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09-27-2013 Edition

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09-27-2013 Edition of the San Mateo Daily Journal
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11/01/2013

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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 35
AGREEMENT MADE
WORLD PAGE 31
49ERS BOUNCE
BACK FOR WIN
SPORTS PAGE 11
U.N. SECURITY COUNCIL REACHES RESOLUTION ON SYRIA
WEAPONS
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After San Mateo Mayor David
Lim and Deputy Mayor Robert
Ross made it clear Thursday night
they would not recommend that
the City Council support Measure
P to upgrade local school facili-
ties, a strange
thing happened
that may have
strained the
already tenuous
r e l a t i o n s h i p
between the
school district and city — some-
body did not shake somebody’s
hand.
Or did they?
Lim and Ross are on the city’s
Legislative Subcommittee and
heard arguments for and against
supporting the $130 million bond
measure Wednesday night.
The measure is on the November
ballot and proposes to add capaci-
ty and upgrade a few schools in the
San Mateo-Foster City Elementary
School District.
After the meeting concluded,
attended by about 20 people, dis-
trict Superintendent Cynthia
Handshake-gate?
Measure P discussion leads to ‘awkward’
moment between mayor, school chief
Government shutdown looms
David Lim, Cynthia Simms
KENNY MARTIN/DAILY JOURNAL
Brian Ogata, Barbara Anderson, Marc Samuels and Eric Fronberg rehearse before their live Blue Blanket Improv
show at Odd Fellows Hall in Half Moon Bay.
REUTERS
U.S. House Speaker John Boehner speaks to the press after a
House Republican meeting on Capitol Hill.
By Andrew Taylor
and Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Moving closer to
the brink of a government shutdown,
House Republicans vowed Thursday
they won’t simply accept the stopgap
legislation that is likely to remain
after Senate Democrats strip away a
plan to dismantle President Barack
Obama’s health care law.
The defiant posture sets the stage for
weekend drama on Capitol Hill after
the Senate on Friday sends the frac-
tious House a straightforward bill to
keep the government operating
through Nov. 15
rather than part-
ly closing down
at midnight
Monday.
Speaker John
Boehner of Ohio
and several rank-
a n d - f i l e
Republicans said
the House sim-
ply won’t accept
a “clean” spend-
ing measure, even though that’s been
the norm in Congress on dozens of
occasions since the 1995-96 govern-
ment closures that bruised Republicans
and strengthened the hand of
Democratic President Bill Clinton.
“I don’t see that happening,”
Boehner said. Still, he declared that “I
have no interest in a government shut-
down” and he doesn’t expect one to
occur on Tuesday.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of
Nevada said the Democratic-led cham-
ber will not relent.
“The Senate will never pass a bill
that guts the Affordable Care Act,”
Reid declared.
A partial government shutdown
would keep hundreds of thousands of
House Republicans vow to not simply accept stopgap legislation
See page 7
Inside
President Obama
mocks GOP for ‘crazy’
Obamacare predictions
See AWKWARD, Page 22
See BUDGET, Page 23
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Longtime South San Francisco
Councilwoman Karyl Matsumoto
is suspending her campaign for a
two-year seat she had sought as a
way to help the council remain sta-
ble in the wake of one mid-term
vacancy and several high-level
retirements.
However, Matsumoto, 70, will
still appear on the ballot and her
candidate state-
ment printed
because the
deadline to for-
mally withdraw
from the race
was Aug. 14,
the close of the
filing period.
Voters can still
cast a ballot for
Councilwoman suspends her
campaign for two-year seat
By Kenny Martin
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
If you make your way to Odd
Fellows Hall, located on Half
Moon Bay’s Main Street, on the
second Saturday of the month,
you’ll be treated to a night of silly
antics and humorous scenarios.
For the cozy, intimate second
story of Odd Fellows Hall is where
Blue Blanket Improv calls home.
Marc Samuels, 46, founded Blue
Blanket Improv in 2001 to create a
challenge for himself, and others,
and to force himself to keep his
wit and mindset sharp. Samuels’
passion for improv started in
Southern California, growing up
in the San Fernando Valley, where
he was a part of the JFK High
School drama program.
“Improv interested me because I
liked to mess with people,”
Samuels said. “Even in regular
shows, I might change a line to
see how the other people would
react.”
Samuels eventually moved to
San Francisco in 2000, and later to
Half Moon Bay in 2001, and he
started teaching improv classes
Laughs for all ages
Blue Blanket Improv at home in Half Moon Bay
See LAUGH, Page 22
Karyl
Matsumoto
See KARYL, Page 23
See opinion
page 9
Inside
Yes on
Measure P
‘BREAKING BAD’
FINALE IS HERE
WEEKEND PAGE 18
Officials question
county investment fund
School and city officials were
scrambling the week of
Sept. 27, 2008 to fig-
ure out the ripple effect
of the national finan-
cial fallout and
whether losses in a county invest-
ment fund would decrease local
credit ratings.
There were more questions than
answers at the County Investment
Fund Oversight Committee meeting
that week. The County Investment
Fund is a pool of money from
school districts, special districts
and cities, managed by the county
treasurer. The fund lost approximate-
ly $150 million, or approximately 5
percent of the $2.6 billion portfo-
lio’s principal due in part to its
holdings in Lehman Brothers
Securities.
WaMu becomes
biggest bank to fail
As the debate over a $700 billion
bank bailout raged on in
Washington, one of the nation’s
largest banks — Washington Mutual
Inc. — collapsed under the weight of
its enormous bad bets on the mort-
gage market the week of Sept. 27,
2008.
The Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp. seized WaMu on Thursday of
that week, and then sold the thrift’s
banking assets to JPMorgan Chase
& Co. for $1.9 billion.
Seattle-based WaMu,
which was founded in
1889, was the largest
bank to fail by far in the
country’s history. Its $307
billion in assets eclipse those of
Continental Illinois National Bank,
which failed in 1984 with $40 bil-
lion in assets; adjusted for 2008 dol-
lars, its assets totaled $67.7 bil-
lion. IndyMac, seized in July, had
$32 billion in assets.
State budget
slows local transit
The state budget was dealing local
transit agencies a major blow the
week of Sept. 27, 2008, cutting
funding by nearly two-thirds more
than what was expected earlier in the
year.
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger
signed the most overdue budget in
the state’s history. Proposition 42,
which takes gas taxes to make trans-
portation improvements, was
untouched by massive cuts, but fund-
ing to local transit agencies such as
Bay Area Rapid Transit, Caltrain and
SamTrans was diverted at record low
levels.
Caltrain, which runs Peninsula rail
service from Gilroy to San
Francisco, could have received
$11.8 million from the state that
year. It received $3.7 million.
SamTrans, which runs bus and para-
transit service in San
Mateo County, could have
received $13.7 million but
the state only allocated
$4.3 million.
Superintendent recommends
denying charter school plan
The San Mateo Union High School
District superintendent came out
against a proposal to open a tech-
nology-based school serving 800
students in sixth through eighth
grades the week of Sept. 27, 2008.
Insufficient information about edu-
cational programs, finances and a
location for the charter school —
known as Magnolia — topped
Superintendent David Miller’s con-
cerns in a recommendation to deny
the charter.
Among the educational concerns
listed were the lack of a guidance
program; little innovative, creative
or powerful instructional strategies;
no physical education standards; and
unclear graduation requirements,
according to the resolution. The
budget was a major concern listed by
the district.
From the archives highlights stories origi-
nally printed five years ago this week. It
appears in the Friday edition of the Daily
Journal.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actress Gwyneth
Paltrow is 41.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1991
President George H.W. Bush
announced in a nationally broadcast
address that he was eliminating all
U.S. battlefield nuclear weapons and
called on the Soviet Union to match
the gesture.
“Life is like a coin.You can spend it any
way you wish, but you only spend it once.”
— Lillian Dickson, American missionary (1901-1983)
Actor Wilford
Brimley is 79.
Singer Avril
Lavigne is 29.
Birthdays
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s to
lower 70s. North winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday night: Clear. Lows in the mid
50s. Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s
to lower 70s. Light winds.
Saturday night...Clear. Lows in the mid
50s. West winds around 5 mph in the
evening...Becoming light.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becom-
ing mostly cloudy. Aslight chance of showers. Lows in the
mid 50s.
Monday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers.
Highs in the mid 60s.
Monday night and Tuesday: Partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1540, Pope Paul III issued a papal bull establishing the
Society of Jesus, or Jesuits, as a religious order.
I n 1779, John Adams was named by Congress to negotiate
the Revolutionary War’s peace terms with Britain.
I n 1854, the first great disaster involving an Atlantic
Ocean passenger vessel occurred when the steamship SS
Arctic sank off Newfoundland; of the more than 400 people
on board, only 86 survived.
I n 1928, the United States said it was recognizing the
Nationalist Chinese government.
I n 1939, Warsaw, Poland, surrendered after weeks of resist-
ance to invading forces from Nazi Germany and the Soviet
Union during World War II.
I n 1941, on “Liberty Fleet Day,” the United States
launched 14 rapidly built military cargo vessels, including
the first Liberty ship, the SS Patrick Henry, which was per-
sonally launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in
Baltimore.
I n 1942, Glenn Miller and his orchestra performed togeth-
er for the last time, at the Central Theater in Passaic, N.J.,
prior to Miller’s entry into the Army.
I n 1954, “Tonight!” hosted by Steve Allen made its net-
work debut on NBC-TV.
In 1964, the government publicly released the report of the
Warren Commission, which found that Lee Harvey Oswald
had acted alone in assassinating President John F. Kennedy.
I n 1988, three days after placing first in the men’s 100-
meter dash at the Seoul (sohl) Summer Olympics, Canadian
sprinter Ben Johnson left for home in disgrace, stripped of
his gold medal by officials who said Johnson had used ana-
bolic steroids.
(Answers tomorrow)
USURP AGENT ABRUPT ODDITY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The number of billboards along the highway
was — ADDING UP
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PUDEN
MUDHI
HERTAR
DOSTED
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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Answer
here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gold Rush,No.
1,in first place; Lucky Star,No.2,in second place;
and Big Ben, No. 4, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:46.32.
8 2 6
4 11 32 39 40 33
Mega number
Sept. 24 Mega Millions
2 7 17 49 53 23
Powerball
Sept. 25 Powerball
7 32 36 37 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
9 7 5 4
Daily Four
9 7 1
Daily three evening
5 14 22 25 26 8
Mega number
Sept. 25 Super Lotto Plus
Actress Jayne Meadows is 93. Actress Kathleen Nolan is 80.
Actor Claude Jarman Jr. is 79. Author Barbara Howar is 79.
World Golf Hall of Famer Kathy Whitworth is 74. Singer-
musician Randy Bachman (Bachman-Turner Overdrive) is 70.
Rock singer Meat Loaf is 66. Actress Liz Torres is 66. Actor A
Martinez is 65. Baseball Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt is 64.
Actor Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa is 63. Singer Shaun Cassidy is
55. Comedian Marc Maron is 50. Rock singer Stephan
Jenkins (Third Eye Blind) is 49. Actor Patrick Muldoon is 45.
Singer Mark Calderon is 43. Actress Amanda Detmer is 42.
Rock singer Brad Arnold (3 Doors Down) is 35.
REUTERS
Sukhoi Su-27 jet fighters release flares as they perform during the ‘Russia Arms Expo 2013’ ninth international exhibition of
arms, military equipment and ammunition, in the Urals city of Nizhny Tagil.
3
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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SAN BRUNO
Burglary. Asilver Chevrolet Tahoe’s win-
dow was smashed and a backpack and laptop
were stolen on the 1200 block of El Camino
Real before 7:53 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Burglary. Avehicle’s window was smashed
on the 1100 block of El Camino Real before
6:50 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Vandalism. Property was vandalized on the
1800 block of Niles Avenue before 12:59
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Burglary. A green Ford Escort’s window
was smashed on the 1100 block of National
Avenue before 9:39 a.m. Wednesday, Sept.
25.
Vandalism. The front side passenger door
of a vehicle was scratched on the 400 block
of Redwood Avenue before 6:16 p.m.
Tuesday, Sept. 24.
HALF MOON BAY
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstances. A window
was reported smashed and a golf ball was
found nearby on the 500 block of Turnberry
Drive before 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 22.
Vandalism. The window to a classroom was
broken on the 400 block of Miramontes
Avenue before 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21.
Grand theft. Numerous items were stolen
from three vehicles as well as from a busi-
ness on the 600 block of Seymour Street
before 7 a.m. Friday, Sept. 20.
Police reports
Sticky situation
Someone poured tar in front of a resi-
dence on California Avenue in South
San Francisco before 10:06 a.m.
Monday, Sept. 16.
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MENLO PARK — Google has quietly
retooled the closely guarded formula running
its Internet search engine to give better
answers to the increasingly complex ques-
tions posed by Web surfers.
The overhaul came as part of an update
called “Hummingbird” that Google Inc. has
gradually rolled out in the past month with-
out disclosing the modifications.
The changes could have a major impact on
traffic to websites. Hummingbird represents
the most dramatic alteration to Google’s
search engine since it revised the way it
indexes websites three years ago as part of a
redesign called “Caffeine,” according to
Amit Singhal, a senior vice president for the
company. He estimates that the redesign will
affect the analysis of about 90 percent of the
search requests that Google gets.
Any reshuffling of Google’s search rank-
ings can have sweeping ramifications
because they steer so much of the Internet’s
traffic. Google fields about two of out every
three search requests in the U.S. and handles
an even larger volume in some parts of
Europe. The changes could also drive up the
price of Google ads tied to search requests if
websites whose rankings are demoted under
the new system feel they have to buy the
marketing messages to attract traffic.
The search ads and other commercial
pitches related to Web content account for
most of Google’s revenue, which is expected
to approach $60 billion this year.
Google disclosed the existence of the new
search formula Thursday at an event held in
the Menlo Park, Calif., garage where CEO
Larry Page and fellow co-founder Sergey
Brin started the company 15 years ago.
Google celebrates its birthday on Sept. 27
each year, even though the company was
incorporated a few weeks earlier. The compa-
ny is now based in Mountain View at a
sprawling complex located about seven
miles from the 1,900-square-foot home
where Page and Brin paid $1,700 per month
to rent the garage and a bedroom. The co-
founders’ landlord was Susan Wojcicki, who
is now a top Google executive and Brin’s
sister-in-law.
Wojcicki sold the home to Google in 2006
and it is now maintained as a monument to
the company’s humble beginnings.
Google’s renovations to its search engine
haven’t triggered widespread complaints
from other websites yet, suggesting that the
revisions haven’t resulted in a radical reshuf-
fling in how websites rank in the recommen-
dations. The Caffeine update spurred a loud
outcry because it explicitly sought to weed
out websites that tried to trick Google’s
search engine into believing their content
was related to common search requests. After
Caffeine kicked in, hundreds of websites that
consistently won a coveted spot near the top
of Google’s search results had been relegated
to the back pages or exiled completely.
Hummingbird is primarily aimed at giving
Google’s search engine a better grasp at
understanding concepts instead of mere
words, Singhal said.
Google’s ‘Hummingbird’
has new search formula
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The South San
Franci sco Ci ty
Council delayed a deci-
sion on the Centennial
Vi l l age mixed-used project until its Oct.
23 meeting. At the same meeting Wednesday
night, the council had no reportable action
out of its closed session, including a deci-
sion on a new city manager.
RETOOLED SEARCH ENGINE:
Google has completed the most dramatic
overhaul of its influential search engine in
three years with an update called
“Hummingbird.”The new formula changes
the way that the Internet’s most popular
search engine analyzes about 90 percent
of the requests that it gets.
QUIET CHANGE:
The different approach to search gradually
rolled out during the past month. Google
Inc. waited until Thursday to reveal the
existence of the new formula at event held
in the Menlo Park garage where the
company started 15 years ago.
POTENTIAL FALLOUT:
The renovations could have ripple effects
on the flow of online traffic and ad
spending.
Google rewrites
its search formula
4
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The best and the brightest salsa makers in
the area will gather in Redwood City tomor-
row and that includes two-time winner Greg
Matonis, while the delicious and dangerous
combination of beer and bacon will hit San
Mateo for the first time ever.
Matonis, 58, lives and breathes salsa and
first began making his own years ago. This
is his sixth year at the sixth annual, admis-
sion free Redwood City Salsa Festival.
“With the amount I eat, it costs too much
to buy,” said the Redwood City resident of
34 years. “I can eat a huge jar for breakfast
or a snack. Eating it is the ultimate goal.”
The event takes place throughout down-
town Redwood City, with multiple stages of
live entertainment and a salsa competition
and tasting.
He came away with best hot sauce the first
year of the event and won the people’s
choice award in the second year. He is going
for the mild competition this year because
he couldn’t find any good hot peppers this
past year and that there is less competition
in the mild category.
So what’s the secret sauce?
Not so secret, Matonis said. He uses the
same 10-year-old family recipe his wife
came up with each year, but he continues
perfecting it each year.
“I have a recipe right down to a T,” he
said. “It’s sort of secret recipe, but it’s not a
difficult recipe. It’s just vegetables and
there’s not a secret ingredient. I sometimes
add a few more peppers or onions to get a
higher yield.”
Although his recipe does not have a
name, his nickname is “The Spaniard.”
Chefs prepare everything on site, putting
in a couple hours to prepare their salsa.
Matonis prepares nine gallons of salsa and
said most years he runs completely out by
the end of the day.
What does he look forward to the most?
“Winning people’s choice this year,” he
said.
This year, there will be a $500 prize and
award for people’s choice salsa, $250 prize
and award for best mild salsa, $250 prize
and award for best hot salsa and $150 prize
and award for best-decorated booth. There
will be a public salsa tasting from noon-5
p.m.
Multiple stages will feature salsa and jazz
music. Local restaurants will serve food as
well. The festival features public tequila
tasting, free hands-on art projects, a chil-
dren’s play area complete with bounce hous-
es and more. The event runs from noon-8
p.m.
“I enjoy making it,” Matonis said. “It
gives you a kick when people love your
salsa too.”
Bacon & Brew
In San Mateo, Bacon & Brew Festival
comes about as a result of the San Mateo
Chamber of Commerce’s effort to develop
something that would bring awareness to
the city.
“The first annual Bacon & Brew Festival
is a unique community event for young and
old alike,” said Cheryl Angeles, president
and CEO of the San Mateo Area Chamber of
Commerce. “People should come to the fes-
tival in beautiful Central Park, if they love
good food, especially bacon and great craft-
ed micro-brews.”
Dishes include truffled bacon nachos,
bacon wrapped tri-tip, pork belly barbecue
tacos, chocolate brownies topped with
bacon and caramel, bacon flavored pastries,
bacon pupusas and more.
Local bands will be performing, includ-
ing Big Wave, Dutch Uncle and College of
San Mateo’s Jazz Combo. The Asiya
Shriners group is bringing a dunk tank to
benefit its Shriners Hospitals for Children.
The event will be on the baseball field at
Central Park on the corner of Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real.
Tickets are $10. Admission includes festi-
val entry and a large beer, glass of wine or a
soft drink for those under 21. Only ticket
holders with wristband receive the free
drink. Those 12 and under are free and 17-
year-olds and under must be accompanied by
a ticket holding adult.
To order tickets, visit sanmateocham-
ber.org/bbf, call 401-2440, or stop by the
San Mateo Area Chamber office at 1700 S.
El Camino Real, Suite 108 in San Mateo. It
runs from noon-6 p.m.
Festivals abound this weekend
Sixth Redwood City Salsa and first Bacon & Brew festivals run tomorrow
Greg Matonis at last year’s Salsa Festival in Redwood City. Matonis is aiming for the ‘People’s
Choice’ award this year.
5
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Insurance agent
imprisoned for stealing
$300,000 in premiums
AMillbrae insurance agent who
stole approximately $300,000
in premiums, leaving several
customers filing claims against
nonexistent policies, was sen-
tenced to four years in prison.
Irene Koh, 54, was also ordered
to pay back the stolen money to
Farmers Insurance Company and
eight victims.
Koh pleaded no contest in July
to five felony counts of embez-
zlement and admitted causing
material fraud.
Prosecutors say between 2004
and February 2007, Koh abused
her position of trust by accepting
hundreds of thousands of dollars
in insurance premiums and spend-
ing them instead on a “lavish”
lifestyle including a Tiburon
home with a $15,000 monthly
mortgage.
Koh avoided detection through
lies and tactics like changing
customers’ addresses to divert
mail sent from Farmers, accord-
ing to the District Attorney’s
Office.
Prosecutors also said several
customers suffered substantial
out-of-pocket losses when they
filed claims against policies that
turned out to be nonexistent.
Koh had been in custody on
$350,000 bail and has credit of
305 days against her four-year
prison term.
Local brief
By Kimberly Dozier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The nation’s
top intelligence official on
Thursday sidestepped questions
from a senator about whether the
National Security Agency has
ever used Americans cellphone
signals to collect information on
their whereabouts that would
allow tracking of the movements
of individual callers.
Asked twice by Sen. Ron
Wyden, D-Ore., if NSA had ever
collected or made plans to collect
such data, NSA chief Gen. Keith
Alexander answered both times
by reading from a letter provided
to senators who had asked the
same question last summer. He
also cited a classified version of
the letter that was sent to sena-
tors and said, “What I don’t want
to do ... is put out in an unclassi-
fied forum anything that’s classi-
fied.”
Wyden promised to keep ask-
i ng.
“I believe this is something the
American people have a right to
know, whether NSA has ever col-
lected or made plans to collect
cell site information,” Wyden
said.
The testy exchange at a Senate
Intelligence Committee hearing
illustrates the wider tension that
has grown between the public and
the U.S. intelligence community,
following disclosures by Edward
Snowden, a 29-year-old former
systems analyst on contract to
the NSA, about the extensive
NSA collection of telephone and
email records of millions of
Americans.
The panel’s bipartisan leader-
ship used the hearing to promote
their version of legislation to
change the Federal Intelligence
Surveillance Act. The lawmakers
seek to trim NSA’s authority to
access and analyze U.S. phone
records and provide new protec-
tions to Americans’ privacy.
They also want to broaden the
government’s spying powers to
allow monitoring of terror sus-
pects who travel to the U.S. after
being tracked overseas by the
NSA.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-
Calif., chairwoman of the com-
mittee, said the legislation would
“strictly limit access to the ...
phone metadata records, express-
ly prohibit the collection of the
content of phone calls,” and limit
the amount of time such U.S.
phone call data could be kept.
Such records show the date and
length of calls, and the numbers
dialed.
But Feinstein’s proposed legis-
lation would not stop the bulk
collection of telephone and email
records. A separate bipartisan
group of four senators, including
Wyden, unveiled legislation ear-
lier this week to end those bulk
collections.
Official sidesteps queries on cellphone locations
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry
Brown on Thursday signed a bill
that will temporarily require over-
time pay for domestic workers in
California, after he vetoed a broad-
er measure last year that critics
said would have opened the door
for government regulation of part-
time baby-sitting.
Under the new law, which takes
effect in January, domestic work-
ers must be paid time-and-a-half if
they work more than nine hours in
a day or more than 45 hours in a
week. Baby sitters are exempt
from the mandate.
The overtime requirement will
end in January 2017 unless
renewed by the Legislature.
State law requires overtime
pay for domestic workers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRESNO — With the harvest in
full swing on the West Coast, farm-
ers in California and other states
say they can’t find enough people
to pick high value crops such as
grapes, peppers, apples and pears.
In some cases, workers have
walked off fields in the middle of
harvest, lured by offers of better
pay or easier work elsewhere.
The shortage and competition
for workers means labor expenses
have climbed, harvests are getting
delayed and less fruit and vegetable
products are being picked, prompt-
ing some growers to say their
income is suffering. Experts say,
however, the shortage is not
expected to affect prices for con-
sumers. But farmworkers, whose
incomes are some of the lowest in
the nation, have benefited, their
wages jumping in California to $2
to $3 over the $8 hourly minimum
wage and even more for those
working piece rate.
Farmers face labor shortages in the fields
“I believe this is something the American people
have a right to know, whether NSA has ever collected
or made plans to collect cell site information.”
—Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.
6
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
For more information call
(650)522-7490
Major funding provided by:
Sutter Health Mills Peninsula Health Services
Saturday, Sept. 28 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
San Mateo Senior Center
2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo
Join us for FREE health screenings, and resource
information provided by a host of vendors.
Flu shots provided by Walgreens.
(Flu shots for those age 50+, while supplies last.
Free to Low Income & Medicare Seniors, or $26)
Walk
a Mile
in My
Shoes
Supporters
walk for the poor
Saturday
September 28th
11:30am - 12:30pm
Bay Trail, Burlingame
starting at Hilton Airport
Bayfront Hotel
Please join us in helping
our neighbors in need by
sponsoring a walker or
walking with us!
To donate online, please visit
www.svdp-sanmateoco.org
I
n the Redwood City
Counci l race for three
seats, candidate James
Han has raised $3,055 to date
and spent $1,714.39, accord-
ing to campaign finance state-
ments for the period July 1 to
Sept. 21. He has no loans and
his donations include $200 each from
Harbor Commi ssi oner Sabrina
Brennan and the Association of Korean
Asi an Acupuncture. His expenses include
fliers, a candidate statement and kickoff
fundraiser.
Candidate Corrin Rankin raised $46,475
to date including a $30,000 personal loan
and spent $26,051. Her donations include
$300 from Undersheriff Carlos Bolanos
and $500 from developer Kirk McGowan.
Her expenses include advertising, voter data
and campaign consultants.
Candidate Ernie Schmidt raised $30,936
to date, including a $10,000 personal loan,
and spent $22,273.47. His donations include
$100 from fellow Pl anni ng
Commi ssi oner Janet Borgens and
$3,000 from the California Real Estate
Pol i t i cal Acti on Commi ttee. His
expenses include Internet, literature, profes-
sional services and campaign paraphernalia.
Candidate Diane Howard raised $26,189
to date, including a $5,000 loan, and spent
$3,471. Her donations include $100 from
SamTrans CEO Mike Scanlon, $250
each from Undersheriff Carlos Bolanos
and Councilman Ian Bain, $100 each
from Assemblyman Kevin Mullin and
county Supervisor Carole Groom, $200
from PG&E and $1,000 from developer
Kirk McGowen. Her expenses include liter-
ature, filing and mailings.
Candidate Jeff Gee raised $34,686 to date
and spent $6,834. he had a beginning cash
balance of $23,238. His donations include
$250 from PG&E, $1,000 from developer
McGowan, $100 from
Mi l l brae Mayor Gi na
Papan, $500 from
Councilwoman Rosanne
Foust and her husband and
former councilman Ji m
Hartnett and $100 from for-
mer councilman Di ck
Claire. His expenses include printed tote
bags and lawn signs.
Candidate John Seybert raised $23,260
to date and spent $15,796. He had a starting
cash balance of $19,334. His donations
include $500 from Foust and $3,000 from
the California Real Estate Political
Action Committee. His expenses include
tote bags, mailing, signs and a donation to
the Elect Tom Mohr to the Col l ege
Board campaign.
***
There will be a Candidates’ Ni ght
Forum for the San Mateo City Council
7 p.m.-9 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1 at the St .
Bart ’s Parish Auditorium, 600 Columbia
Drive in San Mateo. The candidates are Joe
Goethals, Joshua Hugg, David Lim,
Karen Schmidt and Robert Ross.
For more information, contact Ji m Sel l at
349-7698 or j.sell@sbcglobal.net.
***
The League of Women Voters South
San Mateo County is sponsoring candi-
date forums for Redwood City Council
and the Sequoia Union High School
Di stri ct.
The Redwood City Council Candidate
Forum is 7 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct.
2 at the Redwood Ci ty Counci l
Chambers, 1017 Middlefield Road in
Redwood City.
The Sequoi a Uni on Hi gh School
District Candidate Forumis 7 p.m.-8:30
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 3 at the Bi rc h
Conference Room, 480 James Ave., in
Redwood City.
Power lines across
Bay to be upgraded
Pacific Gas and Electric will upgrade the
existing conductor wire in the overhead
transmission lines that cross San
Francisco Bay between Hayward and San
Mateo, according to Foster City officials.
The Foster City portion of the project is
scheduled to start Oct. 11 and be complet-
ed by Nov. 11, depending upon the weath-
er. All of the transporting of material and
personnel will be completed by helicopter
to facilitate access to the lines and mini-
mize the impact of the work on traffic,
according to Foster City officials.
PG&E is working closely with Foster
City to ensure that there is never a disrup-
tion of emergency services, according to
Foster City officials.
Questions or concerns about the project
should be directed to the Public Liaison
Director at Black & Veatch Construction,
Inc., Miguel Martinez, by phone at (855)
472-5224 or email at
martinezm@bv.com. For detailed infor-
mation about this project visit
www.pge.com/BayCrossingProject.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The county Office of Education along
with health, probation and behavioral
health departments will use $9.3 million
in Measure Asales tax funds over the next
two years to emphasize prevention and
early intervention for youth.
The joint effort will launch its first
youth mental health first aid training Oct.
1 using some of the money. The event is a
public education program introducing
school staff to the unique risk factors and
warning signs of youth mental health
problems. The training also addresses
early intervention and teaches how to help
a young person in crisis or experiencing a
mental health or substance use challenge.
This first class will include primarily
school-based counselors but is designed
for any adult member of a school commu-
ni t y.
About 20 percent of youth, aged 13 to 18
years old, experience mental health prob-
lems in a given year with suicide as the
third leading cause of death for youth
between the ages of 15 and 24.
The Board of Supervisors allocated the
Measure Afunds in July. Voters passed the
half-cent sales tax last November.
Measure A money used
for youth mental health
Local brief
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
NATION 7
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Baby Expo
Sunday October 6, 2013
11:00 AM - 5:00 PM
HILLSDALE SHOPPING CENTER
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The Daily Journal and Health Plan of San Mateo present
Exhibitor space still available.
For information call 650-344-5200 x121
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE –
Have you ever
attended a funeral
or memorial service
and felt ill-at-ease,
uncomfortable or
awkward when
talking to the family
of the deceased? Have you ever stumbled
through your words and condolences
because you just didn’t know what to say or
how to say it? Have you even decided to not
approach the family for fear of saying the
wrong thing or making a fool of yourself? If
so you are not alone. Many people in this
situation want to provide some kind of
comfort to the immediate family, but just
don’t have the verbal tools to do so in an
assuring manner.
Learning “Funeral Etiquette” can be
useful. Using the right words at the right
time is an appropriate way to show that you
care, and in situations like this can be of
great help when provided correctly.
Standard condolences such as “I am sorry
for your loss” have become routine and
generic. A personalized phrase can be
welcomed such as “John touched many
lives” or “I will miss John”. DO NOT ask
the cause of death, offer advice or make
comments that would diminish the
importance of the loss such as “Oh, you’re
young and can marry again”.
Other ways to demonstrate your support
include: 1. Listening. The family may feel
the need to express their anxiety, and giving
them that opportunity can be therapeutic; 2.
An embrace. This can show that you care
without the need for words; 3. Offering your
services. This shows the family that you are
willing to give extra time for them: “Please
let me know if there is anything I can do to
help” (be prepared to act if needed).
Even if you don’t feel confident in
approaching the family there are other ways
to show that you care: 1. Attending the
funeral and signing the Memorial Book will
show the family that you took the time to be
there in support; 2. Dressing appropriately
for the funeral will demonstrate your efforts
to prepare for this special occasion (dark
colors are no longer a requisite for funerals,
but dressing in a coat, tie, dress or other
attire that you’d wear to any special event
are considered a way of showing you care);
3. In certain cases friends are invited to
stand up and offer BRIEF personal feelings.
Prior to the funeral write a few key notes
and reflections which will help you organize
your thoughts. Even if there is no
opportunity to speak before a group you
may have a chance to offer your thoughts to
the family following the ceremony; 4. A
personalized card or note will help you
arrange your words better and can be kept
by the family. If you don’t have their
mailing address you can send your envelope
to the funeral home and they will forward it
to the next of kin; 5. Providing flowers is a
long time tradition, or making a charitable
donation in the deceased’s memory will give
the family a strong sense of your regards; 6.
If appropriate a brief phone call can show
your immediate concern, but generally this
should be avoided to give the family the
privacy they may need.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Funeral Etiquette Advice:
Show Up, Be Brief, Listen
advertisement
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Days before
the debut of new online insurance
markets, a couple of last-minute
technical glitches with President
Barack Obama’s health care law
are making supporters anxious
and giving opponents a new line
of attack.
The administration said
Thursday that small business own-
ers who want to use insurance mar-
kets designed especially for them
will have to wait until sometime
in November before they can fin-
ish their sign-ups. They still can
start shopping right away on Oct.
1. And even with the delay, they
can get coverage for their employ-
ees by Jan. 1, when the law takes
full effect.
In a potentially more significant
delay affecting the law’s larger
insurance market for individuals,
the administration quietly told
Hispanic groups on Wednesday
that the Spanish-language version
of the healthcare.gov website will
not be ready to handle online
enrollments for a few weeks. An
estimated 10 million Latinos are
eligible for coverage, and 4 mil-
lion of them speak Spanish prima-
rily.
“It’s been at least two years
since we’ve known that Latinos
are a primary target for enrollment
through the Affordable Care Act,
so we would have hoped that the
administration would have the
rollout ready on Day 1,” said
Jennifer Ng’andu, health care pol-
icy director for the National
Council of La Raza. That said, she
added that her group won’t object
if it takes a few more weeks to get
things right.
Meanwhile, a politically power-
ful small business lobby that
unsuccessfully sued to overturn
“Obamacare” said the enrollment
delay for employers strengthens
the case for hitting pause on the
entire law, one of the strategies
now being pursued by congres-
sional Republicans.
“Every step in the implementa-
tion process has seen delays and
setbacks,” Kevin Kuhlman, a top
official of the National Federation
of Independent Business, said in a
statement. “This is starting to
seem like a parody; unfortunately,
it is extremely serious.”
New state insurance markets for
individuals who don’t have cover-
age on the job, and separate ones
for small businesses with up to
100 workers, are a key part of
Obama’s health care overhaul.
Health law online sign-up delayed for small firms
By Pete Yost
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The FBI has
been using drones to support its
law enforcement operations since
2006 and has spent more than $3
million on the unmanned aircraft,
the Justice Department’s internal
watchdog said Thursday.
The disclosure came in a new
report by the Justice Department’s
inspector general, Michael
Horowitz, who revealed that the
department also has awarded $1.26
million to at least seven local
police departments and nonprofit
organization for drones.
In addition, the IG said another
Justice Department component,
the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives, plans to
use drones to support future opera-
tions. To date, the ATF has spent
almost $600,000, the IG report
stated.
From 2004 to May 2013, the
Justice Department spent almost
$5 million on the unmanned air-
craft.
In June, then-FBI Director
Robert Mueller told Congress that
the FBI occasionally uses the
unmanned aerial vehicles but was
developing guidelines in anticipa-
tion of issues that will arise “as
they become more omnipresent.”
In one instance earlier this year,
the FBI used drones at night during
a six-day hostage standoff in
Alabama.
In a letter in July to Sen. Rand
Paul, R-Ky., the FBI revealed it
had used drones 10 times since
2006 for surveillance in kidnap-
pings, search and rescue missions,
and drug and fugitive investiga-
tions. Among them was last win-
ter’s standoff between authorities
and Jimmy Lee Dykes, who was
shot to death after holding a 5-
year-old boy hostage in an under-
ground bunker in Alabama, the let-
ter said.
Justice Department spent nearly $5M on drones
By Darlene Superville
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LARGO, Maryland — With just
five days to go before Americans
can begin signing up for health
care under his signature law,
President Barack Obama on
Thursday ridiculed Republican
opponents for “crazy” doomsday
predictions of the impact and fore-
cast that even those who didn’t
vote for him are going to enroll.
With polls showing many
Americans still skeptical of the
law known as “Obamacare,” the
president went back to the basics
of explaining how nearly 50 mil-
lion uninsured Americans will be
able to buy coverage in new gov-
ernment-run exchanges while
mocking Republicans for trying
to block its implementation.
“The closer we get, the more des-
perate they get,” Obama argued.
“The Republican party has just
spun itself up around this issue,”
Obama said. “And the fact is the
Republicans’ biggest fear at this
point is not that Affordable Care
Act will fail. What they’re worried
about is it’s going to succeed.”
House Republicans are insert-
ing provisions that undermine the
health care law into a short-term
spending measure needed to avoid
a government shutdown on Oct. 1
and into legislation that would
increase the government’s bor-
rowing ability, which the
Treasury says will hit its limit in
mid-October.
Barack Obama mocks GOP for
‘crazy’ Obamacare predictions
REUTERS
Barack Obama pauses as he speaks about the Affordable Care Act at
Prince George’s Community College in Largo, Md.
LOCAL 8
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T
he North and Central San
Mateo County League of
Women Vot ers and the
Belmont Library both withdrew their
sponsorship of a candidates’ forum
scheduled last night for the Bel mont
Ci t y Counci l race. “Both the League of
Women Voters and the library feel that
we have been placed in a difficult situa-
tion. The intention to hold an impartial
event for the benefit of both candidates
and voters was undermined by the
Chamber of Commerc e flier that was
mailed out to the voters of Belmont
early this week. We didn’t want to be
associated with a forum that is perceived
as biased,” Bel mont Branch
Manager Kat hl een Beasl ey wrote the
six candidates in an email. Chamber
officials told the Daily Journal they were
being censored by city officials and
planned to have the candidates gather at
the library last night anyway despite the
League and library dropping their spon-
sorship.
***
San Mateo was named one of the best
dressed small cities by real estate blog
Movot o. c om for five factors including
the number of high-end fashion stores,
shoe stores, jewelry stores, tailors and
dry cleaners per capita. Santa Monica
tops the list, Boca Raton, Fla., is sec-
ond and San Mateo ranked fifth.
***
Author and advocate Si st er Hel en
Prej ean, author of “Dead Man
Wal ki ng, ” will be at the Notre Dame
de Namur Uni versi t y Chapel 7 p.m.
Friday. Sister Helen began her prison
ministry in 1981 when she dedicated her
life to the poor of New Orleans. While
living in the St . Thomas housing proj-
ect, she became pen-pals with Patri ck
Sonni er, the convicted killer of two
teenagers, sentenced to die in the elec-
tric chair of Louisiana’s Angol a St at e
Pri son. Her book, and the movie star-
ring Sean Penn, was based on
Sonnier’s life. For more information
email info@comunidadsandimas.org .
***
Baysi de Dog Exerci se Park i n
Burlingame was selected to receive a
$2,000 grant for park enhancements on
behalf of The Nutro Company’s
Room to Run dog appreciation proj-
ect.
***
The city of Redwood City not only
unveiled its new MetalCraft
Fi reStorm 36 Fi reboat this past
weekend at the Port of Redwood
Ci t y, it also revealed the winner of its
naming contest.
The name of the new fireboat is
Sequoia Guardian. The winners are
Akemi Coffman who contributed
“Sequoi a” and Oscar Morfin Jr. who
contributed “Guardian. ”
***
Ni ght of Li ght s, the annual coast-
side holiday tradition set for Friday, Dec.
6 was set to be canceled this year after
needed funds were short. However, mem-
bers of the Half Moon Bay Chamber
of Commerc e stepped up and pledged
enough to make it a reality this year.
Sponsorships are still being accepted.
For more information go to www.half-
moonbaychamber. org .
***
Come one, come all to the
Burlingame Pet Parade Saturday,
Sept. 28. Now in its 10th year, the
parade will feature a team of miniature
horses, beginning at 10 a.m. on
Broadway in Burlingame. Pet owners
who wish to march with their pets must
report by 9:30 a.m. to the parking lot
near Broadway and Chula Vista Avenue.
There is no charge to participate. This
family-friendly event offers free enter-
tainment and art projects for children.
Every participant receives a souvenir
ribbon and fancy ribbons are awarded for
the Best Pet Tri ck; Most Unusual
Pet; Best Dressed Pet; and Mos t
Ori gi nal Fl oat, Group or Wagon.
The grand prize winner receives a special
prize. Judging takes place immediately
after the parade at Broadway and
Capuchino Avenue. For more informa-
tion visit
www.burlingamepetparade.com.
And as an added bonus, there will be
free ice cream for all children who turn
10 in 2013 to mark the parade’s 10th
anniversary.
***
San Mateo Public Library ’s chil-
dren’s librarian Pamela Mayer has
been awarded the Sugarman Family
Childre n’s Book Award for her new
book, “Don’t Sneeze at the
Weddi ng. ” She will receive Oct. 13 at
the Washington, D.C., Jewi sh
Communi ty Center.
***
Asmall group of Bay Area flight
instructors were recognized for their
excellence in flight training by The
Aircraft Owners and Pilots
As s oc i at i on.
Sixty-nine flight instructors from
across the United States were nominated
by their students and colleagues and
earned a spot on the AOPA Fl i ght
Trai ni ng Excel l ence Awards Fl i ght
Instructor Honor Ro l l. Four of these
instructors teach out of San Carl os
Fl i ght Center, a local flight school
based at San Carl os Airport. These
four instructors are Andy Geosi t s, of
Burlingame; Sue Bal l ew, of Redwood
City; Bri an El i ot , of San Jose; and
Dan Dyer, of San Francisco.
Additionally, San Carlos Flight Center
is one of 11 flight schools in the United
States to be nominated for Outstandi ng
Fl i ght School .
The reporters’ notebook is a weekly collection
of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
Barbara Schimmel Burman
Barbara Schimmel Burman, born Oct. 8,
1921, in Wasseralfingen, Germany, died
peacefully at home in San
Carlos, Sept. 23, 2013.
She immigrated to San
Francisco in 1925. She
attended Star of the Sea
Academy and worked in
San Francisco where
friends introduced her to
Bob Burman. The two fell
in love and married July
14, 1942, in San
Antonio, Texas, just before he went off to
war. Over the next 62 years, ‘B&B’ created a
wonderful life together with their four chil-
dren, living in California, Pennsylvania,
Germany, Ohio and Virginia.
Her favorite experience was when Bob
served as defense attache in Sweden (1970-
75) where she played hostess to the interna-
tional community there. True to her nature,
Barbara treated royalty and servants with a
common love and affection. For two
decades, B&B lived in Virginia Beach, Va. ,
to be close to their children, and were active
in Ascension parish. In 2004, they returned
home to be near family and friends.
‘Oma’ is predeceased by her husband Bob
and her oldest son Robert. She is survived
by son Steve, daughters MaryAnn, Barbara
Ann, eight grandchildren and four great-
grandchildren. There will be a celebration of
life 1:30 p.m. Sunday Sept. 29 at Crippen &
Flynn Woodside and Carlmont Chapels,
1111 Alameda de las Pulgas in Belmont.
Mariska Vizcarra Knuist
Mariska Vizcarra Knuist, of Redwood
City, died Tuesday, Sept. 24 2013.
She was 40 years old.
Daughter of Louis
Knuist and the late
Johanna Seip, stepdaugh-
ter to Leila Knuist and the
late Bill Seip. Sister to
Robert Knuist and mother
to Thomas, Bailey and
Dominic.
Family and friends were
present for her peaceful passing. The family
expresses deep appreciation for the love and
support of family and friends during this dif-
ficult time.
Obituaries
OPINION 9
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letter to the editor
F
or more than six years, education
officials have talked about ways to
solve the overcrowding situation in
Foster City schools. Asignificant portion
of that time was spent on trying to find an
appropriate location. Would a public park
be an appropriate location? City officials
said no. Would a private shopping center
be an appropriate location? The communi-
ty took issue and the district decided no.
Ultimately, a Foster City-based commit-
tee formed to find consensus on the issue
determined the best path forward would be
to add capacity and another grade level at
Bowditch Middle School in Foster City.
The discussion then turned to how the dis-
trict would pay for the new construction.
Measure L, the $175 million bond passed
in 2008, could have been used for land pur-
chase but not the additional cost of a new
school. In addition, Measure L was known
to have not covered the entire scope of the
district’s facility and technology needs.
Still, there are projects on the Measure L
list that have not been completed though
there is approximately $70 million left of
it.
Measure P seeks to cover the cost of con-
structing a new and expanded Bowditch
Middle School while also addressing sever-
al other district needs including enroll-
ment, technology and loosening up some
money for the general fund through solar
power that can be put into the classroom.
Its main benefit is addressing the Foster
City school overcrowding issue — which
in itself is no small task after years of dis-
cussion. It is a $130 million bond measure,
and the bulk of it — about $60 million-$80
million — will go toward Bowditch.
Measure P will pay for about $18 million
in renovations at Knolls Elementary
School, which has been used off and on as a
temporary school during other renovations
for years and is now leased out. About $30
million can be allocated over short periods
to pay for new technology and $18 million
can be spent on energy efficiency, includ-
ing solar panels, which will lower the dis-
trict’s utility payments and allow for more
money to flow into the classroom.
Make no mistake, Measure P is not per-
fect. And those who take issue with it have
valid points. With some schools — partic-
ularly those in San Mateo — still left with
significant project needs, why exactly is
the district focusing so much money on
Foster City? How exactly will Knolls be
used once it is renovated? Does it mean that
the district will recalibrate boundary lines
on the west side of El Camino Real? Why
invest in technology that is ever-evolv-
ing? And why invest so much in solar? In
reverse order, solar panels have an initial
costly outlay but have proven to save
money in the long run when done right.
With so many districts enacting solar pro-
grams, it makes sense to check out best
practices to see what will give the district
the most bang for its buck. As far as tech-
nology, the district is smart in agreeing to
shorter bonds for those so the technology
can be updated and the payment period is
shorter. The district has yet to commit to
what it will do with Knolls but officials
have floated the idea of having it be solely
transitional kindergarten or a magnet
school — essentially leaving school
boundaries as they are. Project needs in San
Mateo schools have largely been met, but
there are still needs. And there is still
Measure L money and enough wiggle room
in Measure P to ensure San Mateo schools
get their needs met. But that’s a lot of ifs.
It is inherently critical, however, to look
at the larger picture. The San Mateo-Foster
City Elementary School District is the
county’s largest. Because it serves two
cities with a total population of 140,000,
it often has to balance the needs of several
unique communities in both cities. The rev-
enue it receives is largely based on its stu-
dent population drawn from both cities and
it has several unique opportunities through
its magnet school program to move chil-
dren according to their interests. Having
San Mateo children go to Foster City
schools has not been an option in recent
years because of the overcrowding issue.
Having a reconstructed Bowditch would
loosen up that issue and allow for new
opportunities.
But there is a certain amount of trust
involved in the decision to vote yes on
Measure P. If you live in Foster City, this
decision is easy. There will be more room
for your students. If you live in San Mateo,
you may feel as if there are too many
unknowns. But the strength of the overall
district is key. With the Foster City over-
crowding situation addressed, the district
will not have to face decisions that could
have a deleterious effect on students and
can move on to other issues. It could be a
rework of its magnet program or a move
toward having one location be a transition-
al kindergarten school. We doubt the dis-
trict will look at changing boundaries west
of El Camino simply because it is abun-
dantly clear it is an unpopular idea.
The district is charged with the task of
ensuring that the needs of every one of its
communities are being met. At this time,
solving the Foster City overcrowding issue
is a priority but that doesn’t mean other
areas are not important. It simply means
the district can move forward on solving
this one while engaging the community in
its next steps.
Overall, Measure P will have a communi-
ty benefit for both San Mateo and Foster
City at a cost of $19 a year per $100,000
assessed value of a property. It deserves
your support.
Downtown artwork
Editor,
Hooray for Lorna Watt and other artists
participating to beautify downtown San
Mateo. Their creative, picturesque work is
fantastic! I have wondered for some time
who was responsible for this unique and
creative art. It is wonderful seeing these
yarnbombs and murals displayed through-
out downtown. This is what our city needs
more of. The talent and workmanship
involved with these projects is incredible.
Taking those eyesore utility boxes and
making them “good-looking” paintings of
bright murals is superb.
I was unaware of the squid until reading
the article “Downtown gets makeover” in
the Sept. 23 edition of the Daily Journal
and took a walk to Tilton Avenue and B
Street. What an exquisite, detailed, breath-
taking creation. It was a shock when realiz-
ing the complete tree and details were all
prepared using her yarnbombing tech-
niques. Everyone needs to take time and see
all these unique art displays. I hope you
appreciate the luster brought to our down-
town. I look forward to seeing her future
artwork. Hopefully, everything will sur-
vive the upcoming weather and not be
ruined by graffiti or other destruction.
Susan Gardner
San Mateo
Yes on Measure P
Editorial
Other voices
A billion dollars to
help homeless vets
just sitting unused
Los Angeles Daily News
I
t’s a national embarrassment that so
many of the military men and
women who served in wars overseas
come back and don’t have homes of their
own or even places to sleep. California
voters want to help veterans get decent
homes, but their good intentions have
fallen flat because of the government’s
ineffectiveness.
In 2008, California voters passed a
$900 million bond for veterans’ home
loans. Those funds, administered by the
state’s Veterans Affairs Department, have
gone practically untouched because
would-be veteran homeowners picked up
loans with better interest rates on the
open market.
Meantime, nearly half of $500 million
from a similar 2000 voter-approved bond
measure is still unspent.
That’s more than a billion dollars
meant to help homeless vets but sitting
idle. It’s time for it to be repurposed.
That’s why Gov. Jerry Brown should
sign AB 639. The bill, by Assembly
Speaker John Perez, would ask voters to
decide, come election day in June 2014,
whether to redirect $600 million of those
unused funds toward building or rehabili-
tating housing for the neediest veterans
— ones who often find themselves living
on city streets, shuffling between shel-
ters and going without the mental health
services they need. Voters approved the
bonds and must also approve any changes
to them.
Among other things, this change would
aid long-term housing facilities for veter-
ans who need to get on their feet, by pro-
viding job and health services at their
homes.
Right now the bond money can be
spent only toward the purchase of single-
family homes and farms. But the veterans
who are lucky enough to afford homes are
looking elsewhere for help.
The Center for Investigative Reporting
found a more than 3 percent gap between
the market rate and the Veterans Affairs
Department’s in October 2011, when pri-
vate home loan rates fell to 2 percent.
Rates were lowered, but all the while,
homeless vets, many just off tours in
Afghanistan and Iraq, struggled to find
places to live.
Proponents of the bill say the cost of
paying off the current bonds — about $25
million annually — would be offset by
easing the strain on social services, espe-
cially in Southern California, where half
of the state’s nearly 16,500 homeless
veterans reside.
Their logic is substantiated by a report
by the Economic Roundtable and the Los
Angeles Homeless Services Authority
that estimates a homeless person living
in a place where they can access support-
ive services costs the public 79 percent
less than they do on the streets.
It would also give priority to funds that
can be leveraged. With President Obama’s
commitment to eliminate chronic veteran
homelessness by 2015, more money is
likely to be made available to such pro-
grams.
Brown should sign this bill now. Too
many military men and women who have
represented the United States in troubled
times, in hostile situations and with fam-
ilies waiting back home, are in need of
new beginnings.
This would be the governor’s salute to
them.
San Mateo County
Community College District
Richard Holober
Tom Mohr
Belmont-Redwood
Shores Elementary School District
Rakesh Hegde
Amy Koo
Charles Velschow
Hillsborough City
Elementary School District
Lynne Esselstein
Don Geddis
Kaarin Hardy
San Bruno Park School District
Patrick Flynn
John Marinos
Henry Sanchez
San Carlos Elementary School District
Nicole Bergeron
Carol Elliott
Kathleen Farley
Sequoia Union High School District
Alan Sarver
Chris Thomsen
Measure R-YES
$174 parcel tax for Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District
Daily Journal
endorsements
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BUSINESS 10
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
Dow 15,328.30 +55.04 10-Yr Bond 2.643 +0.029
Nasdaq 3,787.43 +26.33 Oil (per barrel) 102.86
S&P 500 1,698.67 +5.90 Gold 1,324.10
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Hertz Global Holdings Inc., down $4.15 to $21.63
Hertz cuts its profit and revenue outlook for the year due to softer-than-
expected demand for U.S. airport car rentals.
J.C. Penney Co. Inc., up 30 cents to $10.42
A two-day plunge in the retailer’s shares ends, for now, after it delivers
assurances of stronger sales.
Air Products & Chemicals Inc., up $2.46 to $109.78
The company announced the departure of its CEO and also changes to
its board amid pressure from Bill Ackman’s Pershing Square.
Jabil Circuit Inc., down $2.38 to $21.62
The electronics and design company, which has a lot of exposure to
troubled Blackberry, gave a weak first-quarter forecast.
Nasdaq
Bed Bath & Beyond Inc., Up $3.32 to $77.54
Profits at the home-ware retailer spiked 11 percent and revenue jumped
9 percent on strong comparable store sales.
eBay Inc., up $2.43 to $56.64
The e-commerce giant reached a deal to buy online and mobile payments
technology provider Braintree for $800 million in cash.
Ballard Power Systems Inc., up 12 cents to $1.77
The fuel cell company signs a multiyear agreement to supply Azure
Hydrogen’s zero emission fuel cell bus program in China.
Facebook Inc., up 93 cents to $50.39
Shares of the social media company climb above $50 for the first time
as industry watchers sense new revenue streams.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Upbeat news about
jobs and retailers helped the Standard
& Poor’s 500 index snap its longest
losing streak of the year on Thursday.
U.S. unemployment claims fell
close to their lowest level in six
years, the government reported, and
J.C. Penney and Bed Bath & Beyond
delivered encouraging news.
The positive trends outweighed wor-
ries about a potential government
shutdown in Washington next week.
Those concerns had led the S&P 500
index to five consecutive days of
declines, the index’s worst run in
2013.
That ended Thursday when the S&P
500 index rose six points, or 0.4 per-
cent, to close at 1,698.67.
“There’s a little bit of a bounce
here,” said Robert Pavlik, chief mar-
ket strategist at Banyan Partners. “It
may be a little bit of bargain hunt-
ing.”
The broad index is less than two per-
cent below its all-time high from
Sept. 18.
U.S. economic growth rose to an
annual rate of 2.5 percent from April
through June, the Commerce
Department reported Thursday. That
was an increase from the 1.1 percent
growth in the previous quarter.
Applications for unemployment
benefits fell 5,000 to a seasonally
adjusted 305,000 last week, the gov-
ernment said, the fewest since
September 2007, three months before
the Great Recession began.
While the economic news was
encouraging, it wasn’t spectacular.
Some analysts said it justified the
Federal Reserve’s surprise decision
last week to keep up its economic
stimulus.
The U.S. central bank has been buy-
ing $85 billion of bonds a month to
keep long-term interest rates low,
which has encouraged borrowing and
driven up stock prices.
Wall Street had expected the Fed to
start easing back on its stimulus.
“It’s fair to say that the Fed got it
right by delaying,” the cuts to stimu-
lus, said Ron Florance, deputy chief
investment officer for Wells Fargo
Private Bank. “Growth is uninterest-
ing and subdued.”
Growth-sensitive retail stocks were
among the best performers in the 10
industry groups that make up the S&P
500 index.
The group got a lift from the trou-
bled department store owner J.C.
Penney, which said it was pleased with
its turnaround efforts.
The company’s stock ended the day
up 30 cents, or 3 percent, at $10.42.
Shares, however, fell more than 5
percent in after-markets trading fol-
lowing the company’s announcement
that it planned to sell up to 96.6 mil-
lion shares of common stock in a pub-
lic offering. It was the latest indica-
tion the chain is looking to shore up
its cash reserves.
Bed Bath & Beyond also gave the
industry a boost. The stock climbed
$3.32, or 4 percent, to $77.54 after
the company said its quarterly profit
increased 11 percent.
Other stock indexes rose. The Dow
Jones industrial average climbed 55
points, or 0.4 percent, to 15,328. The
Nasdaq climbed 26 points, or 0.7 per-
cent, to 3,787.
In government bond trading, the
yield on the 10-year note edged up to
2.64 percent from 2.63 percent late
Wednesday.
Encouraging news on jobs, retailers lifts stocks
“It’s fair to say that the Fed got it right by
delaying. ... Growth is uninteresting and subdued.”
— Ron Florance, deputy chief investment officer for Wells Fargo Private Bank
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The U.S. economy grew
at a 2.5 percent annual rate from April
through June, an improvement from the first
three months of the year. But economists are
worried that growth may now be slowing.
The Commerce Department said Thursday
that its final look at economic growth in the
spring was unchanged from a prior estimate
made last month.
However, the components of growth were
altered slightly.
Businesses added a bit less to their stock-
piles and exports did not grow as fast as pre-
viously thought. These downward revisions
were balanced by slightly stronger spending
by state and local governments.
Many analysts believe growth is slowing
to a sluggish rate at or below 2 percent in the
current quarter. Economists had initially
hoped growth would improve in the second
half of the year.
If economists are correct that economic
activity slowed this summer, it would mark
the third quarter in the last four that growth
rates have been 2 percent or lower. Growth in
the fourth quarter of 2012 nearly stalled out
at a barely discernible 0.1 percent rate and
then improved slightly to 1.1 percent
growth in the January-March quarter.
The government initially estimated activ-
ity in the April-June quarter at a lackluster
1.7 percent but a big narrowing of the trade
deficit reflecting stronger export sales over-
seas helped boost growth to 2.5 percent in
the government’s second look.
EBay to buy payments
company Braintree for $800M
NEW YORK — E-commerce giant eBay
Inc. reached a deal to buy online and mobile
payments technology provider Braintree for
$800 million in cash.
The move comes as eBay’s PayPal unit
works to evolve from its roots as an online
payments provider, expanding its offline,
mobile and online offerings to stores,
restaurants and other business.
Braintree’s payments technology is used
by popular startups such as vacation rentals
site Airbnb, cab-hailing app Uber and
restaurant reservations site OpenTable. The
company charges businesses a fee of 2.9
percent plus 30 cents per each transaction,
and expects to process about $12 billion in
payments this year.
San Jose, Calif.-based eBay Inc. said
Thursday that it will operate Braintree as a
separate business. Bill Ready, the CEO of
the Chicago-based company, will report to
PayPal President David Marcus.
“Braintree will continue to do what it’s
currently doing,” Marcus said, adding that
PayPal will help the company to grow and
to expand internationally. EBay said that
Braintree’s mobile app, Venmo, will help
add to PayPal’s mobile payments capabili-
ties. The app lets people pay each other
using their mobile devices, similar to a
service PayPal offers.
Toyota recalls
615,000 Sienna minivans
TORRANCE — Toyota is recalling
615,000 Sienna minivans in the U.S.
because they can inadvertently shift out of
park and roll away.
The recall involves Siennas from the
2004, 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2009 models
years.
Toyota said Thursday that the shift lock-
ing device can potentially be damaged. If
that happens, the minivans can shift out of
park even if the driver isn’t depressing the
brake pedal.
Economy grew at 2.5
percent rate in spring
Business briefs
By R.B. Fallstrom
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS — Missing some of their
biggest stars, the San Francisco 49ers put
their foot down. They put the St. Louis
Rams back in their place, too.
Colin Kaepernick threw two touchdown
passes, Frank Gore had his first 100-yard
game of the season and the defense stepped
up in a 35-11 victory Thursday night.
“We know the talent we have on this
team,” Kaepernick said. “We know what
we’re capable of.”
Anquan Boldin had five catches for 90
yards and a touchdown, and Gore had 153
yards on 20 carries and a 34-yard score for
San Francisco (2-2), which was outscored
46-10 the previous two games. NaVorro
Bowman had two of the 49ers’ five sacks
with a strip leading to Anthony Dixon’s
fourth-quarter scoring run.
“If we keep playing, our offense will come
around sooner or later,” Bowman said.
The Rams (1-3) had an overtime win and
tie against San Francisco last year, and took
the early lead Thursday before falling flat.
Greg Zuerlein banged in a 40-yard field goal
off the right upright to end a nine-game
scoring drought in the first quarter, but the
49ers answered with 28 straight points.
“Tomorrow’s going to be a pretty tough
day in the film room,” Rams quarterback
Sam Bradford said. “The good news is we
have 10 days, 11 days until we play again
and there’s going to be ample time to get
that corrected.”
St. Louis was held to 188 total yards and
was completely stuffed on the run, with 18
yards on 19 carries.
“That’s what we do,” said safety Donte
Whitner, who had an interception in the end
zone. “We stop the run first, then we stop
the pass and then we get away with wins.”
The 49ers came close to a Super Bowl title
in February and regained their footing
against the team that gave them the most
trouble last season. Minus cornerback
Nnamdi Asomugha and linebackers Patrick
Half Moon Bay (1-2) at Menlo
School (2-1), 3:15 p.m. Friday
The Cougars corralled their first
win of the season last week, beat-
ing South City 56-14. … The
Knights knocked out San Mateo,
48-7. … After scoring a combined
28 points in its first two games,
Half Moon Bay doubled that
against South City. … The
Cougars jumped out to a 28-0 lead
over the Warriors last week. …
Menlo put up a game’s worth of
stats in one half last week, scoring
all seven of its first-half posses-
sions. … QB Jack Heneghan con-
tinues to shred opposing defenses.
He threw for 383 yards and six
scores in the first two quarters last
week.
San Mateo (1-2) at
Carlmont (2-1), 7 p.m. Friday
The Bearcats were buried 48-7 by
Menlo School last week. … The
Scots suffered their first loss of the
season, 23-19 to Homestead. …
Since opening with a 43-6 win
over Gunn, San Mateo has allowed
an average 45 points in its last
two games. … After gaining 370
yards of offense in their first game,
the Bearcats have managed 288
yards combined over the last two
games. … The difference in
Carlmont’s three games has been
21 points. … The Scots lost to
San Mateo 20-13 last season.
Los Altos (3-0) at
Mills (3-0), 7 p.m. Friday
The Eagles clipped Mountain
View last week, 32-14. … The
Vikings vanquished San Lorenzo
Valley 37-7. … Los Altos has
experienced quite the turnaround
after going winless last season. …
Los Altos is averaging nearly 37
points per game, buoyed by a 61-
point outburst against Burton-SF
in its season opener. … Mills is 3-
0 for the first time since 2003. …
QB Conor Hildalgo torched San
Lorenzo Valley for 191 yards pass-
ing and four TDs. … Victor
Beglitsoff also had a big day:
catching five passes for 133 yards
and three scores, a 66-yard scoring
run and a 37-yard field goal.
Terra Nova (3-0) at
Salinas (2-1), 7:30 p.m.
The Tigers tore up Pioneer 56-15
last week. … The Cowboys were
saddled with their first loss of the
year by Sacred Heart Prep, 25-10.
… Terra Nova’s offense is averag-
ing 50 points per game and more
<< Pryor limited in return to practice, page 12
• Arrest made in killing of Dodgers fan, page 13
Friday, Sept. 27, 2013
WELCOME TO THE BAY: WOODSIDE VOLLEYBALL TEAM SWEEPS SOUTH CITY >> PAGE 12
Best Bets
San Francisco regains footing, rout Rams 35-11
REUTERS
San Francisco running back Frank Gore ran
for 153 yards and touchdown. See 49ERS, Page 13
See BEST, Page 14
Different kinds of bounce
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
SouthCity will need to get Tyler Keahi and the rest of its running game in gear if the Warriors have a chance of
beating visiting Burlingame Friday night at Clifford Field.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Friday night’s Daily Journal
Game of the Week should serve as
an interesting experiment — one
that looks into what a blowout
does to two different football
teams.
Under the lights in South San
Francisco, the Warriors will be the
team trying to bounce back from
one.
And on the other sideline,
Burlingame High School will be
the team bouncing around with a
lot of swagger after back to back
shellings of the opposition.
Needless to say, with so much to
prove, emotions and adrenaline
will be high when the ball gets
kicked off at 7 p.m.
“We have been fortunate enough
to get off to good starts,” said
Burlingame head coach John
Philipopoulos. “We’ve had big
plays in the kicking game. We’ve
scored early. We’ve created
turnovers. We’ve played pretty
decent football for four quarters.
It’s a combination of a number of
things. We’re hoping we can keep
working and the trend continues.”
“We worked hard this week,”
said South City head coach Frank
Moro. “I’m tired. Our guys
responded well to it. We took it as
a learning experience. It was pour-
ing rain on Saturday (after Friday’s
loss) and we were out there practic-
ing. What I thought we had to do
was go back to teaching.”
It’s been a long time since Moro
and the Warriors have been man-
handled like they were last Friday
against Half Moon Bay. Usually
the more aggressive and physical
of the teams they play, South City
ran into an inspired Cougars team
who took it to the Warriors from
the opening kickoff. After five
plays, Half Moon Bay was up 7-0
and by the half, they added four
more scores.
“We looked at the film (after the
game) and we got beat up,” Moro
See GOTW, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA— Oakland Raiders quarterback
Terrelle Pryor returned to practice on a limited
basis Thursday, three days after being
knocked out with a concussion, and his status
for Sunday’s game remains in question.
Pryor passed a concussion test Wednesday
that allowed him to return to practice but he
still must be cleared for contact before the
Raiders (1-2) decide whether to play him
Sunday against Washington (0-3).
“There’s still some hurdles that he has to
clear but he was cleared to go ahead and non-
contact practice,” coach Dennis Allen said.
“He was able to get in there and practice some
on a limited basis today.”
During the part of practice open to the
media, Pryor did conditioning without a hel-
met and watched backups Matt Flynn and
Matt McGloin run practice. But Allen said
that Pryor put the helmet
on later and got some
plays in with his team-
mates.
Allen said he’d like to
know as soon as possible
about Pryor’s status and
that he won’t speculate
about whether Pryor will
play until doctors clear
him for contact.
Pryor was hurt late in
Monday night’s loss in Denver when he was
knocked out on a helmet-to-helmet hit by
linebacker Wesley Woodyard on a quarterback
draw. The play was determined to be legal by
the NFL because Pryor was a runner between
the tackles.
Pryor was cleared to attend meetings and
have physical activity Wednesday and passed
an additional test after that to allow him to
practice. Pryor said Wednesday it was his first
concussion and described the symptoms as
mild.
But because of the uncertainty, offensive
coordinator Greg Olson has had to design two
game plans this week: one that includes
designed quarterback runs for the more mobile
Pryor, who leads the team with 198 yards
rushing, and one for the more traditional
pocket passer Flynn.
“It’s a few tweaks here and there really,”
Olson said. “Obviously you’ll be able to add
the option of some of the things we’re doing
with Terrelle in the run game. But to be hon-
est with you, since Terrelle has taken over,
we’ve done some of those things when Matt
has gotten in and taken some of the few reps
that he has. He’s done some of those things
and he’s comfortable with that. He’s obvious-
ly not the athlete that Terrelle is but as far as
knowing when to pull the ball and when to
hand it off, he’s good at that.”
If Flynn does start, he would be the 16th
starting quarterback for the Raiders since the
start of the 2003 season.
Flynn has started two games in his career
when he was in Green Bay, going 24 for 37
for 251 yards, three touchdowns and one
interception in 2010 at New England and then
throwing for 480 yards and six touchdowns
against Detroit in the 2011 season finale for
the Packers.
But Flynn was beaten out the past two sum-
mers for starting jobs by Russell Wilson in
Seattle and Pryor in Oakland. He was ham-
pered in both training camps by a sore throw-
ing elbow but the time off since losing the
starting job has helped.
“His arm looks fresher,” Olson said. “I
think that jumps out probably to everybody.
His arm is certainly much fresher.”
Pryor limited in return to practice
Terrelle Pryor
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Spanning back to Ocean Division play
last year, Woodside and South City have
forged something of a spirited rivalry, with
both teams moving up to the Bay Division
this season.
The Wildcats picked up right where they
left off, tabbing a decisive sweep at South
City — 25-15, 25-20, 25-13.
Woodside’s senior tandem of Christine
Alftin and Dani Walsh fronted an all-around
dominant performance, as the Wildcats (2-0
in Bay, 9-6 overall) remain unbeaten in
league play. Alftin soared to 14 match kills,
while dominating at the service line with a
season-high seven aces.
“Alot of times, [Walsh] is our big server, ”
Woodside head coach Kyle Mashima said.
“She usually cranks out a lot of aces. But it
didn’t work out like that today. ”
Woodside servers picked apart South
City’s defense throughout, as Ana Oropeza
and Francesca Fioresi tallied four service
points apiece in Game 1. Alftin took it to
the next level in Game 2 — the most spirit-
ed game of the match — reeling off 10 serv-
ice points, while doing even more damage
at the net.
In Game 2, South City rallied back from a
seven-point deficit to overtake Woodside
20-19 on a nifty crosscourt kill by Sierra
Nelson. But Woodside answered right back,
seizing momentum on an authoritative
Alftin kill to tie it, before junior Danielle
La Force delivered a perfectly-timed block
at middle-net for a go-ahead kill. Woodside
would not trail for the remainder of the
match.
South City senior Sifagatogo Faaiu
seemed to single-handedly keep her team in
contention early on, pacing the Warriors
with nine match kills and five blocks.
“She did good,” South City head coach
Enrico Salazar said. “She was aggressive.
That’s what we want. It’s like I tell them –
win or lose, we want to give it our best until
the last point.”
Entering his third year as Woodside’s head
coach, Mashima has seen quite a turn-
around. The Wildcats went from a winless
league record in 2011, to capturing the
Ocean Division crown last season.
Mashima admits Woodside wouldn’t be
where it is without an influx of transfer
players. Joining the team this season from
Elk Grove are sisters Heilani and Haili
Hoeft. But the game-changer was the addi-
tion of both Alftin and Walsh at the midsea-
son mark last year.
Alftin transferred from St. Francis, while
Walsh transferred from Bishop O’Dowd. The
two were forced to sit out throughout non-
league play, but ended up bonding on the
sidelines while running the scorebook
together.
“[The team was] sort of even performance
wise — kind of 50-50,” Mashima said.
“Then when they came on board, we were at
a hundred percent. So, they made a big dif-
ference.”
Now, the tandem’s on-court communica-
tion is tantamount to Woodside’s high-
octane attack.
“We usually tell each other how to hit …
and in midair, we’ll be telling each other
where to hit,” Alftin said. “I think we work
really well together. ”
Other Bay results
Burlingame (1-1, 9-5) bounced back from
a tough loss in Tuesday’s league opener to
down Aragon (0-2, 6-3) in three straight
games — 25-16, 25-21, 25-22. Aragon fal-
tered after taking a 19-13 lead in Game 1.
The Dons are expected to go through some
growing pains to start the season, as their
starting seven consists of four sopho-
mores, two juniors, and just one senior.
“We’re just a young team and we’re trying
to get to know each other,” Aragon head
coach Kelsey Stiles said. “We have fantastic
players. They just need to find their niche.”
Carlmont (2-0, 9-5) downed Hillsdale (0-
2, 3-4) in four games — 25-21, 25-22, 22-
25, 25-11. Senior Charlotte Jackman had a
career-high 15 kills to pace the Scots.
Menlo-Atherton (2-0, 8-3) swept San
Mateo (0-2, 2-7) — 25-14, 25-12, 25-21.
Valerie Mihalek paced the Bearcats with
seven kills, while Morgan Ho totaled 16
assists.
Ocean Division results
Sequoia (2-0, 8-2) maintained one of the
Ocean Division’s best overall records,
downing Westmoor (0-1, 8-6) in five games
— 25-16, 25-21, 13-25, 22-25, 15-11.
With senior Joy Robinson sidelined due to a
hamstring issue, her younger sister, fresh-
man Leanne Robinson, emerged with a
career-high 20 kills. The offensive produc-
tion of Rachel Fink was also key to the
Cherokees perseverance.
Elsewhere, Terra Nova (1-1, 8-2) swept
Jefferson (0-2) — 25-13, 25-20, 25-5.
“We’re starting to move the ball well, and
we’re beginning to attack the net effective-
l y,” Terra Nova head coach Craig Dillie said.
Mills (1-1, 2-5) downed El Camino (0-2,
0-3) in straight games — 25-20, 25-21, 25-
18. Pricilla Young paced the Vikings with
nine kills and seven blocks, while sopho-
more Adrienne Lee had 15 digs.
“[Lee] had an exceptional save that kept
us in the first game,” Mills head coach Polly
Wiard said.
Half Moon Bay (2-0, 6-6) remains unbeat-
en in league after downing Capuchino (1-1,
4-5) — 26-24, 25-21, 24-26, 25-16.
Freshman Hailey Merkes paced the Cougars
with 13 kills, while contributing 10 digs
and five aces.
Woodside too strong for South City
Willis and Aldon Smith, they quieted a rau-
cous, hopeful crowd, sending all but a few
thousand home early.
“We’re going to have to get tough in
here,” Rams defensive end Chris Long said.
“We’re going to have to hold each other
accountable and make plays and dig our way
out of this hole because nobody’s going to
do that for us.”
Kaepernick had no touchdown passes and
four interceptions the previous two weeks
and completed fewer than 50 percent of his
passes. He was 15 for 23 for 167 yards.
Boldin had a monster debut with the 49ers
after helping the Ravens beat San Francisco
in the Super Bowl, but had been quiet along
with the rest of the offense the previous two
weeks. He had two highlight catches in the
second quarter, a 42-yarder despite Cortland
Finnegan getting flagged for holding, and a
20-yard score capped by a dive into the end
zone after barely avoiding the sideline.
Gore more than doubled his output from
the first three weeks and got a lot more
work, too, after totaling just 11 carries last
week. Four days earlier, DeMarco Murray
burned them for 175 yards in Dallas’ 31-7
win.
“It’s disgusting,” Long said. “It really is
just disgusting.”
The Rams have trailed by double digits in
every game, making up an 11-point deficit
against Arizona in the opener but not gaps
of 21 and 24 points against Atlanta and
Dallas, and were down by 25 in the fourth
quarter against San Francisco.
They got hit by injuries, too, the worst of
them when rookie safety T.J. McDonald was
carted off with a leg injury in the second
half.
Bradford was 19 for 41 for 202 yards and
an interception and has been sacked 11
times the last two games after the Rams
allowed none the previous four games.
After mustering just 25 yards in the first
quarter, the 49ers took a noisy crowd out of
it in the second, averaging more than 11
yards per snap while piling up 176 yards
and two touchdowns. Kaepernick was 8 for
12 for 104 yards in the half, all but 11 of
those yards in the second quarter.
The Rams went for it on third-and-1 from
the 49ers 34 and Whitner’s diving intercep-
tion on a tipped ball in the end zone set up
an eight-play, 80-yard drive capped by
Gore’s 34-yard run on third-and-1 in the
final minute that made it 14-3.
SPORTS 13
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Angel Pagan hit a
tiebreaking home run leading off the eighth
inning to give San Francisco a win in what
might have been Tim Lincecum’s final out-
ing with the club, and the Giants beat the
Los Angeles Dodgers 3-2 on Thursday
night.
Pagan’s fifth home run in an injury-short-
ened season was surrendered by losing
pitcher Paco Rodriguez (3-3) and plunked
off the top of an ambulance parked just
beyond the fence in left field.
Lincecum struck out Yasiel Puig three
times among his six Ks but missed a win
against the NL West champion Dodgers.
Santiago Casilla (7-2) earned the victory
with a 1-2-3 eighth, while Sergio Romo
pitched the ninth for his 38th save.
Lincecum is wrapping up a $40.5 million,
two-year contract that paid him $22 million
this season. The 29-year-old right-hander
allowed two runs and three hits in seven
impressive innings.
The NL Cy Young award winner in 2008
and ‘09 and four-time All-Star was drafted
10th overall by the Giants in 2006.
He pitched a no-hitter July 13 at San
Diego and pitched the 2010 World Series
clincher at Texas as the club captured its first
championship since moving West in 1958.
He moved to the bullpen and became an
effective reliever for last season’s title run.
Lincecum received a roaring ovation from
the sellout crowd of 41,221 when introduced
before the game — and several more times
throughout.
“I certainly hope Timmy is back with us,”
manager Bruce Bochy said. “Timmy has
been a pleasure all my years here and I hope
that continues.”
Lincecum allowed two doubles to begin
the fourth, then struck out the next three
batters. He followed up Barry Zito’s victory
in his likely Giants farewell a night earlier
in a 6-4 win with another emotional outing
for the franchise and its supporters.
Fans held large banners reading “We love
U Timmy!” and “Timmy Don’t Leave” and
cheered when he ran off following a fifth-
inning sacrifice. Pagan had an RBI ground-
out in the inning, Gregor Blanco walked and
Brandon Belt hit a trying double to make it
2-2.
After Adrian Gonzalez put the Dodgers
ahead on a first-inning sacrifice fly, the
Giants saved Lincecum a run in the second.
Tim Federowicz was thrown out at home by
left fielder Blanco as he tried to score on
Puig’s single.
Dodgers starter Edinson Volquez’s winless
stretch reached seven starts since he beat
the Mets on Aug. 17. He didn’t beat the
Giants in five tries this year.
The Giants took the season series with
their rivals 11-8, earning just their third
series win at home in the second half in 13
tries.
San Francisco third baseman Pablo
Sandoval was scratched with flu-like symp-
toms after he arrived at the ballpark and
began throwing up, and Nick Noonan
replaced him.
NOTES: A moment of silence was held
before the game for Jonathan Denver, a fan
stabbed to death Wednesday night a few
blocks from the ballpark. ... Dodgers OF
Andre Ethier isn’t expected to play again
during the regular season as he nurses an
injured left ankle the team still hopes will
improve in time for the playoffs.
Lincecum wins in
final start of 2013
Continued from page 11
49ERS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — The man who was fatal-
ly stabbed during a confrontation after a
Dodgers-Giants game in San Francisco was the
son of a Dodgers security guard, the team said
Thursday.
Jonathan Denver’s father, Robert Preece,
worked security on game days at Dodger
Stadium, the Dodgers said.
San Francisco police say Denver, 24, was
with his father, brother and two other people a
few blocks from the San Francisco Giants’ball-
park Wednesday night when their group
exchanged words with some Giants fans who
were leaving a nightclub.
The exchange turned physical and Denver,
who was wearing Dodgers gear, was stabbed to
death.
“There is no rational explanation for this
senseless act,” the Dodgers said in a written
statement. “The pain that this has caused his
family and friends is unimaginable.”
Denver attended the game with his relatives
but left in the eighth inning of what turned out
to be a 6-4 Giants victory. His attackers did not
attend the game, police said.
San Francisco police said Michael
Montgomery, 21, of Lodi, was arrested on sus-
picion of homicide. Another person, whose
name was not released, was also taken into cus-
tody.
“One of the suspects during the course of the
interviews (with detectives) made incriminat-
ing statements that give us the indication that
he will be the person booked for homicide,”
Police Chief Greg Suhr told reporters.
“We’re trying to figure out what we’re going
to do with the other suspect,” Suhr continued.
“The investigation is still ongoing.”
Fans of both teams expressed a range of emo-
tions as they entered Thursday night’s game at
AT&TPark.
“I was a little bit scared at first but then I
thought tonight will probably be the safest
night at this ballpark, so I thought it was still
OK to bring my son out to the game,” said Clay
Brust, a Dodgers fan from Reno, Nev.
Brian Chew, a Giants fan from San Bruno,
said the stabbing was unfortunate.
“It seems like the passion that exudes in
some fans is really pointed in the wrong direc-
tion,” Chew said. “We have bigger purposes in
life than just orange and black, or blue and
white.”
The altercation several blocks from the ball-
park was the second violent confrontation
between Dodgers and Giants fans in the past
several years to end in death or serious injury.
Bryan Stow, a Northern California paramedic
and Giants fan suffered a traumatic brain injury
after two men dressed in Dodgers gear attacked
him following the teams’ March 31, 2011,
game in Los Angeles.
Denver, his father and his brother had left a
bar around 11:30 p.m. — about 90 minutes after
the game ended — when they exchanged heated
words about the Giants-Dodgers rivalry with
another group of people leaving a nightclub.
One of the members of the group was wearing
a Giants hat, Suhr said.
Afight broke out, and no one was seriously
hurt at first. But a second altercation occurred a
few minutes later, Suhr said.
“We’re not sure at this time who wouldn’t let
it go. It wasn’t clear who started the second
fight,” Suhr said, but it ended with Denver’s
stabbing.
“Obviously, this is one of the most storied
rivalries in baseball. That said, and I’m a big
Giants fan, there is no place at these games for
violence,” Suhr said. “Nobody’s life should be
at stake whether they are at the game, leaving
the game, whether it’s six blocks away and an
hour and a half after the game.”
Arrest made in fan’s death
REUTERS
SFPD Police Chief Greg Shur addresses the media on the fatal stabbing of a Dodgers fan
outside of a San Francisco night club Wednesday night.
said. “We got pushed around and that usually
doesn’t happen. And I looked at the film, it
started up front with the lines. You look at
it, we started four out of five underclassmen
on the offensive line. And a lot of those
guys are going both ways so, we had some
problems getting ready for the football
game. We had some problems when things
got physical, we didn’t know what do to and
it showed.”
When the dust settled, the Cougars had
rushed for 453 yards on a team that prides
itself on stomping out the run.
“We just got punched and didn’t know
what to do,” Moro said. “And we don’t have
the experience to know how to react to
that.”
On the other end, the Panthers didn’t let a
bye week slow down their initial momen-
tum. After dismantling Mountain View in
Week 1, the thought was that perhaps
Burlingame would hit a lull and thwart such
a positive start.
“We were a little (concerned),”
Philipopoulos said. “Because the bye was
so early, that two week wait felt like two
months to me. That time kind of drags a lit-
tle bit. But, our kids, they’re resilient and
did a great job. It didn’t effect them one way
or another. We took advantage of that time.”
Indeed they did. Burlinagame jumped all
over Gunderson and controlled all facets of
the game. Offensively, Manese Palu and
Keoni Keahi showed explosion for the
Panthers who tallied 301 yards of total
offense to go with another touchdown on
special teams.
So again, with so much too prove, the key
to Friday night’s game might be what team
handles that pressure the best.
“I told the guys straight up,”
Philipopoulos said, “South City High
School does not lose football games like
that. That’s not who they are. That’s not
what they do. That’s not what they’re accus-
tomed to. And you can bet your bottom dol-
lar they’re going to come out firing on all
cylinders. If you walk in there feeling all
high and mighty because we’re 2-0, we’re
going to be in for a rude awakening.I know
South City is going to come out swinging.
We have a lot of challenges ahead of us
tomorrow. ”
Moro echoed the same sentiment.
“They know that Burlingame is coming
ready to play,” Moro said. “Burlingame is
going to be similar to Half Moon Bay in
that they’re going to be fundamentally
sound. They’re going to run and block as
hard as they can. Get on the right guy. Not
make any mistakes.We went over every-
thing again. We spent a lot of time in prac-
tice trying to get a little more confident and
a little bit more healthy. ”
“The biggest key for us is our offensive
line,” Philipopoulos said. “Being able to
handle their size and athleticism up front is
going to be a challenge for us. And just tak-
ing care of the ball. We don’t want to turn
the ball over and give them momentum.”
“I want to come out of this game playing
fundamentally sound,” Moro said. “We’re
going to go forward and spend more time in
their backfield than they spend in ours.
That’s the key right there. We have to spend
more time in their backfield.”
SPORTS 14
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than 500 yards of offense. … The Tigers
averaged more than 11 yards per carry on the
ground last week, rolling up 206 rushing
yards on just 18 carries. … The Cowboys’
10 points scored was their lowest output
since Week 3 of 2012 when they scored
only three.
Capuchino (1-2) vs. El Camino (2-1) at
South City, 2 p.m. Saturday
The Mustangs mauled Gunn 35-7 last
week for their first win of the season. … The
Colts held off Lincoln-SF, 12-7. …
Capuchino has done what every coach would
ask for: continued improvement. After get-
ting blasted 56-20 in its opener, Cap closed
the gap two weeks ago, falling 23-22 to
South City before breaking through last
week, giving coach Josh Horton his first
win with the Mustangs. … In El Camino’s
two wins, the Colts have scored a total of 40
points. In their lone loss, they put up 26.
Aragon (3-0) at
Scotts Valley (2-1), 2 p.m. Saturday
The Dons downed Lincoln-SJ 35-7 last
week. … The Falcons flew past King’s
Academy by the same score, 35-7. …
Aragon is averaging nearly 40 points per
game this season and have allowed only 33
points. … Aragon fullback Patrick Pauni
scored a pair of touchdowns in the Dons’
win last week. … Scotts Valley is averaging
37 points per contest.
Continued from page 11
BEST
Hillsdale (2-1) at
Alameda (2-1), 7 p.m. Friday
The Knights fell to Alvarez 43-35 last
week. … The Hornets were hammered 44-14
by Miramonte-Orinda. … Hillsdale QB Cole
Carrithers had one of the best outings of his
career, throwing for 349 yards and a pair of
touchdowns on 25 of 41 passing. …
Alameda needs only one more win to equal
last year’s total.
Lowell (0-2) at
Jefferson (0-3), 7 p.m. Friday
The Cardinals were crushed 35-8 by
Tennyson-Hayward. … The Indians were
bashed 53-12 by Petaluma. … Lowell has
been outscored 71-20 in two games this sea-
son. … Jefferson is allowing more than 50
points per game. … The good news for the
Indians is they scored their first points of
the year last week after being shut out in
their first two games.
Sequoia (3-0) at
Cedar City-Utah (2-3), 7 p.m. Friday
The Cherokees chewed up Woodside last
week, 44-26. … The Redmen are coming off
a tight 6-0 victory. … This is the third year
in a row Sequoia is traveling out of state to
play a game. Last year, the Cherokees went
to Idaho and two years ago they traveled to
Oregon. Sequoia is 2-0 in out-of-state
games. … Sequoia QB Faavae Brown
accounted for five touchdowns — four rush-
ing, one passing — in the win over
Woodside. … Throw out a Week 2 63-point
explosion and Cedar City has scored only
32 points in its other four games.
Sacred Heart Prep (3-0) at
King’s Academy (1-1), 7 p.m. Friday
The Gators got by Salinas 25-10 last
week. … The Knights were clobbered by
Scotts Valley, 35-7. … In its three wins,
Sacred Heart Prep is averaging more than
540 yards of offense per game. … RB Ricky
Grau paced the Gators last week with 150
yards and three touchdowns on 19 carries.
… The 10 points allowed by SHP were the
first the Gators have given up this season.
… After an encouraging 55-7 season-open-
ing win over San Jose, King’s Academy was
brought back to earth last week. … The
Knights trailed 21-0 after just six minutes
last week and managed just 82 yards of total
offense.
Menlo-Atherton (2-1) at
Silver Creek (0-2), 2 p.m. Saturday
The Bears beat their second straight
Central Coast Section playoff contender,
handing defending Open Division champi-
on St. Ignatius a 21-16 loss. … The Raiders
were routed by Soquel 41-0. … M-A QB
Brian Keare had a breakout game against the
Wildcats, passing for 302 yards and two
TDs. … Silver Creek has been shut out in
both its games this season.
The Rest
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Sequoia quarterback Faavae Brown
accounted for 200 yards of total offense and
five touchdowns last week.
Continued from page 11
GOTW
The Woodside girls remained unbeaten in
Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division
play with a 5-3 win over Menlo Thursday
afternoon.
The Wildcats led 4-3 at halftime, but shut
out the Knights over the final two periods
before adding an insurance goal in the fourth
period.
Woodside improves to 7-0 with the win,
while Menlo falls to 4-3.
The Burlingame girls won their second
match in overtime this season, rallying
from a two-goal deficit to beat Sequoia 9-8
Wednesday.
Niki Reynolds scored five goals to lead
the Panthers, including a pair in extra time.
Following a scorless first period, Sequoia
led 5-3 at halftime.
Gretta Musayelyan tied the match at 7 for
Burlingame and with the scored tied at 8 in
overtime, Reynolds drew a penalty shot and
converted it with 17 seconds to play to give
the Panthers the victory.
In boys’ action, Sacred Heart Prep
improved to 2-0 in West Catholic Athletic
League play with a 10-7 win over Central
Coast Section power Bellarmine Wednesday.
The Menlo School boys also stayed unde-
feated in league play, topping Carlmont 12-
5 in PAL Bay Division play.
After a close first period during which the
Knights held a slim 4-3 lead, Menlo
outscored the Scots 8-2 the rest of the way.
Chris Xi led Menlo with five goals, while
Nikhil Bhatia and Nick Bisconti each scored
three times.
Menlo’s goaltending tandem of John
Wilson and Spencer Witte had seven saves
each.
Local water polo roundup
SPORTS 15
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
x-Boston 96 63 .604 —
Tampa Bay 90 69 .566 6
Baltimore 83 76 .522 13
New York 82 77 .516 14
Toronto 72 87 .453 24
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Detroit 93 66 .585 —
Cleveland 89 70 .560 4
Kansas City 84 75 .528 9
Minnesota 66 93 .415 27
Chicago 62 97 .390 31
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oakland 94 65 .591 —
Texas 88 71 .553 6
Los Angeles 78 81 .491 16
Seattle 70 89 .440 24
Houston 51 108 .321 43
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
Thursday’sGames
Tampa Bay 4, N.Y.Yankees 0
Baltimore 3,Toronto 2
Texas 6, L.A. Angels 5
Cleveland 6, Minnesota 5
Kansas City 3, Chicago White Sox 2
Friday’sGames
Boston(Buchholz11-1) at Baltimore(Feldman5-5),
4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 12-9) at Toronto (Dickey 13-
13), 4:07 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 13-8) at Miami (Koehler 4-10),4:10
p.m.
L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 17-7) at Texas (Ogando 7-4),
5:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Kluber 10-5) at Minnesota (P.Hernan-
dez 3-2), 5:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 12-9) at Chicago White Sox
(Sale 11-13), 5:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 10-11) at Houston (Ober-
holtzer 4-4), 5:10 p.m.
Oakland (Colon 17-6) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 12-
9), 7:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
x-Atlanta 94 65 .591 —
Washington 84 75 .528 10
New York 73 86 .459 21
Philadelphia 72 87 .453 22
Miami 59 100 .371 35
Central Division
W L Pct GB
z-St. Louis 94 65 .591 —
z-Pittsburgh 91 68 .572 3
z-Cincinnati 90 69 .566 4
Milwaukee 72 87 .453 22
Chicago 66 93 .415 28
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-Los Angeles 91 68 .572 —
Arizona 80 79 .503 11
San Diego 75 84 .472 16
San Francisco 74 85 .465 17
Colorado 72 87 .453 19
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
Thursday’sGames
San Diego 3, Arizona 2, 11 innings
Milwaukee 4, N.Y. Mets 2
Atlanta 7, Philadelphia 1
San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 2
Friday’sGames
Detroit (Porcello 13-8) at Miami (Koehler 4-10),4:10
p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 11-10) at N.Y. Mets (C.Torres
4-5), 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 9-11) at Cincinnati (H.Bai-
ley 11-11), 4:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 14-7) at Atlanta (Medlen 14-
12), 4:30 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (T.Wood 9-11) at St. Louis (Lynn 14-
10), 5:15 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 7-9) at Arizona (Corbin 14-
7), 6:40 p.m.
Colorado (McHugh 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw
15-9), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (B.Smith 1-2) at San Francisco (Vogel-
song 3-6), 7:15 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 83 55
Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 86
N.Y. Giants 0 3 0 .000 54 115
Washington 0 3 0 .000 67 98
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 70 38
Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36
Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 71 74
Tampa Bay 0 3 0 .000 34 57
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 95 74
Detroit 2 1 0 .667 82 69
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88
Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 81 96
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 86 27
San Francisco 2 2 0 .500 79 95
Arizona 1 2 0 .333 56 79
St. Louis 1 3 0 .250 69 121
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 3 0 0 1.000 59 34
Miami 3 0 0 1.000 74 53
N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 55 50
Buffalo 1 2 0 .333 65 73
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 1 0 .667 70 82
Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 68 48
Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 60 56
Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 28 92
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 75 64
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 71 64
Cleveland 1 2 0 .333 47 64
Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 42 76
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 3 0 0 1.000 127 71
Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 71 34
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 57 67
San Diego 1 2 0 .333 78 81
NFL GLANCE
Thursday’sGame
San Francisco at St. Louis, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday’sGames
N.Y. Giants at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
Seattle at Houston, 10 a.m.
Baltimore at Buffalo, 10 a.m.
Arizona at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m.
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Cleveland, 10 a.m.
Chicago at Detroit, 10 a.m.
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 10 a.m.
N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 1:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 1:25 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 1:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 1:25 p.m.
New England at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, GreenBay
Monday’sGame
Miami at New Orleans, 5:40 p.m.
Thursday, Oct. 3
Buffalo at Cleveland, 5:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 6
Detroit at Green Bay, 10 a.m.
New Orleans at Chicago, 10 a.m.
Kansas City at Tennessee, 10 a.m.
Jacksonville at St. Louis, 10 a.m.
@Seattle
1:10
CSN-CAL
9/29
Playoffs
TBD
vs.Padres
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/29
Endof
season
Endregular
season
@Salt Lake
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/21
@ChivasUSA
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/29
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/9
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
vs.Heredia
7p.m.
10/23
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs. Texans
5:30p.m.
NBC
10/6
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
@Jaguars
10:05a.m.
FOX
10/27
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
vs.Redskins
1:25p.m.
FOX
9/29
vs. Chargers
1:25p.m.
CBS
10/6
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
vs.Steelers
1:05 p.m.
CBS
10/27
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
vs. Padres
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/27
vs. Padres
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
9/28
@Seattle
7:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/27
@Seattle
1:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
9/28
vs.Dallas
2:30p.m.
NBCSports
10/26
NFL SCHEDULE
BASEBALL
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL —Announced the
retirement of commissioner BudSeligafter the2014
season. Suspended Milwaukee OF Carlos Gomez
and Atlanta OF Reed Johnson one game and fined
them undisclosed amounts for their actions dur-
ing Wednesday’s game.
AmericanLeague
DETROIT TIGERS —Placed SS Danny Worth on
the 60-day DL. Reinstated SS Jhonny Peralta from
the restricted list.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS —Transferred LHP Brett
Cecil to the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of OF
Ryan Langerhans from Buffalo (IL).National League
CHICAGOCUBS—Placed C Welington Castillo on
the 15-day DL, retroactive to Sept. 20.
NEWYORKMETS—Transferred RHP Matt Harvey
to the 60-day DL.
COLLEGE
STANFORD — Signed men’s water polo coach
John Vargas and women’s water polo coach John
Tanner to multiyear contract extensions.
TRANSACTIONS
EA Sports settles college athlete likeness cases
NEWYORK — The NCAAis now on its own in the legal
battle over whether athletes should share in the money
made from the use of their likenesses.
Electronic Arts and the Collegiate Licensing Company
have settled all lawsuits brought against the companies by
former and current college athletes over the unauthorized
use of the players’ images and likenesses in video games
and other merchandise.
The NCAA is not part of the settlements, which includes
the O’Bannon case. Brought by former UCLA basketball
star Ed O’Bannon, that lawsuit was asking for the NCAA,
EA and CLC to share billions of dollars in revenues —
including those made from massive television rights deals
— with college athletes.
The settlement was submitted for approval to the U.S.
District Court in Northern California and the terms were
confidential.
Sports brief
16
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AUTO
CX-5 is hot-selling Mazda crossover SUV
By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
In its first year, the Mazda CX-5 crossover sport utility
vehicle won over auto critics with its driver-pleasing han-
dling, comfortable interior and sporty looks.
Now in its second model year, the five-passenger CX-5
promises to garner more compliments, thanks to a more
powerful, but still fuel-efficient, engine that puts zoom-
zoom into the compact SUV.
New for 2014, the 2.5-liter, double overhead cam,
SkyActiv-G four cylinder has a larger displacement than the
original 2-liter four cylinder and generates 184 horsepower,
an increase of 29 over last year’s sole engine. Its horse-
power is higher than the four cylinder in the 2014 Toyota
RAV4 and even one of the turbo engines offered in the 2014
Ford Escape SUV.
The new Mazda engine also delivers 185 foot-pounds of
torque at 3,250 rpm, which compares with 150 foot-pounds
of torque at 4,000 rpm in the CX-5’s smaller engine and the
RAV4’s 172 foot-pounds at 4,100 rpm.
The intriguing part is that federal government fuel econo-
my ratings for the front-wheel drive CX-5 with the more
powerful engine still are near the top of the non-hybrid,
gasoline-powered, compact crossover class: 25 miles per
gallon in city driving and 32 mpg on the highway.
Add some new features for 2014 and the fact the CX-5 is a
recommended buy of Consumer Reports magazine, and it’s
no wonder the CX-5 is Mazda’s second best-selling vehicle
in America. In fact, the 54,388 U.S. sales so far this calen-
dar year are more than double the CX-5 sales from last year
at this time.
The CX-5 still offers a six-speed manual, though it is only
with the smaller, 2-liter engine that remains in the lineup.
All told, the 2014 CX-5 remains an affordable and note-
worthy choice for smaller SUV shoppers.
Starting manufacturer’s suggested retail price, including
destination charge, is $22,190 for a base, 2014 CX-5 Sport
with front-wheel drive and six-speed manual transmission.
The lowest starting retail price for a base, 2014 CX-5
Sport with six-speed automatic transmission is $23,590, or
$1,400 more.
The lowest starting MSRP, including destination charge,
for a 2014 CX-5 with all-wheel drive is $24,840. The only
transmission available with all-wheel drive is the six-speed
automatic.
All base models, which are Sport trim, have the base,
155-horsepower, 2-liter four cylinder.
Buyers wanting the new, 2.5-liter four cylinder must move
up to a 2014 CX-5 Touring or Grand Touring model. Starting
retail price for a 2014 CX-5 Touring FWD is $25,610, while
a Touring model with all-wheel drive starts at $26,860.
The base CX-5 prices undercut, just a bit, some competi-
tors, such as the 2014 Toyota RAV4, which has a starting
retail price, including destination charge, of $24,160 for a
front-wheel drive model with 176-horsepower four cylinder
Toyota executive: Pent-up
demand for cars will end
By Tom Krisher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — The boom in sales of new cars in the U.S.
has been fueled by consumers replacing vehicles they kept
through the recession.
But a top auto industry executive says that the pent-up
demand likely will be satisfied by late next year.
Jim Lentz, Toyota’s North American CEO, told the
Associated Press in an interview Thursday that demand for
new cars from owners of older models could dry up sometime
late in 2014. If the economy isn’t creating jobs at a faster
pace when that happens, the boom could screech to a halt.
“The market then has to work off a much better economy,
an improving economy,” Lentz said. “If we don’t have that,
I think the market may flatten out.”
New car and truck sales hit a three-decade low of 10.4 mil-
lion in 2009 as the financial crisis dried up money for car
loans and U.S.-based auto companies nearly went out of
business. Consumers, many who feared they could lose their
jobs, refused to buy new cars and instead kept their old ones
on the road.
Sales, though, gradually rebounded and now are running at
an annual rate of around 15.6 million, just below pre-reces-
sion levels.
Lentz, speaking at the AP’s New York headquarters, said
the average car and truck in the U.S. is now more than 11
years old. At the same time, the supply of coveted used cars
that are one-to-five years old is down to levels not seen
since the 1980s. Used car prices have jumped, making their
monthly payments as high as those for new cars, Lentz said.
That’s brought more buyers into new-car showrooms, he
said.
The base CX-5
weighs less
than 3,200
pounds, or
about the
same as a
base, 2014
Honda Accord
car. Even the
CX-5 Grand
Touring model
with the
slightly larger
engine and
front wheel
drive weighs
less than the
top, 2014
Accord LX
sedan.
See CX-5, Page 17
See TOYOTA Page 17
AUTO 17
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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But as people replace their cars at a faster
rate, the used-car supply increases.
Eventually, prices will drop and lure buyers
out of the new-car market, he said.
“So in time, as that one- to five-year base
builds its way back up, I think we’re going
to reach that equilibrium, probably some-
time near the end of 2014,” he said.
Jesse Toprak, senior analyst for the
TrueCar.com auto pricing site, disagrees,
saying pent-up demand isn’t close to taper-
ing off.
Consumers have not yet made up for four
years of lower-than-normal auto sales, and
won’t for another three or four years, Toprak
said. He also believes that consumers and
businesses have just started to replace old
pickup trucks that were held through the
recession.
If auto sales do slow, that could be bad
news for the U.S. economic recovery. The
auto industry has created thousands of jobs
as sales have recovered, helping to keep the
economy afloat for the past two years.
Continued from page 16
TOYOTA
and automatic transmission. The starting
retail price of the 2014 CX-5 is just a bit
more than the $22,345 for a 2014 Ford
Escape with 168-horsepower four cylin-
der, automatic transmission and front-
wheel drive.
The test CX-5 was a top-of-the-line
Grand Touring model with all-wheel drive,
plus the optional technology package that
added a TomTom navigation system, high-
intensity-discharge headlamps and
advanced keyless entry, among other
things. As a result, the test vehicle’s win-
dow sticker price was just over $32,000.
Drivers can notice quickly the difference
between the smaller four cylinder and the
new one in the CX-5. The higher-powered
CX-5 accelerates more eagerly and moves
in sprightly fashion, due in part to the
vehicle’s impressive low weight that
Mazda engineers carefully honed.
The base CX-5 weighs less than 3,200
pounds, or about the same as a base, 2014
Honda Accord car. Even the CX-5 Grand
Touring model with the slightly larger
engine and front wheel drive weighs less
than the top, 2014 Accord LX sedan.
Power in the CX-5 came on smoothly
and steadily through the automatic trans-
mission. While there were some straining
sounds from the four cylinder when the
SUV was pressed to pass other vehicles on
long, uphill highway stretches in moun-
tain country, the performance was far bet-
ter than what comes from the smaller
engine.
Fuel economy was a surprising 25.5
mpg, which is just below the combined
city/highway mileage of 26 mpg estimat-
ed by the federal government. This trans-
lated into a travel range of 390 miles in
the all-wheel drive model, which had a
15.3-gallon fuel tank. Regular unleaded
gasoline is all that’s needed.
Note that the impact of the larger four
banger on fuel economy is meager, as it
garners 25/32-mpg federal fuel economy
ratings in the front-wheel drive CX-5 vs.
the 26/32-mpg ratings for a front-wheel
drive CX-5 with the smaller engine.
The test CX-5 was stable in curves and
corners, with little body lean exhibited.
The driver became increasingly confident
in making sharp maneuvers, since the SUV
rode like it was kept tightly connected to
the road and responsive to steering inputs.
The engaging experience for the driver,
who, like other SUV drivers, sits a good
distance above the pavement, helps set
the CX-5 apart. Simply, there are plenty of
crossover SUVs with a more plush, more
isolated-from-the-road ride, and they have
quieter interiors, too, than the CX-5. But
this Mazda is agile, fun and relatively
spunky, particularly for drivers who prefer
a sporty car ride.
The CX-5 interior isn’t as stylized as
those of some other vehicles, such as the
Ford Escape. But it’s handsome and func-
tional.
The 5.8-inch display screen in the mid-
dle of the dashboard isn’t as large as those
in some Toyotas, for example, and the
TomTom nav is OK but not exceptional in
its graphics.
The CX-5 seats, leather-trimmed in the
test vehicle, were supportive on lengthy
drives, and back-seat legroom of 39.3
inches was unexpectedly generous.
Towing capacity is 2,000 pounds.
Continued from page 16
CX-5
The CX-5 interior isn’t as stylized as those of some other vehicles, such as the Ford Escape.But
it’s handsome and functional.
It comes down to this
’Breaking Bad’ is ending run but still looking good
By Frazier Moore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The supply is
running low and you know there
won’t be more. “Breaking Bad”
stands to leave its fans reeling.
For five seasons of wickedness
this AMC drama has set viewers
face-to-face with the repellant but
irresistible Walter White and the
dark world he embraced as he
spiraled into evil. With the end
imminent (Sunday at 9 p.m.
EDT), who can say what fate
awaits this teacher-turned-drug-
lord for the havoc he has wreaked
on everyone around him.
This is more than the end of a
TV series. It’s a cultural moment,
arriving as the show has logged
record ratings, bagged a best-
drama Emmy and even scored
this week’s cover of The New
Yorker magazine.
Up through the penultimate
episode, “Breaking Bad” has
been as potent and pure as the
“blue sky” crystal meth Walter
cooked with such skill. Judging
from that consistency in story-
telling and in performances by
such stars as Bryan Cranston
(Walter White), Aaron Paul (his
sidekick Jesse Pinkman), Anna
Gunn (who just won an Emmy as
Walt’s wife) and Betsy Brandt,
the end will likely pack unforgiv-
ing potency.
But one thing is dead sure: It
will be beautiful.
“Breaking Bad” has often been
described as addictive, and if
that’s so, the look of the show is
its own habit-forming drug.
Michael Slovis, the series’ four-
times-Emmy-nominated director
of photography, has been cooking
up that look since the series’
sophomore season.
“I go for the emotion in the
See THE END, Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
It’s 1929 in Berlin, where the
tawdry Kit Kat Klub epitomizes
the atmosphere of anything
goes. In the ensuing months,
however, tensions rise as the
Nazis rise to power.
That’s the setting for
“Cabaret,” the memorable musi-
cal by composer John Kander and
lyricist Fred Ebb, now enjoying
a noteworthy production by
Broadway By the Bay in Redwood
City.
Director Brandon Jackson
employs a minimalist staging
that keeps the action flowing
smoothly and propelling the
plot.
Much of the action takes place
in the Kit Kat Klub, where the
leering Emcee (Alex Rodriguez)
oversees overtly sexual perform-
ances by the six Kit Kat Girls and
the four Kit Kat Boys.
The club’s star performer is an
Englishwoman, Sally Bowles
(Amie Shapiro), who insinuates
herself into the room and bed of a
recently arrived American writer,
Clifford Bradshaw (Jack
Mosbacher).
They live in a rooming house
owned by Fräulein Schneider
(Karen DeHart), an older spin-
ster. Fräulein Schneider figures
in a subplot along with Herr
Schultz (Stuart Miller), a kindly
widower who owns a fruit shop.
They contemplate marriage,
but his being Jewish proves to be
an insurmountable barrier in the
face of the Nazis’ anti-Semitism.
“Cabaret” was a Broadway hit
that first came to San Francisco
in 1987. It has been seen locally
several times since then. BBB
staged it in 2004 at the San
Mateo Performing Arts Center.
For many fans, though, the
benchmark is the 1972 film star-
ring Joel Grey as the Emcee and
Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles.
They set the standard.
Rodriguez’s interpretation of
the Emcee is far different from
Grey’s, but it works well in the
context of this production. He
sings, dances and acts well.
Likewise, Shapiro’s Sally
Bowles is far different from
Minnelli’s. Minnelli is the bet-
ter dancer, but choreographer
Kristin Kusanovich wisely sim-
plifies Shapiro’s dance moves.
Shapiro paces the emotions
and volume well in such songs as
“Mein Herr” and “Maybe This
Time,” but pushes in the title
song. Her acting is generally
good, but she can’t quite capture
Sally’s neediness and vulnerabil-
i t y.
Mosbacher does well as Cliff, a
role based on author Christopher
Isherwood, who penned the sto-
ries on which the play by John
Van Druten and this musical are
based.
Supporting characters are
solid, especially DeHart as
Fräulein Schneider and Miller as
Herr Schultz. However,
Brandon’s direction dilutes the
tragic sadness of her decision not
to marry Herr Schultz because of
how the marriage might affect
her livelihood.
Melissa Reinertson does dou-
ble duty as a Kit Kat Girl and
Fräulein Kost, a prostitute who
also lives in Fräulein Schneider’s
house. Warren Wernick plays
Ernst, who befriends Cliff but
who is revealed to be less inno-
cent than he seems at first.
The show works best in the
first act, when Brandon’s staging
relies on a few chairs on the two-
level set by Margaret Toomey,
who designed the costumes. The
staging doesn’t work as well in
the second act as emotions and
the tensions heighten.
Kusanovich’s inventive chore-
ography is one of the show’s
highlights, as well as the musi-
cal direction by Sean Kana, who
directs the onstage orchestra
from the keyboard.
Taken as a whole, this produc-
tion, though not perfect, has
much to recommend it. It contin-
ues at the Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City,
through Sept. 29. For tickets and
information call 579-5565 or
v i s i t
www.broadwaybythebay. org.
Life is a ‘Cabaret’ at the Fox in Redwood City
MARK & TRACY PHOTOGRAPHY
‘Cabaret,’the memorable musical by composer John Kander and lyricist Fred Ebb,is now enjoying a noteworthy
production by Broadway By the Bay in Redwood City.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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scene, not to overtake it, but to help it
along,” said Slovis over a recent lunch in
Manhattan. “With ‘Breaking Bad,’ I recog-
nized very early that I had a story and per-
formances that could stand up to a bold
look.”
The action is centered in Albuquerque,
N.M., which invites sprawling desert shots
and tidy manicured neighborhoods; washes
of light and jagged sun-drenched expanses.
The look of the show makes the most of
its setting, and also the technology by
which viewers see it: In an age of digital
video, with the smallest detail and the
sharpest resolution visible to the audience,
Walter’s battered mobile meth lab could be
clearly discerned as a speck against a vista
of deserts and mountains. A doll’s disem-
bodied eyeball bobbing in a swimming
pool had chilling vividness.
And don’t forget the show’s visual signa-
ture: “Breaking Bad” was never afraid of the
dark.
Slovis recalls how, his first week as DP,
he was shooting in Jesse’s basement.
“Jesse and Walter are down there cooking
meth, and I turn off all the
lights and turn the back
lights on. There’s smoke
and shafts of light com-
ing through the basement
door and I go, ‘This is
what I came to do!”’
“We have some inter-
esting extremes in light-
ing, thanks to Michael
and his fearlessness,”
said “Breaking Bad” creator Vince Gilligan
from Los Angeles. He invoked the fancy
artistic term for this, “chiaroscuro,” which
means the use of strong contrasts between
light and dark.
“‘Breaking Bad’ has become known for
beautiful bold lighting,” he said, “and
Michael became an indispensable part of
the ‘Breaking Bad’ equation.”
The imagery of “Breaking Bad” is second-
nature to its viewers, whether or not they
are conscious of Slovis’ work. So when they
swoon at the beauty of the desert outside
Albuquerque, they may not know the com-
plexion of this badlands was created in his
camera.
“The desert on the show has a tonality
that doesn’t exist in real life,” he said with a
laugh. This color is achieved with a so-
called “tobacco filter” clamped on the lens.
“I don’t pay much attention to reality when
I light or even when I shoot exteriors. But
nobody questions the color, because it
becomes part of the storytelling.”
You would have a hard time finding many
stylistic links between “Breaking Bad” and
some of Slovis’ other credits, which include
“CSI” (for which he won an Emmy),
“Fringe,” AMC’s short-lived noir thriller
“Rubicon,” and lighter fare including
“Running Wilde” and “Royal Pains.” (Nor
his additional credits as a director, which
range from four episodes of “Breaking Bad”
to “Chicago Fire” and “30 Rock.”)
Instead, he said he strives to let each proj-
ect suggest its own look.
Now 58, Slovis is soft-voiced and lanky,
with a head whose baldness rivals Walt
White’s in Heisenberg mode.
He got the photography bug while grow-
ing up in Plainview, N.J., where he became
the school photographer and won a state
photography contest. He was invited to
study at the Rochester Institute of
Technology.
He imagined himself a fine-arts photogra-
pher but he loved movies and storytelling,
and, after graduate school at New York
University, he landed jobs shooting music
videos and commercials, then got nibbles
from feature films.
But in 2001 he found movie offers drying
up, and, though he had never seen TV in his
future, he gratefully accepted a call from the
NBC series “Ed.”
The timing was terrific. For decades, TV’s
hasty, assembly-line production schedule
proved an obstacle to giving a series its
own visual style.
“Film had been just a way to record the TV
picture,” Slovis said. A further barrier to
getting too creative was the low resolution
and squarish shape of the old TV receivers,
which conversely had a negative impact on
theatrical films, whose wide-screen format
was forced to conform (with lots of medium
and close-up shots) to movies’ eventual
small-screen telecast.
Slovis hails pioneering exceptions such
as “Twin Peaks,” “Law & Order” and “The X-
Files,” and credits “CSI” as “one of the first
times that cinematography became a real
character on a show. TV began changing
around us.”
Gilligan agreed that “the advent of flat-
screen TV really allowed Michael’s work to
shine in a way it wouldn’t have, 20 years
ago.”
Now the end of “Breaking Bad” is nigh.
But through Sunday’s final fade-out, Slovis’
influence will remain, capturing the “Bad”
times you can’t turn your eyes from. He’s a
Continued from page 18
THE END
By Lauri Neff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Betsy Brandt says the
intensity of the final “Breaking Bad”
episodes “physically affected” her.
“There were days shooting — these last
eight episodes especially — I just felt sick.
My chest would get all tight and I just felt
awful,” she said.
Brandt plays Marie Schrader, sister-in-
law to chemistry teacher turned drug lord
Walter White (Bryan Cranston) on the
show, which airs its series finale this
Sunday on AMC at 9 p.m. EDT. In an inter-
view Wednesday she said she did a lot of cry-
ing, too.
“After we’d get a take then I’d just sort of
start sobbing because you gotta get it out
before you go home,” she said.
The actress says the weightiness of
“Breaking Bad” had a lot to do with her deci-
sion to take on the comedy “The Michael J.
Fox” show as her next role. She plays
Annie Henry, wife of Fox’s character in the
series that premieres Thursday at 9 p.m.
EDT.
Brandt says when she read the “Breaking
Bad” finale script, she told show creator
Vince Gilligan it was “the perfect ending for
this show. ”
She’s not giving out any hints, not that
people really want to know.
“It’s funny. They want me to tell but they
really don’t want me to tell,” Brandt said.
“People are crazy, `Tell me. Don’t tell me.
Tell me. Don’t. No. Please stop.’ That’s
kind of what it is.”
Brandt ‘felt sick’ shooting last of ‘Breaking Bad’
By Mark Kennedy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — It may be one of the most
boring lines ever — “Leave a message after
the beep.” But what if you managed to jazz
up your phone’s outgoing message with a
celebrity?
The advocacy group Autism Speaks is
offering just that: custom-recorded mes-
sages from “Batman” star Adam West ,
“Breaking Bad” star Bryan Cranston, singer
Cher, actors Jack Black, Peter Dinklage,
Jim Parsons, “Star Wars” star Mark Hamill,
“Star Trek” actors Michael Dorn and
Zachary Quinto, and broadcaster Vin Scully.
“We got a good mix and match,” Ed Asner,
the curmudgeonly Emmy Award winner of
“The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “Lou
Grant,” who dreamed up the unusual
fundraiser with one of his sons, Matt, who
works for Autism Speaks. “They’ve all been
really happy to do it. And if they’re not
happy, I’ll put a hit out on them.”
Bryan Cranston, Cher offer custom phone recordings
Michael Slovis
Betsy Marie Schrader, sister-in-law to Walter White in AMC’s ‘Breaking Bad.’
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Burlingame’s #1 Choice!
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By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
OH, SAY, YOU SHOULD
SEE: A GLORIOUS 1776
OPENS AMERICAN CON-
SERVATORY THEATER’S
2013- 14 SEASON. Political
infighting, heated debates, nego-
tiated compromises.
Revolutionary events come to
life in the Tony Award-winning
musical 1776, a vivid look at our
founding fathers as they drafted
the Declaration of Independence.
1776 premiered on Broadway in
1969, running for 1,217 per-
formances and winning three
Tony Awards, including Best
Musical. Music and lyrics by
Sherman Edwards. Book by Peter
Stone. Directed by Frank Galati.
Two hours and 35 minutes with
one intermission. Through Oct.
6 .
TICKETS: Tickets, starting at
$20, can be purchased from the
A.C.T. box office at 405 Geary
St., by phone at (415) 749-2228
or online at www.act-sf.org.
STAGE DIRECTIONS:
A.C.T. is located at 415 Geary
St., just off Union Square in the
heart of downtown San Francisco.
Parking is available one block
away at the Mason/O’Farrell
Garage, 325 Mason St. The the-
ater is a relatively level four-
block walk from the BART-
Powell Street Station (Market
Street).
AN ASIDE: A.C.T. Artistic
Director Carey Perloff said,
“Welcome to 1776, the true story
of how this country very nearly
failed to come into being….This
musical play is a brilliant drama-
tization of the debate in Congress
over American independence from
Britain, pushed forward in the
oppressive heat of a Philadelphia
summer by wildly high-strung
John Adams, lovelorn Thomas
Jefferson, gout-afflicted Ben
Franklin and a group of fractious
congressional delegates. The
piece is both hilarious and heart-
stopping, as values get compro-
mised, power gets adjudicated and
last-minute deals get made.”
1776 EVENTS. Learn firsthand
what goes into the making of
great theater. After the shows on
Sept. 29 at 2 p.m. and Oct. 2 at 2
p.m., join a lively onstage chat
with the actors, designers and
artists who developed the work.
On Oct. 5, at 12:30 p.m., before
the 2 p.m. matinee performance,
get hands-on with theater with
the artists who make it happen at
an interactive workshop.
OPEN CAPTION PERFOR-
MANCE ON OCT. 3. An open
captioned performance of 1776 is
offered on Thurs. Oct. 3 at 8 p.m.
Special seats are reserved for
hearing-impaired audience mem-
bers who would like an optimal
view of the digital screen. These
tickets (located in the Orchestra
section) are $40 per person and
available at act-sf.org/ 1776
(select the “caption” tab) or at
(415) 749-2228. Open caption-
ing displays text alongside live
speech, dialogue and singing. It
does not require patrons to use
special equipment for viewing the
text.
***
SAN FRANCISCO OPERA
FREE AT STANFORD.
Stanford Live and San Francisco
Opera team up for a free evening
of music under the stars with a
live simulcast of Giuseppe Verdi’s
Falstaff at Stanford University’s
Frost Amphitheater on Friday
Oct. 11 at 8 p.m. Verdi’s comic
masterpiece is projected on a
large video screen — coupled
with high-fidelity sound — in a
beautiful tree-ringed, grass-cov-
ered setting. Refreshments sold
and picnicking welcome.
Advance registration for guaran-
teed early entry available at
live.stanford.edu. Sung in Italian
with English subtitles on the
amphitheater’s screen. Frost
Amphitheater is located at the
corner of Galvez Street and
Campus Drive.
***
AM/FM: RITA WILSON AT
FEINSTEIN’S AT THE
NIKKO. Hotel Nikko San
Francisco welcomes actress and
singer Rita Wilson (It’s
Complicated, Sleepless in
Seattle, The Good Wife) Thursday
Oct. 31 (8 p.m.), Friday Nov. 1 (8
p.m.) and Saturday Nov. 2 (7
p. m. ). Wilson performs songs
from her debut album “AM/FM” –
a collection of classics from the
‘60s and ‘70s. Intimate 140-seat
cabaret setting. 222 Mason St.
San Francisco. Tickets $40-$60
at (866) 663-1063 or www.tick-
etweb.com. All seating is cabaret
style on a first-come, first-served
basis within the section pur-
chased.
***
U.K.’S PEOPLE SHOW AT
FORT MASON. Someone’s
been murdered. But there’s no
body, no weapon and no motive.
There is a Suspect, and the inter-
rogator is talking to him. The
suspect believes he is innocent,
but can only remember three
things: 1. He is a compulsive
gambler; 2. He is in love with a
woman who is an expert on all
things Agatha Christie; and 3. He
thinks he may be a fictional char-
acter in a detective novel. People
Show, the U.K.’s longest-running
alternative theater company,
makes its first Bay Area appear-
ance since 1989. 75 minutes.
Through Oct. 5. Southside
Theater at Fort Mason in San
Francisco. $39 includes show
ticket and unlimited wine.peo-
pleshowusa.com/tickets.
***
THERE’S STILL TIME TO
CATCH THE SHAKESPEARE
BUG. Lives spiral out of control
as a group of friends and family
are drawn into an alternate
Shakespearean reality, in The
Shakespeare Bug at Stage Werx
Theatre. Delightful, fast-paced
verbal volleys take sharp jabs at
the Silicon Valley culture. Final
Weekend. 8 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday 446 Valencia St. (at 16th
Street). San Francisco.
www.killingmylobster.com.
Susan Cohn is a member of the
American Theatre Critics Association
and the San Francisco Bay Area
Theatre Critics Circle. She may be
reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
KEVIN BERNE
Jarrod Zimmerman (Edward Rutledge) and the cast of the West Coast premiere of the Tony Award–winning
musical 1776, at A.C.T.’s Geary Theater in San Francisco through Oct. 6.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Simms allegedly refused to shake the
mayor’s hand as he had it extended out in
thanks for her presentation.
She also passed on shaking the hand of
Ross before turning around and saying “I
better shake your hand or you will tell
everyone I didn’t,” both Ross and Lim told
the Daily Journal yesterday.
Simms’ office has a different account of
the scenario, however, in which the inci-
dent played out more as an awkward
moment that Simms briefly hesitated to
reach out her hand because they voted “no”
against the bond, Assistant
Superintendent Molly Barton told the
Daily Journal yesterday afternoon.
In the end, there was a handshake, all
three agreed, but the way the moment took
place has caused the mayor and deputy
mayor to question the superintendent’s
professionalism.
Lim even sent Simms an email yesterday
asking for an apology, not a personal one
but one directed more toward the City
Council and its process.
“While we did not vote the way you
obviously had hoped, we felt it was
extremely rude to refuse to shake our hands
when we thanked you for your input at the
conclusion of our meeting,” Lim wrote
Simms in the email. “On behalf of the res-
idents of San Mateo, some of who wit-
nessed your disrespect, we would ask for a
formal apology. Not so much for
Councilmember Ross and I, who are
grown-up enough to forgive your sleight,
but for the disrespect you showed to the
office of the City Council of San Mateo
and the disrespect you showed toward the
democratic process of disagreeing without
being disagreeable.”
But “in the end, they shook hands,”
Barton told the Daily Journal.
“It was awkward, we want the bond to
pass,” Barton said.
If Measure P is approved, Knolls
Elementary School in San Mateo, which
has been used as a temporary overflow
school, could reopen for the 2016-17
school year, following a design process
and construction of about three years, tak-
ing about $18 million. About $60-$80
million would go Bowditch in Foster City
expanding from 1,000 to 1,500 students,
adding a floor and expanding on the
ground level to address growing enroll-
ment. There is also money for technology,
energy efficiencies and other improve-
ments. It would cost property owners $19
per $100,000 assessed property value.
Voters previously approved Measure L, a
$175 million bond measure in 2008. There
is still $70 million in funds left from
Measure L.
Ross opposes the bond because it will
not allow underprivileged, mostly
Hispanic San Mateo children into Foster
City schools and has an unequal distribu-
tion of funds.
“The current policy has exclusionary
practices,” he said.
District officials have said that having
San Mateo children attend Foster City
schools has not been an option because of
overcrowding there, and that this bond
measure will help address that.
It is important for the city and district
to get along or the students will suffer, ”
Ross said.
Ahandshake to Lim is not a meaningless
gesture.
“Even if she thinks I’m a jerk, she
should respect the process and the posi-
tion,” Lim told the Daily Journal. “It’s not
OK. She should be held to a high profes-
sional standard.”
Lim also told the Daily Journal he may
have suffered a moment where he lacked a
bit of maturity but still feels disrespected
by Simms’ actions Wednesday.
Ross, too, feels disrespected.
“I went to shake her hand and she pulled
her hand back and said ‘I’m not going to
shake your hand,’” Ross told the Daily
Journal. “It is important for the city and
district to get along or the students will
suffer. ”
The district is seeking the council’s
endorsement of the bond measure. The
council may still endorse it despite the
subcommittee’s recommendation since it
would require three of five votes.
Measure P requires 55 percent of voters’
approval to pass.
Continued from page 1
AWKWARD
and workshops at Fort Mason in San
Francisco. It was going good for a while.
Samuels was staying sharp and people were
getting good at improv, but then people
would leave for other improv clubs and
Samuels wasn’t feeling the challenge gained
by performing in front of a live audience.
So, Samuels decided to create his own
group, and the first auditions were scheduled
for Sept. 11, 2001. Due to the events of that
morning, however, a second audition date
was created. Some people did actually show
up to the auditions on Sept. 11, and it
seemed to help take people’s minds off the
tragedy of the day, but the majority of peo-
ple came for the postponed tryouts.
Originally, Samuels pictured the troupe per-
forming at parks, and he bought blue blan-
kets (for no particular reason) to be the sign
to let people know where to go for their
entertainment. Thus, the name of the
improv troupe was born.
Samuels and the rest of Blue Blanket
Improv felt getting paid for performances
would complicate things and strain the rela-
tionship, so they registered as a non-profit
group. For their shows, the group asks for a
$10 entrance fee, and all the money they
collect goes to various charities such as
Best Buddies, a group for those with physi-
cal disabilities, or a performing arts schol-
arship.
Samuels and the rest of the performers are
a part of Blue Blanket for the joy they find
in it, but it’s not a way for them to make a
living. Samuels, by day, works at the VA
hospital in Palo Alto, where he has to help
heal traumatized Iraqi and Afghani war veter-
ans.
“It’s very disturbing and requires a lot of
focused, serious energy,” Samuels said. “I
find it very helpful to be in a creative envi-
ronment where I can do anything silly and
it’s OK. We all need therapy, and this is my
therapy. ”
Brian Ogata, another member of the
troupe who teaches public speaking and
debate classes at a high school, is
enthralled with the feeling of creating a
flowing narrative on the fly.
“When you get into a scene that just flows
and everything just seems to work out it’s
the most amazing experience you could ever
have as an improv performer,” Ogata said.
“It feels so good that’s the experience you
keep coming back for. ”
At the shows, all of the scene themes are
generated by the audience. No matter the
improv game, audiences never fail to come
up with humorous situations, such as a
father killing his son trying to shoot a
grape off his head, getting led to hell by the
devil, and then being reunited and bound to
his son for the rest of eternity, with the
entire scene playing out in movie-musical
style.
“I have no idea what’s going to happen in
any given scene on any given night —
which I enjoy,” Samuels said. “A scene is
about developing an interesting story — a
beginning, a middle and an end. The hardest
part for me is not to gag — saying some-
thing funny to get a laugh instead of pro-
gressing a story. I want the audience to
laugh at the situation, not the dirty word.”
The current members of Blue Blanket
Improv are Samuels, Ogata, Steve Ketchpel,
Barbara Anderson, Eric Fronberg, Kevin
Nova, Todd Sedano, Jen Mazzon and
Jasmine Gunkel. To prepare for their live
shows, these performers meet every
Monday evening in Samuel’s garage for a
couple of hours and practice the variety of
games in their repertoire.
These performers described the incredible
chemistry and trust they have built with
each other, through rehearsals and live per-
formances.
“It’s a little bit like jazz,” Anderson said.
“Everything’s going to be spontaneous, but
it’s also true the more you rehearse and work
with the same group of people, the more
you know what tune you can play and how
they’ll harmonize with it. It seems to me
it’s the closest thing to being able to play
jazz.”
For more information go to www.blue-
blanketimpro v.com.
Continued from page 1
LAUGH
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, SEPT. 27
Recent Property Crime Trends.
7:30 a.m. Crystal Springs Golf
Course, 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. $15. For more informa-
tion call 515-5891.
Don’t Get Burned. 10 a.m. to noon.
Twin Pines Senior and Community
Center, 20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
A workshop on home safety and
fraud prevention. Free. For more in-
formation call 595-7441.
Variety Show and Lunch. 10:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Emcee Raoul Epling will be there and
lunch will be served. Tickets at front
desk. For more information call 616-
7150.
Exhibit opening — Television: A
History. 11 a.m. to 4 p..m Museum of
American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave.,
Palo Alto.This exhibit will run through
March 23, 2014. Free. For more infor-
mation call 473-9070 or go to
www.moah.org.
San Mateo Fall Home and Land-
scape Show. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fiesta
Hall, San Mateo County Event Center,
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Hun-
dreds of home improvement and
landscaping exhibits with product
demonstrations. Event continues on
Saturday and Sunday. For more in-
formation go to
www.acshomeshow.com/for-cus-
tomers/details/374-sm-f13.
Admission is free. Parking is $10 cash
per vehicle.
Senior Scam Stopper seminar. 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. Veterans Memorial Se-
nior Center, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. Learn how to protect
yourself from various types of fraud
such as identity theft, telephone
scams and financial, insurance and
mail frauds. Free. Hosted by Sen. Jerry
Hill and assemblymen Richard Gor-
don and Kevin Mullin. To RSVP, call
212-3313.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks
are three for $1, trade paperbacks are
$1, hardbacks are $2, children’s books
are 25 cents. All proceeds benefit the
Belmont Library. For more informa-
tion call 593-5650 or go to
www.thefobl.org.
Music on the Square: Mazacote. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
For more information go to red-
woodcity.org/events.
The 400 Blows Screening. 7 p.m. Bel-
mont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more in-
formation email conrad@smcl.org.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Coastal Repertory Theatre pres-
ents ‘The Diary of Anne Frank.’ 8
p.m. Coastal Repertory Theatre,
1167 Main St., Half Moon Bay. This
moving adaptation confronts a new
generation with the horrors of the
Holocaust. Tickets start at $27. For
more information or to purchase
tickets go to www.coastalrep.com
or call 569-3266.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 28
Autumn at Fioli Festival. 10 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Fioli Gardens, 86 Cañada
Road, Woodside. For more informa-
tion or to purchase tickets visit
http://www.filoli.org/special-events-
and-exhibits/autumn-festival.html.
Family health and fitness day. 3
p.m. to 6 p.m. Barrett Community
Center, 1870 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
Features outdoor games, family
zumba, mini health fair, tennis and
fresh fruit smoothies for sale. Free.
Community Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. to
11 a.m. The American Legion San
Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. We will be serving
scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon,
ham or sausage and French toast. $8
per person, $5 for children under 10.
Tricycle Music Fest presents:
Lucky Dias and the Family Jam
Band. Half Moon Bay Library, 620
Correas St., Half Moon Bay. Free, fam-
ily music event to promote literacy.
For more information go to
www.smcl.org.
Luz Fine Art Gallery and School of
Painting Annual Student Painting
Exhibition: Opening Party. 5:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Edgewater Place
Shopping Center, 969 H-1
Edgewater Blvd., Foster City. Gallery
and studio owner, Luz Maria Hartley,
will be holding the annual exhibi-
tion for the original oil paintings of
her students. Exhibition continues
through Oct. 11. For more informa-
tion go to www.luzfineart.com.
Wellness Walk. 8:30 a.m. to 9:30
p.m. San Mateo’s Beresford Park,
2720 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. Community walk of varying
distances. Free. For more informa-
tion call 522-7490.
Walk to Remember and
Community Festival. 9 a.m.
Mitchell Park, 600 E. Meadow Drive,
Palo Alto. Free. For more information
email walk2013@kara-grief.org.
S.S.F. Weed Warriors. 9 a.m. to 12
p.m. Meet behind the Montessori
School, 1400 Hillsdale Blvd., South
San Francisco. Help restore habitats
on the South San Francisco side of
San Bruno Mountain. Wear long
pants and bring water. For more
information call (415) 467-6631.
Bog Trail Stewardship. 10 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. San Bruno Mountain
State and County Park main parking
lot. Bring water and sun protection.
$6 entrance fee. For more informa-
tion call (415) 467-6631.
Wellness Walk. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. A ‘free’
health fair designed for seniors,
their families and those who pro-
vide for their care. Free for low
income and Medicare seniors or
$26. For more information call 522-
7490.
Founder’s Hike. 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
44 Visitacion Ave., Suite 206,
Brisbane. David Schooley will lead a
group of 10 people on a hike into
Owl and Buckeye canyons. Sign up
in advance at the online hike sign
up page. For more information call
(415) 467-6631.
San Mateo Senior Center Health
and Wellness Fair. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
San Mateo Senior Center, 2645
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. A
‘free’ health fair designed for sen-
iors, their families, and those who
provide for their care. Free for low
income and Medicare seniors or
$26. For more information call 522-
7490.
Autumn at Fioli Festival. 10 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Fioli Garden, 86 Cañada
Road, Woodside. A variety of activi-
ties will be available for children and
families. Purchase tickets before
noon of Friday, Sept. 27. Tickets are
$20 for adult members, $25 for adult
nonmembers, $5 for children ages 5
to 17 and free for children under 4.
To buy tickets or for more informa-
tion call 364-8300, ext. 508, or go to
www.fioli.org.
San Mateo Fall Home and
Landscape Show. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Fiesta Hall, San Mateo County Event
Center, 1346 Saratoga Drive, San
Mateo. Hundreds of home improve-
ment and landscaping exhibits with
product demonstrations. Event con-
tinues on Sunday. For more informa-
tion go to
www.acshomeshow.com/for-cus-
t ome r s / de t a i l s / 3 7 4 - s m- f 1 3 .
Admission is free. Parking is $10
cash per vehicle.
Walk a Mile in My Shoes. 11:30 a.m.
Hilton San Francisco Airport
Bayfront, 600 Airport Blvd.,
Burlingame. Walk two miles along
Bay Trail to raise awareness and
funds for St. Vincent de Paul’s mis-
sion to help neighbors in need. Free.
For more information call 373-0622.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage
Lane, Twin Pines Park, Belmont.
Paperbacks are three for $1, trade
paperbacks are $1, hardbacks are
$2, children’s books are 25 cents. For
more information call 593-5650.
Bacon & Brew Festival. Noon to 6
p.m. San Mateo’s Central Park.
Family-friendly event featuring local
breweries, bacon vendors and live
music. Tickets are $10 and children
under 18 must be accompanied by
an adult. For more information go to
www.sanmateochamber.org/bbf.
Redwood City Salsa Festival.
Noon to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City.
There will be multiple stages featur-
ing a variety of Latin music, includ-
ing salsa and jazz. Amateur and pro-
fessional salsa chefs will compete
for fun, prizes and salsa glory. There
will also be tequila tasting, hands-on
art projects, a children’s play area
and more. Free admission. For more
information call 780-7340 or go to
www.redwoodcityevents.com.
Fibromyalgia Support Group. 2
p.m. Redwood City Downtown
Library, 1044 Middlefield Road.
Guest speaker Dr. Matthew Piazza
will speak on chiropractic options
for Fibro/Chronic pain. For more
information email sherie@pixel-
splice.com.
Financial Workshops by the
Salvation Army and Wells Fargo. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. 409 S. Spruce Ave.,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information contact laine.hen-
dricks@usw.salvationarmy.org.
Family Fit Fun Day. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Barrett Community Center, 1870
Ralston Ave., Belmont. Interactive
outdoor games, Family Zumba, and
a mini health fair will be going on.
Free. For more information call 595-
7441.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
her and if she wins can accept or
decline the seat, according to City
Clerk Krista Martinelli.
Matsumoto, the city’s second female
councilmember, is currently the mayor
pro tem.
She did not return a call for com-
ment.
In her ballot statement, Matsumoto
said she was running for the two-year
seat to “provide greater stability” amid
the retirements of the city manager,
assistant to the city manager, fire chief
and public works director. She also
highlighted her work to double parks
and open space, create the farmers’
market and sculpture garden, confound-
ed the Community Outreach Program
and promote “fiscal accountability and
responsive government.”
While on the council, she also
serves on regional bodies including
SamTrans and the City/County
Association of Governments.
Matsumoto’s decision comes just
ahead of an Oct. 1 partial term candi-
date debate in council chambers.
Martinelli said the city is currently
looking into any other implications
of Matsumoto’s suspension and should
have more information next week.
Carlos Martin and Collin K. Post are
still running for the two-year seat cur-
rently held by Pradeep Gupta. Gupta is
now seeking one of three four-year
seats alongside Councilman Mark
Addiego, community volunteer
William (Bill) Lock, businessman
Rick Ochsenhirt, businessman John
Harry Prouty, Kate MacKay, Liza
Normandy, a trustee with the South San
Francisco Unified School District and
Maurice Goodman, also a trustee with
the South San Francisco Unified
School District.
Gupta, a former city planning com-
missioner, was appointed in January
after councilman Kevin Mullin was
elected to the state Assembly. Mullin
had nearly three years left in the term
and the City Council opted to appoint
a place holder only until the regular
November election.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
KARYL
federal workers off the job, close
national parks and generate damaging
headlines for whichever side the pub-
lic held responsible.
Washington faces two deadlines:
The Oct. 1 start of the new budget year
and a mid-October date — now esti-
mated for the 17th — when the gov-
ernment can no longer borrow money
to pay its bills on time and in full.
The first deadline requires Congress
to pass a spending bill to allow agen-
cies to stay open. The mid-month
deadline requires Congress to increase
the government’s $16.7 trillion bor-
rowing cap to avoid a first-ever default
on its payments, which include inter-
est obligations, Social Security bene-
fits, payments to thousands of con-
tractors large and small, and salaries
for the military.
The standoff just four days before
the end of the fiscal year increased the
possibility of a shutdown, with no
signs of compromise.
The No. 2 Democrat in the Senate,
Dick Durbin of Illinois, said that
because of the time it takes the Senate
to approve even non-controversial
bills, if the House amends a Senate-
passed spending bill and returns it to
the Senate over the weekend, “That is
a concession on their part that we’re
going to shut down the government.”
Not far from the Capitol, at a com-
munity college in Largo, Md., Obama
insisted he would not negotiate over
his signature domestic achievement,
either on a bill to keep the govern-
ment operating or legislation to raise
the nation’s borrowing authority.
“The entire world looks to us to
make sure that the world economy is
stable. You don’t mess with that,”
Obama said of the debt ceiling/default
measure. “And that’s why I will not
negotiate on anything when it comes
to the full faith and credit of the United
States of America.”
Responding to Obama’s non-nego-
tiable stand, Boehner said, “Well, I’m
sorry but it just doesn’t work that
way. ”
House GOP leaders said Thursday
they would unveil their own legisla-
tion to lift the government’s borrow-
ing cap through December of next
year, but only if the new health care
law is delayed for a year.
Meeting behind closed doors, House
Republican leaders encountered resist-
ance from their rank and file over their
measure even though they were attach-
ing a list of other Republican
favorites such as green-lighting the
Keystone XL oil pipeline, blocking
federal regulation of greenhouse gases
and boosting offshore oil explo-
ration.
Republicans who lost the presiden-
tial election and a shot at Senate con-
trol last year are trying to use must-
pass measures to advance agenda
items that the Democratic-led Senate
and Obama have soundly rejected. The
last-ditch effort on “Obamacare”
comes just days before coast-to-coast
enrollment in the plan’s health care
exchanges begins Oct. 1.
Despite the popular items, the lead-
ership was struggling to win over its
recalcitrant GOP members, especially
tea party-backed lawmakers pressing
for deeper, deficit-cutting spending
measures. The spending cuts the
Republicans would attach to the debt-
limit legislation would be likely to
represent a small fraction of the
almost $1 trillion in new borrowing
authority the bill would permit.
“Among conservatives, there’s a lot
of angst about that,” said Rep. John
Fleming, R-La.
Proposed changes include requiring
federal workers to contribute more to
their pensions, along with other
items from a failed 2011 deficit-cut-
ting effort.
Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the
chairman of the Senate Budget
Committee, insisted that the House
accept the Senate bill.
“Republicans have got to put an end
to the tea party temper tantrums and
pass our bill without any gimmicks
and without any games,” she said.
In the Senate, top Democrat Reid
sought to schedule a series of votes
Thursday night to speed the short-
term spending bill to the House. Sens.
Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Mike Lee, R-
Utah, blocked the effort, however,
saying they wanted the vote on
Friday.
Cruz gave a 21 hour-plus speech ear-
lier this week opposing the measure if
it is changed to remove the anti-
Obamacare provisions. Reid’s request
sparked a remarkable exchange
between Cruz and Bob Corker, R-
Tenn., who accused the tea party duo
of being publicity hounds who want a
Friday vote because that’s what
they’ve told outside activists to
expect.
“My two colleagues, who I respect,
have sent out emails around the world
and turned this into a show,” Corker
said, his voice dripping with derision.
“And that is taking priority over get-
ting legislation back to the House so
they can take action before the coun-
try’s government shuts down.”
Continued from page 1
BUDGET
COMICS/GAMES
9-27-13
thursday’s PuZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOus
sudOku
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Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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1 Cousteau invention
6 — pie
11 Indifferent gestures
13 With caution
14 — del Fuego
15 Prophet
16 Chocolate-colored dog
17 TV knob
18 Hypo units
21 Force back
23 Lipstick color
26 Racetrack circuit
27 Persia, today
28 Creeping plant
29 Alongside
31 Pageant crown
32 Synthetic fabric
33 Earth circler
35 Leg joint
36 Disagreeable task
37 Completely
38 Hearing aid?
39 Makes mention of
40 Cunning
41 Vigor’s partner
42 Yale student
44 Slumbering
47 Blockhead
51 Long, narrow ditch
52 Dirty looks
53 Dull surface
54 Euclid or Plato
dOwn
1 Retired fier
2 T’ai — ch’uan
3 Suffx for forfeit
4 Knot on a tree
5 Rural
6 Christmas song
7 Europe-Asia range
8 — -tac-toe
9 Chicago’s st.
10 Potato bud
12 Cavalry weapons
13 Made on a loom
18 Author Arthur
19 Poolside shelter
20 More agile
22 Shiny leather
23 Lassos
24 Register
25 Very much
28 Travel word
30 Want ad letters
31 Roughhousing
34 Chess pieces
36 Pizzazz
39 Dorothy, to Em
41 Blow off steam
43 Livy’s route
44 PIN prompter
45 Tijuana “Mrs.”
46 Permit
48 Itty-bitty
49 Vexation
50 My, my!
diLBErt® CrOsswOrd PuZZLE
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friday, sEPtEMBEr 27, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Don’t fold under
pressure. Make decisions for the right reason. You’ll
get the most out of your day and avoid complaints if
you try to do the best job possible.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You’ll have a clear
picture of what you want to see unfold today. Rely on
your intuition and your keen eye to guide you through
any uncertainties you face. You’ve got the right idea.
saGittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Cast your fate
to the wind. Pursue an adventure that will take your
mind off your worries. Getting perspective on a
confusing situation will help you see the light.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — It’s not a good
time to second-guess yourself. Decide what needs
to be done and do it. It’s the time for action, not
talking. An important relationship will require careful
nurturing.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You’ll see the need
to bring about change, but it may not be as easy
you think. Additional responsibilities will become
apparent and must be dealt with frst. Avoid high-
pressure situations.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) — Plan a celebration.
Delve into a creative interest or spend time with
children or loved ones. Personal improvements will
pay off.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) — Do what you can on
your own in a work involvement. Avoid depending on
others, and you’ll be free of disappointment. Strive
for perfection by doing things the way that works
best for you.
taurus (April 20-May 20) — It’s a good day to
spend time with friends or people who inspire and
motivate you. An interesting proposal will come from
an unusual source. Consider your options.
GEMini (May 21-June 20) — Revisit old ideas and
peers, and you will gain insight into an opportunity.
With a bit of fne-tuning, you can get your place in
good shape and host an event.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) — Take some time out;
pampering will do you good and give you a chance
to let some information sink in, allowing you to make
the most opportune choice.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Stay on top of what’s
happening at home and at work. Your reputation
must be protected, and your decisions must be
based on accurate information. Have your facts and
fgures ready.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Play the game
strategically. Whether you are involved in a personal
or professional situation that requires hands-on
input, you must be cautious, attentive and well-
informed.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
110 Employment
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
Immediate openings for full time Diet-
ary Aide and part-time Cook. Must be
experienced with excellent communi-
cation skills and ability to 4/2 sched-
ule. Apply in person at
2140 Carlmont Dr., Belmont, CA
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
REWARDING EMPLOYMENT
Help us help sick children in the
community. P/T eve. hrs. adv. poten-
tial. Call Brittany (650)-340-0359
110 Employment
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, “Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
OUTSIDE POSITION
Enter our full training plan for a career
in marketing. Flexible hours - local
travel only - expenses and top com-
pensation to $28.83 per hour, includ-
ing bonuses to $49.66 per & up.
Exciting and lucrative. (650)372-2811.
Mr. Swanson.
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
RESTAURANTS -
Servers, Bussers, Bartenders, Hostesses
wanted. New Downtown San Mateo Res-
taurant, Call (650)340-7684
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523249
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Anna Christine Morris
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Anna Christine Morris filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Anna Christine Morris
Proposed name: Annabelle Christine
Jones
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 10,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 09/06/13, 09/13/2013,
09/20/2013, 09/27/2013)
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
26 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523462
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Mei Feng Zheng
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Mei Feng Zheng filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Rebecca Yen Chang
Proposed name: Rebecca Yen Pan
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 31,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/11/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2013
(Published, 09/20/13, 09/27/2013,
10/04/2013, 10/11/2013)
CASE# CIV 523902
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Elizabeth Navarro
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Elizabeth Navarro filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Giovanni Paredres Nav-
arro
Proposed name: Giovanni Navarro
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
8, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/04/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/04/2013
(Published, 09/27/2013, 10/04/2013,
10/11/2013, 10/18/2013)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257498
The following person is doing business
as: CRUSH Community, 132 Bancroft
Road BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Gale Green, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Gale Green /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/13, 09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257456
The following person is doing business
as: Woodside West Apartments, 1937-
1947 Woodside Rd. Bldg. 1937, RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Gary C.
Hunt, 858 Braeman Dr., Hillborough, CA
94010. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Gary C. Hunt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/06/13, 09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257591
The following person is doing business
as: Manila-Bay-Area Driving School, 550
Washington St., Ste. 114, DALY CITY,
CA 94015 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners:Roberto Banez Mabunga,
23 Treeside Ct., South San Francisco
CA 94080. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Roberto Banez Mabunga /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257595
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Real Deal Enterprises, 36 W.
28th Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Richard A. Villarea and Maylonn
Chan-Villareal same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Married Couple.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Richard A. Villareal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257503
The following person is doing business
as: La Belle Vie Cleanse, 204 Second
Ave., Ste. 508, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Troo Spark, LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
10/15/2013.
/s/ Cindy Sohn /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257503
The following person is doing business
as: ITT Consulting, 23 Bayport Ct., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Irene Torres-Ta-
bor, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 12/01/2012.
/s/ Irene Torres-Tabor /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257541
The following person is doing business
as: Bail Hotline Bail Bonds, 630 El Cami-
no Real, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
IDMCG, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 10/01/13.
/s/ Daniel McGuire /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257592
The following person is doing business
as: Azure, 215 Anita Rd., #2, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: LS Associates
Corporation, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Konniam Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/13/13, 09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257675
The following person is doing business
as: Rumeysa Jewelry & Carpet, 353 Roll-
ins Rd., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ismail Celik, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Ismail Celik /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257681
The following person is doing business
as: Longshore Resources, 321 N. San
Mateo Dr., #109, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Blueprint Fit, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Seoyoon Sandro Persing /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257697
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Salon One Seven Three, 61
37th Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Monica Richards and Eli Richardsm
27600 Dobbel Ave., Hayward CA 94542.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/18/2013.
/s/ Monica Richards /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257235
The following person is doing business
as: Job Well Done Janitorial, 1212 An-
napolis Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Tracy Donis, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Tracy Donis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257607
The following person is doing business
as: Carlsen Porsche, 3636 Haven Ave.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Carl-
sen Motor Cars, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/08/2002.
/s/ Richard Pasquali /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #2567351
The following person is doing business
as: DPC Business Services, 221 S. Fre-
mont St., Unit 402, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Darlyn P Cobb, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2013.
/s/ Darlyn P Cobb /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
08/29/13, 09/05/13, 09/12/13, 09/19/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257725
The following person is doing business
as: Whirling Wool & Alpaca, 20 JLB Rd.,
LA HONDA, CA 94020 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cynthia
Martin, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Cynthia Martin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257718
The following person is doing business
as: Realty One Group - Alliance, 1021 S.
El Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: ROG AllianceCorp., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Rosemarie Figueroa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13).
NOTICE OF PETITION TO
ADMINISTER ESTATE OF
Kenneth Campo, aka Kenneth F.
Campo
Case Number: 123748
To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con-
tingent creditors, and persons who may
otherwise be interested in the will or es-
tate, or both, of: Kenneth Campo, aka
Kenneth F. Campo. A Petition for Pro-
bate has been filed by Carmela Eleazar
Campo in the Superior Court of Califor-
nia, County of San Mateo. The Petition
for Probate requests that Carmela Elea-
zar Campo be appointed as personal
representative to administer the estate of
the decedent.
The petition requests authority to admin-
ster the estate under the Independent
Administration of Estates Act. (This au-
thority will allow the personal representa-
tive to take many actions without obtain-
ing court approval. Before taking certain
very important actions, however, the per-
sonal representative will be required to
give notice to interested persons unless
they have waived notice or consented to
the proposed action.) The independent
administration authority will be granted
unless an interested person files an ob-
jection to the petition and shows good
cause why the court should not grant the
authority.
A hearing on the petition will be held in
this court as follows: October 21, 2013 at
9:00 a.m., Dept. 28, Superior Court of
California, County of San Mateo, 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063.
If you object to the granting of the peti-
tion, you should appear at the hearing
and state your objections or file written
objections with the court before the hear-
ing. Your appearance may be in person
or by your attorney.
If you are a creditor or a contingent cred-
itor of the decedent, you must file your
claim with the court and mail a copy to
the personal representative appointed by
the court within the later of either (1) four
months from the date of first issuance of
letters to a general personal representa-
tive, as defined in section 58(b) of the
California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days
from the date of mailing or personal de-
livery to you of a notice under section
9052 of the California Probate Code.
Other California statutes and legal qutho-
203 Public Notices
ity may affect your rights as a creditor.
You may want to consult with an attorney
knowledgeable in California law.
You may examine the file kept by the
court. If you are a person interested in
the estate, you may file with the court a
Request for Special Notice (form DE-
154) of the filing of an inventory and ap-
praisal of estate assets or of any petition
or account as provided in Probate Code
section 1250. A Request for Special No-
tice form is available from the court clerk.
Attorney for Petitioner:
Randall J. Witte, Esq
Law Offices of Phillip H. Shecter
1313 Laurel St., #222
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070
(650)592-5676
Dated: September 19, 2013
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
on September 20, 27, October 4, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC,
(650)322-6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)315-5902
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
296 Appliances
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. SOLD!
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,900/obo.. (650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
27 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
303 Electronics
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $50 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
304 Furniture
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA SECTIONAL RECLINER - 3
piece, $75., SOLD!
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, SOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
SOLD!
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, SOLD!
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
308 Tools
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
MORTAR BOX Filled with new mansory
tools, $99 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
SOLD!
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14.,SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60.
SOLD!
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
310 Misc. For Sale
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., SOLD!
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo
(650)345-3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. (650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
310 Misc. For Sale
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-5902
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 SOLD!
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
28 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Williams’ partner
in paint
8 Vivid
15 Former and
current Yankee
Alfonso
16 “How sexy!”
17 *Doing more than
is necessary
19 Decorates on
mischief night,
briefly
20 Norwegian saint
21 Bad marks in high
school?
22 *Where secrets
are kept
26 MD’s “Pronto!”
29 Habituate
30 New York
governor before
Spitzer
33 Prefix with tarsal
34 Mean: Abbr.
37 *“The Elements of
Style” co-author
39 *“We’re even!”
41 OK hours
42 Hot stuff
44 Toady
45 “Blue Jasmine”
director
46 Map speck
47 *Words before a
flip
53 Household name
in household
humor
54 Bologna bone
55 Local center?
58 Celebration
suggested by
words that end
answers to
starred clues
63 Frequent park
statue visitors
64 “Show Boat”
(1936) standout
65 Gives a kick
66 Hanging in the
balance
DOWN
1 Army NCO
2 Earring shape
3 Most massive
known dwarf
planet
4 Dog star’s first
name?
5 It may be covered
6 “__ Chicago”:
1937 Tyrone
Power film
7 Exploding stars
8 Brit’s oath
9 Balderdash
10 Contented sigh
11 “Say __”
12 Contrive
13 Actress Massey
14 French royal
name of yore
18 Violinist Zimbalist
22 The Colorado
runs through it
23 R.E.M.’s “The __
Love”
24 Bonkers
25 Use a Pink Pearl
26 Project detail,
briefly
27 They’re run at
bars
28 Chem lab abbr.
31 Defeats, as a bill
32 European prefix
34 Green machines?
35 Medical lab
vessel
36 Item in a pool
38 “Did you __?!”
40 Surplus store
caveat
43 “Three Sisters”
playwright
Chekhov
45 Bits of advice
from gramps,
perhaps
47 Jalopies
48 “Sesame Street”
striped-shirt
wearer
49 Cuban
girlfriend
50 Latin stars
51 Enjoys a lucky
streak
52 Editor Marshall
and singer Lisa
55 Toledo thing
56 “Star Wars”
creature
57 Kin of -ess
59 “Woo-__!”
60 Old Opry network
61 1942 FDR
creation
62 Asian occasion
By Matt Skoczen
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/27/13
09/27/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
317 Building Materials
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
318 Sports Equipment
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
RED HAWK Ruger .44 Mag Revolver
with leather holster & belt 3 boxes of
shells, $1000 best offer, (650)591-0419
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new 650 255-2996
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
YARD SALE
Many Years Worth
Sept. 28th & 29th
9am to 5pm
28 Hillview Ave.
Redwood City
Kitchen &
Cooking stuff,
furniture, tools toys &
Much More !
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 48 volt electric mower $25
650 255-2996
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD ‘95 LX Coupe -
$1800., (650)245-1386
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
FREE 14' boat with trailer (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
29 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Neat Nit’s
Natural
Home
Cleaning
Te peninsula’s genuinely all natural
cleaning company, using all natural,
non-toxic cleaning agents.
Chemical free! Ideal for those with
small children and pets.
We have your good health in mind!
Mention this ad for a 15% discount
on your frst two cleanings!
800.339.6020
www.neatnit.com
-ڀInterior Residential
- Oďce
- Move Ins/Move Outs
- Friendly & Eďcient StaČ
- Licensed/Insured/Bonded
- FREE Estimates
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
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&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
by Greenstarr
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Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
30 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Painting
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tree Service
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Dental Services
DR. NANJAPA DDS
DR. SABOOWALA DDS
DR. VIRAPARIA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
We Moved:
1528 S. El Camino Real, #408,
San Mateo 94402
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
WORLD 31
Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Travel Wizards Invites You To
CRUISE EXTRAVAGANZA 2013
Tuesday, October 1
5:00-8:00 at the Lagoon Room
Foster City Recreation Center
650 Shell Boulevard
Come to a one-of-a-kind
evening of presentations
by top executives of the
most award-winning
cruise lines in the world,
including:
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There will be special pricing for
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REUTERS
A man walks on a damaged street in Homs , Syria.
By Edith M. Lederer and Matthew Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
UNITED NATIONS — The five permanent
members of the deeply divided U.N. Security
Council reached agreement Thursday on a
resolution to eliminate Syria’s chemical
weapons arsenal, British and U.S. diplomats
said, and the full council was set to discuss it
Thursday night.
The agreement represents a major break-
through in addressing the 2 1/2-year con-
flict, which has killed more than 100,000
people.
Divisions among the permanent members
have paralyzed council action on Syria since
the conflict began.
U.N. diplomats said this resolution would
be the first legally binding one on Syria in
the conflict if adopted, which now appears
virtually certain.
Britain’s U.N. ambassador, Mark Lyall
Grant, tweeted that Britain, France, the U.S.,
Russia and China had agreed on a “binding
and enforceable draft ... resolution.”
He said Britain would introduce the text to
the 10 other council members Thursday
night.
The U.S. and Russia had been at odds on
how to enforce the resolution, but Russia’s
Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and U.S.
Ambassador Samantha Power confirmed that
the last hurdles to agreement had been over-
come.
On Twitter, Power said the draft resolution
establishes that Syria’s chemical weapons
“is threat to international peace & security
& creates a new norm against the use of
CW. ”
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and
Lavrov met in hastily scheduled, closed-door
talks Thursday afternoon at the United
Nations, and the agreement was announced
soon afterward.
The agreement came a day after Russia’s
deputy foreign minister said negotiators had
overcome a major hurdle and agreed that the
resolution would include a reference to
Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter, which allows
for military and nonmilitary actions to pro-
mote peace and security.
The U.S. and Russia had been at odds on
how to enforce the resolution to secure and
dismantle Syria’s chemical weapons.
In Moscow, Deputy Foreign Minister
Sergei Ryabkov offered to provide troops to
guard facilities where Syria’s chemical
weapons would be destroyed.
The flurry of diplomatic activity is in
response to an Aug. 21 poison gas attack
that killed hundreds of civilians in a
Damascus suburb, and President Barack
Obama’s threat of U.S. strikes in retaliation.
After Kerry said Syrian President Bashar
Assad could avert U.S. military action by
turning over “every single bit of his chemi-
cal weapons” to international control within
a week, Russia, Syria’s most important ally,
agreed. Kerry and Lavrov signed an agree-
ment in Geneva on Sept. 13.
U.N. Security Council reaches
a resolution on Syria weapons
By Matthew Lee and Lara Jakes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
UNITED NATIONS — The U.S. and its
European allies said Thursday they were
pleased by a new tone and a significant
shift in attitude from Iran in talks aimed at
resolving the impasse over the country’s
disputed nuclear activities. Iran said it was
eager to dispel suspicions that it is trying
to develop a nuclear weapon and to get
punishing international sanctions lifted
as fast as possible.
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad
Javad Zarif, who also had an unexpected
one-on-one meeting with U.S. Secretary of
State John Kerry, said six world powers
and Iran had agreed to fast-track nuclear
negotiations with the hope of reaching a
deal within a year.
Iran, the five permanent members of the
U.N. Security Council and Germany also
agreed to hold a new round of substantive
nuclear negotiations on Oct. 15-16 in
Geneva.
“We agreed to jump-start the process so
that we could move forward with a view to
agreeing first on the parameters of the end
game ... and move toward finalizing it
hopefully within a year’s time,” Zarif said
after the talks ended. “I thought I was too
ambitious, bordering on naiveti. But I saw
that some of my colleagues were even
more ambitious and wanted to do it faster. ”
Kerry said he was struck by a “very dif-
ferent tone” from Tehran after their ses-
sions, which marked the highest-level
direct contact between the United States
and Iran in six years. But, like his
European colleagues, he stressed that a
single meeting was not enough to assuage
international concerns that Iran is seeking
to develop nuclear weapons under cover of
a civilian atomic energy program.
“Needless to say, one meeting and a
change in tone, that was welcome, does
not answer those questions,” Kerry told
reporters. “All of us were pleased that the
foreign minister came today and that he did
put some possibilities on the table.”
He said they agree to continue the
process and try to find concrete ways to
answer the questions that people have
about Iran’s nuclear activities.
Zarif and Kerry sat next to each other at a
U-shaped table during the group talks. It
was the highest-level direct contact
between the United States and Iran in six
years. EU foreign policy chief Catherine
Ashton suggested the two men had shaken
hands and been cordial with each other.
She also said the parties had agreed to
“go forward with an ambitious timeframe.”
Zarif said the meetings were “very con-
structive” and “very substantive.”
“We hope to be able to make progress to
solve this issue in a timely fashion (and)
to make sure (there is) no concern that
Iran’s program is anything but peaceful,”
he said. “I am satisfied with this first
step,” he added. “Now we have to see
whether we can match our positive words
with serious deeds so we can move for-
ward.”
He said the end result would have to
include “a total lifting” of the internation-
al sanctions that have devastated Iran’s
economy.
Diplomats hail new attitude in
Iranian nuclear weapon talks
32 Friday • Sept. 27, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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