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NUMBER

Numbers Large and Small

Chapter
Big Idea

Understanding very large and very small numbers helps me describe and solve real-world problems.

Learning Goals
I can show my understanding of place value for numbers greater than one million. I can show my understanding of place value for numbers less than one thousandth. I can use technology to solve problems involving large numbers.

Essential Question
How can understanding large and small numbers help me understand the world around me?

Important Words
billion expanded form million millionth period standard form ten thousandth

Large Numbers

Use your knowledge of large numbers to read and write numbers in standard and expanded form, and to compare and order large numbers. Example: Show the number 1 305 067 890 in many ways.

This number is one billion, three hundred f ive million, sixty-seven thousand, eight hundred ninety. I can write the number in a place value chart.
Billions
Hundred Ten One 1 3

Millions
Hundred Ten 0 One 5 0

Thousands
Hundred Ten 6 One 7 Hundred 8

Units
Ten 9 One 0

I can write the number in expanded f orm as 1 000 000 000 + 300 000 000 + 5 000 000 + 60 000 + 7000 + 800 + 90 Or as (1 x 1 000 000 000) + (3 x 100 000 000) + (5 x 1 000 000) + (6 x 10 000) + (7 x 1000) + (8 x 100) + (9 x 10)

11. Write each number in a place value chart. a. 497 000 000 c. 771 000 967 000 b. 35 048 650 d. 84 900 600 300

12. List the numbers in question 1 from smallest to largest. Circle the largest number. Put a rectangle around the smallest number. How do you know those numbers are the largest and the smallest? 13. What is the value of the 5 digit in each number below? a. 511 111 111 c. 252 222 222 e. 335 333 333 b. 454 444 444 444 d. 665 666 666 666 f. 577 777 777 777

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Large Numbers (continued)

14. Put the numbers in question 3 in order from smallest to largest. Explain the strategies you used. 15. Use the place value chart below to answer the following questions. Billions
Hundred Ten One

Millions
Hundred Ten One

Thousands
Hundred Ten One Hundred

Units
Ten One

3 5 0 5 7 5 6

8 8 7 7 5

5 7 0 9 0

8 6 0 6 7

7 2 5 5 8

7 5 6 0 0

0 0 6 6 0

1 6 8 0 0

7 8 4

a. Describe any patterns you see in the place values. b. c. d. e. f. g. Each set of three place values is called a period. Describe any patterns you see in the periods. Model one of the numbers and explain how your model shows the pattern in the place values. Write each number in expanded form. Write each number in standard form. Read each number aloud and write it in words.

A period in a number is a group of three place values: one, ten, hundred.

One number has a 9 in the thousands period. Locate the digits 1, 2, 3, and 4 in the chart. Name the period where each digit is found.

16. The numbers below are written in expanded form. Write each number in standard form.
Expanded form uses multiplication to show the value of each digit in a number. Standard form is the way numbers are usually written. The value of a digit is shown by its location.

a. 60 000 000 + 20 000 + 3000 + 50 b. (8 1 000 000) + (6 100 000) + (2 10 000) + (4 100) c. 50 000 000 000 + 300 000 000 + 50 000 + 3 d. (2 1 000 000 000) + (3 10 000 000) + (2 100) + (4 10)
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Large Numbers (continued)

17. The numbers below are written in words. Write each number in standard form. a. five million, four hundred twenty-seven thousand, one hundred twelve b. nine hundred seventy-eight million, six hundred thirty-four thousand c. one hundred eighty-five billion 18. Write the number that is a. b. c. d. e. f. 10 000 000 less than 150 456 000 100 000 000 less than 510 207 860 100 000 greater than 450 1 000 000 greater than 89 345 1000 less than 9 070 574 10 000 greater than 1 797 704
A billion is a thousand millions, or 10 100 000 000.

19. Use your calculator to answer the questions below. a. Press each calculator key in order from 1 to 8. What number is displayed? b. What value does each digit have in the number displayed? c. What is the largest number that can be displayed in your calculator?

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Large Numbers (continued)

10. Write each of the following numbers in standard form. a. 15 billion c. 75.5 million e. 3150 thousand b. 13.5 thousand d. 1205 billion f. 8709 million

11. Compare each pair of numbers by writing a statement using the greater than (>), less than (<), or equal (=) symbol. a. 34 600 000 and 3.4 million b. Eighty-four thousand and 84 000 000 c. 2.5 million and 2500 thousand 12. Find the number described in each riddle. a. I am a number between 1 and 1 000 000. I have six digits and the hundred digit is the same as the hundred thousands digit. There are six thousands. The digit in the tens is half the digit in the thousands. The tens digit is two more than the ones digit. If you add the digit in the thousands place to the number of tens and then subtract the number of ones you get the ten thousands digit. The hundreds digit is three less than the ten thousands digit. I have eight digits, and no digits are repeated. There is one ten and three ten millions in the number. The digit in the thousands place is twice the digit in the tens place. The thousands digit is half the digit in the millions place. The digit in the ten thousands place is less than the digit in the tens place. The digit in the hundred thousands is twice the number of ten millions. The sum of the digits in the millions period is the digit in the hundreds place. The ones digit is two less than the hundreds digit.

b. I am a number between 1 and 50 000 000.

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Large Numbers (continued)

c. I am a number between 1 million and 1 billion. I have nine digits. The millions digit and the hundreds digit are the same. There is one ten thousand. The digit in the ten millions place is double the digit in the tens place. The ten millions digit is half of the digit in the hundred millions place. There is a two in the tens place. The hundred thousands digit is three more than the ones digit. The digit in the ones is four more than the digit in the tens. The millions is the difference between the hundred thousands and the ones. The digits in the ten thousands place and the thousands place are consecutive.

13. Write your own riddle for a number between 1 million and 100 billion. Exchange with a partner and try to find each others number. Compare the strategies you each used to find the number. 14. Explain how the patterns in place values could be important in knowing about numbers. 15. Our number system is sometimes called a base ten system. Use what you know about place value to explain why that is a good name for our number system.
I can show my understanding of place value for numbers greater than one million.

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Numbers Around Us

Use your knowledge of large numbers to work with numbers from contexts such as sky science, populations, money, and technology. Example: In 1998, the music industry sold seven hundred eleven million CDs. Of these, they sold approximately: one hundred sixty million, nine thousand R & B albums. three hundred eighty-one million, thirty thousand rap albums. one hundred million, four hundred thousand alternative albums. two hundred seventeen million country albums.

a. Write each number in standard form.

R & B Rap A lt Country

160 009 381 030 100 400 217 000

000 000 000 000

b. Order the numbers from smallest to largest.

A lt 100 400 000 R & B 160 009 000 These both have 1 hundred million, but R & B has 6 ten mil l ions so it sold more than A l ternative. Country 217 000 000 Rap 381 030 000 Rap is the highest because it has 3 hundred millions.

c. Explain when you might choose to write numbers in each of these forms.

I woul d al ways write the digits. I think numbers are easier to compare when theyre written in standard f orm. The numbers might need to be written in words if they were starting a sentence.

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Numbers Around Us (continued)

11. The following headlines include large numbers. City of Edmonton plans to spend more than $1.5 million to fix roads Walk-a-thon raises almost a quarter-million for cancer research Wednesday lottery draw an estimated $50 million Chinas population passes 1.3 billion Crowd of over 56K attends Stampede game

a. Write each number in standard form. b. Explain why headlines might write numbers in this way. 12. Write a headline using each of the following numbers. a. 7 457 000 c. 250 000 b. 500 000 000 d. 1 520 000 000

13. Estimate or research to gather the following data: the number of legs on a dog the number of students in our class the number of students in the school the number of books in the library the cost of a new car the cost of a house the amount you could win in the lottery the number of people who live in Canada the distance from Mars to the Sun the number of people who live in India

a. What sorts of numbers did you find? b. In which period is each number? c. Which number is largest? smallest?

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Numbers Around Us (continued)

14. The population for each of the ten most populous countries is given in the table below.
Country China India United States Indonesia Brazil Pakistan Bangladesh Nigeria Russia Japan Population (2010) 1 333 940 000 1 172 170 000 307 860 000 231 369 500 191 991 000 167 871 500 162 221 000 154 729 000 141 881 000 127 560 000
A million is a thousand thousands, or 10 100 000.

a. Write each population in a place value chart.

b. Japans population is about 127.6 million. Write each population in millions. 15. The number of transistors used in a computer chip in each decade since their invention in the 1950s is shown in the table below.
Decade 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s Number of transistors one 16 4500 275 thousand 3.1 million 0.592 billion

a. Write each number in standard form. b. What observations can you make about the number of transistors used in a computer chip in each decade? c. Predict how many transistors there might be in one computer chip in the 2010s.

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Numbers Around Us (continued)

16. The diameter of each of the first four planets in our solar system is shown below.
Planet Mercury Venus Earth Mars Diameter (millions of metres) 4.88 12.100 12.758 6.794

a. Write each number in standard form. b. Write each number in expanded form. c. List the planets in order from the one having the smallest diameter to the one having the largest diameter. 17. The largest bill still printed in Canada is the $100 bill. In the last century, some countries have printed bills with large numbers on them.
Country Angola Argentina Bolivia Bosnia-Herzegovina China Germany Hungary Zimbabwe Bill 5 000 000 kwanzas readjustos 1 000 000 pesos 10 million pesos bolivianos 500 000 000 000 dinara 180 000 000 yuan 100 000 000 000 000 marks 100 quintillion pengo 100 trillion dollars

a. Write the number on the bill from Bolivia in standard form. b. A quintillion is a 1 with 18 zeros after it. Write the number for the bill from Hungary. c. A trillion is a 1 with 12 zeros after it. Write the number for the bill from Zimbabwe. d. Name the country that had the bill with the highest number. e. Explain whether you can tell from the numbers which bill is worth the most.

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Numbers Around Us (continued)

18. The average distance from the sun to each of the eight planets is given in the table below.
Planet Earth Jupiter Mars Mercury Neptune Saturn Uranus Venus Average distance from the sun (kilometres) 149 000 000 806 000 000 227 000 000 ..57 900 000 4 500 000 000... 1 425 000 000... 2 850 000 000... 108 500 000

a. Write four of the distances in another form, such as in millions of kilometres. b. List the planets in order from the one closest to the Sun to the one farthest from the Sun.

19. Explain whether one ten million is the same as ten millions.

10. Explain the strategies you used to order large numbers. 11. Why might there be many ways to write the same number?
I can show my understanding of place value for numbers greater than one million.

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Small Numbers

Use your knowledge of small numbers to read and write numbers in standard and expanded form and to compare and order small numbers. Example: Show the number 0.0375 in many ways.

This number is zero and three hundred seventy-f ive ten thousan d ths. I can write it in a place value chart.

I can write the number in expanded f orm as 0. 03 + 0.007 + 0. 0005 Or as (3 x 0. 01) + (7 x 0. 001) + (5 x 0. 0001) 3 7 5 Or as + +
100 1000 10 000

. Tenths 0 . 0
Ones

Ten Hundred Hundredths Thousandths Thousandths Thousandths

Mil l ionths

Ten Millionths

Hundred Millionths

I can write this number as a f raction.


375 10 000

11. What is the value of the 5 digit in each number? a. 1.511 c. 2.252 e. 3.335 b. 4.444 544 d. 6.666 656 f. 7.777 775

12. The numbers below are written in expanded form. Write each number in standard form. a. 0.060 + 0.002 + 0.0003 + 0.000 050 b. (8 0.1) + (6 0.01) + (2 0.001) + (4 0.0001) c. 0.5 + 0.003 + 0.0005 + 0.000 03 d.
2 100

3 1000

2 10 000

4 1 000 000

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Small Numbers (continued)

13. Use the place value chart to answer the following questions.
Ones

0 0 5 1

. . . . .

Tenths

Ten Hundred Hundredths Thousandths Thousandths Thousandths Millionths

Ten Millionths

Hundred Millionths

0 7 0 9

3 0 6 7

7 9 6 0

5 0 2 9 0 8 0 7 4 6

a. Describe any patterns you see in the place values. b. Model one of the numbers and explain how your model shows the pattern in the place values.

c. Write each number in expanded form. d. Write each number in standard form. e. Read each number aloud and write each number using words. 14. Write each number in a place value chart. a. 0.034 b. 0.816 08 d. 0.090 712 c. 0.7259

15. List the numbers in question 4 from smallest to largest. Circle the largest number. Put a rectangle around the smallest number. How do you know the numbers are the largest and the smallest? 16. Write each of the following numbers in words. a. e. 200.2002 9.003 b. 0.1082 d. 4.070 65 c. 0.106 106

17. Order the numbers from question 6 from smallest to largest.

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Small Numbers (continued)

18. Write each of the following as numbers in standard form. a. two and three hundred sixty eight thousandths b. four hundred and ninety-three ten thousandths c. four hundred ninety-three ten thousandths

One millionth is one part when a whole is divided into one million parts.

d. sixteen and seven hundred four thousand, nine hundred twenty-five millionths 19. You have been given the digits 2, 5, and 8, a decimal point, and four 0 digits. Use all of these digits to make a number: a. less than one c. close to 0.5 e. close to 0.005 g. close to one quarter 10. Arrange the numbers you made in question 9 from smallest to largest. b. close to one d. less than one thousandth f. close to one ten thousandth
One ten thousandth is one part when a whole is divided into ten thousand parts.

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Small Numbers (continued)

11. Compare each pair of numbers by writing a statement using the greater than (>), less than (<), or equal (=) symbol. a. 0.000 315 and 0.000 513 b. 3 millionths and 0.000 03 c. 0.000 08 and 8 hundred thousandths 12. Solve each riddle to discover the mystery number. a. My number has four digits. b. My number is greater than one. The digit in the hundredths is the same as the number of toes on one foot. The ones digit is two greater that the hundredths digit. The digit in the tenths place is three less than the digit in the ones place. The thousandths digit is half the tenths digit. My number is less than 10. The first two digits are consecutive numbers. The ones digit is the same as the number of legs on a dog. The digit in the ten thousandths place is the same as the number of tails on a dog. The hundredths digit is seven more than the ten thousandths digit. The thousandths is five less than the sum of the ten thousandths and the hundredth.

My number has five digits.

13. Write the number that is: a. b. c. d. e. f. 0.001 less than 510.207 860. 0.0001 greater than 8.9345. 0.000 01 less than 150.456 000. 0.000 001 greater than 450. 0.1 less than 9.070 574. 0.01 greater than 1.797 704.

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Small Numbers (continued)

14. Numbers can be expressed as decimals or fractions. a. Copy and complete the table below.
Place value Ones Tenths Hundredths Thousandths Ten thousandths Hundred thousandths Millionths Decimal 1 0.1 0.01 Fraction 1
1 10 1 100

What fraction might be used to represent: b. c. d. 0.0008? 0.000 48? 0.000 167?

15. How could you use fractions to write a decimal number in expanded form?

16. Write your own mystery number riddle using a number between one millionth and one. Exchange with a partner and try to find each others number. Compare the strategies you each used to find the number. 17. Explain how the patterns in place values could be important in knowing about numbers. 18. Our number system is sometimes called a base ten system. Use what you know about place value to explain why that is a good name for our number system.
I can show my understanding of place value for numbers less than one thousandth.

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Numbers in the World

Use your knowledge of small numbers to read and write numbers in standard and expanded form. The numbers are taken from contexts such as statistics, body science, and measurement. Example: The anthrax bacteria causes a disease that can affect humans and livestock. The bacteria are between 0.000 001 and 0.000 009 metres long. Show this number in many ways.

I can read these numbers as one millionth of a metre and nine mil l ionths of a metre. I can show these numbers in a place value chart.
Ones Tenths
Ten Hundred Hundredths Thousandths Thousandths Thousandths

Mil l ionths

Ten Millionths

Hundred Millionths

0 0

. .

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

1 9

I can write 0. 000 009 metres as 9 x 0.000 001 metres. I can think of 0.000 001 m as 0.001 mm.

11. Coach Nichols collected the statistics below about the kids on his baseball team. He wants to calculate the batting average of each player. The batting average is the number of hits divided by the number of times at bat.
Name Amal Curtis Erica Jared Krista Nina Thomas Number of hits 30 16 35 26 21 25 15 Number of times at bat 65 56 55 65 66 70 65

a. Use a calculator to find the batting average of each player. b. Arrange the players in order from highest to lowest batting average.

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Numbers in the World (continued)

12. Environment Canada, a department of the Government of Canada, tracks the precipitation in cities across Canada. The average precipitation (in metres) in each city in four specific months is shown in the table below.
City Victoria, BC Edmonton, AB Winnipeg, MB Ottawa, ON Fredericton, NB St. Johns, NL Whitehorse, YK January (m) 0.1411 0.0229 0.0193 0.58 0.0933 0.1478 0.0169 April (m) 0.0419 0.0218 0.0359 0.069 0.0834 0.1104 0.0083 July (m) 0.0176 0.101 0.072 0.0881 0.0845 0.1212 0.0393 October (m) 0.0744 0.0177 0.0295 0.0748 0.0931 0.1517 0.23

a. Which city gets the most precipitation in January? the least? b. Which city gets the most precipitation in April? the least? c. Which city gets the most precipitation in July? the least? d. Which city gets the most precipitation in October? the least? e. In which city would you like to live? Why? 13. The dimensions of different parts of the average human body are shown in the table below.
Body part Hair Front tooth Red blood cells Liver cell Ovum Fingernail Dimension 0.000 08 m wide 0.006 m wide 0.000 008 m wide 0.000 05 m long 0.0002 m long 0.01 m wide

a. Write each number in a place value chart. b. Write each number in expanded form. c. Compare expanded form and place value charts for showing numbers. d. Arrange the body parts from smallest to largest.
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Numbers in the World (continued)

14. One of the longest bugs is a stick bug which can grow to 36 cm, or 0.36 m. The length of some of the smallest bugs is shown in the table below.
Bug Dust mite Red ant Fairy fly Feather-winged beetle Nanosellini beetle Flea Length 0.000 25 m 0.005 m 0.000 21 m 0.000 25 m 0.0006 m 0.0015 m

a. Write each number in expanded form. b. Compare expanded form and standard form for showing numbers. c. Name the shortest insect whose length is shown in this table. 15. Silk, cotton, and wool have been used for clothing for thousands of years. The width of four fibers is shown in the table below.
Fiber Spider web silk Cotton fiber Silk fiber Wool fiber Width 0.000 005 m 0.000 01 m 0.000 07 m 0.000 25 m

a. Write each number in words. b. Explain whether you can tell from the numbers which fiber will be the smoothest. 16. Explain whether one ten thousandth is the same as ten thousandths.

17. Explain the strategies you used to compare small numbers. 18. Why might there be many ways to write the same number?

I can show my understanding of place value for numbers less than one thousandth.

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Numbers Large and Small

Use your knowledge of small and large numbers to compare and order numbers. You will need to work with numbers in standard and expanded form. Example: 35.12 million 985 millionths Explain how you know which number is bigger. Adas strategy:

M il l ions are much larger than millionths so 35.12 mil l ion must be more that 985 millionths.
Biankas strategy:

I put both numbers into the same place value chart to compare them.
Hundred Thousan d t h s Hundred Thousands One Thousan d t h s Ten Thousan d t h s Hundred M il l ion

One M il l ionths

Ten Thousands

One Thousand

2 0 0 0

. 0 . 0 .

0 0 0 9 8

Dakotas strategy:

I used a calculator to multiply 35.12 x 1 000 000 to get 35 120 000. I multiplied 985 x 0.000 001 to get 0.000 985. Then I compared the numbers. 35 120 000 is much bigger than 0.000 985.
Cailyns strategy:

I wrote each number in expanded f orm to help me tell which was b igger. 30 000 000 + 5 000 000 + 100 000 + 20 000 0. 0009 + 0. 000 08 + 0.000 005

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Ten M il l ionths

One M il l ion

Hundredths

Ten M il l ion

Hundreds

Tenths

Ones

Tens

Numbers Large and Small (continued)

11. Write a number between: a. 1 and 1 000 000. c. 1 000 000 and 1 000 000 000. e. 10 000 000 and 100 000 000. b. 0 and 1. d. 0.001 and 0.0001. f. 0 and 0.001.

12. Use your calculator to find the operation that can be used to find the next number in the table. a. When moving from the millions place value down to the smaller number. b. When moving from the millionths place value up to the larger number.
Place value Millions Hundred thousands Ten thousands Thousands Hundreds Tens Ones Tenths Hundredths Thousandths Ten thousandths Hundred thousandths Millionths Value 1 000 000 100 000 10 000 1000 100 10 1 0.1 0.01 0.001 0.0001 0.000 01 0.000 001

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Numbers Large and Small (continued)

13. Compare each pair of numbers by writing a statement using the greater than (>), less than (<), or equal (=) symbol. a. ten thousand and ten thousandths b. 20 000 001 and 20.000 001 c. 2.4 and 2.4 million d. 324 millionths and 324 000 000 14. Use a calculator to find the pattern in each set of expressions. Predict the next term in the pattern. b. 2 3 a. 45 000 000 9 2 0.3 4 500 000 9 2 0.03 450 000 9 2 0.003 45 000 9 2 0.000 3 4 500 9 2 0.000 03 450 9 2 0.000 003 45 9

5. In your own words, explain standard form and expanded form.

I can show my understanding of place value for numbers greater than one million. I can show my understanding of place value for numbers less than one thousandth. I can use technology to solve problems involving large numbers.

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Numbers at Large

Use your knowledge of small and large numbers to estimate and calculate answers to problems in contexts such as science, geography, technology, money, and measurement. Example: Mary reads for 25 minutes each night. For how many minutes does she read in two years? For how many hours does she read for in two years? For how many seconds does she read in two years?

25 minutes x 365 nights x 2 years = 18 250 minutes M ary reads f or 18 250 minutes in two years. 18 250 m 60 m/hour = 304.166 667 hours M ary reads f or 304.166 667 hours in two years. 18 250 m x 60 seconds/m = 1 095 000 seconds M ary reads f or 1 095 000 seconds in two years.

11. The diameter of each of the first four planets in our solar system is shown below.
Planet Mercury Venus Earth Mars Diameter (millions of metres) 4.88 12.100 12.758 06.794

a. Write each number in standard form. b. Determine how much larger the diameter of Venus is than the diameter of Mercury. c. Calculate how many times larger the diameter of Venus is than the diameter of Mercury. d. Explain whether you think the number from b or the number from c tells you more about the size of Venus and Mercury. e. Find the planet with a diameter that will fit about twice into the diameter of another planet.

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Numbers at Large (continued)

12. Two different boxes of balloons are available at the local party store. a. Find the cost of one balloon from each box. b. Explain which box is the better buy. 13. Statistics Canada tracks the population of every region in the country. The populations are shown in the table below:
Province or Territory Alberta British Columbia Manitoba New Brunswick Newfoundland and Labrador Northwest Territories Nova Scotia Nunavut Ontario Prince Edward Island Qubec Saskatchewan Yukon 2008 population (millions) 3.585 4.382 1.208 0.747 0.508 0.043 0.938 0.031 12.929 0.140 7.751 1.016 0.033

a. Calculate the total population of Canada in millions. b. Write the population of Canada in standard form. c. Write the population of Canada in expanded form. d. Calculate how many more people there are in Alberta than in Saskatchewan. e. Calculate how many times larger Albertas population is than Saskatchewans population. f. Explain whether the number from d or the number from e tells you more about the populations of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

g. Write two questions that can be answered using the numbers in this table.
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Numbers at Large (continued)

14. Environment Canada tracks the precipitation in cities across Canada. The average precipitation (in metres) in each city in four specific months is shown in the table below.
City Victoria, BC Edmonton, AB Winnipeg, MB Ottawa, ON Fredericton, NB St. Johns, NL Whitehorse, YK January (m) 0.1411 0.0229 0.0193 0.58 0.0933 0.1478 0.0169 April (m) 0.0419 0.0218 0.0359 0.069 0.0834 0.1104 0.0083 July (m) 0.0176 0.101 0.072 0.0881 0.0845 0.1212 0.0393 October (m) 0.0744 0.0177 0.0295 0.0748 0.0931 0.1517 0.23

a. Calculate the total precipitation in each city for the months shown. b. Which city gets the most total precipitation? c. Which city gets the least total precipitation? d. What is the difference in precipitation between the two cities in b and c? e. In which city would you prefer to live? Why? 15. A million dollars sounds like a lot of money. a. How many five cent candies can you buy for a million dollars? b. How many eighty-five cent candy bars can you buy for a million dollars? c. How many $27 000 cars can you buy for a million dollars? d. How many $350 000 houses can you buy for a million dollars? e. What would you buy with a million dollars? 16. Susannah sleeps eight hours each night. a. How many hours does she sleep in one year? b. Susannah is 12 years old. How many hours has she slept in her life? c. How many minutes has Susannah slept in her life? d. How many seconds has Susannah slept in her life? e. How many years has Susannah slept in her life?

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Numbers at Large (continued)

Use a calculator to help you answer the following questions. Explain the steps you followed to answer each question. 17. Explain whether you think one million tennis balls would fit into your classroom. 18. Calculate how many times your heart has beat in your life. 19. Determine which is taller, you or a million-dollar stack of ten-dollar bills. 10. Use a dictionary to estimate the number of words in the English language.

11. How did using a calculator help you answer these questions? 12. Write your own question using large or small numbers. Exchange questions with a partner and solve each others problem. Compare the solution strategies you used.
I can show my understanding of place value for numbers greater than one million. I can show my understanding of place value for numbers less than one thousandth. I can use technology to solve problems involving large numbers.

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