A at beg of rnd. Knit 4
rnds. Change to B.
Eyelet section:
Rnd 1: Knit.
Rnd 2: Knit.
Eyelet rnd: k1, *yo, k2tog, k3; rep from
* to last 4 sts, yo, k2tog, k2.
Rnd 4: Knit.
Rnd 5: Knit.
Ruffe: *Change to A. Knit 4 rnds.
Change to B. Knit 4 rnds. Rep from
* once more. Picot Bind-off: With B,
*(k1, p1, k1, p1) all in next st, pass first
3 sts over 4th, then BO next 3 sts, sl st
on right needle to left needle; rep from
* to end.
FLOWER
With C and smaller dpn, CO 2 sts. Do
not join.
Row 1 and all odd rows: Knit.
Row 2: P1, p1f&b3 sts.
Row 4: P1, p1f&b, purl to end4 sts.
Row 6: P1, p1f&b, purl to end5 sts.
Rnd 8: *K2, k2tog; rep from *
around36 sts rem.
Rnd 9: *K1, k2tog; rep from *
around24 sts rem.
Rnd 10: *K2tog; rep from * around12
sts rem.
BO all sts.
TEA COZY
Edging: With B and larger dpn, CO 13
sts. Do not join.
Cable patt:
Row 1 and all odd rows: K2, p9, k2.
Row 2: P2, 3/3 LC (see Stitch Guide),
k3, p2.
Row 4: P2, k9, p2.
Row 6: P2, k3, 3/3 RC (see Stitch
Guide), p2.
Row 8: P2, k9, p2.
Rep Rows 18 until piece measures 20"
from CO, or fts comfortably around
base of teapot, ending with Row 7. BO
all sts. Sew BO edge to CO edge to
create a loop. Body: With A and larger
cir needle, working between 2 purl sts
at edge of cable, pick up and knit 100
sts evenly spaced along edge of cabled
edging. Place marker and join in the
rnd, being careful not to twist sts. Next
rnd: K50, pm, knit to end of rnd. Knit 3
more rnds. Divide for spout and handle:
Place last 50 sts of rnd on holder. Work
back and forth in rows as foll:
Row 1: With B, k50, turn work.
Row 2: (WS) P50, turn work.
Row 3: K50, turn work.
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BARTON COTTAGE
SHRUG
Kristi Schueler
T
his versatile shrug can be worn
with a variety of outfts whether
you live in Jane Austens world or are
out and about in this day and age. The
lace edging aspires to a certain
romantic sensibility, not unlike
Marianne Dashwood in Sense and
Sensibility. Replacing the button and
neckbands of a classic V-neck raglan
with a continuous casing through which
a ribbon is threaded and cinched
creates gathers and a complementary
silhouette without complicating the
construction. A variety of looks can be
achieved depending upon the ribbon
chosen and the amount it is cinched.
Knitted with a laceweight yarn, this
shrug makes a great layering piece that
can be worn spring through fall.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 27
1
2 (31, 34
3
4,
38
1
2, 42
1
4)" bust circumference. Shrug
shown measures 31".
YARN Lornas Laces Helens Lace (50%
wool, 50% silk; 1,250 yd [1143 m]/113 g):
growth (green), 1 (1, 2, 2, 2) skein(s).
NEEDLES Size 4 (3.5 mm): 16" and
24" circular (cir) and set of double-
pointed (dpn). Adjust needle size if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); locking
markers; stitch holders or waste yarn;
tapestry needle; 1
3
4 yd 1
1
4" wide ribbon.
7
5
3
1
Lace Edging
4
1
4 (4
3
4, 5, 6, 6
3
4)"
11 (12, 12.5, 15, 17) cm
27
1
2 (31, 34
3
4, 38
1
2, 42
1
4)"
70 (78.5, 88.5, 98, 107.5) cm
Body
1"
2.5 cm
8
1
2 (9
1
4, 9
3
4, 10, 10
1
2)"
21.5 (23.5, 25, 25.5, 26.5) cm
13 (12
3
4, 13
1
2, 14
1
4, 14
3
4)"
33 (32.5, 34.5, 36, 37.5) cm
11
1
2 (12
3
4, 14, 15
1
4, 16
1
4)"
29 (32.5, 35.5, 38.5, 41.5) cm
9 (10, 11
1
4, 12
1
2, 13
3
4)"
23 (25.5, 28.5, 31.5, 35) cm
7 (7
1
4, 7
1
4, 7, 7
1
4)"
18 (18.5, 18.5, 18, 18.5) cm
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row. Purl 1 RS row for turning ridge.
Cont in St st until piece measures 1"
from turning ridge. Loosely BO all sts.
Wash according to yarn manufacturers
directions and block to measurements.
Sew lace edging seam on sleeves. Fold
ribbon casing to WS at turning ridge
and sew in place. Weave in loose ends.
Tread ribbon through casing and
cinch as desired.
Kristi Schueler is a knitwear designer and
handspinner living along the front range
of the Colorado Rocky Mountains where
she can frequently be found cuddled up
with her knitting in the company of a BBC
production of Jane Austens work. Thank-
fully, her husband enjoys Jane Austen
almost as much and often indulges her
cravings. Kristi is the author of a recently
released eBook pairing twelve patterns
with twelve recipes entitled Nourishing
Knits: 24 Projects to Gift and Entertain.
She blogs about her fber adventures at
http://blog.designedlykristi.com.
FLOWER AND
LACE CUFFS
Carol Huebscher Rhoades
W
henever I read a Jane Austen
novel, I imagine the young
ladies wearing lovely Empire-style
cotton dresses with tiny fower buds
printed on the fabric. While there is
no evidence that knitted wrist
warmers were worn in the early
nineteenth century, this style of cuff
might have ft well with the costumes
worn. After all, those cotton dresses
probably werent warm enough in
drafty English countryside homes.
The cuffs are worked in a strip and
then seamed, so you can knit the piece
K42 (48, 54, 59, 64), place next 66 (75,
84, 90, 93) sts on holder or waste yarn
for sleeve, CO 9 (9, 9, 12, 15) sts for
underarm, k84 (96, 108, 118, 128),
place next 66 (75, 84, 90, 93) sts on
holder or waste yarn for sleeve, CO
9 (9, 9, 12, 15) sts for underarm, k42
(48, 54, 59, 64)186 (210, 234, 260,
286) body sts. Body: Work even until
piece measures 11
1
4 (11, 11
3
4, 12
1
2,
13)" from underarm, ending with a
WS row. Next row: (RS) K1, [M1] 1 (1,
1, 0, 1) time(s), knit to last st, [M1] 1
(1, 1, 0, 1) time(s), k1188 (212, 236,
260, 288) sts. Work 1 WS row. Lace
edging: With RS facing and using the
knitted method (see Glossary), CO
13 sts. Set-up row: (RS) K1, k2tog,
k2, k2tog tbl, k5, k2tog tbl (last st
from edging and 1 st from body), turn.
Work Rows 28 of Lace Edging chart,
then rep Rows 18 until all body sts
have been joined to edging, joining
edging to body at end of every RS row
by working ssk using last st from edg-
ing and 1 st from body. BO all sts.
SLEEVES
With RS facing and beg at center of
underarm, pick up and knit 6 (6, 6, 7, 9)
sts along underarm, k66 (75, 84, 90, 93)
held sleeve sts, pick up and knit 5 (5, 5,
6, 8) sts to center of underarm, pm, and
join in the rnd77 (86, 95, 103, 110)
sts total. Dec rnd: K1, ssk, knit to last 3
sts, k2tog, k12 sts decd. Rep dec rnd
every rnd 3 more times69 (78, 87, 95,
102) sts rem. Rep dec rnd every 10 (9,
9, 9, 9) rnds 3 (2, 2, 1, 3) time(s)63
(74, 83, 93, 96) sts rem. Rep dec rnd
every 9 (8, 8, 8, 8) rnds 1 (3, 3, 4, 2)
time(s)61 (68, 77, 85, 92) sts rem.
Next rnd: K1, [ssk] 1 (0, 1, 1, 0) time(s),
knit to end of rnd60 (68, 76, 84, 92)
sts rem. Lace edging: CO and work as
for body. BO all sts.
FINISHING
Ribbon casing: Beg at right front lower
edge above lace edging, pick up and knit
3 sts for every 4 rows to CO sts at neck,
1 st for each CO st around neckline,
then 3 sts for every 4 rows along left
front to top of lace edging. Do not join.
Work in St st for 1", ending with a WS
GAUGE 27 sts and 35 rows = 4" in
St st.
SHRUG
Yoke: With 16" cir needle, CO 60 (66,
66, 76, 80) sts. Do not join. Set-up row:
(WS) P2, p1 and mark this st, p12
(13, 12, 14, 13) for right sleeve, p1 and
mark this st, p28 (32, 34, 40, 46) for
back, p1 and mark this st, p12 (13, 12,
14, 13) for left sleeve, p1 and mark this
st, p2. Shape front neck and raglan:
Note: Raglan shaping beg at same time
as front neck shaping; read the foll sec-
tion all the way through before proceed-
ing. Neck inc row: (RS) K1, k1f&b,
work to last 2 sts, k1f&b, k12 sts
incd. Rep neck inc row every RS row
11 (13, 14, 17, 20) more times. At the
same time, shape raglan as foll: *Work
to marked st, (k1, p1, k1) in marked
st; rep from * 3 more times, work to
end8 sts incd. Rep raglan inc row
every RS row 7 (10, 14, 15, 16) more
times, every 4th row 10 (9, 6, 5, 5)
times, then every RS row 9 (11, 15,
17, 18) times300 (342, 384, 416,
442) sts: 41 (47, 53, 58, 63) sts for each
front, 82 (94, 106, 116, 126) sts for
back, 66 (75, 84, 90, 93) sts for each
sleeve, 4 marked sts. Divide for body:
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knit on RS, purl on WS
purl on RS, knit on WS
sl 1 st pwise wyb
sl 1 st kwise wyb
k2tog
yo
BO
pb pink
pb ruby
pb green
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Bead Pattern
7
5
3
1
Cyprus Lace Edging
Adapted by Carol Rhoades from Weldons
Practical Knitter Fourteenth Series. Edgings in
Weldons Practical Needlework, Volume 5. Love-
land, Colorado: Interweave, 2001.
THREAD BEADS
Insert sewing thread through eye of
beading needle and tie a small knot to
join ends. Insert end of knitting yarn
row eliminates an extra st added
to the CO for the bead section.
Tis extra stitch at the beginning is
needed so that you can easily pick up
the correct number of loops for the
join at the end.
Te bead pattern is a 20-row repeat
and the lace is 8 rows; the two pat-
terns will end at the same time on
every 40th row.
Stitch Guide
Place Bead (pb):
Insert right needle into next st (the one
indicating the bead), slide bead up to
needle and complete knit st.
long enough to ft comfortably around
your wrist. The garter-stitch structure is
fairly elastic. To adjust for larger or
smaller sizes, work with a tighter or
looser gauge by changing needle size.
Feel free to stop mid-pattern when the
cuff is the right size. If you have to split a
pattern, do so with the bead motif rather
than the lace motif.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 6" circumference;
5" long.
YARN Isager Alpaca 2 (50% alpaca,
50% wool, 273 yd [250 m]/50 g): #100
natural white, 1 skein.
NEEDLES Size 00 (1.75 mm). Adjust
needle size if necessary to obtain the
correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); beading
needle size 10; 12" strand of cotton
sewing thread; tapestry needle; beading
mat is useful. Size 11 Japanese matte
AB glass seed beads, one 28 g tube each
bright pink (#2045), ruby (11-F254),
and light green (11-F258A) (bright pink
available from www.meant-to-bead
.com; ruby and light green from www
.beyondbeadery.com).
GAUGE 36 sts and 80 rows = 4" in
garter st.
NOTES
Beads are placed on WS rows.
Every row begins with sl 1 kwise wyb
and ends with p1 for the edge sts.
Te k2tog at the end of the frst bead
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GAUGE 24 sts and 40 rows/rnds =
4" in Diagonal Scallop patt on larger
needle; 2 pattern reps (1822 sts; see
Notes) = 3" wide and 36 rows/rnds =
4" high in patt from Floral chart on
larger needle.
NOTES
Te smaller size circular needle is
used only for the frst few rows of
the sleeves and for the fnal rows and
facing of the neckline trim.
Te bodice shaping is distributed
over more rounds than usual for
a more gradual A-line shape. For
example, only one stitch is decreased
at the side markers in each decrease
round, and then one stitch is de-
creased on the opposite side of each
marker in the next decrease round.
Tis alternating method creates a
more gradual taper than decreasing
on both sides of the side markers in a
single round.
Te sleeves are worked back and
forth in rows from the cuf until they
are joined to the bodice at the un-
derarm. Ten the sleeves are worked
simultaneously with the sweater
bodice.
If the frst stitch of the Double or
Quad Wrap stitches becomes loose
when worked on in the following row
Carol Huebscher Rhoades lives in Madi-
son, Wisconsin, where she spins, knits,
edits, translates, and designs. She has
a wardrobe of wrist warmers to choose
from on cold winter days and always feels
elegant when wearing them.
FIORI PULLOVER
Mary Annarella
I
n Sense and Sensibility, Marianne
Dashwood was a romantic, expres-
sive soul who could never love by
halves. She may very well have
enjoyed gracing her own garments
with fowers. The Fiori Pullover is
inspired by Mariannes romantic
nature as well as the empire and
A-line styles of her time. Knit in the
round from the bottom up, the sleeves
and bodice are joined at the under-
arm, and set-in sleeves are created
simultaneously with decreases and
short-rows. The foral trim at the
underbust, neckline, and cuffs involve
wrapping the yarn around a set of
stitches before working them to
imitate smocked needlework.
FI NI SHED SI ZES 31 (35,
39, 43, 49)" bust circumference.
Pullover shown measures 35".
YARN Schaefer Audrey (50% Merino
wool, 50% cultivated silk; 700 yd
[640 m]/4 oz [113.4 g]): subtly solids
safron, 2 (2, 2, 2, 3) skeins.
NEEDLES Body and sleevessize
5 (3.75 mm): 24" circular needle (cir).
Hem and neckline facingsize 4
(3.5 mm): 24" cir. Adjust needle sizes if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Tapestry needle; markers
in 2 colors (A and B); stitch holders;
waste yarn; cable needle (cn).
into loop of sewing thread and pull
through about 8" of yarn. String beads
in sequence beginning at top right-hand
corner of chart. Work left across that
row. Te bead threading sequence al-
ways starts at the right side of a row on
this chart and goes left. It is important
that the beads are threaded in reverse
order: the last bead strung will be the
frst bead knitted. For example, Row
20: string 4 pink beads; Row 18: (1
pink, 1 red) 4 times; Row 16: 12 pink.
Check the sequence as you work as it is
not easy to correct errors. Te beads go
onto the beading needle, over the sew-
ing thread, then onto the doubled yarn
and, fnally, down to the single strand of
yarn. After youve strung 6 reps of the
20-row bead pattern, space beads down
the yarn. I usually slide the frst set (one
20-row section of bead pattern) down
48 arm lengths, the next set down 40
arm lengths, etc. Te last rep of beads
can be left about 2 yd from beg of tail.
CUFF (MAKE 2)
Leaving a 24" tail, CO 12 sts with a
knitted cast-on (see Glossary). Knit
1 WS row. With the working yarn
and the tail, use the long-tail cast-on
(see Glossary) to CO 39 sts over two
needles held together. Carefully remove
extra needle. K39, pm, work Row 1
of Cyprus Lace Edging chart. Dec row:
(WS) Turn and work Row 2 of lace
edging; after m, k4, place bead, (k8,
place bead) 4 times, k2tog, p1. Cont
as established until 6 reps of the Bead
Pattern chart are completed, ending
after WS row 20 of Bead Pattern chart.
Cut yarn, leaving an 1820" tail. With
RS facing, CO row at top, and working
from right to left, insert a dpn from back
to front of top loops across the CO row
as foll: Pick up 12 sts across the lace CO
and 38 sts in the bead section CO. Te
stitches should be sitting on needle as for
normal knitted stitches. Make sure that
you have 50 sts on each needle. With RS
on outside, join the two sets of sts with
Kitchener st (see Glossary).
FINISHING
Block cufs fat to dry, pinning out
points. Weave in all tails neatly on WS.
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1 (0, 1, 0, 0) time, knit to last 2 sts,
k1f&b, k170 (78, 88, 96, 100) sts.
Next row: (WS) Purl.
Diagonal Scallop set-up row: K4 (8, 8, 2,
4), work Row 1 of Diagonal Scallop patt
in rows (see Stitch Guide) over center 62
(62, 72, 92, 92) sts, k4 (8, 8, 2, 4).
Keeping sts at each side in St st, work
Rows 212 of pattpiece measures
about 3" from CO. Cut yarn. Place
the frst and last 4 (5, 6, 8, 10) sts onto a
strand of waste yarn. Place rem 62 (68,
76, 80, 80) center sts on a holder. Make
a second sleeve in the same manner.
LOWER BODY
Using larger cir needle, CO 182
(204, 225, 247, 279) sts using the Old
Norwegian CO method (see Glossary).
Taking care not to twist your work, join
sts in the rnd, pm in color A at beg of
rnd. Work 5 rnds St st.
Next rnd: *K8, k1f&b; rep from * to
last 2 (6, 0, 4, 0) sts, knit to end of
rnd202 (226, 250, 274, 310) sts.
Next rnd: Purl 1 rnd for hem fold line.
Rows 12, 14, 16, 18, and 20: Purl.
Rows 13, 15, 17, and 19: Knit.
Rep Rows 120 for patt.
Diagonal Scallop Pattern in Rounds:
(multiple of 10 sts + 2)
Rnd 1: *Diagsc, k8; rep from * to last 2
sts, diagsc.
Rnds 210: Knit.
Rnd 11: K5, *diagsc, k8; rep from * to
last 7 sts, diagsc, k5.
Rnds 1220: Knit.
Rep Rnds 120 for patt.
SLEEVE
With smaller cir needle, CO 68 (77,
86, 95, 99) sts. Knit 4 rows. Change to
larger cir needle and purl 1 WS row.
Floral chart set-up row: (RS) K2 (2, 2, 2,
4), work Row 1 of Floral chart over next
63 (72, 81, 90, 90) sts (inc as shown on
chart; see Notes), k3 (3, 3, 3, 5).
Keeping sts at each side in St st, work
Rows 214 of Floral chart as estab-
lishedst count is back to CO number.
Next row: (RS) K0 (1, 0, 1, 1), k1f&b
or round, tightened it by inserting
the needle under the wrap itself and
giving the wrapped strands of yarn a
gentle tug.
Te stitch count of the Floral chart
pattern repeat does not remain the
same from row to row. It begins as
a multiple of 9 stitches, gradually
increases to a multiple of 11 stitches
for Rows 410, then decreases back
to a multiple of 9 stitches again by
Row 13.
During shaping, if there are not
enough stitches to work a complete
2-stitch diagonal scallop stitch, work
the remaining stitch in stockinette
instead.
Stitch Guide
3-st Double Wrap-M1: (worked over
3 sts, incd to 4 sts) With RS facing,
sl 3 sts onto cable needle (cn), wrap
yarn twice around 3 sts on cn coun-
terclockwise, return 3 wrapped sts
to left needle, and work them as k2,
k1f&b3 sts incd to 4 sts.
4-st Double Wrap: (worked over 4 sts)
With RS facing, sl 4 sts onto cn, wrap
yarn twice around 4 sts on cn counter-
clockwise, return 4 wrapped sts to left
needle, and work them as k4.
4-st Quad Wrap: (worked over 4 sts)
With RS facing, sl 4 sts onto cn, wrap
the yarn around 4 times around 4 sts on
cn counterclockwise, return 4 wrapped
sts to left needle, and work them as k4.
Diagonal Scallop Stitch: (diagsc, worked
over 2 sts) Insert tip of right needle
from back to front under the running
thread of yarn between the stitch just
worked and the next st, and lift it onto
the right needle. K2, then pass the
lifted strand over the 2nd knit st.
Diagonal Scallop Pattern in Rows:
(multiple of 10 sts + 2)
Row 1: (RS) *Diagsc (see Stitch Guide),
k8; rep from * to last 2 sts, diagsc.
Rows 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10: (WS) Purl.
Row 3, 5, 7, and 9: Knit.
Row 11: K5, *diagsc, k8; rep from * to
last 7 sts, diagsc, k5.
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Next rnd: *K4 (0, 3, 4, 1), [k14 (18,
19, 21, 26), k1f&b] 4 times, k18 (18,
23, 26, 27), p1, sl m; rep from * once
more174 (198, 222, 246, 282) sts.
Diagonal Scallop set-up rnd: *K2 (3, 4,
0, 4), work Rnd 1 of Diagonal Scallop
patt in rnds over 82 (92, 102, 122, 132)
sts, k2 (3, 4, 0, 4), p1, sl m; rep from *
once more. Cont in patt with St st and
seam sts as established, beg with the
next rnd, shape the upper bodice at
each side seam as foll:
First inc rnd: *K1f&b, work in patt to
next m, sl m, rep from * once more2
sts incd; 1 st each for front and back.
Work 1 rnd even in established patt.
Second inc rnd: *Work in patt to 2 sts
before side m, k1f&b, p1, sl m; rep from
* once more2 sts incd; 1 st each for
front and back. Work 1 rnd even in
established patt. Cont in patt, rep the
last 4 rnds 3 more times, working new
sts into Diagonal Scallop patt190
(214, 238, 262, 298) sts. Work even in
patt until piece measures 4 (4, 5,
5, 5)" from the top of the underbust
band, and about 13 (14, 14, 14,
15)" from hem fold line, ending with
Rnd 12 of Diagonal Scallop patt to
match last rnd of sleeves.
BODICE AND SLEEVE CAPS
Joining rnd: (Rnd 13 of patt) Work in
patt to last 20 (21, 23, 24, 26) front sts,
pm in color A to denote new beg of
rnd, k15. Place last 5 (6, 8, 9, 11) front
sts and next 4 (5, 7, 8, 10) back sts on
holder (removing side m)9 (11, 15, 17,
21) right underarm sts on holder. Place
62 (68, 76, 80, 80) held right sleeve sts
on left needle, k1, pm in color B, work
in established patt to the last sleeve st,
pm in color B, k1. Work in patt to last
5 (6, 8, 9, 11) back sts before next side
m, place last 5 (6, 8, 9, 11) back sts and
next 4 (5, 7, 8, 10) front sts on holder
(removing side m). Place 62 (68, 76, 80,
80) held left sleeve sts on left needle, k1,
pm in color B, work in patt to the last
sleeve st, pm in color B, k1. Knit to m
in color A end of rnd296 (328, 360,
388, 416) sts total; 60 (66, 74, 78, 78)
sts each sleeve between color B m; 88
(98, 106, 116, 130) sts each for front and
back. Work Diagonal Scallop patt as
back. Work 3 rnds in established
patt. Second dec rnd: *Work in patt
to 3 sts before side m, ssk, p1, sl m,
rep from * once more2 sts decd; 1
st each from front and back. Work 3
rnds even in established patt. Cont in
patt, rep the last 8 rnds 8 more times
(see Notes)166 (190, 214, 238, 274)
sts. Purl 1 rnd, then knit 1 rndpiece
measures about 7" from hem fold
line. Floral chart set-up rnd: *K0 (2, 3,
0, 0), work Rnd 1 of Floral chart over
next 81 (90, 99, 117, 135) sts (inc as
shown on chart), k2 (3, 5, 2, 2), sl m;
rep from * once more. Working sts
at each side of patt in St st (do not
purl the seam sts), work Rnds 214
of Floral chart as established. Purl 1
rnd, then knit 1 rndunderbust band
measures about 1" high; piece mea-
sures about 9" from hem fold line.
Next rnd: K100 (112, 124, 136, 154)
front sts, p1 for seam st, pm in color
B, k100 (112, 124, 136, 154) back sts,
p1 for seam st to end at m in color A
already in place at beg of rnd.
Work seam sts as purl every rnd, work
5 rnds in St st.
Diagonal Scallop set-up rnd: *K4 (5,
6, 7, 6), work Rnd 1 of Diagonal
Scallop patt in rnds (see Stitch
Guide) over 92 (102, 112, 122, 142)
sts, k4 (5, 6, 7, 6), p1,* sl m B; rep
from * to * for back.
Next rnd: Working sts outside patt in
St st or rev St st as established, work
Rnd 2 of patt. Cont in patt, and at
the same time, beg with Rnd 3, dec
at sides as foll (see Notes): First dec
rnd: *K2tog, work in patt to side m,
sl m, k2tog, work in patt to end2
sts decd; 1 st each from front and
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established for each section; the patt will
not be continuous across the marked
boundaries.
Armhole Shaping
Body dec rnd: *Work to 2 sts before m
B, k2tog, sl m, work to next m B, sl m,
ssk; rep from * once more, work to end
of rnd4 sts decd; 2 sts each from
front and back. Rep the last rnd 2 (4, 4,
7, 5) more times82 (88, 96, 100, 118)
sts each for front and back; no change to
sleeve sts.
[Work 1 rnd even in patt (no decs),
then rep the body dec rnd] 1 (1, 2, 2,
3) time(s)80 (86, 92, 96, 112) sts
each for front and back; no change to
sleeve sts; armhole measures about
(, 1, 1, 1)" from joining rnd. Next
rnd: Work to the 4th m B at end of left
sleeve, sl m, work 10 (10, 12, 14, 20)
front sts, BO next 60 (66, 68, 68, 72)
front sts (removing m A as you come to
it)220 (238, 264, 280, 308) sts total;
10 (10, 12, 14, 20) sts each side of front
neck (including live st on right needle
after last BO); 80 (86, 92, 96, 112) back
sts; 60 (66, 74, 78, 78) sts each sleeve.
Sleeve Cap Shaping
With RS still facing, beg working back
and forth in rows as foll:
Set-up row: (RS) *Work to 1 st before
m, place new m, ssk (removing old
m from middle of dec), work to 1 st
before next m, k2tog (removing old m
from middle of dec), place new m; rep
from * once more, work to end4 sts
decd; still 60 (66, 74, 78, 78) sleeve sts
because moving m 1 st outwards at each
side balances out the decs; 9 (9, 11, 13,
19) sts each side of front; 78 (84, 90,
94, 110) back sts. Next row: (WS) Purl.
Sleeve dec row: (RS) *Work to m, sl m,
ssk, work to 2 sts before next m, k2tog,
sl m; rep from * once more, work to
end4 sts decd; 2 sts from each sleeve.
Rep the last 2 rows 14 (16, 10, 6, 10)
more times156 (166, 216, 248, 260)
sts total; 30 (32, 52, 64, 56) sts rem
between m for each sleeve; 78 (84, 90,
94, 110) back sts; 9 (9, 11, 13, 19) sts
each side of front; armholes measure
3 (4, 3, 2, 3)" from joining rnd.
Cont for your size as foll:
ABOUT THE TECHNIQUE
Te Fiori Pullover simultaneously creates a seamless, set-in sleeve along
with the upper bodice. I began experimenting with this type of sleeve
construction (originally described by Elizabeth Zimmermann in her
book Knitters Workshop) a few years ago in an attempt to avoid steek-
ing and seaming a sleeve in a Fair Isle design. Te basic premise of the
technique is as follows:
1. Decrease the body stitches at the join of the sleeves (where the armhole
seam would be) until the body has reached the desired width of the
shoulders. In the Fiori Pullover, you decrease the body stitches every
round, and then every other round, to more closely mimic typical
armhole shaping.
2. Switch the direction of the decreases to reduce the sleeve stitches every
other row/round to about 42 to 45 percent of the number of sleeve
stitches originally joined to the bodice (i.e., dont count the underarm
stitches on the holders).
3. Decrease the sleeve stitches every row/round until 10 to 14 stitches
(roughly 2" worth of stitches at your gauge) remain for the top of the
sleeve cap.
4. Work the shoulder short rows, and then join the shoulder stitches with a
3-needle bind of.
If desired, an easy way to add more depth to the armhole is to insert extra
pattern rows/rounds without any decreases in between steps 1 and 2.
Sizes 31 (35)" only:
Work 1 WS row even. Next row: (RS)
Work to m, sl m, ssk, work to 2 st
before next m, k2tog, sl m, work 10 (10)
sts, BO the next 60 (66) sts for back
neck, work to next m, sl m, ssk, work
to 2 sts before next m, k2tog, work to
end28 (30) sts each sleeve; 9 (9) sts
each side of back; 9 (9) sts each side of
front; armholes measure 4 (4)".
Sizes (39, 43, 49)" only:
Next row: (WS) *Purl to m, sl m, p2tog,
purl to 2 sts before m, ss-p2tog-b, sl m;
rep from * once more, work to end4
sts decd; 2 sts from each sleeve. Next
row: (RS) Work sleeve dec row4 sts
decd; 2 sts from each sleeve.
Rep these last 2 rows (4, 6, 3) more
times, then work 1 WS row even
(32, 36, 40) sts each sleeve; no change
to back and front sts. Next row: (RS)
*Work to m, sl m, ssk, work to 2 sts
before m, k2tog, sl m, work (11, 13,
19) back sts, BO the next (68, 68, 72)
sts for back neck, work to m, sl m,
ssk, work to 2 sts before m, k2tog, sl
m, work to end(30, 34, 38) sts each
sleeve; (11, 13, 19) sts each side of
back; (11, 13, 19) sts each side of front;
armholes measure (4, 4, 4)".
Left Cap and Shoulder
Note: Te right and left sides are worked
separately; place right cap and shoulder
sts on holder, or allow them to rest on the
cable portion of the needle while working
the left sleeve cap and shoulder sts only
as foll:
Next row: (WS) Purl. Sleeve dec row:
(RS) Work to m, sl m, ssk, work to 2 sts
before m, k2tog, sl m, work to end2
sleeve sts decd. Next row: (WS) Purl to
m, sl m, p2tog, purl to 2 sts before m,
ss-p2tog-b, sl m, work to end2 sleeve
sts decd. Next row: (RS) Rep the sleeve
dec row2 sleeve sts decd.
Rep these last 2 rows 3 more times10
(12, 12, 16, 20) sleeve sts rem; no
change to sts at left front and back.
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Te shoulder short-row shaping
increases the height of the armhole
without adding any appreciable length
to the sleeve cap. Work short-rows to
shape left front shoulder as foll:
Row 1: (WS) Work to m, sl m, p2tog,
w&t (see Glossary).
Row 2: (RS) Sl 1 as if to purl (pwise), sl
m, work to end.
Rep these last 2 rows 2 (3, 3, 5, 7) more
times7 (8, 8, 10, 12) sleeve sts rem.
Next row: (WS) Work to m, sl m, p2tog,
work to 2 sts before next m, ss-p2tog-b, sl
m, work to end5 (6, 6, 8, 10) sleeve sts.
Work short-rows to shape left back
shoulder as foll:
Row 1: (RS) Work to m, sl m, ssk, w&t.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 pwise, sl m, work to
end.
Rep these last 2 rows 2 (3, 3, 5, 7) more
times2 sleeve sts rem for all sizes;
9 (9, 11, 13, 19) sts each side of back;
9 (9, 11, 13, 19) sts each side of front;
armholes measure 5 (6, 6, 6,
7)" from joining rnd. Place rem sts on
separate needles with 11 (11, 13, 15, 21)
sts on each needle. Hold needles tog
with RS touching and WS facing out,
and use the 3-needle bind-of method
(see Glossary) BO to join shoulder sts.
Right Cap and Shoulder
Return right cap and shoulder sts to
needle if they are not already on the
needle, and rejoin yarn with RS facing.
Sleeve dec row: (RS) Work to m, sl m,
ssk, work to 2 sts before m, k2tog, sl m,
work to end2 sleeve sts decd. Next
row: (WS) Purl to m, sl m, p2tog, purl
to 2 sts before m, ss-p2tog-b, sl m, work
to end2 sleeve sts decd. Next row:
(RS) Rep the sleeve dec row2 sleeve
sts decd.
Rep these last 2 rows 3 more
times10 (12, 12, 16, 20) sleeve sts
rem; no change to sts at right front
and back.
Work short-rows to shape right back
shoulder as foll:
Row 1: (WS) Work to m, sl m, p2tog,
w&t.
Row 2: (RS) Sl 1 as if to purl (pwise), sl
m, work to end.
Rep these last 2 rows 2 (3, 3, 5, 7) more
times7 (8, 8, 10, 12) sleeve sts rem.
Next row: (WS) Work to m, sl m,
p2tog, work to 2 sts before next m,
ss-p2tog-b, sl m, work to end5 (6, 6,
8, 10) sleeve sts.
Work short-rows to shape right front
shoulder as foll:
Row 1: (RS) Work to m, sl m, ssk, w&t.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 pwise, sl m, work to end.
Rep these last 2 rows 2 (3, 3, 5, 7) more
times2 sleeve sts rem for all sizes; 9
(9, 11, 13, 19) sts each side of back; 9 (9,
11, 13, 19) sts each side of front; arm-
holes measure 5 (6, 6, 6, 7)"
from joining rnd. Join right shoulder
sts as for left shoulder using 3-needle
bind-of method.
NECKLINE TRIM
Note: Te neckline trim is worked circu-
larly with mitered corners; read ahead to
familiarize yourself with how the mitering
is accomplished.
With larger cir needle and RS facing,
beg at right-back corner of neck open-
ing, pick up and knit 61 (67, 69, 69,
73) sts across back neck, pm in color
B, pick up and knit 55 (59, 59, 59, 59)
sts along the left side of neck, pm in
color B, pick up and knit 61 (67, 69, 69,
73) sts across front neck, pm in color
B, pick up and knit 55 (59, 59, 59, 59)
FINISHING TIP
If the mitered corners of the
neckline appear stretched, using a
small crochet hook and beginning
at the base of the neckline, hook
up a vertical line of knit stitches
with the loose strand of yarn in
between the decreases, then sew
the extra stitch in place before
sewing the facing.
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sts along the right side of neck, pm in
color A for beg of rnd232 (252, 256,
256, 264) sts total. Purl 1 rnd, then
knit 1 rnd. Work Floral chart patt
with mitered decs as foll:
Rnd 1: *K2tog, k3 (6, 7, 7, 4), work Rnd
3 of Floral chart over 50 (50, 50, 50, 60)
sts (inc as shown on chart), k4 (7, 8, 8,
5) ssk, sl m, k2tog, k5 (7, 7, 7, 7), work
Rnd 3 of Floral chart over 40 sts for
all sizes, k6 (8, 8, 8, 8), ssk; rep from *
once more8 sts decd; 1 st each side
of all 4 m. Work sts outside patt in St st
on all foll rnds.
Rnd 2: *Work in patt to 2 sts before m,
ssk, sl m; rep from * 3 more times4
sts decd; 1 st at end of each section.
Rnd 3: *K2tog, work in patt to 2 sts
before m, ssk, sl m; rep from * 3 more
times8 sts decd; 1 st each side of all
4 m.
Rnd 4: *K2tog, work in patt to m, sl m;
rep from * 3 more times4 sts decd; 1
st at beg of each section.
Rnd 5: Rep Rnd 38 sts decd; 1 st
each side of all 4 m.
Rnds 612: Rep Rnds 25 once, then
work Rnds 24 once more, ending with
Rnd 14 of chart160 (180, 184, 184,
192) sts rem; 43 (49, 51, 51, 55) sts each
for back and front sections; 37 (41, 41,
41, 41) sts each side section.
Purl 1 rnd, knit 1 rndneckline trim
measures 1" from pickup rnd. Purl 1
rnd for facing fold line.
Neck Facing
Note: Mitering for the facing corners
is accomplished in a manner similar to
the neckline trim decreases, except that
the decreases are replaced with k1f&b
increases.
Change to smaller cir needle.
Rnd 1: *K1f&b, knit to 1 st before
next m, k1f&b, sl m; rep from * 3 more
times8 sts incd; 1 st each side of all
4 m.
Rnd 2: *K1f&b, work to next m, sl m;
rep from * 3 more times4 sts incd; 1
st at beg of each section.
Rnd 3: *K1f&b, knit to 1 st before next m,
k1f&b, sl m; rep from * 3 more times8
sts incd; 1 st each side of all 4 m.
Rnd 4: *Work to 1 st before next
m, k1f&b, sl m; rep from * 3 more
times4 sts incd; 1 st at end of each
section.
Rep these 4 rnds until the facing
measures 1" from purled fold linest
count may vary; number of sts is not as
important as facing length. BO all sts.
FINISHING
Fold neck facing and lower body hem
to WS along fold lines and sew in
place with yarn threaded on a tapestry
needle. Graft or sew the underarm
sts tog. Weave in all loose ends. Block
garment.
Mary Annarella taught herself to knit
over twenty years ago. Who knew that
she would love the process of design-
ing and creating knit garments as much
as wearing them? A professional singer
and science instructor, she fnds pattern
writing to be wonderfully appealing to
both the creative and technical sides of
her nature.
33 (37, 41, 45, 51)"
85.5 (96, 106, 116, 131.5) cm
27 (31, 35, 39, 45)"
70.5 (80.5, 91, 101, 116) cm
31 (35, 39, 43, 49)"
80.5 (91, 101, 111, 126.5) cm
3"
9 cm
11 (13, 14, 16, 16)"
29 (33, 37, 40.5, 42) cm
5 (6, 6, 6, 7)"
14.5 (16, 16.5, 17, 18.5) cm
13 (14, 14, 14, 15)"
35 (35.5, 37, 37.5, 38) cm
3 (3, 3, 3, 4)"
9 (9.5, 9.5, 9.5, 11) cm
1 (1, 2, 2, 3)"
3.8 (3.8, 5, 5.5, 8.5) cm
1"
4.5 cm
6 (7, 7, 7, 8)"
16.5 (19, 19.5, 19.5, 21.5) cm
2
k on RS rows and all rnds; p on WS rows
p1tbl on RS rows and all rnds; k1tbl on WS rows
k2tog
no stitch
pattern repeat
k1f&b
3-st double wrap-M1 (see Stitch Guide)
4-st double wrap (see Stitch Guide)
4-st quad wrap (see Stitch Guide)
2
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Floral
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 77
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NORTHANGER
ABBEY HOOD
Designed by CATHERINE
SALTER BAYAR.
PAGE: 82. YARN: Elsebeth
Lavold Silky Wool.
Garden
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 79
SCARLET CAPELET
Designed by HEATHER ZOPPETTI. PAGE: 87.
YARN: Plymouth Yarn Worsted Merino Superwash and
Plymouth Yarn Mulberry Merino.
CHAWTON MITTENS
Designed by ANNE BLAYNEY. PAGE: 96.
YARN: Brown Sheep Nature Spun Fingering.
ELINOR TUNIC
Designed by KRISTI SCHUELER. PAGE: 85.
YARN: Rowan Wool Cotton and Rowan Kidsilk Haze.
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FREDERICK & ANNE SCARF
Designed by KIRSTI JOHANSON. PAGE 95.
YARN: Malabrigo Sock Yarn.
LYDIA MILITARY SPENCER
Designed by ANNIE MODESITT. PAGE: 90.
YARN: Brooklyn Tweed Shelter.
MR. KNIGHTLEYS VEST
Designed by JENNY SORENSEN. PAGE: 92.
YARN: Cascade Yarns Heritage Silk.
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 81
THEME SCARF
Designed by STEPHENIE
GAUSTAD. PAGE: 103.
YARN: Merino/silk handspun.
VARIATION SCARF
Designed by STEPHENIE
GAUSTAD. PAGE: 104.
YARN: Mountain Colors
Winter Lace.
LEAFY MUFF
Designed by KAREN HOLMES.
PAGE: 101. YARN: Twinkle Soft
Chunky.
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G
a
r
d
e
n
NORTHANGER
ABBEY HOOD
Catherine Salter Bayar
W
hile I was frst attracted to the
heroines name (Catherine
Morland) in Jane Austens Northanger
Abbey, tales about the lives of real and
literary women intrigue me, especially
women who challenge convention. This
silk and wool lace wrap was inspired by
the intricate social structure of the
novel as well as the decorative appeal
of Regency-era clothing. I created the
cropped front and dipped back shape
by varying the needle sizes and
integrating geometric forms. The hood
is held to the body at the neck by an
eyelet row and drawstring, ornamented
by an intricate Turkish oya, in a nod to
similar tales these needle lace foral
trims have traditionally told about
colorful, convoluted village life in my
adopted Turkish homeland.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 31" along neck
edge, 55" wide at lower edge, and 19"
tall at center back, excluding hood.
YARN Elsebeth Lavold Silky Wool
(45% wool, 35% silk, 20% nylon; 191
yd [175 m]/50 g): #60 granite, 4 skeins.
Yarn distributed by Knitting Fever.
NEEDLES Body and hoodsizes
6, 7, and 8 (4, 4.5, and 5 mm). Draw-
stringsize 6 (4 mm): set of 2 double-
pointed (dpn). Adjust needle sizes if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Tapestry needle; 2 Turk-
ish needle lace foral trims or other
decorative trim as desired. (Oya may be
purchased by contacting Catherine via
her website.)
GAUGE 18 sts and 24 rows = 4"
in charted diamond patt on smallest
needles.
NOTES
Te body of the wrap is worked
in one piece, from the center neck
down. Shaping is achieved through
yarnovers on each right-side row and
by increasing needle size as noted in
the directions.
Te hood, also worked in one piece,
begins at the neck, and is also shaped
by changing needle sizes, increas-
ing from neck through the center,
then decreasing to shape the top.
Knit the frst stitch of each row and
slip the last stitch purlwise with
yarn in front, on both right-side and
wrong-side rows, for smooth sel-
vedges on either edge. (Tese stitches
are shown on the charts.)
BODY
With smallest needles, CO 23 sts.
Row 1: (RS) K1 (selvedge st; see Notes),
*k1, p1; rep from * to last 2 sts, k1, sl 1
(selvedge st; see Notes).
Row 2: K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to last 2
sts, p1, sl 1.
Eyelet row: K1, *k2tog, yo; rep from * to
last 2 sts, k1, sl 1.
Row 4: K1, *p1, k1; rep from * to last 2
sts, p1, sl 1.
Work Rows 138 of Body chart.
Change to middle-size needles. Work
Rows 3986 of chart. Change to largest
needles. Work Rows 87117 of chart.
Next row: (WS) K1, *purl to double yo,
(p1, k1) in double yo; rep from * to last
double yo, (p1, k1) in double yo, purl to
last st, sl 1. BO all sts kwise.
HOOD
With smallest needles and RS facing,
pick up and knit 29 sts along angled
right front edge of body, 23 sts along
body CO edge, and 29 sts along angled
left front edge of body81 sts total.
Next row: (WS) K1, purl to last st,
sl 1. Work Rows 18 of Hood chart.
Change to middle-size needles. Work
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
4 4
4 4
4 4
4 4
Edging
14-st repeat
1 (WS)
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 83
*
*
*
*
1
1
7
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
0
9
1
0
7
1
0
5
1
0
3
1
0
1
9
9
9
7
9
5
9
3
9
1
8
9
8
7
8
5
8
3
8
1
7
9
7
7
7
5
7
3
7
1
6
9
6
7
6
5
6
3
6
1
5
9
5
7
5
5
5
3
5
1
4
9
4
7
4
5
4
3
4
1
3
9
3
7
3
5
3
3
3
1
2
9
2
7
2
5
2
3
2
1
1
9
1
7
1
5
1
3
1
1
9
7
5
3
1
4
5
4
3
4
1
3
9
3
7
3
5
3
3
3
1
2
9
2
7
2
5
2
3
2
1
1
9
1
7
1
5
1
3
1
197531
4
7
4
5
4
3
4
1
3
9
3
7
3
5
3
3
3
1
2
9
2
7
2
5
2
3
2
1
1
9
1
7
1
5
1
3
1
1
9
7
5
3
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
B
o
d
y
*
W
o
r
k

a
s

g
i
v
e
n

i
n

d
i
r
e
c
t
i
o
n
s
JAK_078-104_Garden.indd 83 10/3/11 1:46 PM
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84 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
G
a
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d
e
n
k2tog on WS
sl 2 as if to k2tog, k1, p2sso
k4tog
k4tog tbl
sl 1 wyb on RS; sl 1 wyf on WS
sl 1 wyf on RS; sl 1 wyb on WS
4
4
k on RS; p on WS
p on RS; k on WS
yo
[yo] 2 times
k2tog
sl 1, k1, psso
2
(k1, p1, k1, p1, k1) in same st, turn; p5, turn; k5,
turn; p5, turn; pass 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th sts over 1st st, k1tbl
bind off 1 st pwise on RS; bind off 1 st kwise on WS
st on needle after BO
no stitch
pattern repeat
*
*
*
*
71
69
67
65
63
61
59
57
55
53
51
49
47
45
43
41
39
37
35
33
31
29
27
25
23
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
95
93
91
89
87
85
83
81
79
77
75
73
Hood
*Work as given in directions
Rows 924 of chart. Change to largest
needles. Work Rows 2542 of chart.
Change to middle-size needles. Work
Rows 4354 of chart. Change to
smallest needles. Work Rows 5595
of chart. With WS facing, BO all sts
kwise.
FINISHING
With yarn threaded on a tapestry
needle, sew BO edges at top of hood
to sides of top center hood panel. Front
edge trim: With RS facing and beg
at lower right front edge, pick up and
knit 57 sts to base of hood, 99 sts along
hood (being careful to pick up 50th
st at center of hood), and 57 sts to left
front lower edge213 sts total. Work
Rows 120 of Edging chart. With WS
facing, BO all sts kwise. Weave in loose
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 85
ends. Block to measurements. I-cord
drawstring: With smallest dpn, CO 4
sts. Work I-cord (see Glossary) until
piece measures 42". BO all sts. Tread
drawstring through eyelets at neck and
through edging; knot ends. Sew or pin
decorative trim at center front neck,
just above drawstring.
Catherine Salter Bayar is a Californian
clothing, interiors, and knitwear de-
signer who relocated to Turkey in 1999 to
pursue her love of handmade textiles and
fber arts. Bazaar Bayar is a handcrafts
workshop she founded in Istanbul to
provide work to local artisans and to
teach visiting women about Turkish
handcraftsboth traditional and modern.
Learn more at www.bazaarbayar.com.
ELINOR TUNIC
Kristi Schueler
T
he Empire-waisted dresses of
Jane Austens time inspired this
tunic named after Elinor Dashwood of
Sense and Sensibility. In the BBC flm
adaptation, a dress layered over a
lightweight shawl was a common
sight, especially amongst the Misses
Dashwoods whom I assume did so as
a means to adjust to the lower
economic standing after Mr. Dash-
woods death. To conserve yarn and
time, this pattern creates that same
layered look by stitching a faux shawl
inset knitted from a complementary
yarn into the neckline. Pair this tunic
with leggings and ballet fats or skinny
jeans and boots for an Austen-inspired
contemporary look.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 35 (40, 44, 48,
52)" bust circumference and 46
(49, 55, 60, 64)" hip circumference.
Tunic shown measures 35".
YARN Body and sleevesRowan
Wool Cotton (50% Merino, 50% cot-
ton, 123 yd [112 m]/50 g): #941 clear,
9 (11, 12, 13, 14) skeins. InsetRowan
Kidsilk Haze (70% mohair, 30% silk,
229 yd [209 m]/25 g): #636 mist. 1
skein all sizes.
NEEDLES Body and sleevessize 6
(4.0 mm): 16" and 24" circular (cir) and
double-pointed (dpn). Insetsize 8
(5.0 mm): straight. Adjust needle sizes
if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Waste yarn; markers
(m)1 unique, 2 each of 2 colors and 2
locking; stitch holders; tapestry needle.
GAUGE 20 sts and 28 rnds = 4" in
St st worked in the round on smaller
needles with body yarn. 20 sts and 20
rows = 4" in St st worked fat on larger
needles with inset yarn.
NOTES
Wrapped short-row techniques are
used to shape both the shoulder and
the sleeve caps.
Knitting from the top down allows
the garment to be tried on as it is
knitted which enables precise place-
ment of the Empire waistdefning
turning round. Use body landmarks
given in the pattern for the best ft.
Unless noted otherwise, use the
backward-loop method (see Glos-
sary) for all CO.
Stitch Guide
Seed Stitch: (odd number of sts)
Row/rnd 1: (RS) P1, *k1, p1; rep from *.
Row/rnd 2: On following rows, knit the
purls and purl the knits.
Rep Rows/Rnds 1 and 2 for pattern.
UPPER FRONT
With waste yarn and smaller 16" cir,
use the provisional method (see Glos-
sary) to CO 20 (22, 21, 23, 24) sts; rep
with a second length of waste yarn.
Using 2 skeins of body yarn, work each
front shoulder separately at the same
time. Establish patt: (RS) Attach 1
skein and work 15 (17, 16, 16, 17) sts
in St st, pm, work seed st (see Stitch
Guide) over 5 (5, 5, 7, 7) sts to end
of frst strap and drop working yarn,
attach 2nd skein and work seed st over
5 (5, 5, 7, 7) sts, pm, work 15 (17, 16, 16,
17) sts in St st to end of second strap.
Work even in established patt until
piece measures 5 (5, 6, 6, 6)"
from cast-on, ending after a WS row.
Cast-on for front neck: (RS) Work in
established patt over frst strap, CO 33
(35, 37, 41, 41) sts, cont working second
strap with same yarn as frst to join73
(79, 79, 87, 89) sts. Cut yarn on second
strap, leaving an 8" tail. Note: Armhole
shaping may begin before the seed st edging
is completed. Work even, maintain seed
st between markers until piece mea-
sures 1 (1, 1, 1, 1)" from front neck
CO, then remove markers and work all
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G
a
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strap with same yarn as frst to join,
cut yarn of second strap leaving an 8"
tail, CO 5 (7, 11, 9, 11) sts at underarm,
place held front sts on other end of cir
needle and work across, CO 2 (3, 5, 4,
5) sts, pm for beg of rnd, CO 2 (4, 6,
5, 6) sts at underarm176 (200, 220,
244, 264) sts. Work even, maintaining
seed st patt between markers at back
neck until piece measures 1 (1, 1, 1,
1)" from back neck CO, then work
all sts in St st until piece measures 3
(4, 4, 4, 5)" from joining rnd or
lands at front bra-band level when tried
(see Glossary). Rep the last row with
WS facing1 st wrapped per strap.
Next row: (RS) Work to end of frst
strap, work to last 13 (14, 14, 15, 16)
sts of second strap, w&t. Rep the last
row with WS facing2 sts wrapped
per strap. Work to end of next 2 rows,
hiding each wrap (see Glossary). Work
even in established patt until piece
measures 7 (7, 7, 7, 7)" from mark-
ers at shoulders, ending after a WS
row. Shape armholes: (RS) K1, M1R,
work to last st of second strap, M1L,
k11 st incd each strap. Work 1 WS
row even. Rep last 2 rows 1 (2, 3, 4, 5)
more time(s)22 (25, 25, 28, 30) sts
on each strap. At the beg of the next 2
rows, CO 3 (4, 6, 8, 10) sts25 (29, 31,
36, 40) sts on each strap.
LOWER BODY
Join for working in the rnd: (RS) With
smaller 24" cir and body yarn, work
frst strap in patt, CO 33 (35, 37, 41, 41)
sts for back neck, cont working second
sts in St st until piece measures 7 (7, 7,
7, 7)" from shoulder cast-on, ending
after a WS row. Shape armholes: (RS)
K1, M1R (see Glossary), work to last
st, M1L (see Glossary), k12 sts incd.
Work 1 WS row even. Rep last 2 rows
1 (2, 3, 4, 5) more time(s)77 (85, 87,
97, 101) sts. At the beg of the next 2
rows, CO 3 (4, 6, 8, 10) sts83 (93, 99,
113, 121) sts. Place sts on holder, cut
yarn leaving an 8" tail.
UPPER BACK
Undo provisional CO sts and place sts
of each strap on smaller 16" cir, pm to
the outside of seed st borders. Place
removable markers into fabric at each
armhole edge to use for measuring.
With body yarn, work each strap sepa-
rately at the same time in established
patt with 5 (5, 5, 7, 7) neck edge sts of
each strap worked in seed st throughout
and at the same time, Shape shoulders:
(RS) Work to end of frst strap, work to
last 7 (7, 7, 8, 8) sts of second strap, w&t
I
n
s
e
t
3 (3
1
4, 3
1
2, 3
1
2, 3
3
4)"
7.5 (8.25, 9, 9, 9.5) cm
1
4

(
1
4
3

4
,

1
5
1

4
,

1
6
1

4
,

1
6
3

4
)
"
3
5
.
5

(
3
7
.
5
,

3
8
.
7
5
,

4
1
.
2
5
,

4
2
.
5
)

c
m
5
1
2 (6, 6
1
2, 6
3
4, 7
1
4)"
14 (15.25, 16.5, 17.25, 18.5) cm
Body and Sleeves
6
1
2 (7, 7
1
2, 8
1
4, 8
1
4)"
16.5 (17.75, 19, 21, 21) cm
4 (4
1
2, 4
1
4, 4
1
2, 4
3
4)"
10.25 (11.5, 10.75, 11.5, 12) cm
3
1
2 (3
3
4, 3
1
2, 3
1
2, 3
3
4)"
8.75 (9.5, 9, 9, 9.5) cm
18
1
4 (18
1
2, 19
1
4, 20, 20
1
2)"
46.25 (47, 49, 50.75, 52) cm
8
1

2

(
8
3

4
,

9
1

4
,

9
1

2
,

1
0
)
"
2
1
.
5

(
2
2
.
2
5
,

2
3
.
5
,

2
4
.
2
5
,

2
5
.
5
)

c
m
1
3
1

2

(
1
4
1

2
,

1
6
1

2
,

1
8
3

4
,

1
9
1

4
)
"
3
4
.
2
5

(
3
6
.
7
5
,

4
2
,

4
7
.
5
,

4
9
)

c
m
46
1
2 (49
1
2, 55
1
4, 60, 64)"
118 (125.75, 140.25, 152.5, 162.5) cm
1
3
1

4
"
3
3
.
7
5

c
m
5
1

2

(
5
3

4
,

6
,

6
1

2
,

6
3

4
)
"
1
4

(
1
4
.
5
,

1
5
.
2
5
,

1
6
.
5
,

1
7
.
2
5
)

c
m
3
3

4

(
4
1

4
,

4
1

2
,

4
3

4
,

5
)
"
9
.
5

(
1
0
.
7
5
,

1
1
.
5
,

1
2
,

1
2
.
7
5
)

c
m
1
7

(
1
7
1

2
,

1
7
3

4

1
8
,

1
8
1

4
)
"
4
3
.
2
5

(
4
4
.
5
,

4
5
,

4
5
.
7
5
,

4
6
.
2
5
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c
m
7
3

4

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8
1

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,

9
,

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"
1
9
.
7
5

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2
1
,

2
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5
,

2
2
.
7
5
,

2
3
.
5
)

c
m
35
1
4 (40, 44, 48
3
4, 52
3
4)"
89.5 (101.5, 111.75, 123.75, 134) cm
14
1
2 (16, 16, 17
1
4, 17
3
4)"
36.75 (40.75, 40.75, 43.75, 45) cm
JAK_078-104_Garden.indd 86 9/29/11 12:36 PM
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 87
SCARLET CAPELET
Heather Zoppetti
H
ooded cloaks were popular
outerwear during the beginning
of the Regency era. The cloaks in
Britain were traditionally red in color,
were made of wool or broadcloth and
lined with fur or silk, and reached
almost to the ground. Ive attempted
to update this fashion by designing a
hooded capelet. The pattern starts at
the front of the hood and is worked
down toward the neck using short-
rows and clever shaping. The
semicircular capelet extends seam-
lessly from the base of the hood to
the elbow.
FI NI SHED SI ZE About 32 (36, 40,
44, 50)" bust circumference and 42
3
4
(47
3
4, 53, 58
3
4, 66)" lower edge circum-
ference, with 3" front edgings meeting
in center. Capelet shown measures 36"
at bust.
YARN Plymouth Yarn Worsted Me-
rino Superwash (100% Merino; 218 yd
[199 m]/100 g): #46 red (MC), 4 (5, 6,
6, 7) skeins. Plymouth Yarn Mulberry
Merino (52% silk, 48% merino; 99 yd
[91 m]/50 g): #2060 red (CC), 2 (2, 2,
3, 3) skeins.
NEEDLES Size 7 (4.5 mm): 32"
circular needle (cir) and set of 2
double-pointed (dpn). Adjust needle
size if necessary to obtain the correct
gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); tapestry
needle; two 1
1
8" buttons.
GAUGE 22 sts and 30 rows = 4" in
St st.
Stitch Guide
Pattern A: (multiple of 4 sts + 2)
Row 1: (WS) With CC, purl.
on. Empire-waist ridge: Knit 3 rnds.
Next rnd: *Pick up purl bump 3 rows
below and k2tog with next st; rep from
* to end of rnd. Work an additional
1" from ridge. A-line shaping: *K22
(26, 29, 33, 37), pm, M1R, k4, M1L,
pm, k36 (40, 44, 48, 50), pm, M1R,
k4, M1L, pm, k22 (26, 29, 33, 37); rep
from * for front8 sts incd. Work 7
(8, 7, 7, 7) rnds even. Inc rnd: Knit to
frst m, sl m, M1R, knit to second m,
M1L, sl m; rep from * 3 more times,
knit to end8 sts incd. Rep the last
8 (9, 8, 8, 8) rnds 5 (4, 5, 5, 5) more
times232 (248, 276, 300, 320) sts.
Work even until piece measures 16
(16, 16, 16, 17)" from joining rnd.
Hemmed edge: Work 6 (6, 7, 8, 8) rnds
even. Purl 1 rnd. Work an additional 6
(6, 7, 8, 8) rnds even. BO all sts.
SLEEVES
Sleeve caps will be shaped using
short-row shaping. You will want 2
each of 2 distinct st m to aid in working
the short-rows (2 A markers and 2
B markers). When picking up sleeve
sts, be certain to distribute sts evenly
around the armhole. Starting at center
of underarm, with RS facing, dpn, and
body yarn, pick up and knit 92 (98,
106, 116, 122) sts around armhole and
pm as foll: k11 (11, 15, 19, 19), pm (A1),
k24 (26, 24, 24, 26), pm (B1), k22 (24,
28, 30, 32), pm (B2), k24 (26, 24, 24,
26), pm (A2), k11 (11, 15, 19, 19), pm
for beg of rnd. Begin short-rows: K to
B2, sl m, ssk, k1, turn. Sl 1 pwise wyf, p
to B1, sl m, p2tog, p1, turn. *Sl 1 pwise
wyb, knit to 1 st before gap, ssk across
gap, k1, turn. Sl 1 pwise wyf, purl to 1
st before gap, p2tog across gap, p1, turn;
rep from * 11 (12, 11, 11, 12) more
times, until A m are reached. Resume
knitting in the rnd, remove A and B m
as reached, dec across rem gaps68
(72, 82, 92, 96) sts rem. Work 5 (5, 4,
3, 3) rnds even in St st. Dec rnd: K1,
ssk, knit to last 3 sts of rnd, k2tog,
k12 sts decd. Rep dec rnd every 11
(10, 8, 6, 6) rnds 6 (6, 9, 19, 19) more
times, then every 7 (7, 5, 3, 4) rnds 6 (7,
8, 3, 3) times42 (44, 46, 48, 50) sts.
Work even until sleeve measures 17
(17, 18, 18, 19)" from end of cap
shaping. Hemmed edge: Work 6 (6, 7,
8, 8) rnds even. Purl 1 rnd. Work an
additional 6 (6, 7, 8, 8) rnds even. BO
all sts.
INSET
Make two mirrored panels, one right
and one left. Both panels: With larger
needle and inset yarn, loosely CO 28
(30, 32, 34, 36) sts and work even in St
st, starting with a WS row for 1". Dec
along neck edge on next RS row, then
every 5th row 7 (6, 5, 6, 3) more times,
using appropriate dec row below. Right
panel dec row: (RS) K1, ssk, knit to
end of row1 st decd. Right panel dec
row: (WS) Purl to last 3 sts of row, ssp,
p11 st decd. Left panel dec row: (RS)
Knit to last 3 sts of row, k2tog, k11
st decd. Left panel dec row: (WS) P1,
p2tog, p to end of row1 st decd.
Ten dec along neck edge every 4th
row, 4 (6, 8, 8, 12) times16 (17, 18,
19, 20) sts. Work even until total length
equals 14 (14, 15, 16, 16)". BO
all sts.
FINISHING
Weave in ends. Wash according to
manufacturers directions and block
fat to measurements. Seam insets into
neck opening with the wider end at the
front neck, gathering extra width evenly
across each half. For a more authentic
layered look, stitch the insets in place
1
4
1
2" to the inside of the bodys neck
opening. Steam inset seam if needed.
Kristi Schueler is a knitwear designer and
handspinner living along the front range
of the Colorado Rocky Mountains where
she can frequently be found cuddled up
with her knitting and some tea in the
company of a BBC production of Jane
Austens work. Kristi is the author of a
recently released eBook pairing twelve
patterns with twelve recipes entitled,
Nourishing Knits: 24 Projects to Gift
and Entertain. She blogs about her fber
adventures at http://blog.designedly
kristi.com.
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Row 2: Sl 1 knitwise (kwise), M1 (see
Glossary), k1, M1, pm, k18, pm, M1,
k1, M1, p126 sts.
Row 3: Sl 1 kwise, purl to end.
Row 4: Sl 1 kwise, M1, knit to m, M1,
sl m, k18, sl m, M1, knit to last st, M1,
p14 sts incd.
Repeat Rows 3 and 4 eighteen more
times, then work Row 3 once more
102 sts.
Work short-rows to shape curve from
top to back of head as foll:
Row 1: (RS) Sl 1 kwise, k96, w&t (see
Glossary).
Row 2: (WS) P92, w&t.
Row 3: K87, w&t.
Row 4: P82, w&t.
Row 5: K77, w&t.
Row 6: P72, w&t.
Row 7: K67, w&t.
Row 8: P62, w&t.
Row 9: K57, w&t.
Row 10: P52, w&t.
Row 11: K47, w&t.
Row 12: P42, w&t.
Row 13: K37, w&t.
Row 14: P32, w&t.
Row 15: K27, w&t.
Row 16: P22, w&t.
Row 17: Knit to last st, hiding wraps as
you come to them (see Glossary), p1.
Next row: (WS) Sl 1 kwise, purl to end,
hiding rem wraps.
Work straight section at back of head
as foll:
Row 1: (RS) Sl 1 kwise, knit to last st, p1.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 kwise, purl to end.
Repeat last 2 rows 29 more times, end-
ing with a WS row.
NECK
Row 1: (RS) Sl 1 kwise, k17, [k2tog] 33
times, k17, p169 sts.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 kwise, p25, [p2tog] 9
times, p2560 sts rem.
CAPE
Row 1: (RS) Sl 1 kwise, knit to last st, p1.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 kwise, purl to end.
First inc row: Work according to your
size as foll:
Rep Rows 14 for patt.
Pattern B: (multiple of 4 sts + 2)
Work all rows with MC as foll:
Row 1: (RS) K1, M1, knit to last st,
M1, k12 sts incd; patt is now a
multiple of 4 sts.
Row 2: (WS) Knit.
Row 3: Rep Row 12 sts incd; patt is
back to a multiple of 4 sts + 2 again.
Row 4: Knit.
HOOD
With MC, CO 22 sts. Work top of
head as foll:
Row 1: (WS) Purl.
Row 2: (RS) With MC, k1, M1, knit to
last st, M1, k12 sts incd; patt is now
a multiple of 4 sts.
Row 3: With MC, purl.
Row 4: With CC, k1, M1, k1, *sl 1
pwise, insert right needle tip from front
to back into st 2 rows below next st
on left needle and draw up a st, return
the new st and slipped st to left needle
and work them tog as k2tog, k1, insert
left needle tip from front to back into
same st 2 rows below and draw up a st,
work the new st and the st after it tog
as ssk, k1; rep from * to last 2 sts, k1,
M1, k12 sts incd; patt is back to a
multiple of 4 sts + 2 again.
42
3
4 (47
3
4, 53, 58
3
4, 66)"
108.5 (121.5, 134.5, 149, 167.5) cm
32 (36, 40, 44, 50)"
81.5 (91.5, 101.5,
112, 127) cm
Cape
Hood
17"
43 cm
15
3
4 (17
1
4, 19, 20
1
2, 22)"
40 (44, 48.5, 52, 56) cm
13
1
2"
34.5 cm
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BOTTOM EDGING
Work Rows 14 of Pattern A (see
Stitch Guide) 5 times, then work WS
Row 1 once more20 sts incd. Work
Rows 14 of Pattern B (see Stitch
Guide)226 (254, 282, 314, 354) sts;
piece measures 15
3
4 (17
1
4, 19, 20
1
2, 22)"
from start of cape section. BO all sts.
FRONT EDGING
With MC and RS facing, beg at lower
front right corner, pick up and knit 48
(54, 60, 66, 72) sts along right front
to base of hood, 126 sts along front
edge of hood, and 48 (54, 60, 66, 72)
sts along left front222 (234, 246,
258, 270) sts total. Work Rows 14 of
Pattern A 5 times, then work WS Row
1 once more20 sts incd. Work Rows
14 of Pattern B246 (258, 270, 282,
294) sts; front edging measures 3" from
pick-up row. BO all sts.
FINISHING
With yarn threaded on a tapestry
needle, sew mitered corners where
bottom and front edgings meet. Sew a
button to the RS of each front, aligned
with the frst cape section inc row as
shown. With dpn, CO 3 sts. Work
an I-cord (see Glossary) about 6" long.
Join ends of I-cord tog to form a circle.
Twist the circle in the middle to form a
fgure eight, place one-half of the fgure
eight over the right front button, and
sew in place, allowing the other half to
extend beyond the center front edge to
form a button loop.
Block to measurements. Weave in ends.
Heather Zoppetti is the creative director
for the Alpaca Yarn Company. She has
been obsessed with the fber arts for the
last ten years and can always be found
holding needles, a spindle, or a hook.
Heather teaches at several local yarn
shops and self-publishes patterns on her
website, www.digitalnabi.com.
k0 (2, 1, 2, 1), p1150 (172, 194, 214,
248) sts.
Next row: Sl 1 kwise, purl to end.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 above 7 (8, 9, 10, 11)
times.
Fourth inc row: Sl 1 kwise, k6 (9, 2, 9,
2), [M1, k2, M1, k3 (3, 4, 3, 4), M1, k3]
17 (19, 21, 24, 27) times, M1, k6 (9,
1, 2, 1), M0 (0, 0, 1, 0), k0 (0, 0, 9, 0),
p1202 (230, 258, 288, 330) sts.
Next row: Sl 1 kwise, purl to end.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 above 28 (32, 36, 40,
44) times.
Next row: (RS) Work according to your
size as foll:
Sizes 32 (36, 40, 50)": Sl 1 kwise, knit
to last st, p1no change to st count.
Size 44" only: Sl 1 kwise, M1, knit to
last st, M1, p1290 sts.
For all sizes: Piece measures 12
3
4 (14
1
4,
16, 17
1
2, 19)" from start of cape section.
Size 32": Rep Row 1 aboveno change
to st count.
Sizes 36 (40, 44)": Sl 1 kwise, k2 (4, 4),
[M1, k6 (3, 2)] 9 (17, 25) times, M1, k2
(3, 4), p170 (78, 86) sts.
Size 50": Sl 1 kwise, k3, [M1, k1,
M1, k2, M1, k1] 13 times, M1, k3,
p1100 sts.
Next row: Sl 1 kwise, purl to end.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 above 3 (4, 4, 5, 5)
times.
Second inc row: Sl 1 kwise, k3 (4, 4, 4,
5), [M1, k1, M1, k2, M1, k1] 13 (15,
17, 19, 22) times, M1 (1, 1, 1, 0), k3
(4, 4, 4, 5), p1100 (116, 130, 144,
166) sts.
Next row: Sl 1 kwise, purl to end.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 above 4 (4, 5, 5, 6)
times.
Third inc row: Sl 1 kwise, k0 (2, 1, 2, 1),
[M1, k2] 49 (55, 63, 69, 81) times, M1,
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LYDIA
MILITARY SPENCER
Annie Modesitt
O
riginally designed as a mockery of
the extreme fashions of the
Regency period, the spencer jacket
became a signature piece of the time.
Oddly fattering, simple to wear, and
fun to knit up, this jacket will become a
perennial favorite in many seasons.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 26 (30, 34,
38, 42)" bust circumference. Spencer
shown measures 30".
YARN Brooklyn Tweed Shelter
(100% wool; 140 yd [128 m]/50 g): red
long johns, 6 (7, 9, 9, 11) skeins.
NEEDLES Size 7 (4.5 mm). Size 8 (5
mm): straight and set of double-pointed
(dpn). Size 9 (5.5 mm): straight, 16"
circular (cir), and set of dpn. Adjust
needle sizes if necessary to obtain the
correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch hold-
ers; tapestry needle; fve " buttons.
GAUGE 21 sts and 24 rows = 4" in
herringbone patt on largest needles.
NOTE
When shaping in the herringbone
pattern, do not work a pattern decrease
if there are not enough stitches to work
its corresponding increase.
BODY
With largest needles, CO 98 (112, 126,
140, 154) sts. Change to middle-size
needles. Work 10 rows in St st, ending
with a WS row. Set up patt: Change
to largest needles. Work Rows 16 of
Herringbone Setup chart140 (160,
180, 200, 220) sts. Rep Rows 1 and 2
of 20-st Herringbone chart until piece
measures 7 (7, 8, 10, 10)" from
top of rolled hem, ending with a WS
row. Divide fronts and back: Next row:
(RS) Cont in patt as established, work
38 (39, 50, 49, 60) sts, BO 10 (10, 10,
12, 12) sts, work 44 (62, 60, 78, 76)
sts, BO 10 (10, 10, 12, 12) sts, work to
end38 (39, 50, 49, 60) sts for each
front, 44 (62, 60, 78, 76) sts for back.
Break yarn; place front sts on holders.
BACK
With WS facing, rejoin yarn to back
sts. Cont in patt as established until
armhole measures 8 (8, 9, 9,
10)", ending with a WS row. Shape
shoulders: Cont in patt as established,
BO 4 (5, 5, 6, 7) sts at beg of next 4
rows, then BO 4 (4, 6, 6, 6) sts at beg of
foll 2 rows20 (34, 28, 42, 36) sts rem
for back neck. Place sts on holder.
LEFT FRONT
With WS facing, rejoin yarn to left
front sts. Cont in patt as established,
work even until armhole measures 5
(6, 6, 6, 6)", ending with a RS row.
Shape neck: At beg of WS rows, BO
15 (13, 17, 16, 21) sts once, then BO 2
(2, 4, 3, 4) sts 2 times19 (22, 25, 27,
31) sts rem. BO 1 st at beg of every WS
row 7 (8, 9, 9, 11) times. At the same
time, when armhole measures 9 (9,
10, 10, 11)", shape shoulder as
foll: At beg of RS rows, BO 4 (5, 5, 6,
7) sts 2 times, then BO 4 (4, 6, 6, 6) sts
onceno sts rem.
RIGHT FRONT
With WS facing, rejoin yarn to right
front sts. Cont in patt as established,
work even until armhole measures 5
(6, 6, 6, 6)", ending with a WS
row. Shape neck: At beg of RS rows,
BO 15 (13, 17, 16, 21) sts once, then
BO 2 (2, 4, 3, 4) sts 2 times19 (22,
25, 27, 31) sts rem. BO 1 st at beg of
every RS row 7 (8, 9, 9, 11) times. At
the same time, when armhole measures
9 (9, 10, 10, 11)", shape shoulder
as foll: At beg of WS rows, BO 4 (5,
5, 6, 7) sts 2 times, then BO 4 (4, 6, 6,
6) sts onceno sts rem. Steam-block
pieces. Sew shoulder seams; seams will
sit to back of garment.
SLEEVES
With largest cir needle and beg at
center of underarm, pick up and knit
72 (78, 84, 84, 96) sts around armhole.
Place marker and join in the rnd.
Sleeve cap: Set-up rnd: Beg with st 1
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(1, 4, 4, 4) and ending with st 6, work
Row 2 of Sleeve Undercap chart over
12 (12, 15, 15, 15) sts, pm for cap
shaping, work Sleeve Cap Setup chart
over 24 (27, 27, 27, 33) sts, pm for top
of sleeve (this may fall in center of
chart), cont Sleeve Cap Setup chart
(beg with next st to be worked) over 24
(27, 27, 27, 33) sts, pm for cap shaping,
work Row 2 of Sleeve Undercap chart
over 12 (12, 15, 15, 15) sts, ending
with st 6 (6, 3, 3, 3) of chart104
(114, 120, 120, 140) sts.
Shape cap: Shape cap using short-rows
as foll: Next row: (RS) Work Row 1 of
Sleeve Undercap chart as established
over 12 (12, 15, 15, 15) sts, sl m, work
Row 1 of Sleeve Cap chart to 1 st before
next shaping m, w&t (see Glossary).
Body
26 (30, 34, 38, 42)"
68 (77.5, 87, 96.5, 106.5) cm
1", 2.5 cm
1", 2.5 cm
8 (8, 9, 9, 10)"
20.5 (22, 24, 24, 26.5) cm
7 (8, 8, 10, 10)"
19 (20.5, 22, 26, 26.5) cm
4 (4, 5, 5, 5)"
11 (11.5, 12.5, 14, 14.5) cm
2 (2, 3, 3, 3)"
5.5 (7, 7.5, 9, 9.5) cm
3 (6, 5, 8, 6)"
9.5 (16.5, 13.5, 20.5, 17) cm
S
l
e
e
v
e
10 (10, 13, 13, 13)"
27.5 (27.5, 33.5, 33.5, 33.5) cm
3 (3, 3, 3, 4)"
8.5 (9, 9, 9, 11) cm
19 (20, 21, 21, 24)"
49 (51, 54.5, 54.5, 61) cm
1"
3.8 cm
1
Sleeve Cap Setup
1
Sleeve Cap Decrease
5
3
1
Herringbone Setup
1
14-st Herringbone
14-st repeat
1
20-st Herringbone
20-st repeat
1
Sleeve Undercap
st 6
st 4 st 3
st 1
k on RS; p on WS
p on RS; k on WS
k2tog
ssk on RS; ssp on WS
p2tog
sl 1 pwise wyb on RS; sl 1 pwise wyf on WS
sl 1 pwise wyf on RS; sl 1 pwise wyb on WS
RLI (see Glossary)
LLI (see Glossary)
pattern repeat
Next row: (WS) Work Row 2 of Sleeve
Cap chart to 1 st before next shaping m,
w&t. Next row: (RS) Work in patt to 5
sts before last wrapped st, w&t. Next row:
(WS) Work in patt to 5 sts before last
wrapped st, w&t. Rep last 2 rows 6 (7,
7, 7, 9) more times4 sts on each side
between last wrapped st and top of sleeve
m. Next row: (RS) Work in patt to top of
sleeve m, remove m, cont in patt to shap-
ing m, working wraps tog with wrapped
sts as you come to them, sl m, work Row
1 of Sleeve Undercap chart as estab-
lished to end of rnd. Next rnd: Work
Row 2 of Sleeve Undercap chart as
established over 12 (12, 15, 15, 15) sts, sl
m, work in patt to m, working wraps tog
with wrapped sts as you come to them, sl
m, work Row 2 of Sleeve Undercap chart
as established to end of rnd. Next rnd:
Work Row 1 of Sleeve Undercap chart
as established over 12 (12, 15, 15, 15) sts,
remove m, work Sleeve Cap Decrease
chart to next m, remove m, work Row 1
of Sleeve Undercap chart as established
to end of rnd72 (78, 84, 84, 96) sts
rem. Lower sleeve: Next rnd: Purl, dec 2
(8, 0, 0, 12) sts evenly spaced70 (70,
84, 84, 84) sts rem. Knit 3 rnds. Next
rnd: [P3 (3, 4, 4, 4), p2tog] 14 times56
(56, 70, 70, 70) sts rem.
Work 14-st Herringbone chart over all
sts. Cont in patt until piece measures
18 (19, 20, 20, 23)" from
beg of lower sleeve, or desired length.
Change to middle-size dpn. Work
10 rnds in St st. With largest needle,
loosely BO all sts.
1
Sleeve Cap
10-st repeat
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FINISHING
Left front buttonband: With smallest
needles and RS facing, pick up and
knit 60 (64, 68, 72, 76) sts along left
front edge. Work in garter st for 9
rows. With RS facing, loosely BO
all sts. Right front buttonhole band:
With smallest needles and RS facing,
pick up and knit 60 (64, 68, 72, 76)
sts along right front edge. Work in
garter st for 2 rows. Next row: (WS)
K3 (5, 5, 5, 5), [BO 2 sts, knit until
there are 11 (11, 12, 13, 14) sts on
right needle after BO] 4 times, BO 2
sts, knit to end. Next row: (RS) [Work
to BO space, CO 2 sts] 5 times, knit
to end. Work in garter st for 5 rows.
With largest needle and RS facing,
BO all sts. Collar: Note: WS of garment
is RS of collar. With smallest needles
and WS of garment facing, pick up
and knit 5 (5, 6, 5, 4) sts along top of
left front band, 33 (38, 40, 37, 38) sts
along left front neck edge, k20 (34, 28,
42, 36) from back neck holder, pick up
and knit 33 (38, 40, 37, 38) sts along
right front neck edge to band, and 5 (5,
6, 5, 4) sts along top of band96 (120,
120, 126, 120) sts total. First short-row
section: Next row: (WS of collar) P57
(69, 69, 72, 69), w&t. Next row: (RS) Sl
1, k17, w&t. Next row: (WS) Sl 1, purl
to wrapped st, work wrap tog with
wrapped st, p2, w&t. Next row: (RS) Sl
1, knit to wrapped st, work wrap tog
with wrapped st, k2, w&t.
Rep last 2 rows 8 (10, 10, 11, 10)
more times11 (17, 17, 17, 17) sts
unworked after last wrap at each
end of row. Second short-row section:
Change to middle-size needles. Next
row: (WS) Sl 1, purl to wrapped st,
work wrap tog with wrapped st, purl
to last 8 sts, w&t. Next row: (RS) Sl
1, knit to wrapped st, work wrap tog
with wrapped st, knit to last 8 sts,
w&t. Next row: (WS) Sl 1, purl to 6
sts before wrapped st, w&t. Next row:
(RS) Sl 1, knit to 6 sts before wrapped
st, w&t. Rep last 2 rows once more6
wrapped sts total. Next row: (WS) Sl 1,
purl to end of row, working wraps tog
with wrapped sts as you come to them.
Next row: (RS) Knit to end of row,
working rem wraps tog with wrapped
sts. Garter edge: Change to largest
needles. Next row: (WS) Knit to last
8 sts, w&t. Next row: (RS) Knit to last
8 sts, w&t. Next row: Knit to wrapped
st, work wrap tog with wrapped st,
w&t. Rep last row 3 more times3
wrapped sts at each end. Next row: Knit
to wrapped st, work wrap tog with
wrapped st, knit to end. Rep last row
once more. With WS facing, loosely
BO all sts. Weave in loose ends.
Annie Modesitt lives in St. Paul, Minne-
sota, with her husband, children, pets, and
many, many books. She agrees with Miss
Austen that the person, be it gentleman
or lady, who has not pleasure in a good
novel, must be intolerably stupid.
MR. KNIGHTLEY S
VEST
Jenny Sorensen
I
cannot make speeches, Emma . . .
If I loved you less, I might be able
to talk about it more.
Mr. Knightley in Emma
It is male characters like Mr.
Knightley, and their relationships, that
have endeared Jane Austen to many of
her readers. And these male charac-
ters were my inspiration for this
project. I wanted to create something
sleek and beautiful for the Austen
men. I wondered, What if I was
Emmawhat would I knit for Mr.
Knightley? This vest fts the bill
perfectly. The gorgeous colorwork
fabric is both masculine and elegant.
The wool/silk blend yarn gives the vest
a warm functional aspect. Mr.
Knightleys Vest, when paired with an
ascot and a long coat, exemplifes the
Regency era. It can also be worn with
a T-shirt and jeans for a modern look.
The twined knitting technique that is
used to create the colorwork is easy to
master and can be done by a beginner,
even though the resulting fabric looks
like it requires a seasoned knitter.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 35 (40, 44,
47, 51)" chest circumference,
buttoned. Cardigan shown measures
40".

JAK_078-104_Garden.indd 92 9/29/11 12:36 PM


09292011124319
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 93
direction of your twists to unwind the
strands. Te unwinding of the strands
will quickly become part of your knit-
ting rhythm.
Stitch Guide
BYOF (back yarn over front): Bring the
back strand of yarn to the front by mov-
ing it over the front strand of yarn.
BYUF (back yarn under front): Bring the
back strand of yarn to the front by mov-
ing it under the front strand of yarn.
Zigzag Colorwork: (multiple of 2 sts)
Note: When working this patt at the beg
of a row, slip the frst st pwise wyf.
Row 1: (RS) K2 MC, *k1 MC, BYOF,
k1 CC, BYOF; rep from * to 2 sts from
end, k2 MC.
Row 2: K2 MC, *BYOF, p1 MC,
BYOF, p1 CC; rep from * to 2 sts from
end, k2 MC.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 for patt.
Dominant Stripe Colorwork: (multiple of
2 sts + 1)
Row 1: (RS) *BYUF, k1 CC, BYOF,
k1 MC; rep from * to 1 st from end,
BYUF, k1 CC.
Row 2: *BYUF, p1 CC, BYOF, p1 MC;
rep from * to 1 st from end, BYUF, k1
CC.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 for patt.
BODY
With MC yarn and cir needle, CO 323
(371, 403, 435, 467) sts. Do not join;
work back and forth in rows. Circular
needle is used to accommodate large
number of sts. Work 2 rows garter st,
sl 1st st of each row pwise wyf. Set-up
row: (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k85 (97,
105, 113, 121) for left front, pm, k151
(175, 191, 207, 223) for back, pm, k86
(98, 106, 114, 122) for right front.
Establish patt: (RS) Slipping markers
at the beg of each row pwise wyf, work
zigzag colorwork patt to m, sm, work
dominant stripe colorwork patt to m, sl
m, work zigzag colorwork patt to end.
Work as established until piece mea-
sures 1" from CO edge, ending after a
WS row. Buttonhole row: (RS) Work as
established to last 5 sts, k2tog, yo, work
as established to end. Cont to work in
YARN Cascade Yarns Heritage Silk
(85% Merino superwash wool, 15%
mulberry silk; 437 yd [400 m]/100 g):
#5608 pine (MC), 2 (2, 2, 3, 3) skeins;
#5610 camel (CC) 2 (2, 2, 3, 3) skeins.
NEEDLES Size 3 (3.25 mm): 16" and
36" circular (cir) and straight. Adjust
needle sizes if necessary to obtain the
correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch hold-
ers; tapestry needle; six
5
8" buttons.
GAUGE 36 sts and 40 rows = 4" in
colorwork patts.
NOTES
Te twined knitting that is used in
this pattern will twist your working
yarn as you knit. Te WS rows will
unwind the twists as you work because
the twist is opposite of the twist that is
used on the RS rows. If you fnd that
the twisting of the yarn is bothersome,
place your skeins in a basket on top of
a lazy Susan. When the twists start to
interfere with your knitting, you can
tighten down the twists by placing your
fnger between the strands closest to
your work and then pushing toward the
basket. Once the twists are tight, you
can spin the lazy Susan in the opposite
patt, working buttonhole row every 2
(2, 2, 2, 2)" fve more times and
at the same time, when piece measures
13 (13, 13, 14, 15)" from CO
edge, ending after a WS row, divide for
armholes: (RS) Work as established to
12 sts before m, with MC, BO 20 sts
removing m, attach new CC strand,
work as established to 8 sts before next
m, with MC, BO 20 sts removing m,
attach new CC strand, work as estab-
lished to end74 (86, 94, 102, 110) sts
rem each front; 135 (159, 175, 191, 207)
sts rem for back. Place sts for back and
sts for right front onto waste yarn or st
holders. One buttonhole should remain
to be worked.
LEFT FRONT
Cont working buttonholes as estab-
lished. Shape armhole: (WS) Sl 1
pwise wyf, k1, work in patt to last 4 sts,
p2tog in next color of patt, k2 MC1
st decd. Dec row: (RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf,
k1 MC, k2tog in next color of patt,
work to end as established1 st decd.
Rep the last 2 rows 0 (3, 6, 7, 10) more
times72 (78, 80, 86, 88) sts. Six
buttonholes are completed. Work 1
WS row even. Shape neck and armhole:
(RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1 MC, k2tog in
next color of patt, work to last 4 sts,
ssk in next color of patt, k2 MC2
sts decd. Rep the last 2 rows 5 more
times60 (66, 68, 74, 76) sts. Work
1 WS row even. Shape neck: (RS)
Work as established to last 4 sts, ssk in
next color of patt, k2 MC1 st decd.
Rep the last 2 rows 19 (25, 23, 29, 27)
more times40 (40, 44, 44, 48) sts
rem. Cont even in patt until armhole
measures 9 (10, 10, 11, 11)", ending
after a WS row. Work 2 rows garter
st with MC. Place all sts on holder or
waste yarn. Break yarns.
RIGHT FRONT
Return held right front sts to straight
needle and join yarns preparing to work
a WS row.
Shape armhole: (WS) Sl 1 pwise wyf,
k1 MC, ssp in next color of patt, work
as established to end1 st decd. Dec
row: (RS) Work as established to last 4
sts, ssk in next color of patt, k2 MC1
JAK_078-104_Garden.indd 93 9/29/11 12:36 PM
09292011124319
94 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
G
a
r
d
e
n
st decd. Rep the last 2 rows 0 (3, 6, 7,
10) more times72 (78, 80, 86, 88)
sts. Work 1 WS row even. Shape neck
and armhole: (RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1
MC, k2tog in next color of patt, work
to last 4 sts, ssk in next color of patt, k2
MC2 sts decd. Rep the last 2 rows
5 more times60 (66, 68, 74, 76) sts.
Work 1 WS row even. Shape neck:
(RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1 MC, k2tog in
next color of patt, work as establihsed
to end1 st decd. Rep the last 2 rows
19 (25, 23, 29, 27) more times40 (40,
44, 44, 48) sts rem. Cont even in patt
until armhole measures 9 (10, 10, 11,
11)", ending after a WS row. Work 2
rows garter st with MC. Place all sts on
holder or waste yarn. Break yarns.
BACK
Return held back sts to straight needle
and join yarns preparing to work a WS
row. Shape armholes: (WS) Sl 1 pwise
wyf, k1 MC, ssp with next color of patt,
work to last 4 sts, p2tog with next color
of patt, k2 MC2 sts decd. Dec row:
(RS) Sl 1 pwise wyf, k1 MC, k2tog with
next color of patt, work to last 4 sts, ssk
Left Front Back Right Front
4 (5, 5, 6, 6)"
10.8 (14, 13.3, 16.5, 15.9) cm
4 (4, 5, 5, 5)"
11.4 (11.4, 12.7, 12.7, 13.3) cm
16 (19, 21, 23, 24)"
42.5 (49.5, 54, 58.4, 62.9) cm
9 (11, 11, 12, 13)"
24.1 (26.7, 29.8, 32.4, 34.3) cm
9 (11, 11, 12, 13)"
24.1 (26.7, 29.8, 32.4, 34.3) cm
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33.7 (36.8, 38.7, 41.9, 42.5) cm
JAK_078-104_Garden.indd 94 9/29/11 12:36 PM
09292011124319
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 95
Austens novels, and I am in agony
every time I read it about whether or
not Anne and Frederick will fnd their
way back to one another.
I came up with a delicate leaf to
represent Annes faithful belief and love
for Frederick, ever resilient, as well as her
renewed bloom upon reacquaintance with
him. For Frederick, I chose an undulating
wave pattern to represent his love of the
sea and ever-present life force, much like
his love for and dedication to Anne. To
unite these two motifs, I chose a simple
garter-stitch band with eyelets and a
delicate Regency-esque edging.
The overall structure of this knitted
piece is based on the Estonian lace
scarves in Nancy Bushs book Knitted
Lace of Estonia (Interweave, 2008), and
I credit her chapters on structure for my
knowledge of structuring a rectangular
lace garment.
FI NI SHED SI ZE About 7" wide by
60" long.
YARN Malabrigo Sock Yarn (100%
superwash Merino; 440 yd [402 m]/
100 g): #805 alcaucil, 1 skein.
with next color of patt, k2 MC2 sts
decd. Rep the last 2 rows 0 (3, 6, 7, 10)
more times131 (143, 147, 159, 163)
sts. Work 1 WS row even. Rep the last
2 rows 6 more times119 (131, 135,
147, 151) sts. Cont in patt until armholes
measure 8 (9, 10, 10, 11)", ending
after a WS row. Shape neck: (RS) With
MC, k40 (40, 44, 44, 48) sts, BO 39 (51,
47, 59, 55) sts, k40 (40, 44, 44, 48) sts.
With MC, work 3 rows garter st on each
shoulder strap, ending with WS row.
FINISHING
Block pieces to measurements. With
MC yarn threaded on a tapestry needle,
use Kitchener stitch (see Glossary) to
join shoulders. Sew buttons to right
front, opposite buttonholes.
Jenny Sorensen is a busy stay-at-home
mother of two. By sheer force of will, she
has found time for knitwear designing
between the puzzles, art projects, and
story times that make up a typical day
for her. She blogs, provides tutorials,
and self-publishes patterns through
j.erin Knits at www.jerinknits.com.
FREDERICK
& ANNE SCARF
Kirsti Johanson
T
he inspiration for the Frederick &
Anne Scarf was born when I spun
a gorgeous braid of handpainted Finn
fber into two-ply yarn and needed to
fnd the perfect project. On noticing
that the colorway was named Persua-
sion, I decided that it needed a project
that would match the delicate strength
Anne Elliot displays in the novel.
Persuasion is my favorite of all of Jane
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Body
k on RS; p on WS
p on RS; k on WS
yo
k2tog
ssk
k3tog
sl 1, k2tog, psso
sl 2 as if to k2tog, k1, p2sso
sl 1 pwise wyf on RS
sl 1 pwise wyf on WS
k3tog tbl
pattern repeat
marker position
11
9
7
5
3
1
Border
10-st repeat
NEEDLES Size 5 (3.75 mm). Adjust
needle size if necessary to obtain the
correct gauge.
JAK_078-104_Garden.indd 95 9/29/11 12:36 PM
09292011124320
96 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
G
a
r
d
e
n
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch
holder or waste yarn; tapestry needle.
GAUGE 25 sts and 28 rows = 4" in
patt, after blocking.
NOTE
Place stitch markers between each of
the lace panels to keep track of repeats
(such as 6 garter sts, pm, wave pattern,
pm, center panel, pm, wave pattern,
pm, 6 garter sts).
SCARF
Using the long-tail method (see Glos-
sary), loosely CO 45 sts. Knit 1 WS row.
Work Rows 111 of Border chart. Next
row: Sl 1 pwise wyf, knit to end. Rep last
row 2 more times. Next row: (RS) Sl 1
pwise wyf, k1, *yo, k2tog; rep from * to
last st, k1. Next row: Sl 1 pwise wyf, knit
to end. Rep last row 2 more times.
Work Rows 116 of Body chart 24
times, then work Rows 18 once more
(or work to desired length, ending with
a WS row).
Place sts on holder or waste yarn.
Break yarn.
BORDER
CO 45 sts. Knit 1 WS row. Work
Rows 111 of Border chart. Next row:
Sl 1 pwise wyf, knit to end. Rep last
row 2 more times. Next row: (RS) Sl 1
pwise wyf, k1, *yo, k2tog; rep from * to
last st, k1. Next row: Sl 1 pwise wyf, knit
to end. Rep last row 2 more times. Do
not BO.
FINISHING
Graft live border sts to live sts on scarf
body using Kitchener st (see Glos-
sary). Weave in loose ends. Block to
measurements.
Kirsti Johanson is a Jane Austenloving
knitter who picked up the needles in 2004
and hasnt set them down since. She
teaches musical theatre and serves as the
artistic director for MadCAP, a school of
the arts in Madison, Wisconsin. You can
fnd her on Twitter and Ravelry as kjerstie.
See Kirstis handspun version of this scarf
in the Fall 2011 issue of Spin
.
Off.
CHAWTON
MITTENS
Anne Blayney
T
hese colorwork mittens feature
cameosthose most classic
Regency silhouettesof a young
lady and her fne gentleman gazing
at each other. The silhouettes are
framed with cabled ovals, worked
with the contrasting color against
the main/background color. The
cables give an unexpected hint of
texture to the stockinette-stitch
mittens and add a little extra
challenge for the knitter. In the
background are diamond and stripe
patterns inspired by historical
wallpaper patterns. A deep cuff of
twisted-stitch ribbing keeps the
mittens snug and practical.
JAK_078-104_Garden.indd 96 9/29/11 12:37 PM
09292011124320
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 97
Inspired by the elegance, vintage aura,
and needlework of the 1940s,
A Handknit Romance takes you back in time.
Knit 22 unforgettable designs with
this exquisite collection.
Feminine vintage style has
never looked better.
A Handknit Romance:
22 Vintage Designs with
Lovely Detail
Jennie Atkinson
136 pages, 7.5 x 9.8, $24.95
ISBN: 978-1-59668-779-0
Romantic
Rendezvous
with enchanting knits
JAK_097.indd 97 9/29/11 2:59 PM
09292011150036
98 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 99
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100 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
G
a
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n
M1L as a backward-loop CO (see
Glossary), making sure to turn the
loop so that it slants in the correct
direction.
To avoid snags and keep tension even,
be sure to catch any long foats every
34 stitches, except when working
the silhouettes. If your contrasting
color is signifcantly paler than your
main color (as in the knitted sample),
caught foats can show through the
pale expanses of the silhouettes. To
prevent this, leave your foats loose
across the back of the silhouettes
as you work them. When you have
fnished knitting, turn the mitten
inside out and use a darning needle
and a spare length of yarn to weave
through the foat strands diagonally,
frst in one direction and then in the
other. After each run through, tug at
the mitten to keep the woven strands
loose. Tis will secure the long foats
and help keep them from snagging
on fngertips and rings.
LEFT MITTEN
Cuff: With CC, CO 80 sts. Join in the rnd,
being careful not to twist sts. Next rnd:
*[K1tbl] 2 times, p2; rep from * around.
Rep last rnd 19 more times. Knit 1 rnd.
Hand: Join MC and work Rows 136 of
Left Hand chart, being sure to lock in
strands every 34 sts when working a
long run of one color (see Notes)116
sts. Next rnd: (Row 37 of chart) Work
to last 32 sts, place next 32 sts on
holder for thumb84 sts rem. Work
to end of chart16 sts rem. With CC
threaded on a tapestry needle, graft
sts using Kitchener st (see Glossary).
With CC and using daisy chain st (see
Glossary), embroider across grafted sts
to visually cont CC stripe from side of
mitten.
Thumb: Place 32 thumb sts onto
needles. Rnd beg at crook of thumb.
Work Rnds 118 of Thumb chart14
sts rem. With CC, graft and finish as
for mitten tip.
RIGHT MITTEN
Work as for left mitten, working Right
Hand chart in place of Left Hand
chart.
GAUGE 45 sts and 48 rnds = 4" in
charted patt.
NOTES
It is important to block swatch
before measuring gauge.
For all cable stitches, the contrasting
color is held in front of the main
color. At this dense gauge, working
cables without a cable needle is dif-
fcult; a toothpick or a large darning
needle makes a passable substitute
for a cable needle.
It may be easier to work M1R and
FI NI SHED SI ZE 7
1
2" hand circum-
ference and 9
1
2" long. To ft a womans
medium.
YARN Brown Sheep Nature Spun
Fingering (100% wool; 310 yd [283 m]/
50 g): #117 winter blue (MC) and #730
natural (CC), 1 skein each.
NEEDLES Size 1 (2.25 mm): set of
double-pointed (dpn) or circular (cir)
for magic loop. Adjust needle size if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Small cable needle (cn);
waste yarn to be used as a stitch holder;
tapestry needle.
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accessory. The piece is knitted in
the round and uses several tech-
niquesprovisional cast-on, light
lace pattern incorporating increases
and decreaseswithout being
diffcult to create.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 13" wide and 22"
circumference for muf; 18" for cord.
YARN Twinkle Soft Chunky (100%
virgin wool; 83 yards [75 m]/200 g):
#24 lavender, 3 skeins.
NEEDLES MufSize 13 (9 mm): 24"
circular (cir). CufsSize 11 (8 mm): 16"
circular (cir). Adjust needle sizes if neces-
sary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Marker (m); tapestry nee-
dle; needle and thread; 14" 21" piece of
high-loft polyfll batting; optional fabric
14" 21" to cover batting; size K/10.5
(6.5 mm) crochet hook; waste yarn.
GAUGE 30 sts in leaf pattern = 11"
and 22 rows = 6" with larger needles;
10 sts and 15 rows = 4" in St st with
smaller needles.
LEAFY MUFF
Karen Holmes
I
fnd that anything Jane Austen
makes me happyI enjoy the
stories, the ups and downs, the
romance, and the clothes. When
thinking of what to design, the muff
was an accessory that was interest-
ing and a bit frivolous, too. Muffs of
the Regency period were characteris-
tically made from fur or silk and
were quite large. I chose a chunky
yarn and the leaf pattern to give the
muff depth and texture. My goal was
to create a beautiful and functional
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends and secure foats
(see Notes). Wet-block to measure-
ments, stretching cuf as little as
possible.
Anne Blayney of Waterloo, Ontario,
Canada, has been knitting since 2005.
In the few years since she knitted her
frst garter-stitch rectangle, yarn and fber
have come to occupy a great deal of her
imagination as well as her apartment. In
addition to knitting and brief attempts
at crochet, she has taken up spinning on
a Wee Peggy wheel. Her husband calls
himself her Chief Enabler. Anne can be
found on Twitter as @Anniebeeknits,
on Ravelry as AnnieBee, on Flickr as
TheBees, andat least sporadicallyon
the Internet at www.anniebeeknits
.wordpress.com.
Spin
.
Off 2002-2010 Collection CDs
(866) 949-1646
shop. spi nni ngdai l y. com
New CD
Collections
Available
Now!
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102 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
G
a
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n
knit
purl
M1
ssk
k2tog
yo
sk2p
no stitch
pattern repeat
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Leaf Pattern
Begins and ends as a multiple of 30 sts.
Note: Stitch count varies between 30 and 32 sts.
NOTES
Cuf is knitted on smaller needles to
draw the muf in and give warmth
when wearing.
Te batting is used to give the muf
shape and show of the leaf pattern.
Cotton batting could be used but it is
not as lofty as polyfll.
Fabric to cover batting will depend
on your preference. If using a darker
color yarn, the lining may be desired
since polyfll is white.
Loop handle is optional and is de-
signed to use if hands need to be free
and the muf can be held on the wrist.
Stitch Guide
22 Rib: (multiple of 4 sts)
Rnd 1: *K2, p2; rep from * around.
Rep Rnd 1 for patt.
MUFF
With larger needle, use the provisional
CO method (see Glossary) to CO 50
sts, pm, and join to work in the rnd.
Next rnd: Knit around. Next rnd: Purl
around. Inc rnd: K3, M1, [k5, M1]
9 times, k260 sts. Next rnd: Purl
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around. Work 22 rnds of Leaf Pattern
chart twice. Next rnd: Purl around. Dec
rnd: K2, k2tog, [k4, k2tog] 9 times,
k250 sts rem. Next rnd: Purl around.
Right cuff: Change to smaller needle;
k2, k2tog, [k3, k2tog] 9 times, k140
sts rem. Work in 22 rib (see Stitch
Guide) for 5 rnds. Dec rnd: K1, k2tog,
[k2, k2tog] 9 times, k130 sts rem.
Cont to knit every rnd until piece mea-
sures 7" from last purl rnd. BO sts as
loosely as possible. Left cuff: Carefully
remove waste yarn and slip 50 sts from
provisional CO onto smaller needle,
pm, and join to work in the rnd. Dec
rnd: K2, k2tog, [k3, k2tog] 9 times,
k140 sts. Work in 22 rib for 5
rnds. Dec rnd: K1, k2tog, [k2, k2tog]
9 times, k130 sts. Next rnd: Cont to
knit every rnd until piece measures 3"
from last purl rnd. BO sts as loosely as
possible.
FINISHING
Turn muf inside out and with tapestry
needle, weave in loose ends. Measure
and cut both the batting and fabric.
Handstitch or machine stitch the
fabric to the batting. Roll the batting
(RS facing) so the ends meet, sew ends
together, and turn lining inside out (so
batting side is facing you). Slide the
lining over muf and center it over body
of the muf. Now holding the lining in
place, turn the muf back to the right
side; once this is done, the lining can
be adjusted before sewing the cufs
together. Hold the end of the muf with
the shorter cuf facing you and then
gently pull the longer piece out and sew
the cufs together.
Optional loop: With crochet hook, ch
(see Glossary) 55 sts; slip-stitch (see
Glossary) back down the chain and
fasten of leaving an 8" tail. Fold the
chained loop in half and with a tapes-
try needle, secure the ends together.
Attach the loop inside the muf at the
base of the 22 ribbing.
Karen Holmes loves all things to do with
fber and knitting which inspired her to
open Fresh Purls in Providence, Rhode
Island, in March 2007. She lives in
Massachusetts with her husband and two
cats and lots of yarn. The Fresh Purls
website is www.freshpurls.com.
THEME AND
VARIATION
SCARVES
Stephenie Gaustad
T
he source of inspiration for these
two scarves is the love of things
with frills, as diverse as exotic
undersea creatures and famenco
dancers skirts. Frills give the illusion
of movement even when they are
stock-still. The process of making the
scarves is an adventure in three-
dimensional knitting, too.
The frst scarf is the theme, and it
was originally published in the Spring
2011 issue of Spin
.
Off magazine as
the Helix Scarf. It is a garter-stitch
scarf with short-row wedges along
both long edges. It is knitted in a
spindle-spun wool and silk blend.
Although handspun was used to knit
this scarf, it could have been knitted
in similar laceweight commercial yarn.
The second scarf is a variation knitted
entirely from a silk/wool blend commer-
cial yarn. The frst 5 stitches in each row
are changed to a simple lace. The
short-row wedges are thus softened,
more open. This gives the frill more
actual movement. A simple sturdy
crocheted picot edge is the fnale.
Because a fne crochet hook is used, and
the yarn is laceweight, the picot trim is
frm and magnifes the ruffed effect.
THEME SCARF
FI NI SHED SI ZE 4" by 45".
YARN High-twist fne laceweight
yarn spun on a tahkli supported spindle
(50% Merino, 50% silk carded sliver
spun Z/S; 2-ply, 52 wpi, 4,350 ypp),
500 yds.
NEEDLES Size 1 (2.25 mm). Adjust
needle size if necessary to obtain the
correct gauge.
GAUGE 28 sts and 28 rows = 4" in
garter stitch.
NOTE
Te Teme Scarf is knitted in a garter-
st patt with short-rows set into the two
long edges.
Stitch Guide
Wedge:
Knit 10 sts, w&t (see Glossary).
Knit to end
Knit 5 sts, w&t.
Knit to end.
SCARF
CO 30 sts.
Row 1: Knit.
Rep Row 1 and wedge (see Stitch
Guide) until piece measures 45" or
desired length. BO all sts.
FINISHING
Weave in ends. Block if desired.
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G
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VARIATION SCARF
FI NI SHED SI ZE 4" wide by 43"
long.
YARN Mountain Colors Winter Lace
(50% wool, 50% silk; 1,200 yd (1,097
m]/100 g): red willow, 1 skein.
NEEDLES Size 3 (3.25 mm). Adjust
needle size if necessary to obtain the
correct gauge.
CROCHET HOOK Size 7 (4.5 mm)
GAUGE 28 sts and 28 rows = 4" in
garter st.
NOTES
Te main body of the Variation Scarf is
knitted in essentially the same system
as the Teme Scarf. Te selvedges are
k1, yo, k2tog, yo, k2tog lace. Te lace
is symmetrical: 2 holes stacked directly
over the row below and above running
along each selvedge. Tis looks like a
knitted version of flet crochet.
Stitch Guide
Picot Edge: *Work 3 sc, ch5; rep from
* around.
Curvy Tails:
Ch 6, sc in second ch from hook, sc in
next 3 ch.
SCARF
CO 30 sts.
Row 1: K1, [yo, k2tog] 14 times, yo,
k131 sts.
Row 2: Knit.
Row 3: K1, [yo, k2tog] twice, w&t (see
Glossary).
Row 4: Knit to end.
Row 5: K1, [yo, k2tog] twice, k5, w&t.
Row 6: Knit to end.
Row 7: K1, [yo, k2tog] twice, k26.
Repeat Rows 37 until piece measures
43" or desired length, ending after Row 5.
Next row: K1 [yo, k2tog] 14 times, yo,
k1. Loosely BO all sts. Keep last st on
needle; do not break yarn.
EDGING
Slip rem loop from BO onto crochet
hook. Work picot edge (see Stitch
Guide) evenly around the perimeter
of the scarf working 1 rep of patt into
each yo on scarf edge. If desired, adjust
by working more or less sc in each yo.
At each corner, work a curvy tail (see
Stitch Guide). Sl st into frst sc to join.
Fasten of.
Dyepots litter the front yard; looms,
books, and spinning wheels fll the house.
Her daughter asks if maybe Mom has an
issue with too much fber. No. It is just
life as Stephenie Gaustad.
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866.949.1646
Take a Spinning Workshop
from the Masters
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EMMA SHRUG
Designed by TIAN
CONNAUGHTON.
PAGE: 120.
YARN: Berroco Linsey.
Town
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MERYTON COAT
Designed by STEPHANIE EARP. PAGE: 113.
YARN: Jamiesons Shetland Spindrift.
KENSINGTON MITTS
Designed by ANNIE MODESITT. PAGE: 122.
YARN: Madelinetosh Tosh Sock.
JOSEPHINE SHAWL
Designed by REBECCA BLAIR. PAGE: 110.
YARN: The Sanguine Gryphon Gaia Lace.
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DIAMOND AND
CROSS RETICULE
Designed by KENDRA NITTA. PAGE: 127.
YARN: Yarn Love Elizabeth Bennet.
MISS MORLANDS NECKCLOTH
by KENDRA NITTA. PAGE: 119.
YARN: Buffalo Gold Lux Lace.
MISS BENNETS BEADED BAG
Designed by JOANNA JOHNSON.
PAGE: 124. YARN: Spud & Chlo Fine.
SENSE AND FASHION
HANDWARMERS
Designed by HANNAH POON. PAGE: 125.
YARN: Louisa Harding Grace Silk & Wool.
Kensington Mitts,
Page 122
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EVENING SPENCER
Designed by CORRINA
FERGUSON. PAGE: 116.
YARN: Classic Elite Liberty Wool.
PICTURESQUE
CAPE
Designed by SHARON
FULLER. PAGE: 128.
YARN: Schulana Kid Seta.
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T
o
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n
JOSEPHINE SHAWL
Rebecca Blair
T
his shawl was inspired by the
costuming in Ang Lees 1995 flm
version of Sense and Sensibility and by
a colorplate in Racinets Le Costume
Historique (1888) that illustrates the
different ways that women of the
Regency era wore their shawls. Many of
those pictured feature elaborately
patterned borders framing plainer
central patterns. Josephine is a
Shetland lace knitters interpretation of
those designs, named for the empress
who popularized the fashion. The
central pattern is a feld of bead motifs
surrounded by garter stitch, and it is
easy to memorize and quick to knit.
The border section at each short end is
a sampler of more intricate motifs. The
shawl is fnished with a scalloped
edging that is more practical for the
knitter than a fringe, as it makes the
fnished piece much easier to block.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 24" wide and 64"
long.
YARN Te Sanguine Gryphon Gaia
Lace (60% silk, 40% cashmere; 420 yd
[384 m]/2 oz [57 g]): ladyslippers, 3
skeins.
NEEDLES Size 4 (3.5 mm). Adjust
needle size if necessary to obtain the
correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Waste yarn for provi-
sional CO; markers (m); stitch holder;
tapestry needle; T-pins; blocking wires
(optional).
GAUGE 24 sts and 37 rows = 4" in
center patt, after blocking.
NOTE
Tis shawl begins with stitches cast
on provisionally. Te center is knitted
frst, then the frst border is knitted
immediately afterward, and its stitches
are put on a holder. Te cast-on stitches
are picked up and the second border is
knitted in the other direction so that
the ends are symmetrical. Te edging
is worked last and is knitted on all the
way around the shawl.
Stitch Guide
Single Join:
Row 1: (WS of edging) Work to last st
of edging, knit last st tog with next st
from shawl, turn.
Row 2: Work next row of edging.
Double Join:
Row 1: (WS of edging) Work to last st
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Edging
27
25
23
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Center
16-st repeat
k3tog on WS
sl 1, k2tog, psso on RS
sl 1, k2tog, psso on WS
pattern repeat
k on RS; p on WS
p on RS; k on WS
yo
k2tog on RS
k2tog on WS
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27
25
23
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Border A
16-st repeat
27
25
23
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Border B
16-st repeat
35
33
31
29
27
25
23
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Border C
16-st repeat
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T
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n
of chart 11 times, joining at end of each
WS row according to single join instruc-
tionsno border sts rem. With empty
needle, RS of shawl facing, and working
from left to right, pick up (but do not
knit) each bar between garter ridges
along adjacent long edge of shawl257
picked-up sts. Beg with WS of shawl
facing, work Rows 120 of Edging chart
26 times, joining edging to picked-up
sts by working a double join (see Stitch
Guide) 2 times, then working single
joins until 1 picked-up st rem, then
working a double joinno picked-up sts
rem; chart Row 20 is complete. Work
Rows 120 of chart 11 times, joining to
held border sts at end of each WS row
according to single join instructionsno
border sts rem. With empty needle, RS
of shawl facing, and working from left to
right, pick up (but do not knit) 256 sts
along second long side as for frst. Beg
with WS of shawl facing, work Rows
120 of Edging chart 25 times, then
work Rows 119 once more, joining edg-
ing to picked-up sts by working a double
join 2 times, then working single joins
until 1 picked-up st rem, then working a
double joinno picked-up sts rem. Cut
yarn, leaving a 12" tail. Carefully remove
provisional CO from beg of edging and
place sts on needle. With tail threaded
on a tapestry needle, graft edging sts tog
using Kitchener st (see Glossary).
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends but dont trim
them yet. Block shawl by soaking in
lukewarm water, squeezing out excess
water in a towel, and laying fat to dry,
pinning out each edging point with
a T-pin or threading blocking wires
through edging points if desired. When
shawl is completely dry, unpin it and
trim yarn tails.
Rebecca Blair is a knitter of mostly
lace who lives in southern Ontario,
Canada. Her favorite Jane Austen novel
is Northanger Abbey and her favorite flm
adaptation is the 1995 BBC version of
Persuasion.
6 times, k4110 sts rem. Break yarn
and place sts on holder. Second border:
Carefully remove provisional CO and
place sts on needle. With RS facing, join
yarn and work Rows 128 of Border
A chart, then Rows 128 of Border
B chart, then Rows 135 of Border C
chart. Next row: (WS) K4, k2tog, k5,
[k4, k2tog, k4] 10 times, k5, k2tog,
k5111 sts rem. Edging: Note: WS
of edging is RS of shawl. With attached
working yarn, waste yarn, WS of shawl
facing, and using a provisional method,
CO 8 sts onto right needle. Work Row
20 of Edging chart, joining edging to
shawl according to single join instruc-
tions (see Stitch Guide). Rep Rows 120
of edging, knit last st tog with next st
from shawl, turn.
Row 2: Work next row of edging.
Row 3: Work to last st of edging, knit
last st of edging tog with st in row
below it, turn.
Row 4: Work next row of edging.
SHAWL
Using a provisional method (see Glos-
sary), CO 123 sts. Work Rows 128
of Center chart 11 times, then work
Rows 122 once more. First border:
Work Rows 128 of Border A chart,
then Rows 128 of Border B chart, then
Rows 135 of Border C chart. Next row:
(WS) K3, k2tog, [k8, k2tog, k7, k2tog]
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93) sts, work steek sts as [k1 with
CC, k1 with MC] 2 times, k1 with
CC. (Work steek sts in same manner
throughout.) Shape back: Inc rnd:
*Work to m, M1 in patt, sl m, k1 with
CC, M1 in patt; rep from * once more,
work in patt to end4 sts incd. Rep
inc rnd every 4th rnd 13 (13, 15) more
times, working new sts into patt. At the
same time, when 14 (14, 10) rnds from
CO are completed, shape front as foll.
Shape front: Dec rnd: Ssk in patt, work
in patt to 2 sts before steek, k2tog in
patt, work to end of steek2 sts decd.
Rep dec rnd every other rnd 20 (23,
29) more times203 (239, 283) sts
when all shaping is complete. Work
NEEDLES Body and sleevessize 3
(3.25 mm): 24" circular (cir) and set of
double-pointed (dpn). Edgingsize 1
(2.25 mm): 47" cir. Adjust needle sizes
if necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); locking
markers; tapestry needle; one 1
1
4" but-
ton; size C/2 (2.75 mm) crochet hook
(optional).
GAUGE 31 sts and 31 rnds = 4" in
stranded patt on larger needle.
NOTES
Peplum is worked frst, from the
waist to the hem, and then body
stitches are picked up at the waist
and worked upward toward the neck
and shoulders. Sleeves are worked in
the round with steeks for cuf detail
and armhole.
Steek stitches are not included in
stitch counts.
PEPLUM
With MC and larger needle, CO 189
(231, 279) sts, pm for steek, CO 5 steek
sts (see Notes). Place marker and join
in the rnd. Beg with st 2 (1, 2) and
ending with st 4 (5, 4), work Body
chart over 63 (77, 93) sts, pm, k1 with
CC; beg with st 3 (2, 3) and ending
with st 3 (4, 3), work Body chart over
61 (75, 91) sts, pm, k1 with CC; beg
with st 2 (1, 2) and ending with st 4
(5, 4), work Body chart over 63 (77,
MERYTON COAT
Stephanie Earp
I
nspired by the coats worn by Jane
Austens military characterslike
the despicable Wickhamthe Meryton
Coat is a feminine and modern take on
the Regency era. A simple allover
stranded pattern is an excellent
backdrop for beautiful fnishing details
such as I-cord piping and mitered
corners on edgings. Knitted in the
round with steeks at the front, arm-
holes, and sleeves, this piece is
challenging because it requires
attention to detail, but the result is a
garment worthy of wear at Pemberley.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 30
1
2 (36, 41
1
2)"
bust circumference. Cardigan shown
measures 36".
YARN Jamiesons Shetland Spindrift
(100% Shetland wool; 115 yd [105 m]/
25 g): #125 slate (MC), 7 (8, 10) balls;
#1260 raspberry (CC), 7 (8, 10) balls.
Body
26
1
4 (30
3
4, 36
1
2)"
66.5 (78, 92.5) cm
2
1
4"
5.5 cm
31
1
2 (37, 42
1
4)"
80 (94, 107.5) cm
24
1
2 (29
3
4, 36)"
62 (75.5, 91.5) cm
8
1
2 (9, 9)"
21.5 (23, 23) cm
7
3
4 (8, 8
1
2)"
19.5 (20.5, 21.5) cm
7
1
4 (8, 9)"
18.5 (20.5, 23) cm
3
1
2 (4
1
4, 5)"
9 (11, 12.5) cm
3 (4
1
4, 4
1
4)"
7.5 (11, 11) cm
Left
Sleeve
6"
15 cm
2
3
4"
7 cm
6
3
4 (7
1
4, 7
1
2)"
17 (18.5, 19) cm
16 (16
1
2, 16
1
2)"
40.5 (42, 42) cm
11
1
4 (12, 13)"
28.5 (30.5, 33) cm
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35 (43, 48) sts for each front, 77 (99,
109) sts for back. Double dec rnd: Sssk,
work in patt to 3 sts before center front
steek, k3tog, work steek4 sts decd.
Rep double dec rnd every rnd once
more139 (177, 197) sts rem: 31 (39,
44) sts for each front, 77 (99, 109) sts
front, 77 (99, 109) sts for back. Cont in
patt until armhole measures 6 (6,
6)". Shape neck: Work to 8 (10, 10)
sts before center front steek; BO 8 (10,
10) patt sts, 5 steek sts, and 8 (10, 10)
patt sts; work to end of rnd, then CO 5
new steek sts147 (185, 205) sts rem:
even until piece measures 7 (8, 9)"
from CO. With MC, BO all sts.
BODY
With MC, larger needle, and RS
facing, beg at left of steek, pick up and
knit 189 (231, 279) sts along peplum
CO edge, pm for steek, CO 5 steek sts.
Place marker and join in the rnd. Work
Right Edging chart over 8 sts, pm; beg
with st 1 (2, 2) and ending with st 5 (4,
4), work Body chart over 41 (51, 63)
sts, pm for side, p1 with CC; beg with
st 1 (2, 2) and ending with st 5 (4, 4),
work Body chart over 89 (111, 135)
sts, pm for side, p1 with CC; beg with
st 1 (2, 2) and ending with st 5 (4, 4),
work Body chart to 8 sts before steek,
pm, work Left Edging chart over 8 sts,
work steek sts as [k1 with CC, k1 with
MC] 2 times, k1 with CC. (Work steek
sts in same manner throughout.) Work
6 (6, 8) rnds even. Inc rnd: *Work to
side m, M1 in patt, sl m, p1 with CC,
M1 in patt; rep from * once more,
work in patt to end4 sts incd. Rep
inc rnd every 4th rnd 13 (13, 11) more
times, working new sts into patt245
(287, 327) sts. Work even until piece
measures 7 (8, 8)" from pick-up
rnd, measuring at center back. Shape
armholes: *Work in patt to 10 (10, 13)
sts before side m, BO 21 (21, 27) sts for
underarm; rep from * once more, work
in patt to end203 (245, 273) sts rem:
53 (63, 70) sts for each front, 97 (119,
133) sts for back. Next rnd: *Work to
3 sts before armhole, k3tog, CO 5
steek sts, sssk; rep from * once more,
work to end of rnd195 (237, 265)
sts rem: 51 (61, 68) sts for each front,
93 (115, 129) sts for back. Double dec
rnd: *Work to 3 sts before steek, k3tog,
work steek sts as [k1 with CC, k1 with
MC] 2 times, k1 with CC, sssk; rep
from * once more, work to end8 sts
decd. Rep double dec rnd every rnd 0
(0, 1) more time(s)187 (229, 249) sts
rem: 49 (59, 64) sts for each front, 89
(111, 121) sts for back. Dec rnd: *Work
to 2 sts before steek, k2tog, work steek,
ssk; rep from * once more, work to
end4 sts decd. Rep dec rnd every
other rnd 5 more times163 (205,
225) sts rem: 43 (53, 58) sts for each
MC
CC
using the backward-loop
method, CO 1 st with CC
steek st
pattern repeat
5
3
1
Right Edging
5
3
1
Left Edging
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Cuff
5
3
1
Body
st 5
st 4
st 3
st 2
st 1
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unattached I-cord as foll: *K3, return
3 sts to left needle; rep from * until
I-cord portion measures 3". K3tog1
st rem. Fasten of last st. Tie I-cord
into loop for button and secure to left
front. I-cord piping at sleeves: With
CC, larger needle, and RS facing, beg
at underarm, pick up and knit 92 (98,
98) sts around armhole, picking up
sts in body, not sleeve, and working
as closely as possible to seam without
actually picking up through it. Break
yarn; slide sts to other end of needle.
CO 3 sts onto left needle and work
applied I-cord as for waist. When 3 sts
rem, k3tog and fasten of last st. Bring
tails to WS of garment and weave in
ends. Body edging and neckband: With
CC, smaller needle, and RS facing, beg
at center back neck, pick up and knit 31
(41, 41) sts to left front neck edge and
mark last picked-up st, 138 (147, 161)
sts to left front lower edge (between
steek and body) and mark last picked-up
st, 203 (239, 283) sts along lower edge
to right front and mark last picked-up
st, 138 (147, 161) sts to right front neck
edge and mark last picked-up st, and 30
(40, 40) sts to center back neck540
(614, 686) sts total; 4 marked sts. Place
marker and join in the rnd. Inc rnd:
*Knit to marked st, M1, knit marked
st, M1; rep from * 3 more times, knit
to end8 sts incd. Rep inc rnd every
rnd 4 more times580 (654, 726) sts.
Purl 1 rnd for turning ridge. Next rnd:
*Knit to 1 st before marked st, sk2p;
rep from * 3 more times, knit to end8
sts decd. Rep dec rnd every rnd 8
more times508 (582, 654) sts rem.
Loosely BO all sts. Cuff edging: With
CC, smaller needle, and RS facing, beg
at upper edge of steek, pick up and knit
13 sts along steek (between steek and
sleeve) and mark last st, 47 sts along
cuf edge, 1 st along steek and mark this
st, and 12 more sts along steek73 sts
total; 2 marked sts. Do not join. Next
row: (WS) *Purl to marked st, M1P,
purl marked st, M1P; rep from * once
more, purl to end4 sts incd. Next
row: (RS) *Knit to marked st, M1, knit
marked st, M1; rep from * once more,
knit to end4 sts incd. Rep last 2
rows once more89 sts. Knit 1 WS
4th rnd 5 (0, 3) times, every 3rd rnd 5
(13, 9) times, then every other rnd 2
times22 sts rem. BO all sts.
RIGHT SLEEVE
With MC and larger dpn, CO 39 sts,
pm for steek, CO 5 steek sts, pm for
steek, CO 8 sts47 sts total. Place
marker and join in the rnd. Beg and end-
ing with st 3, work Body chart over 37
sts, work Cuf chart over 4 sts plus steek;
beg with st 4 and ending with st 2, work
Body chart over 5 sts, p1 with CC49
sts. Shape and fnish as for left sleeve.
FINISHING
Block pieces to measurements. Rein-
force steeks if desired (garment shown
used no steek reinforcement) and cut.
Sew sleeves into armholes. Note: If you
have dif culty picking up sts for piping
through garment, use a crochet hook
and transfer sts to needle. I-cord piping
at waist: With CC, larger needle, and
RS facing, beg at right front waist,
pick up and knit 162 (198, 242) sts
around body, ending at left front waist,
using line of picked-up body sts as a
guide. Break yarn; slide sts to other
end of needle. Beg at right front edge,
rejoin yarn, CO 3 sts onto left needle,
then work applied I-cord as foll: *K2,
k2tog tbl, return 3 sts to left needle;
rep from * until 3 sts rem. Work
for back. Dec rnd: Ssk, work in patt to
2 sts before center front steek, k2tog,
work steek2 sts decd. Rep dec rnd
every rnd 3 (5, 5) more times131
(165, 185) sts rem: 27 (33, 38) sts for
each front, 77 (99, 109) sts for back.
Work in patt as established until
armhole measures 8 (9, 9)". Shape
back neck: Work in patt to armhole
steek, BO steek sts, work until there
are 27 (33, 38) sts on right needle after
BO, BO next 23 (33, 33) sts for back
neck, work to armhole steek, BO steek
sts, work to center front steek, BO
steek sts27 (33, 38) sts rem for each
shoulder. Join shoulders: Place 27 (33,
38) left front shoulder sts onto one dpn
and 27 (33, 38) left back shoulder sts
onto another dpn. With RS tog, join
shoulder using 3-needle bind-of (see
Glossary). Rep for right shoulder.
LEFT SLEEVE
With MC and larger dpn, CO 8 sts,
pm for steek, CO 5 steek sts, pm for
steek, CO 39 sts47 sts total. Place
marker and join in the rnd. Beg with
st 3 and ending with st 2, work Body
chart over 6 sts, work Cuf chart over
4 sts plus steek; beg with st 3 and
ending with st 2, work Body chart
over 36 sts, p1 with CC49 sts. Cont
in patt for 6 (4, 3) more rnds. Inc rnd:
M1 in patt, work in patt to last st, M1
in patt, p1 with CC2 sts incd. Rep
inc rnd every 8th (6th, 5th) rnd 12
(15, 19) more times, working new sts
into patt. At the same time, on fnal
rnd of Cuf chart, BO 5 steek sts. Next
rnd: Work to steek BO, CO 6 sts in
patt, cont in patt to end. Work all sts
in patt until piece measures 16 (16,
16)" from CO87 (93, 101) sts.
Shape cap: Work to last 11 (11, 14)
sts; BO 21 (21, 27) sts; work to end of
rnd, then CO 5 steek sts66 (72, 74)
sts rem. Double dec rnd: Sssk, work to
3 sts before steek, k3tog, work steek
sts as [k1 with CC, k1 with MC] 2
times, k1 with CC4 sts decd. Rep
double dec rnd every rnd 1 (1, 2) more
time(s)58 (64, 62) sts rem. Dec rnd:
Ssk, work to 2 sts before steek, k2tog,
work steek2 sts decd. Rep dec rnd
every other rnd 5 more times, every
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21, 25, 32) sts rem for back neck. Place
sts on holder.
RIGHT FRONT
CO 38 (43, 48, 53, 60) sts. Work in St
st until piece measures 2 (2, 2, 2,
3)", ending with a WS row. Work bust
increases as foll:
Row 1: (RS) K10 (10, 12, 12, 14), M1,
k5, M1, k23 (28, 31, 36, 41)2 sts
incd.
Row 2: Purl.
Row 3: K7 (7, 9, 9, 11), M1, k7, M1, k5,
M1, k21 (26, 29, 34, 39)43 (48, 53,
58, 65) sts.
Continue working in St st until piece
measures 5 (5, 5, 6, 6)", ending
with a RS row. Shape armhole: (WS)
Keeping in St st, BO 4 (5, 5, 5, 6) sts
at armhole edge (beg of WS rows)
1 time, then BO 3 sts 1 time36
(40, 45, 50, 56) sts. Ten dec 1 st at
armhole edge every RS row 2 (3, 5, 5,
8) times34 (37, 40, 45, 48) sts rem.
Cont in St st until armhole measures
6 (7, 8, 8, 9)", ending with a WS
row. Shape front neck and shoulder:
Note: Shoulder shaping is introduced
YARN Classic Elite Liberty Wool
(100% washable wool; 122 yd [112 m]
/50 g): #7847 sky, 6 (7, 8, 9, 11) skeins.
NEEDLES Body and sleevessize
6 (4 mm): straight. Applied I-cord and
front closuressize 6 (4 mm): double-
pointed (dpn). Adjust needle size if
necessary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Stitch holder or waste
yarn; tapestry needle; 9 small hook-
and-eye closures.
GAUGE 20 sts and 29 rows = 4" in
St st.
BACK
CO 75 (85, 95, 105, 120) sts. Work
in St st until piece measures 5 (5, 5,
6, 6)" or desired length to armholes,
ending with a WS row. Shape arm-
holes: BO 4 (5, 5, 5, 6) sts at beg of next
2 rows, then BO 3 sts at beg of foll 2
rows61 (69, 79, 89, 102) sts. Dec 1
st each edge every RS row 2 (3, 5, 5,
8) times57 (63, 69, 79, 86) sts rem.
Cont in patt until armholes measure
7 (8, 9, 10, 10)", ending with a
WS row. Shape shoulders: BO 6 (7, 8,
9, 9) sts at beg of next 6 rows21 (21,
row for turning ridge. Next row: (RS)
*Knit to 1 st before marked st, sk2p;
rep from * once more, knit to end4
sts decd. Next row: (WS) *Purl to 1
st before marked st, p3tog; rep from *
once more, purl to end4 sts decd.
Rep last 2 rows 3 more times57 sts
rem. Loosely BO all sts. Press and sew
edgings: Using steam iron on wool set-
ting, press garment to reduce curling of
edges. Turn body and cuf edgings to
WS along turning ridge, covering steek
waste, and sew in place. Press with iron
again to eliminate curling edges. Sew
button to right front opposite button
loop. Weave in loose ends.
Stephanie Earp lives in Kingston,
Ontario, Canada, with her well-thumbed
copies of Jane Austens books. She
manages a flm festival, writes about
television, plays in a rock band, and
knits whenever her hands are free. She
is also a dyeryou can fnd her yarn at
www.vanderrockyarns.com.
EVENING SPENCER
Corrina Ferguson
E
ven on our fanciest occasions,
modern-day dress rarely holds a
candle to period fashions. The
beautiful Empire-waist dresses of Jane
Austens day would be perfectly
accented in a jacket like thisenough
to keep the chill off while wearing a
plunging neckline, but ftted enough
to let the beautiful lines of the dress
show through.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 32 (36, 40, 44,
50)" bust circumference, hooked closed
with fronts meeting at center. Jacket
shown measures 36".
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Ten dec 1 st at armhole edge every RS
row 2 (3, 5, 5, 8) times34 (37, 40, 45,
48) sts rem. Cont in St st until armhole
measures 6 (7, 8, 8, 9)", ending with
a RS row. Shape front neck and shoul-
der: Note: As for right front, shoulder
shaping begins while neck shaping is still in
progress; read the next sections all the way
through before proceeding. For neck shaping,
Row 3: K21 (26, 29, 34, 39), M1, k5,
M1, k7, M1, k7 (7, 9, 9, 11)43 (48, 53,
58, 65) sts.
Continue working in St st until piece
measures 5 (5, 5, 6, 6)", ending with a
WS row. Shape armhole: (RS) Keeping
in St st, BO 4 (5, 5, 5, 6) sts at armhole
edge (beg of RS rows) 1 time, then BO
3 sts 1 time36 (40, 45, 50, 56) sts.
while neck shaping is still in progress;
read the next sections all the way through
before proceeding. For neck shaping, BO
at neck edge (beg of RS rows) 8 (8, 8,
10, 10) sts 1 time, then 3 sts 1 time,
then 2 (2, 2, 2, 3) sts 1 time, then 2 (0,
0, 0, 2) sts 1 (0, 0, 0, 1) time(s), then
dec 1 st at the neck edge 1 (3, 3, 3, 3)
time(s)16 (16, 16, 18, 21) sts total
removed by neck shaping. At the same
time, when armhole measures 7 (8,
9, 10, 10)", shape shoulder by BO
6 (7, 8, 9, 9) sts at beg of next 3 WS
rows18 (21, 24, 27, 27) sts removed
by shoulder shaping; no sts rem after
all neck and shoulder shaping has been
completed.
LEFT FRONT
CO 38 (43, 48, 53, 60) sts. Work in St
st until piece measures 2 (2, 2, 2,
3)", ending with a WS row. Work bust
increases as foll:
Row 1: (RS) K23 (28, 31, 36, 41), M1,
k5, M1, k10 (10, 12, 12, 14).
Row 2: Purl.
Sleeve
7 (9, 10, 10, 11)"
19 (23.5, 25.5, 25.5, 28.5) cm
3 (3, 4, 4, 4)"
8.5 (9, 10, 11.5, 12) cm
13 (15, 17, 18, 20)"
34.5 (39.5, 44.5, 47, 51) cm
4 (5, 6, 6, 6)"
11.5 (13.5, 15, 16, 17) cm
15 (16, 17, 17, 18)"
38 (40.5, 43, 44.5, 47) cm
Right
Front
7 (8, 9, 10, 12)"
19 (21.5, 24, 26.5, 30.5) cm
", 2 cm
7 (8, 9, 10, 10)"
19 (21.5, 24, 25.5, 27.5) cm
5 (5, 5, 6, 6)"
12.5 (12.5, 14, 15, 15) cm
1 (2, 2, 2, 2)"
4.5 (5.5, 5.5, 5.5, 6.5) cm
3 (3, 3, 3, 4)"
8.5 (8.5, 8.5, 9, 11) cm
3 (4, 4, 5, 5)"
9 (11, 12, 14, 14) cm
8 (9, 10, 11, 13)"
21.5 (24, 26.5, 29, 33) cm
Back
4 (4, 4, 5, 6)"
11 (11, 11, 12.5, 16.5) cm
15 (17, 19, 21, 24)"
38 (43, 48.5, 53.5, 61) cm
5 (5, 5, 6, 6)"
12.5 (12.5, 14, 15, 15) cm
7 (8, 9, 10, 10)"
19 (21.5, 24, 25.5, 27.5) cm
", 2 cm
3 (4, 4, 5, 5)"
9 (11, 12, 14, 14) cm
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to WS of right front, with lowest pair
aligned with bottom edge of body, the
highest pair at start of neck shaping,
and rem 7 evenly spaced in between.
Make sure the applied I-cord edging
covers the hook-and-eye closures when
the jacket is hooked closed.
Frog and Leaf Closures: With the dpn,
CO 3 sts and work unattached I-cord
for 6". Work leaf embellishment at
end of cord as foll:
Rows 1: K1, yo, k1, yo, k15 sts.
Rows 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10: Purl.
Row 3: *K2, yo, k1, yo, k27 sts.
Row 5: K3, yo, k1, yo, k39 sts.
Row 7: K1, ssk, k3, k2tog, k17 sts.
Row 9: K1, ssk, k1, k2tog, k15 sts.
Row 11: K1, sl 2 sts as if to k2tog, k1,
pass 2 slipped sts over, k13 sts.
Row 12: P3tog1 st rem.
Fasten of last st. Pick up and knit 3 sts
from CO edge of I-cord and work Rows
112 of leaf again. Make 2 more pieces
with 6" I-cords in the same manner for
loop half of frogs. For button halves of
frogs, make 3 pieces in the same manner
with 8" I-cords, then tie an overhand
knot in the center of each 8" cord to
make a button. Sew the 3 loop halves of
the frogs to the right front centered over
the 2nd, 5th, and 8th eyes counting up
from the bottom of the jacket, twisting
the cords and sewing down the leaves
as shown. Sew the 3 button halves of
the frogs to the left front in the same
manner, centered over the 2nd, 5th, and
8th hooks counting up from the bottom
of the jacket. Weave in all ends. Block
again, if desired.
Corrina Ferguson knits and designs in
Florida where there are only about three
sweater days per year. But she keeps on
knitting anyway and dreams of someday
retiring somewhere where it snows.
FINISHING
Block pieces to measurements. With
yarn threaded on a tapestry needle,
sew shoulder seams. Sew sleeves into
armholes. Sew sleeve and side seams.
Applied I-cord edging
Te edging is worked around the entire
edge of the body and around the sleeve
cufs with RS facing the entire time.
When picking up sts, pick up at a rate of
1 st for each st along CO or BO edges, 1
st for each held back neck st, and about 5
sts for every 7 rows along vertical edges.
Body edging: With dpn, CO 3 sts.
With RS facing, k2, sl last I-cord
st kwise, pick up and knit 1 st from
bottom edge of body near a side seam,
psso. Slide I-cord sts back to the op-
posite end of the needle and bring yarn
around behind the work, in position
to work another RS row. *K2, sl 1 st
kwise, pick up and knit 1 st from body,
psso; rep from * all the way around,
ending at the side seam where you
began. Seam ends of I-cord tog.
Cuff edging: With dpn, CO 3 sts and
work applied I-cord edging around the
CO edge of each sleeve, beg and ending at
the sleeve seam. Seam ends of I-cord tog.
Front Closures
Sew 9 hook halves of hook and eyes
to WS of left front, and 9 eye halves
BO at neck edge (beg of WS rows) 8
(8, 8, 10, 10) sts 1 time, then 3 sts 1
time, then 2 (2, 2, 2, 3) sts 1 time, then
2 (0, 0, 0, 2) sts 1 (0, 0, 0, 1) time(s),
then dec 1 st at the neck edge 1 (3, 3,
3, 3) time(s)16 (16, 16, 18, 21) sts
total removed by neck shaping. At the
same time, when armhole measures 7
(8, 9, 10, 10)", shape shoulder by
BO 6 (7, 8, 9, 9) sts at beg of next 3 RS
rows18 (21, 24, 27, 27) sts removed
by shoulder shaping; no sts rem after
all neck and shoulder shaping has been
completed.
SLEEVES
CO 38 (46, 50, 50, 56) sts. Work in
St st until piece measures 2". Inc 1 st
each edge every 4 rows 6 (6, 12, 16, 18)
times, then every 6 rows 9 (10, 7, 5, 4)
times, working new sts in St st68
(78, 88, 92, 100) sts. Work even in
patt until sleeve measures 15 (16,
17, 17, 18)" or to desired length,
ending with a WS row. Shape cap: BO
4 (5, 5, 5, 6) sts at beg of next 2 rows,
then BO 3 sts at beg of foll 2 rows54
(62, 72, 76, 82) sts rem. Dec 1 st each
end of needle every RS row 11 (14,
16, 17, 17) times32 (34, 40, 42, 48)
sts. BO 2 sts at beg of next 2 (2, 4, 4,
6) rows, then BO 3 sts at beg of foll 4
rows16 (18, 20, 22, 24) sts rem. BO
all sts.
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in upper position, and using Judys Magic
method (see Glossary), CO 216 sts108
sts on each needle. Place 108 sts from
24" cir needle on holder108 sts rem on
16" cir needle. With RS facing, work 1
row in k5, p1 rib. Place marker and join
in the rnd. Work in k5, p1 rib until piece
measures 2" from CO. Work Rows
16 of Lace Edging chart 5 times, then
work Rows 15 once more, working each
Row 6 as foll: Remove m, k1, pm, work
as charted to end of rnd. BO as foll: Sl 1,
then, using the Conch method (see Stitch
Guide), BO all sts.
NARROW EDGING
Transfer 108 held sts onto 16" cir
needle. With RS facing, sl 7 sts to ar-
rive at far edge of next purl column (see
Notes). Place marker and join in the
rnd. Work Rows 16 of Lace Edging
chart 2 times, then work Rows 15
once more. BO as foll: Sl 1, then, using
the conch method, BO all sts.
FIRST TIE
With RS facing and dpn, pick up (but
do not knit) 17 sts by inserting dpn un-
der about every other purl bump along
a column of purl sts in ribbed section of
cowl. With wider lace edging to right-
hand side and larger needle, k17. Do
not join. Set-up row: (WS) Yo, k2tog,
k1, p5, k1, p5, k1, yo, k2tog. Work
Rows 112 of Tie chart 9 times, then
NOTI ONS Locking markers (m);
stitch holder (optional); tapestry needle.
GAUGE 24 sts and 52 rnds = 4" in k5,
p1 rib on larger needle.
NOTES
Locking markers are recommended for
working the lace portions of the cowl
due to the centered double decrease on
Row 6. Use a marker to identify the
purl column that begins each repeat,
and it wont be necessary to remove the
marker and replace it when working
the decrease at the end of the repeat.
Te lace patterns on the top and
bottom of the cowl are purposely
ofset one-half repeat to give a tulip-
like appearance to the k5, p1 section
in the middle. If you would like the
yarnover portions of the lace to align
top and bottom, do not shift the
beginning of the round before begin-
ning the narrow edging.
Stitch Guide
Conch Bind-Off:
** *[K3, transfer 3 sts to left needle]
2 times, BO 3 sts; rep from * 2 more
times, k2, s2pp2, transfer 3 sts to left
needle, k3, transfer 3 sts to left needle,
BO 3 sts; rep from ** around.
COWL
With both cir needles, holding 16" cir
needle in lower position and 24" cir needle
MISS MORLAND S
NECKCLOTH
Kendra Nitta
W
hen Catherine Morland left for
Bath in Northanger Abbey, her
mother wisely advised her to always
wrap yourself up very warm about the
throat, when you come from the rooms
at night. In the spirit of Mrs. Mor-
lands admonitions, this project
reinvents the Regency gentlemans
elaborately tied cravat or neckcloth as
a lacy cowl, perfect for heroines-in-
training like Miss Morland.
This project is worked from the
middle outward, in a gorgeous blend
of buffalo, cashmere, and silk that
shows off the true lace edging on
top and bottom. The long self-ties are
picked up from the purl columns and
worked back and forth in a variation
on the same lace pattern.
Appropriate for indoors or out, wear
your neckcloth two ways: under a crisp
collared shirt, snug against the throat
and knotted in front, as Mr. Tilney
would have worn his; or as a cowl to
complement a cashmere twinset with
the wide lace border at the top and
the ties loosely tied over the shoulder
or in a bow down the front.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 18" in circumfer-
ence and 7" tall; ties measure 2" wide
and 15" long.
YARN Bufalo Gold Lux Lace (45%
bison down, 20% cashmere, 20% silk,
15% Tencel; 330 yd [302 m]/40 g):
plum, 1 skein.
NEEDLES Body and tiessize 2
(3 mm): 16" and 24" circular (cir);
size 1 (2.5 mm) or smaller: set of
double-pointed (dpn). Adjust needle
sizes if necessary to obtain the cor-
rect gauge.
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FI NI SHED SI ZE 32 (36, 40,
44, 51)" bust circumference (with 1"
positive ease). Shown in size 36".
YARN Berroco Linsey (64% cotton,
36% linen; 114 yd [104 m]/50 g): #6550
blonde, 4 (5, 5, 6, 7) skeins.
NEEDLES BodySize 7 (4.5 mm):
straight and double pointed needles
(dpn). Adjust needle size if necessary to
obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Tapestry needle; size G/6
(4.25 mm) crochet hook; one 1" button.
GAUGE 20 sts and 29 rows = 4" in
St st.
Stitch Guide
Seed Stitch: (Worked over an even
number of sts)
Row 1: *K1, p1, rep from * across.
On following rows, knit the purls and
purl the knits.
BACK
With straight needles, CO 82 (92, 102,
112, 128). Work seed st (see Stitch
Guide) for 19 rows. Beg with a RS
row, work St st for 2 rows. Short-row
shaping: (RS) Knit to 27 (30, 35, 38,
43) sts from the end of the row, w&t
(see Glossary), sl1 st pwise wyf, purl to
27 (30, 35, 38, 43) sts from end, *w&t,
sl1 st pwise wyb, knit to wrapped st,
knit wrapped st hiding the wrap (see
Glossary), k1, w&t, sl1 pwise wyf, purl
to wrapped st, purl wrapped st hiding
EMMA SHRUG
Tian Connaughton
F
or my design, I drew inspiration
from Emma Woodhouses free-
spirited nature as well as the ftted
bodices of the Regency period dress;
all well tailored with beautiful firty,
feminine details that would perfectly
suit women of all sizes and ages. I
have a very simplistic design
aesthetic, blending undemanding
shapes with clean, understated
details. My vision for this design was
to create a modern and romantic
shrug, which I imagined Emma
would wear on a summer day while
at the pianoforte or at a dinner
party. The design, while simple in
nature, adds touches of detail in the
short-row shaping at the back and
firty crochet edging. While crochet
gives the firty feminine touches I
was after, I fnd the crochet also add
strength and stability to the shape of
the fnished garment.
work Rows 1320 once25 sts. Using
the conch method, BO all sts, working
last 3 sts of row as k3tog before BO.
SECOND TIE
With narrow lace edging at top, count
4 purl columns to right of frst tie. With
dpn, pick up (but do not knit) 17 sts along
purl column as before. With wider lace
edging to left-hand side (WS of ties will
face each other) and larger needle, k17.
Beg with set-up row, work as for frst tie.
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends. Block to measure-
ments. To wear as neckcloth: Beg with
wider lace edge on bottom and ties in
back; cross ties to pull snug, then tie in
a half or full knot in front, taking care
to have RS of ties showing around neck.
To wear as cowl: Beg with wider lace
edge on bottom and ties in front or to
the sides; tie in a loose half knot or bow.
Kendra Nitta is a member of the Jane
Austen Society of North America and a
fan of Northanger Abbey. She knits, sews,
and designs primarily with silk and plant-
based fbers. Follow along at www
.missknitta.com.
* 6
5
3
1
3
3
3
Lace Edging
* Work as given in directions
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
3
3
Tie
k2tog on WS
ssk on WS
sl 2 as if to k2tog, p1, p2sso
no stitch
pattern repeat
3
k on RS; p on WS
p on RS; k on WS
yo
k2tog on RS
ssk on RS
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 121
neckline shaping are worked at the same
time. Shape armhole: (RS) BO 3 (3, 4,
4, 5) sts, k to end of row37 (43, 46,
52, 59) sts rem. Purl 1 WS row. Dec
1 st at the beg of every RS row as foll:
[k1, k2tog, knit to end of row] 5 (5, 6,
9, 12) times and at the same time, when
armhole measures 1 (1, 2, 2, 2)"
end after a WS row. Neckline shaping:
Cont to shape armhole until completed
and dec 1 st at the end of every RS row
as foll: [knit to last 3 sts, ssk, k1] 14
(16, 15, 17, 18) times and at the same
time, when armhole measures 5 (5,
the wrap, p1, rep from * 11 (12, 14,
15, 17) times2 (3, 4, 5, 6) sts rem
unwrapped at each end. Switch to St
st. Cont until piece measures 7 (7, 8,
8, 8)" along side edges, ending after
a WS row. Shape armholes: (RS) BO 3
(3, 4, 4, 5) sts at beg of next 2 rows76
(86, 94, 104, 118) sts rem. Dec 1 st
each end on every RS row as foll: [k1,
k2tog, knit to last 3 sts, ssk, k1] 5 (5,
6, 9, 12) times66 (76, 82, 86, 94)
sts rem. Work even until armhole
measures 5 (5, 6, 6, 6)" ending
after a WS row. Shape upper armholes:
(RS) Inc 1

st at each end on every RS
row as follows: [k1, m1, k to 1 st before
end, m1, k1] 6 times78 (88, 94, 98,
106) sts. Work 3 rows in St st, ending
after a WS row. BO all sts.
LEFT FRONT
With straight needles, CO 16 (20, 22,
26, 34). Work 3 rows in seed st. Front
edge body shaping: (RS) Cont in seed
st, inc 1 st at end of every RS row as foll:
[work to last st maintaining patt, m1, k1]
8 times24 (28, 30, 34, 42) sts. Work 1
WS row in seed st. Switch to St st, cont
to inc 1 st every RS row 16 (18, 20, 22,
22) times40 (46, 50, 56, 64) sts. Work
in St st until piece measures 7 (7, 8,
8, 8)" from cast on, ending after a
WS row. Note: Read the following instruc-
tions before beginningthe armhole and
6, 6, 6)" end after a WS row. Shape
upper armhole: Cont to shape neckline
until completed and inc 1 st at the beg
of every RS row as foll: [k1, m1, work
to end] 6 times24 (28, 31, 32, 35)
sts rem after all shaping is completed.
Work 3 rows in St st, ending after a
WS row. BO all sts.
RIGHT FRONT
With straight needles, CO 16 (20,
22, 26, 34). Work 3 rows in seed st.
Front edge body shaping: (RS) Cont
in seed st, inc 1 st at beg of every RS
Back
2"
5 cm
1
4

(
1
5
,

1
6
,

1
6
1

2
,

1
7
1

2
)
"
3
5
.
5

(
3
8
,

4
0
.
5
,

4
2
,

4
4
.
5
)

c
m
16
1
2 (18
1
2, 20
1
2, 22
1
2, 25
1
2)"
42 (47, 52, 57.25, 64.75) cm
7 (7
1
2, 8, 8
1
4, 8
3
4)"
17.75 (19, 20.25, 21, 22.25) cm
7 (7
1
2, 8, 8
1
4, 8
3
4)"
17.75 (19, 20.25, 21, 22.25) cm
3
1
2 (3
3
4, 4
1
2, 4
3
4, 5
1
4)"
8.75 (9.5, 10.75, 12, 13.25) cm
6 (6
1
2, 6
1
2, 6
3
4, 7
1
4)"
15.25 (16.5, 16.5, 17.25, 18.5) cm
13
1
4 (15
1
4, 16
1
2, 17
1
4, 18
3
4)"
33.75 (38.75, 42, 43.75, 47.75) cm
4
3
4 (5
1
2, 6
1
4, 6
1
2, 7)"
12 (14, 15.75, 16.5, 17.75) cm
Left
Front
4
3
4 (5
1
2, 6
1
4, 6
1
2, 7)"
12 (14, 15.75, 16.5, 17.75) cm
5
1

2

(
6
,

6
,

6
,

6
)
"
1
4

(
1
5
.
2
5
,

1
5
.
2
5
,

1
5
.
2
5
,

1
5
.
2
5
)

c
m
2"
5 cm
7 (7
1
2, 8, 8
1
4, 8
3
4)"
17.75 (19, 20.25, 21, 22.25) cm
7 (7
1
2, 8, 8
1
4, 8
3
4)"
17.75 (19, 20.25, 21, 22.25) cm
8 (9
1
4, 10, 11
1
4, 12
3
4)"
20.25 (23.5, 25.4, 28.5, 32.5) cm
3
1
4 (4, 4
1
2, 5
1
4, 6
3
4)"
8.25 (10.25, 11.5, 13.25, 17.25) cm
JAK_106-131_Town.indd 121 9/29/11 1:29 PM
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31, 32, 35) sts rem after all shaping is
completed. Work 3 rows St st, end-
ing after a WS row. BO all sts.
I- CORD BUTTON LOOP
With dpns, CO 3 sts. Work in I-cord
(see Glossary) for 4". BO all sts.
FINISHING
Seam shoulders and sides.
Crochet edge neckband: With WS fac-
ing, attach yarn with sl st on left front
at frst neckline inc. Single crochet (sc;
see Glossary) 45 (48, 47, 50, 52) evenly
along left front neckline, sc 30 (32, 34,
36, 40) evenly across back neck, sc 45
(48, 47, 50, 52) evenly down the right
front neckline, turn120 (128, 128,
136, 144) sc. Ch-2, *sk 3 sc, work 8
dc in next sc, sk 3 sc, sc in next sc; rep
from * to end. Fasten of and weave in
ends.
Shoulder edging: With WS facing,
attach yarn with sl st at frst upper
armhole inc. Sc 12 to shoulder seam,
then sc 12 more, turn24 sc. Ch 2, *sk
3 sc, work 8 dc in next sc, sk 3 sc, sc in
next sc; rep from * to end. Fasten of and
weave in ends.
Sew I-cord on right front at base of
crochet edging. Sew button on left
front opposite button loop. Weave in all
ends. Block again, if desired.
Tian Connaughton is a wife and mom.
She works in fnance and is an aspir-
ing crochet/knitwear designer living in
rural western Massachusetts. When
she is not hanging out with her son and
husband or chasing chickens out of her
gardens, she can be found in her offce
playing with fber, watching Sense and
Sensibility or Pride and Prejudice, yet
again. You can fnd out more of her
designs at tian-knitdesigns.blogspot
.com.
row as follows: [k1, m1, work to end
maintaining patt] 8 times24 (28,
30, 34, 42) sts. Work 1 WS row in
seed st. Switch to St st, cont to inc 1
st every RS row 16 (18, 20, 22, 22)
times40 (46, 50, 56, 64) sts. Work
in St st until piece measures 7 (7, 8,
8, 8)" from cast on, ending after
a RS row. Note: Read the following
instructions before beginningthe
armhole and neckline shaping are
worked at the same time. Shape arm-
hole: (WS) BO 3 (3, 4, 4, 5) sts, purl
to end of row37 (43, 46, 52, 59) sts
rem. Dec 1 st at the end of every RS
row as follows: [knit to last 3 sts, ssk,
k1] 5 (5, 6, 9, 12) times and at the
same time, when armhole measures
1 (1, 2, 2, 2)" end after a WS
row. Neckline shaping: Cont to shape
armhole until completed and dec 1
st at the beg of every RS row as foll:
[k1, k2tog, k to end of row] 14 (16,
15, 17, 18) times and at the same
time, when armhole measures 5 (5,
6, 6, 6)" end after a WS row.
Shape upper armhole: Cont to shape
neckline until completed and inc 1 st
at end of every RS row as foll: [work
to last st, m1, k1] 6 times24 (28,
KENSINGTON
MITTS
Annie Modesitt
T
he measured, linear beauty of the
gardens at Kensington Palace are
refected in the strong horizontal lines
of these fngerless mitts. Not intended
for gardening, these mitts are perfect
for offering fngertips to a gentleman at
a summer ball.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 4 (5
1
2, 6
3
4, 8
1
4)"
hand circumference and 16 (16
1
2, 17,
17
1
2)" long. Mitts shown measure 6
3
4".
YARN Madelinetosh Tosh Sock
(100% superwash Merino; 395 yd
[361 m]/100 g): oak, 1 skein.
NEEDLES Size 4 (3.5 mm): set of
double-pointed (dpn). Adjust needle
size if necessary to obtain the correct
gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch
holder or waste yarn; tapestry needle.
GAUGE 35 sts and 35 rows = 4" in
horseshoe lace patt.
Stitch Guide
Triple Twist Drop Stitch: Insert needle
into next st and wrap yarn 3 times
around both needles, then wrap yarn
around right needle and draw through
double wraps; drop double wraps from
needles. Do not pull stitch tight or
adjust tension until next row.
Vertical Double Increase (VDI): (K1, yo,
k1tbl) in same st2 sts incd.
MITTS (MAKE 2)
CO 36 (48, 60, 72) sts. Place marker
and join in the rnd. Work 4 rnds in
garter st (purl 1 rnd, knit 1 rnd). Arm:
Work Rows 110 of Horseshoe Lace
chart once. Work 4 rnds in garter st.
*Work Rows 110 of Horseshoe Lace
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 123
Rows 4 and 5 of chart 2 (3, 4, 5) times,
or to desired length. Work Rows 6 and
7 of chart once36 (48, 60, 72) sts.
Hand: Work 4 rnds in garter st. Thumb
Gusset:
Rnd 1: RLI (see Glossary), pm for end
of gusset, work Row 1 of Horseshoe
Lace chart to end of rnd37 (49, 61,
73) sts; 1 gusset st between m.
Rnd 2: VDI (see Stitch Guide), sl m,
work in patt to end of rnd39 (51, 63,
75) sts; 3 gusset sts between m.
Rnd 3: K1, VDI, k1, sl m, work in patt
to end of rnd41 (53, 65, 77) sts; 5
gusset sts between m.
Rnd 4: Knit to m, sl m, work in patt to
end of rnd.
Rnd 5: RLI, knit to m, LLI (see Glos-
sary), sl m, work in patt to end2
gusset sts incd.
Rep last 2 rnds 3 more times49 (61,
73, 85) sts; 13 gusset sts. Work 9 rnds
evenRow 10 of chart is complete.
Work 3 rnds in garter st. Next rnd:
Place 13 gusset sts on holder, knit to
end of rnd36 (48, 60, 72) sts rem.
chart 2 times. Work 4 rnds in garter
st. Next rnd: Work triple twist drop
st (see Stitch Guide) in each st. Work
4 rnds in garter st. Rep from * once
more. Work Rows 110 of Horseshoe
Lace chart 2 times. Work 4 rnds in
garter st. Wrist: Work Rows 1 and 2
of Wrist chart 5 times. Work Row 3
of chart30 (40, 50, 60) sts rem. Rep
Fingers: Work Rows 1 and 2 of Finger
chart 3 (4, 5, 6) times, or to desired
length, then work Rows 38 once24
(32, 40, 48) sts rem. Loosely BO all sts.
THUMB
Transfer 13 gusset sts to needles, then
pick up and knit 2 (3, 4, 5) sts along
hand edge of thumb opening15 (16,
17, 18) sts total. Place marker and join
in the rnd. Work 4 (6, 8, 10) rnds in
St st, or to desired length, then work 4
rnds in garter st. Loosely BO all sts.
FINISHING
Weave in loose ends. Steam-block.
Annie Modesitt lives in St. Paul, Min-
nesota, with her husband, children,
pets and many, many books. She agrees
with Miss Austen that the person, be it
gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure
in a good novel, must be intolerably
stupid.
9
7
5
3
1
Horseshoe Lace
12-st repeat
7
5
3
1
Finger
5
3
7
1
Wrist
knit
purl
yo
ssp
sl 2 as if to k2tog, k1, p2sso
RLPI (see Glossary)
pattern repeat
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crochet hook and worked
into the piece as you go; there
is no need to thread beads
onto your working yarn. A
satin lining and velvet ribbon
handles fnish the bag.
Stitch Guide
Garter Rib (back and forth):
Row 1: (RS) K1, *p1, k1; rep
from * to end.
Row 2: Purl.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 for patt.
Garter Rib (in the round):
Rnd 1: K1, *p1, k1; rep from *
to * end.
Rnd 2: Knit.
Rep Rnd 1 and 2 for patt.
Place Bead and Knit 1 (pb k1):
Slide one bead onto the
crochet hook, then slip the
frst live knitted stitch from
left-hand needle onto the
crochet hook. Draw knitted
stitch through bead, sliding
bead over loop, place beaded
loop back onto the left-hand
needle, and knit 1.
HANDLE CASING (MAKE 2)
With smaller cir, use the long-tail
method (see Glossary) to CO 87 sts,
leaving an extra 16" on tail for seaming
the casing. Work back and forth in
garter rib (see Stitch Guide) until piece
measures 2", ending after a WS row.
Sl sts for frst casing onto a holder and
MISS BENNET S
BEADED BAG
Joanna Johnson
A
vintage dressing gown embel-
lished with cascading apples
inspired the descending snowfake lace
on this beaded bag. Velvet ribbon used
as handles adds a feminine, traditional
touch and can easily be replaced with
circular or D-shaped handles for a
modern twist. The bag is reminiscent
of a drawstring reticule, yet slightly
larger than bags generally used by
Janes contemporaries. This would be
the perfect evening bag for carrying a
small notebook or novel, should the
evenings formal company grow
tiresome or dull. It would also make a
great project bag for the modern
knitter at home or abroad.
FI NI SHED SI ZE About 12" wide
and 12" high.
YARN Spud & Chlo Fine (80%
wool, 20% silk; 248 yd [ 227 m]/65 g):
#7807 tutu, 2 skeins.
NEEDLES Size 1 (2.25 mm): 24"
circular (cir); Size 2 (2.75 mm): 24"
cir. Adjust needle sizes if necessary to
obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Markers (m); stitch
holders; tapestry needle; 126 size 8
transparent luster amethyst Delica
beads; size 9 (1.40 mm) steel crochet
hook; 1 yd 1" wide velvet ribbon; 13"
24" rectangle of satin fabric; sewing
thread and needle.
GAUGE 30 sts and 38 rows = 4" in St
st on larger needles.
NOTE
Tis bag is worked from the top down,
from the handle casings to the base,
which is fnished with a 3-needle bind-
of. Te beads are added using a small
cut yarn. Keep sts from second casing
on needle, do not cut yarn.
BAG
Switch to larger cir, and knit across
87 sts from second casing, pm, use the
backward-loop method (see Glossary)
to CO 3 sts to the right-hand needle,
pm, knit across 87 sts from the frst
casing, pm, CO 3 sts to the right-
knit
purl
sl 1 pwise wyb
skp
yo
k2tog
sk2p
pb k1 (see Stitch Guide)
stitch marker
pattern repeat
55
53
51
49
47
45
43
41
39
37
35
33
31
29
27
25
23
21
19
17
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
Lace and Bead
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 125
folding hem toward the wrong side of
the lining. Slip lining into bag with
wrong sides of bag and lining together
and secure lining to the edge of the
casing using a whipstitch.
Joanna Johnson is the author and
designer of the knitting picture books
Phoebes Sweater and Freddies Blanket,
which are illustrated by her husband,
Eric, and published by their indepen-
dent press, Slate Falls Press. They live
in Loveland, Colorado, with their three
children, who offer continual inspiration
for their stories. She is happily working
on her third childrens book.
hand needle, pm indicating beg of the
rnd180 sts. Work as foll to create faux
seam along side of bag:
Rnd 1: [Knit to m, sl m, p1, sl 1 pwise
wyb, p1, sl m] twice.
Rnd 2: Knit.
Rep Rnds 1 and 2 for 4", ending after
Rnd 2.
Beg working in lace patt, cont to work
the faux seam between m on each side
of bag. Work Rnds 156 of Lace and
Bead chart.
Switch to smaller cir, remove beg of rnd
m and knit to 1st m, remove marker,
k2, m1, k1, remove 2nd m, knit to 3rd
m, remove m, k2, pm for new beg of
rnd, m1, p1182 sts. Cont working
garter rib in the rnd for 1".
Divide sts evenly onto each end of cir
needle and use a third needle to fnish
the bottom of the bag using 3-needle
bind-of holding the wrong sides
together. Te seam should be visible on
the RS.
FINISHING
Leaving CO tails long for seaming the
handle casing, weave in all other rem
ends and block bag to 12" wide and 13"
high. Using CO tails, fold casing in half
toward the inside of the bag and sew
to the bag, leaving a slot at each end to
place ribbon or handles through. Cut
ribbon in half and slide through casing
and knot, tie, or sew ends to secure.
LINING
Fold satin fabric in half for lining and
sew side seams with a running stitch
leaving a " seam allowance. Sew a 1"
hem along the top of the bag lining,
SENSE
AND FASHION
HANDWARMERS
Hannah Poon
T
hese light and lacy handwarmers
are deceptively simple since they
use a four-row pattern repeat for the
body. They work up quickly for an easy
entry into the world of lace. Both
handwarmers can be knitted in an
afternoon. Working the pattern in a silk/
wool blend provides plenty of stretch so
that one size will ft most hands. The
cuffs of these handwarmers are worked
in two repeats of eighteen stitches, with
the glove worked in four repeats of nine
stitches. To maintain this balance, a
slightly larger size can be obtained by
increasing the gauge with a larger
needle, rather than increasing the
number of stitches worked (use Size 6
for the small size and Size 7 for the
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large size). The pattern is perfectly
symmetrical, allowing the left and right
hands to be knitted identically.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 6 (7
1
4)" hand
circumference and 8 (9
1
2)" long. Hand-
warmer shown in smaller size.
YARN Louisa Harding Grace Silk
& Wool (50% Merino, 50% silk; 110 yd
[101 m]/50 g): #6 ruby, 1 (2) balls.
NEEDLES Smaller size: Size 6
(4 mm): set of double-pointed (dpn).
Larger size: Size 7 (4.5 mm): set of dpn.
Adjust needle size if necessary to obtain
the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Tapestry needle; stitch
holder.
GAUGE Smaller size: 24 sts and 28
rnds = 4" in patt. Larger size: 20 sts
and 22 rnds = 4" in patt.
NOTES
Because these handwarmers are knit-
ted lace, blocking will be necessary to
achieve the fnal size. Te gauge swatch
should be blocked before measure-
ments are taken.
Due to the wool content of these
handwarmers, the smaller size will
stretch to accommodate a wrist up
to 8
1
2" around and will comfortably ft
most ladies hands.
Stitch Guide
Wavy Lace Edging: (multiple of 18 sts)
Rnds 1 and 2: Knit.
Rnd 3: [K2tog] 3 times, [yo, k1] 6
times, [k2tog] 3 times.
Rnd 4: Purl, adjusting sts evenly across
needles.
Rep Rnds 14 for pattern.
Vine Lace: (multiple of 9 sts)
Rnd 1: *Yo, k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, yo, k1;
rep from * around.
Rnds 2 and 4: Knit.
Rnd 3: *K1, yo, k2, ssk, k2tog, k2, yo;
rep from * around.
Rep Rnds 14 for pattern.
Thumb Pattern:
Rnd 1: K3, k2tog, yo, k2, yo, ssk, k3,
yo, ssk, k2tog, yo.
Rnd 2: Knit.
Rep Rnds 1 and 2 for pattern.
Picot Edging Bind-Off:
*CO 2 sts, BO 4 sts, sl last st from right
needle to left needle; rep from * around.
Fasten of last st.
HANDWARMERS (MAKE 2)
CO 36 sts and join in the rnd, being
careful not to twist sts. Work wavy lace
edging (see Stitch Guide) for 8 rnds.
Knit 1 rnd. Work Rnds 14 of vine
lace patt (see Stitch Guide) 4 times.
Shape thumb gusset: Next rnd: M1,
work Rnd 1 of vine lace patt to end1
gusset st. Knit 1 rnd. Next rnd: K1f&b,
work Rnd 3 of vine lace patt to end2
gusset sts. Knit 1 rnd. Next rnd: K1,
M1, k1, work Rnd 1 of vine lace patt to
end3 gusset sts. Knit 1 rnd. Next rnd:
K1, k1f&b, k1, work Rnd 3 of vine lace
patt to end4 gusset sts. Knit 1 rnd.
Next rnd: K1, yo, k2, yo, k1, work Rnd
1 of vine lace patt to end6 gusset sts.
Knit 1 rnd. Next rnd: K2, yo, k2, yo, k2,
work Rnd 3 of vine lace patt to end8
gusset sts. Knit 1 rnd. Next rnd: K3,
yo, k2, yo, k3, work Rnd 1 of vine lace
patt to end10 gusset sts. Knit 1 rnd.
Next rnd: K4, yo, k2, yo, k4, work Rnd 3
of vine lace patt to end12 gusset sts.
Knit 1 rnd. Place first 12 sts of rnd on
holder, work Rnd 1 of vine lace patt to
end36 sts rem. Cont in vine lace patt
for 11 more rnds, ending with Rnd 4.
Using picot edging bind-off (see Stitch
Guide), BO all sts. Thumb: Place 12 sts
from holder onto 2 needles. With an
empty needle and beg at end of gusset
sts, pick up and knit 4 sts along crook
of thumb16 sts total; rnd beg at end
of picked-up sts. Work thumb patt (see
Stitch Guide) for 6 rnds. Using picot
edging bind-off, BO all sts. Weave in
loose ends.
Hannah Poon has been a knitter and
crocheter for fourteen years but only
began to dabble in the world of design in
the last two years. Her hobbies are not
limited to knitting, as she also spins and
weaves, enjoys beadwork, card making,
and scrapbooking. She has a personal
fondness for gloves, especially fngerless
gloves, as a means to try out new stitches
and ideas. In whatever spare time
Hannah can fnd, she enjoys Regency
dancing with her local historic society
and has even convinced her husband that
a country dance is an enjoyable way to
spend an evening.
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DIAMOND AND
CROSS RETICULE
Kendra Nitta
S
ay what you will about the insuffer-
able Mrs. Elton and her caro sposo,
but the lady could accessorize! When
Emma arrives at the home of Mrs. and
Miss Bates, she sees Mrs. Elton with
a sort of anxious parade of mystery,
fold up a letter which she had appar-
ently been reading aloud to Miss
Fairfax, and return it to the purple and
gold reticule by her side, saying, with
signifcant nods, We can fnish this
some other time, you know. Our
methods of sharing notes may have
changed from ink and paper to
smartphones, but a great little bag for
stowing away treasures never goes out
of style.
Worked seamlessly in a traditional
lozenge shape, this charming reticule
features the Cross and Diamond
mosaic pattern from Charted Knitting
Designs (Schoolhouse Press, 1998) by
Barbara G. Walker, worked stranded
Diamond
12-st repeat
15
13
11
9
7
5
3
1
MC
CC
pattern repeat
rather than slip-stitched. Other than
the I-cord handles and tassel, there is
virtually no fnishing, making this a
wonderful, quick gift or a special
indulgence for yourself.
FI NI SHED SI ZE About 7" in
circumference and 7" tall, excluding
handles and tassel.
YARN Yarn Love Elizabeth Bennet
(65% superfne Merino wool, 20%
bamboo, 15% silk; 195 yd [178 m]/50
g): stallion (brown; MC) and safron
(CC), 1 skein each.
NEEDLES Sizes 2 and 3 (2.75 and
3.25 mm): set of double-pointed (dpn).
Adjust needle sizes if necessary to
obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Waste yarn for provision-
al CO; markers (m); tapestry needle.
GAUGE 31 sts and 38 rnds = 4" in
St st on smaller needles; 31 sts and
30 rnds = 4" in charted patt on larger
needles.
NOTES
Te lining is slightly narrower and
shorter than the exterior of the
piece to help prevent the exterior
of the bag from being pulled out of
shape by bulky or heavy contents. If
you modify the width or length, be
sure to adjust the lining dimensions
accordingly.
As a special surprise for the recipient,
you may also wish to use duplicate
stitch to add a monogram or other
design to the bag lining. Te best
time to do this is when you pause
to weave in the loose ends before
working the decrease rounds of the
base. You may fnd it easier to split
your yarn and work only with about
half the number of plies or to use
embroidery foss. If you have never
tried duplicate stitch before, practice
your design on your swatch.
Instructions are provided for a yarn
tassel, but you can also dress up your
reticule with a beaded tassel that you
can make or purchase.
BAG
Outer bag: With MC, larger needles,
and using a provisional method (see
Glossary), CO 60 sts. Place marker and
join in the rnd. Work 3 rnds in rev St
st (purl every rnd). Next rnd: *K12, pm;
rep from * around. Colorwork: Work
Rnds 116 of Diamond chart 2 times,
then work Rnd 1 once more. Break
CC. With MC, knit 1 rnd. Change
to smaller needles. Work 3 rnds in
rev St st, then 2 rnds in St st. Dec rnd:
*Knit to 2 sts before m, k2tog; rep
from * around5 sts decd. Rep dec
rnd every rnd 3 more times40 sts
rem. Knit 1 rnd, removing all m except
beg-of-rnd m. Eyelet rnd: *K3tog, [yo] 3
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overcoat with layered capes around the
shoulders. I wanted to create a
womans cloak that would be similarly
dashing, warm, and generously cut
suitable for a young lady who appreci-
ates the fner things but has only just
grown out of rolling down hills.
FI NI SHED SI ZE 67
1
4 (73, 81
1
2,
87, 91
3
4)" lower edge circumference,
with front edges meeting at center. To
ft bust size 29 (33, 37, 41, 45)" or 37
(41, 46, 50, 54)" circumference around
outside of upper arms at bustline. Cape
shown measures 81
1
2" at lower edge.
YARN Schulana Kid Seta (70% kid
mohair, 30% silk; 230 yd [210 m]/25 g):
#1 silver (MC), 2 (2, 3, 3, 3) skeins; #33
light gray (CC1), 2 (2, 3, 3, 3) skeins;
#31 charcoal (CC2), 2 (2, 2, 3, 3) skeins.
NEEDLES Cape layerssize 7
(4.5 mm): 40" to 60" circular (cir)
needle. Collarsize 4 (3.5 mm): straight
or 24" cir. Adjust needle sizes if neces-
sary to obtain the correct gauge.
NOTI ONS Smooth waste yarn;
markers (m); locking markers; tapestry
needle; size E/4 (3.5 mm) and G/6
(4.0 mm) crochet hooks; sweater clip
(optional).
GAUGE 19 sts and 28 rows = 4" in St
st on larger needle before blocking; 17
sts = 4" (10 cm) in St st on larger needle
after blocking; 19 sts and 38 rows = 4"
in seed st on smaller needle with two
strands of yarn held together.
NOTES
Each of the three layers is worked
separately from the top down.
Te two shoulders and back neck of
each layer are worked in short-rows,
then worked down from the shoul-
ders to the lower edge.
If your across-shoulder measurement
difers signifcantly from that speci-
fed for your size, work the neck and
shoulders using the size that fts you
best, and adjust the rate of increases
in the body to achieve an appropriate
fnal circumference.
If you drop a stitch in the lower body
and dont notice it until several rows
later, dont try to recover the stitch
with a crochet hookyoull end
picot turning rnd, taking care to match
eyelets. Block lightly to measurements,
emphasizing pentagonal shape, if
desired. Tread I-cord through eyelets
and tie ends tog so that knot is on
inside of piece. Tassel: Cut a 4" length
of CC and set aside. Wrap CC 2530
times around fngers, or until tassel
is desired thickness. For a two-toned
tassel (not shown), hold both MC and
CC tog and wrap 1315 times. Using 4"
length of CC, tie loops tog at one end,
pulling tightly. Tread MC tail from
base onto tapestry needle and draw
through knot at top of tassel loops,
bringing tassel up to base of piece.
Wrap tail tightly around tassel loops
several times about " below knot,
using tapestry needle to tie of securely.
Cut loops at bottom of tassel; trim as
needed.
Kendra Nitta knitted up the sample of
this reticule at the 2011 Gala Spring
Meeting of the Jane Austen Society of
North AmericaSouthwest Region, cele-
brating the 200th anniversary of Sense &
Sensibility. She knits, sews, and designs
primarily with silk and plant-based fbers.
Follow along at www.missknitta.com.
PICTURESQUE CAPE
Sharon Fuller
T
his romantic layered cape is
named in honor of Catherine
Morland, the heroine of Northanger
Abbey. Perhaps she would wear it to
the dance at the Lower Rooms where
she meets Henry Tilney or on their walk
around Beechen Cliff as he instructs
her in the picturesque.
For all its femininity, the design is
actually inspired by a mans garrick, an
times, ssk; rep from * around. Next rnd:
*K1, (p1, k1, p1) into triple yo, k1; rep
from * around. Inc rnd: *K8, using the
backward-loop method (see Glossary),
CO 1 st, pm; rep from * around45
sts. Inc rnd: Work to m, CO 1 st, sl m;
rep from * around5 sts incd. Rep inc
rnd every rnd 2 more times60 sts.
Work 5 rnds even in St st. Picot turning
rnd: *K2tog, yo; rep from * around.
Lining: Work 5 rnds in St st, verifying
that m are still placed every 12 sts. Dec
rnd: *Work to 2 sts before m, k2tog;
rep from * around5 sts decd. Rep
dec rnd every rnd 3 more times40 sts
rem. Knit 1 rnd, removing all m except
beg-of-rnd m. Lining eyelet rnd: *K3tog,
[yo] 3 times, ssk; rep from * around.
Next rnd: *K1, (p1, k1, p1) into triple
yo, k1; rep from * around. Inc rnd: *K8,
CO 1 st, pm; rep from * around45
sts. Inc rnd: *Work to m, CO 1 st, sl
m; rep from * around50 sts. Knit 1
rnd. Change to CC. Work even in St
st until piece measures 5" from picot
turning rnd. Dec rnd: *Knit to 2 sts
before m, k2tog; rep from * around5
sts decd. Rep dec rnd every rnd 8 more
times5 sts rem. Break yarn, leaving a
6" tail. Tread tail onto tapestry needle
and draw through rem sts. Pull tight to
gather sts and fasten of on WS.
BASE
Remove provisional CO and place 60
sts onto smaller needles. Place marker
and join in the rnd. With MC, knit 1
rnd. Turn piece WS out and weave in
loose ends, adjusting tension as needed.
Turn piece RS out; if desired, add
duplicate st monogram or other decora-
tion (not shown, see Notes). Set-up rnd:
*K12, pm; rep from * around. Dec rnd:
*Knit to 2 sts before m, k2tog; rep from
* around5 sts decd. Rep dec rnd
every rnd 10 more times5 sts rem.
Break yarn, leaving a 10" tail. Tread
tail onto tapestry needle and draw
through rem sts. Pull tight to gather
sts; leave tail on RS.
FINISHING
With MC and smaller needles, CO 3
sts. Work I-cord (see Glossary) for 36".
BO all sts. Fold lining to WS along
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 129
up with a column of tight stitches
that wont even out with blocking.
Instead, if the dropped stitch is in
a feld of stockinette, simply tie a
loop of yarn around the stitch and
the nearest purl bump on the wrong
side to keep the stitch from raveling
further. Te dropped stitch will be
practically invisible. Tere is no need
to increase to compensate for the
dropped stitch.
If you drop a stitch in the shoulders
or collar, you will need to rip back to
recover it. Work slowly and gently,
using a tapestry needle to tease the
mohair fbers apart as needed.
It is a good idea to experiment with
the crochet edging on your knitted
gauge swatch. Crochet is not easy
to undo in this yarn, so its better
to check your tension on a swatch
instead of on the garment itself.
A sweater clip is an optional ac-
cessorythe short-row shoulder
construction ensures the cape will
stay securely in place, with or with-
out a closure. Sweater clips can be
purchased new; the one here is from
Its a Swindle (www.itsaswindle.etsy
.com). Tey can also be found in
vintage shops or custom-made. To
make your own sweater clip, start
with a 5" length of chain attached
with jump rings at each end to clip-
on earrings or earring backs, small
alligator clips, or shank buttons and
lobster clasps.
Stitch Guide
Provisional Chain Cast-On: Make a slip-
knot in smooth waste yarn and place
on crochet hook. Hold knitting needle
in left hand. Place yarn under needle
and crochet hook over needle. *With
crochet hook, catch yarn and crochet a
chain st around the needle. Bring yarn
back under needle tip and repeat from *
for desired number of sts. Cut yarn and
pull end through last loop.
Left Slant Increase (LSI):
Insert right needle tip from back to
front into st below next st on left
needle, lift this st onto the left needle
and knit it1 st incd.
Right Slant Increase (RSI):
Insert left needle tip from back to front
into st 2 rows below st just worked on
right needle, lift this st onto the left
needle and knit it through the back
loop1 st incd.
Work Stitch Together with Wrap
RS rows: Knit to wrapped st, sl wrapped
st pwise to right needle, use the left
needle tip to lift the wrap onto the right
needle, sl both the st and its wrap back
to left needle and knit them together.
WS rows: Purl to wrapped st, insert
right needle tip from back to front
into the back loop of the wrap and lift
it onto the left needle, then purl the st
and its wrap together.
Seed Stitch: (even number of sts)
Row 1: (WS) *K1, p1; rep from * to last
2 sts, k1, bring yarn to front, sl 1 pwise.
Row 2: (RS) *P1, k1; rep from * to last
2 sts, p1, bring yarn to back, sl 1 pwise.
Rep Rows 1 and 2 for patt.
Seed Stitch Increase
If st at increase point is to be purled, work
[p1, k1, p1] all into same st2 sts incd.
If st at increase point is to be knitted,
work [k1, p1, k1] all into same st2 sts
incd.
Purl 2 Together Bind-off (p2tog BO):
Purl frst st, *return st just worked to
left needle, then work this st tog with next
st after it as p2tog; rep from * to end.
BOTTOM LAYER
With waste yarn, larger needle, and
larger crochet hook, CO 76 (76, 80, 80,
84) sts using provisional chain CO (see
Stitch Guide). Change to MC. Work
shoulder and neck shaping using short-
rows as foll:
Left front shoulder
Row 1: (RS) K10 left front neck sts,
pm, k8 (8, 9, 9, 10), use the backward-
loop CO method (see Glossary) to CO
1 st, k1, pm in center of shoulder, k1,
use the backward-loop method to CO
1 st, k8 (8, 9, 9, 10), w&t (see Glos-
sary)2 sts incd.
Row 2: (WS) Sl wrapped st, place third
m, purl to center m, sl center m, purl to
1 st before frst m, w&t.
Row 3: Remove first m, sl the
wrapped st, replace first m, knit to
1 st before center m, LSI (see Stitch
Guide), k1, sl center m, k1, RSI (see
Stitch Guide), knit to 1 st before
third m, w&t2 sts inc d.
Row 4: Remove third m, sl the wrapped
st, replace third m, purl to center m, sl
m, purl to 1 st before frst m, w&t.
Repeat Rows 3 and 4 only 15 (15, 16,
16, 17) more times17 (17, 18, 18, 19)
wrapped sts each side; 34 (34, 36, 36,
38) rows completed; piece measures 4
3
4
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(4
3
4, 5, 5, 5
1
4)" from CO along center
shoulder line.
Next row: (RS) Remove frst m, sl the
wrapped st, replace frst m, knit to 1 st
before center m, LSI, k1, sl center m,
knit to third m (omitting RSI), sl m, do
not turn work1 st incd.
Left back shoulder:
Cont across the same RS row, work the
17 (17, 18, 18, 19) wrapped sts as foll:
*Knit frst wrapped st tog with its wrap
(see Stitch Guide), knit second wrapped
st tog with its wrap; on third wrapped
st, lift wrap back over st, knit the wrap
tbl, then knit the st; rep from * 4 (4, 5,
5, 5) more times, work last 2 (2, 0, 0,
1) wrapped st(s) tog with wrap, do not
turn work5 (5, 6, 6, 6) sts incd; 22
(22, 24, 24, 25) sts made from 17 (17,
18, 18, 19) wrapped sts.
Back neck:
Cont across the same RS row as foll:
Row 1: (RS) K16, turn.
Row 2: (WS) Sl 1 pwise, p12, w&t.
Row 3: Sl wrapped st, k14, turn.
Row 4: Sl 1 pwise, p13, work wrapped
st tog with its wrap, w&t.
Row 5: Sl wrapped st, k16, turn.
Row 6: Sl 1 pwise, p15, work wrapped
st tog with its wrap, w&t.
Row 7: Sl wrapped st, k17, do not turn
workpiece measures about 1" from
CO in center of back neck sts.
Right back shoulder:
Cont across the same RS row, as foll:
Row 1: (RS) Place frst m, k8 (8, 9, 9,
10), use the backward-loop method to
CO 1 st, k1, pm in center of shoulder,
k1, use the backward-loop method to
CO 1 st, k8 (8, 9,
9, 10), w&t2 sts
incd.
Work as for left front
shoulder until 34
(34, 36, 36, 38) rows
have been completed,
ending with a WS
row17 (17, 18, 18,
19) wrapped sts each
side; piece measures
4
3
4 (4
3
4, 5, 5, 5
1
4)"
from CO along
center shoulder line.
Next row: (RS) Remove frst m, sl the
wrapped st, replace frst m, knit to 1 st
before center m, LSI, k1, slip center m,
knit to third m (omitting RSI), sl m, do
not turn the work1 st incd.
Right front shoulder:
Cont across the same RS row, work as
for left back shoulder to inc 17 (17, 18,
18, 19) wrapped sts to 22 (22, 24, 24,
25) sts, then knit across last 10 sts at
end of row for right front neck.
Joining row:
With WS facing, purl to m at back of
right shoulder (third marker), sl m, *purl
frst wrapped st tog with its wrap, purl
second wrapped st tog with its wrap;
on third wrapped st, lift wrap back
over st, purl the wrap tbl, then purl the
st; rep from * 4 (4, 5, 5, 5) more times,
work last 2 (2, 0, 0, 1) wrapped st(s) tog
with wrap, do not turn work5 (5, 6,
6, 6) sts incd; 22 (22, 24, 24, 25) sts
made from 17 (17, 18, 18, 19) wrapped
sts. Cont across the same WS row,
purl across back neck sts, working last
wrapped st tog with its wrap. Cont
across the same WS row, purl to m at
front left shoulder (last marker), sl m,
work across 17 (17, 18, 18, 19) wrapped
sts of left front shoulder as for right
back shoulder, inc them to 22 (22, 24,
24, 25) sts, then purl across last 10 sts
at end of row for left front neck166
(166, 178, 178, 186) sts total: 10 neck
sts at each end of row, 22 (22, 24, 24,
25) sts each for front and back of each
shoulder, 10 (10, 11, 11, 12) sts each in
4 marked shoulder sections centered
on shoulder m, and 18 sts across back
of neck. Tere should be 3 markers in
place for each shoulder.
Body:
Work in St st to end.
Inc row: (RS) *Knit to 1 st before m,
LSI, k1, sl m, k1, RSI; rep from * 5
more times, knit to end12 sts incd, 1
st on each side of all 6 m.
[Work 3 rows even in St st, then rep
the inc row] 0 (2, 7, 12, 14) times178
(202, 274, 334, 366) sts. [Work 5 rows
even in St st, then rep the inc row]
6 (9, 3, 3, 1) time(s)250 (310, 310,
370, 378) sts. [Work 7 rows even in St
st, then rep the inc row] 3 (0, 3, 0, 1)
time(s)286 (310, 346, 370, 390) sts.
Work even if necessary for your size
until piece measures 9
1
2 (9
3
4, 10, 10
1
4,
10
1
2)" from joining row (outer points
of shoulders), ending with a WS row.
BO all sts loosely with RS facing using
p2tog BO (see Stitch Guide).
MIDDLE LAYER
Using CC1, CO 66 (66, 70, 70, 74) sts
and work as for bottom layer to end
of joining row with only 5 neck sts at
each side156 (156, 168, 168, 176) sts
total: 5 neck sts at each end of row, 22
(22, 24, 24, 25) sts each for front and
back of shoulders, 10 (10, 11, 11, 12)
sts each in 4 marked shoulder sections
centered on shoulder m, and 18 sts
across back of neck. Work body as for
bottom layer until piece measures 8
1
2
(8
3
4, 9, 9
1
4, 9
1
2)" from joining row (1"
less than bottom layer), ending with a
WS row. Note: You may not have fn-
ished the same number of body increases
as for the bottom layer; working to the
correct length is more important than
the fnal stitch count. BO all sts loosely
using p2tog BO.
TOP LAYER
Using CC2, CO 56 (56, 60, 60, 64)
sts and work as for bottom later to
end of joining row with no neck sts at
each side146 (146, 158, 158, 166) sts
total: 22 (22, 24, 24, 25) sts each for
front and back of shoulders, 10 (10, 11,
11, 12) sts each in 4 marked shoulder
sections centered on shoulder m, and
18 sts across back of neck. Work body
JAK_106-131_Town.indd 130 9/29/11 1:30 PM
09292011133617
Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 131
as for bottom layer until piece measures
7
1
2 (7
3
4, 8, 8
1
4, 8
1
2)" from joining row
(1" less than middle layer), ending with
a WS row; as for the middle layer, you
may not have fnished the same number
of body increases as the bottom layer.
BO all sts loosely using p2tog BO.
ASSEMBLY
Block pieces fat to measurements,
blocking the lower edge of each layer to
a gauge of about 17 sts = 4". You may
fnd it easier to block all three layers
stacked on top of each other.
Bottom layer:
Undo provisional CO from bottom
layer and place 76 (76, 80, 80, 84) sts on
larger needle.
Next row: (WS) With MC, BO 5 sts,
knit to last 5 sts, BO 5 sts, break yarn,
and fasten of last st66 (66, 70, 70,
74) sts rem.
Change to smaller needle. With RS fac-
ing, join with CC1 and CC2 held tog.
Next row: (RS) Purl all sts tbl.
Set aside; do not break yarns.
Middle layer:
Undo provisional CO and place 66 (66,
70, 70, 74) sts on larger needle. Hold
needles parallel with bottom layer in
front, WS of bottom layer facing you,
and RS of bottom layer touching WS
of middle layer.
Next row: (WS) Using CC1 and CC2
held tog and smaller needle, *insert
needle tip into frst st on bottom layer
as if to knit, then into frst st on middle
layer needle as if to knit tbl, and knit
both sts tog; rep from * to end66
(66, 70, 70, 74) sts total on smaller
needle. Set aside, do not break yarns.
Top layer:
Undo provisional CO and place 56 (56,
60, 60, 64) sts on larger needle. Hold
needles parallel with joined bottom
and middle layers in front, RS of top
layer facing you, and RS of middle layer
touching WS of top layer.
Next row: (RS) Using CC1 and CC2
held tog and smaller needle, purl frst 5
sts from joined layers, *insert needle tip
into frst st on joined layer as if to purl,
then into frst st on top layer needle
as if to purl tbl, and purl both sts tog;
rep from * to last 5 sts of joined layer,
p566 (66, 70, 70, 74) sts total on
smaller needle.
Collar turning row: (WS) Purl across all sts.
FINISHING
Collar
Place a removable marker in the st at
the base of each shoulder center line,
then place a removable marker in the
9 (9, 10, 10, 11)th st on each side of
center m6 markers total; 3 marked
sts at each shoulder. Note: Move these
markers up as you work if necessary
so you can easily identify the marked
sts. Beg with RS row 2, work 3 rows
in seed st (see Stitch Guide), ending
with RS row.
Inc row: (WS) *Work in established
seed st patt to marked st, work seed
st inc (see Stitch Guide) in marked st;
rep from * 5 more times, work in patt
to end12 sts incd, 2 sts in each of 6
marked sts.
Working new sts into established patt,
[work 7 rows even in seed st, then rep
the inc row] 2 times102 (102, 106,
106, 110) sts. Work 6 rows even, ending
with a WS rowcollar measures 2
3
4".
BO all sts loosely using p2tog BO.
Collar reinforcement: Using CC1 and
CC2 held tog and smaller hook, work a
row of slip-stitch crochet (see Glossary)
along turning row at base of collar on
RS to reinforce the neck and prevent it
from stretching.
Crochet Edging
Using the smaller hook for selvedges
and larger hook across the bottom
BO edges, work 2 RS rows of single
crochet (sc; see Glossary) around side
and bottom edges of each layer using
a single strand of the matching color
yarn. After working the frst RS sc row,
break the yarn, return to the starting
point, and work the second row in the
same direction. For bottom layer, also
crochet across the top of the front neck
sts.
Weave in all loose ends. Block again, if
desired.
Sharon Fuller would like to be Sophia
Croft (Persuasion) when she grows up,
but for now she works as a database
developer and enjoys designing knitting
patterns as another sort of programming.
This pattern owes much of its success
to her husband, Matt, for sketching,
drafting, trigonometry, and design engi-
neering. Sharon has designed for Twist
Collective, KnitPicks, Petite Purls, and the
forthcoming Fresh Designs Series from
Cooperative Press. To see more of her
work, visit sharonf on www.ravelry.com.
67
1
4 (73, 81
1
2, 87, 91
3
4)"
171 (185.5, 207, 221, 233) cm
16 (16, 16
3
4, 16
3
4, 17
3
4)"
40.5 (40.5, 42.5, 42.5, 45) cm
4
3
4 (4
3
4, 5, 5, 5
1
4)"
12 (12, 12.5, 12.5, 13.5) cm
1", 2.5 cm
9
1
2 (9
3
4, 10, 10
1
4, 10
1
2)"
24 (25, 25.5, 26, 26.5) cm
JAK_106-131_Town.indd 131 9/29/11 1:30 PM
09292011133617
132 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
GLOSSARY
beg beginning; begin; begins
bet between
BO bind of
CC contrasting color
cm centimeter(s)
cn cable needle
CO cast on
cont continue(s); continuing
dec(s) decrease(s); decreasing
dpn double-pointed needle(s)
foll following; follows
g gram(s)
inc increase(s); increasing
k knit
k1f&b knit into front and back of
same st
k2tog knit two stitches together
kwise knitwise
LC left cross
m(s) marker(s)
MC main color
mm millimeter(s)
M1 make one (increase)
p purl
p1f&b purl into front and back of
same st
p2tog purl two stitches together
patt(s) pattern(s)
pm place marker
psso pass slipped stitch over
p2sso pass two slipped stitches
over
pwise purlwise
RC right cross
rem remain(s); remaining
rep repeat; repeating
rev St st reverse stockinette stitch
rib ribbing
rnd(s) round(s)
RS right side
rev sc reverse single crochet
S2kp2 slip 2 sts as if to k2tog, k1,
pass 2 sl sts over2 sts
decd
S2pp2 slip 2 sts as if to k2tog with
yarn in back (wyb), p1, pass
2 sl sts over2 sts decd
sk skip
Sk2p slip 1 st kwise, k2tog, pass
sl st over2 sts decd
sl slip
sl st slip stitch (sl 1 st pwise
unless otherwise indicated)
ssk slip 1 kwise, slip 1 kwise,
k2 sl sts tog tbl (decrease)
ssp slip 1 kwise, slip 1 kwise,
p2 sl sts tog tbl (decrease)
Ss-p2tog-b slip 2 sts individually as if
to knit (kwise), then purl
them tog through the back
loops1 st decd
st(s) stitch(es)
St st stockinette stitch
tbl through back loop
tog together
WS wrong side
wyb with yarn in back
wyf with yarn in front
yo yarn over
* repeat starting point
(i.e., repeat from *)
* * repeat all instructions
between asterisks
( ) alternate measurements
and/or instructions
[ ] instructions that are to be
worked as a group a
specifed number of times
ABBREVIATIONS
Work to where you want the buttonhole to begin, bring yarn to front, slip one purlwise, bring yarn
to back (Figure 1). *Slip one purlwise, pass first slipped stitch over second; repeat from * one (two,
three, four) more time(s). Place last stitch back on left needle (Figure 2), turn. Cast-on three (four,
five, six) stitches as follows: *Insert right needle between the first and second stitches on left needle,
draw up a loop, and place it on the left needle (Figure 3); repeat from * two (three, four, five) more
times, turn. Bring yarn to back, slip first stitch of left needle onto right needle and pass last cast-on
stitch over it (Figure 4), work to end of row.
Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3
2 (3, 4, 5) Stitch One-Row Buttonhole
Figure 2
Cable Cast-On
Begin with a slipknot and one knitted cast-on stitch if there are no established stitches. Insert
right needle be tween first two stitches on left needle (Figure 1). Wrap yarn as if to knit. Draw yarn
through to complete stitch (Figure 2) and slip this new stitch to left needle as shown (Figure 3).
Figure 1 Figure 3
Leaving a long tail (about
1
2" to 1" for each stitch to be cast on),
make a slipknot and place on right needle. Place thumb and index
finger of left hand between yarn ends so that working yarn is
around index finger and tail end is around thumb. Secure ends
with your other fingers and hold palm upward, making a V of
yarn (Figure 1). Bring needle up through loop on thumb (Figure
2), grab first strand around index finger with needle, and go back
down through loop on thumb (Figure 3). Drop loop off thumb
and, placing thumb back in V configuration, tighten resulting
stitch on needle (Figure 4).
Continental (Long-Tail) Cast-On
Figure 2
Figure 4 Figure 3
Figure 1
Slip-Stitch Crochet (sl st)
Insert hook into stitch, yarn over hook and draw loop through stitch
and loop on hook.
Leaving a long tail, make a slipknot, and hold yarn as
shown (Figure 1). *Bring needle in front of thumb, under
both yarns around thumb, down into center of thumb
loop, back forward, and over top of yarn around index
finger (Figure 2), catch this yarn, and bring needle back
down through thumb loop (Figure 3), turning thumb
slightly to make room for needle to pass through. Drop
loop off thumb and place thumb back in V configuration
while tightening up resulting stitch on needle (Figure 4).
Repeat from *.
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Old Norwegian Cast-On
JAK_132-136_Glossary.indd 132 9/29/11 1:36 PM
09292011133648
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JAK_133.indd 133 9/29/11 3:06 PM
09292011150707
134 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
GLOSSARY
Place a loose slipknot on needle
held in your right hand. Hold
waste yarn next to slipknot and
around left thumb; hold working
yarn over left index finger. *Bring
needle forward under waste yarn,
over working yarn, grab a loop of working yarn (Figure 1), then bring needle
to the front, over both yarns, and grab a second loop (Figure 2). Repeat from
*. When youre ready to work in the opposite direction, pick out waste yarn
to expose live stitches.
Figure 1 Figure 2
Invisible (Provisional) Cast-On
Step 1: Bring threaded needle through
front stitch as if to purl and leave stitch
on needle.
Step 2: Bring threaded needle through
back stitch as if to knit and leave stitch on
needle.
Step 3: Bring threaded needle through
first front stitch as if to knit and slip this stitch off needle. Bring threaded
needle through next front stitch as if to purl and leave stitch on needle.
Step 4: Bring threaded needle through first back stitch as if to purl
(asillustrated), slip this stitch off, bring needle through next back stitch as
if to knit, leave this stitch on needle.
Repeat Steps 3 and 4 until no stitches remain on needles.
Kitchener Stitch
Knit into the back of stitch (in the purl bump) in
the row directly below the stitch on the left needle.
Insert left needle into back of the
stitch below stitch just knitted.
Purl into the stitch in the row directly below the stitch on the left needle.
Purl into the stitch below the stitch just purled.
Knit this stitch.
Purl (RLPI)
Purl (LLPI)
Lifted Increase
Right (RLI)
Left (LLI)
*Loop working yarn and place it on
needle backward so that it doesnt
unwind. Repeat from *.
Backward-Loop Cast-On
Bring threaded tapestry needle out
from back to front at center of a
knitted stitch. *Form a short loop
and insert needle back where it came
out. Keeping loop under needle,
bring needle back out in center of next stitch over. Beginning each stitch
at the same point on the knitted background, repeat from * for desired
number of petals (six shown).
Daisy Stitch
With double-pointed needle, cast on desired num-
ber of stitches. *Without turning the needle, slide
the stitches to other end of the needle, pull the yarn
around the back, and knit the stitches as usual; repeat
from * for desired length.
I-Cord
Find our full glossary online @ knittingdaily.com.
Judys Magic Cast-On
Note: Judys magic CO was invented by Judy Becker as a CO for toe-
up socks. The technique made its debut in the Spring 2006 issue of
Knitty magazine and her detailed tutorial can be found at www.knitty.
com. The technique is modified here so that it uses a half-twist rather
than a slipknot.
Step 1: Hold one needle tip horizontally and drape the yarn over it with
the tail toward you and the yarn going to the ball (working yarn) away
from you. Give the yarn a half twist below the needle so that the tail is
now away from you and the working yarn is toward you (the reverse
of long-tail CO).
Step 2: Hold another needle tip just below the needle with the yarn
loop already on it. The yarn loop will be the first st CO to the top
needle. Tent the yarn strands over the thumb and index finger of your
left hand as if doing a long-tail CO. The tail will rest on your index
finger and the working yarn will rest on your thumb.
Step 3: Cast the first st onto the bottom needle by bringing both nee-
dles up and around the yarn tail on your index finger, scooping up the
yarn using a clockwise motion with your right hand. The yarn will wrap
around the bottom of the empty bottom needle from back to front as
for a yarnover. Sl the yarn tail between the needles to complete the loop
around the bottom needle. There is now 1 st CO to each needle. Be sure
to pull these first sts tight to avoid loose sts at the edge of the CO row.
Step 4: Cast the next st onto the top needle by bringing both needles
down and around the working yarn on your thumb, scooping up the
yarn using a counterclockwise motion with your right hand. The yarn
will wrap around the top of the top needle from back to front. Sl the
working yarn between the needles to complete the loop around the
top needle.
Step 5: Cast the next st onto the bottom needle as in Step 3. Rep Steps
45 until there are the desired number of sts on each needle. Rotate
needles so that the yarn tail and working yarn are on your right. The
working yarn should be coming off the bottom needle and the yarn
tail off the top needle. You will begin working across the sts on the top
needle. Make sure to capture the yarn tail by placing it between the
top needle and the working yarn as you start knitting across the sts
on the top needle. You can pull the yarn tail to firm up any looseness
at the beginning of this rnd. Note: When working the sts on the 2nd
(bottom) needle, you will need to knit them through the back loops to
avoid twisting them.
JAK_132-136_Glossary.indd 134 9/29/11 1:36 PM
09292011133648
Knitted Lace
A Collection of Favorite Designs
from Interweave
Anne Merrow, Editor
160 pages, 8 x 9, $24.95
ISBN 9781-59668-482-9
Introducing Interweaves treasury of
25 unique knitted lace designs
with expert advice from Eunny Jang
and Jackie Erickson-Schweitzer,
edited by Anne Merrow.
Lessons
in
Lace
discover timeless
JAK_135.indd 135 9/29/11 3:07 PM
09292011150752
136 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
GLOSSARY
Work to turn point, slip next stitch purlwise
to right needle. Bring yarn to front (Figure1).
Slip same stitch back to left needle (Figure 2).
Turn work and bring yarn in position for next
stitch, wrapping the stitch as you do so. Note:
Hide wraps in a knit stitch when right side
of piece is worked in a knit stitch. Leave wrap
if the purl stitch shows on right side. Hide
wraps as follows: Knit stitch: On right side,
work to just before wrapped stitch. Insert
right needle from front, under the wrap from
bottom up, and then into wrapped stitch as usual. Knit them together,
making sure new stitch comes out under wrap. Purl stitch: On wrong
side, work to just before wrapped stitch. Insert right needle from back,
under wrap from bottom up, and put on left needle. Purl them together.
Figure 2
Figure 1
Short-Rows: Wrapping a Stitch
Insert hook into an edge stitch, yarn over hook and draw a loop through
stitch, yarn over hook (Figure 1) and draw it through both loops on
hook (Figure 2).
Figure 1 Figure 2
Single Crochet (sc)
Place stitches to be joined onto two separate
needles. Hold them with right sides of knit-
ting facing together. Insert a third needle into
first stitch on each of the other two needles
and knit them together as one stitch. *Knit
next stitch on each needle the same way. Pass
first stitch over second stitch. Repeat from * until one stitch remains on
third needle. Cut yarn and pull tail through last stitch.
Three-Needle Bind-Off
With right side of work facing and working one
stitch in from the edge, bring threaded needle out
from back to front along edge of knitted piece.
Whipstitch
Wrap & Turn (w&t)
Knit row: With yarn in back, slip next st as if to purl, and bring yarn to
front. Return the slipped st to the left needle, take the yarn to the back
between the needles, and turn the work.
Purl row: With yarn in front, slip next st as if to purl, and bring yarn to
back. Return the slipped st to the left needle, take the yarn to the front
between the needles, and turn the work.
Make one right (M1R): Insert left needle from back to front under strand
of yarn running between last stitch on left needle and first stitch on right
needle, then knit the lifted strand through its front loop1 st incd.
Make one left (M1L): Insert left needle from front to back under strand
of yarn running between last stitch on left needle and first stitch on right
needle, then knit the lifted strand through its back loop1 st incd.
Make one purl (M1P): Insert left needle from back to front under strand
of yarn running between last stitch on left needle and first stitch on right
needle, then purl the lifted strand through its front loop1 st incd.
Make One Increases
Hide Wrap:
Knitting a wrapped stitch: With the right side of the fabric facing
you, insert right needle into the bottom of the wrap from front to back,
and lift the wrap onto the left needle. Knit the wrap together with the
wrapped st through the back loops.
Purling a wrapped stitch: With the wrong side of the fabric facing
you, insert right needle into the bottom of the wrap from back to front,
and lift the wrap onto the left needle. Purl the wrap together with the
wrapped st.
Leaving a long tail (about
1
2" to 1"
for each stitch to be cast on), make
a slipknot and place on right needle.
Place thumb and index finger of
left hand between yarn ends so that
working yarn is around index fin-
ger and tail end is around thumb.
Secure ends with your other fingers
and hold palm upward, making a V
of yarn (Figure 1). Bring needle up
through loop on thumb (Figure 2),
grab first strand around index fin-
ger with needle, and go back down
through loop on thumb (Figure 3). Drop loop off thumb and, plac-
ing thumb back in V configuration, tighten resulting stitch on needle
(Figure 4).
Continental (Long-Tail) Cast-On
Figure 2
Figure 4 Figure 3
Figure 1
Knitted Cast-On
Place slipknot on left needle if there are no established stitches. *With
right needle, knit into first stitch (or slipknot) on left needle (Figure 1)
and place new stitch onto left needle (Figure 2). Repeat from *, always
knitting into last stitch made.
Figure 1 Figure 2
JAK_132-136_Glossary.indd 136 9/29/11 1:36 PM
09292011133648
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138 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
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406 Bench St. (651) 465-6588
MI S S I S S I P P I
Knutty KnittersYazoo City
We carry over 60 lines of lovely yarns as well as books,
needles, lessons, workshops, fellowship, and great fun.
128 S. Main St. (662) 746-7555
NE B R AS KA
The Plum NellyHastings
www.theplumnelly.com
Plum Nelly means just about everything. In this case
everything a fiber artist needslooms, spinning wheels,
f leece, yarn, shuttles, books, magazines, classes. Email
info@theplumnelly.com.
731 W. 2nd St. (402) 462-2490
NE W HAMP S HI R E
HodgePodge Yarns & Fibers
Newport
hdgpdg_2000@yahoo.com
Homespun yarns, local-grown fibers (raw and processed),
spinning wheels (Majacraft, Louet, Ashford). We also
carry a full line of knitting yarns and supplies.
59 Belknap Ave. (603) 863-1470
NE W Y OR K
Yarn CupboardJamesville
www.yarncupboard.com
Conveniently located 10 minutes from the center of Syra-
cuse. Yarns, patterns/books, notions, buttons, accessories.
6487 E. Seneca Tpk. (315) 399-5148
Lion Brand Yarn StudioNew York
www.lionbrandyarnstudio.com
Wide selection of Lion Brand yarns, free knit and crochet
demonstrations, classes, and special events.
34 W. 15th St. (212) 243-9070
Susans Spinning BunnyWest Danby
www.spinningbunny.com
Quality in your hands. Hand-dyed fibers and yarns,
Baynes spinning wheels, patterns, kits, spinning and
knitting accessories, needle felting supplies.
311B Tupper Rd. (866) 504-7236
OHI O
Spin A Yarn Fiber GardenMarion
www.spinayarnfibergarden.com
Hand-dyed yarns, fiber, roving, Ashford wheels, looms,
carding equipment, felting kits, dyes, books, cascade, Hi-
yaHiya, books, classes. Closed Sun, Mon. (Charleston
Place Shops).
187 W. Center St. (740) 382-6969
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JAK_138-139_Shop.indd 138 9/29/11 2:47 PM
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shop and web listings
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LEND A
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France! C
NORTH
& Fiberwo
of everyth
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633-2500.
HAPPY S
White an
wool coat
dyed moh
alpaca/wo
spinning b
ow Farms
WY OMI NG
The Fiber HouseSheridan
www.thefiberhouse.com
Fleece to fashion and fun! Ashford and Kromski wheels
and looms. Our own Alpaca Bliss roving and yarn. Books,
notions, classes, and 30+ yarn lines! E-mail info@the
fiberhouse.com.
146 Coffeen Ave. (307) 673-0383
E VE NTS
NORTH CAROLINA. January 1315, 2012 Friends
& Fiberworks Winter Retreat! Three Spectacular days
of everything fiber! Classes and vendors will be posted
on our website. www.friendsandfiberworks.com; (828)
633-2500.
AID WILL ALWAYS BE GIVEN TO THOSE IN
NEEDor those who simply chatter too much. I am
always pleased to be of service in matters of the heart.
References available from Mister Knightly. Contact
Emma@cooperativepress.com.
F I B E R S
HAPPY SHEEP PRODUCE BEAUTIFUL f leeces.
White and natural-colored fine-, medium-, and long-
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alpaca/wool/silk top. Wool/multicolored alpaca/silk
spinning batts. $3.50 for f leece samples. MoonsShad-
ow Farms, 11252 Kekke Rd., Chisholm, MN 55719.
COME TO ME, MY LOVE. My blood cries out for
you. Ive already stuck my neck out. I am Counting
on you and Stoked to see you again. Contact Lucy@
cooperativepress.com.
TR AVE L
CRAFT CRUISES Join us on a knitting trip! Musk
Ox and Glaciers w/ Beth Brown-Reinsel & Donna
Druchunas, Scotland, Shetland & Norway w/ Joan
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Day and South America w/ Mary Jane Mucklestone
& Cynthia LeCount. More trips will be announced
shortly. Visit www.craftcruises.com or call (877)
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FRIVOLOUS TEEN SEEKS dashing soldier for
shallow relationship. Contact Lydia@cooperativepress
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KNIT & SKI STEAMBOAT. Join Cat Bordhi and
Lucy Neatby next winter in Steamboat Springs for
serious knitting and skiing fun. Visit www.knitandski
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LEND A HAND to brilliant doctor friend in Geneva.
Monstrously difficult task. Only God-like surgeons
need apply. Apply to Jekyll@cooperativepress.com
Y AR NS
BLACK WELSH MOUNTAIN f leece, roving, yarn,
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ert Weyr LLC, 16870 Garvin Mesa Rd., Paonia, CO
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TO THE LADY IN THE WINE SHOPwas it
my name I saw you knitting into your stole? Vive le
France! Contact Barsad@cooperativepress.com.
OR E GON
Knot Another HatHood River
www.knotanotherhat.com
Your source for everything hip and knit worthy! Find fine
yarns, needles, accessories, gifts, and more!
16 Oak St., Ste. 202 (541) 308-0002
TE NNE S S E E
Bliss YarnsBrentwood
www.blissyarns.com
Just south of Nashville off I-65, youll find a friendly and
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127 Franklin Rd. (615) 370-8717
Three Creeks FarmCharlotte
www.3creeksfarm.com
We have Shetland and Icelandic f leeces and roving,
Kromski spinning wheels, dyes, books, yarn, spinning and
felting supplies. Spinning lessons. Open by appointment.
E-mail tn3creeksfarm@yahoo.com.
365 Peabody Rd. (615) 789-5943
Enchanted Yarn Shop
Clarkesville
www.enchantedyarnshop.com
Offering natural yarns and fibers, spinning wheels, spin-
ning and knitting supplies, and unique handcrafted gifts.
2327 Madison St. (931) 553-9000
Smoky Mountain Spinnery
Gatlinburg
www.smokymountainspinnery.com
Come relax and shop in the comfortable surroundings
of Smoky Mountain Spinnery. Everything for spinning,
weaving, knitting, needle felting, as well as antiques and
gifts.
466 Brookside Village Wy., Ste. 8 (865) 436-9080
TE XAS
WC MercantileNavasota
www.wcmercantile.com
The BEST little Wool shop in Texas! Featuring natural fi-
bers for knitting and spinning. Lots of local Texas yarns, too!
201 E. Washington Ave. (936) 825-3378
YarnoramaPaige
www.yarnorama.com
We are a full-service yarn, spinning and weaving shop.
We carry a large selection of fibers, including local exotics,
wheels, looms and fiber prep supplies.
130 Gonzales St. (512) 253-0100
UTAH
Blazing NeedlesSalt Lake City
www.blazing-needles.com
Blazing Needles, your friendly Sugarhouse community
gathering place. Yarns to inspire. Classeseveryone
welcome.
1365 S. 1100 E. (801) 487-5648 (KNIT)
VI R GI NI A
Stony Mountain FibersCharlottesville
www.StonyMountainFibers.com
Serving Spinners, Weavers, Knitters, Dyers, and Felters
with Equipment, Supplies, and Classes for over 20 years.
Check our website for all kinds of specials!
939 Hammocks Gap Rd. (434) 295-2008
WAS HI NGTON
Paradise FibersSpokane
www.paradisefibers.net
Unbeatable selection of quality spinning fibers and spin-
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stop in. Same-day shipping. Shop online!
225 W. Indiana Ave. (888) 320-7746
K NI T T I NG
C ONNE C T I ON
website listings
to advertise here call Stephanie Griess at
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F I B E R P R OC E S S I NG
Ohio Valley Natural Fibers
www.OVNF.com
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Serving your fiber and processing needs for over 25
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Still River Mill
www.stillrivermill.com
(860) 974-9918
F I B E R S
FiberLady.Com
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texasfiber@comcast.net
Dyed and natural Merino and Merino blends.
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Domestic Targhee yarn and fiber, hand dyed
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S HOP S / MAI L OR DE R
The Fold
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Village Spinning & Weaving Shop
www.villagespinweave.com
(888) 686-1192
Very extensive inventoryFast shippingQuestions?
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WE B S I TE S TO VI S I T
Lion Brand Yarn Company
www.lionbrand.com
(800) 258-YARN
Yarncrafting education, inspiration, and innovation.
Famous for quality since 1878.
The Yarn Barn
www.theyarnbarn.com
(203) 389-5117
Free shipping on kits for Interweave patterns.
JAK_138-139_Shop.indd 139 9/29/11 2:47 PM
09292011144804
140 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
Learn from best-selling author and knitwear designer Louisa Harding a
variety of unique and creative ways to bring big appeal to your knitting
using only the tiniest of elements. The 24 projects in Knitting in the Details
showcase small, quick-to-knit patterns featuring embroidery, beading, rib-
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design tips will inspire you to create enchanting and fashionable knitwear.
Adorn your knitting
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Knitting in the Details
Charming Designs to
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Louisa Harding
136 pages, 8 x 9
$22.95,
ISBN: 978-159668-256-6
JAK_140.indd 140 9/29/11 3:10 PM
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 141
Bufalo Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15
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Fiddlesticks Knitting. . . . . . . . . . .23
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Hampton Artistic Yarns . . . . . . . . 137
Interweave. . . . . . . . . 1, 7, 26, 27, 49,
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Lisa Souza Knitwear
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Mountain Colors Yarns . . . . . . . . .13
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Skacel Collection Inc. . . . . . . . . . 137
TNC Enterprises (slipcovers) . . . . .19
Universal Yarn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
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JAK_141_AdIndex.indd 141 10/3/11 1:22 PM
10032011132229
142 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
PROJECT INDEX
Linen Work Apron
pages 30, 36
Short Stays
pages 31, 38
Fitz Fingerless Mitts
pages 31, 45
Pemberley Slippers
pages 32, 46
Woodhouse Spencer
pages 56, 61
Marianne Dashwood
Stockings, pages 57, 60
Lambton Top
pages 57, 65
Barton Cottage Shrug
pages 58, 69
Northanger Abbey Hood
pages 78, 82
Elinor Tunic
pages 79, 85
Chawton Mittens
pages 79, 96
Scarlet Capelet
pages 79, 87
Kensington Mitts
pages 107, 122
Meryton Coat
pages 107, 113
Town
Manor
Garden
Emma Shrug
pages 106, 120
Josephine Shawl
pages 107, 110
JAK_142-143_photo.indd 142 9/29/11 1:56 PM
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Special Issue 2011 Jane Austen Knits 143
PROJECT INDEX
Georgiana Shawlette
pages 34, 52
Modern Reticule
pages 35, 48
Frivolous Socks
pages 35, 50
Picturesque Cape
pages 109, 128
Lydia Bennet Secret
Stockings, pages 32, 54
An Aran for Frederick
pages 33, 40
Evening Spencer
pages 109, 116
Mr. Knightley's Vest
pages 80, 92
Lydia Military Spencer
pages 80, 90
Leafy Muff
pages 81, 101
Frederick and Anne
Scarf, pages 80, 95
Variation Scarf
pages 81, 104
Diamond and Cross
Reticule, pages 108, 127
Miss Bennets Beaded
Bag pages 108, 124
Sense and Fashion
Handwarmers
pages 108, 125
Miss Morlands Neckcloth,
pages 108, 119
Flower and Lace Cuffs
pages 59, 70
Fiori Pullover
pages 59, 72
Elinor's Tea Cozy
pages 59, 67
JAK_142-143_photo.indd 143 9/29/11 1:57 PM
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144 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
by Rebecca Dickson
J
ane Austen was born on the same
day that Ludwig van Beethoven was,
though she was fve years younger.
When Beethoven was born in 1770,
he wasnt expected to become
accomplished at many diferent
tasks. It would be acceptable if he
became, say, merely a fne pianist
and composer. But when baby
Jane was born on December
16, 1775, she had many widely
diferent expectations of her,
all of which she would meet.
Among other things, she would
become an accomplished pianist,
though perhaps she wasnt quite as
able as Ludwig. She also became a
composer, though she did a diferent
type of composing.
Understanding the diferent
expectations of boys and girls in
the late eighteenth century helps
to convey the nature of Austens
culture and the dif culties a woman
faced in becoming a respected
writer. It also helps convey how
uniquely gifted Jane Austen was.
Unlike Beethoven, Austen was an
accomplished needleworker. Tis
was expected of herany middle-
class woman of the eighteenth
and early nineteenth centuries was
expected to be able to create things
with her hands. For working-
and middle-class women, it was
necessary work: Tey made their
own clothes and their familys
clothes. Tey darned socks, they
made household furnishings and
decorations. While a middle-class
Jane Austen,
Multitasker
man could spend his time being
good at one thing, women werent
encouraged to focus on a single
activity; they needed many skills
and abilities to win a husband and
help run a household. Even if, like
Austen, a woman did not marry, she
needed to be an able workershe
needed to be able to cook, sew, do
needlework, keep a garden, and
supervise servants who did the
heavy work.
Women were also expected to be
the entertainers of the household
they were expected to sing, dance,
draw, and recite poetry. When she
was a teenager, Austen read aloud
her own early works to her family,
who were very supportive of her
writing. When she was older, Austen
played the piano for her nieces and
nephews and houseguests so they
could all dance. Her nephew James
Edward Austen-Leigh describes her
as being successful in everything
that she attempted with her fngers.
She made lace and fashioned little
handkerchiefs. She and her sister
and mother made a patchwork
quilt that can still be viewed at her
home in Chawton. But was Jane
Austen a knitter? Tats not clear,
but she likely was, as most women in
England at that time and of Austens
social standing and situation were
knitters.
What is clear is that Jane
Austen knew how to workshe
had a determined self-discipline
that is as inspiring as her novels
themselves. She was happy enough
for others to know of her typical
employments. But she didnt want
any attention drawn to her writing.
She didnt want anyone besides
her closest confdantes to know
how seriously she took her
writing. James Edward tells us
that she wouldnt allow the maid
to grease the door into the sitting
room because she wanted to hear if
someone was coming into the room
so she could hide her latest writing
project.
Why? Because in Austens world,
men were expected to be the good
writers. In 1800, a woman was
considered audacious if she tried to
do something more than piecework,
housework, and entertaining. Jane
Austen was quietly pretty audacious.
Encouraged and supported in his
work, Beethoven gave the world Ode
to Joy, while Austen, with the aid of
squeaky hinges, discreetly penned
Elizabeth Bennet and never once
neglected her needlework.
Rebecca Dickson is a Jane Austen
lover and a longtime knitter. She teaches
writing and rhetoric at the University of
Colorado at Boulder. The author of Jane
Austen: An Illustrated Treasury (Storey,
2008), she lives in Boulder, Colorado, with
two cats and her husband, Steve Welter.
B
E
N
J
A
M
I
N

S
.

C
L
A
R
K
E
JAK_144_JA_Multitasker.indd 144 9/29/11 2:28 PM
09292011142902
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4 Jane Austen Knits janeaustenknits.com
Knitting Daily TV Series 700
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