R E T H I N K I N G

S C H O O L

LU N C H

COOKING WITH CALIFORNIA FOOD
I N K–1 2 S C H O O L S
A cookbook and professional development guide and Ann M. Evans

10 11/16" (10.6875") G e o r g e a n n e B r e n n a n

C E N T E R F O R E C O L I T E R A C Y C E N T E R F O R E C O L I T E R A C Y
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Copyright © 2011 Center for Ecoliteracy Published by Learning in the Real World All rights reserved under International and Pan-American Copyright Conventions. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Center for Ecoliteracy David Brower Center 2150 Allston Way, Suite 270 Berkeley, CA 94704-1377

For more information about this book, email info@ecoliteracy.org or visit www.ecoliteracy.org.

Learning in the Real World is a publishing imprint of the Center for Ecoliteracy, a not-forprofit, tax-exempt organization. Created in 1997, Learning in the Real World offers resources to support schooling for sustainability, stories of school communities, and the ecological framework that informs the work of the Center.

This book was printed on paper made from 100% postconsumer waste.

First Edition ISBN 978-0-9818409-1-8

cooking with california food

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r e t h i n k i n g

s c h o o l

lu n c h

Cooking with California Food
i n K–1 2 S c h o o l s
a cookbook and professional development guide

b y g e o r g e a n n e b r e n n a n a n d a n n m . e va n s

center for ecoliteracy

cooking with california food

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Table of contents

Letter from TomKat Charitable Trust and Center for Ecoliteracy Letter from Georgeanne Brennan and Ann M. Evans 9

6

Introduction
Addin g M or e F r esh, Loc a l , H ealth y C a l i f o r n i a F o o d to S c h o o l M e a l s 11

About the Recipes

12 12 14

Terms Used in This Book Rethinking School Lunch

Chapter 1
Professi on a l D ev elop m en t: I n tr o d u c i n g N e w F o o ds a n d F l avo r P r o f i l e s 17

General Considerations Prior to Launching the Program The Instructor Preparation The Class Itself 21 21 21

18

Chapter 2
The Season a l Sa l a d B a r 24

Seasonal Salad Bar Components Salad Dressings 29

24

cooking with california food

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Chapter 3
6-5-4: Di shes, F l avor P r of i l es, a n d S e as o n s 34

The Six Dishes

34 35

The Five Flavor Profiles The Four Seasons 46

Chapter 4
Recip es 56

Fall Recipes Winter Recipes Spring Recipes Summer Recipes

56 76 98 120

Resourc es

14 0

Sources for Local, In-Season Produce

140 141

Resources for Further Flavor Profile Information and Seasonal Recipes Acknowledgments 142

In dex

14 3

About the Authors

152 152

About the Center for Ecoliteracy

cooking with california food

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The Center for Ecoliteracy and TomKat Charitable Trust are pleased to present Cooking with California Food in K–12 Schools, a cookbook and guide to menu planning organized around six basic dishes, five cultural flavor profiles, and four seasons. We hope that you will be inspired by these recipes and the vision of incorporating fresh, seasonal food in the meals we offer young people.
The nearly 900 million meals served yearly in California schools today present 900 million opportunities to create positive systemic change. After all, what better way is there to build healthy lifelong eating habits, support student well-being, and promote our economy and environment than by offering delicious, appealing meals that celebrate our agricultural abundance and rich cultures? Healthy students learn better and achieve more. Changing how we grow, process, and prepare food impacts issues from health care costs to climate change, energy and resource conservation, and community vitality. The billions of dollars devoted to providing healthier school meals will boost California agriculture, invigorate local economies, and promote equity. The Center for Ecoliteracy and TomKat Charitable Trust share an enduring commitment to health, education, and care for the environment. We are heartened by the passion and dedication of everyone in the movement to transform school meals. We applaud you, and offer this book with our best wishes. Sincerely,

Zenobia Barlow Cofounder and Executive Director Center for Ecoliteracy

Kat Taylor President TomKat Charitable Trust

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Map of California from 1888.ORG 7 . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. showing cultural landmarks and agricultural areas.ECOLITERACY.

showing the distribution of major crops.ORG 8 . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.Detail of 1888 map of California.ECOLITERACY.

the “crossover season. milk.ECOLITERACY. Young leafy greens emerge as winter gives way to spring and our kitchens draw on fresh local asparagus. Summer orchards are sweet with peaches. We offer this cookbook and manual in hopes that it will be a resource to you as you explore and celebrate this abundance with the young people whom you serve. including citrus. sweet peppers. cheese. herbs. parsnips. greens. blackberries. mushrooms. pears. Georgeanne Brennan Ann M. into dishes that are popular with children and reflect our state’s diverse cultural heritage. sourced locally. sugar snap peas. plums. From storage come potatoes. corn. and pomegranates. and okra. the sun. strawberries. persimmons. Throughout the year California produces onions. sweet potatoes. a vast number of crops are available fresh even during winter. rice. Because of the state’s Mediterranean climate.ORG 9 . beans. and nectarines. and peppers are found side by side with grapes. As the days grow longer and warmer. and the first winter squashes.We could not live or prepare meals for school children in a more bountiful land than California. and root crops such as carrots and radishes. give thanks to the soil. beans. cherries. and tender young lettuce. kiwifruit. the water. Sincerely. and turnips. California’s agriculture makes it possible to serve the best. We invite you to adapt the concepts developed in this book in order to introduce seasonal fruits and vegetables. where each season offers a rich profusion of choices for cooking from scratch. apples. California’s fields overflow with juicy tomatoes. eggplant. and more. zucchini. healthiest food imaginable. and those who work the land for the confluence that makes such food available to our children.” when tomatoes. Summer extends into fall. while its bakers give us fresh breads of every kind. Evans cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. freshest. As you do.

cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY.ORG 10 .

ORG 11 . drawing on their skills and inspiring their creativity. and Middle Eastern/Indian foods. It offers ideas for adding more fresh. and pizza toppings. wraps. The five flavor profiles broadly represent African. This book belongs to a suite of publications and projects created by the Center for Ecoliteracy under the title Rethinking School Lunch. It provides recipes using the matrix and offers a plan and instructions for a creative approach to professional development. health. and the environment.Introduction Adding More Fresh. pastas. Local. They reflect California’s multicultural cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. It helps meal services devise an appealing variety of menus around dishes that children already love. Cooking with California Food in K–12 Schools introduces the concept of the dynamic 6-5-4 School Lunch Matrix. locally sourced fruits and vegetables. rice bowls. Increasing the amount of fresh.ECOLITERACY. they can be adapted and creatively applied to school lunch menus. It describes a tested plan for effective professional development which nutrition services staff members enjoy. The six dishes in the 6-5-4 matrix are salads. local. These productions include ideas and strategies for improving school food. five ethnic flavor profiles. culture. soups. Once the matrix concepts are practiced through this approach. supporting sustainable food systems. European/Mediterranean. whole grains. seasonal ingredients and using different flavor profiles. while honoring California’s rich history and cultural heritage. teaching nutrition. healthy foods to school lunches. Healthy California Food to School Meals Cooking with California Food in K–12 Schools serves many purposes. Asian. based on six dishes students know and love. and designing education programs focused on understanding the relationships between food. Latin American. and four seasons. We developed this cookbook and professional development guide to assist school food service personnel in learning more about cooking with fresh. and other nutritious foods in school lunches is a goal of many school districts and of the United States Department of Agriculture’s National School Lunch Program.

Most school nutrition services directors have techniques for scaling up recipes to meet the needs of their programs. school districts use a variety of definitions. ingredient amounts. Each recipe includes a headnote with background information. winter. California. and whole grains. increase the use of in-season fruits and vegetables. spring. as well as suggestions for variations on the basic recipe. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. utilize USDA commodity products in as nutritious a way as possible. The classes focused on introducing and increasing local seasonal ingredients in dishes already popular with students. Other suggestions include adaptation of dishes for other seasons or flavor profiles to expand the repertoire of food service professionals. or within 50 miles). many of the plants. “Minimally processed” includes such foods as pastas. and introduce California extra virgin olive oil as a healthy fat. Abo ut th e Recipes The recipes are written in test-size quantities that are based on home cooking for families and appropriate for use in the professional development approach described in this book. nut butters. The notes sometimes include suggestions that recipes might be altered for students at various grade levels. in a hands-on cooking school format using family-size recipes. and cooking instructions. and summer. The concept described here was piloted over three years in Davis. spices. The four seasons are fall. some dairy products. and animals that make up these cuisines were brought to California by immigrant groups over the last two centuries. nuts. delicatessens. grains.ECOLITERACY. expand the inclusion of whole grains. Terms Us ed in This Book “Local” refers here to the state of California.history and heritage. The flavor profiles also represent foods increasingly offered by restaurants. through professional development for nutrition services personnel. local might be defined as the foods coming from within a 100. herbs. however. Districts may extend their definition in tiers—first foods from within a short radius (such as the county.or a 300-mile radius. followed by a radius of 100 miles and then 300 miles. For example. These kinds of dishes served as a platform from which to introduce new flavor profiles (for both variety and palate education).ORG 12 . and retail markets. such as reducing the amount of garlic and jalapeño for elementary students. Some form of provenance labeling with vendors is useful so that school food service personnel can track the percentage of local product being ordered.

and seasonal California ingredients. local. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY. Recipe on page 78.Asian Cabbage and Orange Salad with Ginger is a flavorful combination of fresh.ORG 13 .

Culture. July. May S umm e r June. and discussion guides for films such as Food. The four seasons are defined as follows: Fa l l September. for instance. and the Environment).org. Vegetables and fruits are classified according to their usual culinary uses rather than their technical botanical designations. November W i n t er December. Cooking from scratch does not include the use of additional prepared products such as sauces and prepackaged mixes or heat-andserve items. essays on the Center for Ecoliteracy website. For further information. Health. August Rethi nking Sch ool Lun c h In addition to this book. we are treating squash and tomatoes as vegetables for the purposes of this book. February S p ri n g March. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY. So.ecoliteracy. consulting with schools and districts. April.“Cooking from scratch” refers to preparing a dish from start to finish using only ingredients that are raw and fresh or are minimally processed. workshops and professional development seminars. October.ORG 14 . January. see www. a conceptual framework for integrating learning in K–12 classrooms (Big Ideas: Linking Food. the Center for Ecoliteracy’s Rethinking School Lunch collection of publications and projects includes an extensive online Rethinking School Lunch Guide. and Nourish: Food + Community. Inc.

ORG 15 .ECOLITERACY.org.The Rethinking School Lunch Guide by the Center for Ecoliteracy is available free at www.ecoliteracy. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

ECOLITERACY.ORG 16 .cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

and preparing for and delivering the classes. The classes as proposed typically last two to three hours. presentation. including initial instruction. including those described in this book. into school lunches. which enriches the class. tasting. The instructor circulates. cooking.ORG 17 . and cook one or two recipes per group per class. These classes are a chance for staff members to try recipes. Cooking class participants discover new flavors and recipes and frequently contribute knowledge from their own experiences and cultural backgrounds. and become motivated to introduce them into the meal program. selecting the instructor. and includes specific information on considerations prior to launching classes. with attention to attractive presentation. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. After preparing their dishes. Participants work in groups of two or three. participants serve them to the whole group on platters or in bowls. Cooking is more fun when it is hands-on and value-driven. and discussion. experiment with their own variations.1 professional development: Introducing new foodS and flavor profiles Classes in professional development for nutrition services staff members are opportunities to facilitate the introduction of new foods and flavor profiles. Each class cooks six to eight recipes. and discuss them together.ECOLITERACY. This chapter provides information about an approach to delivery of professional development based on this premise. answering questions and making suggestions. taste the dishes.

zesters. and have functional equipment such as stovetops and ovens needed to prepare the recipes. Review the options for kitchens in which the cooking class could be offered and meet with appropriate kitchen personnel to walk the site in order to check functionality of equipment and the number of stations available.Gen er al Cons iderat ion s P r ior to L au n c hin g t he P r ogr am Class pa r t i c i pa n ts The classes are designed for school food service personnel with a variety of backgrounds and abilities. Optional additional equipment includes mortars and pestles for grinding spices and herbs by hand. a spice grinder (an electric coffee grinder works well). Local community groups such as the school district’s nutritional advisory committee. and utensils for home-style cooking. a citrus reamer.ORG 18 . Location The facilities should offer enough cooking stations and space for all participants to engage in hands-on cooking.ECOLITERACY. to purchase ingredients or equipment. There is likely a district protocol for payment of overtime if the class will be offered in addition to preapproved hours or scheduled in-service time. health providers. and/or to compensate an instructor. pans. The school district may have a grant writer available to secure funding for professional development and equipment. The local farmers’ market board of directors and manager may also be a source of support and funding. The approval process will vary by school district. As adults they have all gained some sort of cooking knowledge. We suggest group sizes of no more than fifteen people. or local service clubs might be sources of funding. useful for citrus. Such knowledge is a resource to the class. and this professional development approach is structured to respect and draw upon it. Bowls and platters for family-style serving may need to be acquired. Ap p rova l p r oc ess Approvals and funding for these professional development sessions should be secured in advance. Class si z e Participants are more receptive in smaller groups where they are more active and receive more individual attention. Fundin g Extra funding may be required to compensate for school staff members’ time. Staff members will greatly appreciate having a selection of sharp knives. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Required equ i p m en t The kitchen may need extra pots. useful for hand juicing of one or two items at a time.

cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 19 .ECOLITERACY.

cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 20 .ECOLITERACY.

Many local restaurateurs and chefs are expressing an interest in working with school staff. Give staff members advance notification and remind them several days before sessions. Preparat ion Resp ons i bi l i t i es of t he sc hool di str i c t n u tr i ti o n s e rv i c e s di r e c to r Ensure that you have someone available to wash dishes as the class progresses and after the tasting. The Class Itself Gettin g sta r t ed Participants sign in as appropriate. There may be capable individuals within the school food service who are interested in guiding the professional development of their peers.The i nstructor Qua lities n eed ed The instructor should be knowledgeable about cooking with fresh. having the same teacher from class to class provides consistency.ECOLITERACY. and can be found through the national program Chefs on the Move to Help Child Nutrition through www. Resp ons i bi l i t i es of t he i n st r u cto r Ensure that the required facilities and equipment are available. Although it’s not necessary.letsmove. the International Association of Culinary Professionals. and able to work easily with adult students.ORG 21 . Culinary instructors in secondary schools. The instructor passes out copies of the recipes to each person. These organizations have chapters across the nation. and gather in the kitchen. familiar with international flavor profiles and ingredients. and Slow Food USA may be helpful. and culinary schools may be a direct source. Secure all the ingredients necessary and place them in a central location from which participants can access them as needed for the recipes they are cooking. Introduce the professional development approach to the staff. don their hairnets. community colleges. perhaps providing each person with this cookbook and professional development guide and discussing changes the staff would like to see. Other professional culinary organizations such as Les Dames d’Escoffier International.gov and in your local community. wash their hands. seasonal ingredients. which is part of building trust and relationships that will empower those who are taking the class. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. or have access to “cooking farmers” or chefs who would like to lead classes. Select the recipes and provide them to the food service director to make copies for each participant. Where to f i n d a n i n st r u c tor The local farmers’ market manager may know of volunteers or interns.

ORG 22 . Participants are eager to begin handson learning. some participants will improvise and others will follow the recipes exactly. uniformity is not as important as the experience of cooking. Some questions about ingredients and techniques are easier to ask one-on-one. sitting or standing. each group volunteers to take one or two recipes. The introduction is brief.org/downloads/nutrition-education-cards. All recipes in this cookbook can be accomplished in that period of time. others will come up late the first few times. participants assemble around the table. Participants divide into groups of two or three. about five to 10 minutes at most. Valuable casual conversation occurs during this time. For inclusion in a recipe for school lunch. Those who are done early can set out a cloth on the central table and ensure that there are chairs and plates. Hosp ita l i t y t r a i n i n g Using nutrition as an entree. As home cooks do. bowls. and further instruction can be provided as they cook. so that students know what to expect.ECOLITERACY. utensils.ecoliteracy. participants place them in bowls or on platters for family-style serving and are encouraged to be creative with garnish. though. uniformity of flavor and ingredients is important. Cookin g Hands-on cooking lasts about 45 minutes to an hour. describing the ingredients and techniques used. Some participants will finish on time or early. and can be followed by an integrated nutrition education lesson relating to the dishes prepared and a brief guided group discussion of the appropriate grade levels and style of introduction of the dishes into the school lunch menu. and are invited to talk briefly about how they prepared their dishes. Included in the suite of Rethinking School Lunch publications and projects created by the Center for Ecoliteracy are picture cards with suggestions for what to say to students about various fruits and vegetables. The instructor circulates among the groups. showing examples of vegetables or herbs as appropriate. the instructor may encourage participants to think about how they would interact with students about these dishes. The rhythm is best learned through experience over the first few classes. and napkins. The instructor keeps track of timing so that all dishes are finished and plated for presentation at the same time. The instructor assigns recipes if all are not taken. Presen tat i on a n d tast i n g When dishes are completed. assisting and guiding as appropriate. so that all can sample. Sa mp ling Sampling the dishes is a high point of the class. For the purpose of the professional development. This portion should take no more than 10 minutes. Once the finished and plated dishes are presented on a table for all to view. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Participants are instructed to gather ingredients and proceed with the assigned recipes. These are available free by download on the CEL website at www.The p re sen tat i on The instructor introduces the recipes and flavor profiles and discusses the ingredients to be used.

ECOLITERACY. or even vendors. The instructor or school district food service director may wish to invite a verbal or written evaluation of the class. Consider in advance whether they will be invited to participate in hands-on cooking or to observe. While the cooking instructor works with the class. board members. and invite two or three guests who have a stake in the outcome to observe. the funding needed to achieve the goals. nutrition advisory committee members. Over time. This professional development program is a chance to showcase changes in your school lunch program. participants will become well acquainted with the cooking-school style of learning and will need less of the instructor’s time and encouragement.The en d i n g The table is cleared. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. the food service director or another appropriate person could invite the visitors to adjourn to a separate room to review the overall goals for changes in school lunch. and the progress made to date. associate superintendents in charge of business or curriculum.ORG 23 . funders and potential funders. This can include the superintendent. consider setting an annual schedule of five to six classes. community members. Dishes are washed and the kitchen is cleaned for the next day’s use. After one or two classes have been given.

“trail mix. pumpkin seeds. If using a house-made blend. local. croutons The gre en sa l a d base There are many possibilities for the green salad base. tuna. in-season fruits and vegetables is to offer a daily seasonal salad bar. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. The salad bar is also an opportunity to introduce more whole grains into the diet through serving freshly made whole grain salads.2 The Seasonal Salad Bar The easiest way to increase student consumption of fresh. or cheese (including one vegetarian protein) 5 One or two additional products. create a recipe specifying the quantity of each item that is used. local. or beets 6 Other items: raisins and other dried fruits. almonds. for instance canned or frozen fruits or vegetables such as peaches. pickled jalapeños.ECOLITERACY. Blends of lettuce. and even raw vegetables can be made to suit students’ age levels.” yogurt.ORG 24 . greens. in-season fruits and/or vegetables 3 Two made-from-scratch or freshly prepared seasonal salads. chicken. in order to ensure uniformity. such as Whole Wheat Penne and Tuna or Cucumber and Jicama 4 One or two proteins such as hard-boiled eggs. beans. sunflower seeds. Seasonal Salad Bar Com pon e n ts We propose that seasonal salad bars contain a minimum of six components: 1 A base of fresh lettuce and/or greens 2 A minimum of two fresh. walnuts. apricots.

+ lettuce a n d g r ee n s f r esh . f r esh . lo c a l . a n d/or t r a i l m i x a n u tr i ti o us. lo c a l seas o n al meal cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. nuts . seas o n a l f r u i ts a n d veg e tables + f r es hly p r epa r e d seas o n a l sa l a ds + prote i n s . at l e ast on e veg e ta r i a n + f r ozen o r c a n n e d f r u i ts a n d ve getables + = raisin s.ORG 25 . c r ou ton s .ECOLITERACY.

cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Recipe on page 58.ORG 26 .ECOLITERACY.Whole grain salads like Tabbouleh offer exceptional nutrition and are popular salad bar additions.

spring onions.ECOLITERACY. cherry tomatoes. cherry tomatoes. cucumbers. germ. zucchini Win ter Apples. carrots. zucchini Summer Apricots. nectarines. pears. Whole grain salads Salads prepared from whole grains offer exceptional nutrition. zucchini Made-from-scratch or freshly prepared salads There are many opportunities to prepare salads from scratch for the seasonal salad bar. watermelon. For this book. broccoli. For example: Fa ll Apples. kiwifruit. “whole grains” are cereal seeds that have all their original bran. and endosperm. in-season fruits and vegetables offered in a seasonal salad bar change both between and within the seasons. red onions. beans. jicama.ORG 27 . cucumbers. strawberries.Some salad base options: Asian greens Cabbage Chard Iceberg Kale Mixed field greens Red leaf. plums. persimmons. cherries. tangerines Sp rin g Apricots. such as the Asian-inspired Soba Noodles with Eggplant. All of the salads in the recipes section of this book are appropriate for the salad bar. Additionally. melons. plums. peaches. sliced tomatoes. sugar snap peas. can be served on the salad bar rather than as hot entrées. cherry tomatoes. mandarins. oranges. mandarins. some of the recipes for pasta. cucumbers. cabbage. peaches. Grains are the edible seeds of plants. primarily cereals or legumes. snap beans. green leaf Romaine Spinach Season a l f r u i ts a n d v eg eta bl e s The fresh. sweet peppers. cherries. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. asparagus. sliced tomatoes. Tofu. cauliflower. with some items overlapping two seasons. strawberries. jicama. local. jicama. and Thai Basil or the European/ Mediterranean-inspired Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni. sweet peppers.

Combine the grain with chopped. and grits. salads. Use in soups. It is an entire wheat kernel (wheat berry) that is then cracked or ground into coarse or medium particles. fine or coarsely ground. It has a smoky. Grits are hominy. Bulgur has a nutlike flavor and a firm texture. All rice starts out brown. entrées. and side dishes. Millet has a bland. depending on the amount of water used and length of time in cooking. Some common whole grains: Barley has a sweet. and side dishes. Wheat ber ry has a nutty flavor and chewy texture. and any way in which rice might be used. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. hominy. side dishes.ORG 28 . fresh herbs. or in any way that rice might be used. Use in salads. It is the entire wheat kernel. and partially debranned. Corn has a sweet flavor. Hominy (also known as pozole or samp) is dried corn soaked in hydrated lime or lye. and pilafs. Use in salads. Use in salads. seasonal vegetables. it is used for baking and pasta. It is used in a variety of forms such as cornmeal. dried. Ground into flour. slightly nutty flavor and can be used for salads and pilafs. salads. Use in soups. It is usually ground fine or medium. typically used in baked dishes or as a breakfast cereal. Use in soups. draining as needed. usually degermed. cook a suggested-for-salad whole grain as listed below or whole grain pasta. The texture is chewy to soft. Use in salads and side dishes. and salt and pepper to taste. It also known as bulgur wheat. Quin oa has a sesame-like flavor and a delicate texture.To create your own whole grain salads. Cracked w heat has a mild flavor and fluffy texture. chewy texture and is commonly used in soups and stews. Season with spices. slightly sour flavor and a soft. salads. Cornmeal. extra virgin olive oil. can be fine or coarsely ground and is commonly used in baking.ECOLITERACY. white rice is brown rice with the bran and germ removed—thus it is no longer whole grain. and other ingredients from one of the flavor profiles in this cookbook. and side dishes. and add lemon juice. stews. Brown ri c e has a nutty flavor and a chewy texture. earthy flavor. It is an entire wheat kernel (wheat berry) that has been parboiled.

In the recipes section of this book several recipes are provided for house-made dressings. including Ranch. House-made salad dressings. prepared from scratch.ORG 29 . are an opportunity to increase flavor and remove hidden ingredients such as sweeteners which can increase caloric intake. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY. and Soy Sesame. Russian.Sa l a d Dressings Salad dressings are important to the success of the salad bar. Thousand Island.

ECOLITERACY.ORG 30 . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. 1/2 1/2 cup mayonnaise cup low-fat sour cream teaspoons lemon juice teaspoon onion powder 2 1/2 1/2 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard teaspoon dried dill teaspoon dried parsley teaspoon salt 1 1/2 1 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder Combine all ingredients and mix well.Ranch Dressing Makes about 1 cup Ranch dressing is a favorite among students. who like it not only for salads but also for dipping raw vegetables of all kinds. Will keep refrigerated for about 5 days.

made with pickles. Will keep refrigerated for about 1 week. and mayonnaise. onions.Thousand Island Dressing Makes about 1 1/2 cups This old-time favorite. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. or 1 teaspoon dried chives 2 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley.ORG 31 . is coming back in style.ECOLITERACY. or 1 teaspoon dried parsley 1 tablespoon minced onion. or 1 teaspoon onion powder Salt Pepper Combine all ingredients and mix well. Students like it for its sweet flavor and use it on any kind of salad greens or with cottage cheese and fruits. 1 1/4 cup mayonnaise cup ketchup tablespoons minced sweet pickles or sweet pickle relish 1 tablespoon minced fresh chives. ketchup.

Russian Dressing Makes about 1 1/2 cups This is similar to Thousand Island dressing. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. or 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 1 1 Salt Pepper Combine all ingredients and mix well. or with cottage cheese and fruits. Will keep refrigerated for about 1 week. 1 1/4 cup mayonnaise cup ketchup tablespoon horseradish teaspoon Worcestershire sauce tablespoon minced fresh parsley. You can use it as a sandwich spread or as a salad dressing.ORG 32 . or 1 teaspoon dried parsley 1 tablespoon minced onion. but has a bit more tang.ECOLITERACY.

S oy S e s a m e D r e s s i n g Makes about 2 cups Students like this salad dressing as an alternative to Ranch and other mayonnaise-based dressings. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. stir or shake the container. 1/2 1/4 1/2 cup rice wine vinegar cup honey cup canola oil teaspoons toasted sesame oil 2 1 1 tablespoons fresh lime juice teaspoon dry mustard teaspoon ground ginger Salt 2 1/2 cup light soy sauce Freshly ground black pepper to taste In a large bowl. because the ingredients will separate if standing.ECOLITERACY. Alternatively. whisk together the vinegar and honey until the honey dissolves. Whisk in the remaining ingredients. Taste and adjust with salt and pepper as desired. blend in a blender. Before using.ORG 33 . especially for any salads with Asian flavors. Will keep refrigerated for about 1 week. You can also use this to accompany Asian-style entrée salads. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

rice bowls. along with whole grains. fruits. and pizza toppings.ORG 34 . local. and herbs in dishes that children know and enjoy.ECOLITERACY. Flavor Profiles. the salad bar provides the opportunity for students to eat raw fruits and vegetables. soups.” for more information. “The Seasonal Salad Bar. worldwide. or freshly prepared using ready-made broth or commodity tomatoes as a base. to use fresh. in-season foods. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.3 6-5-4: DISHES. SOUPS Every culture. Use of this matrix allows food service directors and kitchen staff to diversify their menu offerings. They are salads. and restaurants. many dishes that are flavorful. makes soup. and can incorporate vegetables as well as whole grains and proteins. See Chapter 2. By varying the seasonal ingredients and using different flavor profiles. In particular. retail food establishments. and to create multiple versions of those dishes by varying the seasonings. pastas. Sa l a ds Salads are the easiest way to increase student consumption of fresh. their homes. A whole grain roll can be served with the soups. and reflective of California’s ethnic diversity can be created throughout the year. in-season vegetables. wraps. They can be made from scratch. in season. and sEASONS This cookbook is based on a matrix of six basic dishes and five cultural flavor profiles that can be easily adapted to the four seasons. The SIX Dis hes We have chosen six dishes that are already familiar to students through school lunches.

Virtually all pastas can have vegetables added to them. wraps Many dishes using ingredients in different flavor profiles can be wrapped into a tortilla. not for the pizza crust or sauce. Latin American. Within each of these profiles are very significant regional differences.ORG 35 . and Middle Eastern/Indian. r i c e bow l s Rice is eaten around the world. Thus the pizza recipes in the book are for seasonal toppings reflecting the five flavor profiles. main courses. Due to trade and globalization. either as primary components or as finely chopped secondary components. or tucked into a pita pocket. Adding additional fresh herbs to these wraps increases flavor. and in-season vegetables. or bleached and enriched white flour. This cookbook assumes that school kitchens are purchasing or making their pizza crust and using a basic topping of tomato sauce and cheese. They can also be made from rice and other flours. They are African. numerous cuisines around the world employ many of the same basic foods. or spring roll skin. and even dessert. allows us to talk in broad terms about flavor profiles. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. local. and color.pastas Pastas can be made from whole grain flour. chapatti. it is not the intent of this book to address the differences. European/Mediterranean. but different cuisines season those foods in distinctive ways. p i zz a top p i n g s Pizzas are among America’s favorite food. The FIVE Flavor Profile s The broad. The multiple ways to serve rice include with fresh. Different cultures use a variety of pasta shapes and sizes in soups. Asian. whole wheat. however. salads. and in some cases ingredients. flatbread. texture.ECOLITERACY. general flavor profiles chosen for this cookbook represent the world’s major continents and reflect the heritage and ethnic diversity of California’s population. and in some instances fruits. The choice of seasonings.

explorers. Beans Black-eyed peas Collard greens Corn Millet Molasses Okra Paprika Peanuts Peppers. with the incorporation of foods of the Americas such as corn into this evolving cuisine. and traders over the centuries. sweet Sassafras Sweet potatoes Yams cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. “African” refers primarily to the countries of the African continent south of the Sahara plus the islands of Madagascar. black-eyed peas. The cuisine is diverse as well. a strong cultural identity has grown up around the consumption of certain foods that today are deeply associated with the cooking and foodways of African Americans.ORG 36 . chili Peppers.ECOLITERACY. showing the influence of colonizers.fl avor profile: Africa n In this book. Enslaved Africans brought with them to America their cooking traditions with native foods such as okra. Cape Verde. and yams. In the southern United States especially. and São Tomé. The process of interweaving indigenous and imported foods continued. The following foods are included in the African profile. interwoven with diets based on indigenous foods.

collard gree n s b l ac k.ECOLITERACY.ORG 37 .eye d peas pa p r i ka pe a n u ts cor n chil i peppe r s sw eet potato es okr a cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

ECOLITERACY. and the Indonesian archipelago. Japan. Laos. Malaysia.ORG 38 . Vietnam. the Koreas. herbs. the following spices. soy sauce Thai basil Tofu Turmeric cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.Fl avor Profile: Asian The Asian continent includes countries as culturally and culinarily different as China. fermented soybeans. Most of them use. Coriander Coconut Cumin Curry Fish sauce Ginger Lemongrass Mint Mung beans Peppers. sweet Rice vinegar Saffron Sesame seeds and sesame oil Soy flavorings: miso paste. Cambodia. Thailand. and ingredients. chili Peppers. in one way or another and to greater or varying degrees.

ECOLITERACY.ginger tof u l emongrass sa ffro n co r i a n de r ch il i peppe r s hot peppe r s co co n u t mu n g be a n s cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 39 .

ECOLITERACY. especially of immigrants from the British Isles. Greeks. Later immigration brought additional Northern and Eastern Europeans as well as Italians. These immigrants brought with them the foods of their homelands. sweet Rosemary Saffron Thyme Tomatoes cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Portuguese. which they often combined with indigenous American foods such as tomatoes and peppers. and Spain. once a part of Mexico. and other Mediterranean peoples through the first part of the twentieth century.ORG 40 . have always had a strong Spanish influence. Barley Basil Capers Couscous Dill Fennel Garlic Horseradish Mint Olives Olive oil Oregano Paprika Peppers. California and the Southwest. Northern Europe.Fl avor Profile: Europe a n / M e d it e r r a n e a n This profile traces its origins to North American settlements in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. chili Peppers.

ECOLITERACY.f en n el o li ves and o li ve o i l b a r l ey oregano sw ee t peppe r s cor n ga rlic co us cous cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 41 .

ORG 42 . Portugal. Achiote Bananas Beans Chocolate Cinnamon Corn Cumin Garlic Hibiscus Mangoes Nopales (cactus pads) Oregano Papaya Peppers. sweet Plantains Quinoa Tomatoes Vanilla cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY. and the islands of the Caribbean have elements of a distinct New World cuisine based on indigenous ingredients. Holland.Fl avor Profile: Latin A m e r ic a n Mexico. and by the African traders. but those cuisines have also been heavily influenced by colonizers from Spain. chili Peppers. the Central American and South American countries. and France.

ORG 43 .pla n tain s ac h i ote be ans qu i n oa va n i l la tom atoes cumin h i b i s c us cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY.

chili Peppers. Culinarily. The Indian subcontinent is sometimes included in geographical references as part of Western Asia. India and the Middle East use many of same herbs and spices.ORG 44 . including Iran. Iraq. sometimes as part of Southern Asia. Afghanistan. Yemen. as well as countries of North Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean. also known as Western Asia. as well as such ingredients as yogurt.Fl avor Profile: Middle E ast e r n / I n d ia n This profile encompasses cuisine from the Middle East. Allspice Cardamom Chickpeas (garbanzo beans) Cilantro Cinnamon Coriander Cumin Fennel Garlic Ghee (clarified butter) Mint Nutmeg Peppers. Turkey.ECOLITERACY. and Pakistan. sweet Pine nuts Pomegranates Rose water Sesame oil Tamarind Turmeric Yogurt More specific to India: Curry Garam masala Kaffir lime leaves Mangoes cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

cilantro c in n a m o n c u r ry yo g u rt ma n goes p i n e n u ts ta m a r i n d P o me g r a n at es chic kpeas cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY.ORG 45 .

This is especially true in California with its versatile Mediterranean climate. However. Within each profile there are very significant regional differences. Due to multiple geographic and weather influences the physical seasons may overlap. Fall: Se p t em ber . N ov e m b e r Fall is sometimes called the “crossover season” because many summer fruits and vegetables (such as tomatoes. fall Fru i ts Apples Asian pears Blackberries Dates Feijoa (pineapple guava) Figs Grapefruit Grapes Kumquats Lemons Melons Oranges Peaches Pears Persimmons Pomegranates Plums Raspberries Strawberries Quince fall ve g eta bl es Arugula Asian greens Basil Beans Beets Bok choy Broccoli CAbbage cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY. which is so amenable to a multitude of crops. This means fall is a very abundant season.ORG 46 . and dates are appearing. beans. speaking seasonally allows us to think in a general way about locally grown fruits and vegetables. persimmons. peppers. with multiple choices available for cooking from scratch. and they show the effects of microclimates.The Four Seasons These four broad profiles represent the seasons as experienced in California and reflect the crops grown in this part of the Western hemisphere. and grapes) are still available even while hard winter squash. O c tober .

Fall Tabbouleh salad with tomatoes. parsley.ORG 47 . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Recipe on page 58. Middle Eastern/Indian flavor profile. and mint. cucumber.ECOLITERACY.

ECOLITERACY.ORG 48 . sweet Potatoes Pumpkins and other winter squash Purslane Radicchio Radishes Eggplant Rapini Endive Rhubarb Fennel Garlic Kale Kohlrabi Leeks Lettuces Mushrooms Mustard Okra Shallots Spinach Summer squash Sunchokes Tangerines Tomatillos Tomatoes Turnips fa ll herbs Basil Chives Cilantro Dill Marjoram Mint Oregano Tarragon Thyme Winter savory Parsley Rosemary Summer savory cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.Cactus pads Carrots Cauliflower Celery Chard Collards Corn Cress Cucumbers Raw Olives Onions Peppers. chili Peppers.

Ja n ua ry. winter F r u i ts Avocados Apples Dates Grapefruit Kiwifruit Fejoa (pineapple guava) Lemons Mandarins Oranges Pomegranates Pomelos Tangerines Quince winter v eg eta bl es Asian greens Beets Bok choy Broccoli Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Celery Chard Collards Escarole Endive Fennel Frisée Green garlic (Feb.ORG 49 . Combining these with different proteins. and grains allows for a wide range of items from the 6-5-4 School Lunch Matrix to be prepared and served in school lunches during the cold months. cheeses. They include citrus fruits. cauliflower. carbohydrates. and cabbages.ECOLITERACY. F eb r ua ry During the California winter. an extensive variety of greens and root vegetables.) Green onions Kale Kohlrabi Leeks Lettuces Mushrooms Mustard Onions Potatoes Winter squash Radicchio Radishes Spinach cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.Winter: D ec em ber . and brassicas such as broccoli. a vast number of crops are in season.

A p r i l . M ay Spring is the season of new growth. and tender leaves and roots. which now grow yearround in California. and green onions and slender new carrots are ready to pull on California farms.ECOLITERACY. Strawberries. become plentiful in spring because they are grown in multiple regions as the weather warms and the days lengthen. During these months plants put forth new shoots.win ter her bs Cilantro Chives Marjoram Mint Oregano Turnips Parsley Rosemary Sage Thyme Sp rin g: M a r c h. buds. Asparagus spears poke through the crust of soil.ORG 50 . Many simple dishes can be made to showcase spring in school lunchrooms. sp rin g F r u i ts Blackberries Early cherries Grapefruit Kiwifruit Kumquats Lemons Oranges Raspberries Strawberries sp rin g v eg eta bl es Artichokes Asian greens Asparagus Beets Bok choy Broccoli Cabbage Carrots Celery Chard Cress Dandelion chicory cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. artichokes swell and fill on their bushy plants.

Recipe on page 90.ECOLITERACY. African flavor profile.Winter Black-eyed Peas with Chard. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 51 .

ECOLITERACY. Recipe on pages 101–102. and spring onions. cabbage.ORG 52 .Spring Chinese Chicken Salad with mandarins. Asian flavor profile. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

and stone fruit thrive. peppers. J u ly. while the cooler coastal regions continue to produce leafy greens and tender root crops. thanks to the state’s Mediterranean climate and rich soils.ORG 53 . tomatoes. In the hot interior regions.sp ring v eg eta bl es con t i n u ed Endive Fava beans Fennel Green garlic Kale Leeks Lettuces Mushrooms sp ring her bs Cilantro Chives Marjoram Mint Oregano Parsley Rosemary Tarragon Sage Summer savory Thyme Winter savory Mustard Nettles Onions Potatoes Radicchio Radishes Spinach Turnips Summer: J u n e. eggplant. grapes.ECOLITERACY. Summer f r u i ts Apricots Apples Asian pears Blackberries Blueberries Cherries Figs Grapes Melons Nectarines Peaches Pears Plums Pluots Raspberries Strawberries cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Au g u st Summer in California produces just about every imaginable fruit or vegetable.

sweet Peppers. standard Tomatoes.ECOLITERACY.summer v eg eta bl es Arugula Asian greens Basil Beans Beets Broccoli Cabbage Cactus pads Carrots Celery Chard Corn Cress Cucumbers Eggplant Endive Fava beans Fennel Garlic (new crop) Kale Kohlrabi Leeks Lettuces Mushrooms Okra Onions Peppers. heirloom summer her bs Cilantro Chives Marjoram Mint Oregano Parsley Rosemary Tarragon Sage Summer savory Thyme Winter savory cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 54 . chili Potatoes Purslane Radicchio Radishes Rhubarb Shallots Spinach Summer squash Tomatillos Tomatoes.

ECOLITERACY. African flavor profile. Recipe on page 138. and Sausage pizza.Summer Fresh Corn. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 55 . Okra.

as the cooling autumn weather brings new crops of leafy greens and freshly harvested walnuts and almonds to the shelf. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. while fall apples. and hard squash are just beginning to come into season.4 recipes fall Fall cooking with California food could not be easier. Summer crops like tomatoes and peppers are still growing and available. The market fills up with new ingredients to choose from.ECOLITERACY.ORG 56 . pears.

Whole Wheat Penne Salad with Tuna and Capers. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY.ORG 57 . Recipe on page 122.

cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. adding leaf lettuce and sliced tomato.Ta b b o u l e h Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian serves 6-8 This is a popular Middle Eastern dish made from bulgur. combine bulgur. or until bulgur is soft. Add pepper. cucumber. Let stand at least 15 minutes. nutty flavor. or. S ug g est io n: Use in a pita pocket. With its light. peeled and finely chopped 2–3 1 1/4 – 1/3 cup cup chopped tomatoes extra virgin olive oil In a medium bowl. and salt. boiling water. and tomatoes. a stand-alone entrée. add green onions. when accompanied with pita bread and leaf lettuce.ECOLITERACY. white and green parts included 1/4 cup lemon juice garlic cloves. minced 1 cucumber. mint. then refrigerate for several hours or overnight to let the flavors fully develop. and parsley and mix well. 1 1 1/4 1 1/2 1/2 cup bulgur cups boiling water teaspoons Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/3 cup minced fresh mint leaves 1 – 1 1/2 cups chopped fresh Italian flat leaf parsley 1/2 cup chopped green onions. this versatile whole grain salad can be part of a salad bar.ORG 58 . Cover and let stand 15–20 minutes. olive oil. garlic. which is wheat that has been cracked and parboiled. Just before serving. a side dish. lemon juice.

and tomatoes. (about 2 cups) 1/2 Juice of 2 limes cup chopped fresh cilantro Kosher or sea salt Combine all the ingredients together in a medium bowl and mix well.ORG 59 .ECOLITERACY.Cucumber and Jicama Salad Flavor Profile: Asian serves 4 Jicama is a mild. peppers. crunchy vegetable that readily absorbs flavors. such as cucumbers. and the secondary students like it sprinkled with a little chili pepper. Most students enjoy it straight from the salad bar with lime juice. It combines well with other vegetables. S ug g est io n: Add slices of red and yellow pepper. peeled and diced (about 2 cups) 2 cucumbers. 1 small jicama. peeled and diced. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

Albondigas.ORG 60 . Recipe on pages 61–62.ECOLITERACY. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

Remove from heat and let cool.Albondigas Flavor Profile: Latin American serves 6–8 This is a classic version of the popular Mexican soup. and pepper. In a large bowl combine the sautéed onion. 1/2 cup rice cup boiling water tablespoons vegetable oil white onions. leaves chopped 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint tablespoon dried oregano 1 In a medium bowl. cumin. half the cilantro. eggs. half the mint. while rice adds whole grains to this healthful dish. finely chopped ounces ground pork ounces ground beef 1 1 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin tablespoon salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper 1 4 2 8 8 2 stalks celery. Put 2 tablespoons of the vegetable oil in a small frying pan and sauté half of the onions until soft. combine the rice and the boiling water. Let it soak for 20 minutes. Moisten your hands with water and shape the mixture into meatballs about 1 inch in diameter. pork. If desired. about 2 to 3 minutes. diced 2 eggs 1 bunch fresh cilantro. you can use all beef instead of half beef and half pork. heat the remaining oil and brown the meatballs lightly. or bake them at 350ºF on an oiled baking sheet for 15 minutes. and beef.ECOLITERACY.ORG 61 . the oregano. Mix to blend well. In a large pan over medium-high heat. about 15 minutes. chopped 1 1 1 carrot. Add the soaked rice. The meatballs provide protein. peeled and diced garlic clove. salt. Remove cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. minced 12–ounce can crushed or chopped tomatoes and their juice 1–1 1/2 quarts chicken broth 1 medium zucchini.

then add the tomatoes and the chicken broth. add the zucchini. Simmer until the meatballs are firm (but not so long that they fall apart).ORG 62 . and serve with hot vegetables and beans. about 1 hour. Simmer until the celery is soft. and garlic to the pan. S ug g est io n: Make the meatballs only. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Add the remaining onions.ECOLITERACY. and cook another 10 minutes. abut 2 to 3 minutes. Garnish with the remaining cilantro. carrot. Bring to a simmer. wrapped in a warm tortilla. then add the meatballs and the remaining mint.and set aside. Season with salt and pepper. celery.

add the chicken. Stir. minced 32-ounce can whole stewed tomatoes with juice. sausage. or 1 pound chicken meat (white or dark) 3/4 pound Andouille sausage. okra. prepare the gumbo a day ahead. To allow the flavors to fully blend. others meat-based. chopped into 1-inch pieces Scant pepper 1/2 1/8 1 3. and thyme and sauté. chopped teaspoons fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried bay leaves 2 teaspoon cayenne cup long-grain rice Heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. since the broth is very important to the depth of flavor.ORG 63 . chicken broth 3 stalks celery. ham. about 10 minutes. low-sodium. chopped 1 quart low-fat. celery. turning the chicken and sausage until they are lightly golden. Add the tomatoes. chicken broth. If possible. cooked. Some gumbos are fished-based. and simmer until the rice is tender. parsley. sliced on the diagonal about thick 1/3 inch 1/2 1/3 pound ham. S ug g est io n: Add precooked shrimp several minutes prior to serving. reduce the heat to low. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. When it is hot. which helps thicken the base of the soup. with meat removed. and rice. chopped coarsely 4 1 garlic cloves. its place of origin.Gumbo Flavor Profile: African serves 10 This flavorful soup has to have andouille sausage—nothing can serve as a substitute for the andouille spices that infuse the entire soup. sliced 1 pound fresh okra. make your own chicken broth. 2 tablespoons canola or other light oil 2 yellow onions. about 3 minutes more. cayenne.to 4-pound chicken.ECOLITERACY. Add the onions and garlic and continue to sauté until the onions are translucent. Gumbo is cooked in as many different ways as there are families in Louisiana. diced cup fresh parsley. about 30 minutes. though all contain okra.

slightly beaten cup minced yellow onion cup fine dried bread crumbs cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese onion. Add the onion. oregano. minced cup minced kale cups crushed or chopped canned tomatoes 2 1 1 3 1 1 1/2 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 1/2 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano teaspoon Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper 2–3 Pasta 12 ounces whole wheat penne In a large saucepan. This recipe provides a good opportunity to use commodity beef and tomatoes in combination with fresh kale to prepare a made-fromscratch entrée. and carrot and sauté until the onion is nearly translucent. about 1 minute. chopped garlic cloves. Reduce the heat to low. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. tomatoes. Add the kale. minced carrot.I ta l i a n M e at b a l l s w i t h w h o l e w h e at p e n n e Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean serves 4-6 In Italian restaurants across the country. garlic. salt. cover. Tomato Sauce 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/2 Meatballs 1 pound ground pork or beef 2 1/2 1/2 large eggs.ECOLITERACY. about 30 minutes. heat the olive oil over medium-high heat.ORG 64 . so students are already familiar with these flavors. and simmer until the vegetables are tender. and pepper. meatballs in tomato sauce are standard fare. Preheat an oven to 400ºF.

Mix well. Serve the penne topped with sauce and the remaining 1/2 cup cheese. Place in the oven and cook. 1/2 cup of the cheese. 1 teaspoon salt. S ug g est io n: Instead of pasta. about 15 to 20 minutes. combine the pork. In a large bowl. onion.ECOLITERACY.Meanwhile. make the meatballs. Drain. bread crumbs. Moisten your hands with water. about 12 minutes. Add the penne and cook until tender to the bite. serve the meatballs and sauce in a sandwich using a sourdough or ciabatta roll. Place on a plate. Place the meatballs on a baking sheet and drizzle them with the olive oil. eggs. and shape the mixture into small. Turn to coat well.ORG 65 . turning once or twice until opaque throughout. and some pepper. Add these to the tomato sauce and simmer over low heat. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. bite-size balls.

ECOLITERACY. and tofu. Set aside. and sauté another 1 to 2 minutes. white and green parts 3 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro 2 1 1 1 1 large head bok choy. a member of the cabbage family. or 3 to 4 small ones. turning to coat. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. To serve. bring a large pot of water to a boil and add the noodles. chopped (about 5 cups) Over high heat. combine the soy sauce. sliced 8 3 6 ounces firm tofu. and adds a bright green component to the dish. sugar. In a large wok or skillet over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and sauté another minute. meats. Add the tofu and garlic. Sweet red or orange peppers could add a nice kick of color and flavor. In a small bowl. Cook for 5 to 6 minutes. S ug g est io n: Serve chilled or at room temperature as an entrée salad or part of a salad bar.ORG 66 . and sesame oil. When it is hot. add the bok choy and sauté about 1 minute. Gently stir in the noodles and the soy sauce mixture. then drain and set aside. chopped. Cook about 2 minutes until thoroughly heated. cubed garlic cloves. 1 1/4 6-ounce package of rice noodles cup light soy sauce tablespoons rice vinegar teaspoon sugar or honey teaspoon sesame oil tablespoon canola or other light vegetable oil 4–5 shiitake mushrooms. is abundant in fall. sprinkle with the green onions and cilantro. heat the canola oil. Bok choy. minced green onions.R i c e N o o d l e s w i t h B o k C h oy Flavor Profile: Asian serves 4– 6 Thin noodles made with rice are a staple of the Thai kitchen and are used in multiple ways with vegetables. vinegar.

turmeric.ECOLITERACY. chopped 2 medium potatoes. or easily available vegetables. cloves. Fragrant basmati rice is often used.ORG 67 . and cook until the rice is tender and most of the moisture absorbed. chopped 2 green onions. These give the rice its characteristic yellow color. brown. and onion and stirring for another few minutes. carrots. eggplant. and bring to a boil. nutmeg. fish. 2 cups long-grain. and spices can include cardamom. as is ghee (clarified butter). and aromatic spices. Sprinkle with the cilantro and green onion and serve with Cucumber Raita. peeled and chopped Wash the rice and drain it well. white and green parts. Add the potatoes. star anise. or other rice varietal 1 1 1 1 4 1/2 cup peeled and chopped carrots cup fresh corn kernels cup chopped eggplant onion. 15 to 20 minutes. stirring frequently so that the bottom layer of rice does not burn and the rice is evenly coated with butter. corn. cumin. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. In another pan. In a medium sauce pan over medium heat.V e g e ta b l e B i r ya n i Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian serves 6–8 Biryani is fried rice. fennel. chili powder. try vegetables such as cauliflower and broccoli. combine the rice and 1 tablespoon of the butter and sauté for 3 to 5 minutes. Add the rice and mix well. coriander. and saffron. Add a small amount of additional water if the water gets absorbed before the rice is cooked. peeled and chopped cups water teaspoon Kosher or sea salt 3 tablespoons butter or ghee (Indian clarified butter) 2 2 1 1/2 1 1/2 teaspoons finely chopped garlic teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger teaspoons ground coriander teaspoons allspice 3 sprigs fresh cilantro. cover. and the salt. page 70. S ug g est io n: In winter. Set aside. Add 3 cups of water. Reduce the heat to low. cinnamon. Check the rice periodically to make sure the bottom layer is not burning. melt the remaining butter and sauté the garlic. ginger. Raita is always served with biryani. usually served with meat. pepper. and allspice for 1 to 2 minutes. stirring frequently to coat them with the butter. basmati.

Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers.ECOLITERACY. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Recipe on page 69.ORG 68 .

ORG 69 .ECOLITERACY. about 1 minute. Add the peppers and eggplant. chopped with juice. or 1 cup canned tomatoes. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. cut into 1-inch pieces In a medium frying pan over medium-high heat. spoon over rice and garnish with the parsley. omitting the parsley. juicy tomato. reduce the heat to low. and cook until the eggplant is cooked through and the tomatoes have thickened slightly. add the onion and garlic and sauté until the onion is limp. try replacing the eggplant with broccoli in winter and asparagus in spring. heat the olive oil. and a little sesame oil. 2 to 3 minutes. To serve. Cover. 2 1/4 cup chopped fresh Italian flat leaf parsley 2 sweet red peppers. When the oil is hot. chopped. ginger. Garnish with toasted sesame seeds and cilantro. stirring often until the eggplant has softened and browned a bit. minced 1 large. 10 to 12 minutes. Stir in the tomato. S ug g est io n: Change to an Asian flavor profile by omitting the tomatoes and replace with a mixture of soy sauce. plus water. seeded and cut into 1–inch pieces 3–4 Asian or 1 large globe eggplant (about 1 pound).Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean serves 4 This tasty vegetarian entrée can be varied to suit the season: for example. 4 1/4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil cup chopped onion garlic cloves. scraping up any clinging bits.

finely chopped 1 Few pinches cayenne (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh coriander leaves In a bowl. combine the yogurt. with none of the above vegetables. carrot. a dip or salad with a yogurt base. radish. Serve with the rice. requires no cooking. coriander. 2 1/2 cups plain yogurt teaspoon salt large cucumber. onions. try radish raita.ORG 70 . including using fruits and vegetables such as banana. cucumber.C u c u m b e r R a i ta Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian makes about 3 cups Raita. There are many ways to make raita. using instead one cup of grated radish. It is a cool and refreshing accompaniment to spicier dishes.ECOLITERACY. plus two teaspoons salt and a little ground cumin. and cucumber. salt. finely chopped green onions. grated or chopped 1 2 tomato. S ug g est io n: In the spring. peeled. cabbage. tomato. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. and cayenne (if using) and stir to mix well. white and green parts.

or blend in a food processor. skinless chicken breast 1 2 2 2 1/2 1 red pepper. Starting from the bottom. turning it once or twice.ECOLITERACY. it over and over until you are at the other edge. grill the chicken for 5 minutes. seeded and cut into strips cup chopped fresh cilantro tablespoons extra virgin olive oil tablespoons lime juice garlic cloves. and then turn. Warm whole wheat tortillas in the oven. For a vegetarian option. garlic. or in a frying pan lightly coated with olive oil. the market is filled with the red. Fold each side over partway so that the body of the wrap is about 3 inches in diameter. seeded and cut into strips 1 green pepper.ORG 71 . though the seeds are removed so as not to make the spice too intense. oil. 1 1/2 pounds boneless. peeled and sliced vertically 10 whole wheat flour tortillas 1 teaspoon salt Place the chicken in sealable plastic bag or a container with a lid. seeded and finely chopped 1 yellow pepper. and salt. minced jalapeÑo pepper. S ug g est io n: Replace chicken with beef or pork for a different flavor. or wrap. or toast each one separately on a hot dry pan for 30 seconds per side. Experiment to find what chili fits your taste. yellow. green. whisk together the cilantro. Add this marinade to the chicken and refrigerate for 30 minutes. replace chicken with shredded cheese. combine the chicken with grilled peppers and onion. Let cool. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. lime juice. In a small bowl. then cut into strips.C h i c k e n Fa j i ta Flavor Profile: Latin American Makes 10 wraps In the fall. Place a portion of the chicken and vegetable mixture on each tortilla. On a hot grill. that give this wrap its heat. jalapeño pepper is used. fold the end up about 3 inches. seeded and cut into strips 1 yellow onion. as well as plenty of chilis. Grill the red. In a medium bowl. and yellow peppers. jalapeño. and green pepper strips and the yellow onion slices. Here.

and mustard seed. celery. Put the mayonnaise in a medium mixing bowl. Tuck in 3 to 4 sprigs of cilantro and one of mint. Mix well. S ug g est io n: Create an entrée salad by making a bed of green leaf or other lettuce and topping it with the salad. garnishing with the herbs and toasted pita chips. Repeat with the remaining salad. dry. about 1 minute. 1/2 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin teaspoon cumin seed tablespoon curry powder 1/2 cup finely chopped celery tablespoon finely chopped red onion 1 1 1/4 teaspoon mustard seed cup mayonnaise cups chopped cooked chicken 2 whole wheat pita pockets. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. and mix well.C u r r i e d C h i c k e n S a l a d P i ta Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian Makes 4 pita pocket halves Here. curry powder.ORG 72 . cut in half 1/2 – 2/3 12 – 16 sprigs fresh cilantro 4 sprigs fresh mint 2 In a small. and red onion. Spoon about 1/4 of the mixture into a pita pocket half.ECOLITERACY. Stir in the chicken. curry spices add flavor to the mayonnaise before it is mixed with the chicken and vegetables and tucked into pita pocket halves. add the fragrant spices. toast the ground cumin and seed. ungreased frying pan over medium heat. stirring until fragrant.

following the instructions for the pizza crust. 24 – 36 pitted whole black olives. thinly sliced cup sliced 2 tablespoons capers. capers. Caper. a n d F r e s h T o m at o p i z z a Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean Makes enough to top two 14-inch pizzas Olives. Top with the sliced tomatoes and drizzle with the olive oil.Olive. rinsed and drained teaspoons extra virgin olive oil 1 large red pepper. red peppers. or 3 3/4 2 large. and pepper.ECOLITERACY. where they are often used in pastas and on pizzas. capers. and tomatoes are a popular combination throughout Southern France and Italy. Bake.ORG 73 . seeded and chopped Sprinkle two ready-to-bake pizza crusts with the olives. Red Pepper. juicy tomatoes. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

ECOLITERACY. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 74 . Recipe on page 75.Ham and Yam Pizza.

following the instructions for the pizza crust. peel. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. about 50 minutes. Let cool. wrap in foil. Arrange the cooked yams and the ham on two ready-to-bake pizza crusts and bake. where sweet pineapple is combined with the ham.H a m a n d Ya m p i z z a Flavor Profile: African Makes enough to top two 14-inch pizzas Ham and yams are a classic combination in southern cooking.ORG 75 . place on a baking sheet. Prick the yams with the tines of a fork. and cut into approximately 1-inch pieces. similar to a Hawaiian pizza.ECOLITERACY. and make an excellent pizza topping. cut into 1/2 -inch cubes Preheat an oven to 350ºF. 3 yams (about 1 1/4 pounds) 1/2 – 3/4 pounds ham. and bake until soft.

because of its Mediterranean climate.ECOLITERACY. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. including many different varieties of citrus as well as kiwifruit.ORG 76 . produces a vast number of crops during the winter months. The warmer desert regions of the state provide not only some of the citrus. as well as root crops like radishes and carrots.winter California. but much of the lettuce and other greens available during the winter.

ECOLITERACY.ORG 77 . Recipe on page 78.Asian Cabbage and Orange Salad with Ginger. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

and cilantro in a bowl. mix together the vinegar. Season with salt. and each segment halved 1/2 1/4 – 1/2 cup fresh cilantro leaves teaspoon Kosher salt. S ug g est io n: Add chicken and crispy wontons or noodles for an entrée salad.As i a n C a b b ag e a n d Orange Salad with Ginger Flavor Profile: Asian serves 4 Give this simple cabbage salad an Asian twist by using Napa cabbage. thinly shredded 1 1 1 1 1 navel orange. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 78 . ginger. Put the cabbage. sesame. and soy sauce. or savoy cabbage could be used as well. and soy. pour the sauce over them. red.ECOLITERACY. In a bowl. and toss well. Green. 1/2 cup seasoned rice vinegar tablespoon toasted sesame oil teaspoon grated fresh ginger teaspoon honey or brown sugar teaspoon soy sauce 1/2 head Napa cabbage. segmented. sesame oil. orange segments. honey. plus Asian flavors such as ginger.

in quarters. use water chestnuts and sweet red peppers and dress with a soy-ginger vinaigrette instead of using the raisins and mayonnaise.B r o cc o l i . and vinegar to make a dressing. but dried cranberries or cherries could be used as well. Combine them in a bowl with the raisins and walnuts. R a i s i n . a n d Wa l n u t S a l a d Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean serves 4 – 6 Broccoli is popular in both Asian and Western cuisines.ORG 79 . if large. toasted and coarsely chopped 2–3 2–3 Cut the broccoli florets in half or. Taste.ECOLITERACY. 4 cups broccoli florets (about 4 crowns of broccoli) 1/2 – 2/3 1/4 – 1/3 cup mayonnaise cup 2% or nonfat milk teaspoons sugar teaspoons red wine vinegar 1 1/2 1 cups raisins cup walnuts. In another bowl. It should be a combination of sweet and tart. This is a good use for USDA commodity raisins and walnuts. mix together the mayonnaise. S ug g est io n: To create an Asian flavor profile. sugar. milk. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Pour this over the broccoli mixture in the bowl and turn to coat well. and it can take on different flavor profiles depending on the ingredients with which it’s prepared. Toasting the walnuts deepens the flavor and aroma of the nuts.

juiced. fish sauce. Alternatively. Bring to a full boil. add the rice. stir in the rice. chili paste. Add the mushrooms and cook until they are tender. Remove from heat and stir in the basil. add more serrano chilis or substitute jalapeño chilis. For a spicier version for secondary students. combine the chicken stock.or medium-grain white or brown rice 1 teaspoon Thai chili paste 1 serrano chili. 2 1 cups water cup short. Season with salt and pepper. reduce the heat to low. and seeded to make 1/2 cup strained juice 1 tablespoon fish sauce cup chopped fresh basil Kosher or coarse salt Coarsely ground pepper In a medium saucepan over medium heat. add shredded chicken. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer about 5 minutes. to make a vegetarian soup. it proved to be popular with students and staff alike. cover.ORG 80 . In a large saucepan over medium-high heat. The soup will be slightly foamy and will have turned a golden-orange color. Suggestion: For a meaty soup.ECOLITERACY. or increase button mushrooms by 1/2 cup 2–3 mandarins. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. coconut milk. Set aside. about 20 minutes. bring the water to a boil. Be sure to wear gloves when handling chilis of any kind. peeled. 7 to 10 minutes. and chili. seeded and minced 2 cups quartered fresh button mushrooms 1/2 1 1 1 cup low-fat chicken stock 12-ounce can coconut milk tablespoon freshly grated mandarin zest 1/2 cup chopped fresh oyster mushrooms. Just before serving. use vegetable broth instead of chicken broth and omit the fish sauce. and cook until the rice is tender and the water has been absorbed.Co co n u t M a n da r i n S o u p Flavor Profile: Asian serves 6 When this Thai-style soup was piloted in the Davis school district. mandarin zest and juice.

cut into 1/2-inch 2 2 2 cups finely chopped chard cups 1/2-inch cubes roast turkey cubes cups canned hominy. 3 slices bacon. seeded. Pour off all but 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat. peeled. and cut into 7 1/2-inch cubes 1/2 teaspoon chili flakes cups low-fat chicken broth Kosher or coarse salt Freshly ground pepper In a heavy-bottomed 6. and is a good way to use commodity turkey and canned hominy. cook the bacon over medium heat. Using a slotted spoon. Ground.ECOLITERACY. Hominy. but not browned. dried corn from which the hull and germ has been removed. cut into 1/2-inch cubes 1 teaspoon filÉ (ground sassafras) (optional) 1 pound butternut squash. it is known as grits or samp. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. drained and rinsed 2 large celery stalks. remove and set aside. halved lengthwise. a n d H o m i n y Flavor Profile: African serves 6 – 8 This easy-to-make soup is rich with cold season vegetables. Hominy is also part of Hispanic cooking. where it is known as pozole. is used throughout the southeastern United States and parts of Africa. diced 1 large yellow onion. 3 to 5 minutes. Sauté until the vegetables are soft. Add the onion and celery. cut into 1/2-inch cubes 2 tablespoons minced fresh Italian flat leaf parsley 1 pound red potatoes. and return the pot to medium heat.to 8-quart saucepan. until browned.S o u p o f W i n t e r V e g e ta b l e s . T u r k e y. about 7 minutes. stirring often.ORG 81 .

turkey. substitute dried oregano for the filé. and reserved bacon.ECOLITERACY. hominy.Add the potatoes. Partially cover the pot and cook until the potatoes are tender.ORG 82 . and a white onion for the yellow. and broth. Add the chard. Cook 5 minutes longer. squash. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Season with salt and pepper. about 20 minutes. S ug g est io n: To change the soup to a Latin American flavor profile. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. filé (if using). cilantro for the parsley. chili flakes. parsley.

reserved peppers. Break the fideo coils into 3 or 4 pieces and add directly to the simmering sauce. When soft. The fine. finely chopped cup low-fat chicken broth cup canned whole tomatoes. It is typically sautéed in oil for a few minutes. rather than separately in water as is traditional with Italian pasta. In a medium. about 10 minutes. Taste and season with salt and pepper. then cooked directly in the sauce.ORG 83 . tomatoes. thin pasta comes in coils. Set aside. about 1 minute. and kale. Finely chopped kale adds some greens without altering the tomato-chili flavors.ECOLITERACY. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. heat the oil over medium-high heat. with their juice 2 1/4 1 1 1 pound chorizo. Discard the water. However. If using spaghetti noodles. stemmed kale Kosher or coarse salt Freshly ground pepper 4 ounces fideo or whole wheat spaghetti noodles 1/2 1/2 onion. Add the broth. stirring them in. Add the onion and sauté until soft. remove the stems and seeds and chop into small pieces. Stir in the chorizo. 2 1 2 dried ancho peppers cup hot water tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 cup finely chopped. cooked and crumbled ounces queso fresco. and the other sauce elements of this recipe. crumbled cup fresh cilantro leaves Place the ancho peppers in the hot water and soak until soft. finely chopped garlic clove. Stir in the garlic and cook 1 more minute. coarsely chopped.F i d e o Pa s ta w i t h C h o r i z o a n d K a l e Flavor Profile: Latin American serves 3-4 Fideo is a favorite pasta of Mexican cooking. about 20 minutes. like angel hair pasta. spaghetti also works with the flavors of chorizo (the spicy Hispanic sausage). Simmer for 15 minutes. Cover and cook until the fideo is tender and most of the sauce absorbed. heavy-bottomed saucepan. Cover and reduce the heat to low. cook separately in boiling salted water.

use mild Italian sausage instead of chorizo. and garnish with Parmesan cheese and parsley instead of queso fresco and cilantro. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.Serve garnished with the cheese and cilantro. a few red pepper flakes instead of the soaked ancho peppers.ORG 84 . S ug g est io n: To change the flavor profile to Mediterranean.ECOLITERACY.

Recipe on pages 83-84.Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale.ORG 85 . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY.

reduce to medium heat. sold from food stalls. an Asian relative of broccoli. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. transfer the chicken to a plate to cool. about 2 minutes. thinly sliced on the diagonal. place over high heat. white and pale green parts only 1 1-inch piece of ginger. add the salt. Fill the same saucepan with water. and the food is often served on large leaves instead of plates. Add the chicken. Drain into a colander and rinse with cold running water. Add the noodles. 2 1/2 1/2 teaspoons Kosher or coarse salt pound thin fresh egg noodles pound boneless. the vendors cook up their specialties. lightly beaten cups loosely packed choi sum or chard leaves. and bring to a boil. Choi sum. At each stall. add 1 teaspoon salt. is used here. peeled and minced 3 1 1/2 tablespoons sweet soy sauce 2 tablespoon fish sauce 2 large eggs. about 15 minutes. cut into wedges tablespoon fresh lime juice 4 garlic cloves. bring back to a boil. Let drain again and set aside.ORG 86 . Shred the chicken and set aside. minced 1 Freshly ground pepper 1/4 cup water tablespoons canola oil 2 Place a large saucepan of water over high heat. and bring to a boil. and cook until just tender.Singapore Egg Noodles w i t h C h i c k e n a n d V e g e ta b l e s Flavor Profile: Asian serves 4–6 This is typical of one-dish Singapore street food. but other Asian greens such as Bok Choy or Pak Choy could be used.ECOLITERACY. skinless chicken thighs 2 green onions. stemmed and cut into 2-inch strips 1 1 cup bean sprouts lime. Using tongs. then reduce the heat to medium and cook until the chicken is cooked through.

warm the oil over medium-high heat. about 1 minute. even carrots. remaining green onions. ginger. Stir in the eggs and let set for 2 minutes. Separate the strands of the noodles and add to the pan.ECOLITERACY. instead of the choi sum. S ug g est io n: For a seasonal spring dish. use a mixture of asparagus and sugar snap peas. and garlic. and 1/4 cup water to make a sauce. 3 to 4 minutes. lime juice. Toss and stir until most of the sauce has been absorbed and the noodles have plumped. and lime wedges. Garnish with the sprouts. fish sauce. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.In a medium bowl. In a large frying pan. Set aside. and sauté them just until fragrant. Stir in half the onions.ORG 87 . stir together the soy sauce. Add the choi sum or chard and the sauce and bring to a boil. 1/4 teaspoon pepper. then toss the mixture with a fork.

it proved to be a popular entrée item at all grade levels as well as with staff. a few pieces at a time. we suggest reducing the amount of garlic and jalapeño pepper. turmeric. Put the garlic in the oil and sauté. cayenne. However.ECOLITERACY. chili. In a medium non-stick pot or frying pan. turning them. minced cups tightly packed fresh cilantro leaves. add the chicken. finely chopped 1/2 1 2 1 cup thinly sliced carrots jalapeño chili. Return the chicken pieces and their collected juices to the pan and add 3/4 cup water. and salt. lemon juice. peeled and coarsely chopped 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper teaspoons freshly ground cumin seeds 2 1 6 cup water tablespoons canola oil 1 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander seeds teaspoon ground turmeric teaspoon salt or more as needed tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 1/2 pounds skinless. and brown. heat the oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot. Stir and bring to a boil.Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro Flavor Profile: Middle East/Indian serves 4–6 Using an abundance of fresh cilantro. Stir 1 minute. the lemon juice. 2 1–inch pieces of fresh ginger. boneless chicken parts. remove the pieces to a bowl.ORG 88 . When piloted in the Davis School District. Using a slotted spoon. stirring 1 minute. cut into serving pieces 5 3 garlic cloves. for the elementary children. coriander. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. seeded and minced Put the ginger and 4 tablespoons of the water in a blender or food processor and process to a paste. cumin. and the carrots. add the paste from the blender. and fresh ginger in this Indian-style dish provides a tangy sauce for chicken. When it is golden. Add the cilantro. about 5 minutes.

and cook 15 minutes. uncover the pot. S ug g est io n: To create a seasonal spring dish.Reduce heat to low.ORG 89 . Serve with rice. Adapted from Madhur Jaffrey’s Indian Cooking. cover. If the sauce is too thin. replace the carrots with sugar snap peas or green onions. Barron’s Books cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. increase the heat and boil to thicken. or until the chicken is cooked through.ECOLITERACY. Madhur Jaffrey. Season with salt. Turn the chicken and cook another 10 to 15 minutes.

but their use has spread throughout the world. where they appear in numerous dishes in many countries. chopped. 4 cups water 1 6 teaspoon freshly ground pepper large stalks of chard. and simmer to produce a flavorful broth. sauté in butter or oil. often served over rice. about 20 minutes. cumin seeds. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. onions. peeled 3 tablespoons extra virgin California olive oil 1 teaspoon Kosher or coarse salt 1 24-ounce can black-eyed peas. The small peas. are native to Africa. about 40 minutes. make a base of finely chopped onion and garlic. about 15 minutes. Return the liquid and the greens to the pot and stir in the black-eyed peas.ORG 90 . salt. Serve over rice.B l ac k. Add chopped canned tomatoes and cook over medium high heat to blend the flavors. Bring to a boil. reserving 1 cup of the liquid. Canned peas are soft. olive oil. the recipe here calls for canned black-eyed peas. and coriander seeds. Strain. reduce the heat to low. Add the chard to the pot. and add a teaspoon each of sugar. a type of cowpea. are a mainstay of cooking in the soups and stews of the southeastern United States. and simmer until tender. so be careful not to crush them. S ug g est io n: To create a Middle Eastern profile. and pepper. Collard or turnip greens can be substituted but the stems should be removed. rinsed and drained Put the water in a large pot and add the rosemary.E y e d P e a s w i t h C h a r d Flavor Profile: African serves 4–6 Black-eyed peas. including the stems. Stir in the black-eyed peas as above. Season with salt and pepper. bay leaves. and slices of spicy sausage.ECOLITERACY. 1 sprig fresh rosemary 2 bay leaves 2 small onions. Remove the rosemary and bay leaves. Since cooking dried beans or peas might not be possible in many school food service situations.

Stir the sausage into the cabbage.S p i c y Sau sag e w i t h B r a i s e d C a b b ag e Flavor Profile: African MAKES 4 WRAPS Braised cabbage with chunks of spicy sausage. Serve hot or warm. cored and shredded 1/2 4 large wraps or burrito-size flour tortillas teaspoon Kosher or coarse salt In a medium heavy-bottomed pan with a lid. add black-eyed peas and rice. finely chopped 1 small head of cabbage. 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil or butter 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper ounces spicy link sausage. and cook. S ug g est io n: To change the profile to Asian. replace the sausage with mushrooms and shredded chicken or pork. In the meantime. makes a hearty filling for wraps. For an even more substantial wrap. When hot. or wrap. stirring from time to time until the cabbage is very soft. Cook. in a medium frying pan over medium-high heat.ORG 91 . heat the olive oil or butter over medium-high heat. it over and over until you are at the other edge. heat the sausage until cooked through and the edges are browned. about 5 minutes. until the cabbage is shiny. Starting from the bottom. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. stirring. about 1 minute. such as Louisiana-style hot links. Place that edge on the bottom. about 15 minutes. about 20 minutes. cooking until soft. cut in half lengthwise and sliced 8 1 small onion. fold the end up about 3 inches. and then turn. then season with a little lime juice and soy sauce. add the onion and stir. Heat a wrap in the oven or on a hot griddle or in hot. Remove wrap from heat.ECOLITERACY. Place 1/2 to 3/4 cup of the cabbage mixture in the center of the wrap and spread out into a row. Add the shredded cabbage. dry frying pan. Fold each side over partway so that the body of the wrap is about 3 inches in diameter. Reduce the heat to low and cover.

They should still be firm. burrito-size tortillas. washed 1/8 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper teaspoon ground coriander (or coriander seeds ground in mortar pestle or spice grinder) 3 2 1/2 tablespoons canola or other oil tablespoons cumin seeds small onion. Although ground cumin can be used. red. yellow or white. cayenne. onion. add the cumin. then remove from heat. and chili. They are eaten as side dishes in folded pastry and are baked or folded into flatbreads like chapatti or other wraps. 1/2 pound boiling potatoes. When it is hot.ORG 92 . Sauté for 3 to 5 minutes. mix together the yogurt. In a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the potatoes and cook 10 to 15 minutes. Fold in potato cubes and turn them to coat with the oil and cumin/onion mixture. plus 3 to 5 whole cilantro sprigs 1 small serrano chili.C u r r i e d P o tat o e s i n C h a pat t i Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian MAKES 3 WRAPS Curried vegetables are an important part of Indian cooking. cut in half. cumin seeds provide a stronger flavor. Using fresh green herbs such as cilantro or mint adds both flavor and color. Remove from the water and let cool. Season with cilantro and salt. heat the oil. Place 1/2 cup of the curried potato mixture in the center of the wrap and spread it out into a cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. seeds removed and discarded.ECOLITERACY. turmeric. or chapatti cup plain nonfat yogurt teaspoon turmeric Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium heat. then minced 1/2 1/2 Kosher or coarse salt 3 large whole wheat wraps. In a bowl. Fold the yogurt mixture into the potatoes. Heat a wrap in the oven or on a hot griddle or in hot. dry frying pan. and coriander. Remove wrap from heat. diced 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro.

94.ECOLITERACY.Curried Potatoes in Chapatti. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Recipe on pages 92.ORG 93 .

or wrap. and then turn.row.ORG 94 . Starting from the bottom. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. fold the end up about 3 inches. it over and over until you are at the other edge. S ug g est io n: Substitute cooked sweet potatoes for the boiling potatoes. Fold two sides over partway so that the body of the wrap is about 3 inches in width.ECOLITERACY. Add several whole cilantro sprigs. Place that edge on the bottom.

but also give the vegetable a golden color. 2 1 1 tablespoons canola oil or butter teaspoon turmeric teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 teaspoon Kosher or coarse salt cups cauliflower florets. and reduce the heat to low. Remove from the pan and either place directly on two prepared pizza crusts and bake following the instructions for the pizza crust.ECOLITERACY. about 2 minutes. and salt and stir. or let cool and refrigerate until ready to use. ingredients such as turmeric and cumin are often used to season cauliflower.ORG 95 . turning often. cover. served on a base of traditional tomato sauce and cheese. broken into small florets 2 1/4 – 1/2 cup water In a medium or large saucepan over medium-high heat. S ug g est io n: Combine cauliflower florets with broccoli florets. They not only provide flavor. cumin. Add 1/4 cup of water.G o l d e n C au l i f low e r P i zz a Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian Makes enough to top two 14-inch pizzas In Indian cooking. about 5 minutes. Cook until the cauliflower is tender to a fork. heat the oil. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Add the turmeric. was met with a positive reception at Davis High School. This pizza topping. Add the cauliflower florets and stir until they are glistening with the spiced oil. adding more water if needed.

Recipe on page 97. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY.ORG 96 .Braised Leeks and Feta Cheese Pizza.

thinly sliced 1/2 teaspoon Kosher or coarse salt ounces feta cheese. white parts only.Braised Leeks and F e ta C h e e s e p i z z a Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean Makes enough to top two 14-inch pizzas A layer of braised leeks lends a smooth texture and a sweet. until the leeks are quite soft and lightly browned. add the leeks and stir. about 15 to 20 minutes. S ug g est io n: To create a Turkish flavor. add a little grated nutmeg to the leeks. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Spread the braised leeks on two prepared pizza crusts and sprinkle with the feta cheese.ECOLITERACY. When the butter foams. and elsewhere in Europe and the Middle East. where leeks are popular. Follow baking instructions for pizza crust. Remove the cover and cook. 2 1 3–4 tablespoons butter tablespoon extra virgin olive oil large leeks. Israel. melt the butter with the olive oil. cover. Greece. part of the Middle Eastern profile. mild onion flavor to the pizza. 10 to 15 minutes. and cook until the leeks have softened and have reduced in volume. and goes well with the slightly salty feta cheese favored in Bulgaria.ORG 97 . crumbled 6 In a medium frying pan over medium-high heat. stirring from time to time. Reduce the heat to low. Remove from heat.

and tender sugar snap peas appear along with the season’s first strawberries. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. California asparagus fills the market.SPRING As the days lengthen in springtime. young leafy greens become abundant. all of which allows for diverse use of the 6-5-4 School Lunch Matrix. Mandarins are still in season. along with cabbages and carrots.ORG 98 .ECOLITERACY.

Curried Carrot Soup. Recipe on page 104.

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99

Z u cc h i n i a n d F e ta
Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean Serves 4 – 6

This salad is an easy way to use the first of the season’s zucchini, and can be served through summer and into fall as well. Be sure to squeeze the grated zucchini very dry so that the salad will not be watery.

2 pounds zucchini
1/4

2
1/4

tablespoons minced fresh chives cup extra virgin olive oil tablespoon fresh lemon juice

pound feta cheese green onions, thinly sliced, including white part and about one-third of the green part

2

1

Kosher or sea salt Freshly ground pepper

1/4

cup chopped fresh mint

Using the large holes of a grater, grate the zucchini. With your hand, or in a cloth, squeeze the gratings very dry. In a bowl, toss together the zucchini, cheese, onions, mint, chives, olive oil, and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper.
S ug g est io n: Add a cup of cooked couscous or bulgur wheat to make a whole grain salad.

Halved cherry tomatoes could also be added.

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100

Chinese Chicken Salad
Flavor Profile: Asian Serves 6 – 8

Snow peas, which add a sweet crunch to this recipe, were an early spring crop in ancient China, harvested when snow was still on the ground, hence their name. Napa cabbage has a sweet, mild taste and can be used raw in salads, as it is here. Toasting the walnuts first will bring out their flavor.

4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts, or 2 to 3 cups shredded chicken
1/2

3 mandarins, 2 peeled and sectioned and 1 juiced
1/2

cup walnut meats, toasted 1 minute in a dry frying pan

cup vegetable oil
1/3

8– 10 wonton wrappers, cut into
1/3–inch

cup walnut oil or extra virgin olive oil

strips 1 1 2

1

head Napa cabbage (about 1 pound), cored and shredded, or 6 cups shredded Napa cabbage

tablespoon Chinese sesame oil tablespoon soy sauce tablespoons mandarin juice (or lime juice)

1/2

pound snow peas, stems snapped off and pods cut thinly

3 spring onions, or scallions, cut thinly (optional)

1/3

cup rice vinegar teaspoon Kosher or sea salt

1

Place the chicken breasts in a small saucepan with about 1 inch of water. Cover, and over medium-high heat, bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and simmer until the chicken is opaque, about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove the chicken and let it cool. With a fork and knife, pull cooked meat apart into shreds. Save chicken broth for another purpose. Heat vegetable oil in the same saucepan and add a small amount of the wonton strips, and cook until golden brown and crisp, about 10 seconds. With a slotted spoon, remove to paper towels to drain. Repeat with remaining strips.

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spring onions (if using). and walnuts in a large bowl to make the base of the salad. S ug g est io n: Add 1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger to add more spice. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Whisk in the soy sauce. replace chicken with tofu cubes sautéed to a golden brown in Chinese sesame oil. or. and dressing to the salad base. Add the shredded chicken. Toss and serve. mandarin orange sections. add the walnut and sesame oil. the mandarin or lime juice. won ton strips. Add salt and whisk. and the rice vinegar.ORG 102 .Combine shredded cabbage with the snow peas. for a vegetarian option.ECOLITERACY. In a separate small bowl.

white part only. Return to the pan and reheat to serving temperature.ECOLITERACY.ORG 103 . and garnish with the parsley and chives. chopped 3 spring onions. 4 cups low-fat. cooking until tender. reduce the heat to low. bring the broth to a boil. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. cover. about 10 to 15 minutes. butternut squash in fall. Using a food processor or blender. Ladle the soup into bowls. Add the sugar snap peas. use 1 pound thinly sliced asparagus. S ug g est io n: Instead of sugar snap peas. leek. and onions. ends snipped and coarsely chopped 1 large leek. You can change the main vegetable with the season: for example. process to a coarse purée. appealingly bright soup is a good spring menu item that incorporates different vegetables as well as fresh herbs. and broccoli in winter. try zucchini in summer. and simmer until the peas are tender.S p r i n g V e g e ta b l e S o u p Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean Serves 4 This healthy. chopped In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Season with salt and pepper and stir in the lemon juice. 10 to 15 minutes. low-sodium vegetable or chicken broth Kosher or sea salt Freshly ground pepper 1 2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice tablespoons chopped fresh Italian flat leaf parsley 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1 pound sugar snap peas. white part only.

extra virgin olive oil is substituted. minced 6 cups low-sodium. cover. low-fat chicken broth pounds carrots. turmeric. and broth. S ug g est io n: Butternut squash and sweet potatoes also lend themselves to curried flavors. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. heat the oil. 1 1/2 1 1 1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil large shallot. Drizzle with the remaining olive oil.ORG 104 . about 20 minutes. but it is possible to make your own blend. peeled and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons fresh orange juice Kosher or sea salt Freshly ground pepper 1 teaspoon curry powder In a large saucepan over medium heat. and cook until the carrots are tender. Add the carrots. Taste and season with salt and pepper. process to a smooth purée. cayenne. add the shallot and sauté until soft.ECOLITERACY. Remove from heat and add the orange juice. about 2 minutes. In lieu of ghee. and could be substituted for the carrots here for a fall version of the soup. When it is hot. This recipe calls for a commercial curry powder. curry powder. Reduce the heat to low. balancing cumin. Using a food processor or blender. or other chilis. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil.C u r r i e d C a r r ot S o u p Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian Serves 4 Sweet carrots lend themselves to the flavors of the complex spices found in curries. the clarified butter commonly used in Indian cooking.

diced 1 1/2 1/4 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper teaspoon chili powder 16-ounce cans red beans. and cook. When the oil is hot. Serve with rice. Reduce the heat to low and cover. about 10 minutes.R e d B e a n s . and here. a n d b e e f Flavor Profile: African Serves 4 Red beans over rice are a Southern favorite. about 6 minutes. Add 1 cup of the tomatoes and their juice. S p i n ac h .ECOLITERACY. pepper. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. until wilted. turning. heat the olive oil. stirring to crumble the meat. Add the spinach. drained 1 pound lean ground beef 1 bunch spinach. add the onions and sauté until translucent. over medium-high heat. about 2 minutes. cover. Simmer to allow the flavors to blend. and cook another 5 minutes. 1 1/2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil onion. and cook until opaque. and chili powder. stemmed and finely chopped 1 – 1/2 cups canned chopped tomatoes and their juice 2 In a large frying pan. the salt. Finely chopping the spinach adds the extra nutritional value of green vegetables without changing the customary flavor of the dish. about 1 minute. Add the beef. some ground beef and spinach are added as well.ORG 105 . Add the remaining tomatoes and stir in the beans.

ORG 106 . Recipe on page 105.Red Beans.ECOLITERACY. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. and Beef. Spinach.

stir together the black beans.ORG 107 . cooking until the meat has changed color but is still pink. Add 1 tablespoon of the oil and set aside to marinate for 30 minutes. a common Asian ingredient.B e e f a n d A s pa r a g u s Flavor Profile: Asian Serves 4 Fermented black beans. about 30 seconds to 1 minute. Sauce Main Dish 2 tablespoons fermented black beans 2 1 2 teaspoons light soy sauce teaspoon sherry vinegar teaspoons cornstarch teaspoon sugar teaspoon Kosher or sea salt 2 garlic cloves. and soy sauce. When the beef is ready. garlic. minced 1/2 1 piece fresh ginger. In a bowl large enough to hold the beef. sliced paper-thin across the grain 3 tablespoons corn or canola oil 1 pound asparagus. vinegar. and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt. Pour in the black cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Stir in the beef and coat well. ginger. in a small bowl. and fresh ginger are used here to make a sauce for the beef and the fresh spring asparagus. 1/2 1/2 tablespoons sherry vinegar teaspoon light soy sauce 1 pound beef sirloin. and stir. cornstarch. Set aside. 2 to 3 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. 1 peeled and minced 2 1 inches. vinegar.ECOLITERACY. Put the beef and its marinade in the hot oil. Stir to mix and dissolve the cornstarch. trimmed and cut on the diagonal into thin slices To make the sauce. heat the remaining oil in a wok or deep frying pan and sauté the asparagus until bright green. sugar. over-medium high heat. about 1 inch thick. combine the soy sauce.

ORG 108 .bean mixture and continue to cook just until the meat is cooked through. Serve with rice.ECOLITERACY. another 1 to 2 minutes. just to warm the asparagus. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Stir in the asparagus to cook another 30 seconds.

and 4 tablespoons of the oil. minced chilis. about 6 minutes per side.) Remove the chicken. Here. Place chicken in marinade and let stand for up to 3 hours. or a combination of chicken thighs.C h i c k e n Ya s s a Flavor Profile: African Serves 6-8 This dish is juicy.ORG 109 . heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil and sauté the chicken. the better. thinly sliced teaspoons Kosher or sea salt teaspoon fresh ground pepper teaspoon chili powder tablespoons canola oil 11/2 – 2 cups chicken broth 4 carrots. 1 teaspoon of the salt. until golden.ECOLITERACY. about 5 to 10 minutes. stirring often. Remove from pan. until the onion is soft and reduced in volume. (The longer. Add the onions and their marinade to the pan and cook. seeds removed and minced 4 2 1 1/2 large onions. over medium-high heat. 1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 frying chicken (about 4 pounds). In a large sauté or frying pan. pepper. where this recipe originates. The onions will begin to wilt and release their liquid into the marinade. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. chicken fricassée. breasts. chili powder. Place the chicken pieces in the pan with the onions and add the chicken broth. onions. cut into rounds about 1/3 inch thick 1 10 tablespoon Dijon mustard ounces whole wheat pasta shells 6 In a large bowl. which makes sense given the French influence in western African countries like Senegal. prepare the marinade by combining the lemon juice. almost like a French onion soup. cut into 8 pieces. Chicken Yassa is also reminiscent of another French dish. and drumsticks 2 serrano chilis. The sweetness of the carrot complements the acid of the lemon. turning. Add a few tablespoons of the chicken broth if necessary to keep the onions from sticking to the bottom of the pan. the chicken is served bone-in over large whole wheat pasta shells which can absorb the generous amount of broth.

Add carrots and cook until the carrots are just tender and the onions very soft. Reduce the heat to medium and cook until tender to the bite. bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. reduce the heat to medium-low. In the meantime. S ug g e st io n: Serve over long-grain brown rice to make a rice bowl. add the pasta and the remaining salt. about 20 minutes. and cook until the chicken is nearly cooked through. When boiling. Drain the pasta and spoon into bowls. Stir in the Dijon mustard. about 10 to 12 minutes. topped with a piece of chicken and lots of sauce.ECOLITERACY.Cover. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ORG 110 . about another 15 minutes.

tossing to coat well. and toss again. Add the vegetables. Cook the noodles in boiling water until tender. Vary the vegetables according to the season. about 5 minutes.ECOLITERACY. Drain and rinse. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Serve warm or cold. Place in a bowl and add the sauce.ORG 111 .Asian Noodles with lime chili s a u c e a n d S p r i n g V e g e ta b l e s Flavor Profile: asian Serves 6 Plump soba noodles are the choice here. 8 ounces dried soba noodles or whole wheat spaghetti noodles 1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro leaves Sauce 1/3 1 cup fresh lime juice tablespoons Vietnamese or Thai fish sauce tablespoon chopped fresh mint leaves 2 vegetables 1 1/2 cup shredded carrots cup thinly sliced sugar snap or snow peas 1 2 1/4 teaspoon soy sauce teaspoons sugar cup finely shredded peeled carrot 1/2 cup thinly sliced spring onions or minced red onion 1/2– 1 1/2 teaspoon Thai-style chili paste teaspoon dried chili flakes 1/2 1/2 cup chopped cilantro leaves cup chopped mint leaves Combine the sauce ingredients and whisk well. but whole wheat spaghetti could be used as well.

ECOLITERACY.ORG 112 .Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Recipe on page 111.

stirring. drained and rinsed 5 whole grain or other flour tortillas. cabbage. and wrap. Black Bean Filling Other ingredients 1 1/2 tablespoon vegetable oil onion. or diced chicken 1/2 red onion. and vinegar. purée about 1 1/2 cups of the bean mixture and return to the pot. add corn fresh off the cob to the mix. Season with salt and pepper. burrito-size 1 1 3 1 1 2 2 2 cups cooked. Add the broth.ECOLITERACY. Spread a tortilla with some of the beans. chicken. mixed with 1–2 teaspoons sugar Kosher or sea salt Freshly ground pepper To make the black beans. In summer. add the onion and sauté until translucent. and 1/2 teaspoon salt. red onion. then stir in the cumin. minced teaspoon cumin teaspoon chili powder garlic cloves. When it is hot. including white part and about one-third of the green part 1 1/2 – 2 cups Mexican crema or sour cream. and spring onion. minced tomato. and vegetables that combines the fresh tastes of spring with the flavors typical of the Yucatan region of Mexico. Simmer to blend the flavors. beans. The beans should have a little liquid. shredded cups shredded cabbage 2 2 1/2 cup chopped spring onions. finely chopped carrots.ORG 113 . garlic. In a blender or food processor. about 10 minutes. shredded.Y u c ata n W r a p Flavor Profile: Latin American Makes 5 wraps This is a simple mixture of black beans. tomato. about 2 minutes. carrots. heat the vegetable oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Drizzle with the crema or sour cream sauce. chopped tablespoon red wine vinegar cups low-sodium chicken broth 141/2-ounce cans black beans. chili powder. add the chicken. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

ECOLITERACY. The mixture could also be spooned into crispy tortilla bowls lined with leaf lettuce or layered into a “to-go” cup.S ug g e st io n: To make an entrée salad. spoon the bean mixture.ORG 114 . on top of leaf lettuce and add tortilla chips. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. along with the chicken and vegetables.

Recipe on pages 113–114.Yucatan Wrap.ECOLITERACY.ORG 115 . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

crumble in the beef and cook until nearly browned. and cook until the rice is nearly tender and most of the broth absorbed. covered. about 5 to 7 minutes. and stir until the noodles are golden brown. chopped spinach leaves 1/2 1/2 1 1/2 1/4 cups long-grain rice cup chopped onion 3 1/2 cups low-sodium. about 4 minutes. reduce the heat to low. When it is hot. prepare the meat and mushrooms. shehrehi yeghintz. Add the broth and bring to a boil. Add the salt. broken vermicelli noodles 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1 pound lean ground beef 6 2 ounces mushrooms. cut in half In a medium saucepan over medium heat. nonfat chicken broth teaspoon Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper 1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt wraps 6 whole wheat or other tortillas. which incorporates both pasta and rice. In a medium frying pan. Rice mixture Beef and Mushroom Filling 2 1 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil cup fine. While the rice mixture is cooking. sliced cups stemmed. about 2 minutes. Add the rice and onions and stir until the rice is opaque and glistening. S p i n a c h . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. about 5 minutes. as well as vegetables. or 3 pita breads.Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with B e e f. burrito-size. about 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. a n d M u s h r o o m s Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian Makes 6 wraps This is based on a hearty dish popular in Armenian cooking. When hot. Cover.ECOLITERACY. heat the olive oil. for 5 minutes. Put the mushrooms in the pan and sauté until soft and their juices are released.ORG 116 . add the vermicelli.

Return the beef to the pan, add the spinach, and season with salt and pepper. To finish, combine the rice mixture and the beef mixture. Spoon some down the middle of each of the 6 tortillas and wrap, burrito-style. Alternatively, spoon the mixture into pita bread pockets.
S ug g e st io n: In summer, instead of spinach, use chopped, sautéed eggplant, a favorite

Armenian vegetable, sautéing it before adding the beef.

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A s pa r a g u s a n d M u s h r o o m PIZZA
Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean Makes enough to top two 14-inch pizzas

Asparagus is a quintessential spring vegetable, and versatile enough to be used in stir-fries, pastas, soups, salads, and, here, as a pizza topping. Use as many types of mushrooms as you can find. Herbes de Provence is a mixture of aromatic dried herbs found in the hills of southern France, and is readily available in most stores here. The mixture typically includes thyme, rosemary, bay, basil, and savory.

5

tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/2

teaspoon freshly ground pepper teaspoon dried Herbes de Provence, or substitute dried thyme

1 pound asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1–inch pieces on the diagonal 1 pound mushrooms, various types, sliced
1/2

1

teaspoon Kosher or sea salt

In a large frying pan, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. When hot, add the asparagus and sauté until the pieces turn bright green and are just tender to a fork, about 3 minutes. Remove and set aside. Add the mushrooms and cook until the juices have evaporated and they are soft, about 3 minutes. Return the asparagus to the pan, and season with salt, pepper, and herbs. Spread the topping on each of two 14-inch prepared pizza crusts and bake following the instructions for the pizza crust.
S ug g est io n: Add crumbled feta cheese and pitted Kalamata olives for a Middle Eastern

flavor.

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C h i l i B e e f w i t h S p i n ac h p i z z a
Flavor Profile: Latin American Makes enough to top two 14-inch pizzas

Adding a hint of cinnamon and clove to the ground beef, along with chili powder, gives the meat a depth of flavor reminiscent of Mexican mole sauce. Although the spinach can be finely chopped if desired, the wilted whole leaves make a green background for the ground beef that is very appealing.

2

tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/4 1/8

teaspoon ground cloves teaspoon cayenne (optional) teaspoon chili powder cups water

1 pound lean ground beef 1
1/2 1/4

teaspoon Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 – 1/2

4

2 bunches spinach, stems removed

In a medium frying pan over medium-high heat, heat the olive oil. When it is hot, add the ground beef, crumbling it in. Sprinkle with the salt, pepper, cinnamon, cloves, cayenne (if using), and chili powder. Cook, stirring, until the meat is lightly browned, about 5 minutes. In a medium saucepan, bring the water to a boil. Add the spinach and blanch just until wilted and bright green, about 45 seconds to 1 minute. Drain and pat dry. Chop if desired. On each of two 14-inch prepared pizza crusts, first spread the spinach and then top with the meat. Bake following the instructions for the pizza crust.

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as well as soups that can be served chilled for a change of pace. eggplant. and okra.ORG 120 .ECOLITERACY. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. cucumbers. chilis. beans.SUMMER Summer cooking in California means cooking with an abundance of juicy tomatoes. corn. sweet peppers. It is the easiest time of year to compose salads. zucchini.

ORG 121 . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. and Thai Basil. Tofu.Soba Noodles with Eggplant. Recipe on page 129.ECOLITERACY. shown here with the suggested substitution of whole wheat spaghetti for soba noodles.

and the pepper and mix well. Olives could be added as well. using a fork. Serve at room temperature. This dish has proved to be a favorite of students when piloted in the City of Davis schools. break into flakes. tomatoes. combine the still-hot penne. Drain well. and tuna. Add 1 teaspoon of the salt and the penne.ORG 122 . the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour before serving. cilantro. Put in a small bowl. stir well. lemon juice. rinsed and drained pound whole wheat penne tablespoons fresh lemon juice tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/4 1/4 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley cup chopped fresh basil cup chopped fresh cilantro cup halved cherry tomatoes 2 2 1 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper Drain the tuna. basil. while the abundant fresh herbs and lemon juice provide character and the basil and tomatoes give the taste of local summer produce. Bring a large pot filled with water to a boil. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. and turn and mix gently. and cook until tender to the bite. parsley. Taste and adjust the seasoning. about 12 minutes. and. 1 1 1/2 1/2 6-ounce can olive oil-packed tuna teaspoons Kosher or sea salt 2 teaspoons capers.W h o l e W h e at P e n n e s a l a d with Tuna and Capers Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean Serves 4 The oil-packed tuna adds flavor and texture to this Mediterranean salad. In a large bowl. olive oil.ECOLITERACY. Add the capers.

cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. and sugar and mix. Refrigerate 30 minutes before serving. In a medium serving bowl. and seeded 1 jalapeÑo or serrano chili. cilantro. vinegar. sliced. omitting the chilis for the elementary level.Thai Cucumber Salad Flavor Profile: Asian Serves 2 This refreshing. and onion in layers. chili. combine the water. seeds removed. It can be used as a side salad or a component on the salad bar.ORG 123 .ECOLITERACY. 2 6 1/2 tablespoons water tablespoons rice wine vinegar teaspoon Kosher or sea salt tablespoon sugar cucumber. peeled. thinly sliced In a small bowl. cool salad is served to accompany many different dishes in Thai cooking. arrange the cucumber. salt. Pour the vinegar mixture over the salad. chopped 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 1/2 1 1 yellow onion.

Recipe on page 125.Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY.ORG 124 .

ECOLITERACY. low-sodium chicken broth 1 1/2 cups plain yogurt tablespoons chopped fresh mint garlic clove. garlic. Stir well before serving and garnish with the finely chopped cucumber and the remaining tablespoon of mint. the two are combined to make a cooling summer soup. chopped large slice coarse. peeled. Season with salt and pepper. seeded and finely chopped 1/2 cup low-fat.ORG 125 .C h i l l e d C u c u m b e r a n d Yo g u r t s o u p Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian Serves 4 Yogurt and cucumbers are staples of Middle Eastern and Indian meals. seeded and coarsely chopped 1/2 yellow onion. onion. Chill for two hours or up to overnight. 2 1/2 cucumbers. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. sourdoughtype bread. 1 tablespoon of the mint. combine the coarsely chopped cucumber. crust removed 1 1/2 cucumber. minced 2 1 Kosher or sea salt Freshly ground pepper In a food processor or blender. and broth. Process to a smooth puree. peeled. S ug g est io n: In summer. Here. add 1 cup green grapes and 1/2 cup finely ground almonds to give the soup a Spanish twist similar to that country’s white gazpacho. bread. yogurt.

set aside the drumsticks. over high heat. Ajiaco calls for guasca. rich and creamy. cilantro. cubed 1 pound Purple potatoes. 2 breast halves 1 2 onion (if making your own broth) garlic cloves (if making your own broth) 1 bay leaf (if making your own broth) 2 1 teaspoon Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper 1 bunch green onions. Here. called Ajiaco in its place of origin. Colombia. three kinds are used. Bogotá. Simmer for 1 hour along with an onion. a green herb that grows in Colombia and can be found in Latin American grocery stores. 2 legs. it can feature many kinds of potatoes. avocado. cut into four pieces each 3 tablespoons dried Guasca. cut into 6 pieces. If making your own broth. The accompaniments are important to the dish—cream. or cup fresh (optional) 3 avocados. the soup is also delicious without it. the different textures of which contribute to the flavor of the soup. and in Colombia. thighs. chopped 1 pound Yukon Gold yellow potatoes. or chicken pieces: 2 thighs. peeled and cut into chunks 1 3 cup heavy cream ounces capers 1/2 1 chicken (about 3 pounds). and breast of the whole chicken. diced very small 1 bunch fresh cilantro. chopped. and put the remainder of the chicken in the water. cubed 3 ears of corn.ECOLITERACY. 8 cups water or chicken broth (if not using the whole chicken) 1 1/2 pounds Russet potatoes. bring the water or the broth to a boil. 2 garlic cloves and a bay leaf.ORG 126 . Its consistency is between a broth and a stew. including about 2 inches of the green part In a Dutch oven. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.C o r n a n d P o tat o S o u p Flavor Profile: Latin American Serves 6 This soup. is served throughout South America. and capers. Though there is no substitute for guasca.

Remove the chicken parts and set aside. Serve with these accompaniments. cover. cream. S ug g e st io n: Make a vegetarian soup by using a full-flavored vegetable broth and omitting the chicken. Cook for 10 to 15 minutes. and simmer until the chicken is tender and separating slightly from the bones. and chicken parts to the broth. pepper. Ladle some soup over the corn and chicken until each bowl is three-quarters full.ORG 127 . Add the corn. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Add the remaining potatoes and cook over low heat for 10 minutes. place one piece each of corn and chicken.If you’ve made your own broth. capers and the remaining cilantro. half the cilantro. about 25 minutes. Add the salt. each in their own dish. about 1 minute. remove the chicken carcass. Stir the broth vigorously until creamy. and stir it into the soup. russet potatoes. Guasca (if using).ECOLITERACY. Into each individual bowl. Reduce the heat to low. green onions. Leave room for the avocado.

combine the basil. drizzle in the olive oil to make a paste. 2 6 cups fresh basil leaves tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese 7 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil Kosher or sea salt Freshly ground pepper 16 ounces whole wheat rigatoni or other pasta 1/4 cup walnut meats garlic clove. bring a large pot of water to a boil. introducing them through the rich. Parmesan. robust flavor of basil pesto that is familiar to and well liked by students.ECOLITERACY. or as an entrée salad with chicken added.ORG 128 . Over high heat. and garlic and process until finely chopped. and cook until al dente. S ug g est io n: This can also be served cold or at room temperature as part of the salad bar. Add the pasta.Wa l n u t P e s t o w i t h W h o l e W h e at R i g at o n i Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean Serves 6 This is a good way to add walnuts to the diet. Drain and toss with the walnut paste. reduce the heat to medium-high. Taste and add salt and pepper as desired. walnuts. mashed 1 In a blender or food processor. While processing.B a s i l . cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. about 12 minutes.

Set aside. about 3–4 minutes. Add the lemon juice. They may be served hot or chilled.SOBA N o o d l e s w i t h E g g p l a n t. Place a serving of cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. and 2 tablespoons of water. In a small bowl. Reduce the heat and cook until lightly golden. Heat the vegetable oil in a medium frying pan until hot. and add the eggplant. 14 4 3–4 3 ounces dried soba noodles tablespoons sesame oil tablespoons vegetable oil Japanese eggplants. thinly sliced 1/4 1/4 cup soy sauce cup almond butter In a large pot of boiling water. nutty-flavored. shaking back and forth to remove the starch. Set aside to cool. stirring well. yet firm and not soggy. cut into 3/4-inch cubes 8–10 leaves fresh Thai or other basil. slightly chewy Japanese soba noodles are made from buckwheat flour.ORG 129 . minced teaspoon minced fresh ginger cubes or rounds Dash of cayenne pepper. cook the noodles until soft. garlic. unpeeled and cut into 3/4-inch 1 teaspoon lemon juice or rice vinegar 1 1/4 garlic clove. mixing well. Add the tofu and stir until golden brown. combine the soy sauce and the almond butter. sesame oil. or chili oil 2 or more tablespoons water (about 2 cups) 1/2 pound extra–firm tofu. To f u. 4–5 minutes or as instructed on the package. Drain the noodles in a colander. stirring. hot pepper. about 4 minutes. a n d T h a i B as i l Flavor Profile: Asian Serves 8 These light brown. cayenne pepper. used in soups and stir-fry. Drain them again and put in a serving bowl.ECOLITERACY. ginger. then rinse them well under cold water. Pour the sesame oil over them and toss to coat well. Pour the sauce over noodles and mix carefully so that all of the soba noodles are coated.

cut into strips.noodles in a bowl. S ug g e st i o n: Add an English cucumber. Serve cold or at room temperature.ORG 130 . to introduce a crunchy texture and cool flavor. Replace soba noodles with one 16-ounce package of oriental-style rice noodle sticks (bánh pho my-tho). S ug g e st i o n: Whole wheat spaghetti can be substituted for soba noodles. and garnish with chiffonade of Thai basil. cooking very quickly in hot water for 2 minutes. top with eggplant/tofu mixture. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.ECOLITERACY.

diced 2 cups fresh tomatoes with their juice. cut in half 3 1/4 1/4 large potatoes. Add the tomatoes. diced teaspoon cayenne pepper teaspoon dried chili flakes teaspoon kosher salt 2 yellow onions. Spoon over rice to serve.s u mm e r c h i c k e n S t e w Flavor Profile: African Serves 8 All over Africa. S ug g est io n: In winter or spring. low-sodium chicken stock or water 4 large chicken breasts. Add the onions and peppers. using whatever vegetables are in season. chili flakes. stirring frequently. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. substitute canned tomatoes for fresh. are a specialty. about 5 minutes on each side. over medium heat. potatoes. chicken stews are popular. with bone and skin. 4 tablespoons canola or other vegetable oil 21/2 cups low-fat.ORG 131 . and salt. This version uses summer’s juicy tomatoes and sweet bell peppers. Chicken stews made with peanuts. seeded and diced 1 In a Dutch oven or other large heavy-bottomed pan with tight-fitting lid. about 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to low and simmer until the chicken is tender. or groundnuts as they are called in Africa. about 5 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings. Add the chicken and cook until the skin is golden. until the onions are translucent. warm the oil. cayenne pepper. chopped 1 green or red pepper.ECOLITERACY. and the peppers slightly soft. continue cooking. chicken stock.

until the meat is hot.Chili Verde Flavor Profile: Latin American Serves 4 This bright green sauce. For a spicier version for secondary students. Put in a blender or food processor with the tomatillos. but it does give the sauce a nice. S ug g est io n: Change the flavor profile to Mediterranean by using 5 fresh tomatoes. about 3-5 minutes. bring to a simmer.ECOLITERACY. full of vegetables and herbs. 10 fresh tomatillos 6 sprigs fresh cilantro 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 Anaheim chilis 1 small onion 2 garlic cloves Kosher or sea salt 2 cups cooked shredded or chopped pork or chicken Remove dry husks from the tomatillos and toast the fruit in a dry frying pan until soft. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. add 2 or 3 minced serrano chilis. Put the sauce in a pan. about 5-7 minutes. and cilantro.ORG 132 . stirring. is often added to chicken or pork. Put them in a medium saucepan and cover with water. garlic. To serve. Under a broiler. Taste and adjust for salt. and vegetable oil. roast the chilis until charred. Add the chicken or pork and cook. and over medium-high heat. chilis. slightly smoky. flavor. It is not necessary to toast the tomatillos or roast the chilis. and parsley instead of the tomatillos. spoon over rice. 1 teaspoon chili flakes. 1 sweet red or green pepper. so the sauce is suitable for all grade levels. turning several times. cilantro. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and cook until soft and tender. The Anaheim chilis used are mild. Remove the skin and seeds and coarsely chop the flesh. onion.

ORG 133 . pepper. sour cream. husked and rinsed 3 serrano chilis or 1 jalapeÑo chili.ECOLITERACY. peeled and finely chopped 1 1/2 1 1/2 1 bunch green onions. white and green parts. in a bowl. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. and roll it up. milk. For the filling. Serve warm corn tortillas on the side. finely chopped 1 1/2 cups water cup chopped fresh cilantro cups sliced or chopped canned black olives 1/2 Preheat oven to 350ºF. olives. stemmed. and minced 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 1/4 1/2 1/2 cups low-fat sour cream cup 2% or low-fat milk teaspoon Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper teaspoons ground cumin 1 medium white onion. sliced 3 large garlic cloves. seeded. cumin. 1/2 pound Monterey Jack cheese.C h e e s e E n c h i l a da s w i t h T o m at i l l o S a u c e Flavor Profile: Latin American Makes 12 enchiladas These enchiladas are a flavorful and filling vegetarian entrée. They are a complete meal when served with rice and refried black or pinto beans. reserving about 1/2 cup of each. combine the cheeses. diced corn tortillas 1/2 pound sharp Cheddar cheese. grated 1 pound (about 10–12) tomatillos. green onions. Place rolled tortillas next to each other in a 9-inch by 12-inch baking dish. and green chilis. salt. One large can of green enchilada sauce may be used as a substitute for making sauce from scratch using tomatillos. grated 1 12 cup canned green chilis. Take each tortilla. and a little guacamole or salsa. place a third to a half cup of filling in it.

then transfer to a food processor or blender. Roast the tomatillos and chilis together on a baking sheet four inches below a very hot broiler until darkly roasted. Add 1 1/2 cups of water and the cilantro.ORG 134 . even blackened in spots. husk the tomatillos. Cover filled and rolled tortillas with the tomatillo sauce (or canned green enchilada sauce) and sprinkle remaining cheese on top. and add the tomatillo purée all at once. allowing the cheese to melt.ECOLITERACY. When it is hot. including juice that has run out onto the baking sheet. add the onion and cook. remove the foil. Stir until noticeably darker and very thick. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. In a medium saucepan over medium heat. about 3 minutes. Serve warm. For the last 10 minutes or so. This will blister the tomatillos. S ug g e st io n: Add shredded chicken to the cheese mixture. stirring regularly. Cool. about 7 minutes.To make the tomatillo sauce. heat the oil. Stir in the garlic and cook a minute longer. until golden. about 4–5 minutes. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 30–45 minutes. Stir thoroughly. Increase the heat to medium-high. Process until smoothly puréed. Flip them over and roast the other side for 4–5 minutes.

S ug g est io n: Add thinly sliced zucchini to the tomatoes.ECOLITERACY. 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 10 fresh basil leaves.F r e s h T o m at o a n d M ozz a r e l l a p i zz a Flavor Profile: European/Mediterranean Makes enough to top one 14-inch pizza This is a simple pizza topping for summertime. when tomatoes are at their peak flavor. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. sliced or grated Rub pizza crust with the olive oil. Layer with the tomatoes and basil. Follow baking instructions for pizza crust. coarsely chopped 1 pound fresh plum or other tomatoes. thinly sliced 1/3 –1/2 pound Mozzarella cheese.ORG 135 . then cover with the cheese. Throughout Europe this is called Pizza Margarita.

crumble in the ground beef and cook. ground beef is used. M i n t. another 1 to 2 minutes. tomatoes. a n d O n i o n Flavor Profile: Middle Eastern/Indian Makes 4 pita pockets In Middle Eastern neighborhoods.ECOLITERACY. from which they cut thin slices of meat that they tuck into a warm pita or other flatbread and season well with onions. vendors have upright spits of seasoned lamb roasting. Add 3 sprigs cilantro and 1 each of mint and parsley to each half. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. T o m at o . minced teaspoon Kosher or sea salt teaspoon freshly ground pepper whole wheat pitas. Stir in the garlic and cook until soft. stirring until lightly browned. 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1/2 red onion. Warm the pita halves. about 5 minutes. over medium-high heat. thinly sliced 1 pound lean ground beef 1 1 1/2 12 sprigs fresh cilantro 4 sprigs fresh mint 4 sprigs fresh parsley 4 1 tablespoons sour cream tablespoon lemon juice garlic clove. When hot. cut in half 2 2 medium tomatoes. heat the olive oil. and herbs. Spoon 1/4 of the beef mixture into each pita half.ORG 136 . chopped In a medium frying pan. Mix the sour cream and lemon juice together and add one tablespoon to each pita half.S t y l e P i ta w i t h G r o u n d B e e f. and divide the tomatoes and onions equally among the halves.G y r o . Sprinkle with the salt and pepper. In this version.

Mint. and Onion.Gyro-Style Pita with Ground Beef. Recipe on page 136.ECOLITERACY. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Tomato.ORG 137 .

shucked and kernels removed In a small frying pan over medium-high heat. In a bowl. Any color corn may be used. Place the topping on two prepared 14-inch pizza crusts and bake. a n d S p i c y Sau sag e p i z z a Flavor Profile: African Makes enough to top two 14-inch pizzas This flavorful. When it is hot.Fresh Corn. S ug g est io n: Omit the sausage and add additional vegetables in season. about 3/4-inch 2 Andouille sausages. easy-to-make pizza topping reflects two of summer’s colorful vegetables—okra and corn. such as a sliced or diced crookneck yellow squash. about 4 minutes. combine the sausage and okra with the corn and mix. heat the oil. sliced on the diagonal about 1/3 pieces inch thick 1 ear fresh corn. following the baking instructions for pizza crust. to make a vegetarian pizza.ECOLITERACY. Okra.ORG 138 . sauté the sausage and the okra until the sausage is lightly browned and the okra turns golden. 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 cup sliced fresh okra. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW.

sweet red peppers
• All red peppers start out green, then turn red. • Red peppers have calcium for healthy bones.

winter squash
• Squash has Vitamin A for healthy eyes. • Orange vegetables help you have healthy hair.

cabbage
• Cabbage is related to broccoli and cauliflower. • Cabbage has lots of Vitamin C.

rethinking school lunch

apples
• Apples have healthy natural sugars. • Apples have lots of fiber.

co o k i n g w i t h c a l i f o r n i a f o o d i n K-1 2 s c h o o l s

Nut r it ion Educat ion Car ds and Hospital it y Tr aining For School Nut r it ion Se rvice s Staf f

chard
• Chard has iron for a strong body. • Chard has Vitamin A for healthy eyes.

tomatoes
• California grows most of the tomatoes in the United States. • Tomatoes have lots of Vitamin C.

strawberries
• Strawberries have more Vitamin C than oranges. • California grows most of the strawberries in the United States.

mandarins
• Mandarins have Vitamin A for healthy eyes. • Orange fruits help your heart stay healthy.

beets
• Beets are roots. • Beets have Vitamin B for strong fingernails.

spinach
• Spinach has Vitamin A for healthy eyes. • Spinach has Vitamin C for fighting colds.

kiwifruit
• Kiwifruit grows on a vine. • California grows most of the kiwifruit in the United States.

sugar snap peas
• You can eat sugar snap peas raw or cooked. • Sugar snap peas have iron, for a strong body.

plums
• Plums are related to roses. • Plums have Vitamin C for fighting colds.

To support professional development training, download and free nutrition education cards from the CEL website at www.ecoliteracy.org/downloads/nutrition-education-cards.

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Resources
Here are some suggestions for sourcing local, in-season products and resources for additional recipes and flavor profile information.

Sources for Local, In-Season Produce
School d i st r i c ts’ p r od u c e d i st r i b u to r s

These companies may be able to assist, and normally have a specialist in house who will be familiar with local farmers.

Certifie d fa r m er s’ m a r kets

Local farmers’ market managers know the farmers in a wide region. They may assist the farmers who sell at their market with direct marketing opportunities, such as to school districts. To find a local farmers’ market and its contact information, go to the California Federation of Certified Farmers’ Markets website (www.cafarmersmarkets.com/index.cfm). Certification is given by the California Department of Food and Agriculture through the local county agricultural commissioner’s office. Farmers affirm that they have grown the food they are selling.

Communi t y A l l i a n c e w i t h Fa m i ly Fa r m e r s (CAFF)

This statewide organization advocates for California family farmers and sustainable agriculture. CAFF has developed local food guides as a part of its Buy Fresh Buy Local campaign. The guides cover various regions around California and are searchable online and downloadable from CAFF’s website (www.caff.org). Buy Fresh Buy Local also has its own website with a search engine (http://guide.buylocalca.org/index.html).

Slow Fo od USA

Slow Food has a program nationally focused on improving school lunch. To find the closest chapter, go to the Slow Food USA website (www.slowfoodusa.org). They frequently fundraise to support projects.

Fa rm-to-sc hool p r og r a m s

These programs connect schools with local farms with the objectives of serving healthy meals in school cafeterias, improving student nutrition, and supporting local farmers. Farmto-school is a nationwide movement that connects school food services with farmers who

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can provide fresh, seasonal produce. To learn more, try these websites: Center for Ecoliteracy (www.ecoliteracy.org); California Department of Education (www.cde.ca.gov); California Farm to School (www.cafarmtoschool.org).

Resources for Further Flavor Profile Information and Seasonal Recipes
Cookbooks a n d f ood m ag a z i n e s

There are many, many cookbooks that reflect the five flavor profiles presented here. Many are specific to cuisines of particular regions, such as Japanese, Southeast Asian, Thai, Vietnamese, Korean, West African, North African, Italian, Greek, Sicilian, Spanish, Armenian, Turkish, French, Irish, Polish, Bulgarian, and numerous others. Many cookbooks are also organized by season. Food magazines offer seasonal recipes in multiple flavor profiles and are a good source of ideas.

On line a n d t el ev i si on

The World Wide Web offers tens of thousands of recipes in huge diversity, and there are many food/cooking shows on television that can provide seasonal information and recipes.

Commun i t y m em ber s a n d n u t r i ti o n s e rv i c e s sta f f

The ethnic diversity of California is reflected in community members and nutrition services staff, and they can be excellent resources for authentic ethnic recipes and information to further the culinary education of food service staff.

Ha rvest of t he M on t h ( HOM)

Produced by California Department of Public Health, HOM has a toolkit with downloadable teaching resources, including recipes that match seasonal listings of fruits and vegetables. These are available free of charge at the HOM website (www.harvestofthemonth.com).

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We offer our deep thanks to the team from the Center for Ecoliteracy. and Winters school districts. and the University of California at Davis Center for Nutrition in Schools. and dissemination of Cooking with California Food in K–12 Schools. writing. Oakland. of the research. P u blisher Edito r Designer Projec t Manager Produ c tion Assist ance Proofrea ders Zenobia Barlow Michael K.ECOLITERACY. The 6-5-4 approach was developed through a cooking school offered over three years to Davis Joint Unified School District personnel and to nutrition services staff of the Oakland Unified and Winters Joint Unified School Districts. who were instrumental in shepherding this project at every stage from its conception through its completion. The material on whole grains in this book is adapted from the Cooks Camp handbook. UC Davis Dining Services by Sodexo. Novick cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. We are grateful for the support of the nutrition services directors of the Davis. design.ORG 142 . Stone Karen Brown Jim Koulias Monica Bueb Kate Willsky Mark Rhynsburger In d exer Amy E. publication. This approach was also presented at a “Cooks Camp” made possible by a partnership among the Yolo County Agricultural Marketing Initiative.Acknowledgments We extend our sincere appreciation to TomKat Charitable Trust for their generous support. through the Center for Ecoliteracy.

128 bean sprouts. and Beef. 28 Tabbouleh. 111. Spinach. 138 Gumbo. 81–82 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage. 60. 79 Chinese Chicken Salad. 86–87 broccoli Broccoli. 69 Rice Noodles with Bok Choy. and Mushrooms. in Corn and Potato Soup. Raisin. 90 Chicken Yassa. African flavor profile. 58 Zucchini and Feta (suggestion). 119 Gyro-Style Pita with Ground Beef. 101–2 Coconut Mandarin Soup. Tofu. and Hominy. 87 Spring Vegetable Soup (suggestion). 100 butternut squash curried butternut squash soup (suggestion). 106 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 67 black beans. 113–14. 115 beef Albondigas. 36–37 Black-Eyed Peas with Chard. 55. Vegetable. 104 cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. 90 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage (suggestion). Turkey. 69 Beef and Asparagus. 51. 107–8 Broccoli. 115 black-eyed peas. 131 Albondigas. 38–39 Asian Cabbage and Orange Salad with Ginger. 137 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 109–10 Fresh Corn. 91 Summer Chicken Stew. 61–62 Asian flavor profile. 91 Thai Cucumber Salad. 126–27 Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni. 103 avocados. Spinach. 129–30 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage (suggestion). 112 Beef and Asparagus. 51. Spinach. 90 Red Beans. 95 Vegetable Biryani (suggestion). 103 bulgur. 79 broccoli and sweet red peppers (suggestion). Mint. 86–87 beans Black-Eyed Peas with Chard. 61–62 Beef and Asparagus. 60.ECOLITERACY. 121. 105.Index Page numbers in italics indicate photographs. 86–87 Soba Noodles with Eggplant. 106 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. 68. 71 Chili Beef with Spinach Pizza. in Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. 51. 91 bok choy Rice Noodles with Bok Choy. and Onion. 80 Cucumber and Jicama Salad. See sweet peppers Biryani. 59 Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers (suggestion). 68. 107–8 beef fajita (suggestion). 74. 52. and Spicy Sausage Pizza. 107–8 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables (suggestion). and Walnut Salad. 63 Ham and Yam Pizza. 47. 75 Red Beans. 91 Yucatan Wrap. 116–17 bell peppers. 66 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables (suggestion). 66 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. 105. and Beef. 113–14. 136. Spinach. 118 asparagus and sweet red peppers (suggestion). Tomato. 123 asparagus Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza. 78 Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables.ORG 143 . and Beef. in Yucatan Wrap. 37 Black-Eyed Peas with Chard. and Walnut Salad (suggestion). 67 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). 64–65 Red Beans. 106 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage (suggestion). 69 Golden Cauliflower Pizza (suggestion). and Thai Basil. 105. Okra. Raisin.

103 cabbage Asian Cabbage and Orange Salad with Ginger. 132 Chinese Chicken Salad. 71 Corn and Potato Soup. 60. 131 Yucatan Wrap. 101–2 Coconut Mandarin Soup (suggestion). 115 cauliflower Golden Cauliflower Pizza. black-eyed peas with (substitution). 81–82 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). 83–84. 113–14. 128 Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce (suggestion). 63 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro. 100 chicken Asian Cabbage and Orange Salad with Ginger (suggestion). 78 Chinese Chicken Salad. 138 Vegetable Biryani. and Hominy. 52. with Zucchini and Feta (suggestion). 61–62 Asian Cabbage and Orange Salad with Ginger. 86–87 Soup of Winter Vegetables.ORG 144 . 133–34 cheese fajita (suggestion). 71 chicken with braised cabbage (suggestion). 126–27 Fresh Corn. 109–10 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro. 109–10 Chili Verde. 28. Fideo Pasta with. and Fresh Tomato Pizza. Turkey. 132 Chinese Chicken Salad. 95 Vegetable Biryani (suggestion). 126–27 Olive. Okra. 111. 85 cilantro. 133–34 cheese Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza (suggestion). 67 chard Black-Eyed Peas with Chard. 78 Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. 67 Yucatan Wrap. 67 Yucatan Wrap (suggestion). 91 Chicken Yassa. Caper. 78 Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni (suggestion). Turkey. 113–14. 113–14 couscous. 115 capers Corn and Potato Soup. 115 Chili Beef with Spinach Pizza. 80 collard greens. 57. 91 Yucatan Wrap.Soup of Winter Vegetables. 134 Chicken Fajita. 37 Corn and Potato Soup. 96. 126–27 Cucumber and Jicama Salad. 87 Vegetable Biryani. 90 corn. 118 Braised Leeks and Feta Cheese Pizza. 71 Fresh Tomato and Mozzarella Pizza. 59 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro. 122 carrots Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. 88–89 Coconut Mandarin Soup. 97 Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. 51. 52. 73 Whole Wheat Penne Salad with Tuna and Capers. Red Pepper. 88–89 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables (suggestion).ECOLITERACY. and Spicy Sausage Pizza. 86–87 Summer Chicken Stew. 52. 81–82 Cheddar cheese. 133–34 Chicken Fajita. 112 Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. 101–2 choi sum. 126–27 Curried Chicken Salad Pita. in Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. 100 cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. 86–87 Chorizo and Kale. 90 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. 80 Corn and Potato Soup. 119 Chili Verde. 72 Gumbo. in Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. 111. 55. 45 Albondigas. 88–89 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. 113–14. 135 Zucchini and Feta. 101–2 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage. and Hominy. 112 Chicken Yassa.

93 dressings. 24–27 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. 68. and Walnut Salad. 63 Ham and Yam Pizza. 46–48 feta cheese Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza (suggestion). Chicken. 70 Curried Chicken Salad Pita. 46 for seasonal salad bar. 72 Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers. 86–87 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 96. Tofu. 49 Fajita. 64–65 Olive. 64–65 Olive. and mushrooms (suggestion). 118 Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni. 129–30 Vegetable Biryani. 74. 27–29. 103 Whole Wheat Penne Salad with Tuna and Capers. 58 Vegetable Biryani. pasta and noodle dishes. 61–62 Golden Cauliflower Pizza. Caper. 70 Soba Noodles with Eggplant. and Fresh Tomato Pizza. 59 Cucumber Raita. 47. Spinach. 119 Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale. with Tomatillo Sauce. Spinach. 71 fall dishes Albondigas. 116–17 for salads. 105. 68. and Fresh Tomato Pizza. 66 Tabbouleh. 73 Spring Vegetable Soup. 135 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. See salad dressings eggplant Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers. 67 Enchiladas. rice grapes.ORG 145 . 122 Zucchini and Feta. 90 Chili Beef with Spinach Pizza. 125 Cucumber and Jicama Salad. and Thai Basil. Turkey. 84 Fresh Tomato and Mozzarella Pizza. 99. 117 Soba Noodles with Eggplant. 40–41 Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza. Raisin. 100 Chicken Fajita. and cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. 69 Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale (suggestion). 132 Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers. 124. 125 greens Black-Eyed Peas with Chard. See also specific types fall. 53 winter. eggplant. 97 Zucchini and Feta. 69 Gumbo. Cheese. 130 Tabbouleh. 68. 106 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. 27 spring. 97 Broccoli. 72 Curried Potatoes in Chapatti. 85 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 67 Vegetable Soup (suggestion).ECOLITERACY. Red Pepper. in Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup (suggestion). 79 Chili (suggestion). 96. 51. Caper. 92–94. 123 Curried Carrot Soup. 103 fall seasonal foods. 118 Braised Leeks and Feta Cheese Pizza. 85 fruits. 121. 83–84. 128 Braised Leeks and Feta Cheese Pizza. Tofu. See also bulgur.cucumbers Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup. and Thai Basil (suggestion). 60. 50 summer. about. and Beef. 133–34 European/Mediterranean flavor profile. 104 Curried Chicken Salad Pita. 95 grains. 59 Cucumber Raita. 100 Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale. 64–65 Red Beans. 58 Thai Cucumber Salad. corn. Red Pepper. 83–84. and Mushrooms. 71 Cucumber and Jicama Salad. 75 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 69 rice and vermicelli wrap with beef. 47. 73 Rice Noodles with Bok Choy.

74. 112 mandarins Chinese Chicken Salad. Soup of Winter Vegetables. Braised. in Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. 118 Coconut Mandarin Soup. 71 Chili Beef with Spinach Pizza. 83–84. and Onion. 61–62 Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. Mint. 52. 60. 80 mushrooms with braised cabbage (suggestion). Asian Noodles with. 95 Gyro-Style Pita with Ground Beef. and Hominy (suggestion). Raisin. 70 Curried Carrot Soup. 64–65 meats. Mint. 116–17 Tabbouleh. and Mushrooms. 80 meatballs Albondigas. 85 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 115 Leeks. 135 mushrooms Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza. and Onion. 137 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro. 58 Vegetable Biryani. sausages Middle Eastern/Indian flavor profile. and Mushrooms. Tomato. and Feta Cheese Pizza. 124. 124. 126–27 Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale. 97 Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup. 47. Turkey. Turkey. 48 spring. 118 Black-Eyed Peas with Chard (suggestion). 79 Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup (suggestion). 92–94. 137 ham Gumbo. 83–84. 116–17 Rice Noodles with Bok Choy. and. 72 Curried Potatoes in Chapatti. 59 kale Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale. See also cilantro fall.ECOLITERACY. 136. 44–45 Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza (suggestion). 54 winter. 125 Cucumber Raita. 99. 101–2 Coconut Mandarin Soup. 133–34 Chicken Fajita. See 6-5-4 School Lunch Matrix nuts Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni. 88–89 Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. See pasta and noodle dishes nutrition services. 63 Gyro-Style Pita with Ground Beef. 93 Golden Cauliflower Pizza. 81–82 Gumbo. Spinach. 113–14. Spinach. 96. 97 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro.ORG 146 . 37 cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. 90 Braised Leeks and Feta Cheese Pizza (suggestion). 119 Chili Verde. 66 noodles. 133–34 Mozzarella and Fresh Tomato Pizza. Tomato. 82 Yucatan Wrap. 50 Hominy. 61–62 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 63 Ham and Yam Pizza. pork.Hominy. 75 herbs. and Walnut Salad. 42–43 Albondigas. 91 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. 132 Corn and Potato Soup. chicken. 101–2 okra. 136. See beef. 85 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 52. 128 Broccoli. 111. 104 Curried Chicken Salad Pita. 64–65 Latin American flavor profile. 64–65 Jicama and Cucumber Salad. 88–89 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. 53 summer. 60. 125 Chinese Chicken Salad. 81–82 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 67 Monterey Jack cheese.

Fresh Corn. and Hominy. Cucumber. 122 peas. 116–17 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage (suggestion). 75 Olive. Basil-Walnut. 61–62 Chili Verde. Spinach. 118 Braised Leeks and Feta Cheese Pizza. snow Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. 73 pork. 63 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. 106 rice. 119 Fresh Corn. 81–82 Summer Chicken Stew. with Whole Wheat Rigatoni. 52. 80 Gumbo. 122 Orange and Asian Cabbage Salad with Ginger. Spinach. 131 Vegetable Biryani. 83–84. 133–34 Olive. 128 Chicken Yassa. 111. 97 Chili Beef with Spinach Pizza. Tofu. 138 Gumbo.ORG 147 . 93 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 66 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. Broccoli. Red Pepper. and Walnut Salad. 111. sugar snap Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. 85 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 64–65 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. Spinach. 74. Caper. 64–65 pork fajita (suggestion). 107–8 cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. 73 Whole Wheat Penne Salad with Tuna and Capers (suggestion). 138 Fresh Tomato and Mozzarella Pizza. 63 olives Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza (suggestion). 60. 70 Ranch Dressing. 71 pork with braised cabbage (suggestion). 92–94.ECOLITERACY. 28 Albondigas. 74. Caper. Okra. 63 Ham and Yam Pizza. 86–87 Soba Noodles with Eggplant. 126–27 Curried Potatoes in Chapatti. 129–30 Whole Wheat Penne Salad with Tuna and Capers. 121. Okra. 128 pizza toppings. Red Pepper. and Spicy Sausage Pizza. and Mushrooms. and Fresh Tomato Pizza. 79 Raita. 55. 96. and Fresh Tomato Pizza. and Hominy. See 6-5-4 School Lunch Matrix radish raita (suggestion). and Mushrooms. 67 professional development. Turkey. See also sausages Albondigas. 75 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 135 Golden Cauliflower Pizza. 118 Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. 109–10 Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale. and Thai Basil. 60. 112 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro (suggestion). 132 Gumbo. 35 Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza. 111. 30 Red Beans. 103 peppers. sweet. 91 rice bowls. 81–82 potatoes Corn and Potato Soup. 55. and Spicy Sausage Pizza. 89 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables (suggestion). See sweet peppers Pesto. 116–17 Rice Noodles with Bok Choy. 105. Turkey. 35 Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. 95 Ham and Yam Pizza. 112 Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni. and Beef. 87 Spring Vegetable Soup. 91 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 35 Beef and Asparagus. 78 pasta and noodle dishes. 70 Raisin. 112 Chinese Chicken Salad. 101–2 peas. 61–62 Coconut Mandarin Soup.

and Spicy Sausage Pizza. 103 Soy Sesame Dressing. 111. 125 Coconut Mandarin Soup.ORG 148 . and Beef. 11–12 six dishes. 70 Curried Chicken Salad (suggestion). 99. 34 Albondigas. 68. 105. 131 Vegetable Biryani. 118 asparagus and sweet red peppers (suggestion). 66 Tabbouleh. 53–54 winter. 49–50 seasonal salad bar. 106 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. 46–48 spring. 78 Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni (suggestion).Black-Eyed Peas with Chard.ECOLITERACY. 24–33. 67 rice noodles rice noodle sticks with eggplant. 72 Rice Noodles with Bok Choy (suggestion). 85 Fresh Corn. 52. 17–23 resources. 33 Thousand Island Dressing. 86–87 6-5-4 School Lunch Matrix concept. 124. 58 Thai Cucumber Salad. 68. 112 Chinese Chicken Salad. 91 seasonal food profiles fall. and Thai Basil. 32 Soy Sesame Dressing. 30 Russian Dressing. 90 Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale. 24–33. 101–2 Soba Noodles with Eggplant. 110 Chili Verde. Italian meatball (suggestion). 139. 35–45 four seasons. 55. Tofu. 119 Red Beans. 25 salad dressings Ranch Dressing. 109–10 Chili Beef with Spinach Pizza. 70 Curried Carrot Soup. Spinach. 130 Rice Noodles with Bok Choy. 52. and Mushrooms. 121. 119 Chinese Chicken Salad. Raisin. 112 Asparagus and Mushroom Pizza. 99. 100 sandwich. 106 Summer Chicken Stew. 123 Whole Wheat Penne Salad with Tuna and Capers. 114 Zucchini and Feta. 104 Gumbo. 88–89 Red Beans. and Walnut Salad. 105. 126–27 Curried Carrot Soup. 65 sausages Black-Eyed Peas with Chard (suggestion). 129–30 soups. 51. 107–8 Chicken Stew (suggestion). 14–15. 34–35 five flavor profiles. Okra. 32 salad bar. 63 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage. 31 salads Asian Cabbage and Orange Salad with Ginger. and Beef. 69 Beef and Asparagus. 122 Yucatan Wrap (suggestion). 81–82 Spring Vegetable Soup. 140–41 snow peas Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. and Thai basil (suggestion). Turkey. 69 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro. 83–84. in Gumbo (suggestion). 63 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 116–17 spring dishes Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. 138 Gumbo. 46–54 professional development classes. 111. Spinach. Spinach. 61–62 Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup. 52. 104 cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. tofu. 63 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. 60. 131 Chicken Yassa. and Hominy. 47. 128 Broccoli. 79 Chinese Chicken Salad. 90 Chicken Yassa (suggestion). 59 Cucumber Raita. 25 shrimp. 33 spinach Chili Beef with Spinach Pizza. 101–2 Cucumber Raita (suggestion). 80 Corn and Potato Soup. 50–53 summer. 132 Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers. 101–2 Cucumber and Jicama Salad. 66 Russian Dressing.

31 tofu. 123 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). and Beef. 61–62 Fresh Corn. 135 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). 135 Gyro-Style Pita with Ground Beef. Spinach.ORG 149 . 123 Thousand Island Dressing. 111. Red Pepper. 87 Spring Vegetable Soup. 79 Chicken Fajita. 137 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. 136. 124. 43 Chili (suggestion). 66 Soba Noodles with Eggplant. 103 Zucchini and Feta. 116–17 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables (suggestion). 121. 94 Tabbouleh. 103 Whole Wheat Penne Salad with Tuna and Capers. 133–34 Chili Verde. 100 sweet peppers. and Spicy Sausage Pizza (suggestion). 68. 104 curried sweet potatoes in chapatti (suggestion). 128 Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. Spinach. 138 Fresh Tomato and Mozzarella Pizza (suggestion). 113–14 summer seasonal foods. 131 sweet potatoes. Caper. 103 Zucchini and Feta. 81–82 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). Okra. 129–30 Summer Chicken Stew. 129–30 tomatillos Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. and Spicy Sausage Pizza (suggestion). 103 summer dishes Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni. 135 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). 132 tomatoes. 125 Corn and Potato Soup. and Hominy. 66 Summer Chicken Stew. 121. 39 Chinese tofu salad (suggestion).ECOLITERACY. 37 curried sweet potato soup (suggestion). 133–34 Chili Verde. 70 Red Beans. 122 Yucatan Wrap (suggestion). 126–27 Fresh Corn. 115 Zucchini and Feta. 103 sugar snap peas Asian Noodles with Lime Chili Sauce and Spring Vegetables. 60. 138 Fresh Tomato and Mozzarella Pizza (suggestion). 112 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro (suggestion). 138 Fresh Tomato and Mozzarella Pizza. and Mushrooms (suggestion).Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro (suggestion). and Onion. Mint. 89 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables (suggestion). summer Albondigas. 103 Yucatan Wrap. 113–14. 60. and Fresh Tomato Pizza. 59 Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers. and Thai Basil. Spinach. and Thai Basil. 71 Chili (suggestion). 47. 100 squash. 105. 89 radish raita (suggestion). 50–53 squash. Tofu. 116–17 Soba Noodles with Eggplant. 132 cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. 104 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 53–54 summer squash Albondigas. 58 Thai Cucumber Salad. Turkey. 132 Cucumber and Jicama Salad (suggestion). 55. 69 Olive. 87 Spring Vegetable Soup. 61–62 Fresh Corn. 131 Thai Cucumber Salad. Tofu. 132 Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup. and Mushrooms. 106 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. Tomato. Okra. 100 spring seasonal foods. Okra. 41 broccoli and walnut salad (suggestion). and Spicy Sausage Pizza. 102 Rice Noodles with Bok Choy. winter curried butternut squash soup (suggestion). 73 Rice Noodles with Bok Choy (suggestion).

113–14. 46–48 for seasonal salad bar. 136.Eggplant and Sweet Red Peppers. 92–94. 79 broccoli and sweet red peppers (suggestion). See also bulgur. Red Pepper. 64–65 Olive. and Walnut Salad. 103 Zucchini and Feta. 61–62 Fresh Tomato and Mozzarella Pizza (suggestion). 51. 115 zucchini Albondigas. 122 Turkey. 69 Fresh Tomato and Mozzarella Pizza. 103 vegetables. 92–94. and Fresh Tomato Pizza. 49 Fideo Pasta with Chorizo and Kale. 124. 83–84.ORG 150 . 62 Cheese Enchiladas with Tomatillo Sauce. Spring. 113–14. 122 Tuna and Capers. 79 Chinese Chicken Salad. rice winter dishes Asian Cabbage and Orange Salad with Ginger. about. Caper. 27–29. 93 Yam and Ham Pizza. 85 Golden Cauliflower Pizza. 97 Broccoli. 86–87 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 137 Rice and Vermicelli Wrap with Beef. corn. 27 spring. 96. 50–53 summer. 71 Curried Chicken Salad Pita. 91 Vegetable Biryani (suggestion). and Hominy. 80 Curried Potatoes in Chapatti. 49–50 winter squash curried butternut squash soup (suggestion). 69 Chicken Stew (suggestion). 133–34 Chicken Fajita. 135 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). 135 Gyro-Style Pita with Ground Beef. and Walnut Salad. 47. Tomato. 137 Italian Meatballs with Whole Wheat Penne. 103 wraps. Raisin. Turkey. 54 winter. 72 Curried Potatoes in Chapatti. 35 Albondigas (suggestion). 52. 104 Soup of Winter Vegetables. 75 yogurt. 92–94. Soup of. 45 Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup. 81–82 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage. 116–17 Spicy Sausage with Braised Cabbage. 131 Tabbouleh. Winter Vegetables. 136. 103 winter seasonal foods. and Onion. 95 Lemon Chicken with Fresh Cilantro. 78 Black-Eyed Peas with Chard. 101–2 whole grains. Tomato. Turkey. pasta and noodle dishes. 93 Yucatan Wrap. 73 Summer Chicken Stew. 91 Yucatan Wrap. black-eyed peas with (substitution).ECOLITERACY. Whole Wheat Penne Salad with. and Hominy. and Hominy. Mint. 58 Whole Wheat Penne Salad with Tuna and Capers. 90 Braised Leeks and Feta Cheese Pizza. 115 walnuts Basil-Walnut Pesto with Whole Wheat Rigatoni. 131 Coconut Mandarin Soup. 125 Cucumber Raita. 88–89 Singapore Egg Noodles with Chicken and Vegetables. 100 cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. 74. 93 Gyro-Style Pita with Ground Beef. 68. 60. 81–82 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). 67 Vegetable Soup (suggestion). Mint. See also specific types fall. Raisin. and Mushrooms. Spinach. 70 Curried Potatoes in Chapatti. 90 Vegetable Biryani. 67 Vegetable Soup. 81–82 turnip greens. 128 Broccoli. and Onion. 68.

hybiscus: istockphoto 12552432. AlasdairJames.ECOLITERACY. AngiePhotos. sweet pepper: istockphoto 15317965. vicm. Jamesmcq24. Ekspansio Pages 7-8 California map: www. Areasur. moppet. RedHelga. vtupinamba. magnetcreative. popovaphoto. coriander: istockphoto 15335886. corn: istockphoto 13967505. galaiko. Devonyu. susib. potato salad: istockphoto 13642043.PHOTO CREDITS All photos of 6-5-4 Lunch Matrix Dishes Craig Lee. Aaltazar Cover Photo illustration. beans: istockphoto 6976271. pomegranate: istockphoto 10884055. Aaltazar. annaia. peas: istockphoto 9196693. soup: istockphoto 5956946. vikif eyed peas: istockphoto 6976274. stuartpitkin Page 15 Photo illustration: Dan Bensech Page 16 Slicing lime: istockphoto 6769681. YinYang. quinoa: istockphoto 12306408. oregano: istockphoto 15730560. barley: istockphoto 11478909. chilis: istockphoto 4710381. LauriPatterson. blac Page 41 European/Mediterranean profile fennel: istockphoto 10659058. yogurt: istockphoto 8636220. paprika: istockphoto 11766151. cheese: istockphoto 11790848. plantains: istockphoto 14693727. CherylEDavis. olive oil: istockphoto 8988248. mango: istockphoto 15689149. lemongrass: istockphoto 3355929. KevinDyer. cutting board–back cover: istockphoto 2235928.ORG 151 . AlasdairJames. salad bowl: istockphoto 8662058. cinoby. pandafung. magnetcreative. rice bowl: istockphoto 14294449. eurobanks. okra: istockphoto 10294583. chilis: istockphoto 4710381. achiote: istockphoto 9215515. salad: istockphoto 13026960. jimbatt. KevinDyer. tfazevedo. cherry tomatoes: istockphoto 2061002. garlic: istockphoto 14186271. sasimoto. avalex Page 20 Chopping carrots: istockphoto 12641183. couscous: istockphoto 10463258. CreativeI. sweet potatoes: istockphoto 11170307. cutting board–front cover: istockphoto 1441951. AlasdairJames. andesign 101. AlasdairJames Page 43 Latin American flavor profile tomato: istockphoto 6974625. Atelopus.worldtradepress. trail mix: istockphoto 8545469. olives: istockphoto 337080. AlasdairJames.com World maps www. peanuts: istockphoto 8258761. tfazevedo Page 45 Middle Eastern/Indian flavor profile cilantro: istockphoto 4585508. carrots: istockphoto 12699348. http://craigleephoto. Obaba. vanilla: istockphoto 5791952. gaffera. chickpeas: istockphoto 14067709. sasimoto. mung beans: istockphoto 12339657. JoeBiafore. AngiePhotos. wrap: istockphoto 12719222. AngiePhotos. Max Baumann Page 25 Seasonal salad bar lettuce: istockphoto 13693755. Jamesmcq24. fcafotodigital. popovaphoto. jpa1999 Page 19 Slicing peppers: istockphoto 12671349. tamarind: istockphoto 4018067. pizza: istockphoto 2540687.com Page 10 Chopping parsely: istockphoto 3444172. carrot sticks: istockphoto 12679427. tuna: istockphoto 9679607. cumin: istockphoto 11933156. coconut: istockphoto 11204027 cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. almonds: istockphoto 9257213. amriphoto. Floortje Page 39 Asian flavor profile tofu: istockphoto 12704422. Ekspansio. pine nuts: istockphoto 7729295. alxpin. kromeshnik. pasta salad: Craig Lee.digital-vector-maps. cinnamon: istockphoto 15689149. robynmac Page 37 African flavor profile collard greens: istockphoto 2408145. Dar07. Dan Benesch. ginger: Istockphoto 10862599. dutchicon. AntiMartina.com Icons pasta: istockphoto 14363842. timsa. saffron: istockphoto 11766674. JonnyJim.

LLC. and a cooking school owner and teacher. including its Rethinking School Lunch projects and the book Smart by Nature: Schooling for Sustainability. Through its initiative Smart by NatureTM. coaching for teaching and learning. and experience of Georgeanne Brennan and Ann Evans in the creation of this publication and in many of our Rethinking School Lunch projects. community leadership. focusing specifically on enhancing the skills and creativity of the nutrition services staff using the 6-5-4 School Lunch Matrix. The author of more than 30 books on cooking and food.ORG 152 . Ann M. to transforming school food. The Center’s services include a publishing imprint. technical assistance. As a principal of Evans & Brennan. she has been working over the past several years piloting professional development with the Davis JUSD. she is working with rural and urban communities to improve children’s health through Rethinking School Lunch.ECOLITERACY. the Center offers expertise. Learn more at www.About the Authors The Center for Ecoliteracy is grateful to have been able to call on the wisdom. she has a 30-year career with California state government. and a leadership training academy. She has worked for a decade with Davis Joint Unified School District. Georgeanne Brennan Georgeanne Brennan is an award-winning cookbook author. About the Center for Ecoliteracy The Center for Ecoliteracy is dedicated to education for sustainable living.ecoliteracy. Cofounder of the Davis Food Co-op and the Davis Farmers’ Market. cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. keynote presentations. inspiration. and the marketplace. knowledge. and food policy consultant with a distinguished culinary and business career spanning several decades. in-depth curriculum development. she brings her considerable expertise to Rethinking School Lunch in rural and urban settings. Evans has a long history of involvement in sustainable food systems. educational reform. Evans Ann M. bringing her expertise as former mayor of Davis and Special Advisor to the Superintendent of Public Instruction on school gardens and food. seminars. journalist. which showcases inspiring stories about school communities across the nation. and resources to the sustainability movement in K–12 education. As a principal of Evans & Brennan.org. academic program audits.

wholesome dishes bound to delight schoolchildren of all cultures and tastes. nutritionists.” David G. School meal programs across our state are attuned to offering more fruits.A cooking with california food CENTER FOR ECOLITERACY WWW. Agriculture is a proud partner with our schools in growing future generations of productive. and the bar has been raised to return schools to their roots of cooking and baking from scratch by incorporating fundamental culinary principles with real. vegetables.ORG 153 .“The Center for Ecoliteracy has done it again! The 6-5-4 focus that authors Georgeanne Brennan and Ann Evans take to bringing fresh cooking concepts to school meals is brilliant and long overdue.” Adrienne Baumann Executive Director of Marin Organic © A publication of the Center for Ecoliteracy A publication of the Center for Ecoliteracy ISBN 978-0-9818409-1-8 Printed in the U. parents.” 11 5/8" (11. fresh ingredients. school chefs. Ohm President of California School Nutrition Association “Farmers. Cooking with California Food in K-12 Schools is a truly wonderful collection of recipes that kids will actually enjoy for years to come.625") Denise J.ECOLITERACY. and kids—rejoice! Cooking with California Food in K–12 Schools goes beyond mere instruction to inspire. Binkle Deputy Director of Food Services. and tantalize with recipes that celebrate California's cornucopia of seasonal food in simple. healthy citizens. This menu design tool will assist schools in our goal of finding ways to please the child palate. I can’t wait to try the recipes with our students. Los Angeles Unified School District President of Chefs de Cuisine Association of California “It is so important that our young people learn healthy eating practices—and there couldn't be a better way than offering them an array of delicious choices reflecting the diversity of California's heritage. and whole grains to students. educators.S.” The Honorable Karen Ross Secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture “The 6-5-4 matrix will be a great resource for menu planners in California schools. engage. The gold standard has been set yet again.

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