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NUMBER

Chapter
Big Idea

8

Understanding operations helps me to solve problems in the real world.

Learning Goals
I can multiply decimals. I can divide decimals. I can explain and apply the order of operations, using technology. I can explain and apply the order of operations, without using technology.

Essential Question
How can I complete operations, with and without decimals, to solve problems?

Important Words
order of operations

Orderly Operations

Evaluate expressions that have multiple operations by completing the operations in the appropriate order: parentheses, then multiplying and dividing, then adding and subtracting. Explore which operations your calculator completes first. Example: Veronica, Taya and Agatha were evaluating the expression 80 – 2 × (5 + 3). Which student performed the operations correctly? Veronica 80 – 2 × (5 + 3) 80 – 2 × (8) 78 × (8) 624 Taya 80 – 2 × (5 + 3) 80 – 10 + 3 70 + 3 73 Agatha 80 – 2 × (5 + 3) 80 – 2 × 8 80 – 16 64

Veronica and Agatha both did the f irst step right, by doing the adding inside of the b rackets. But then Veronica did the subtracting next and she should have done the multiplying, l ike Agatha did. Agatha got the right answer.

11. For each expression, explain which operation should be completed first. a. c. 8 + 2 × 4 7 – 3 + 9 b. d. 8 × (2 + 4) 12 ÷ 4 + 2 × 6

12. Evaluate each expression by following the appropriate order of operations. a. 6 – 3 + 8 × 2 b. 2 × (7 + 5) – 1 c. 15 ÷ 3 + 2 × 2 d. 12 + 4 – 8 ÷ 4 e. (9 + 3) × (2 – 1) f. 3 + 7 + (10 – 2) ÷ 2
The order of operations tells us which math tasks to perform in which order. The correct order of operations is to first complete anything in parentheses, then division and multiplication from left to right, then subtraction and addition from left to right.

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Orderly Operations (continued)

13. Decide whether each equation is true. a. 4 × 6 × 2 = 2 × 12 × 2 c. 8 ÷ 4 × 2 = 4 ÷ 2 + 1 b. 5 + 3 + 10 = (2 + 4) × 3 d. (2 + 6) ÷ 2 = 2 + 6 ÷ 2

14. Rewrite each equation with brackets to make it true. a. 2 × 12 + 5 × 6 = 54 c. 2 × 12 + 5 × 6 = 174 b. 2 × 12 + 5 × 6 = 204 d. 2 × 12 + 5 × 6 = 84

15. Make as many different totals as possible using the four numbers in each set, the symbols –, +, ×, and ÷, and brackets. a. 6 c. 8 2 2 3 9 4 3 b. 5 3 d. 7 5 8 0 1 2

16. Two students tried to evaluate each expression. Explain which student completed the work correctly. a. Kash: 4 × (6 + 3) – 1 Lane: 4 × (6 + 3) – 1 4×9–1 4×8 32 (100 – 20) × 3 + 50 80 × 3 + 50 240 + 50 290 4 × 9 – 1 36 – 1 35 Zoe:

b. Adrianna: (100 – 20) × 3 + 50 c. Marcus:

100 – 60 + 50 40 + 50 90 10 + (27 – 4) × 5

Nolan: 10 + (27 – 4) × 5 10 + 23 × 5 10 + 115 125

10 + 23 × 5 33 × 5 165

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Orderly Operations (continued)

17. Calculate each answer by hand then by using your calculator. a. 7 – 2 × 3 c. (9 + 3) × 2 – 1 e. 12 ÷ (3 + 1) 18. Look at each part of question 7. a. Did you get the same answer when using your calculator as when completing the operations by hand? b. What do you have to do to make your calculator give you the correct answer? 19. Elise evaluated the expression 4 × (6 + 3) – 1. She completed the following steps: 4 × (6 + 3) – 1 24 + 12 – 1 35 b. (7 – 2) × 3 d. f. 9+3×2–1 12 ÷ 3 + 1

a. Is she correct? b. Compare her work to the work Kash and Lane did in question 6.

10. Explain why it is important to follow the order of operations.

I can explain and apply the order of operations, using technology. I can explain and apply the order of operations, without using technology.

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CHAPTER 8: Operations

Peculiar Problems

Write and evaluate expressions using multiple operations to solve each problem.
Example:

Mandy rode her bike to school on two different days this week. On each day she tried a different route. The route she took on the first day is 7 km each way. The route she took on the second day is 6 km each way. Write an equation to show the total distance Mandy rode on both days. Valerie’s strategy:

I know that 'each way' means to school and back home so that is two times each distance. My equation is (7 + 6) x 2. Because of the brackets, I know to f irst add together the distances she rode in the morning. Then I mul tiply that number by 2 to f ind the total distance. (7 + 6) x 2 = 13 x 2 = 26 km Mandy rode 26 km in two days.
Renée’s strategy:

I know that 'each way' means two times per day. My equation is 7 x 2 + 6 x 2. I know to mul tiply each distance by 2 to f in d the distance Mandy rode on each day. A f ter mul tiplying I added the numbers together to f ind the total distance. 7x 2 + 6 x 2 = 14 + 12 = 26 km Mandy biked 26 km altogether.

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Peculiar Problems (continued)

11. Match each question to the equation that best represents it. a. Two children and three adults each pay $4 to enter the park. How much do they pay in total? b. Twelve candies are divided evenly between two girls and two boys. How many candies do they each get? c. Iain has two blue marbles and three packages of red marbles with four marbles in each package. How many marbles does he have in total? d. Calla divided 12 chocolates into two cups and then put the two cups on the table. How many chocolates are on the table? i. 12 ÷ (2 + 2)

ii. 12 ÷ 2 × 2 iii. 2 + 3 × 4 iv. (2 + 3) × 4

12. James is baking brownies. He needs 3 cups of flour and 3 cups of sugar and 2 cups of chocolate chips. Once the mixture is made, he will need to divide it between two pans. How many cups must each pan be able to hold? a. b. Write one equation to answer the question. Solve the problem.

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Peculiar Problems (continued)

13. Max is buying hot dog buns for a spring party. Twenty-eight people are coming to the party. Buns come in packages of 12. Max bought three packages of buns. How many buns will Max have left over if every guest eats one bun? a. b. c. Write one equation to answer the question. Solve the problem. How would the equation change if three of the people had two buns each?

14. The Lee family and the Yang family are going to the museum together. The equation below shows how much the two families paid in total to go to the museum. (3 + 5) × $6 = $48 a. b. How many people are in each family? How much did each ticket to the museum cost?

15. Silvia bought three flower pots for $7 each and nine flowers for $2 each. How much money did Silvia spend in total? a. b. c. Write one equation to answer the question. Explain whether the equation needs brackets. Solve the problem.

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Peculiar Problems (continued)

16. The Martins are celebrating their son’s high school graduation. They have rented a hall to host a party and have invited 50 guests. The initial deposit for the hall is $100. The Martins must also pay $3 for each guest. If all 50 guests come, what will it cost to rent the hall? a. b. Write one equation to answer the question. Solve the problem.

17. The Martins are also hiring a caterer for the party. The caterer charges $200 for food and $2 per person for drinks. If all 50 guests come, what will the Martins pay the caterer? a. Write an equation to find the total cost for food and drinks. b. Write an equation to find the cost per person for food and drinks. c. Explain how the equations from a and b are related. d. Explain whether you needed to use brackets in your equations.

18. Write a story problem to match each equation. a. c. e. 19 x 25 – 35 × 5 (4 + 10) ÷ 7 3 × (10 – 5) b. d. 2 × 10 + 5 90 ÷ 6 – 8

09. Explain how you decided whether to use brackets in each equation. 10. Exchange the story problems you wrote in question 8 with a partner and solve each others’ problems. Discuss the strategies you used to solve each problem.
I can explain and apply the order of operations, using technology. I can explain and apply the order of operations, without using technology.

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CHAPTER 8: Operations

Delicious Decimals

Use estimation, calculation, and calculators to multiply decimal numbers by whole numbers.
Example:

What is the dollar value of eight dimes? Fiona’s strategy:

I know I added 0.10 + 0.10 +

that a dime is worth $ 0.10. 0.10 eight times. 0.10 + 0.10 + 0.10 + 0.10 + 0.10 + 0.10 = 0.80

Owin’s strategy:

I used a chart to l ook f or patterns to f ind the answer. 8 8 8 8 x x x x 100 10 1 0. 1 800 80 8 0. 8

8 x $ 0.10 = $ 0. 80.
Candace’s strategy:

I used the amount in cents. I know 8 x 10¢ = 80¢. To so l ve, I converted the amount in cents to an amount in dol lars. 80¢ - 100¢ in one dol lar = $ 0.80
Ripley’s strategy:

I know that dimes are worth $ 0.10. I rounded 8 up to 10. I know that there are 10 dimes in one dollar. The value is about $ 1. 00. To solve, I know that 10 x 0.10 = 1. 00, but I only have eight dimes, which is two f ewer than 10, or 0. 20 less. 10 x 0.10 - 0. 20 = 1. 00 - 0. 20 The value is $0.80.

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Delicious Decimals (continued)

11. Use a calculator to complete each chart. Explain the patterns you see when multiplying by a decimal. a. 5 × 100 5 × 10 5×1 5 × 0.1 5 × 0.01 5 × 0.001 5 × 0.0001 50000 500 5 0.5 ? ? ? b. 2 × 100 2 × 10 2×1 2 × 0.1 2 × 0.01 2 × 0.001 2 × 0.0001 2000 00000 ?0 0 0 0 2. 0000 ?0 0 0 0 ?0 0 0 0 ?0 0 0 0 0.0002

c.

9 × 100 9 × 10 9×1 9 × 0.1 9 × 0.01 9 × 0.001 9 × 0.0001

90000000 90..000 ?0 0 0 ?0 0 0 ?0 0 0 0.009 ?0 0 0

d.

8 × 100 8 × 10 8×1 8 × 0.1 8 × 0.01 8 × 0.001 8 × 0.0001

80000 800 ? ? ? ? ?

12. Choose the best estimate for each product. a. b. c. d. 7 × 0.9 = 8 × 0.004 = 6 × 2.5 = 3 × 0.5 = 70 30 120 20 7 3 12 2 0.7 0.3 1.2 0.2 0.07 0.03 0.12 0.02

13. Explain the strategy you used to choose the best estimate in question 2. 14. Use the less than (<) or greater than (>) symbol to make each statement true. a. c. e.
174

5 × 3.87 ___ 15 42 ___ 7 × 5.808 8 × 0.2 ___ 4
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b. d. f.

2.1 × 3 ___ 6 0.63 × 6 ___ 6 2 ___ 0.499 × 4

Delicious Decimals (continued)

15. Explain how you would estimate each product. a. c. 4 × $0.59 3 × 2.175 b. d. 6 × 2.3 7 × 11.8

16. Use mental math strategies to find the following products. a. c. e. 9 × 0.01 8 × 0.001 4 × 0.03 b. d. f. 5 × 0.1 2 × 0.6 7 × 0.002

17. Explain the mental math strategies you used to calculate each product in question 6. 18. Place the decimal in each product. a. c. 4.36 × 5 = 218 0.147 × 9 = 1323 b. d. 8 × 71.3 = 5704 2 × 5.085 = 1017

19. How does this picture help you figure out why the product of 4 × 1.3 is 5.2? 4

1.3

10. Use the less than (<), greater than (>), or equal to (=) symbol to make each statement true. a. c. e. 7 × 0.08 ___ 8 × 0.07 2 × 0.25 _____ 5 × 0.1 0.32 × 4 _____ 0.6 × 2 b. d. f. 10 × 0.5 ____ 10 × 0.05 4 × 0.08 _____ 8 × 0.2 0.01 × 2 _____ 0.02 × 2

11. Explain whether you needed to calculate each product in question 10 to complete each statement.

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Delicious Decimals (continued)

12. Classify each statement about multiplying with decimals as true or false. For each false statement, give an example that shows why the statement is false. a. b. c. d. Multiplying two numbers always results in a product larger than both factors. The number of decimal places in the factor will be the same as the number of decimal places in the product. Multiplying by 0.5 is the same as dividing by 2. The answer will always be a decimal number when multiplying by a decimal.

13. Calculate each product using the strategy of your choice. a. 2.09 × 7 c. 3.6 × 8 b. 2 × 44.6 d. 5 × 2.764

1.35 x 4 = 5 . 4 =

14. Explain the strategies you used when multiplying with decimals. How are they similar to the strategies you used when multiplying with whole numbers?
I can multiply decimals.

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CHAPTER 8: Operations

Multiplication Problems

Solve problems by multiplying decimals and whole numbers. Write your own problems for given expressions.
Example:

Multiplication Problems
Scarlett’s strategy:

A science class was doing an experiment on transpiration. They found out that a small tree branch gave off 0.23 L of water in one day. How much water would the branch give off in 30 days?

I used easy numbers, so I started by multip l ying 23 x 3. 23 x 3 = 69 I know that means 23 x 30 = 690. But less than half a litre each day f or 30 days should b e less than 15 litres (because 15 is hal f of 30). That means 0. 23 x 30 = 6.9. The b ranch woul d give of f 6.9 L of water in 30 days.
Bethany’s strategy:

I multip l ied in a p l ace value chart. Ones 0 6 Tenths 2 x 30 60 9 Hundredths 3 x 30 90

The b ranch gave of f 6.9 L of water in 30 days.
Xander’s strategy:

I used a number array. x 30 0. 2 6 0. 03 0. 9

6 + 0.9 = 6.9 So I know the b ranch gave of f 6.9 L of water.

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Multiplication Problems (continued)

Peyton’s strategy:

I know 0.23 x 30 is the same as 0.23 x 5 x 6. I built 0. 23 using b ase ten b l ocks.

Then I made f ive groups of 0. 23.

That is 1.15.

Then I made six groups of 1.15.

That is 6.9.

I know the b ranch gave of f 6.9 L of water in 30 days.

11. Peter measured his fish pond to lay a new border around it. The measurements are shown. What is the perimeter of the fish pond?

1.45 m

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Multiplication Problems (continued)

2. The School Council at Roberta Graydon Elementary sells school supplies as a fundraiser. Their price list is shown. School Supply Price List
Pencil. ................................ $0.89 Eraser. ................................$0.44 Notebook. ............................ $1.69 Mechanical Pencil............... $1.85 Pencil Case.........................$3.49 Felt Markers. ..................... $6.29

Use the price list and estimate to determine whether each student can afford the items they want. a. Sonia needs 6 erasers for the year. Will a $5 bill be enough? b. Can you buy two packages of felt markers for $10? c. Noah has $5, can he afford three notebooks?

13. Explain the estimation strategies you used to answer question 2. 14. Use the price list and calculate to answer the following questions. a. How much will four erasers cost? b. How much money will Nolan have left over if he buys two pencil cases with a $10 bill? c. Mikaela will use either eight pencils or five mechanical pencils over the school year. Which should she buy? 15. Explain the multiplication strategies you used to answer question 4. 16. Nigel has a job at Seal World. Last Saturday he worked from 8:00 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. He took an unpaid lunch break for 45 minutes. Nigel earns $7.85 an hour. How much did he earn last Saturday?

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Multiplication Problems (continued)

17. The weight of an object on Earth is different from the weight of that same object on other planets. Weight is the force of gravity pulling an object toward the ground. The weight of an object changes depending on the gravity on a planet.

Celestial Body Venus Earth Jupiter Saturn Pluto Moon

Gravity (as a factor of Earth’s gravity) 0.900 1.000 2.500 1.080 0.008 0.170

A 5 kg dog will have a different weight on each planet. To find the weight of the dog on another planet, multiply the weight of the dog by the gravity on that planet. a. Explain whether the dog would weigh more on Venus than it does on Earth. b. On which planet do you predict the dog will weigh the most? Why? c. Find the weight of the dog on each planet and on the moon.

18. Mrs. Bengal bought 144 cans of juice. Each case contains 24 cans of juice. How much did she spend on juice?

$6.75

Orange Juice
per case

19. When Mary finished Grade 1, she was given a seedling. It was 0.25 metres tall. Each year the seedling grew 0.046 metres. a. b. If the tree grew the same amount each year, how tall will it be when Mary finishes Grade 6? How tall will the tree be when Mary graduates from high school 11 years later?

10. Choose one problem and explain the strategies you used to solve the problem.

I can multiply decimals.

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CHAPTER 8: Operations

Dividing Decimals

Use estimation, calculation, and calculators to divide decimal numbers by natural numbers.
Example:

How can you divide a number by a larger number, such as when sharing four metres of rope candy between five friends? Quinn’s strategy:

I can think of it as a f raction: 5 80 40 or 0. 8. That is the same as 50 or 100 Each person gets 0. 8 metres of rope candy.
Raymond’s strategy:

4

I used a drawing with the length in centimetres. The rope candy is 400 cm long. 80 cm Frien d 1 80 c m Friend 2 8 0c m F riend 3 8 0c m F riend 4 8 0c m F riend 5

Each f riend will receive 80 cm of rope candy, which is the same as 0. 8 metres.
Sean’s strategy:

I used a base ten grid . I drew a l ine f ive boxes long along the top, then coloured in the tenths' rows one at a time until I had a total area of 4. 5 This area is 4.

Then I f ound the length of the other side of the rectangle. It was eight- tenths or 0. 8 long. That means 4 5 = 0. 8. Each person will get 0. 8 metres of rope candy.

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Dividing Decimals (continued)

Tate’s strategy:

I used trading to do the division. our ones f or 40 tenths I traded f 5 x 8 tenths = 40 tenths 40 tenths - 40 tenths = 0 Each f rien d will receive 0. 8 m of rope candy.
Keaton’s strategy:

I used centimetres. 4 m = 400 cm 400 - 5 = 80 80 cm = 0.8 m Each f rien d will get 0.8 m of the candy.

11. Use your calculator to complete each chart. Explain the patterns you see when dividing a decimal by a natural number. a.
a 320.000 32.000 3.200 0.320 0.032 b 4 4 4 4 4

a b
80.000 ? ? ? 0.008

b.

x 60.000 6.000 0.600 0.060 0.006

y 2 2 2 2 2

x÷y 30 3 ? ? ?

c.

p 5 5 5 5 5

q 80 ? ? ? ?

p×q 400.00 40.00 4.00 0.40 0.04

d.

j 9 9 9 9 9

k 70 ? ? ? ?

j (k) 630.000 63.000 6.300 0.630 0.063

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Dividing Decimals (continued)

12. Choose the best estimate for each quotient. a. b. c. d. 0.9 ÷ 7 = 12.1 ÷ 10 = 41.36 ÷ 8 = 18.00 ÷ 5 = 0.01 0.12 50 30 0.1 1.2 5 3 1 12 0.5 0.3 10 120 0.05 0.03

13. Explain the strategy you used to choose the best estimate in question 2. 14. Use the less than (<) or greater than (>) symbol to make each expression true. a. 6.5 ÷ 5 ____ 1 c. 1.367 ÷ 9 ____ 0.1 b. 0.5 ____ 0.84 ÷ 2 d. 3 ____ 24.5 ÷ 7

15. Explain how you would estimate each quotient. a. c. 1.8 ÷ 2 0.056 ÷ 7 b. d. 7.34 ÷ 6 0.09 ÷ 3

16. Use mental math strategies to find the following quotients. a. c. e. 0.08 ÷ 2 0.018 ÷ 6 1.25 ÷ 5 b. d. f. 0.9 ÷ 3 4.8 ÷ 4 7.063 ÷ 7

17. Explain the mental math strategies you used to calculate each quotient in question 6. 18. Place the decimal in each quotient. a. c. 21.8 ÷ 5 = 436 13.23 ÷ 9 = 147 b. d. 570.4 ÷ 8 = 713 8.917 ÷ 2 = 44585

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Dividing Decimals (continued)

19. Use the less than (<), greater than (>), or equal to (=) symbol to make each statement true. a. 0.7 ÷ 8 ____ 0.8 ÷ 7 b. 0.5 ÷ 4 ____ 0.05 ÷ 4 c. 20.25 ÷ 4 ____ 40.5 ÷ 8 d. 4.08 ÷ 2 ____ 4.8 ÷ 2 e. 0.6 ÷ 4 ____ 0.32 ÷ 2 10. Explain whether you need to calculate each quotient in question 9 to complete each statement. 11. Classify each statement about dividing with decimals as true or false. For each false statement, give an example that shows why the statement is false. a. The number of digits in the divisor will be the same as the number of digits in the quotient. b. Dividing by 2 is the same as multiplying by 0.5. 12. Calculate each quotient using the strategy of your choice. a. c. 0.8 ÷ 5 12.27 ÷ 3 b. d. 7.2 ÷ 9 8.016 ÷ 4

13. Describe the strategies you used to estimate when dividing with decimals. 14. Explain the strategies you used when dividing with decimals. How are they similar to the strategies you used when dividing with whole numbers? 15. How can you use what you know about multiplying decimals to help you divide with decimals?
I can divide decimals.

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Different Division

Solve problems by dividing decimals by natural numbers. Write your own problems for given expressions.
Example:

The one-month-old crabeater seal pup at the Vancouver aquarium weighs 112.6 kg. It weighed 20.2 kg when it was born. How much weight did the pup gain each week? Rustam’s strategy:

First I f ound the weight the pup gained, so I subtracted 112.6 - 20.2 = 92.4 kg. There are about f our weeks in a month, so I can divide our. 92.4 kg by f I can do 92 4 using mental math. 92 4 = 92 2 2 = 46 2 = 23 Then I can do 0.4 4; 0.4 4 = 0.1 because 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1 = 0.4 23 + 0.1 = 23.1 The seal pup gained about 23.1 kg each week.
Vincent’s strategy:

F irst I f ound the weight the pup gained, so I subtracted 112.6 - 20.2 = 92. 4 kg. There are about f our weeks in a month, so I can divide our. 92.4 kg by f I added multiples of 4 until I got to 92.4 kg. 4 x 10 = 40 80 4 x 10 = 40 4 x 1 = 4 90 4 x 1 = 4 10 92. 4 4 x 0. 5 = 2 4 x 0. 5 = 2 2.4 4 x 0. 1 = 0. 4 Then I added 10 + 10 + 1 + 1 + 0. 5 + 0. 5 + 0. 1 = 20 + 2 + 1 + 0. 1 = 23 + 0. 1 = 23. 1 The seal pup gained about 23. 1 kg each week.

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Different Division (continued)

Calliegh’s strategy:

First I f ound the weight the pup gained, so I subtracted 112.6 - 20.2 = 92.4 kg. There are about f our weeks in a month, our. so I can divide 92.4 kg by f I represented 92.4 kg using bills and coins. I used f our dimes f or the tenths, two loonies f or the ones, and nine ten-dollar bills f or the tens. Then I dealt the money into f our piles.

I broke the lef tover ten -dollar-bill into 10 loonies and put them with the two lef tover loonies. Then I dealt the 12 loonies into the f our piles.

Each pile contains $23.10. That represents 23.1 kg. The seal pup gained about 23.1 kg each week.
Daniela’s strategy:

First I f ound the weight the pup gained, so I subtracted 112.6 - 20.2 = 92.4 kg. There are about f our weeks in a month, so I can divide our. I wrote the number without any decimal 92.4 kg by f places then divided like with whole numbers. 231 4 924 8 12 12 04 4 0 My result was 231, but this is too high b ecause the pup weighs less than that. I estimated the answer would be about 25 b ecause 100 4 = 25. I wrote a decimal point in 231 to make it 23.1 b ecause that is a reasonab le answer. The seal pup gained ab out 23.1 kg each week.

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Different Division (continued)

11. River City’s Aquarium is open to visitors seven days a week. The week before the manatee was born, the aquarium took in $11 076. The week after the manatee was born, the aquarium took in $12 780. a. About how much did the aquarium make in one day, the week before the manatee was born? b. About how much did the aquarium make in one day, the week after the manatee was born? c. The aquarium charges $6 admission. How many more people came to the aquarium the week after the manatee was born than the week before it was born?

12. Kareem spent $23.85 for three shirts for his bowling team. How much did one shirt cost? 13. Andrea and four friends were paid $18.00 to rake the church yard. How much did they each earn? 14. It rained 18.3 mm in three days. If it rained an equal amount each day, how much rain fell on one day?

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Different Division (continued)

15. The distance from Beaumaris Lake to Kingsway Garden Mall is 16.32 km. a. Janice took five hours to walk from the lake to the mall. How far did Janice walk each hour? b. The next time she wanted to go to the mall, she rode her bike and it only took two hours. How many kilometres can Janice bike in one hour? 16. A subscription for Teen Thrills magazine costs $14.75 for 12 issues. At the drugstore, one copy sells for $2.25. a. Predict whether the subscription price or the drugstore price is lower. b. Use the strategy of your choice to determine which option is less expensive. 17. Eight books cost $41.36. What is the cost of one book? 18. Zander needs 12 batteries for his car racing set. He can buy batteries in the two packages shown below.

a. Use division to determine which he should buy. b. Use multiplication to determine which he should buy. c. Explain how two strategies could be used to solve this problem.

19. When would you use estimation to divide decimals in real life? Why? 10. What strategy did you use the most to solve these problems? Why was that the easiest?
I can divide decimals.

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