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Catalogues and Specifications Reference Manual

AVEVA Solutions Ltd

Disclaimer
Information of a technical nature, and particulars of the product and its use, is given by AVEVA Solutions Ltd and its subsidiaries without warranty. AVEVA Solutions Ltd and its subsidiaries disclaim any and all warranties and conditions, expressed or implied, to the fullest extent permitted by law. Neither the author nor AVEVA Solutions Ltd, or any of its subsidiaries, shall be liable to any person or entity for any actions, claims, loss or damage arising from the use or possession of any information, particulars, or errors in this publication, or any incorrect use of the product, whatsoever.

Copyright
Copyright and all other intellectual property rights in this manual and the associated software, and every part of it (including source code, object code, any data contained in it, the manual and any other documentation supplied with it) belongs to AVEVA Solutions Ltd or its subsidiaries. All other rights are reserved to AVEVA Solutions Ltd and its subsidiaries. The information contained in this document is commercially sensitive, and shall not be copied, reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Ltd. Where such permission is granted, it expressly requires that this Disclaimer and Copyright notice is prominently displayed at the beginning of every copy that is made. The manual and associated documentation may not be adapted, reproduced, or copied, in any material or electronic form, without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Ltd. The user may also not reverse engineer, decompile, copy, or adapt the associated software. Neither the whole, nor part of the product described in this publication may be incorporated into any third-party software, product, machine, or system without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Ltd, save as permitted by law. Any such unauthorised action is strictly prohibited, and may give rise to civil liabilities and criminal prosecution. The AVEVA products described in this guide are to be installed and operated strictly in accordance with the terms and conditions of the respective license agreements, and in accordance with the relevant User Documentation. Unauthorised or unlicensed use of the product is strictly prohibited. First published September 2007 AVEVA Solutions Ltd, and its subsidiaries AVEVA Solutions Ltd, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HB, United Kingdom

Trademarks
AVEVA and Tribon are registered trademarks of AVEVA Solutions Ltd or its subsidiaries. Unauthorised use of the AVEVA or Tribon trademarks is strictly forbidden. AVEVA product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of AVEVA Solutions Ltd or its subsidiaries, registered in the UK, Europe and other countries (worldwide). The copyright, trade mark rights, or other intellectual property rights in any other product, its name or logo belongs to its respective owner.

Catalogues and Specifications Reference Manual

Catalogues and Specifications Reference Manual


Contents Page

Reference Manual
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:1
About this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:1 How this Manual is Organised . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:1 Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:2 Assumptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1:2

Document Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:1


Command Description Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:1 Syntax Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:1 Standard Command Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3

Common Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1


Entering PARAGON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1 Saving Work and Updating Databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1 Exit PARAGON without Saving Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 Saving the Alpha Readout to File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 Switching Text Output Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:3 Defining Colours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4

Catalogue Database Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:1


What is the Catalogue For?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:1 Principal Features of the Catalogue Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:1

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Structure of the Catalogue Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:2 Catalogue (CATA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:3 Catalogue Sections (SECT and STSEC) and Categories (CATE and STCA) . . 4:4
Elements Used in Both Types of Catalogue Section/Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5 Elements Used in Piping Sections/Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5 Elements Used in Structural Sections/Categories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5

Text (TEXT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6 Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6


Component Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Insulation Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Structural Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Design DB Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Piping Component (COMP; SCOM). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Profile (PROF; SPRF) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joint (JOIN; SJOI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fitting (FITT; SFIT). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6 4:7 4:7 4:8

Catalogue Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:9


4:10 4:11 4:11 4:12

Component Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:12


Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:12

Selection Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:13


Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:14

Manipulating the Catalogue Database using PARAGON . . . . . . . . 5:1


Basic Element Operation Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:1
Querying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creation, Deletion etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implicit Element Referencing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . List Position Changing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Standard Attribute Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:1 5:1 5:2 5:2 5:2

Creating Catalogues, Sections and Catalogue Components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:3 Using Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:4
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:4 Expressions Using Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:5

Examples of Parameterisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:6 Constructing 3D Pointsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:9


PTAXI PTCAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:10

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PTMIX ............................................................. Example of Defining a 3D Pointset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining an Axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a Distance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining an Explicit Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a Direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining Connection, Bore and Number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Controlling the Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Specifying Pipe End Conditions for use by ISODRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Example of Defining a Structural Pointset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Neutral Axis Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining an Axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a Position . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defining a Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Controlling the Appearance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5:11 5:12 5:12 5:13 5:13 5:14 5:14 5:14 5:14 5:15 5:16 5:16 5:17 5:17 5:17

Constructing Structural Pointsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:15

Constructing 3D Geomsets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:17 Constructing Structural Geomsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:20 Reference Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:21
Parameter-Controlled Attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:21 Axial Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:22

Component Design and Representation in PARAGON . . . . . . . . . . 6:1


Component Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:1 P-point and P-line Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:2
P-points P-lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:4

Geomset Primitive Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:5 Reference Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:11


Model Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting Representation for Piping Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting Profile Representation for Steelwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting Level Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting Obstruction and Insulation Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting P-Point Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting P-Line Representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Full REPRESENTATION Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:11 6:14 6:15 6:16 6:17 6:18 6:19 6:20

Catalogue Database Elements Setup in PARAGON . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:1

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3D Pointsets (PTSET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:1


Axial P-point (PTAXI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cartesian P-point (PTCAR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mixed Type P-point (PTMIX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Position Type P-point (PTPOS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:2 7:3 7:3 7:3

Structural Pointsets (PTSSET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:3 3D Geomsets (GMSET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:5 3D Geomset Primitives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:6
Box (SBOX) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:6 Boxing (BOXI) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7 Cone (SCON) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7 Cylinder (LCYL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:8 Cylinder (SCYL) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:9 Slope-Bottomed Cylinder (SSLC). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:9 Disc (SDIS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:10 Dish (SDSH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:11 Line (LINE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:11 Line (SLINE). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:11 Pyramid (LPYR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:12 Circular Torus (SCTO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:12 Rectangular Torus (SRTO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:13 Snout (LSNO). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:13 Sphere (SSPH). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:14 Tube (TUBE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:14 User-defined Extrusion (SEXT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:15 Solid of Revolution (SREV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:15

Negative 3D Geomsets (NGMSET) and Negative Primitives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:16 Structural Geomsets (GMSSET) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:18 Structural Geomset Primitives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:18
Structural Rectangle (SREC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:18 Structural Annulus (SANN). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:19 Structural Profile (SPRO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:20

Detailing Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:21 Material Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:22 Connection Compatibility Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:22
COCDES Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:23

Bolting Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:23

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Branch Reducer and Nominal Bore Size Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:24 Unit Types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:25
Use of Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26

General Text Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:28 User-defined Nominal Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:28

Creating Datasets in PARAGON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1


Attributes of DATA Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1 Querying Properties in DESIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:2 Real Properties of P-points, P-Lines and Geomsets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:3
Default Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:3 Querying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:3

Checking Catalogue Database Consistency using PARAGON . . . 9:1


Initiating a Standard Data Consistency Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1 What the Checking Facility Does . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:1 Controlling the Detailed Checking Procedure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:2 Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9:3

Piping Components in PARAGON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:1


Special Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:2
Implied Tube. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mitred Bends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How Number of Cuts (NCUTS) Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dynamic PPOINTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pseudo Attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implied Geometry sets in PARAGON. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:2 10:2 10:3 10:3 10:4 10:4

Naming Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:4 Example Connection Type Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:5 Connection Compatibility Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:6 Construction of Typical Piping Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:7

Specification Constructor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:1


Content and Format of a Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:2 How Component Selection Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:4

Manipulating the Catalogue Database using SPECONMODE. . . . 12:1

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Creating a Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:1 Accessing an Existing Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:2 Entering Tabular Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:3
General Principles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Special Characters in SPEC Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Headings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Defaults ............................................................. Selector Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Subtype Selectors: A Special Case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Including User-defined Attributes in Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Including Comments in Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:3 12:3 12:4 12:5 12:5 12:6 12:6 12:6

Editing an Existing Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:7


Adding a New SPCOM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:7 Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:7

Copying a Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:8 Outputting a Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:9


Defining the Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:9 Outputting Complete Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:9 Controlling the Output Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:9 Outputting Parts of Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:9 How Bores Are Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:10

Using Macros For SPECON Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12:10

Typical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13:1


Selectors and Pointers for Piping Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13:1
Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . P-Point Zero: A Special Case. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference Pointers and Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Examples From Piping Component Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Applicability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Selectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reference Pointers and Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Examples From Structural Component Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13:1 13:2 13:3 13:3 13:5 13:6 13:6 13:9 13:9

Selectors and Pointers for Structural Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13:6

Selectors and Pointers for Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13:10


Pipework Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13:10 Structural Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13:12

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SPECONMODE Command Syntax Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14:1


Syntax Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14:1
<speca> <table> <heading> <default> <linesp> <id> <copy> ............................................................. ............................................................. ............................................................. ............................................................. ............................................................. ............................................................. ............................................................. 14:1 14:2 14:2 14:3 14:3 14:3 14:3

Other PDMS Command Syntax. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14:4

SPECONMODE Error Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15:1 Nominal Pipe Size Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16:1 Properties Constructor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:1
Setting Up a Properties Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:2 Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:2
Design Layout Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Material Property Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Case Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Component Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Constraint Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Run Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:2 17:2 17:2 17:2 17:2 17:2

Material Property Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:3


Hierarchy Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:3 Material Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:3 Pointers from the Design DB and Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:4

Case Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:4


Hierarchy Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:4 Pointer from the Design DB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:5

Component Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:5


Hierarchy Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:5 Querying Calculated Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:7 Pointer from the Specification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:7

Constraints Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:7


Hierarchy Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:7 Pointer from the Design DB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:8

Run Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:8

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Hierarchy Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17:8

Use of Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18:1 Exponential Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19:1 PROPCON Command Syntax Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20:1
Syntax Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20:1

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Introduction

1
1.1

Introduction
About this Manual
This document is a Reference Manual for the Catalogues and Specifications. It describes all of the PARAGON, SPECON and PROPCON keyboard-entered commands in detail. If you need information on how to use the Graphical User Interfaces refer to the Catalogue and Specifications User Guide. It is assumed that you have attended a training course and are familiar with the basic concepts underlying the use of AVEVA products.

1.2

How this Manual is Organised


This manual is divided into chapters, as follows: Document Conventions Common Commands Catalogue Database Structure Manipulating the Catalogue Database using PARAGON Component Design and Representation in PARAGON Catalogue Database Elements Setup in PARAGON Creating Datasets in PARAGON describes notation and entering commands. conventions used when

describes how to enter, leave and change the states of PARAGON. gives details of the Catalogue database hierarchy and the ways in which its constituent elements are defined. explains the procedure for defining the various types of element which represent the design components within the Catalogue database. introduces the principles of catalogue component design and their representation in graphical displays. details elements used for the creation of point set, geometry sets, descriptive texts, coco tables, bolting tables and unit of measurements. explains the concept of datasets, used to store catalogue data which needs to be queried from DESIGN or DRAFT and which is not accessible by other means. describes how to check the catalogue database for inconsistencies from within PARAGON, so that errors can be corrected before the data is used in a design.

Checking Catalogue Database Consistency using PARAGON

Piping Components in PARAGON summarises some p-point conventions which should be followed to enter correct functioning of ISODRAFT.

1:1

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Introduction

Specification Constructor Manipulating the Catalogue Database using SPECONMODE Typical Specifications SPECONMODE Command Syntax Diagrams SPECONMODE Error Messages Nominal Pipe Size Tables Properties Constructor Use of Groups Exponential Numbers PROPCON Command Syntax Diagrams

introduces the principles of specifications. describes SPECONMODE within PARAGON. describes typical specifications. lists SPECONMODE command syntax diagrams. a list of common SPECONMODE error messages. a list of Nominal Pipe Size Tables. introduces the principles of PROPCON. describes the use of groups in PROPCON. describes Exponential Numbers in PROPCON. a list of PROPCON command syntax diagrams.

1.3

Intended Audience
In most companies the responsibility for creating Catalogues and Specifications is restricted to a team of Standards Engineers within the Production Engineering Department or its equivalent. You might, therefore, be a member of such a team setting up or updating a Specification. Alternatively, you might be a pipework or structural designer who needs to use a Specification to select a suitable component and who wishes to understand the principles underlying the selection process.

1.4

Assumptions
You are assumed to be familiar with the general principles of using PDMS, although some of the most relevant points are repeated in this manual as a reminder.

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Document Conventions

Document Conventions
This section describes the conventions used in this manual to describe commands to be typed in from the keyboard. The description of each command follows a standard format which is designed to allow the basic attributes of a command to be interpreted easily. To get the best out of this manual, you are strongly urged to read this section thoroughly.

2.1

Command Description Format


You will find that commands are described in a standard format. This format is described below. Title (e.g. Setting Level Representation) Keywords This is a list of those PARAGON, SPECON or PROPCON command words which are the prime constituents of the command syntax which carries out the given function. Description This is a brief description of the use of the command. Example(s) These are examples of typical command lines that show the effect of the principal options. Special notes on the behaviour of the command in specific conditions are given here. Command Syntax This shows the actual command with its possible options. The notation used for commands is described below (Syntax Diagrams). Querying The relevant querying options are listed.

2.2

Syntax Diagrams
The commands described in this manual have their legal command and interrogation options presented in the form of syntax diagrams. These diagrams formalise the precise command sequences which may be used and are intended to supplement the explanations given in the appropriate sections of the manual. The following conventions apply to syntax diagrams: All diagrams have abbreviated names. Such names are composed of lowercase letters enclosed in angled brackets, e.g. <expres>. These short names, which are used for cross-referencing purposes in the text and within other syntax diagrams, are supplemented by fuller descriptions where they are not self-explanatory. Commands to be input from the Command Line are shown in a combination of uppercase and lowercase letters. In general, these commands can be abbreviated; the capital letters indicate the minimum permissible abbreviation.

Note: This convention does not mean that the second part of the command must be typed in lowercase letters; commands may be entered in any combination of uppercase and lowercase letters.

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Document Conventions

For example, the command

DEFault
may be input in any of the following forms:

DEF DEFA DEFAU DEFAUL DEFAULT


Commands shown wholly in uppercase letters cannot be abbreviated. Syntax diagrams are generally read from top left to bottom right. Points marked with a plus sign (+) are option junctions which allow you to input any one of the commands to the right of the junction. Thus

>---+--- ABC -----. | | |--- PQR -----| | | |--- <dia> ---| | | -------------+--->
means you may type in ABC or PQR or any command allowed by the syntax given in diagram <dia> or just press Enter/Return to get the default option. Points marked with an asterisk (*) are loop-back junctions. Command options following these may be repeated as required. Thus

.------<------. / | >---*--- option1 ---| | | |--- option2 ---| | | --- option3 ---+--->
permits any combination of option1 and/or option2 and/or option3 (each separated by at least one space) to be used. The options may define commands, other syntax diagrams, or command arguments). The loop-back construction may form an exception to the rule of reading from top left to bottom right. The simplified format

.----<-----. / | >---*--- name --+--->


means that you may type in a list of PDMS names, separated by at least one space.

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Document Conventions

2.3

Standard Command Tools


Command Tool is a generic term covering command arguments (or atoms) and command parts. Both classes of command tool fit into ordinary commands and provide different ways of stating a particular requirement. Command tools may be PDMS-wide or module-specific. This section describes the standard Command Tools that may be used in PARAGON, SPECON or PROPCON. They may be one of the following: Standard Command Tools - which fit into ordinary commands External Macro Facilities - which can be used in a stored macro file and which control the behaviour of the macro when it is executed Standard Concepts - which apply globally within PARAGON, SPECON or PROPCON

Some of the main command tools (or the PARAGON, SPECON or PROPCON variations of them) summarised for convenience:

Command Arguments
Command arguments are also called atoms because they cannot be broken down any further. They are individual units which PARAGON, SPECON or PROPCON can recognise as constituents of a complete command. They usually need to be separated by spaces so that they are individually distinguishable. Command arguments are distinguished from the other command parts by being written in lower case italics. The principal command arguments are: integer value letter word text a positive or negative whole number, e.g. 2 -5 25 a signed number with or without a decimal point, e.g. 2.5 5 -3.8 a single alphabetic character a sequence of up to four letters with significance to PDMS a string of alphanumeric or symbol characters, which may include spaces, enclosed between single closing quotation marks ... or |...| characters. This is normally used to add descriptive material to an appropriate attribute. For example, DUTY Low Pressure. (Note that paired quotation marks ... will not work.) the space bar (not usually specified unless of special significance) a sequence of characters preceded by a / character and representing a PDMS Element name, e.g. /VALVE1. an external file name of the format /filename an identifier (for use with the VARIABLE command within macros) of the format !name, where name is a text string. For example: !COUNTER !height the , character, which can be used to concatenate PARAGON, SPECON or PROPCON commands; for example: NEW UNIT, BUNI INCH, DUNI FINC the +, -, * and / characters, which can be used within expressions, for example: (1 + 2), (1 - 2), (1 * 2), (1 / 2)

space name filename varid

comma plus minus star solid

Note: There must be a space before and after each of these command arguments.

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Document Conventions

Command Parts
Command parts are subsets of the general command syntax which are used frequently within other command sequences. The following command parts are summarised here: Expressions Any mathematical, logical or alphabetical expression whose result replaces it in the command syntax. Dimensions A physical dimension entered using default or explicit units. Catalogue Element Types A word used to represent a specific type of element in the Catalogue database hierarchy. Element Identifiers Methods for specifying which database element you want your next commend to act upon. Cursor-picking Identifier (<sgid>) This command part defines the most general method of identifying an Element. The command is completed by picking an element using the cursor in a graphical view.

Expressions (<eval>)
If a value given within a command needs to be calculated from other known values, you can enter an expression from which the required result is to be evaluated by PARAGON, SPECON or PROPCON as it executes the command. Such an expression must be enclosed between parentheses (...) to identify where it begins and ends. Full details of the expression syntax are given in the Plant Design Software Customisation Guide and Plant Design Software Customisation Reference Manual, and are also available as on-line help.

Dimensions (<uval>)
Once the working units have been specified, all dimensions input subsequently will be assumed to be in those units unless you override them. (Note that these are simply specific examples of the use of real expressions. You can include explicit units of measurement when entering a value in any expression.)

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Document Conventions

Examples 5 5.5 EX 3 5.3/4 5 56 56.3/4 5 INCHES 5M 56.3/4 IN 5 5500 5.75 5 feet 5 feet 6 inches 5 feet 6.75 inches 5 inches 5 metres 5 feet 6.75 inches in current working units in current working units in current working units (only use when working units are FINCH) (only use when working units are FINCH) (only use when working units are FINCH) (regardless of current working units) (regardless of current working units) (regardless of current working units)

Note: On output, values are rounded by default as follows: millimetres to the nearest millimetre inches to the nearest 1/32 or 0.1 inch. However, rounding on output may be controlled by using the PRECISION command. Within PARAGON, SPECON or PROPCON, values are stored as accurately as the host computer will allow.

Catalogue Element Types (<snoun>)


This command part refers to an element type in the Catalogue hierarchy. Catalogue administrative elements:

WORLd CATEgory

CATAlogue STCAtegory

SECTion TEXT

STSEction

Piping Components:

SCOMponent

COMPonent number

Profile Components:

SPRFile
Joint Components:

PROFile number

SJOInt

JOINt number

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Document Conventions

Fitting Components:

SFITting
Note: FITTing number is not a valid option) 3D Geomset elements: GMSEt SCOne SSLCylinder LINes TUBe SVERtex Negative 3D Geomset elements: NGMSet NSDSh NSCYlinder NLPYramid NSBOx NSSLcylinder NSCTorus NSEXtrusion NSCOne NSSPhere NSREvolution SLOOp NLSNout NLCYlinder NSRTorus SVERtex SBOX LSNout SSPHere SCTorus LPYRamid SDIsc SDSH LCYLinder SREVolution SEXTrusion SDIsk BOXIng SCYLinder SRTorus SLOOp

Structural Geomset elements: GMSSet SPVErtex 3D Pointset elements: PTSEt PTAXi PTCAr PTMIx SRECtangle SANNulus SPROfile

Structural Pointset elements: PTSSet PLINe

Dataset elements: DTSEt DATA

Detailing Text elements: SDTExt DTEXt number

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Document Conventions

Material Text elements: SMTExt MTEXt number

Bolt Table elements: BLTAble MBOLt BLISt MBLIst SBOLt DTABle LTABle

Connection Table elements: CCTAble Units elements: UNIT USECtion MSET UDEFinition MTYPe ATLIst COCO COCDES

Group World elements: GPWL GROUp

Part World elements: PRTWLD PRTELE GPART

Specification World elements: SPWL SPECi SELEc SPCOm

Table World elements: BRTAB NOMTAB TABWLD

Specific Element Identifier (<gid>)


This command part identifies a specific element either explicitly or by reference to its relative position in the database hierarchy.

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Examples /VALVE10 SAME OWN NEXT 2 4 LAST 3 MEM END SECT CATE 3 Named catalogue element Previous element accessed Owner of Current Element 2nd element in member list order at same level 4th member of Current Element 3rd last member of Current Element Next element up in hierarchy Section above Current Element 3rd Category

Cursor-picking Identifier (<sgid>)


This command part defines the most general method of identifying an Element. The command is completed by picking an element using the cursor in a graphical view. Examples ID @ ID SBOX @ ID SCOM @ Lowest level element hit by cursor Box primitive hit by cursor Piping Component hit by cursor

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Common Commands

Common Commands
The commands in this section are available throughout PDMS.

3.1

Entering PARAGON
The commands for PARAGON and PROPCON are combined within the PARAGON module so that you do not need to switch between modules. SPECON commands are also available in PARAGON by using the SPECONMODE command. Keyword: Description: PARAGON or SPECONMODE This command is available throughout PDMS, allowing PARAGON or SPECON to be accessed at any time.

To enter SPECON commands type SPECONMODE. To exit SPECONMODE type EXIT.

3.2

Saving Work and Updating Databases


Keyword: Description: SAVEWORK GETWORK These two commands are complementary. SAVEWORK lets you update the databases to incorporate any changes you have made during your current PARAGON session (since your last SAVEWORK). GETWORK lets you refresh your view of all READ or Multiwrite databases to pick up any changes that others may have made since you first opened them. Both commands can be restricted to specific databases within the current MDB by following them with a list of numbers. These numbers represent specific databases in the order they appear in the output of the STATUS command, which may be given in MONITOR or in the MDB mode of any GUI module. If no database numbers are given, then the commands apply to the whole MDB. It is good practice to use SAVEWORK frequently, to ensure maximum data security. However, it should only be necessary to use GETWORK when there are specific changes that you wish to pick up (in which case it is likely that you will know which databases you will actually want to refresh). GETWORK slows subsequent database access because the information has to be re-read from disk, and should be avoided unless you really need to use it.

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3.3

Exit PARAGON without Saving Changes


Keyword: Description: QUIT FINISH This command exits from PARAGON without saving any changes or the display setup. QUIT has the effect of deleting any changes made since the last SAVEWORK, module change or MDB change.

Examples: QUIT QUIT DESIGN QUIT FINISH Exit from PARAGON (to MONITOR module) Exit from PARAGON to DESIGN module Exit from PARAGON and from PDMS (returns to operating system)

Command Syntax:

>-- QUIT --+-- modulename --. | | |-- FINish ------| | | ----------------+-->

3.4

Saving the Alpha Readout to File


Keywords: Description: ALPHA LOG ALPHA FILE

This facility lets you save the alpha display information to a text file in the computer operating system. Two types of output are available, depending on the command used. ALPHA LOG enables the contents of either or both of the COMMANDS and REQUESTS alpha regions to be written to a file. ALPHA FILE enables the contents of the REQUESTS region only to be written to file. The ALPHA LOG/ ALPHA FILE facilities may be used to save data or as a general output facility.

Note: After an ALPHA file has been opened, subsequent output will be directed to both the file and the screen until the file is closed, or until you change to another PDMS module.

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Examples: ALP LOG /LF1 COMMANDS - log information displayed in the COMMANDS region in file /LF1
ALP LOG /LF1 OVER COMM ALP LOG /LF2 ALP FILE /LF2 ALP LOG END ALP FILE END - as above, but overwrite existing file /LF1 - log information displayed in both alpha regions in file /LF2 - log information displayed in REQUESTS region only - finish logging information

Command Syntax: >-- ALPha --+-- LOG --+-- name --+-- OVERwrite --. | | | | | | |-- APPend -----| | | | | | | ---------------+-- COMMands --. | -- END --> | | | |-- REQuests --| | | | | --------------+-> | -- FILE --+-- name --+-- OVERwrite --. | | | | |-- APPend -----| | | | | ---------------+--> -- END -->

3.5

Switching Text Output Off


Keywords: Description: TRACE This command, applicable in TTY mode only, controls the automatic output of the Current Element name and attributes. With Trace set to ON, the attributes display is automatically updated for each element accessed. With Trace set to OFF, the attribute display is not changed. When macros are being run, TRACE is always set to OFF automatically.

Examples: TRACE OFF TRACE ON - Stops the automatic output of attribute data. - Restarts automatic output of Current Element name and attributes.

Command Syntax:

>-- TRAce --+-- ON ---. | | -- OFF --+-->

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3.6

Defining Colours
Keywords: Description: COLOUR ACTIVE CE VISIBLE AIDS These commands allow colours to be defined so that the status of different types of item in the display may be distinguished by means of colour. The colours used have default settings, but these may be redefined. The colours may be assigned by using the COLOUR command to define the Red-Green-Blue mix for a colour number or to assign a predefined colour mix by name. PARAGON allows the use of 100 user-definable colours, plus some specific ones which are assigned to items which need to be readily distinguishable in the display. Definitions: The Active colour is used for the catalogue component being worked on (the significant element, e.g. ELBO, VALV). If the current element is a geometric primitive, the active colour is used for all primitives owned by the significant element except the current primitive. The CE colour is used for the element currently being accessed (i.e. the element highlighted in the Members list). This may be either a primitive or a significant element. The Visible colour is used for any element in the display other than those to which the active or CE colours apply. The Active and Visible elements together constitute the Draw List.

The predefined colour mixes which you may specify by name are as follows: Colour black white whitesmoke ivory grey lightgrey darkgrey darkslate red brightred coralred tomato plum deeppink pink salmon Red 0 100 96 93 66 75 32 18 80 100 80 100 55 93 80 98 Green 0 100 96 93 66 75 55 31 0 0 36 39 40 7 57 50 Blue 0 100 96 88 66 75 55 31 0 0 27 28 55 54 62 44

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Colour orange brightorange orangered maroon yellow gold lightyellow lightgold yellowgreen springgreen green forestgreen darkgreen cyan turquoise aquamarine blue royalblue navyblue powderblue midnight steelblue indigo mauve violet magenta beige wheat tan sandybrown brown khaki chocolate darkbrown

Red 93 100 100 56 80 93 93 93 60 0 0 14 18 0 0 46 0 28 0 69 18 28 20 40 93 87 96 96 86 96 80 62 93 55

Green 60 65 50 14 80 79 93 91 80 100 80 56 31 93 75 93 0 46 0 88 18 51 0 0 51 0 96 87 58 65 17 62 46 27

Blue 0 0 0 42 0 20 82 67 20 50 0 14 18 93 80 78 80 100 50 90 31 71 40 60 93 87 86 70 44 37 17 37 13 8

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The default colour assignments are: Colour No Current element Visible elements 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Examples: COL 5 DARKGREEN Colour 5 will be changed to dark green Colour yellow lightgrey grey red orange yellow green cyan blue violet brown white pink mauve turquoise indigo black magenta

COL 3 MIX RED 50 GRE 50 BLU 5 Colour 3 will change to the specified mix of red, green and blue COL VISIBLE BRIGHTRED Sets the colour for displaying components to bright red

Note: When colours are mixed in their Red, Green and Blue constituents, the command line must contain values for all three constituents in the correct order. The numbers entered for the relative proportions of the basic colours must each be in the range 0100, but they are not percentages of the overall colour and so do not need to add up to 100.

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Command Syntax:
>-- COLour -+| || || integer -. | ACTIVE --| | CE ------| | VISIble -+- colour_name --> | - MIX RED integer GREen integer BLUe integer -->

where colour_name is the name of any of the predefined colour mixes listed above. Querying: >-- Q COLour --+-| |-| |-| -integer -----. | ACTIVE ------| | CE ----------| | VISIble -----+-->

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Catalogue Database Structure

Catalogue Database Structure


This chapter details the structure of the PDMS Catalogue database. Note: Words of four or five uppercase characters which appear in this chapter (for example, CATA, BLTA, SPREF) are PDMS element names. When an elements member list is queried in PDMS, each element type will be displayed as a fourcharacter name. Five or six characters are occasionally used in this chapter where this gives a PDMS name which is closer to the elements English name, for example SPREF (instead of SPRE) for Specification Reference.

4.1

What is the Catalogue For?


The Catalogue in PDMS serves a purpose similar to a parts catalogue to which a pipework designer or structure designer would refer when using conventional design methods. It contains details of all available components (piping and structural), including their dimensions, geometry and drawing symbols. Whereas the conventional parts catalogue is a book held in the DESIGN Office, the PDMS Catalogue is a database held on the computer.

4.2

Principal Features of the Catalogue Database


If a new Catalogue database (DB) is required, PARAGON can be used to construct it - see Manipulating the Catalogue Database using PARAGON for details of creating and manipulating a Catalogue DB using PARAGON. The Catalogue data is held according to a strict hierarchy which is similar in form to that of the Design data. When a Component is selected by the designer using DESIGN, a Specification Reference (SPREF) is identified and held in the DESIGN database. The SPREF points to a Specification Component (SPCOM) in the Specification. This in turn points to a Catalogue Component (SCOM, SPRF, SJOI, SFIT, etc.) in the Catalogue (see Figure 4:1.: Interrelationship between Design Data, Catalogue and Specifications). Whereas the Design data is specific to a particular DESIGN, Catalogues and Specifications may be specific to a company but general to a number of projects in that company. For example, the same Catalogue Component may be referred to many times in a particular design and may also appear in other design projects proceeding at the same time. Catalogues are usually built up as a library of catalogue macros. A selection of these macros can then be used to build up a project-specific Catalogue database containing only those Components which might be used on that project.

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Figure 4:1.

Interrelationship between Design Data, Catalogue and Specifications

4.3

Structure of the Catalogue Database


Catalogues are constructed as a hierarchy of elements. Each element has certain attributes and some may contain further member elements. The complete Catalogue hierarchy is shown in Figure 4:2.: The Catalogue Database Hierarchy. Note that in any discussion of attributes which may appear in the rest of this chapter, the standard attributes of TYPE, NAME, OWNER and LOCK will not be mentioned, as these are common to all the elements described below. In addition, User Defined Attributes (UDAs) and User Defined Element Types (UDETs) may be used with Catalogue database elements - see the LEXICON Reference Manual for details.

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Figure 4:2.

The Catalogue Database Hierarchy

4.4

Catalogue (CATA)
CATA is the highest level element of the Catalogue hierarchy. Its attributes include: DESC - a text description of the catalogue. PURP - a PDMS word showing the specific purpose for which that catalogue is intended. This should be set to the same word as the Specification with which it is to be used; e.g. PIPE, FITT. CSTA - the Catalogue standard.

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A CATA can contain a number of Catalogue Sections. These are of two types: Piping Sections (SECT) and Structural Sections (STSEC). They are the principal administrative elements by which the Catalogue is divided and arranged. The Catalogue can also contain Text elements (TEXT) - see General Text Elements. All elements referred to in a Specification (see Specification Constructor) must exist within a CATA hierarchy, although elements may exist within a CATA which are not referred to by a Specification. Note that the following elements may also exist within the Catalogue database at the same level as CATA: Units World (UNITS) Connection Tables (CCTAB) Bolt Tables (BLTAB) Specification World (SPWL) Group World (GPWL)

Units, Connection Tables and Bolt Tables are described in Catalogue Database Elements Setup in PARAGON, the latter element type being described in more detail in the ISODRAFT Reference Manual. Specification World elements are detailed in Specification Constructor.

4.5

Catalogue Sections (SECT and STSEC) and Categories (CATE and STCA)
Sections and Categories are administrative elements which let you segregate particular types of catalogue data into logical parts of the hierarchy. Sections, which subdivide an overall CATA, are obligatory; Categories, which subdivide Sections, are optional (although their use is recommended). There are two types of Catalogue Section: Piping Sections (SECT) and Structural Sections (STSEC). Both have the following attributes: DESC - a textual description of the section. PURP - a PDMS word showing the specific purpose for which that section is intended. GTYP - a PDMS word showing the generic type for elements contained in the section. This should be the same word as that used to identify the elements in DESIGN; e.g. VALV, BEAM.

Similarly, there are two types of Category: Piping Category (CATE) and Structural Category (STCA). Both have the following principal attributes: DESC - a textual description of the category. PURP - a PDMS word showing the specific purpose for which that category is intended. This should be set to the same STYPE as in the Specification with which it is to be used; e.g. GLOB, GATE etc. for a VALV. GTYP - a PDMS word showing the generic type for elements contained in the section. SKEY - a textual symbol key showing how the item is represented in isometric drawings (see the ISODRAFT Reference Manual). PTRE - a reference to a 3D P-point Set (PTSE). GMRE - a reference to a 3D Geometry Set (GMSE). DTRE - a reference to a Data Set (DTSE).

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CDET - a reference to Detailing Text (DTEX).

Both types of Catalogue Section or Category contain the elements 3D P-point Set, 3D Geometry Set, Data Set, Detailing Text and Material Text, as described in Elements Used in Both Types of Catalogue Section/Category. Piping Sections/Categories may also contain Piping Components, as described in Elements Used in Piping Sections/Categories. Structural Sections/Categories may also contain Structural Components (Profiles, Joints and Fittings), Structural Pointsets, Negative 3D Geometry Sets and Structural Geometry Sets, as described in Elements Used in Structural Sections/Categories.

4.5.1

Elements Used in Both Types of Catalogue Section/Category


The following elements may be used in either type of Catalogue Section or Category: 3D P-point Set (PTSET) (usually abbreviated to 3D Pointset) - a definition of the position, direction, connection type and bore of a Components P-points, to be used by DESIGN, ISODRAFT, etc. 3D Geometry Set (GMSET) (usually abbreviated to 3D Geomset) - a grouping of 3D primitive elements, defining the dimensions, orientation and obstruction geometry of each primitive. Used by DESIGN and the Drawing modules. Data Set (DTSET) (usually abbreviated to Dataset) - a grouping of DATA elements, holding any catalogue data not stored more specifically elsewhere and which is required for use in DESIGN or DRAFT; e.g. the cross-sectional area of a structural steel member calculated from its parameterised dimensions. Detailing Text (DTEX) - elements containing general descriptive text relating to a Component. Referred to from SPCOM elements in the Specification. For further details see Detailing Text. Material Text (MTEX) - elements containing text describing the material(s) from which the physical Component is constructed. Referred to from SPCOM elements in the Specification. For further details see Material Text.

4.5.2

Elements Used in Piping Sections/Categories


A Piping Section or Category may contain all those elements listed in Elements Used in Both Types of Catalogue Section/Category plus the following: Piping Component (COMP) - an element defining a piece of pipework. It consists of a list of values (known as component parameters) and references to a 3D Pointset element and a 3D Geomset element. The Pointset and Geomset make use of the component parameter values in defining the size, geometry and connection types of the Piping Component.

4.5.3

Elements Used in Structural Sections/Categories


A Structural Section or Category may contain all those elements listed in Elements Used in Both Types of Catalogue Section/Category plus the following: Structural Pointset (PTSSET) - a definition of the position and direction of a Components P-lines, to be used by DESIGN. Negative 3D Geometry Set (NGMSET) (usually abbreviated to Negative 3D Geomset) - a grouping of 3D negative primitive elements (representing holes, end preparations etc.), defining the dimensions, orientation and obstruction geometry of each primitive. Used by DESIGN and the Drawing modules.

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Structural Geometry Set (GMSSET) (usually abbreviated to Structural Geomset) - a grouping of 2D primitive elements, defining the dimensions, orientation and obstruction geometry of each primitive. Used by DESIGN and the Drawing modules. Profile (PROF) - a 2D structural Component defining the cross-section of a beam, column etc. (a Section). It consists of a list of component parameters and references to a Structural Pointset element and a Structural Geomset element. The Pointset and Geomset make use of the component parameter values in defining the size and geometry of the Component. In the design process, a length is associated with a Profile to produce a Section. Joint (JOIN) - a 3D structural Component defining a physical means of attaching one Section to another. It consists of a list of component parameters and references to a Structural Pointset element, a 3D Pointset element and a 3D Geomset element. The two Pointsets and the Geomset make use of the component parameter values in defining the size and geometry of the Component. Fitting (FITT) - a 3D structural Component defining an object which is physically attached to a Section but is not part of the structure formed by Sections and Joints. For example, a Fitting may be used to attach a pipe hanger to a Section. The element consists of a list of component parameters and references to a 3D Pointset element and a 3D Geomset element. The Pointset and Geomset make use of the component parameter values in defining the size and geometry of the Component.

The Catalogue structure as described so far may be used in various ways, but the recommended method of use is to place only one type of element in each Catalogue Section, and to place different kinds of Components in different Catalogue Categories. For example, you might place all 3D Pointsets for Piping Components in one Piping Section and all 3D Geomsets for Piping Components in another, with separate Piping Sections for equal tees and reducing tees. When defining Profiles, you might place Profiles for Universal Beams in one Structural Section, Profiles for Unequal Angles in another, and so on.

4.6

Text (TEXT)
The Text is a general element that can occupy many positions in the hierarchy. It can be used to store additional information about an owning or adjacent element. The TEXT element should not be confused with the MTEX and DTEX elements described in Elements Used in Both Types of Catalogue Section/Category. See General Text Elements for further details.

4.7

Parameters
Parameters define the size, geometry and other characteristics of Components. They are used in setting the attributes of the Pointsets, Geomsets and Datasets to which Component elements refer. All classes of Component can use component parameters, design parameters and insulation parameters. Structural Components can also use attached and owning design parameters. Component parameters are defined in the Catalogue; the other classes of parameters allow characteristics to be set during the design process.

4.7.1

Component Parameters
Piping Components (COMP), Profiles (PROF), Joints (JOIN) and Fittings (FITT) all have a PARAM attribute which lists the component parameters.

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Creating Catalogues, Sections and Catalogue Components describes how to set up the component parameters of a Component. You may define default values which PARAGON will use if you are working with a Component whose component parameters have not been set up. The values are set using the MODEL SETTINGS command. For example,

MODEL SETTINGS PARAM 1 10


defines a default value of 10 for component parameter number 1. See Model Settings for the full syntax of how to set default values. These default values are set up only for the current PARAGON session. They are not stored in the Catalogue DB. You must define the component parameters of a Component before you use it in the DESIGN DB.

4.7.2

Insulation Parameters
A design element in the DESIGN DB refers to a main Catalogue Component (indirectly) via its Specification Reference (SPREF) attribute. The design element may also refer to a second Catalogue Component which defines the insulation of the first Component, via its Insulation Specification (ISPEC) attribute. The second Component is the Insulation Component of the design element. Insulation parameters (IPARAM) allow the main Component to take dimensions from the Insulation Component. When the main Component uses IPARAM 3, for example, it picks up the value of the PARAM 3 of the corresponding Insulation Component. When you define a Catalogue Component using insulation parameters, its dimensions are not completely specified in the Catalogue. So that PARAGON can give some idea of what the Component will look like when used in a design, you can define specimen values for the insulation parameters. These specimen values apply to all Components, unlike the component parameters which are attributes of a particular Component. The values are set using the MODEL SETTINGS command. For example,

MODEL SETTINGS IPARAM 3 25


defines a specimen value for insulation parameter number 3. See Setting Obstruction and Insulation Representation for the full syntax of how to set values for insulation parameters. The values are not stored in the Catalogue DB; they are set up only for the current PARAGON session.

4.7.3

Structural Parameters
These allow Joint and Fitting Components to take dimensions from the Section or Sections (beam, column, etc.) to which they are physically connected. In this way, a basic design of Joint or Fitting may be adjusted automatically in the Design DB to fit a connected Section of any size. (Structural parameters are meaningless for Profiles.) Structural parameters are of four types: Attached parameters (APARAM) Owning parameters (OPARAM) Design attached parameters (DES APARAM) Design owning parameters (DES OPARAM).

The types of structural parameter that a Component can use depends on whether it is a Piping Component, Profile, Joint or Fitting. In the case of a Joint, it also depends on how the Component is used in the Design DB.

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Joints are of two types: primary and secondary. A primary Joint has an attached Section in the Design DB; a secondary Joint has an attached Section and an owning Section. (See the DESIGN Reference Manual for details of primary and secondary Joints.) Note that primary and secondary Joints are represented by the same class of Catalogue Component, but the settings of their attributes and the attributes of their Pointsets and Geomsets are different. A Fitting Component has an owning Section in the Design DB. Components which have an attached Section (i.e. primary and secondary Joints) can use attached parameters to define the attributes of their Pointsets and Geomsets. Attached parameters correspond to the component parameters of the attached Section. For example, when a Joint component uses APARAM 2, it picks up the value of the PARAM 2 of the Joints attached Section. Similarly, Components which have an owning Section (i.e. secondary Joints and Fittings) can use owning parameters in defining the attributes of their Pointsets and Geomsets. Owning parameters correspond to the component parameters of the owning Section. For example, when a Joint or Fitting component uses OPARAM 5, it picks up the value of the PARAM 5 of the components owning Section. You can define specimen values for structural parameters in the same way as for insulation parameters. For example,

MODEL SETTINGS APARAM 2 300


defines a specimen value of 300 for attached parameter number 2. See Section 5.9? for the full syntax of how to set values for structural parameters.

4.7.4

Design DB Parameters
These allow structural Components to take dimensions from Design Parameter Arrays in the Design DB. Each design element has a Design Parameter Array with ten values. (See the DESIGN Reference Manual for further details.) Design DB parameters are of three types: Design parameters (DES PARAM) Design attached parameters (DES APARAM, structural items only) Design owning parameters (DES OPARAM, structural items only)

Design parameters allow any component with an SPREF to use values from the design element which refers to it (via the SPREF). For example, the DES PARAM 4 of a Component is the fourth value in the Design Parameter Array of the design element. Design parameters can be used anywhere that component parameters can be used. Design attached parameters and design owning parameters allow a Joint or Fitting Component to use values from the design elements which represent its attached and owning Sections. (Attached and owning sections are explained in Structural Parameters.) For example, the DES OPARAM 1 of a Component is the first value in the Design Parameter Array of the design element of its owning Section. Design attached parameters can be used anywhere that attached parameters can be used. Similarly, design owning parameters in place of owning parameters. You can define specimen values for Design DB parameters in the same way as for insulation parameters. For example,

MODEL SETTINGS DES PARAM 7 9.5

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defines a specimen value of 9.5 for design parameter number 7. See Model Settings for the full syntax of how to set values for Design DB parameters. Figure 4:3.: Table of Parameters and Components summarises how the various types of parameters may be used with the different classes of Component.

Applicable to: Parameter:


Catalogue Component Parameters Insulation Parameters Attached Parameters (Structural) Owning Parameters (Structural) Design Parameters (Design DB) Design Attached Parameters Design Owning Parameters (PARAM) (IPARAM) (APARAM) (OPARAM) (DES PARAM) (DES APARAM) (DES OPARAM)

Piping Comp't (COMP)

Profile (PROF)

Prim'y Joint (PJOI)

Sec'y Joint (SJOI)

Fitting (FITT)

b b

b b

b b b

b b b b

b b

b b

b b

b b b

Figure 4:3.

Table of Parameters and Components

4.8

Catalogue Components
There are four classes of Catalogue Component: Piping Component Profile Joint Fitting

Their attributes are described in the following sections. These attributes (other than the component parameters) must be set to actual values (words or references to other elements). They cannot be defined using parameters. A reference to an element is usually set to the name of the element, for example /PTSR3, but it can also be set as a general identifier, for example:

PTSE 4 OF SECT 2 OF CATA /ASA-CATA


The attributes of Pointsets and Geomsets may be defined using component parameters, design parameters and insulation parameters. Where appropriate, attributes for structural items may also be defined using design owning parameters and design attached parameters. A component parameter may be a numeric value, an expression or a word. (The full syntax for expressions is defined in the Plant Design Software Customisation Guide.) An insulation parameter, a structural parameter or a Design DB parameter may only be a numeric value or an expression. The values assigned to parameters and the use to which they are put, and the number of parameters used, are arbitrary, depending only on the skill and experience of the user. Manipulating the Catalogue Database using PARAGON contains examples of the parameterisation of typical Components. Catalogue Components do not have member elements.

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4.8.1

Piping Component (COMP; SCOM)


The attributes of a Piping Component are: PTREF - reference to a 3D Pointset element. GMREF - reference to a 3D Geomset element. PARAM - the component parameters, a list of values used in the 3D Pointset and 3D Geomset to define the Component. GTYPE - a word attribute indicating the generic type of the Piping Component, selected from the following: ATTA BEND CAP CLOS COUP CROS DUCT ELBO FBLI FILT FLAN or FLG FTUB GASK HELE INST INSU LJSE NOZZ OLET PCOM REDU SHU TEE TRAC TRAP TUBE UNIO VALV VENT VFWA VTWA WELD attachment pipe bend end cap closure coupling cross piece ducting fitting elbow blind flange filter flange fixed length tube gasket hanger element instrument insulation lap joint stub end nozzle weldolets pipe component reducer standard hook-up fitting tee tracing steam trap implied tube union valve open-ended pipe or vent four-way valve three-way valve weld

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The GTYPE must be set as one of the above, otherwise a data consistency check on a Branch containing the Component (see the DESIGN Reference Manual) will not work correctly. DTREF - reference to a Dataset element.

4.8.2

Profile (PROF; SPRF)


The attributes of a Profile are: PSTREF - reference to a Structural Pointset element. GSTREF - reference to a Structural Geomset element. PARAM - the component parameters, a list of values used in the Structural Pointset and Structural Geomset to define the Component. GTYPE - a word attribute indicating the generic type of the Profile. Any word value may be used. The following are suggested: BEAM BRAC COLU GANT GIRD JOIS PILE PROF PURL RIDG SDRA beam brace column gantry girder joist pile profile purlin ridge side rail

DTREF - reference to a Dataset element.

4.8.3

Joint (JOIN; SJOI)


The attributes of a Joint are: PSTREF - reference to a Structural Pointset element. PTREF - reference to a 3D Pointset element. GMREF - reference to a 3D Geomset element. PARAM - the component parameters, a list of values used in the Structural Pointset, 3D Pointset and 3D Geomset to define the Component. GTYPE - a word attribute indicating the generic type of the Joint. Any word value may be used. The following are suggested: BASE JOIN KNEE base joint knee

CTYA - a word attribute indicating how the Joint is fixed to the attached Section (the Joints connection type for the attached Section). Any word value may be used. If the

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connection type attribute of the attached Section (CTYS or CTYE) has not been set when the Joint is selected in the design process, the attribute will automatically be set to the value of CTYA. The PDMS data consistency checks (see the DESIGN Reference Manual) check whether the connection type attributes of the Joint and attached Section match. CTYO - similar to CTYA, but for the Joints owning Section (secondary Joints only). DTREF - reference to a Dataset element.

4.8.4

Fitting (FITT; SFIT)


The attributes of a Fitting are: PTREF - reference to a 3D Pointset element. GMREF - reference to a 3D Geomset element. PARAM - the component parameters, a list of values used in the Structural Pointset, 3D Pointset and 3D Geomset to define the Component. GTYPE - a word attribute indicating the generic type of the Fitting. Any word value may be used, but the word FITT is suggested. CTYA - a word attribute used only if the Fitting is attached to a pipe hanger in the Design DB. Any word value may be used. If the connection type attribute of the pipe hanger (HCON or TCON) has not been set when the Fitting is selected in the design process, the attribute will automatically be set to the value of CTYA. The PDMS data consistency checks (see the DESIGN Reference Manual) check whether the connection type attributes of the Fitting and pipe hanger match. DTREF - reference to a Dataset element.

Note: For details of the MODEL SETTINGS command syntax used to set default values for component parameters, and specimen values for other classes of parameter, see Model Settings.

4.9

Component Parts
The GPART element allows catalogue components to be fully defined in one place and without the need for specifications, and these can be used by all disciplines. The GPART element has the same standard attributes as a SPCO, including CATREF, DETREF, MATXT, CMPREF and BLTREF, along with other attributes specific to the Part. It is also possible to add any number of user defined properties to each individual Part. Parts can be added to the Selection Tables for selecting Parts in the design module, and these can be used for all disciplines except piping. For the piping discipline it is possible to add Parts to Piping Specifications in the same way as SPCOs. It is possible to select Parts in the design model directly from the catalogue, using filtered searches.

4.9.1

Hierarchy
Parts are defined under a new Part World hierarchy:

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The PRTELEs can be used to define a hierarchy with any number of levels, allowing flexible grouping of Parts in the database.

4.10

Selection Tables
Selection Tables are used for selecting Component Parts in the design model. They provide the following methods of selection: 1. Selection Criteria can be used to offer you a choice of Parts based on the current design context (e.g. captain or crew cabin, inside or outside hull, etc.) 2. Attributes Filters can be used to allow you to search the selection table for Parts with matching attributes. 3. A combination of 1 and 2 can be used. Note: It will also be possible to use attribute filters to select Parts directly from the catalogue without using selection tables at all, however the use of selection tables is recommended where only a subset of the whole Part catalogue should be used on a particular project.

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4.10.1

Hierarchy
Selection tables will be stored under a new hierarchy as shown below:

1. The Table Group will contain Selection Tables that are related in some way (at least one table group for each discipline). 2. The Selection Table will contain one Table Header and numerous Table Items. 3. The Table Header defines the selection questions for that table. 4. The Table Items have a reference to the corresponding Part, and hold the selection answers for that Part.

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Manipulating the Catalogue Database using PARAGON


PARAGON has a Graphical User Interface consisting of forms and menus. The interface provides access to the most commonly used facilities. To enter direct command syntax, use the Display>Command Line menu option to open a special window which accepts command inputs and displays system outputs. This section describes PARAGON keyboard-entered commands in detail. If you need information on how to use PARAGON to carry out the principal Catalogue design activities with minimal use of the keyboard, by using the Graphical User Interface, refer to the Catalogues and Specifications User Guide.

5.1
5.1.1

Basic Element Operation Commands


Querying
QUERY e.g. QUERY ATTRIBUTES

5.1.2

Creation, Deletion etc


NEW DELETE REORDER COPY RENAME INCLUDE e.g. NEW SECTION e.g. DELETE SREC e.g. REORDER 5 BEFORE 3 e.g. COPY /VALVES2-1 e.g. RENAME /UEANGLE80 /UEANGLE100 e.g. INCLUDE SCOM 6 OF /FLAN300 BEFORE 2

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5.1.3

Implicit Element Referencing


OLD END SAME CE OWNER GOTO e.g. GOTO PTREF

5.1.4

List Position Changing


FIRST LAST NEXT PREVIOUS number list position number, e.g. 5 (Can be just command word by itself or followed by element type, for example FIRST LCYL)

5.1.5

Standard Attribute Setting


NAME UNNAME LOCK UNLOCK These commands are those which are common to all constructor modules of PDMS and some are used in this chapter without further explanation. However, the element types which the above commands operate on relate to the Catalogue database rather than the Design database (so, for example, NEXT SITE is meaningless in PARAGON).

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5.2

Creating Catalogues, Sections and Catalogue Components


Catalogues and Sections are created using the NEW command. You would normally also specify names by which you can recognise and refer to the elements created. For example:

NEW CATA /ANSI-CATALOGUE


will create a Catalogue with the name /ANSI-CATALOGUE in the Catalogue database.

NEW SECT /FLANGES NEW STSEC /PROFILES


will create a Piping Section with the name /FLANGES and a Structural Section with the name /PROFILES. Similarly,

NEW CATEG /ANSI-B16.5-CLASS-300-BLIND-FLANGES NEW STCAT /UNIVERSAL-BEAM


will create a Piping Category and a Structural Category with the names given. A Catalogue Component is represented by one of the Component elements SCOM, SPRF, SJOI, SFIT (see Catalogue Components).

NEW SCOM
will create a Piping Component with unspecified component parameters, the values of which may be set later. If the Component is to be named, this can be done at the same time; for example,

NEW SFIT /EKAA2VEE


The attributes of the Component (see Catalogue Components) are set simply by following the attribute with the word, name or value(s) to be assigned to it. For example:

NEW SCOM GTYPE ELBO PTREF /PSE1 GMREF /GSE1 PARAM 20 19.1 12.7 37.1 BWD
The above commands create a Piping Component, of generic type ELBO, which is defined by 3D Pointset /PSE1 and 3D Geomset /GSE1, and which has the five component parameters shown. The Pointset and Geomset which are referred to by name must already exist; they would have been created by the commands

NEW PTSET /PSE1 NEW GMSET /GSE1


All five component parameters have been given values using a single command line, but they can be given values individually by using commands such as

PARAM[1] 20 PARAM{2] 19 ... etc.


Note: You can only use the PARAM[number] syntax to change the value of a parameter which has already been set.

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This facility allows component parameter definitions to be edited. (Caution: If you delete a COMP which is referred to by a SPCO - via the CATREF attribute of a design component this reference will be lost.). The use of component parameters and the other classes of parameter is discussed and illustrated in the next section. Note: If you give a PARAM command with, say, four values as a single command line, PARAGON sets the values of the first four component parameters and deletes all the rest. You may define default values which PARAGON will use if you are working with a Component whose component parameters have not been set up. See Parameters for details. The attributes of a Component may be queried by a

QUERY ATTRIBUTES
command, or may be queried individually by name. Component parameters can be queried as a set by using the command

QUERY PARAMETERS
or singly by using commands such as

QUERY PARAMETER[1] QUERY PARAMETER[2] etc.

5.3
5.3.1

Using Parameters
Introduction
Piping Components, Profiles and Fittings each use one type of Pointset and one type of Geomset. Joints use both types of Pointset and one type of Geomset. The attributes of Pointsets and Geomsets may be defined in terms of parameters, set either explicitly or as real expressions (which may themselves incorporate the current settings of other parameters). (The classes of parameter which may be used depend on the class of Component - see Parameters for details.) For example, the bore of a P-point could be defined by entering

PBORE (PARAM[1])
This means that the value assigned to the bore of the P-point is the value of the first component parameter. The Y dimension of a box in a 3D Geomset used by a Joint could be defined as the expression

PYLEN (APARAM[2] + 3)
This means that the Y dimension of the box is to be given a value in the design process, taken from the Section to which the Joint is attached. The value of the Y dimension of the box is the value of the second component parameter of the attached Profile plus 3 mm.

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The use of parameters makes it possible to use the same Pointsets and Geomsets for large numbers of catalogue items. For example, there may be families of tees, valves, I-beam profiles etc., each family containing items which are geometrically similar. In this way, the Catalogue size and the effort needed to prepare input data are minimised. Examples of the parameterisation of typical Components are given later in this chapter. The values assigned to parameters, the uses to which they are put, and the number of parameters used, are arbitrary, depending only on the skill and experience of the user, except in the special case of a Piping Component which represents implied tubing (GTYPE attribute set to TUBE) and which has no Geomset. In this case, component parameter 2 must be the outside diameter. If the tube is to be insulated, insulation parameter 1 must be twice the thickness of the insulation. Note: on the use of Insulation Parameters: Insulation parameters may be used in two ways. They may be used in an additive manner to increase the diameter or length of a primitive or, if there is a significant change in the geometry from the uninsulated to the insulated form, they may be used to define a new primitive. Where there is no insulation, the insulation parameters will be zero, yielding a primitive of zero diameter (but probably non-zero length).

5.3.2

Expressions Using Parameters


Any expression which includes parameters and which evaluates to a real result may be built into definitions of Pointsets and Geomsets. For example:

PDIA (4.5 * PARA[2]) PDIS (-PARA[2]) PBOR (PARA[7] + IPARA[1]) PHEI (PARA[2] + 50) PDIS (APARA[2] - PARA[7]) PDIA (-(PARA[1] - PARA[5])) PX (2 * OPARA[3]) PTDIS (PARA[2] * DESP[5]) PHEI (PARA[4] / ODESP[1]) PZ (5 * (ADESP[3] * PARA[9]) PDIS (3.1 * (PARA[1] + HEIG)) PHEI (PARA[1] * TAN (ANGL / 2))
(For the full range of expression syntax available, see the DESIGN Software Customisation Guide.)

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5.4

Examples of Parameterisation
Example 1 A Slip-On Flange

Figure 5:1.

Example of Parameterisation for a Slip-On Flange

A slip-on flange can be parameterised using five component parameters, as shown in Figure 5:1.: Example of Parameterisation for a Slip-On Flange. PARAM 1 - PBORE PARAM 2 - Outside Diameter PARAM 3 - Thickness PARAM 4 - Connection Type at P1 PARAM 5 - Connection Type at P2

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Example 2 A Reducing Tee

Figure 5:2.

Example of Parameterisation for a Reducing Tee

A reducing tee might be parameterised using 12 component parameters, as shown in Figure 5:2.: Example of Parameterisation for a Reducing Tee. PARAM 1 - Nominal bore of main run (PBOR1) PARAM 2 - Outside diameter of main run PARAM 3 - Nominal bore of branch (PBOR3) PARAM 4 - Outside diameter of branch PARAM 5 - Half overall length of main run PARAM 6 - Standout length of branch run PARAM 7 - Connection type of main run PARAM 8 - Connection type of branch run PARAM 9 - Flange diameter of main run PARAM 10 - Flange thickness of main run PARAM 11 - Flange diameter of branch run PARAM 12 - Flange thickness of branch run Equal and reducing welded tees using parameters 1-8 Equal and reducing flanged tees using all the parameters

Other families of tees could be defined as follows:

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Example 3 A Universal Beam Profile

Figure 5:3.

Example of Parameterisation for a Universal Beam Profile

A Universal Beam Profile might be parameterised using four component parameters, as shown in Figure 5:3.: Example of Parameterisation for a Universal Beam Profile. PARAM 1 - Overall height of Profile PARAM 2 - Flange width PARAM 3 - Web thickness PARAM 4 - Flange thickness

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Example 4 An Angle Joint

Figure 5:4.

Example of Parameterisation for an Angle Joint

An Angle Joint might be parameterised using three component parameters and two attached parameters, as shown in Figure 5:4.: Example of Parameterisation for an Angle Joint. PARAM 1 - Overall height of angle leg PARAM 2 - Overall length of angle foot PARAM 3 - Thickness of leg and foot APARA 1 - Height of profile of attached Section APARA 2 - Width of flange of attached Section

5.5

Constructing 3D Pointsets
A 3D Pointset defines the connection information of a Piping Component, Joint or Fitting as explained in Component Design. For the three types of P-point elements which may be contained in a 3D Pointset, you must define the following attributes:

5.5.1

PTAXI
A P-point number (NUMB) An axis direction (PAXI) (parallel to X, Y, Z or in the XY, YZ or ZX plane) A distance along the specified axis (PDIS) Connection type (PCON) Bore (PBOR) P-point symbol key (PSKEY) (see Defining a Direction)

If the Pointset is used by a Piping Component, you may optionally define the attributes:

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PCON and PBOR are meaningless if the Pointset is used by a Joint or Fitting.

Figure 5:5.

Example of three Axial P-Points

5.5.2

PTCAR
A P-point number (NUMB) An axis direction (PTCDIR) (in any plane) An explicit position (PX, PY, PZ) (explicit coordinates) Connection type (PCON) Bore (PBOR) P-point symbol key (PSKEY) (see Defining a Direction)

If the Pointset is used by a Piping Component, you may optionally define the attributes:

PCON and PBOR are meaningless if the Pointset is used by a Joint or Fitting.

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Figure 5:6.

Example of two Cartesian P-Points

5.5.3

PTMIX
A P-point number (NUMB) An axis direction (PAXI) (parallel to X, Y, Z or in the XY, YZ or ZX plane) An explicit position (PX, PY, PZ) (explicit coordinates) Connection type (PCON) Bore (PBOR) P-point symbol key (PSKEY) (see Defining a Direction)

If the Pointset is used by a Piping Component, you may optionally define the attributes:

PCON and PBOR are meaningless if the Pointset is used by a Joint or Fitting.

Figure 5:7.

Example of two Mixed P-Points

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5.5.4

Example of Defining a 3D Pointset


A suitable 3D Pointset for the reducing tee shown in Figure 5:2.: Example of Parameterisation for a Reducing Tee would be created as follows: NEW PTSET /RTPTSE NEW PTAX NUMBER 1 PAXI -Y PDIS (PARA[5]) PCON (PARA[7]) PBOR (PARA[1]) NEW PTAX NUM 2 PAXI Y PDIS (PARA[5]) PCON (PARA[7]) PBOR (PARA[1]) NEW PTAX NUM 3 PAXI X PDIS (PARA[6]) PCON (PARA[8]) PBOR (PARA[3]) Notice how all the P-point attributes may be defined on one line. The last P-point (P3) could alternatively be defined as a Cartesian P-point: NEW PTCAR NUM 3 PCON (PARA[8]) PBOR (PARA[3]) PX (PARA[6]) PY 0 PZ 0 PTCDIR X Further examples of the construction of typical 3D Pointsets are given in Appendix C. Reference information concerning the setting up of the P-point attributes is given in the following subsections. Create new 3D Pointset Create axial P-point element P1 Direction of P1 along negative Y axis Distance along axis from P0 = half overall length Connection type at P1 Nominal bore at P1

5.5.5

Defining an Axis
The PAXI attribute of a P-point can be defined in one of two ways: by a direction letter, e.g. PAXI Z by an angle in the XY plane (see below). You can specify the angle as a number DDANGLE a parameter TWICE a parameter

The classes of parameter which you can use depend on the class of the Component which uses the P-point - see Parameters for details. If you do not define the axis, PAXI Y is assumed.

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Figure 5:8.

P-point Axis Definition

5.5.6

Defining a Distance
Distance in a PTAXI element is defined by the PDISTANCE keyword (minimum abbreviation PDIS) followed by a value or a parameter function. For example:

PDIS 100 PDIS (PARAM[1]

sets P-point position to 100 units along defined axis sets P-point position to (value of first component parameter) units along defined axis

If you do not define the distance, a value of zero is assumed. For the reducing tee shown in Figure 5:2.: Example of Parameterisation for a Reducing Tee, the position of P-point 3 could be defined by the commands:

PAXI X PDIS (PARAM[2])


since PARAM 2 is the dimension called height.

5.5.7

Defining an Explicit Position


Position in a PTCAR element and a PTMIX element is defined by the PX, PY and PZ keywords, each followed by a value or a parameter function. For example: PX 100 PY (0.5 * APARA[3]) sets P-point X coordinate to 100 sets Y coordinate to (0.5 times value of third attached parameter) units

PZ (PARA[2] * SIN (ANGLE / 2)) sets Z coordinate to (second component parameter times sine of half design angle) units If you do not define a coordinate, a value of zero is assumed.

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5.5.8

Defining a Direction
Direction in a PTCAR element is defined by the PTCDIRECTION keyword (minimum abbreviation PTCDIR), followed by the direction specified in terms of the X, Y, Z axes and rotations towards those axes. For example: PTCDIR X45Y PTCDIR X(ANGL / 2)Y45U direction is along the X axis, rotated 45 degrees towards the Y axis includes an expression for the Y component

For other examples, see Figure 5:6.: Example of two Cartesian P-Points. Note that any one, any two, or all three of X, Y, Z may be present in the PTCDIR command line, in any order. The rotation value may be positive, negative or absent altogether (i.e. zero). If you do not define the direction, DIR Y is assumed.

5.5.9

Defining Connection, Bore and Number


These three attributes are common to all three types of P-point elements, and are set by the PBORE, PCONNECTION and NUMBER (minimum abbreviations PBOR, PCON, NUM) commands respectively. PBOR and PCON may be set as parameter functions as well as words. Examples:

PBORE (0.5 * PARAM[2]) PCONN BWD PCONN (PARAM[7]) NUMBER 3


If you do not define the bore or the P-point number, a value of zero is assumed.

5.5.10

Controlling the Appearance


How a P-point is drawn depends on the REPRESENTATION settings. This is discussed in P-point and P-line Representation.

5.5.11

Specifying Pipe End Conditions for use by ISODRAFT


The symbol used by ISODRAFT to represent a particular piping component on an isometric drawing is determined by the symbol key (SKEY attribute setting) for that component. (See the ISODRAFT Reference Manual for a full explanation of this concept.) By default, each SKEY has associated with it a standard end condition (showing the pipe connection type) which applies to each of the components connection points. The end condition for any individual connection point may be modified, if required, by setting the PSKEY attribute of the corresponding P-point to a PDMS word chosen from the following: BW CP FL SC SW PL Butt Weld Compression Flange Screwed Socket Weld Plain

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The effect of setting PSKEY to one of these words for a P-point of type PTAXI, PTCAR or PTMIX is that ISODRAFT will then add the symbolic representation of the specified end condition to the symbol derived from the corresponding SKEY when it plots an isometric drawing showing the component. The default setting for PSKEY is always NULL, which means that ISODRAFT plots only the standard end conditions for the symbol. Note that the effect is additive, so that ISODRAFT superimposes any user-specified end condition (derived from a non-Null PSKEY setting) on top of any end condition which forms part of the standard symbol associated with the SKEY. The use of the PSKEY facility is, therefore, applicable mainly to components which do not have other end conditions already defined, particularly those associated with user-defined symbols (as detailed in the ISODRAFT Reference Manual).

5.6

Constructing Structural Pointsets


A Structural Pointset defines the connection information of a Profile or Joint as explained in Structural Pointsets (PTSSET). A Structural Pointset has a neutral axis reference attribute in addition to the standard attributes, and contains P-lines.

5.6.1

Example of Defining a Structural Pointset


A suitable Structural Pointset for the Profile shown in Figure 5:3.: Example of Parameterisation for a Universal Beam Profile would be created as follows: NEW PTSSET /UBPTSE NEW PLIN /UB-TOS PKEY TOS PLAXI Y PY (0.5 * PARA[1]) CLFLA TRUE TUFLA FALSE NEW PLIN /UB-BOS Create new Structural Pointset Create P-line element for top of steel Define key Direction of P-line along positive Y axis Distance in Y direction from component origin = half overall height. (There is no need to set PX, because it is zero.) Display P-line in centreline representation but not in tube representation Create new P-line element for bottom of steel

PKEY BOS PLAXI -Y PY (-0.5 * PARA[1]) CLFLA TRUE TUFLA FALSE NEW PLIN /UB-NA Create new P-line element for neutral axis

PKEY NAXI PLAXI Y CLFLA TRUE TUFLA FALSE END NAREF /UB-NA Make the Structural Pointset the current element Define neutral axis reference

Notice how all the P-line attributes may be defined on one line. Reference information concerning the setting up of the P-line attributes is given in Defining an Axis to Controlling the Appearance.

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5.6.2

The Neutral Axis Reference


The neutral axis reference identifies a P-line in the Structural Pointset. It is set by the NAREF command. The attribute is usually set to the name of the P-line, but may be set to the P-lines number in the member list of the Pointset. For example: NAREF /UB-NA NAREF 3 Sets neutral axis reference to the P-line called /UB-NA Sets neutral axis reference to the third P-line of the Structural Pointset

If you do not set NAREF, DESIGN will make an assumption about where the neutral axis is. You are strongly recommended to set the neutral axis reference in the Catalogue. DESIGN will use as the neutral axis the first P-line in the Structural Pointset which has a PKEY value of NA, if any. Failing that, it will choose the first P-line with a PKEY value of NAXI, and failing that, it will choose the first P-line with a PKEY value of ZAXI. If there are no P-lines with a PKEY value of NA or NAXI or ZAXI, DESIGN will assume that the neutral axis of the Component lies at the component origin and has a direction along the positive Y axis.

Figure 5:9.

P-line Axis Definition

5.6.3

Defining an Axis
The PLAXI attribute of a P-line can be defined in one of two ways: by a direction letter, e.g. PLAXI Y by an angle in the XY plane (see below). You can specify the angle as a numbe DDANGLE a parameter

TWICE a parameter The classes of parameter which you can use depend on the class of the Component which uses the P point - see Parameters for details. If you do not define the axis, PLAXI Y is assumed.

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5.6.4

Defining a Position
Position in a P-line element is defined by the PX and PY keywords, each followed by a value or a parameter function. For example: PX 50 PY (0.5 * DESPAR[2]) sets P-line X coordinate to 50 sets P-line Y coordinate to 0.5 * (value of second design parameter) units

If you do not define a coordinate, a value of zero is assumed.

5.6.5

Defining a Key
A P-line is identified by its key in the same way as a P-point is identified by its number. The key is defined by the PKEY keyword followed by a word. For example: PKEY TOS sets P-line key to TOS

PKEY may be set to any desired word value. Typical values are: TOS BOS NA, NAXI or ZAXI Top of steel, for a P-line at the top of the Profile Bottom of steel, for a P-line at the bottom of the Profile Neutral axis P-line

5.6.6

Controlling the Appearance


Whether a P-line is drawn or not depends on the settings of its LEVEL, TUFLA and CLFLA attributes, and the REPRESENTATION settings. How a P-line is drawn also depends on the REPRESENTATION settings. See P-point and P-line Representation for details.

5.7

Constructing 3D Geomsets
A 3D Geomset is a grouping of the primitive elements which make up a Piping Component, Joint or Fitting. It specifies the dimensions, orientation and obstruction geometry of each primitive. The Geomset defines what is drawn for a particular Component by PARAGON (and other PDMS modules), and also defines the obstruction geometry of the Component for use when clash checking. Each Component is built up from a combination of threedimensional primitives, as listed in 3D Geomsets (GMSET). Creating a Geomset consists of creating the relevant member primitives and setting the attributes for each primitive. For each primitive the OBST attribute must be set, whilst for a primitive that is required to be drawn the LEVEL, TUFLA and CLFLA attributes must also be set. (See Component Design and Representation in PARAGON and the DESIGN Reference Manual for details of these attributes.) 3D Geomset elements and their attributes are listed in 3D Geomset Primitives. Note: Only the first 20 primitives in a Geomset with OBST values of 1 or 2 are considered by DESIGNs clash checking facility. By using the TUFLA and CLFLA flags, you can create two different drawings of a Component, a double-line representation (tube) and a single-line stick representation (centreline).

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To define the tube representation for the tee shown in Figure 5:2.: Example of Parameterisation for a Reducing Tee (with clash geometry) the commands shown below could be used. (The P-points in the following examples relate to the Pointset defined in PTAXI.) NEW GMSET /RTGMSE NEW SCYL PAXI -Y PDIS (PARA[5]) PDIA (PARA[2]) PHEI (-2 * PARA[5]) OBST 2 TUFL TRUE CLFL FALSE NEW SCYL PAXI X PDIS 0 PHEI (PARA[6]) PDIA (PARA[4]) OBST 2 TUFL TRUE CLFL FALSE To define the centreline representation for the tee (with welded joints), the following commands could be used. Figure 5:10.: Centreline Representation of a Reducing Tee shows the symbol produced. The illustration is drawn with REPRESENTATION PPOINTS ON LENGTH 0 NUMBERS ON. The P-points are thus displayed as dots, but they cannot be seen because they lie on the displayed LINEs. Create new 3D Geomset Create cylinder primitive Direction of axis on which SCYL origin lies Distance of SCYL origin from tee origin = half overall length Outside diameter of main run Height of SCYL Set obstruction value as hard Set drawing flags

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Figure 5:10. Centreline Representation of a Reducing Tee

NEW SSPH PAXI -Y PDIS (PARA[5]) PDIA (0.1 * PARA[1]) OBST 0 TUFLA FALSE CLFL TRUE NEW SSPH PAXI P2 PDIS 0 PDIA (0.1 * PARA[1]) OBST 0 CLFL TRUE NEW SSPH PAXI P3 PDIS 0 PDIA (0.1 * PARA[3]) OBST 0 CLFL TRUE NEW LINE P3 P0 OBST 0 CLFL TRUE DIAM 1

Create sphere primitive (to represent weld) Direction of axis on which sphere origin lies Distance of sphere origin from tee origin = half overall length Sphere diameter relative to bore size Clash checking to ignore item Set drawing flags

Set axis direction and origin in terms of P-point 2 PAXI P2 PDIS 0 is equivalent to PAXI Y PDIS (PARA[5]))

Define line elements

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NEW LINE P1 P2 OBST 0 CLFL TRUE DIAM 1 Note how a P-point has been used to define an axis direction and origin for a primitive - see Reference Section for details. To put the flanges on the tee the first two representations (as given above) would remain the same but the centreline representation would not need the SSPH elements (which represent the welds). The latter are replaced by using the following commands to represent the flanged connections:

NEW SCYL PAXI P1 PHEI (-PARA[10]) PDIA (PARA[9]) PDIS 0 OBST 2 CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE NEW SCYL COPY PREV PAXI P2 NEW LCYL PAXI P3 PTDI 0 PBDI (-PAR[12]) PDIA (PAR[11]) OBST 2 CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE

5.8

Constructing Structural Geomsets


A Structural Geomset is a grouping of the 2D primitive elements which make up a Profile. Like the 3D Geomset, it specifies the dimensions, orientation and obstruction geometry of each primitive. It also defines the symbol that is drawn for a particular Component and the obstruction geometry of the Component. The Profile is built up from a combination of Structural Rectangles (SREC) and Structural Annuli (SANN), as described in Structural Geomsets (GMSSET). Structural Geomset elements and their attributes are listed in Structural Geomset Primitives. To define the tube representation for the Profile shown in Figure 5:3.: Example of Parameterisation for a Universal Beam Profile, the commands shown below could be used. A simplified clash geometry for the Profile is specified by defining a bounding box for the Profile with hard obstruction and giving the primitives of the Profile itself no obstruction. The P-lines used are those defined in Example of Defining a Structural Pointset. NEW GMSSET /UBGMSS NEW SRECT PXLE (PARA[1]) PYLE (PARA[1] - 2 * PARA[4]) Create new 2D Geomset Create rectangle primitive for web Web thickness Web length (PX and PY are zero, so there is no need to set them) PLAXI Y TUFL TRUE CLFL FALSE OBST 0 NEW SRECT Direction of axis of rectangle Set drawing flags Set obstruction value as none Create rectangle primitive for upper flange

PXLE (PARA[2]) PYLE (PARA[4]) Flange length and thickness PY (0.5 * (PARA[1] - PARA[4])) PLAXI Y Position of rectangle origin Direction of axis of rectangle

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TUFL TRUE CLFL FALSE OBST 0 NEW SRECT PXLE (PARA[2]) PYLE (PARA[4]) PY (-0.5 * (PARA[1] - PARA[4])) PLAXI Y TUFL TRUE CLFL FALSE OBST 0 NEW SRECT PXLE (PARA[2]) PYLE (PARA[1]) PLAXI Y TUFL FALSE CLFL FALSE OBST 2

Set drawing flags Set obstruction value as none Create rectangle primitive for lower flange

Create rectangle which bounds the Profile

Set both drawing flags off Set obstruction value as hard

A P-line may be used to define an axis direction and position for a primitive. The example below shows how the upper flange could be positioned and orientated using a P-line. See Reference Section for details. PLAXI TOS PY (-0.5 * PARA[4]) Set axis direction and origin in terms of P-line TOS Position of rectangle origin relative to position of P-line

5.9
5.9.1

Reference Section
Parameter-Controlled Attributes
The following attributes of P-points, P-lines and Geomset primitives may be set equal to parameters or functions of parameters (as well as to constant values):

PDIStance PBBT PRADius POFFset PX PBORe PXTShear PBTP PDIAmeter

PBDIstance PCBT PBDMeter PBRAdius PBOFfset PY

PTDIstance PCTP PTDMeter

PTRAdius PCOFfset PYLEngth PHEIght PXBShear

PWIDth PZ

PANGle

PXLEngth PCONnect

PZLEngth

PYTShear

PYBShear

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5.9.2

Axial Attributes
Axial attributes of both 3D and 2D primitives define a position and a direction. An axial attribute of a 3D primitive may be specified as a direction in one, two or three dimensions or as a P-point. Similarly, the axial attribute of a 2D primitive may be specified as a direction in one or two dimensions or as a P-line. If an axial attribute of a 3D primitive is specified as a P-point, the direction of the axis is taken to be the direction of the P-point, and the origin of the axis to be the position of the Ppoint. If the axial attribute is specified as a direction, the origin of the axis is taken to be the component origin, i.e. the position of P-point 0. Examples: PAAX -P2 PBAX X34-Y PCAX X45Y30Z PAXI X DDANG Z Syntax:
>--+| || || PAXIs --. | PAAXis -| | PBAXis -| | PCAXis -+- sign -. | | --------+- P - number -------------------------------. | | - <axis> -+- value -----. | | | | |- <expres> --+- sign -. | | | | | | --------+- <axis> -| | | ---------------------------------+-->

sets PAAX to be opposite the direction of P-point 2 with its origin at the position of the P-point sets PBAX to the given direction from the component origin sets PCAX to the given direction from the component origin takes the Design DDANGLE and calculates the direction accordingly

where <axis> is >--+-- X --. | | |-- Y --| | | -- Z --+-->

If the axial attribute of a 2D primitive is specified as a P-line, the direction of the axis is taken to be the direction of the P-line, and the origin of the axis to be the position of the P-line. If the axial attribute is specified as a direction or direction expression, the origin of the axis is taken to be the component origin. Examples: PLAX PLIN NAXI PLAX X60-Y sets PLAX to be the direction of the P-line whose PKEY attribute is NAXI; the origin of the axis is at the position of the P-line sets PLAX to the given direction from the component origin

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Syntax:
>- PLAXis -+- sign -. | | --------+- PLINe - <plkey> --------------------------. | | - <axis> -+- value -----. | | | | |- <expres> -+- sign -. | | | | | | --------+- <axis> -| | | ---------------------------------+-->

where <axis> is
>--+-- X --. | | -- Y --+-->

and <plkey> is the PKEY attribute of the P-line.

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Component Design and Representation in PARAGON

Component Design and Representation in PARAGON


This chapter introduces the methods of Component design and graphical representation in PARAGON; in particular the MODEL, MODEL SETTINGS and REPRESENTATION commands are detailed.

6.1

Component Design
Assuming that you have opened a suitable 3D view, the interactive graphical Component design process in PARAGON is initiated using the MODEL command. If a new Component is to be designed, then a new catalogue element must first be specified by a command such as

NEW SCOM /CR2-1


or

(at SECT or CATE level)

NEW SPRF /UB4-A


The command

(at STSEC or STCAT level)

MODEL CE
(for Model Current Element) will add the new component to the 3D view. Note: The MODEL CE command is valid only for SCOM, SPRF, JOIN, and SFIT elements. Only complete Components may be displayed in this way - individual Pointsets and Geomsets may not be, although these items will easily be distinguishable. (Geomset and/or Pointset elements can be removed from the display with the aid of the REPRESENTATION command - see P-point and P-line Representation). The MODEL SETTINGS command can be used to specify the Component Design Data attributes. For example,

MODEL SETTINGS DDRADIUS 75 DDHEIGHT 200


gives the Design Data attributes DDRADIUS and DDHEIGHT values of 75mm and 200mm respectively. The DDRADIUS, DDHEIGHT and DDANGLE attributes are the Design parameters used in the selection process for variable Components. In PARAGON it is possible to use these attributes as part of the Component design. For example, whereas an attribute such as PHEIGHT would normally be defined in terms of parameters, a command such as:

PHEI DDHEIGHT

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(assuming a suitable current element) would set PHEIGHT to the Design height. (In such a case, a MODEL SETTINGS command would need to be followed by a MODEL CE command before any change in the display would be observed.) To produce a display of a Component with insulation, the bore, temperature and working pressure of the Component must be known. To this end the MODEL SETTINGS command can be used to set the BORE, TEMP and PRESSURE. This must be done before the Insulation Specification, INSPEC, can be specified. For example,

MODEL SETTINGS TEMP 300 BORE 80


would set the temperature and bore Design Data attributes (the pressure would stay at its default value, see below). The Insulation Spec may then be specified by a command such as

MODEL SETTINGS INSPEC /INSUL1


Assuming the drawing REPRESENTATION (see Reference Section) is correctly set, the Component will then be displayed with insulation shown. All Design settings can be restored to their defaults by

MODEL SETTINGS DEFAULT


Note: This command also deletes all default and specimen values of parameters. It unsets the Insulation Specification. The default values of the Design Data attributes, and the full syntax of how to set them, are given in Reference Section. QUERY MODEL SETTINGS will output the Design settings currently in use. The Design process is turned off by

MODEL END
which also has the effect of clearing the display.

6.2
6.2.1

P-point and P-line Representation


P-points
P-points may be displayed in PARAGON in one of two ways. The form of display is controlled by the REPRESENTATION PPOINTS command as illustrated in Figure 6:1.: Specifying P-points On or Off.

Figure 6:1.

Specifying P-points On or Off

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The size of the arrow may also be controlled by the REPRESENTATION PPOINTS command, as illustrated in Figure 6:2.: Specifying P-point Length. The overall length of the arrow is specified in millimetres. The default length is 50mm. Specifying a length of zero causes the P-point to appear as a dot.

Figure 6:2.

Specifying P-point Length

The P-point numbers may be omitted, or they may be displayed any size, the size being specified in millimetres. The default size is 5 mm. The size of the numbers is controlled by the REPRESENTATION PPOINTS command, as illustrated in Figure 6:3.: Specifying Ppoint Number Representation.

Figure 6:3.

Specifying P-point Number Representation

Both LENGTH and NUMBERS may be set in the same command, for example:

REPRESENTATION PPOINTS ON LENGTH 25 NUMBERS ON SIZE 7


Note: P-points are always displayed in some form. They cannot be omitted from the display completely. See Reference Section at the end of this chapter for the full syntax of the REPRESENTATION PPOINTS command.

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6.2.2

P-lines
P-lines may be displayed in PARAGON in one of two ways. The form of display is controlled by the REPRESENTATION PLINES command as illustrated in Figure 6:4.: Specifying Plines On or Off.

Figure 6:4.

Specifying P-lines On or Off

The P-line identifier keys may be omitted or displayed. This is also controlled by the REPRESENTATION PLINES command, as illustrated in Figure 6:5.: Specifying P-line Identifier Key Representation.

Figure 6:5.

Specifying P-line Identifier Key Representation

P-line length (default 50mm) and size (default 5mm) can also be controlled. See Reference Section at the end of this chapter for the full syntax of the REPRESENTATION PLINES command. Unlike P-points, P-lines can be omitted from the display completely. Whether a P-line is drawn or not depends on the settings of three of its attributes: LEVEL - the drawing level range CLFLA - the centreline drawing flag attribute TUFLA - the tube drawing flag attribute

LEVEL is a pair of integers. CLFLA and TUFLA are logical attributes which are set to TRUE or FALSE (corresponding to ON or OFF respectively). When you first create a P-line, CLFLA and TUFLA are both FALSE. Control is initially on the setting of LEVEL. If the PARAGON LEVEL setting is within the LEVEL range specified for the P-line (as its LEVEL attribute) then the P-line will be considered for drawing, otherwise it will not be. If the level condition is satisfied, then whether a P-line is displayed or not in PARAGON depends upon the settings of its CLFLA

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and TUFLA attributes and upon the settings of the drawing options specified by the REPRESENTATION command. The REPRESENTATION command provides a means of effectively overriding the settings of the P-lines drawing attributes without changing them. An example REPRESENTATION command is

REPRESENTATION TUBE ON CL OFF


(The word CENTRELINE may be used instead of CL.) The drawing option settings interact with the drawing attributes of the P-lines thus: if an ON REPRESENTATION setting matches a corresponding TRUE attribute setting (e.g. REPRESENTATION CL ON and CLFL TRUE) then the P-line will be drawn, otherwise it will not be drawn. The drawing of Geomset primitives is controlled in a similar way. The next section gives examples of how the LEVEL, CLFLA and TUFLA attributes interact with the REPRESENTATION settings.

6.3

Geomset Primitive Representation


Whether a Geomset primitive is displayed or not depends on the settings of its LEVEL, CLFLA and TUFLA attributes (as for a P-line) and also on its OBST attribute. (The OBST attribute is a number which defines the degree of obstruction for clash checking.) If the PARAGON LEVEL setting is within the LEVEL range specified for the primitive (as its LEVEL attribute), then the primitive will be considered for drawing, otherwise it will not be. If the level condition is satisfied then, the primitive will be displayed if it has an OBST value of 1 or 2 and the REPRESENTATION setting is

REPRESENTATION OBSTRUCTIONS ON
The primitive will be drawn in solid lines if OBST = 2 (hard obstruction), dashed lines if OBST = 1 (soft obstruction0. The control mechanisms of tube, centreline and obstruction are quite independent of each other. So, for example, if a primitive has an OBST value of 2 and the REPRESENTATION setting is OBSTRUCTIONS ON, the primitive will be drawn whatever the values of its CLFLA and TUFLA attributes and the REPRESENTATION TUBE and CL settings (provided that the PARAGON LEVEL setting is within the LEVEL range of the primitive). Note: Whenever you use a REPRESENTATION command, the current design Component is redrawn. If you want to change several REPRESENTATION settings, put them all in the same line so that the Component is only redrawn once. For example, REPRESENTATION TUBE ON CL OFF OBST ON PPOINTS OFF The following example shows the Catalogue representation of a control valve, and how it might appear in PARAGON with various combinations of TUBE, CL and OBST settings. All the illustrations have PPOINTS ON.

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Figure 6:6.

Catalogue Control Valve, showing all Primitives

For this example, the settings of the attributes of interest are considered to be:

SCYL SCYL SSPH SCON SDSH SCYL SCYL LSNO LSNO LSNO LSNO

1 2 1 1 1 3 4 1 2 3 4

OBST 2, OBST 2, OBST 0, OBST 0, OBST 2, OBST 0, OBST 0, OBST 0, OBST 0, OBST 0, OBST 0,

CLFL FALSE, CLFL FALSE, CLFL TRUE, CLFL TRUE, CLFL TRUE, CLFL FALSE, CLFL FALSE, CLFL FALSE, CLFL TRUE, CLFL FALSE, CLFL TRUE,

TUFL FALSE TUFL FALSE TUFL TRUE TUFL TRUE TUFL TRUE TUFL TRUE TUFL TRUE TUFL TRUE TUFL FALSE TUFL TRUE TUFL FALSE

SCYL 1, SCYL 2 and SDSH 1 are obstruction volume primitives, that is, they represent the obstruction volume of the Component, not its physical geometry and dimensions. The other primitives represent the actual geometry and dimensions of the Component. The following illustrations show the appearance of the Component under various REPRESENTATION settings.

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Figure 6:7.

REPRESENTATION OBST OFF TUBE OFF CL ON

This is the default REPRESENTATION setting for OBSTRUCTION, TUBE and CENTRELINE. The attribute settings chosen for this example are typical for a Catalogue, and so Figure 6:7.: REPRESENTATION OBST OFF TUBE OFF CL ON shows the normal appearance of the valve. Notice how the OBST OFF setting does not affect the visibility of the obstruction dish (handwheel space) since it has CLFL TRUE.

Figure 6:8.

REPRESENTATION OBST ON TUBE OFF CL ON

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Here the OBST ON setting matches the OBST 2 attribute value of the obstruction cylinders and so they become visible, even though they have CLFL and TUFL both FALSE.

Figure 6:9.

REPRESENTATION OBST ON TUBE OFF CL OFF

Here TUBE and CENTRELINE are both OFF but OBST is ON, and so only the obstruction volume primitives are visible.

Figure 6:10. REPRESENTATION OBST ON TUBE ON CL OFF

Compared with Figure 6:9.: REPRESENTATION OBST ON TUBE OFF CL OFF, those primitives with TUFL TRUE now become visible because TUBE is now ON. The obstruction primitives remain visible because OBST is still ON.

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Figure 6:11.

REPRESENTATION OBST OFF TUBE ON CL OFF

OBST is now OFF and so the obstruction cylinders disappear. (The obstruction dish remains because it has TUFL TRUE.)

Figure 6:12. REPRESENTATION OBST OFF TUBE ON CL ON

Here, all those primitives which have one or both of CLFL, TUFL TRUE are visible.

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Figure 6:13. REPRESENTATION OBST ON TUBE ON CL ON

In Figure 6:13.: REPRESENTATION OBST ON TUBE ON CL ON, all REPRESENTATION settings are ON and so all the Geomset primitives are visible.

the

Figure 6:14. REPRESENTATION OBST OFF TUBE OFF CL OFF

Here, all the REPRESENTATION settings are OFF and so no primitives are visible. The Component P-points are still visible since the REPRESENTATION PPOINTS setting in the example is ON.

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The full default REPRESENTATION is:

CL ON TUBE OFF OBSTRUCTIONS OFF LEVEL 0 PPOINTS ON LENGTH 50 NUMBERS OFF PLINES ON PKEYS OFF
which is regained by

REPRESENTATION DEFAULT
Note that the TVISIBLE and BVISIBLE end visibility flags have no effect in PARAGON.

6.4

Reference Section
This section gives the syntax of the MODEL SETTINGS command and the REPRESENTATION command, as described in this chapter and in Catalogue Database Structure (the latter for setting component parameter defaults etc.). The description of the syntax for the REPRESENTATION command is spread over a number of separate sections, each showing how the command is applied to a particular type of element. The final section summarises the complete REPRESENTATION syntax in a single diagram. Querying information is given, as are further examples, where appropriate.

6.4.1

Model Settings
Keywords: Function: Description:

MODEL SETTINGS Sets default component parameters and design data attributes. Sets default values for component parameters and specimen values for other classes of parameters (see Catalogue Database Structure). Also sets design data attributes; the numeric attributes may be used in place of parameters for defining Pointsets and Geomsets.

Examples of setting default component parameters: MODEL SET PAR 3 35 MODEL SET IPAR 1 3.5 IPAR 2 4.5 MODEL SET APAR 1 250 Sets default value for component parameter 3 to 35 Sets insulation parameter 1 to 3.5 and insulation parameter 2 to 4.5 Sets attached parameter 1 to 250

MODEL SET APAR 3 5.1 OPAR 2 19.75 Sets attached parameter 3 to 5.1 and owning parameter 2 to 19.75 MODEL SET CAT OPAR 3 2.5 MODEL SET DES PARA 3 1.2 Sets owning parameter 3 to 2.5 Sets design parameter 3 to 1.2

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MODEL SET DES APAR 10 99 MODEL SET DES PAR 2 (ATAN(4 / 3)) MODEL SET DEF

Sets design attached parameter 10 to 99 Sets design parameter 2 to tan-1 4/3 Deletes all default and specimen parameters (also sets Design Data attributes to default values)

The word CAT (short for CATALOGUE) in the fifth example is optional. You can use it when setting default values for component parameters, and when setting specimen values for structural parameters. You may find it helpful to use the word for clarity in macros, to distinguish between Design DB parameters and other classes of parameters. Values for any of these classes of parameters may be set in a single command, for example:
MODEL SET PAR 2 12 IPAR 1 17 APAR 2 32 DES PAR 3 25 DES OPAR 5 6.3

Examples of setting design data attributes: MODEL SET INSPEC /IS50 MODEL SET BOR 100 TEMP 350 PRESS 50 Set Insulation Specification to IS50 Set Component bore, temperature and pressure to given Design value as

MODEL SET DDHEI 2000 DDRAD 35 Set height and radius to given Design values MODEL SET DDANG (ASIN(6 / 7)) MODEL SET DEF Set Design Angle to arcsin (6/7) Set Design Data attributes to default values (also deletes all default and specimen parameters and unsets Insulation Spec)

Default values: TEMP BORE PRESSURE DDANGLE DDHEIGHT DDRADIUS INSPEC -100000 150.0 mm 0.0 90 degrees 100.0 mm 225 mm Nulref (i.e. unset)

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Command Syntax:
.---------------------<---------------------. / | >- MODEL - SETtings --+--*- CATalogue* -. | | |- DESign -----| | | |--------------+- PARam --. | | | |- APARam -| | | | - OPARam -+ | | | | | | |- IPARam ----------------+------. | | | .------------- | | | - number -+- value ----| | | - <expres> -| | | | | |-- INSpec --- name -----------------------| | | | | |-- TEMp --- value ------------------------| | | | | |-- BORe --- value ------------------------| | | | | |-- PREssure --- value --------------------| | | | | |-- DDHEIght --- value --------------------| | | | | |-- DDRADius --- value --------------------| | | | | -- DDANGle ---+--- value ----------------| | --- <expres> --------------| | | --- DEFault ---------------------------------+-->

Querying Syntax:
>- Q - MODEL -- SETtings --+-- CATalogue --. |-- DESign -----| |---------------+-- PARam ---. | |-- APARam --| | -- OPARam --+ | | |-- IPARam ------------------| | | |-- INSpec ------------------| | | |-- TEMp --------------------| | | |-- BORe --------------------| | | |-- PREssure ----------------| | | |-- DDHEIght ----------------| | | |-- DDRADius ----------------| | | -- DDANGle -----------------+-->

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6.4.2

Setting Representation for Piping Components

Keywords: Description:

REPRESENTATION TUBE CL CENTRELINE The REPRESENTATION command allows piping components to be represented by a single centreline (CL) or by a 2D outline (TUBE). In some cases, it helps to switch between the two representations to simplify an otherwise complicated view. Switching TUBE On switches CL Off automatically, and vice versa. TUBE and CL representations are not instantly updated on the screen. To see the effects of a representation change, it is necessary to replace the affected item in the Draw List by Removing and Adding it.

Examples: REPR TUBE ON REPR CL ON Command Syntax:


.---------------------<-----------------. / | >-- REPResentation --*-- CL -------------------------. | | | | |-- CENTreline -----------------| | | | | -- TUBE -----------------------+-- ON ---| | | -- OFF --+-->

Sets tubing representation as double line Sets tubing representation as centreline

Querying: Q REPR TUBE Q REPR CL Q REPR - queries all Representation options.

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6.4.3

Setting Profile Representation for Steelwork


Keywords: Description:

REPRESENTATION PROFILE The REPRESENTATION PROFILE commands allow structural steel profiles to be represented by a single centreline or by a 2D outline. In some cases, it helps to switch between the two representations to simplify an otherwise complicated view. Changes to the representation are not instantly updated on the screen. To see the effects of a representation change, it is necessary to replace the affected item in the Draw List by Removing and Adding it.

Examples: REPR PROF ON PROF CL OFF REPR PROF CL ON PROF OFF REPR PROF ON PROF CL ON Sets profile representation as 2D outline Sets profile representation as centreline Sets both types of representation on

.-----------------<--------------------. / | >-- REPResentation --*-- PROFile --+-- CL ----------. | | | | |-- CENTreline --| | | | | ----------------+-- ON ---| | | -- OFF --+-->

Querying: Q REPR PROF Q REPR - queries all Representation options.

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6.4.4

Setting Level Representation

Keywords: Description:

REPRESENTATION LEVEL This command enables individual drawing levels to be specified for the display of catalogue elements. Every basic primitive shape has an associated drawing level range attribute stored in the Catalogue. If the specified drawing level coincides with this range, the 3D object will be drawn when it is added to the Draw List. The practical effect of this facility is that it allows you to minimise visible detail when representing catalogue items. For instance, at level 3, steelwork may be represented as single line only, whereas at level 1 the full detail may be visible. Level 3 may well be adequate for design purposes. LEVEL manipulation is not instantly updated on the screen. To see the effects of a level change, use the REPR UPDATE command.

Examples: REPR LEVEL PIPE 5 Sets piping level to 5. All pipes which are added after this command will be drawn at level 5. Those which were already in the view will remain unchanged. Set level for all other Component types to 2

REPR LEVEL 2 Command Syntax:

.-------------------<-------------------. / | >-- REPResentation --*-- LEVel --+-- PIPE -------. | | | | |-- NOZZle -----| | | | | |-- STRUcture --| | | | | ---------------+-- integer --+-->

Querying: Q REPR Q REPR LEVEL Q DISPLAY - lists all REPRE options - lists levels at which other Components are drawn - gives units and tolerance settings, as well as representation levels

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6.4.5

Setting Obstruction and Insulation Representation

Keywords: Description:

REPRESENTATION OBSTRUCTION INSULATION Component Obstructions are often given LEVELS or TUBE and CENTRELINE settings which render them invisible. Setting the Representation of OBST On forces the system to override normal LEVEL and TUBE settings and show all of the primitives, regardless of the other settings. Setting the Representation of INSU On or Off determines whether or not insulation is shown on primitives. These have the effect of considering all primitives which have an obstruction level greater than zero and all primitives which are affected by insulation parameters. As with changes to LEVEL representation, the graphics display is not updated instantly. Use the RECR UPDATE command to make any changes visible.

Examples:

REPR OBST ON INSU OFF REPR INSU ON REPR PROF OBST ON PROF INSU OFF
Command Syntax:
.--------------<------------. / | >-- REPResentation --*-- OBSTruction --. | | | | |-- INSUlation ---+-----------| | | -- PROFile --+- OBSTruction -| | | - INSUlation --+- ON --. | | - OFF -+-->

Querying: Q REPR Q REPR INSU Q REPR OBST Lists all Representation settings Queries if INSU is ON or OFF Queries if OBST is ON or OFF

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6.4.6

Setting P-Point Representation

Keywords: Description:

REPRESENTATION PPOINTS LENGTH NUMBERS P-point representation may be set to ON or OFF. The default setting is PPOINTS OFF, although p-points will be shown automatically as part of an identification operation. When p-points are on, they are drawn as small arrows with a cross at the p-point position and with the arrow indicating the p-point direction. The size of the arrow is controlled by the LENGTH option. P-point numbers may also be displayed, as controlled by the NUMBERS option. As with changes to other representation settings, the graphics display is not updated instantly. Items must be removed and readded to the Draw List before changes to the display of p-points becomes visible.

Examples: REPR PPOINTS ON REPR PPOINTS LENGTH 5 REPR PPOINTS NUMB ON Command Syntax:
>-- REPResentation - PPoints --+-- ON ---. | | |-- OFF --| | | | | --------------------------+--. | .--------------<--------------------- | +-- NUMbers --+-- ON ---. | | | | -- OFF --| | | ------------------------+-->

Sets the p-point representation to ON Sets size of p-point arrows Shows p-point numbers

Querying:

Q REPR PPOINTS

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6.4.7

Setting P-Line Representation

Keywords: Description:

REPRESENTATION PLINES LENGTH PKEY P-line representation for structural Profiles may be set to ON or OFF. The default setting is PLINES OFF. When p-lines are on, the size of the arrow showing their direction is controlled by the LENGTH option. P-line identifiers, in the form of the settings of their PKEY attributes (TOS, BOS, NA, etc.) may also be displayed, as controlled by the PKEY option. As with changes to other representation settings, the graphics display is not updated instantly. Use the RECR UPDATE command to see changes to the display of p-lines.

Examples: REPR PLINES ON REPR PLINES LENGTH 6 REPR PLINES PKEY ON Command Syntax: .---------------------<---------------. / | >-- REPResentation --*-- PLINes -+- ON --. | | | | | | |- OFF -| | | | | | | -------+- LENgth - <uval> -| | | | | -------------------| | | -- PKEYs --+- ON --. | | | | - OFF -+-------------------+--> Querying: Sets the p-line representation to ON Sets size of p-line arrows Shows p-line identifiers (settings of PKEY attributes)

Q REPR PLINES Q REPR PKEYS

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6.4.8

Full REPRESENTATION Syntax


.----------------------<-------------------. / | >-- REPResentation --+--*-- TUBE - <onoff> --------------------------| | | | | |-- CL ----------. | | | | | | |-- CENTreline --+- <onoff> -----------------| | | | | |-- HOLEs - <onoff> -------------------------| | | | | |-- OBSTruction - <onoff> -------------------| | | | | |-- INSUlation - <onoff> --------------------| | | | | |-- LEVel -+- PIPE ------. | | | | | | | | |- NOZZle ----| | | | | | | | | |- STRUcture -| | | | | | | | | -------------+- integer ---------| | | | | |-- PPoints - <onoff> - <ppsiz> -------------| | | | | |-- PROFile -+- CL ----------. | | | | | | | | |- CENTreline --| | | | | | | | | |- OBSTruction -| | | | | | | | | |- INSUlation --| | | | | | | | | ---------------+- <onoff> -----| | | | | |-- PNODes --. .--------<---------. | | | |/ | | | |-- SNODes --*- <onoff> ----------| | | | | | | | | |- COLour - <colno> -| | | | | | | | | -- SIZe - <uval-----+----------| | | | | |-- POINts - <onoff> ------------------------| | | | | |-- PKEYs - <onoff> -------------------------| | | | | |-- PLINes - <onoff> -+- LENgth - <uval> -. | | | | | | | | -------------------+--| | | | | |-- HOLes - <onoff> -------------------------| | | | | |-- MASSproperties - <int> ------------------| | | | | |-- DARCtolerance - <uval> ------------------| | | | | \-- UPDATE ----------------------------------| | | -- DEFault ------------------------------------+--> <onoff> is either ON or OFF <ppsiz> is

>--+- LENgth - <uval> -. | | -------------------+- NUMbers - <onoff> -. | | ---------------------+-->

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<colno> is

>--+-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| |-| | | | | | | | | --

integer ----------------------------------------. | ACTive -----------------------------------------| | VISIble ----------------------------------------| | CE ---------------------------------------------| | CLASH ------------------------------------------| | OBST -------------------------------------------| | COMPAre --+-- MATCHed -----------------------. | | | | |-- MISMatched --------------------| | | | | |-- UNMAtched --+-- CONNector --. | | | | | | | | ---------------+--| | | | | -- TEXT --------------------------+--| | AIDS -------------------------------------------+-->

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This chapter describes in detail the following Catalogue DB elements: 3D Pointset (PTSET) Structural Pointset (PTSSET) 3D Geomset (GMSET) Negative 3D Geomset (NGMSET) Structural Geomset (GMSSET) Detailing Text and Material Text Connection Tables and Bolt Tables Unit Types General Text User-defined Nominal Dimensions

Creation and manipulation of the Catalogue elements is described in Manipulating the Catalogue Database using PARAGON.

7.1

3D Pointsets (PTSET)
A PTSET is a collection of P-point elements. P-points are used in the design process to position and orientate Piping Components, and to define their connectivity to each other. Ppoints may also be used in PARAGON to define the position and orientation of the 3D Geomset primitives which make up Piping Components, Joints and Fittings. (Profiles do not use P-points.) A P-point has a 3D position and a direction, and is identified by a number. Each PTSET includes a special P-point, P-point zero (P0), whose position is the component origin and whose direction is the Z axis direction of the Component. It has no other attributes. P0 is created automatically by PARAGON; you cannot change it in any way. The numbering of the P-points of Piping Components must follow certain conventions - see Piping Components in PARAGON for a summary of these, and the ISODRAFT Reference Manual for fuller details. There are no special conventions for numbering the P-points of Joints and Fittings. A P-point has a connection type attribute, which is used only when the P-point belongs to a Piping Component. The connection type attribute can be used to specify how a Piping Component is connected to another at the position of the P-point, for example by a butt weld or socket weld.

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A P-point has a bore attribute, which is used only when the P-point belongs to a Piping Component. It can be used to specify the bore of the pipe at that point. PDMSs data consistency checks (see the DESIGN Reference Manual) can be used to check that the connection type attributes of Piping Components are compatible with the corresponding attributes of the Components to which they are connected. The compatibility of connection types is defined in a Connection Compatibility Table (CCTAB) - see Connection Compatibility Tables for details. Use of the REPRESENTATION command affects how P-points are drawn by PARAGON; see P-point and P-line Representation for details. A PTSET has the following attributes: DESC - a textual description of the Pointset GTYP - the generic type of the item for which the Pointset is used SKEY - the Symbol Key to which the Pointset relates (see the ISODRAFT Reference Manual) PURP - the purpose of the Pointset Axial P-point - PTAXI Cartesian P-point - PTCAR Mixed P-point - PTMIX

A PTSET may contain one or more of the three types of P-point element:

7.1.1

Axial P-point (PTAXI)


A PTAXI allows a P-point to be defined in terms of an axis and a distance along that axis. A PTAXI has no member elements and has the following attributes: NUMB - the P-point number PCON - the connection type PBOR - the bore of the P-point PAXI - the axis of the P-point PDIS - the distance along the axis of the P-point PSKEY - the pipe fitting (end condition) type to be used by ISODRAFT DESC - a textual description of the P-point PURP - the purpose of the P-point

NUMB must be set as a value. PAXI must be set as a direction - see Defining an Axis for details. The other attributes may be set as values or words (as appropriate), or in terms of parameters (which in turn are values or words). The classes of parameter which may be used depend on the class of Component (Piping Component, Joint or Fitting) which uses the P-point - see Parameters for details. PCON and PBOR are used for Piping Components only. They have no meaning if the P-point is used by a Joint or Fitting. For details of PSKEY settings, see Specifying Pipe End Conditions for use by ISODRAFT. These conventions also apply to the attributes of the PTCAR and PTMIX elements described below. See Constructing 3D Pointsets for examples of setting these attributes.

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7.1.2

Cartesian P-point (PTCAR)


A PTCAR allows a P-point to be defined by specifying its position and direction explicitly. A PTCAR has no member elements and has the following attributes: NUMB - the P-point number PCON - the connection type PBOR - the bore of the P-point PX,PY,PZ - the X, Y, Z coordinates of the P-point PTCDIR - the direction of the P-point PSKEY - the pipe fitting (end condition) type to be used by ISODRAFT DESC - a textual description of the P-point PURP - the purpose of the P-point

PTCDIR must be set as a direction - see Defining a Direction for details.

7.1.3

Mixed Type P-point (PTMIX)


A PTMIX allows a P-point to be defined by specifying the position explicitly but using PAXI to specify the direction. A PTMIX has no member elements and has the following attributes: NUMB - the P-point number PCON - the connection type PBOR - the bore of the P-point PX,PY,PZ - the X, Y, Z coordinates of the P-point PAXI - the axis of the P-point PSKEY - the pipe fitting (end condition) type to be used by ISODRAFT DESC - a textual description of the P-point PURP - the purpose of the P-point

7.1.4

Position Type P-point (PTPOS)


A PTPOS allows a P-point to be defined by specifying a position expression PTCPOS and using PTCD to specify the direction expression. A PTPOS has no member elements and has the following attributes: NUMB - the P-point number PCON - the connection type PBOR - the bore of the P-point PTCPOS - the position expression PTCD - the direction expression PSKEY - the pipe fitting (end condition) type to be used by ISODRAFT DESC - a textual description of the P-point PURP - the purpose of the P-point.

7.2

Structural Pointsets (PTSSET)


A PTSSET is a collection of P-line elements (PLINE). P-lines are used in the Catalogue by Profiles and Joints. P-lines are used in the design process to position and orientate Sections (derived from Profiles) and Joints.

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Figure 7:1.

D and 3D Views of a P-line

A P-line is the structural counterpart of a P-point. It is a line which runs the full length of a Component parallel to its Z axis. Viewed in the XY plane, it appears as a point. This point is its position. A P-line also has a direction. This is not the direction of the line itself (which is always parallel to the Z axis of the Component), but a direction from the line in the XY plane. The position and direction are defined in XY coordinates only. Figure 7:1.: D and 3D Views of a P-line shows a two-dimensional view and a three-dimensional view of a P-line on the top of a Section. P-lines may be used in PARAGON to define the position and orientation of the 2D primitives in a Structural Geomset which make up a Profile. They cannot be used to position and orientate the 3D primitives which make up a Joint. One of the P-lines in a Structural Pointset must be designated as the neutral axis p-line. This is used in DESIGN for positioning and orientating the Component. (The neutral axis is the line where there is no stress in bending, and about which the Component bends.) A Pline is designated as the neutral axis by setting the neutral axis reference attribute (NAREF) of the Structural Pointset to the name of the P-line. A PLINE has no member elements and has the following attributes: PKEY - the P-line identifier key PX,PY - the X, Y coordinates of the P-line PLAXI - the axis of the P-line, defining its direction LEVEL - the drawing level range attribute CLFLA- the centreline drawing flag attribute TUFLA - the tube drawing flag attribute DESC - a textual description of the Pline PURP - the purpose of the Pline

PKEY is a word attribute which identifies the P-line. It is equivalent to the NUMB attribute of a P-point. PLAXI is a direction, equivalent to the PAXI attribute of a P-point. PKEY must be set as a word. PLAXI must be set as a direction - see Defining an Axis for details. PX and PY may be set as values or in terms of parameters. The classes of parameter which may be used depend on whether the P-line is used by a Profile or by a

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Joint - see Parameters for details. Manipulating the Catalogue Database using PARAGON gives examples of setting these attributes. The settings of LEVEL, CLFLA and TUFLA and the use of the REPRESENTATION command affect whether or not the P-line is drawn by PARAGON. LEVEL is a pair of numbers specifying a range and CLFLA and TUFLA are set to TRUE or FALSE (corresponding to on or off respectively). The way in which LEVEL, TUFLA and CLFLA and the REPRESENTATION settings interact is discussed in P-point and P-line Representation. (The settings of LEVEL, CLFLA and TUFLA also affect whether or not the P-line is drawn in DESIGN.) The primitives in the Geomsets also have LEVEL, CLFLA and TUFLA attributes, which affect whether or not they are drawn in PARAGON and DESIGN. Note: A P-line has its own set of axes, which are used in the design process (not in PARAGON). See the DESIGN Reference Manual for details.

7.3

3D Geomsets (GMSET)
A GMSET is a grouping of 3D primitive elements which are used to make up Piping Components, Joints and Fittings. It specifies the dimensions, orientation and obstruction geometry of each primitive. The Geomset defines the symbol that is drawn for a particular Component by PARAGON (and DESIGN) and also defines the obstruction geometry of the Component for use when checking for clashes. Each symbol is built up from a combination of the following primitives: SBOX - rectangular box BOXI - boxing (used by HVAC and Ducting etc) SCON - cone LCYL - cylinder SCYL - cylinder SSLC - slope bottomed cylinder SDIS - disc SDSH - dish SLINE - line LINE - line LPYR - pyramid SCTO - circular torus SRTO - rectangular torus LSNO - snout SSPH - sphere TUBE - tubing SEXT - user-defined extrusion SREV - solid of revolution

GMSET has no attributes other than the standard ones. Each member element of a 3D Geomset has the following attributes in addition to the standard ones: LEVEL - the drawing level range attribute CLFLA - the centreline drawing flag attribute TUFLA - the tube drawing flag attribute

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OBST - the obstruction attribute DESC - a textual description of the Geomset GTYP - the generic type of the item for which the Geomset is used PURP - the purpose of the Geomset

The settings of LEVEL, CLFLA and TUFLA affect whether the primitive is drawn or not by PARAGON (or DESIGN), as they do for P-lines. See Structural Pointsets (PTSSET) for details. OBST is a number which defines the obstruction level of the primitive for use by DESIGNs clash checking facility: OBST = 0: No obstruction. The primitive will not clash with anything (used for symbols and negative volumes). OBST = 1: Soft obstruction. Used for insulation, access volumes, penalty volumes, etc. OBST = 2: Hard obstruction. DESIGNs clash checking facility will report hard interference with any item having OBST 1 or 2.

The LEVEL, OBST, CLFLA and TUFLA attributes are common to all primitives. Each primitive also has additional attributes depending on its shape; these are described in the next section.

7.4

3D Geomset Primitives
The following primitive elements are used by 3D Geomsets. They all have the standard attributes and the common attributes LEVEL, CLFLA, TUFLA and OBST.

7.4.1

Box (SBOX)
SBOX has particular attributes as follows: PXLE, PYLE, PZLE - box dimensions in X, Y, Z directions PX, PY, PZ - box coordinates

Figure 7:2.

SBOX Catalogue Primitive

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7.4.2

Boxing (BOXI)
Components whose GTYPE attribute is TUBE can use BOXI elements to give, for example, implied tube of rectangular cross-section. BOXI elements can be used for modelling ducting, trunking and cable trays. BOXI has the following particular attributes: PXLE - cross-section X-direction length PZLE - cross-section Z-direction length PAXI - position and orientation of normal to centre of end face TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

Figure 7:3.

BOXI Catalogue Primitive

When implied tube is drawn using BOXI elements, the Y axis of the implied BOXI is set to the PLeave direction of the preceding component. The X axis of the BOXI is set to be mutually orthogonal to the PLeave and the Z axis of the preceding component (which usually corresponds to the X axis of the component). The Z axis of the BOXI is then derived from its X and Y axes (and usually corresponds to the Z axis of the component). A 3D Geomset may contain more than one BOXI element and corresponding P-points may be offset in the X or Z directions. Note: for Pipework Designers: If there is no preceding component (that is, if the implied BOXI forms the Head of a Branch), the Y axis will be set to the Parrive of the following component (that is, the first component in the Branch). If there are no components, the BOXI will be set to the orientation of the Zone. (Since Pipe and Branch elements have no coordinate system, this is the lowest level in the design hierarchy from which an orientation can be derived.)

7.4.3

Cone (SCON)
SCON has particular attributes as follows: PAXI - direction of axis of cone PDIS - height of vertex above base PDIA - diameter of base

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Figure 7:4.

Cone Catalogue Primitive

7.4.4

Cylinder (LCYL)
There are three types of cylinder primitive defined in different ways. LCYL is defined by the distances from the origin to the two end faces. LCYL has particular attributes as follows: PAXI - direction of axis of cylinder PDIA - diameter of cylinder PBDI - distance along axis to centre of bottom surface PTDI - distance along axis to centre of top surface TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

Figure 7:5.

Cylinder (LCYL) Catalogue Primitive

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7.4.5

Cylinder (SCYL)
This type of cylinder primitive is defined by the distance to the bottom face from the origin and the height. SCYL has particular attributes as follows: PAXI - direction of axis of cylinder PHEI - height of cylinder PDIA - diameter of cylinder PDIS - distance along axis to centre of nearest surface TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

Figure 7:6.

Cylinder (SCYL) Catalogue Primitive

7.4.6

Slope-Bottomed Cylinder (SSLC)


This is similar to the SLCY available in the Design Data and has its main use in the modelling of mitred bends. SSLC has the following particular attributes: PAXI - direction of axis of cylinder PHEI - height of cylinder PDIA - diameter of cylinder PXTS - inclination of top face to X-axis PYTS - inclination of top face to Y-axis PXBS - inclination of bottom face to X-axis PYBS - inclination of bottom face to Y-axis PDIS - distance from origin TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

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Figure 7:7.

Slope-Bottomed Cylinder (SSLC) Catalogue Primitive

7.4.7

Disc (SDIS)
The Disc primitive is a circular element of zero thickness. SDIS has particular attributes as follows: PAXI - direction of axis of disc PDIS - distance along axis to centre of disc PDIA - diameter of disc

Figure 7:8.

Disc Catalogue Primitive

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7.4.8

Dish (SDSH)
This is similar to the DISH available in the Design Data. It allows symbolic modelling of control valves and closer modelling of other Components. SDSH has the following particular attributes: PAXI - direction of axis of dish PDIS - distance along axis to centre of top surface PDIA - diameter of dish base PHEI - maximum height of dished surface above base PRAD - corner radius

If PRAD=0 a spherical section dish is drawn, if PRAD>0 an ellipsoidal section dish is drawn.

Figure 7:9.

Dish Catalogue Primitive

7.4.9

Line (LINE)
In addition to the three-dimensional primitive elements, 3D Geomsets may contain Line (LINE). A LINE has one particular attribute: PTS - a set of numbers (up to six) representing P-point numbers of the P-points in the corresponding Pointset, which determine the course of the line.

The values held in PTS are set by the SETPoints command, followed by point specifications in which each p-point identifier is preceded by P or T, e.g. P1 P2 T3 P4. When the P-point is preceded by P it is treated in the same way as a point element (POINT) in the Design Data; when preceded by a T it is treated in the same way as a tangent point element (TANP) in the Design Data. (See the DESIGN Reference Manual for further details).

7.4.10

Line (SLINE)
In addition to the three-dimensional primitive elements, an alternative to the LINE element is the SLINE. This has two particular attributes: PTSPOS - Start position expression PTEPOS - End position expression

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7.4.11

Pyramid (LPYR)
The main use of this element is in the creation of rectangular reducers for ducting etc. LPYR has the particular attributes as follows: PAAX - direction of axis normal to top face of pyramid (the A axis): this is taken to be in the Z direction PBAX, PCAX - the directions of the two axes perpendicular to the A axis and mutually perpendicular to define the position of the B and C sides PBTP, PCTP - length of top faces in B axis and C axis directions PBBT, PCBT - length of bottom faces in B axis and C axis directions PBOF, PCOF - top face offsets in B axis and C axis directions PTDI - distance from origin to centre of top face along A axis PBDI - distance from origin to centre of bottom face along A axis TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

Figure 7:10. Pyramid Catalogue Primitive

7.4.12

Circular Torus (SCTO)


The circular torus is only part of a torus; it is not permitted to subtend more than 180 degrees. It is circular in cross-section. SCTO has particular attributes as follows: PAAX, PBAX - direction of axes normal to the end faces of the torus PDIA - diameter of the cross-section of the torus. TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

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Figure 7:11.

Circular Torus Catalogue Primitive

7.4.13

Rectangular Torus (SRTO)


The rectangular torus is similar to the circular torus except that it is rectangular in crosssection. SRTO has particular attributes as follows: PAAX, PBAX - direction of axes normal to the end faces of the torus PDIA - width of the cross-section of the torus PHEI - height of the cross-section of the torus TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

Figure 7:12. Rectangular Torus Catalogue Primitive

7.4.14

Snout (LSNO)
The Snout primitive is a cylindrical element of varying diameter along its length. It may be eccentric or concentric. LSNO has particular attributes as follows: PAAX - direction of axis normal to top surface of snout (the A axis) PBAX - offset direction PTDI, PBDI - distance along A axis to top, bottom surfaces of snout PTDM, PBDM - diameter of top, bottom surfaces of snout POFF - the offset/eccentricity of the snout as measured in the PBAX direction TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

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Figure 7:13. Snout Catalogue Primitive

The sizes of the top and bottom surfaces of the snout may be defined in terms of their radii instead of their diameters. PTRA, PBRA - radius of top, bottom surfaces of snout

7.4.15

Sphere (SSPH)
SSPH has particular attributes as follows: PAXI - direction of axis on which centre of sphere lies PDIS - distance along axis to centre of sphere PDIA - diameter of sphere

Figure 7:14. Sphere Catalogue Primitive

7.4.16

Tube (TUBE)
Components whose GTYPE attribute is TUBE can use TUBE Geomset elements to give, for example, implied tube of circular cross-section. TUBE has particular attributes as follows: PDIAM - tube diameter TVISI - visibility of top face BVISI - visibility of bottom face

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7.4.17

User-defined Extrusion (SEXT)


This primitive is generated by extruding a user-defined 2D shape, known as a Loop (SLOO), whose outline is defined by a set of member elements called Vertices (SVER). The lines joining adjacent SVERs form the edges of the SLOO. The extrusion distance is defined by the height of the SEXT to give the final 3D volume. In addition to the attributes defining its position, each SVER can have a radius which applies a convex or concave fillet to the loop at that point. SEXT has particular attributes as follows: PX, PY, PZ - coordinates of origin of SLOO PAAX, - directions of axes of SLOO PBAX - (these will define coordinate system for SVERs) PHEI - distance by which 2D SLOO is extruded to form 3D SEXT

SLOO has no special attributes. SVER has particular attributes as follows: PX, PY - coordinates of vertex PRAD - fillet radius of loop at vertex position

Figure 7:15. User-defined Extrusion Catalogue Primitive

7.4.18

Solid of Revolution (SREV)


This primitive is generated by rotating a user-defined 2D shape, known as a Loop (SLOO), whose outline is defined by a set of member elements called Vertices (SVER), through an angle about an axis. The swept angle must be in the range -360 to +360 degrees, 360 degrees giving a solid which is axially symmetrical. In addition to the attributes defining its position, each SVER can have a radius which applies a convex or concave fillet to the loop at that point. SREV has particular attributes as follows: PX, PY, PZ - coordinates of origin of SLOO PAAX, - directions of axes of SLOO PBAX - (these will define coordinate system for SVERs) PANGLE - angle through which 2D SLOO is rotated to form 3D SREV

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SLOO has no special attributes. SVER has particular attributes as follows: PX, PY - coordinates of vertex PRAD - fillet radius of loop at vertex position

Figure 7:16. Solid of Revolution Catalogue Primitive

7.5

Negative 3D Geomsets (NGMSET) and Negative Primitives


A NGMSET is a grouping of negative 3D primitive elements which are used to represent holes or end preparations for structural items. It specifies the dimensions, orientation and obstruction geometry of each negative primitive. The attributes of NGMSETs are the same as those of their positive equivalents (see 3D Geomsets (GMSET) and 3D Geomset Primitives). The Negative Geomset defines the symbol that is drawn for a particular Component by PARAGON (and DESIGN) and also defines the obstruction geometry of the Component for use when checking for clashes. Each symbol is built up from a combination of the following negative primitives: NSBO - negative rectangular box NBOX - negative boxing NSCO - negative cone NLCY - negative cylinder NSCY - negative cylinder NSSL - negative slope bottomed cylinder NLPY - negative pyramid NSCT - negative circular torus NSRT - negative rectangular torus NLSN - negative snout NSSP - negative sphere NTUB - negative tubing NSEX - negative user-defined extrusion NSRE - negative solid of revolution NSRU - negative ruled surface

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Negative Primitives have the same attributes as the corresponding positive primitives, with the addition of the NAPP (Negative APPlies to) attribute, which controls whether the negative primitive is removed from the item itself, or the attached or owning item. The allowed values are: 1 - Default. See following table: Item PJOInt SJOInt SUBJoint SCOJoint PFITting COFItting FITTing FIXIng Remove from Attached SCTN or GENSEC Attached SCTN or GENSEC Attached SCTN or GENSEC Owning PANEl Owning PANEl Owning PANEl Owning SCTN Owning GENSEC

0 - Negative Primitive will not be removed from anything. 1 - Negative Primitive will be removed from Attached item 2 - Negative Primitive will be removed from Owner 4 - Negative Primitive will be removed from the item itself 7 - Negative Primitive will be removed from all items. The positive values can be combined so that the hole will be created in more than one item. For example, NAPP=6 means that the volume will be removed from the item itself and the items owner. The following table shows what Attached and Owner mean for items that can referenced NGMSEs. Item PJOInt SJOInt SUBJoint SCOJoint PFITting COFItting FITTing FIXIng Attached Attached SCTN or GENSEC Attached SCTN or GENSEC Owner Owning SCTN or GENSEC Owning PCOJ/SCOJ Owning SCTN or GENSEC Owning PANEl Owning PANEl Owning SCTN Owning GENSEC

For example, if a SUBJoint references a NGMSE which contains an NSBOX with NAPP=1, the NSBOX will be removed from the Subjoints attached Section.

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7.6

Structural Geomsets (GMSSET)


A GMSSET is a grouping of 2D primitive elements used to make up structural Profiles. It specifies the dimensions, orientation and obstruction geometry of each primitive. The Geomset defines the symbol that is drawn for a particular Component by PARAGON (and DESIGN) and also defines the obstruction geometry of the Component for use when clash checking. Each symbol is built up from a combination of the following three types of primitive: SREC - rectangle SANN - annulus SPRO - user-defined profile

Like the member elements of a 3D Geomset, each member element of a Structural Geomset has LEVEL, CLFLA, TUFLA and OBST attributes. Note: For correct clash detection, the maximum number of primitives with OBST set to 1 or 2 in any GMSSET is 20; the order of these in the members list is not important. See the DESIGN Reference Manual for details of the best way of setting up Component data so as to minimise processing time for clash detection. The primitives have additional attributes as described in the next section.

7.7

Structural Geomset Primitives


The following primitive elements are used by Structural Geomsets. They all have the standard attributes and the common attributes LEVEL, CLFLA, TUFLA and OBST. The additional particular attributes of each element are as described below. Note that each 2D primitive has effectively two types of positional attributes which allow its geometry to be changed progressively as it is extruded in space to create a 3D design element (such as a structural SCTN or GENSEC element). The P... attributes define the geometry at the Start of an extruded section, while the D... attributes define the change in that geometry between the Start and End of the extruded section.

7.7.1

Structural Rectangle (SREC)


SREC has particular attributes as follows: PXLE, PYLE - rectangle dimensions in X, Y directions DXLE, DYLE - difference in rectangle dimensions in X, Y directions for tapered sections PX, PY - coordinates of centre of rectangle DX, Dy - offset of coordinates of centre of rectangle between ends of section PLAXI - direction of Y axis of rectangle

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Figure 7:17. SREC Catalogue Primitive

7.7.2

Structural Annulus (SANN)


SANN has particular attributes as follows: PX, PY - coordinates of centre of annulus DX, DY - offset of coordinates of centre of annulus between ends of section PRAD - external radius DRAD - change of external radius between ends of section PWID - width of annulus DWID - change of width between ends of section PANG - angle subtended by annulus PLAXI - start angle

Note: PANG must be in the range -180_ to +180_. Positive angles are anticlockwise when the primitive is viewed in the -Z direction.

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Figure 7:18. SANN Catalogue Primitive

7.7.3

Structural Profile (SPRO)


This element represents a user-defined 2D shape whose outline is defined by a set of member elements called Structural Profile Vertices (SPVE). The lines joining adjacent SPVEs form the edges of the SPRO. In addition to the attributes defining its position, each SPVE can have a radius which applies a convex or concave fillet to the profile at that point. SPRO has particular attributes as follows: PLAXI - direction of Y axis of profile (this defines coordinate system for SPVEs) PX, PY - coordinates of vertex DX, DY - offset of coordinates between start and end of a tapered section PRAD - fillet radius of profile at vertex position DRAD - change of fillet radius of profile at vertex position between ends of section SPVE has particular attributes as follows:

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Figure 7:19. SPRO and SPVE Catalogue Primitives

7.8

Detailing Text
Detailing Text (SDTE) elements contain descriptive text relating to a Component, which is used during the construction of drawings, reports, take-off sheets etc. An SDTE element exists at the same level in the Catalogue database hierarchy as a Component element (i.e. it is a member of a Section or Category) and is referred to from SPCOM elements in the Specification. An SDTE element (which will usually be named) is created simply by typing, for example:

NEW SDTE /C/T1


The text itself exists as an attribute of the SDTE element; namely one of the attributes RTEX, STEX or TTEX. The text is input simply by typing the attribute name followed by the text itself in quotes; for example:

STEX 21DD-JJOOA2 12.31


The choice of attribute name depends on the PDMS module which is to use the related text. STEX and TTEX are used primarily by the detailing interface modules, and the attribute to be used will be specified from that module. The format of the text depends on the detailing module in use - see the appropriate Reference Guide for details. RTEX is used by ISODRAFT, which also uses another SDTE attribute, SKEY. SKEY is a four-character code which represents a geometric description of the associated Component type. RTEX and SKEY must be set in order for ISODRAFT to work correctly. A typical pair of commands would be:

RTEX COUPLING - SOCKET WELD 3000LB SKEY COSW


(The SKEY codes are fixed for a given element type - see the ISODRAFT Reference Guide for a list.)

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7.9

Material Text
Material Text (SMTE) elements contain descriptive text describing the material(s) from which the physical component is constructed, and is used during the construction of drawings, reports, take-off sheets etc. An SMTE element exists at the same level in the Catalogue database hierarchy as a Component element (i.e. it is a member of a Section or Category) and is referred to from SPCOM elements in the Specification. An SMTE element (which will usually be named) is created simply by typing, for example:

NEW SMTE /5L-S-80


The text itself exists as an attribute of the SMTE element; namely one of the attributes XTEX, YTEX or ZTEX. The text is input simply by typing the attribute name followed by the text itself in quotes, for example:

XTEX SCM.80 API 5L GR.B SMLC


The choice of attribute name depends on the PDMS module which is to use the related text, the attribute to be used being specified from that module. XTEX is used by ISODRAFT.

7.10

Connection Compatibility Tables


The Connection Compatibility Table (element name CCTA) holds a list of all the compatible connection types for Piping Components in a set project. A CCTA is an administrative element which exists at the same level as CATA in the hierarchy. A CCTA has Connection Compatibility (COCO) elements as its members, each of which has a pair of coded connection types stored as its CTYPE attribute. These connection types are those referred to in the PCON attribute of a Piping Components P-points. The commands below give an example of the setting up of a typical connection table. NEW CCTA NEW COCO /WELDWELD CTYPE WELD WELD NEW COCO /SCRDSCRD CTYPE SCRD SCRD NEW COCO /WELDBW CTYPE WELD BW (weld to weld) (screwed to screwed) (weld to butt weld)

Note: That ISODRAFT uses the connection codes to derive bolting requirements, and so the connection codes used must conform to certain standards - see Appendix B and the ISODRAFT Reference Guide for details. Setting up the Connection Compatibility Table should be one of the first tasks to be carried out when commencing a design project using PDMS. If an attempt is made to connect two pipework components in DESIGN, then a check is made to see if the p-leave PCON attribute of the first component and the p-arrive PCON attribute of the second component appear as a matching pair in the connection table. If there is such a matching pair then the components are connected, otherwise a similar check is made on the p-leave PCON attributes of each component. If a matching pair is now found, the second component is flipped and connected to the first. If no matching pair is found then an incompatible connection type error message is output and the second component is left in its original position and orientation.

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7.10.1

COCDES Elements
COCDES provide the means of associating a long description to a COCO pair. Create a COCDES element below a CCTA as follows: NEW COCDES DESC 'This is a long description of a COCO element' COCONNECTION FBB

7.11

Bolting Tables
The Bolt Table hierarchy contains information describing the nature of the bolted connections of Piping Components in a project. Although the Bolt Table is part of the Catalogue database, and so must be set up using PARAGON, it has been designed for the exclusive use of ISODRAFT and so is described in detail in the ISODRAFT Reference Guide; only a summary is presented here. Element creation and attribute setting is done in the usual way. The Bolt Table hierarchy is illustrated below:

The element types are as follows: BTSE - the Bolt Set is the administrative element for catalogue component bolting information. It owns Bolt P-point (BLTP) elements. BLTP - the Bolt P-point stores the bolting information for an individual bolt for a particular type of flange. It has the following attributes: NUMBER BDIA BTHK BTYPE the bolt hole number in the bolt circle the bolt diameter the bolt length the type of bolt

BLTA - the Bolt Table is an administrative element. BLIS - the Bolt List is an administrative element which groups together Standard Bolt (SBOL) elements.

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SBOL - the Standard Bolt element. This has the attributes: NSTD BITEM BITL a pointer to a non-standard length array additional bolt items to be used when calculating bolt length the lengths of the additional bolt items

LTAB - the Length Table holds a number of Diameter Tables. DTAB - the Diameter Table stores information on standard bolt lengths, held as a string of values in its BLEN attribute. DTAB is accessed from the NSTD attribute of the SBOL element.

7.12

Branch Reducer and Nominal Bore Size Tables


The TABWLD element is a top level administrative element providing the following table structures.

Nominal Bore Size Tables are created with the following element types: NOMTAB SNOTAB SNOTAB is the administrative element for nominal Size Range Table nominal bores in mm are stored in a element the wall thickness of a bore is recorded in this element

A Branch/Reducer tables uses the following elements: BRTAB SBRTAB SSBRTA A Purpose attribute controls the underlying table purpose such as Branch/Reducer Contains the bore size 'from part' Contains the bore size 'to part'

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7.13

Unit Types
PARAGON enables unit types to be set up which will then be linked to relevant attributes of the various elements which appear throughout the PDMS databases. The most common units (the default units) are millimetres, inches or feet and inches, which are usually assigned to bore and distance attributes. These units currently apply to all PDMS modules except PROPCON. You may also define other units with conversion factors to relate one set of units to another; unit definitions can be collected together into sets to be used for different purposes. Information controlling units is held in a UNIT element of the Catalogue Database. The UNITS hierarchy is shown below:

The elements of the UNITS hierarchy are as follows: UNIT - The UNIT element is the top-level element of the hierarchy. It has three special attributes: BUNI, DUNI and DFUN. BUNI and DUNI can be set to determine the default Bore and Distance units, respectively. They are set to any of MM, INCH, MIL or FINC (for feet and inches). A typical sequence of setup commands would be:

NEW UNIT BUNI INCH DUNI FINC


This would mean that, by default, all bore values are interpreted as inches and all distance values, e.g. HEIGHT, DISTANCE, as feet and inches. If user-defined units are to be used, then an MSET element should be named in the DFUN attribute of the UNIT, indicating that MSET element should be used as the default measurement set. Each PDMS module has its default units initialised at run time to those defined in the first UNIT element of the first Catalogue DB in the MDB being used. BUNI and DUNI may also be set to NULL. MSET - Measurement Set. This element is used to form a collection of MTYP (measurement type) elements. It is the MSET which is named in the DFUN attribute of the UNIT element to indicate which collection of units are to be used. In practice MSET may relate to say S.I. or IMPERIAL. MTYP - Measurement Type. This element forms the link between a collection of attributes and the Units Definition (UDEF) to be used for them. The attributes are accessed via the ATLI (Attribute List) elements owned by the MTYP and the Units Definition via its UREF attribute. The latter simply contains the name of the UDEF element which is to be used for the attributes named in the member ATLI elements. ATLI - Attribute List. Each ATLI element contains (as its ATNA attribute) the name of the attribute for which the UREF (see above) applies.

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USEC - Unit Section. This is an administrative element used to collect together UDEF elements. UDEF - Units Definition. One UDEF is required for each non-PDMS unit that you wish to implement. UDEF has the following special attributes: ABREV - Abbreviation. This is the abbreviation used when outputting a value under the control of this UDEF, or when inputting a value which is in a UNIT that is not the one for that attribute in the current MSET. The attribute is an eight-character text. MULT - Multiplier. This is a conversion factor which is used in conjunction with ADEN, to convert from input/output units to PDMS stored units. This is done on the basis that: Output value Stored value = = (Stored value - ADEN) / MULT (Input value * MULT) + ADEN

The exponential facility is useful in the accurate setting of MULT and ADEN. For example:

MULT 0.12345 EX -8
will set MULT to 0.0000000012345 ADEN - see MULT above. SIGF and DECP - Significant Figures and Decimal Places. These relate to the output of units. To summarise, the unit is defined as: (input_value * MULT ) + ADEN and is output to SIG significant figures with DEC decimal places and suffixed by the notation ABREV ( e.g. psi).

7.13.1

Use of Units
In certain PDMS modules, e.g. PROPCON, the choice of units to be used can be indicated by using the command:

UNITS name
where name is the name of an MSET. If this is not done, the units will be those given by the DFUN attribute of the UNIT element, as explained above. Following this, whenever the value of a special attribute is set or queried, its name (e.g. TEMP for temperature) will be compared with the ATNA attributes of all ATLIs under the current MSET. If a match is found, then the UREF of the MTYP owning the matching ATLI will be used to access the relevant UDEF. When output, such values are followed by their abbreviations to remind you which units are being used. If you wish to input a value which is in a UDEF that is not referred to from the current MSET, then you may use the abbreviation of that value as a key. For instance, in PROPCON, if the current temperature unit is centigrade, but there is a UDEF defining Fahrenheit (with abbreviation deg. F), it would appear as

TEMP 35 deg. F

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As an example, if you require a PROPCON attribute ACBO (Actual Bore) to be output in inches, then the following syntax would be required: NEW USEC NEW UDEF /INCH ABREV IN MULT 0.254 EX 2 NEW MSET MTYP UREF /INCH NEW ATLI ATNA ACBO create a Measurement SetNEW create a Measurement Type set the Reference Units that the MTYP refers to create an Attribute List for the MTYP set the Attribute Name that is required to be output/input in inches create a new Unit Section create and name a new Units Definition -set ABREV and MULT attributes

This results in the following hierarchy:

If ACBO is referred to in PROPCON, the attribute name (ATNA) is searched for in the UNIT hierarchy. The search then moves up the hierarchy to find the MTYP attribute UREF. The MULT attribute of the UDEF (found from the UREF) is then applied to the stored ACBO attribute and the ABREV is output with the resulting value. As a further example, to define and use a unit system called /IMPERIAL, for which temperatures (TEMP, PTEM and RTEM) will be in Fahrenheit and pressures (PRES, RPRE and IPRE) will be in PSI, the instruction sequence would be:

NEW UNIT /EXAMPLE-OF-UNITS NEW USEC NEW UDEF /PSI ABRE lbf/in2 ADEN 0 MULT 6895.0 NEW UDEF /F ABRE deg. F ADEN -17.778 MULT 0.55556 NEW MSET /IMPERIAL NEW MTYP /IMPERIAL/TEMP UREF /F NEW ATLI ATNA TEMP NEW ATLI ATNA PTEM NEW ATLI ATNA RTEM

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NEW MTYP /IMPERIAL/PRESSURE UREF /PSI NEW ATLI ATNA IPRE NEW ATLI ATNA RPRE NEW ATLI ATNA PRES
Note: It is possible to set up UNIT elements with MSETs containing duplicated ATNAs. This is not prevented, but a warning is given on attempting to use such an MSET.

7.14

General Text Elements


A TEXT element is used to store additional information about an owning or adjacent element. The text string itself exists as the setting of the STEX attribute of the TEXT, and can be up to 120 characters long. It is set in the usual way; for example

STEX High pressure pipeline


Note that the STEX attribute of a TEXT element is completely independent of the STEX attributes of the Detailing Text (SDTE) elements described in Detailing Text. The TEXT element can occupy many positions in the hierarchy - it can be owned by UNIT, CATA, SECT, CATE, STSE, STCA, CCTA, SPEC, BLTA, BLIS, LTAB or MBLI elements.

7.15

User-defined Nominal Dimensions


For users who required bores, bolt diameters and lengths, and rod diameters that are not included in the standard nominal values stored in core, a facility exists for the creation of tables that hold the required values in the catalogue database. When being switched from module to module, the catalogue database is scanned for a NBRWLD element with the PURP attribute set to BORE indicating that user-defined nominal bores etc are to be used. If so, the nominal bore-checking routine is switched to the userdefined nominal bores. Bores For most users, the requirement is adding or removing a few bores. For this purpose, a macro of standard PDMS bores is provided (nominal_bore.mac), which enables a user to edit the values concerned and then input the User-defined Nominal Bore table into the catalogue. Bolts When there is a need to use a bolting catalogue with both Imperial and Metric projects, there is not always a direct conversion from one system to the other. For example, a inch bolt may convert to a 12mm rather than a 13mm one. To overcome the problem, User-defined Nominal Bolting tables for diameter and length can be set up, as for the User-defined Nominal Bore table. The PURP attribute is set to BDIA for bolt diameters and BLEN for bolt lengths. Rods When rods for hangers and supports are specified, the rod diameter is related to the bore diameter. It is, therefore, necessary to have User-defined Nominal Rod Diameter tables, if User-defined Nominal bores are being used.

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If a hanger connects to a branch with different bores, the rod diameter is selected to match the branch with the User-defined Nominal bore or, if this applies to neither branch, the standard piping bore. The PURP attribute is set to ROD. Database The following addition is made to the catalogue database: World element NBRWLD, with: Attribute PURP. Owns: NOMINB elements, with: Real attribute INCBOR Real attribute MMBOR Inch Nominal Value MM Nominal Value

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Creating Datasets in PARAGON

Creating Datasets in PARAGON


A Dataset (DTSE) is a collection of DATA elements. These can be used to store any items of catalogue data which need to be queried directly from within the DESIGN or DRAFT modules and which are not accessible by other means.

8.1

Attributes of DATA Elements


Each DATA element has the following special attributes: DKEY PTYP DTIT PPRO DPRO Data Key. A PDMS word which allows a specific DATA element to be referenced from within DESIGN or DRAFT using the Q PROP dkey command. Property Type. Data Title. A text string describing the property stored in the DATA. Property. Any expression which defines a property of the item with which the dataset is associated. Default Property Value. The value to be used if the true setting of the Property cannot be evaluated at any time. See Controlling the Detailed Checking Procedure. Purpose. A PDMS word showing the purpose for which the stored property is relevant. For example, PARA (for catalogue parameters), DESP (for design parameters), DATA (for general properties). Number. An integer which may be set to further categorise the specific property stored in the DATA. For example, the identifying number of a PARAM or DESPARAM. Property Units. The units used when evaluating the Property value. Real Property Flag. See Controlling the Detailed Checking Procedure.

PURP

NUMB

PUNI RUSE

The PPRO attribute is evaluated in response to the Q PROP... command in DESIGN or DRAFT. The parameters in the expression may not be defined until the item is added to the model. It can include any attributes which are valid for the design element, including userdefined attributes; for example: ((:COST OF OWNER) * :LENGT). The PPRO attribute can also be set to a parameterised expression which will be used in the definition of Pointsets and Geomsets. See Controlling the Detailed Checking Procedure.

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8.2

Querying Properties in DESIGN


Consider the following examples, which allow you to query two properties of this parameterised I-beam in DESIGN:

Example 1: The depth of the beam Datakey: DEPT Dtitle: Depth of beam Pproperty: (PARAM [1] ) Dproperty: 600 Purpose: DATA Number: 1

The command Q PROP DEPT in DESIGN or DRAFT will return the depth of the current beam (or the default of 600 if the true value cannot be evaluated). Example 2: The cross-sectional area of the beam Datakey: XSEC Dtitle: Cross-section of beam Pproperty: (((P [1] - (2 * P[3])) * P[4]) + (2 * (P[2] * P[3]))

Note: PARAM has been shortened to P here to show the format of the expression more clearly. The full version must be used when setting the attribute. Purpose: DATA Number: not relevant here, so leave unset

The command Q PROP XSEC in DESIGN or DRAFT will return the calculated crosssectional area of the current beam. Similarly, you could query the following attributes of this DATA element: Q PRTI XSEC Q PRDE XSEC Q PRPU XSEC Data title Data description Data purpose

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8.3

Real Properties of P-points, P-Lines and Geomsets


Pointset and Geomset attributes can be defined in terms of a Dataset pseudo-attribute RPROP (Real Property). For example, the PBORE of a P-point can be defined by the expression:

PBORE ( PARAM[1] + 20 )
If the dataset associated with the component contains a DATA element with the Datakey DBOR, and DBOR has its PPRO attribute set to the expression ( PARAM[1] + 20 ), PBORE can be defined as:

PBORE ( RPROP DBOR )


Pointset and Geomsets with attributes defined in terms of RPROPs will have their RFLG flag set to 1. Only elements with RFLG set to 1 need to be pre-evaluated when the item is added to a model. DATA elements have an attribute RUSE. If this attribute is set, the PROP attribute (or default Property DPRO, see Controlling the Detailed Checking Procedure) cannot be set to a text expression or to an expression containing the OF notation. RUSE is set (=1) and unset (=0) using the commands:

SETRuse UNSETRuse
DATA elements with PROP attributes property which can be used as RPROPs should have their RUSE flags set. Only elements with RUSE set to 1 need to be pre-evaluated.

8.3.1

Default Values
The DATA element attribute DPRO can be used to store a default property value. When a Design element is added to the model, the associated dataset is pre-evaluated and the default value used if the PPRO attribute in the Dataset unset or cannot be evaluated. The default property value can be queried from DESIGN using the pseudo-attribute PRDE.

8.3.2

Querying
The value of RPROP can be queried using the command:

Q RPROP datakey
This command will return the result RPROP unset if the corresponding PPRO attribute contains a text string rather than a real value. The default value of a text or real property value may be queried from a Design component using the command:

Q PRDE datakey
A list of the datakeys available at a Design item can be obtained using the command:

Q PRLS

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Checking Catalogue Database Consistency using PARAGON

Checking Catalogue Database Consistency using PARAGON


To avoid having to transfer component design or specification errors from the Catalogue database to the Design database before data inconsistencies can be detected, a facility is provided for checking the main settings of a piping catalogue as you build it in PARAGON. (This facility is not yet available for checking a structural catalogue.)

9.1

Initiating a Standard Data Consistency Check


The basic command to initiate a database consistency check, using default settings, is

CHECK <gid>
where <gid>, the element below which checks are to be carried out, may be any SPEC, SELE, SPCO or COMP. If you start the check from within a specification (SPEC, SELE or SPCO) all components referenced via the starting element will be checked. If you start the check at component level (COMP), only that component and elements below it will be checked. (See Controlling the Detailed Checking Procedure for details of the ways in which you can modify the default checking procedures.)

9.2

What the Checking Facility Does


The following tests may be carried out: At SPEC level: Check that no question in the specification is repeated. Check that one question in the specification is TYPE. From the TYPE reference, check that the GTYPE of the COMP has the same setting. From the TYPE reference, check that the SKEY setting of SDTE is correct. From the TYPE reference, check that the point set has the correct geometry, as required by ISODRAFT.

At SPCO level: Check that all of the following reference attributes are set: CATREF, DETAIL, MATX, CMPR, BLTREF. (The BLTREF need be set only if the connection type begins with F or L.)

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At COMP or equivalent level: Check that there is a valid PTREF and GMREF. At a PTSE, check that P-points are set and that there are no duplicate numbers. At a GMSE, check that there are primitives set and that they are not degenerate. Check also that no invalid P-point numbers or parameters are used. Note that this test uses catalogue parameters, so that if a primitive is constructed only from design and insulation parameters, spurious warnings will be generated. Check that each P-point connection type exists in the COCO tables. P-points used for construction purposes can have connections of 0.0, NUL or NULL. The connection type will not be checked for validity for a specific type of component. Check that a P-point bore is valid for a recognised set of nominal bores. P-points used for construction purposes, and a P-point with connection type CLOS, can have a zero bore.

9.3

Controlling the Detailed Checking Procedure


You can modify the effect of the CHECK command by using additional syntax so that you can check different types of catalogue without generating unnecessary errors. The command options are as follows:

TOLerance CATAlogue CMPRef ON/OFF


switches Component Reference checking on or off for all component types in a SPCO.

TOLerance CATAlogue CMPRef word ON/OFF


switches Component Reference checking on or off for the specified component type in a SPCO.

TOLerance CATAlogue GMREf ON/OFF


switches Geomset Reference checking on or off for all component types.

TOLerance CATAlogue GMREf

word

ON/OFF

switches Geomset Reference checking on or off for the specified component type.

TOLerance CATAlogue BORE ON/OFF


switches bore checking on or off for Pointsets.

TOLerance CATAlogue BORE

value

value

sets range of permissible bores to be checked for Pointsets.

TOLerance CATAlogue ISOMetric ON/OFF


checks for SKEY and similar ISODRAFT-related settings.

TOLerance CATAlogue DEFault


resets all checking options to their default settings. These defaults are: Do not check any CMPREFs. Ignore GMREF settings for ATTA, FLAN, TUBE and BOLT. Check nominal bores in the range 6 mm to 2150 mm. Check all ISODRAFT-related settings.

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To query any of the current data consistency checking settings, use the corresponding command format

Q TOLerance CATAlogue ...

9.4

Error Messages
Error messages which can result from diagnosed data inconsistencies are as follows: C10 C20 C30 C40 C50 C60 C70 C80 C90 C100 C110 C120 C130 C140 C150 C160 C170 C180 C190 C200 C210 C220 C230 C240 C250 C260 Spec error: Question word asked more than once Spec error: Question TYPE never asked Spco error: DETA not set Spco error: Unknown ref for DETA Spco error: MATX not set Spco error: Unknown ref for MATX Spco error: CMPR not set Spco error: Unknown ref for CMPR Spco error: BLTR not set Spco error: Unknown ref for BLTR Spco error: CATR not set Spco error: Unknown ref for CATR Comp error: PTRE not set Comp error: Unknown ref for PTRE Comp error: GMRE not set Comp error: Unknown ref for GMRE Ptset error: Duplicate ppoint number integer Ptset error: No ppoints set Ptset error: Unknown connection type word for ppoint Comp error: GTYPE word different from spec TYPE word Ptset error: Non standard bore value for ppoint Gmset error: Unknown parameter integer for primitive Gmset error: Axis defined with unknown Ppointinteger for primitive Isometric error: Ppointinteger not defined Isometric error: Cannot calculate angle between Ppointinteger and Ppointinteger Isometric error: Incorrect angle between Ppointinteger and Ppointinteger. Angle is value and should be value.

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C270 C280 C290 C300 C310 C820 C830 C840

Isometric error: Incorrect angle between Ppointinteger and Ppointinteger. They should not be parallel. Gmset error: primitive may be a degenerate primitive Isometric error: Ppoint1, Ppoint2 and Ppoint0 should be colinear Gmset error: primitive cannot be constructed Gmset error: Expression error for primitive SKEY not set SKEY word is used with generic type word, not word SKEY word not known. Assumed to be user defined.

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10

Piping Components in PARAGON


You must use the following conventions for numbering the P-points of Piping Components so that ISODRAFT can recognise them: For tube components, there must only be one P-point, P1, which defines the bore and connection type of both ends of the piece of tube. For nozzles, the connection P-point (i.e. the P-point for connection to the head or tail branch) must be P1. For two-way components, the arrive and leave P-points must be numbered P1 and P2 (in either order). For two-way valves, the spindle direction must be indicated by P3. For three-way components, the offline leg must be indicated by P3. The spindle direction for three-way valves must be specified by using a P-point greater than P3, which must have its bore unset. For four-way components, the two straight-through flows must have P-points P1/P2 and P3/P4. The spindle direction for four-way valves must be specified by using a Ppoint greater than P4, which must have its bore unset. For eccentric reducers without a connection point, the flat side must be indicated by P3. Eccentric reducers with a connection point must use P3, with a valid bore set, to indicate the connection point and must use P9, with bore unset, for orientation of the flat side. For U-bends, the P-points must be set as shown in Figure 10:1.: P-point Numbering Convention for U-bends.

Figure 10:1. P-point Numbering Convention for U-bends

See the ISODRAFT Reference Manual for further details.

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10.1
10.1.1

Special Components
Implied Tube
Implied tube is special because it only requires one ppoint and does not require a geometry set. Because tube has a default geometry set, the parameters for tube are fixed by convention as: Parameter 1 Nominal Bore Parameter 2 Outside Diameter Parameter 3 Connection Type Parameter 4 onwards may be used for any other purpose but will not affect the geometry.

10.1.2

Mitred Bends
Mitred Bends are essentially piping components fabricated from tube cut at angles and welded together. Prior to version 12.0 of PDMS, these components were catalogue components with a complex geometry set. Although the bend shown appears to have a square end, the tube lengths are calculated to the longest side of the cuts and the start and end segments are treated as part of the arrive and leave tube for material purposes. These two end parts are deemed as virtual segments in PDMS because they don't cut the pipe at P1 and P2

To enable this more intelligent use of mitred bends, a default geometry set has been built in to PDMS for conventional mitred bend types. The default geometry set is used in a similar way to tube where a default geometry set is used if the component GTYP is a BEND and the geometry reference is unset. A bend pointset is required to define arrive and leave points with P1 and P2 defined and positioned by either parameters or DDANGLE and DDRADIUS. The same pointset will be applicable if it is a pulled or mitred bend. In the design database, a BEND element now has a new attribute NCUTS which determines how many cuts to apply to each bend. This is only used if the bend has no geometry set, so existing bends will be unaffected. Any bends with NCUTS set to zero or less will be treated as a pulled bend. The default value for NCUTS is 0. Pipe Bore, Connection type and PPOINT positions are all required to enable connection between components. Additionally a pipe outside diameter is required to enable the component size to be determined. Like implied tube, the order in which these parameters are built is important and should be as follows:

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Parameter 1 Nominal Bore Parameter 2 Outside Diameter Parameter 3 Connection Type Parameter 4 default NCUTS Parameter 5 onwards may be used for any other purpose but will not affect the geometry

10.1.3

How Number of Cuts (NCUTS) Work


The values assigned to parameter 4 are important in how they apply to the design. Any positive values of NCUTs from zero will be interpreted in the design as the number of cuts so if parameter 4 is set to 3 then the design component will have 3 cuts regardless of the setting in DESIGN. Setting parameter 4 to 0 will mean that the bend is treated like a pulled bend and will not have any cuts available. This means that the parameter4 setting will override any changes to the NCUTS attribute in DESIGN and the user will not be able to modify it. This is necessary so that the type of bends to be used can be controlled via a specification and so that ISODRAFT can get the correct SKEY and number of cuts. If the user wants to have fully variable cuts and freedom to re-specify NCUTS then setting parameter 4 to a negative number will result in an uncontrolled bend where the user must specify how many cuts to use. The maximum number of cuts per bend is 25.

10.1.4

Dynamic PPOINTS
In order to calculate dimensions and tube lengths, a set of dynamic ppoints are provided to suit the number of cuts being used. For example on a single cut bend we would require a ppoint on the inside centre and outside as shown below plus extra cuts if insulation is added. The points are arranged with the centreline ppoint as number 10, Inside point as 11 outside point as 12 and then points 13 and 14 as the inside and outside insulation points respectively.

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Because of the dynamic nature of the ppoints, the ppoint numbers are directly related to individual cuts, multiplied by ten, so cut 1 will have five ppoints numbered from 10 to 14 and cut 2 will have five ppoints from 20 to 24. additional ppoints will be available for each additional cut defined by the cut number times ten with the same configuration as described earlier.

10.1.5

Pseudo Attributes
To find out if a bend is a new type of mitred bend, there is a new pseudo attribute ACTNCU to get the actual ncuts value in either the catalogue or from the design. If ACTNCU returns zero, then it is not a mitred bend. The pseudo attributes ATLE, LTLE, TLE and FITLEN now return the maximum cut length of the relevant implied tube. To get the tube lengths of the individual segments and virtual segments the following can be used. BSCLL BSMXL BSMNL BVSCLL BVSMXL BVSMNL Bend Segment Centre-Line Length Bend Segment MaXimum Length Bend Segment MiNimum Length Bend Virtual Segment Centre-Line Length Bend Virtual Segment MaXimum Length Bend Virtual Segment MiNimum Length

10.1.6

Implied Geometry sets in PARAGON


Components with implied geometry sets cannot currently be visualised in PARAGON other than showing the pointset locations.

10.2

Naming Conventions
It is important that certain items in the Catalogue database are named as they are referenced from other databases as well as internally. It would be impracticable to allow system-generated database reference numbers to be referenced as this would lead to meaningless output from reports and isometrics. Figure 10:2.: Design, Specification and Catalogue databases shows the relationship between the Design, Specification, and Catalogue databases. Consistency when naming items is important, making cross-database connections as easily identifiable as possible. In ISODRAFT, bolt lengths for Piping Components are derived by referring to the SBOL name. Item detail is picked up from the RTEX attribute of the DTEX and the material is picked up from the XTEX attribute of the MTEX. Note that the item code name on an isometric is obtained from the second part of the SPREF attribute of a Component, i.e. its name in the Specification. In the example in Figure 10:2.: Design, Specification and Catalogue databases, the name would be output as FLANWN300100. See the ISODRAFT Reference Manual for further details.

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10.3

Example Connection Type Codes


Naming of the P-point PCON attribute of a Piping Component requires early consideration. The PCON name is for use mainly in data consistency checking, but also by ISODRAFT for working out bolting details. The rules for ISODRAFT are as follows: The first letter of the PCON attribute of a flange must be F or L (the latter for lap joints) The first letter of the PCON attribute of a gasket must be G The first letter of the PCON attribute of a wafer fitting must be W

The list below is not exhaustive and only shows example codes - it is not mandatory. Item and/or Connection Type 300lb Raised-Face Flange 300lb Gasket Pipe Bevelled End Butt Weld Socket Weld 300lb Wafer Fitting Screwed Male Screwed Female Code FGD GGD TUB BWD SWF WGD SCM SCF

Figure 10:2. Design, Specification and Catalogue databases

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10.4

Connection Compatibility Table


The table in the previous section can be used to construct a PDMS Connection Compatibility Table (CCTA) which sets out all the permissible connection pairs. If an attempt is made to connect two pipework components in DESIGN, then a check is made to see if the p-leave PCON attribute of the first component and the p-arrive PCON attribute of the second component appear as a matching pair in the connection table. If there is such a matching pair then the components are connected, otherwise a similar check is made on the p-leave PCON attributes of each component. If a matching pair is now found, the second component is flipped and connected to the first. If no matching pair is found then an incompatible connection type error message is output and the second component is left in its original position and orientation. The following sample connection table uses the connection list given in the previous section:

NEW CCTAB NEW COCO /FGDGGD CTYPE FGD GGD NEW COCO /TUBBWD CTYPE TUB BWD NEW COCO /GGDWGD CTYPE GGD WGD NEW COCO /TUBSWF CTYPE TUB SWF NEW COCO /SCMSWF CTYPE SCM SWF NEW COCO /SCFTUB CTYPE SCF TUB
The COCO (Connection Compatibility) elements are named so that the allowable connections are easily queried. The above table shows, for example, that tube can be connected to a screwed female connection but not to a screwed male connection. Different ratings of flanges and gaskets should have different connection attributes to ensure that different pressure fittings cannot be connected without a warning message being issued. This principle also applies to different flange face characteristics, e.g. flat face and raised face: however, there are some exceptions. On some jobs a flat-faced flange on a piece of equipment may be butted up to a raised-face flange. If this is a common occurrence, it may be worth inputting a new COCO to allow the connection.

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10.5

Construction of Typical Piping Components


This section gives sample macros for the construction of typical Catalogue Piping Components using PARAGON. Each macro starts at CATEGORY level. The view parameters used to produce the drawings shown vary between each example, and so are not given here. Each drawing has REPRESENTATION settings of TUBE ON CENTRELINE ON PPOINTS ON NUMBERS ON. Some of the Components are too large to fit onto a typical view area when drawn at the default SCALE value of 1. Values of 0.5 are suggested for examples 1 and 3, and 0.05 for example 6. The definition for each Component includes the possibility of insulation being present, although this is not drawn. Note how the clash geometry and component geometry have been combined.

Figure 10:3. A Control Valve, using the SDSH primitive

NEW PTSE /CVMWPS NEW GMSE /CVMWGS NEW SCOM /CVMW GTYP INST PARA 25 100 133 17.5 FLGD PTRE /CVMWPS GMRE /CVMWGS MODEL CE GOTO PTRE NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[5]) NUMB 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS (PARAM[2]) PAXI -Y NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[5]) NUMB 2 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS (PARAM[2]) PAXI Y NEW PTAX PCON NULL NUM 3 PBOR 0 PDIS (2.50 * PARAM[4]) PAXI X

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/CVMW GOTO GMRE NEW SCYL PDIS (PARAM[2]) PHEI (-2 * PARAM[2]) PDIA (PARAM[3]) PAXI Y NEW SCYL PDIS 0 PHEI (2.5 * PARAM[2]) PDIA (1.6 * PARAM[2]) PAXI X NEW SSPH OBST 0 CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PDIS 0 PAXI -Y PDIA (0.50 * PARAM[1]) NEW SCON OBST 0 CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PDIS (2.5 * PARAM[2]) PDIA (1.6 * PARAM[2]) PAXI X NEW SDSH CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PDIA (1.6 * PARAM[2]) PHEI (0.8 * PARAM[2]) PDIS (2.5 * PARAM[2]) PAXI X NEW SCYL OBST 0 TUFL TRUE PDIS (PARAM[2]) PHEI (-1 * PARAM[4]) PDIA (PARAM[3] + IPARAM[1]) PAXI -Y NEW SCYL COPY PREV PAXI Y OBST 0 TUFL TRUE PDIS (PARAM[2]) PHEI (-1.0 * PARAM[4]) PDIA (PARAM[3] + IPARAM[1]) PAXI Y NEW LSNO OBST 0 TUFL TRUE PTDI (PARAM[2] - PARAM[4]) PBDI 0 PTDM (PARAM[3] + IPARAM[1]) PBDM (1 + IPARAM[1]) PAAX -Y PBAX Z NEW LSNO COPY PREV PAAX Y NEW LSNO OBST 0 CLFL TRUE PTDI (PARAM[2]) PBDI 0 PTDM (PARAM[3] + IPARAM[1]) PBDM (1 + IPARAM[1]) PAAX -Y PBAX Z NEW LSNO COPY PREV PAAX Y $.

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Figure 10:4. An Unequal Tee

NEW PTSE /MWTPTSET NEW GMSE /MWTGMSET NEW SCOM /MWNEQTEE GTYP TEE PARA 100 80 114 90 BWD 105 80 15 10 PTRE /MWTPTSET GMRE /MWTGMSET MODEL CE GOTO PTRE NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[5]) NUMB 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS (PARAM[6]) PAXI -Y NEW PTAX COPY PREV PAXI Y NUM 2 NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[5]) NUMB 3 PBOR (PARAM[2]) PDIS (PARAM[7]) PAXI X /MWNEQTEE GOTO GMRE NEW LINE OBST 0 CLFL TRUE P1 P2 NEW LINE OBST 0 CLFL TRUE P3 P0 NEW SSPH OBST 0 CLFL TRUE PDIS 0 PAXI P1 PDIA (PARAM[8]) NEW SSPH COPY PREV PAXI P2 NEW SSPH OBST 0 CLFL TRUE LEVE 0 2 PDIS 0 PAXI P3 PDIA (PARAM[9]) NEW SCYL TUFL TRUE PDIS 0 PHEI (-2 * PARAM[6]) PDIA (PARAM[3]) PAXI P1 NEW SCYL TUFL TRUE PDIS 0 PHEI (PARAM[7]) PDIA (PARAM[4]) PAXI X END $.

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Figure 10:5. A Weld Neck Flange

NEW PTSE /MWFLPS NEW GMSE /MWFLGS NEW SCOM /MWWNFLAN GTYP FLAN PARA 100 114 254 30 56 180 TUB FLGD 20 PTRE /MWFLPS GMRE /MWFLGS MODEL CE GOTO PTRE NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[8]) NUMB 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 0 PAXI -Y NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[7]) NUMB 2 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PAXI Y PDIS (PARAM[4] + PARAM[5]) /MWWNFLAN GOTO GMRE NEW SCYL CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PDIS 0 PHEI (PARAM[4]) PDIA (PARAM[3] + IPARAM[1]) PAXI Y NEW LINE OBST 0 CLFL TRUE P1 P2 NEW SSPH OBST 0 CLFL TRUE PDIS 0 PAXI P2 PDIA (PARAM[9]) NEW LSNO TUFL TRUE PTDI (PARAM[5] + PARAM[4]) PBDI (PARAM[4]) PBDM (PARAM[6] + IPARAM[1]) PTDM (PARAM[2] + IPARAM[1]) PAAX Y PBAX X POFF 0 END $.

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Figure 10:6. A Concentric Reducer

NEW PTSE /MWRPTSET NEW GMSE /MWRGMSET NEW SCOM /MWCR2 GTYP REDU PARA 100 80 110 90 102 0 BWD 15 10 PTRE /MWRPTSET GMRE /MWRGMSET MODEL CE GOTO PTRE NEW PTAX NUMB 1 PCON (PARAM[7]) PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 0 PAXI -Y NEW PTCA NUMB 2 PCON (PARAM[7]) PBOR (PARAM[2]) PX 0 PY (PARAM[5]) PZ (-1 * PARAM[6]) NEW PTAX NUMB 3 PDIS 0 PAXI -Z /MWCR2 GOTO GMRE NEW LINE OBST 0 CLFL TRUE P1 P2 NEW SSPH OBST 0 CLFL TRUE PDIS 0 PAXI P1 PDIA (PARAM[8]) NEW SSPH OBST 0 CLFL TRUE PDIS 0 PAXI P2 PDIA (0.65 * PARAM[9]) NEW LSNO TUFL TRUE PTDI (PARAM[5]) PBDI 0 PTDM (PARAM[4] + IPARAM[1]) PBDM (PARAM[3] + IPARAM[1]) PAAX Y PBAX -Z POFF (PARAM[6]) END $.

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Figure 10:7. An Elbow

NEW PTSE /MWPS35 NEW GMSE /MWGS34 NEW SCOM /MWEL5 GTYP ELBO PARA 50 60 25 75 15 SWF PTRE /MWPS35 GMRE /MWGS34 MODEL CE GOTO PTRE NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[6]) NUMB 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS (PARAM[3]) PAXI -Y NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[6]) NUMB 2 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS (PARAM[3]) PAXI Y 45 X /MWEL5 GOTO GMRE NEW LINE OBST 0 CLFL TRUE P1 T0 P2 NEW SCTO TUFL TRUE PAAX P1 PBAX P2 PDIA (PARAM[2] + IPARAM[1]) NEW LSNO OBST 0 CLFL TRUE PTDI (PARAM[5]) PBDI 0.00 PTDM (PARAM[4] + IPARAM[1]) PBDM (PARAM[4] + IPARAM[1]) PAAX P1 PBAX Z TVIS FALSE NEW LSNO COPY PREV PAAX P2 NEW SCYL OBST 0 TUFL TRUE PHEI (PARAM[5]) PDIA (PARAM[4] + IPARAM[1]) PAXI P1 NEW SCYL COPY PREV PAXI P2 END $.

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Figure 10:8. A Mitred Elbow, using SSLC Primitives

NEW PTSE /MWPTESTC1 NEW GMSE /MWGTESTC1 NEW SCOM /MWLOBST-51 GTYP ELBO PARA 500 2000 398.7 -550 -152.2 -1234.6 -585.5 BWDN PTRE /MWPTESTC1 GMRE /MWGTESTC1 MODEL CE GOTO PTRE NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[8]) NUMB 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS (PARAM[2]) PAXI -Y NEW PTAX PCON (PARAM[8]) NUMB 2 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS (PARAM[2]) PAXI X NEW PTCA NUMB 3 PX (-PARAM[6]) PY (PARAM[5]) PZ 0 PTCDIR -X 24 -Y NEW PTCA NUMB 4 PX (-PARAM[7]) PY (PARAM[7]) PZ 0 PTCDIR -X 45 -Y NEW PTCA NUMB 5 PX (-PARAM[5]) PY (PARAM[6]) PZ 0 PTCDIR -Y 24 -X /MWLOBST-51 GOTO GMRE NEW SRTO PAAX P1 PBAX P2 PDIA (-1.2 * PARAM[4]) PHEI (PARAM[3]) NEW SSLC OBST 0 CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PDIA (PARAM[4]) PHEI (-PARAM[3]) PDIS 0 PAXI P1 PXTS -11.5 NEW SSLC OBST 0 CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PDIA (PARAM[4]) PHEI (-PARAM[3]) PDIS 0 PAXI P2 PXTS 11.5 NEW SSLC OBST 0 CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PDIA (PARAM[4]) PHEI (-2 * PARAM[3]) PDIS (PARAM[3]) PAXI P3 PXTS -11.5 PXBS 11.5 NEW SSLC COPY PREV PAXI P4 NEW SSLC COPY PREV PAXI P5 END $.

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Figure 10:9. A Rectangular Cross Section Pipe, using BOXI primitives

PARAGON Syntax: NEW PTSE /PBOXI2 NEW PTAX PCON BWD NUM 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 0 PAXI -Y END OF END NEW GMSE /GBOXI2 NEW BOXI PAXI P1 PXLE (PARAM[3]) PZLE (PARAM[2]) CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE END OF END NEW PTSE /PELBO NEW PTAX PCON BWD NUM 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 250 PAXI -Y END NEW PTAX PCON BWD NUM 2 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 250 PAXI X END OF END NEW GMSE /GELBO NEW SRTO CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PAAX P1 PBAX P2 PDIA (PARAM[2]) PHEI (PARAM[3]) END OF END NEW PTSE /PVELBO NEW PTAX PCON BWD NUM 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 250 PAXI -Y END NEW PTAX PCON BWD NUM 2 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 250 PAXI Z END OF END NEW PTSE /PWELD NEW PTAX PCON BWD NUM 1 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 0 PAXI Y END NEW PTAX PCON BWD NUM 2 PBOR (PARAM[1]) PDIS 0 PAXI -Y END OF END NEW GMSE /GWELD NEW SSPH CLFL TRUE TUFL TRUE PAXI P1 PDIA (PARAM[2]) END OF END NEW SCOM /BOX100 GTYP TUBE PARA 300100 100 300 END OLD SCOM /BOX100

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PTRE PTSE /PBOXI2 GMRE GMSE /GBOXI2 NEW SCOM /HELBO100 GTYP ELBO PARA 300100 300 100 END OLD SCOM /HELBO100 PTRE /PELBO GMRE /GELBO NEW SCOM /VELBO100 GTYP ELBO PARA 300100 100 300 END OLD SCOM /VELBO100 PTRE /PVELBO GMRE /GELBO NEW SCOM /BWELD100 GTYP WELD PARA 300100 200 END OLD SCOM /BWELD100 PTRE /PWELD GMRE /GWELD SPECON Macro: NEW SPECIFICATION /BOXI.SPEC MATREF =0 FLUREF =0 RATING 0.000 LINETYPE NUL HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF TUBE */D300X100 300100.0 /BOX101 =0 =0 =0 =0 HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 STYP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPRE BLTREF ELBO */HB300X100 300100.0 H /HELBO101 =0 =0 =0 =0 ELBO */VB300X100 300100.0 V /VELBO101 =0 =0 =0 =0 HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF WELD */W300X100 300100.0 /BWELD101 =0 =0 =0 =0 $.

DESIGN Syntax: NEW PIPE SPEC BOXI.SPEC NEW BRAN /BOXIBRAN HPOS E0 HBOR 300100 HDIR N HCON BWD TPOS E2500 N7000 U1000 TDIR S TBOR 300100 TCON BWD NEW WELD SEL CONN TO PH AND P0 IS U SPRE /BOXI.SPEC/W300X100 LSTU/BOXI.SPEC/D300X100 ORIF TRUE POSF TRUE NEW ELBO SEL WI STYP V THRO N5000 DIR U NEW ELBO SEL WI STYP H THRO U1000 DIR E NEW ELBO SEL WI STYP V THRO PT DIR N NEW WELD SEL CONN TO PT AND P0 IS E END Note: That it is assumed that a COCO element allowing BWD to BWD connections already exists in your database.

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Specification Constructor

11

Specification Constructor
SPECON, the Specification Constructor, is used to create or modify the Specification (SPEC) elements in Catalogue Databases. These Specifications govern the choice of components from the catalogue. They must have been set up, together with the rest of the Catalogue DB, before design work takes place. In principle, therefore, SPECONMODE within PARAGON will be one of the first modules to be used when a new PDMS project is initiated, although in practice it is likely that a companywide library of Catalogues and Specifications will be created independently of any individual design project and accessed by subsequent users to ensure overall standardisation and quality control. SPECON enables you to input new Specifications, to modify existing Specifications, and to output Specifications to your terminal or to a file (to be printed or input again at a later date). A facility is provided so that you can make changes to a Specification without losing compatibility between existing design data and earlier versions of that Specification. This is achieved by maintaining valid references to obsolescent components in the Specification while preventing their selection in new designs. The part of the hierarchy below a Catalogue element which is relevant when considering Specifications is shown in Figure 11:1.: Part of the structure of a CATA element. (The options CATE, STCAT and TEXT have been omitted; see Catalogue Database Structure for a fuller explanation.)

Figure 11:1.

Part of the structure of a CATA element

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The functions of the individual types of element are as follows: SECT COMP Piping Section and Structural Section elements are administrative STSECT subdivisions of the owning CATA element. Component elements hold the definitions of piping components. These definitions comprise pointers to GMSET (Geomset) and PTSET (Pointset) elements, plus lists of parameters which specify the exact type, size and geometry of each component (that is, the components Attributes, including its GTYPE). Profile, Joint and Fitting elements hold the definitions of corresponding structural components. These definitions comprise pointers to GMSET, FITT GMSSET, PTSET and PTSSET elements, plus lists of specific attributes, in a similar way to COMP elements. Detailing Text elements hold text which may be used to describe components in schedules and on isometrics. (They also hold the SKEYs which define the symbols used to represent components in isometric drawings; see the PDMS ISODRAFT Reference Manual.) Material Text elements hold text which may be used to describe the materials of construction of the components.

PROF JOIN

DTEXT

MTEXT

11.1

Content and Format of a Specification


The component Specifications, which define the availability of components for particular types of use, are held in the SPWLD (Specification World) Elements of the Catalogue DB. These elements, which are at the same hierarchic level as the CATA elements, can own the simple hierarchy of elements shown in Figure 11:2.: The structure of a SPWLD element.

Figure 11:2.

The structure of a SPWLD element

A SPEC is equivalent to an engineering specification for a given class of piping or structural component. It may contain all components of a given material, for example carbon steel, or all components for a given class of use, for example all piping components with a particular pressure rating. Such a SPEC comprises tabulated data of the type illustrated in Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components, where each headed question column represents a SELEC and each horizontal row represents an SPCOM.

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Specification Constructor

It is possible to allocate a default value to most SELEC options, to be used if that particular attribute is not defined during the selection process. The default setting is shown in the tabulated SPEC immediately below the corresponding column heading (the SELEC element) for that attribute. Note: Default values are not allowed for NAME or TYPE, or for reference pointers such as CATREF and DETAIL. It is also possible to define overall specification pointers and settings which apply to the whole SPEC, not just to individual SPCOMs. These are shown at the top of the SPEC listing, before the Heading, as shown by the entries MATREF, FLUREF, RATING and LINETYPE in Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components. The meanings of the various parts of the Specification, and lists of valid attributes (corresponding to the column headings) which apply to particular types of component specification, are detailed in Typical Specifications.

Figure 11:3.

Part of a typical Specification for piping components

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Specification Constructor

11.2

How Component Selection Works


This section explains how the tabulated Specification (SPEC) data is used to choose an appropriate piping component from the complete catalogue. Similar principles apply to structural components and equipment nozzles, although for these you may also use the catalogue without a Specification. The SELEC elements are generated automatically from the tabular SPECON input for a given SPEC and hold all information about those attributes of a component which determine its availability for a given purpose. For any given set of design criteria, the route through the SELECtors follows a question and answer sequence to determine which SPCOM is suitable. Each question relates to a specific item in the specification and each answer leads to the next relevant question in a logical progression. Any given combination of answers should correspond to one, and only one, SPCOM. The types of information considered at the SELEC decision points for PDMS piping components might include: Generic type; for example, BEND, TEE, VALV etc. Bore(s) Angle(s) between multiple inlets/outlets and so on.

In addition to these specifying attributes, each SPCOM contains a pointer to a COMP, which meets all the listed specifications, in a CATA element. It is this pointer, known as the Catalogue Reference (CATREF), which forms the key to correct component selection when new pipework is being designed. Each SPCOM also contains pointers to detailing text (DETAIL points to DTEXT), material text (MATXT points to MTEXT), bolting requirements (BLTREF points to BLTAB), component properties (CMPREF points to CMPT in a Properties DB) and part requirements (PRTREF). There are two essential links which ensure that an appropriate component is selected during the design of new pipework or a new structure, namely: Design Component to Specification Specification to Catalogue Component

Thus, when a new pipe component is to be selected for inclusion in a Design DB, the following sequence is applied: The design component is allocated a Specification Reference (SPREF) which is selected from the required SPEC. You usually define the Pipe Specification (PSPEC) as soon as you create a new pipe, and this is then applied to all components which the Pipe owns unless you override it. The SPREF points to an SPCOM (in the Catalogue DB). The SPCOM points to a suitable catalogue component (COMP) via the CATREF pointer.

(The SPCOM also points to a DTEXT via the DETAIL pointer, an MTEXT via the MATXT pointer, a BLTAB element via the BLTREF pointer, and a CMPT element in a Properties DB via the CMPREF pointer, as appropriate.) This is illustrated below.

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Specification Constructor

COMP PIPE COMPONENT (PSPEC)


via SELECs

SPEC COMPONENT (SPCOM) CATREF DETAIL

DTEXT

SPREF

MATXT BLTREF CMPREF

MTEXT

BLTAB

CMPT (PROPS DB)

DESIGN DATA
Figure 11:4.

SPECIFICATIONS

CATALOGUE

The links between Design Data, Specifications and Catalogue

EXAMPLE: As an illustration of the principles of the selection process, consider the following question and answer sequence which might apply when choosing a valve from the /RF300 Specification represented in Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components: SELEC_1 TYPE? Answer VALV, which leads to the next question ... SELEC_2 PBOR0? Answer 25.0, which leads to a choice of three STYPs SELEC_3 STYP? Answer GA, which in this example offers only one choice for SHOP SELEC_4 SHOP? Answer TRUE The resulting combination of SELEC answers, namely a 25mm bore Gate Valve with its SHOP attribute set to TRUE, is represented in the SPEC by one, and only one, SPCOM, namely */25GA. This points to the component in the Catalogue which completely matches the specification, via the CATREF /VGAFF. The corresponding descriptive DTEXT is pointed to by the DETAIL /DGA.V.SW, and so on. Note that the CATREF is unique within this SPEC, whereas the same DETAIL applies to other components such as */20GA.

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Manipulating the Catalogue Database using SPECONMODE

12

Manipulating the Catalogue Database using SPECONMODE


SPECON is used for all aspects of Specification creation, modification and interrogation. This chapter explains how to carry out the following tasks: Create a new SPEC (Creating a Specification) Access an existing SPEC (Accessing an Existing Specification) Input data (SELECs and SPCOMs) to a SPEC (Entering Tabular Data) Edit an existing SPEC (Editing an Existing Specification) Copy an existing SPEC as the basis for a new SPEC (Copying a Specification) Output the contents of a SPEC to a selected device (Outputting a Specification) Use macro input techniques to simplify SPECON usage (Using Macros For SPECON Inputs)

12.1

Creating a Specification
In PARAGON command line type SPECONMODE to use the SPECON command syntax. To create a new SPEC, use one of the commands

NEW SPECification specname NEW specname


where specname is the PDMS name which will be used to refer to the complete Specification. Note: The short form of the command is all that is necessary, since a SPEC is the only element type which you can create at this level in SPECON (the lower level elements SELEC and SPCOM are created indirectly when the tabular data is entered; see Entering Tabular Data). For example, either of the following commands:

NEW SPEC /RF300 NEW /RF300


would create a new SPEC called /RF300. To associate a descriptive text with the SPEC name, use the syntax

TEXT text

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For example, the SPEC created in the preceding example might be given an associated text by entering the command:

TEXT 300 psi Piping Specification


Note: The delimiting apostrophes enclosing the text string, which must not exceed 50 characters. This text, which is stored in a TEXT element in the hierarchy, will be shown after the SPEC name when the Specification is output; see Outputting a Specification. Two system attributes on the PDMS SPECIFICATION element are used when the product VPRM is the source of PDMS Specifications. When a specification is imported to PDMS the attributes FISSUE and FINPUTBY hold the VPRM information. FISSUE holds VPRM issue number FINPUTBY holds information indicating that the source was VPRM and includes the date of issue

The system attribute FSTATUS also holds the VPRM status of the specification, usually working or approved. For example:

Finputby |VPRM at 26-NOV-2003 12:04| Fissue Fstatus |00| |APPROVED|

12.2

Accessing an Existing Specification


Access a SPEC by using any of the following commands:

OLD SPECification specname OLD specname SPECification specname specname


where specname is the name of an existing SPEC. For example, enter any of the following commands:

OLD SPEC /RF300 OLD /RF300 SPEC /RF300 /RF300


to access the SPEC created in Creating a Specification. Clearly, the simplest method is to enter just the name of the SPEC required. You may interrogate the SPWLD hierarchy by using the command, or change to a different SPEC element within it by using any of the standard DB navigational commands such as FIRST, NEXT, etc., in the usual way.

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12.3
12.3.1

Entering Tabular Data


General Principles
You must have created or accessed a SPEC (as described in Creating a Specification and Accessing an Existing Specification, respectively) before you can enter tabular data. Each Specification may contain any number of separate tables. For example, that part of the SPEC named /RF300 listed in Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components contains four tables (one for each of the component types VALV, TEE, ELBO and FLAN), although the complete SPEC would probably contain many more.A table comprises three distinct types of data: A Heading (or Question Line) Defaults Answer Lines

The heading must be at the top of the table; the defaults, if specified, must immediately follow the heading; and the answer lines (one for each SPCOM) form the remainder. This sequence is illustrated in Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components.

12.3.2

Special Characters in SPEC Data


In addition to conventional alphanumeric PDMS names and attribute values, the following special characters may be used in the SPEC data entries: * The star or asterisk character is used throughout PDMS as an abbreviation which you can set to the name of an owning element when naming a member element in a DB hierarchy. In most modules you must define this character by using the command, but it is set automatically by SPECON so that it always refers to the name of the current SPEC. For example, in the SPEC named /RF300 shown in Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components, the component listed as */20GA has the full PDMS name /RF300/20GA. + The plus character means ditto; it enables you to repeat the setting above it in the table with the minimum of keystrokes. - The minus or dash character, which may be used only in the default line of a table, means not applicable or unspecified. If a default line is present, this character must appear under TYPE and NAME, and under any SELEC questions for which default answers are not set. It must not appear under CATREF, DETAIL, MATXT etc., for which defaults are never allowed. = The equals character, when used in the default line of a table, means that the answer will default to the first selector in list order after all other questions have been answered.

As an example, consider the following part of a table (which incorporates all four of the characters * - + and = ):
HEADING TYPE NAME DEFAULTS FLAN */FG FLAN */FX ... PBOR0 20.0 + STYP CATREF = S P /FSAAPAPP + DETAIL /20FL + MATXT /ASA-20F /ASA-20FX CMPREF =0 =0 BLTREF /SBOL/20F +

This includes two SPCOMs which differ only in the Selector STYP (Subtype) and which have pointers, for the purpose of this example, to different Material Texts. When this SPEC is used to select a component without specifying the required STYP, the = default option will

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select the first SPCOM (*/FG) in the list order, which points to the MTEXT identified as / ASA-20F. Note: The equals signs within the body of the table, in the form =0, simply show that those pointers have not been set. They have no relevance to the equals sign in a default line. Since PDMS does not allow any SPREF to exist more than once, items in a SPEC which are identical but which need to be distinguished from each other may be allocated suffixes. ISODRAFT can be made to ignore such a suffix by recognising the delimiting character which separates the suffix from the rest of the SPREF. For example, if the delimiting character is defined as a colon (:), which is the default, ISODRAFT will identify two components with the SPREFs /TEE.FS:AA and /TEE.FS:AB as having the same item code / TEE.FS. See the ISODRAFT Reference Manual for further details, including the way in which you may specify which character is to be recognised as the delimiter.

12.3.3

Headings
The heading line, which defines the column headings for the rest of the table, contains four distinct sorts of information: TYPE is the generic type (GTYPE) of the component represented by an SPCOM. NAME is the unique identifier for each SPCOM. Selector Questions define the SELEC choices which will be used to choose an appropriate SPCOM for a given design purpose (e.g. STYPE, ANGLE etc.). Reference Pointers link each SPCOM to the corresponding definitions in the other parts of the Catalogue (e.g. CATREF points to a COMP, DETAIL points to a DTEXT, and so on).

(For full details of the available options for Selector Questions and Reference Pointers, see Selectors and Pointers for Piping Components, Selectors and Pointers for Structural Components, or Selectors and Pointers for Insulation.) To define a heading, use the command syntax

Heading TYpe NAme

questions

pointers

noting that the command is entered on two lines (i.e. you must press RETURN after the command HEADING, as well as after the last entry in the second heading line). Note: When new data is entered into a Specification, the input sequence is TYPE NAME ... etc.; when an existing Specification is modified (see Editing an Existing Specification), or when its contents are output (see Outputting a Specification), the corresponding sequence is NAME TYPE ... etc. Examples of possible commands for defining headings are as follows: For generic type TUBE HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 SCHE SHOP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF

For generic type ELBO HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 STYP ANGL SHOP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF

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For generic type REDU HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 PBOR2 STYP SHOP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF

For generic type BEAM HEADING TYPE NAME STYP GRAD DEPT WIDT WEIG INER CATREF

and so on. See Typical Specifications for explanations of the SELEC questions used in these headings. The maximum number of entries in a heading line (that is, the maximum number of columns in the table) is 20. Note: The number of columns in an existing Specification cannot be changed, so it is important that you choose the headings carefully when you create a new Specification.

12.3.4

Defaults
To define the default settings for the SELEC answers, use the command syntax

Defaults default_settings
which, as with the HEADING command, occupies two input lines. Each SELEC question column must be set to either a definite answer (value, word, etc.) or to a - or = character (as defined in Special Characters in SPEC Data). The TYPE and NAME columns must have - (null) defaults and the Reference Pointer columns must have no default entries at all. For example, heading and default lines for a table of VALV Specifications might be entered as follows: HEADING TYPE NAME BLTREF DEFAULTS PBOR0 STYP SHOP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF

GATE

Any VALV selected without specifying the STYPE (for example, by using the command NEW VALV SEL in a design module) will have the word GATE assigned as the answer to the SELEC question for its STYPE.

12.3.5

Selector Answers
To complete the main area of the table, enter the TYPE and NAME, followed by an appropriate answer (value, word etc.) under each column heading, for each SPCOM line in turn. The spacing between the answers is not critical, although interpretation of the SPEC table may be easier if you align the headings and answers in vertical columns, as illustrated in Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components. Note, however, that the tabulation used when data in input to a SPEC is not retained when that SPEC is subsequently output. Remember that you can use the * and + characters, defined in Special Characters in SPEC Data, to save repetitive typing when entering the SPEC data from a keyboard.

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Note: You must take care not to use any of the dimensional units (MM, M, IN, FT, FE etc.) in answers which are expected to be words. This applies particularly to the STYPE Selector (see Subtype Selectors: A Special Case). If, for example, a Specification included the adjacent headings PBOR0 STYPE and you entered the answers 25 for the bore and FT for the STYPE, SPECON would interpret this as a bore of 25 feet and would try to assign the next answer or reference pointer to the STYPE.

12.3.6

Subtype Selectors: A Special Case


Subtype (STYP or equivalent) selector answers can be tabulated in either of two formats: as a PDMS word (up to four letters), or as a text string (of any length) enclosed between apostrophes. If you use the latter format, you must precede the text string with the word TEXT to avoid possible confusion with user-defined dimensioning units. For example, the STYP for a gate valve (generic type VALV) could be listed either as GATE or as the equivalent form TEXT GATE. If these are to be truly equivalent, you must use uppercase characters for GATE in the text answer. Alternatively, the text version could be extended to give a more explicit description; for example, TEXT High Pressure Gate.

12.3.7

Including User-defined Attributes in Specifications


To include the settings of user-defined attributes in a Specification, for subsequent use by ISODRAFT, use the command syntax

EXTRA
For example:

:uda_name

attribute_setting

EXTRA :colour green (where :colour is a uda of type text) EXTRA :diagonal 226.87 (where :diagonal is a uda of type real)
User-defined attribute settings included in this way (one per line) will be correctly output and re-input when you list the SPEC using macros. Note: User-defined attributes to be used in this way must have been defined in LEXICON with SPCOMs as valid components.

12.3.8

Including Comments in Specifications


To include a comment in a Specification, typically to clarify details of its content for future users, use the command syntax

COMMENT text
All text between apostrophes following the COMMENT command will be ignored when the SPEC is interpreted, but will be correctly output and re-input when you list the SPEC using macros.

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12.4
12.4.1

Editing an Existing Specification


Adding a New SPCOM
To add one or more new SPCOM lines to an existing SPEC, use the same syntax as that described in Entering Tabular Data for setting up a new SPEC; that is, enter the command lines

Heading TYpe NAme questions pointers Defaults(optional) default_settings(optional) selector_answers pointer_settings


The heading line TYPE NAME questions pointers must be the same as the corresponding line in the existing SPEC. SPCOMs entered in this way will be merged into the table for the relevant component type when the SPEC is output.

12.4.2

Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM


The terminology used here is significant: If a SPEC or SPCOM is deleted, all aspects of it are eliminated from the Catalogue DB. If an existing design includes a component with an SPREF which points to the deleted data, any future access to the Design DB, say to produce a drawing, will result in an error since no matching SPCOM will be found. If a SPEC or SPCOM is removed, the data held within it is transferred to a special archive Specification named /*LIMBOSPEC. The data still exists, so that references to it are still valid, but it no longer forms part of the original named SPEC. This facility is useful: when a component is withdrawn from use for new designs but its continued use in existing designs is permitted when use of a component is to be suspended temporarily while modifications are made.

Note: If you are using more than one Catalogue DB, there is one archive Specification for each DB. This avoids inadvertent transfer of data between DBs due to removal and subsequent restoration of SPECs or SPCOMs. Such multiple archive Specifications are named /*LIMBOSPEC, /*LIMBOSPEC_1, /*LIMBOSPEC_2 etc. Only the single form /*LIMBOSPEC will be referred to in the remainder of this manual. To delete individual SPCOM lines from a SPEC, use the command syntax

DELETE spcom1 spcom2 ...


where spcom1, spcom2 etc. identify the relevant SPCOMs. For example,

/RF300 DELETE */20GA */25GA


will access the SPEC /RF300 and delete the SPCOMs /RF300/20GA and /RF300/25GA. To delete a complete Specification, use the command syntax

DELETE SPECification specname

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where specname is the name of the SPEC. For example,

/RF300 DELETE SPEC /RF300


will access and then delete the entire SPEC named /RF300. To delete all SPCOMs from a SPEC without deleting the SPEC itself, enter the command

DELETE ALL
Note: The DELETE command should be used with care. No checks are made against any design data before the SPCOMs are deleted and any references to such SPCOMs in a Design DB will become invalid. If in doubt, use the REMOVE command. To remove individual SPCOM lines from a SPEC, use the command syntax

REMove spcom1 spcom2 ...


where spcom1, spcom2 etc. identify the relevant SPCOMs. The effect of this command is to remove all answers from the named SPCOM lines, except for the pointers CATREF and DETAIL, and to transfer those SPCOMs to the archive Specification /*LIMBOSPEC. If a Specification Reference (SPREF) in a Design DB points to an SPCOM which cannot be found in the currently named SPEC, it will automatically look for that SPCOM in /*LIMBOSPEC. To remove the entire contents of a SPEC, enter the command

REMove ALL
To reinstate a removed SPCOM, ensure that you are pointing to the correct current SPEC and then use the syntax for modifying an SPCOM, as defined in Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM, but incorporate the name of the SPCOM to be reinstated. The SPCOM will automatically be moved back from /*LIMBOSPEC into the original SPEC.

12.5

Copying a Specification
It is sometimes necessary to have two SPECs which are very similar, perhaps differing only in the CATREF and DETAIL pointers of their member SPCOMs. To enable you to create these easily, SPECON allows you to make a copy of an existing SPEC which you can then rename and edit as required. To do so, use the command syntax

COPY specname REName name1 name2


where specname identifies the complete SPEC which is to be copied and name1 and name2 define the old and new name parts, respectively, for the individual SPCOM lines throughout the SPEC. In most cases name1 will be the same as specname. For example, to create a new Specification /SPEC2 derived from an existing and similar Specification /SPEC1, enter the commands

NEW SPEC /SPEC2 COPY /SPEC1 RENAME /SPEC1 /SPEC2


/SPEC2 will contain exactly the same headings, default settings and SPCOM lines as / SPEC1 except that all SPCOMs which were named /SPEC1/... in the latter will have been renamed /SPEC2/... in the former. You can now change any individual answers (attribute settings or pointers) in /SPEC2 by using the editing commands described in Editing an Existing Specification.

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12.6
12.6.1

Outputting a Specification
Defining the Destination
You can output the content of a SPEC to your terminal or to a file (perhaps for subsequent printing). The device to which SPECON is to send the output may be defined by using the standard device-selection commands described in the PDMS MONITOR Reference Manual. The default is TERMINAL.

12.6.2

Outputting Complete Specifications


To output one or more complete SPECs, use the command syntax

OUTput specname1 specname2 ...


For example, to send the content of Specification /RF300 to a file named /RF300.SPEC in your current OS directory, enter the commands

FILE /RF300.SPEC OUTPUT /RF300


The data will be output to the selected device in a similar tabular format to that in which it was entered into the SPEC, although the precise tabulation settings will have been modified to suit the linewidth of the destination device (but see also Controlling the Output Format). SPEC data output in this way has the same NAME TYPE ... sequence as that which applies when existing data is being accessed for editing; not the TYPE NAME ... sequence in which it was entered. To output a SPEC with the heading sequence TYPE NAME ... (to be used, for example, as input at a later time; see Using Macros For SPECON Inputs), use the extended command syntax

OUTput NEW specname1 specname2


(The default version of the OUTPUT command is equivalent to OUTPUT OLD, but there is no advantage in using the longer form.)

12.6.3

Controlling the Output Format


By default, the tabulated layout of data derived the output macro is the same as that in the original SPEC. You can compact the output macro file by replacing multiple spaces by a single space. This saves disk space, but can make the tables more difficult to read. To do so, use the command

COMPact
To restore the tabulated format with aligned columns, use the command

ALIGned

12.6.4

Outputting Parts of Specifications


To generate output which is restricted to one or more specified types of component, include the generic types of the required components by using one of the syntax formats

OUTput gtype1 gtype2 ... specname1 specname2 ... OUTput OLD gtype1 gtype2 ... specname1 specname2 ... OUTput NEW gtype1 gtype2 ... specname1 specname2 ...

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where gtype1, gtype2 etc. are the component types to be included and specname1, specname2 etc. are the Specifications from which the data is to be extracted. For example, to create a file containing just the valve and flange data from the Specification /RF300, in a format suitable for use as input to a different Specification, you might use the commands

FILE /SPECDATA OUTPUT NEW VALV FLAN /RF300

12.6.5

How Bores Are Output


Although all pipe bores are stored in the PDMS databases in mm, they may be input and output in either metric or imperial units. The program converts from one set of units to the other by applying the factor 25.4 mm/inch. PDMS holds tables of standard nominal bore pipe sizes and, unless specified otherwise, compares each actual bore against the values in the appropriate (metric or imperial) table. If the actual bore falls within a predefined tolerance of one of the nominal bores, it is assumed that the standard sized pipe is suitable and so that nominal bore is output. You may specify whether component bores within the Specification data are to be output as actual or nominal sizes by using the command syntax

BOREs ACTual BOREs NOMinal


The default is BORES NOMINAL. Note: RADI and HEIG questions use the current Distance unit. Nominal Pipe Size Tables contains the tables used by PDMS to define metric and imperial pipe sizes.

12.7

Using Macros For SPECON Inputs


While it is possible to create or modify SPECs and SPCOMs interactively, it is usually more efficient to use macros for this purpose. The tabular format of the SPECON input is easily achieved using any normal text editor and the data file thus created can be checked for errors before it is read into the Catalogue DB. If any syntax errors are found when the macro file is run in SPECON, the file may be edited to correct the mistakes and rerun with the minimum amount of effort. The format of the macro input file is exactly the same as that produced by the OUTPUT NEW command described in Outputting Complete Specifications; that is, TYPE must precede NAME in the heading and SPCOM lines. This means that Specifications which have been sent to a file may be edited independently of PDMS, using any available text editor in your computer system, and then reloaded via SPECON. This is often the most effective way of carrying out major revisions of existing SPECs. Any part of an SPCOM line may be changed in this way other than the NAME or TYPE; if these were changed SPECON would not be able to locate the SPCOM to overwrite it. Remember, when creating SPECON input macros from the keyboard, that the symbols * (automatically set to the Specification Name) and + (equivalent to ditto) can be used to save repetitive typing (see Special Characters in SPEC Data).

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To update an existing macro to use text strings instead of PDMS words for STYPE selector answers (see Subtype Selectors: A Special Case), edit the macro so that each fourcharacter word representing an STYP (or equivalent) is replaced by the keyword TEXT followed by the replacement text enclosed between apostrophes. For example, you would replace GATE by TEXT GATE. Note that the text must be in uppercase characters if it is to be interpreted in the same way as the equivalent PDMS word.

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13

Typical Specifications
This section explains, with examples, typical data entries which might be used in Specifications for the main types of design components (piping components, structural components and insulation).

13.1
13.1.1

Selectors and Pointers for Piping Components


Applicability
The headings in this section may apply to components from the following list of GTYPEs: ATTAchment NOZZle Bend Bolt CAP CLOsure COUpling CROSs DUCting Elbow FBLind FILter FLAnge FLG FTUbe GASket HELement OLEts PCLamp PCOmp REDucer ROD SCLamp SHU TEE TUBe TRAP UNIon VALve VENt VFWay VTWay

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ATTAchment INSTrument LJSE (For Insulation, see Pipework Insulation) WELD

13.1.2

Selectors
There are very few constraints on the SELEC questions, and the order in which you list them, when defining SPECs for piping components. The following headings should meet most of your requirements: Pbore integer Specifies the bore of p-point integer. For multiway components (such as a Tee), more than one PBORE SELEC may be specified (PBORE1, PBORE2 etc.). PConn integer Specifies the connection type of p-point integer. Note: See P-Point Zero: A Special Case for important information about the use of the special cases PBORE0 and PCONN0 which may be applied to the preceding SELECs. SType Defines the Specific Type of the component; it is effectively a subdivision of a GTYPE. For example, a component of GTYPE VALV may have an STYPE GATE, GLOB, CHEC etc. ANGle Defines the required angle of an ELBO or BEND, when DDANGL has been used in the component pointset (PTSET). The answer to this SELEC question in an SPCOM may be a single value (e.g. 90.0) or a range of values (e.g. 45.0,90.0). RADius Defines the required radius of an ELBO or BEND, when DDRADI has been used in the component pointset (PTSET). May be a single value or a range. TEMperature Defines the operating temperature. PRessure Defines the operating pressure. RATing Defines the pressure rating. SHOP Defines whether the component is intended for shop fabrication (SPCOM answer TRUE or SHOP) or on-site assembly (SPCOM answer FALSE or SITE). In addition to the standard SELEC headings, you may use any word (up to four letters), with or without a numeric qualifier, to define your own questions. For example, if you wished to

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include a range of colour-coded reducers in your Catalogue (perhaps having a base colour and a marker colour to indicate suitability for particular types of use), you might include the questions COL1 and COL2 as SELEC headings in the Specification for TYPE REDU. The SPCOMs containing the answers to these questions will be considered by the selection process if the appropriate option is specified in your design module command; for example

SELECT NEW REDU ... WITH COL1 RED WITH COL2 BLUE
If COL1 and/or COL2 are omitted, the default colours (answers) will be used.

13.1.3

P-Point Zero: A Special Case


Normally, when the bore or connection type of a p-point is used as a SELEC question, the answer provided will apply to a specific p-point number. For example, PBORE1 will be the components arrive bore, PBORE2 will be its in-line leave bore, and so on. However, under some circumstances this need not apply. In such cases you may use the Selectors PBORE0 and/or PCONN0 to represent either the arrive or leave p-point of the component. For example, assume that you wish to select a flange. Normally P1 would represent p-arrive and P2 would represent p-leave, so that the Selector PBORE1 could be matched against the p-leave bore of the preceding component to select a suitable flange. If, however, the flange is reversed (flipped), P2 becomes the p-arrive and so a Specification based on the Selector PBORE1 will not allocate a correct match. If the SELEC is defined as PBORE0, all p-points of the new component will be tested, in numeric order, against the p-leave of the preceding component. Thus, in the case of our flipped flange, if a P1 match cannot be found then P2 will be tested as a second choice. If either P1 or P2 matches the answer given for PBORE0, then a flange will be selected. The same principle applies to the connector type PCONN0. You will find the P-point Zero convention very useful when compiling Specifications. Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components, for example, illustrates the use of PBORE0 (abbreviated to PBOR0) for four component types.

13.1.4

Reference Pointers and Settings


The following reference pointers and settings are applicable to the specification of piping components (see the examples below). Individual Specification Component Pointers These pointers, which are attributes of SPCOM elements, are set individually for each line in a Specification table. Only the CATREF pointer is obligatory; the other pointers may be omitted from the heading when the Specification is created or they may be left as unset (=0) in individual SPCOM lines. CATREF - Catalogue Reference: Points to one particular component in the Catalogue DB which meets all the SELEC requirements specified for an individual SPCOM. A CATREF heading is obligatory for every SPEC table since it is the essential link between the design specification and the choice of a component from the Catalogue. It is important that the component pointed to by the CATREF already exists when the SPCOM is defined, otherwise you will receive the error message Undefined Name and the CATREF in the Specification will be shown as =0 (i.e. unset).

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DETAIL - Detail Text: Points to a DTEXT element in the Catalogue DB. This holds any general text which is used to describe the corresponding component in schedules, on isometric drawings, etc. (see Catalogue Database Structure). MATXT - Material Text: Points to an MTEXT element in the Catalogue DB. This holds the text which is used to describe the materials of construction of the corresponding component in schedules, on isometric drawings, etc. (see Component Parts and the ISODRAFT Reference Manual). BLTREF - Bolt Reference: Points to a BLTAB element in the Catalogue DB. This contains details of the bolts needed to connect the corresponding component into a pipeline (see the ISODRAFT Reference Manual). This heading is, of course, applicable only to components which require bolts (flanges etc.). CMPREF - Component Reference: Points to a CMPT element in the Properties DB (see Properties Constructor).

Overall Specification Pointers


These pointers, which are attributes of SPEC elements, are set for an entire Specification. Their settings are shown at the beginning of the Specification, immediately after the name, and always appear, even if they remain unset. MATREF - Material Reference: Points to a SOLID element in the Properties DB. This holds information about the properties of the materials of construction of the piping components (see Properties Constructor). FLUREF - Fluid Reference: Points to a FLUID element in the Properties DB. This holds information about the properties of the liquids or gases for use with which the piping components are suitable (see Properties Constructor).

Overall Specification Settings


These are not pointers to other elements but are local to the Specification itself. Their settings are shown at the beginning of the Specification, immediately after the MATREF and FLUREF pointers, and always appear, having default settings if you have not specified otherwise. These attribute settings are used only by ISODRAFT and are relevant only when fixed length piping is being used. You are referred to the section entitled Fixed Length Piping in the ISODRAFT Reference Manual for fuller details. RATING - Pipeline Pressure Rating: May be set to the maximum pressure at which the components covered by the Specification are intended for service. ISODRAFT can then use this setting to determine those points in a composite pipeline at which the pressure rating changes. The default setting is zero. LINETYPE - Fixed Length Piping Line Type: May be set to either of the identifiers

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FP - Fixed Pipe FX - Fixed Length ISODRAFT uses this setting to decide whether or not to append the length of a component to its item code in a material list. The length is appended if linetype is set to FP, but is assumed to be incorporated into the standard code if linetype is set to FX. The default setting is NUL (i.e. variable length piping between components is assumed).

13.1.5

Examples From Piping Component Specifications


To keep the examples brief, very few lines (SPCOMs) are shown for each GTYPE.
NEW SPECIFICATION /RF300 MATREF =0 FLUREF =0 RATING 0.000 LINETYPE NUL HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 SHOP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF = TUBE */20TU 20.0 TRUE /TUEE /DTUB1 /MTUB =0 =0 TUBE */25TU 25.0 TRUE /TUFF /DTUB1 /MTUB =0 =0 ... HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 STYP SHOP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF PE = FTUB */20FT 20.0 PE TRUE /FTEE /DFTUB /MFTUB =0 =0 FTUB */25FT 25.0 PE TRUE /FTFF /DFTUB /MFTUB =0 =0 ... HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 RADI ANGL SHOP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF = = BEND */20VB1 20.0 100.0 90.0 TRUE /VBEE /DVBEND1 /MVBEND =0 =0 BEND */20VB3 20.0 100.0 180.0 TRUE /BEEE /DBEND1 /MVBEND =0 =0 BEND */20VB2 20.0 60.0 90.0 TRUE /VBEE /DVBEND2 /MVBEND =0 =0 BEND */20VB4 20.0 60.0 180.0 TRUE /BEEE /DBEND2 /MVBEND =0 =0 BEND */25VB1 25.0 125.0 90.0 TRUE /VBFF /DVBEND1 /MVBEND =0 =0 ... HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR0 CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF GASK */20G 20.0 /GAEE /DGASK /MGASK =0 =0 GASK */25G 25.0 /GAFF /DGASK /MGASK =0 =0 ... HEADING TYPE NAME PBOR1 PBOR2 STYPE SHOP CATREF DETAIL MATXT CMPREF BLTREF CONC = REDU */25RC1 25.0 20.0 CONC TRUE /RCFE /DRED.C /MRED =0 =0 REDU */25RE1 25.0 20.0 ECC TRUE /REFE /DRED.E /MRED =0 =0 REDU */32RC1 32.0 25.0 CONC TRUE /RCGF /DRED.C /MRED =0 =0 REDU */32RE1 32.0 25.0 ECC TRUE /REGF /DRED.E /MRED =0 =0

...
and so on. (See Figure 11:3.: Part of a typical Specification for piping components for some other examples.)

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Typical Specifications

13.2
13.2.1

Selectors and Pointers for Structural Components


Applicability
The headings within this section may apply to components from the following list of GTYPEs: BASE BEAM BRACe COLUmn FITTing GANTry GIRDer JOINt JOISt KNEE PILE PROFile PURLin RIDGe ROD SCTN SDRAil SPLIce STANchion STIFfener STRUt TIE

13.2.2

Selectors
The following SELEC questions are those which you are likely to use when defining SPECs for structural components: SType Defines the Specific Type of the component; particularly applicable to the general generic types PROF, JOIN and FITT. Examples of STYPE answers which might be applied to structural components to cover European, American and British standards include: STYPE C CHS CRSJ CUB CUC CZB EAI Meaning Channel section or American standard Cshapes (tapered flanges) Circular hollow section Castellated rolled steel joists Castellated universal beams Castellated universal columns Castellated Zbeams Imperial equal angles

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STYPE EAM HD HE HL/HX HP IPE IPN LST M/W RHS RSJ S T TUB TUC U UB UBP UC UEAI UEAM UPN PLAT DEPth

Meaning Metric equal angles European columns (wide flanges) European beams (wide flanges) European beams (very wide flanges) Bearing piles (wide flanges) European beams (parallel faced flanges) European standard beams (tapered flanges) Long stalk teebars American Ishapes (wide flanges) Rectangular hollow section Rolled steel joists American standard Ishapes (tapered flanges) Tee bars Tees cut from universal beams Tees cut from universal columns European small channels Universal beams Universal bearing piles Universal columns Imperial unequal angles Metric unequal angles European standard channels Plate girders

The depth (height) of a structural section; e.g. 100 mm. WIDth The width of a structural section; e.g. 100 mm. WEIGht The weight per unit length; e.g. 100 kg/m. DIMEnsion integer: Any dimension. The qualifying integer is optional; suggested conventions are: DIME1 Depth or long leg DIME2 Width or short leg

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CTYPE integer A connection type. The qualifying integer is optional; suggested conventions are: CTYPE1 Start connection CTYPE2 End connection CTYPE3 Attached connection CTYPE4 Owning connection with the possible answers RIVET, BOLT, WELD, GLUE etc. CTYStart Start connection (equivalent to CTYPE1). CTYEnd End connection (equivalent to CTYPE2). CTYAttached Attached connection (equivalent to CTYPE3). CTYOwning Owning connection (equivalent to CTYPE4). INERtia integer Moment of inertia about a specified axis; e.g. 280 cm$. (It is usually convenient to use cm rather than mm here to avoid having to list large values.) The qualifying integer is optional; suggested conventions are: INER1 Inertia about x-x INER2 Inertia about y-y INER3 Inertia about u-u INER4 Inertia about v-v THICkness integer Plate thickness within a section; e.g. 10 mm. The qualifying integer is optional; suggested conventions are: THIC1 Web thickness THIC2 Flange thickness

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FIXty Joint fixity; e.g. FIXED, PINNED, PLASTIC, HINGED, RIGID etc. GRADe Material grade for fire-resistant insulation; e.g. 43. (See Structural Insulation.) FIREsistance Degree of fire resistance for insulation; e.g. 2 hr. (See Structural Insulation.) ITHIckness Insulation thickness; e.g. 50 mm. (See Structural Insulation.) AREA Area of a section; e.g. 100 cm. As for piping component specifications, you may also use any word, with or without a numeric qualifier, to define your own questions. See Selectors.

13.2.3

Reference Pointers and Settings


The pointers and attribute settings which you may specify for structural component specifications are the same as those defined in Reference Pointers and Settings for piping components, although the relative importance of the references will differ (for example, FLUREF, RATING and LINETYPE are unlikely to be relevant). As for piping components, only the CATREF pointer is obligatory.

13.2.4

Examples From Structural Component Specifications


The following excerpt from a Specification for structural steelwork components illustrates some of the features defined in the preceding sections: Note: The Reference Pointers DETAIL, MATXT, CMPREF and BLTREF have been omitted to save space. Although these are available to give consistency with Piping Specifications, you are unlikely to use these for structural components (BLTREF, in particular, would have no meaning for a structural component). No defaults have been set in this example.
NEW SPECIFICATION /BS4.PT1 MATREF =0 FLUREF =0 RATING 0.000 LINETYPE NUL TEXT Middlesbrough Mills HEADING TYPE NAME STYP GRADE WIDTH DEPTH WEIGHT INERTIA CATREF BEAM */UB1 UB 43 465 153 82 32435 /457X152X82UB + */UB2 + 50 465 153 82 32435 /457X152X82UB + */UB3 + 43 310 125 48 9504 /305X127X48UB ... HEADING TYPE NAME STYP GRADE DEPTH WIDTH WEIGHT INERTIA CATREF BRAC */UEA1 UEAM 43 200 150 47 2376 /200X150X18L + */UEA2 + 50 200 150 47 2376 /200X150X18L + */UEA3 + 43 125 75 18 354 /125X75X12L ... HEADING TYPE NAME STYP WIDTH DEPTH WEIGHT INER1 INER2 CATREF PROF */BS.C1 C 102.0 432.0 65.5 21399.0 628.6 /432X102X65KG.C + */BS.C2 + 102.0 381.0 55.1 14894.0 579.8 /381X102X55KG.C

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... PROF */BS.CRSJ1 CRSJ 102.0 305.0 25.3 5372.0 162.5 /305X102X25KG.CRSJ + */BS.CRSJ2 + 102.0 267.0 21.5 3562.0 139.1 /267X102X21KG.CRSJ HEADING TYPE NAME STYP DEPT WIDT WEIG INER1 INER2 CATREF PROF */BS.CUB1 CUB 1371.0 419.0 388.0 1661103.0 42443.0 / 1371X419X388KG.CUB + */BS.CUB2 CUB 1371.0 419.0 343.0 1449837.0 36223.0 /1371X419X343KG.CUB ...

and so on.

13.3

Selectors and Pointers for Insulation


The information given in this section applies specifically to the generic type INSulation.

13.3.1

Pipework Insulation
You do not select and store Insulation in the same way that you select piping components from other modules. The Insulation Specification is interrogated automatically by modules such as DESIGN each time insulation details are required. When setting up an Insulation Specification you must follow a strict format if this automatic selection is to work properly. For any specific insulation material, the correct insulation thickness for a given pipework application is usually derived from two Selector questions: Note: Although usually derived from two Selector questions this is optional. Refer to Sample Insulation Specification. TEMPerature: The working temperature; usually specified as a temperature range (e.g. 101,200) PBOR0: The nominal diameter of the component; usually specified as a range of bore sizes (e.g 1, 2 using inch bores or 25,70 using metric bores) These might be related to the available thicknesses in the following way: Temperature Range 101 - 200 101 - 200 201 - 400 201 - 400 0 - 100 Bore Range 1 - 2 3-8 1 - 2 3-8 1-8 Insulation Thicknes 1 1 2 3 1

where the bores and insulation thickness are defined in inches. It is assumed in this example that the minimum insulation thickness which can be handled conveniently is 1 inch and so this has been applied to all pipe sizes in the low temperature range (0 to 100 degrees).

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Typical Specifications

This data would result in an Insulation Specification of the following form:


NEW SPEC /INSPEC HEADING TYPE NAME TEMP INSU */IN1 0,100 INSU */IN2 101,200 INSU */IN3 101,200 INSU */IN4 201,400 INSU */IN5 201,400

PBOR0 1,8 1,2.5 3,8 1,2.5 3,8

CATREF /IC1 /IC1 /IC1.5 /IC2 /IC3

DETAIL /CAL.SIL /CAL.SIL /CAL.SIL /CAL.SIL /CAL.SIL

Note: Because of possible ambiguity due to the overlapping ranges of PBOR0, the order in which the SELEC headings are tabulated is important. For the successful selection of Insulation the TEMP question must be tabulated before the PBOR0 question. Sample Insulation Specification The following example shows an Insulation Specification not using Temperature as a selector:
$S- -- Synonym translation OFF -- ------------------------------------------------ Data Listing Date : 27 Jan 2010 10:20 ONERROR GOLABEL /ERROR0 -- Navigate to existing location /E NEW SPWL /AvevaPipeISPECS -- * NEW SPECIFICATION /20mm_FibreGlass Matref /FIBERGLASS-INSULATION PURP INSU DESCR 'Aveva Pipe 20mm insulation' LNTP unset QUES TYPE TDEF 'NONE' NEW TEXT DESCR 'Aveva Pipe 20mm insulation' STEX 'INSUL' NEW SELEC QUES PBOR TANS 'INSU' TDEF 'NONE' NEW SPCOMPONENT MAXA 100000 CATR SCOMPONENT /INS20 -- * NEW SPECIFICATION /25mm_FibreGlass Matref /FIBERGLASS-INSULATION PURP INSU DESCR 'Aveva Pipe 25mm insulation' LNTP unset QUES TYPE TDEF 'NONE' NEW TEXT DESCR 'Aveva Pipe 25mm insulation' STEX 'INSUL'

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NEW SELEC QUES PBOR TANS 'INSU' TDEF 'NONE' NEW SPCOMPONENT MAXA 100000 CATR SCOMPONENT /INS25 etc

13.3.2

Structural Insulation
Insulation for Sections, Joints and Fittings may be selected from an Insulation Specification by using the selection criteria Grade, Fire Resistance and Insulation Thickness derived from the current component. An extract from a typical Insulation Specification for use in structural design might be as follows:
NEW SPECIFICATION /BS4.PT1.INSUL HEADING TYPE NAME GRADE FIRE ITHI DEFAULTS 43 INSU */IN1 43 1,2 20 + */IN2 40 1,2 40 + */IN3 43 2,4 20 + */IN4 50 2,4 40 + */IN5 43 4,10 20 + */IN6 50 4,10 40

CATREF /IN25 /IN50 /IN50 /IN75 /IN75 /IN100

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SPECONMODE Command Syntax Diagrams

14

SPECONMODE Command Syntax Diagrams


This section contains the legal command and interrogation syntax diagrams relevant to SPECON. These diagrams formalise the precise command sequences which may be used and are intended to supplement the explanations given in the appropriate sections of this manual.

14.1

Syntax Diagrams
The diagrams are listed approximately in the order in which they are described in this manual.

14.1.1

<speca>
.----------------------------<----------------------------. / | >---*--- NEW ---+--- SPECification ---. | | | | | | ---------------------+--- name ----------------| | | |---OLD ---+--- SPECification ---. | | | | | | ---------------------+ | | | | |--- SPECification --------------+--- <id> -----------------| | | |--- <table> ---> | | | |--- REMove ---. .----<-----. | | | / | | |--- DELETE ---+---*--- <id> ---+----. | | | | | | |--- ALL -------------| | | | | | | --- SPECification ---+----------------------| | | |--- TEXT --- text -----------------------------------------| | | |--- OUTput ---+--- NEW ---. | | | | | | |--- OLD ---| .-----<-------. | | | |/ | | | -----------*--- <gtype> --- .----<-----. | | | / | | | ---------------*--- <id> ---+---| | | |--- COMPact ---. | | | | |--- ALIGned ---+-------------------------------------------| | | |--- <copy> ------------------------------------------------| | | |--- MATRef ---. |

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SPECONMODE Command Syntax Diagrams

| |--| |--| |--| ---

| | FLURef ---+--- <id> -----------------------------------| | RATIng --- value --------------------------------------| | LINETYpe --- word -------------------------------------| | BOREs ---+--- ACTual ----. | | | | --- NOMinal ---+-----------------------------+--->

14.1.2

<table>
.--------<--------. / | >--- <heading> ---*--- <default> -----| | | |--- <linesp> ------ | --->

14.1.3

<heading>
.---------------------------. / | >--- Heading - nl --+-- TYpe - NAme --. .--*--- PBore --- integer -------| | | | | | -- NAme - TYpe --+-- |--- PConn --- integer -------| | | |--- SType -------------------| | | |--- ANGle -------------------| | | |--- RADius ------------------| | | |--- TEMperature -------------| | | |--- PRessure ----------------| | | |--- RATing ------------------| | | |--- SHOP --------------------| | | |--- CATref ------------------| | | |--- DETail ------------------| | | |--- MATXt -------------------| | | |--- CMPref ------------------| | | |--- BLTref ------------------| | | |--- DEPth -------------------| | | |--- WIDth -------------------| | | |--- CTYStart ----------------| | | |--- CTYEnd ------------------| | | |--- CTYAttached -------------| | | |--- CTYOwning ---------------| | | |--- FIXty -------------------| | | |--- GRADe -------------------| | | |--- FIREsistance ------------| | | |--- ITHIckness --------------| | | |--- AREA --------------------| | | |--- WEIGht ------------------|

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SPECONMODE Command Syntax Diagrams

| | |--- DIMEnsion ---. | | | | |--- CTYPE -------| | | | | |--- INERtia -----| | | | | |--- THICkness ---| | | | | |--- word --------+-- value --| | | | ----> -----------

14.1.4

<default>
.------------. / | >--- Defaults --- nl --- sign --- sign ---*--- <uval> ---| | | |--- sign -----| | | |--- word -----| | | |--- equals --- | --->

14.1.5

<linesp>
>--+--- noun ---. | | |--- sign ----+--- name -----. | | --- <id> ---+--- noun -----| | | |--- sign -----| .-----------------------------------------. | |/ | --------------*--- word ----------------------------------| | | |--- TEXT --- text -------------------------| | | |--- EXTRA --- :uda_name --- uda_setting ---| | | |--- COMMENT --- text ----------------------| | | |--- <uval> ---+--- comma --- <uval> ----. | | | | | | -------------------------+--| | | |--- sign ----------------------------------| | | |--- <id> ---------------------------------- | --->

14.1.6

<id>
>----+--- name ---. | | --- refno ---+--->

14.1.7

<copy>
>--- COPY --- <id> ----+--- REName --- name --- name ---. | | --------------------------------+---><uval>
>---+--- value ----------. | | --- <expression> ---+--- EXponential --- value ---. | | -----------------------------+--- MM -------. | | |--- Metres ---| | |

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SPECONMODE Command Syntax Diagrams

|--- INches ---| | | |--- FT -------| | | |--- FEet -----| | | |--- text -----| | | --------------+--->

14.2

Other PDMS Command Syntax


Common commands which may be legally used from within SPECON, but which are not directly related to this module, include the following: Function(s) Actions setting (i.e. ACTIONS command) Element identification and database navigation Device control Date and time (real & elapsed) Querying specific options: Actions Reading banner Buffers Input/output device Input/output counters Project details Defining the current (default) units of measurement Attribute type references Module selection Giving system commands Defining logical expressions etc. <qact> <qbann> <qbuff> <qdevc> <qioc> <qproj> <setun> <satt> <smodu> <syscom> <pml> Syntax Diagram Name <actset> <gid> and its subsidiary syntax <devvic> <klok> and <datxtr>

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SPECONMODE Error Messages

15

SPECONMODE Error Messages


The following is a list of those error messages specific to SPECON. All such error messages have a message number beginning with 17. Any other messages that may be output are not described here as they are not specific to SPECON. Note: Since some other modules access the Specifications directly during their normal functioning (for example, to select insulation data) you may receive SPECON error messages while working in those modules. (17:2) Cannot access ID

The element specified does not appear to exist in this DB. Check that you have entered the identifier correctly. (17:3) Cannot access SPECIFICATION

Check that you have entered the identifier for the SPEC correctly. (17:4) Cannot create SPCOM or SELEC

You can only add a new SPCOM line or SELEC question after you have created a new SPEC or have accessed an existing SPEC (see Creating a Specification to Entering Tabular Data). (17:5) Cannot create SPECIFICATION

You can only create a new SPEC as a member of a Specification World (SPWLD) element in a CATALOGUE DB. Check your current position in the hierarchy. (See Structure of the Catalogue Database and Content and Format of a Specification.) An accompanying message should give a fuller explanation. (17:6) CATREF already used in heading

You have specified two CATREF pointers in a heading line. The second entry will be ignored, but should preferably be deleted. (17:7) Answers select previously defined spcom

The combination of answers listed for this SPCOM line leads to an SPCOM which has already been defined. The second SPCOM line will, therefore, never be reached during the selection process. (17:9) DB unsuitable for SPEC

You can only create a new SPEC as a member of a Specification World (SPWLD) element in a CATALOGUE DB (see Structure of the Catalogue Database and Content and Format of a Specification).

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(17:10)

DITTO IN FIRST LINE

The ditto symbol (+) means repeat the corresponding entry in the preceding line and is therefore only valid in the second or subsequent lines of the table. (17:11) No SPECIFICATION defined

You must have created a new SPEC or accessed an existing SPEC before you can add to, modify, or output any tabulated Specification data (see Manipulating the Catalogue Database using SPECONMODE). (17:12) ID name/refno does not correspond to column heading

An element identifier in an SPCOM line must correspond to a relevant Reference Pointer in the heading line. It cannot be given as an answer under a SELEC question in the heading (see How Component Selection Works). (17:13) ID is not a SPEC

The identifier given in an OUTPUT command must refer to an accessible SPEC (see Outputting a Specification). Check that you have entered the identifier correctly. (17:14) Too many headings for output

You cannot output more than 20 headings in a table. (17:15) More answers than questions - extra answers ignored

You have more entries in an SPCOM answer line than you have corresponding entries in the heading line. Check for unintentional spaces. (17:16) More defaults than questions - extra defaults ignored

You have more entries in the defaults line than you have corresponding entries in the heading line. (17:17) More than 20 HEADINGS

The maximum number of entries permitted in a heading line is 20. (17:18) DETAIL already used in heading

You have specified two DETAIL pointers in a heading line. The line will be ignored. (17:19) Name already defined. Name/refno will remain unnamed.

The NAME specified for this SPCOM has already been used and so this second SPCOM line will have only its PDMS refno as its identifier. Redefine this line with a new NAME if required. (17:20) No. of QUESTIONS and ANSWERS do not match up

If the answers in a given SPCOM line do not correspond in a relevant way with the SELEC questions in the heading then that SPCOM will be ignored. (See the Note in Selector Answers for one possible cause of this problem.) (17:22) Reserve name /*LIMBOSPEC has been used - object with this name has been unnamed

The Specification /*LIMBOSPEC is reserved for holding REMOVED SPCOMs (see Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM). You cannot use it for any other purpose.

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(17:23)

SPCOM does not exist

Check that you have entered the SPCOM identifier correctly when modifying an existing Specification. (17:24) SPEC does not exist

Check that you have entered the SPEC identifier correctly. (17:26) This command only allowed in SPEC

You can only use a DELETE or REMOVE command after you have accessed an appropriate SPEC (see Accessing an Existing Specification and Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM), otherwise SPECON does not know which Specification you are telling it to modify. (17:28) TYPE required as first answer

When adding a new SPCOM you must enter its TYPE (a PDMS noun) before its NAME. You may only use the reverse order when referring to an existing SPCOM (see Entering Tabular Data). (17:29) Unable to create TEXT element

You can only specify one string of descriptive text for each SPEC. (17:30) Unable to put CATREF

You are unable to set this Reference Pointer to the element specified. Possibly you have specified it incorrectly. (17:33) Undefined name

Check that you have entered the required identifier correctly. (17:34) SPEC or an offspring is locked.

The SPEC is protected against modification. Use the UNLOCK command before trying to use any of the SPECON editing facilities. (17:35) SPEC is not empty

When using the COPY command, the SPEC into which the copy is transferred (name1 in Copying a Specification) must be empty. You cannot concatenate SPECs with the COPY command. (17:36) ID must be SPCOM

The REMOVE command can only be used to remove SPCOMs. You cannot remove an entire SPEC, although you may use the REMOVE ALL option to empty it of its contents (see Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM). (17:38) (17:39) No databases to work from No SPEC database

The specified MDB does not contain an appropriate CATALOGUE DB in which SPECON can create SPECs.

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(17:40)

TEXT longer than 50 characters

The text associated with a SPEC cannot exceed 50 characters in length (see Creating a Specification). (17:41) Unable to put CMPREF

You are unable to set this Reference Pointer to the element specified. Possibly you have specified it incorrectly. (17:42) Unable to put DETAIL

You are unable to set this Reference Pointer to the element specified. Possibly you have specified it incorrectly. (17:43) Unable to put MATXT

You are unable to set this Reference Pointer to the element specified. Possibly you have specified it incorrectly. (17:44) Unable to put BLTREF

You are unable to set this Reference Pointer to the element specified. Possibly you have specified it incorrectly. (17:45) You may not delete /*LIMBOSPEC

The SPEC named /*LIMBOSPEC, used to hold removed SPCOMs, is created automatically by PDMS and cannot be deleted, otherwise future REMOVE commands would not work (see Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM). (17:46) You cannot REMOVE SPEC - use REMOVE ALL

The REMOVE command applies only to the contents of a SPEC. Use REMOVE ALL to empty the SPEC of all contents or DELETE SPEC specname to eliminate the complete SPEC. (See Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM.) (17:47) You cannot REMOVE items from /*LIMBOSPEC

The REMOVE command can only transfer SPCOMs to /*LIMBOSPEC. Only by re-entering an SPCOM under its existing name can it be transferred back from /*LIMBOSPEC into a user-defined SPEC. (See Deleting or Removing a SPEC or SPCOM.) (17:48) MATXT already used in heading

You have specified two MATXT pointers in a heading line. The second entry will be ignored, but should preferably be deleted. (17:49) CMPREF already used in heading

You have specified two CMPREF pointers in a heading line. The second entry will be ignored, but should preferably be deleted. (17:50) BLTREF already used in heading

You have specified two BLTREF pointers in a heading line. The second entry will be ignored, but should preferably be deleted. (17:51) SPCON NAME name already exists

You must use a unique name for each SPCON. The new SPCON will be rejected.

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SPECONMODE Error Messages

(17:52)

word is not valid as a GTYPE

See Applicability for examples of valid GTYPEs. (17:53) TMPR already used in heading

You have specified two TMPR pointers in a heading line. The second entry will be ignored, but should preferably be deleted. (17:54) Unable to put TMPR

You are unable to set this Reference Pointer to the element specified. Possibly you have specified it incorrectly.

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Nominal Pipe Size Tables

16

Nominal Pipe Size Tables


As explained in Outputting Parts of Specifications, PDMS holds tables of nominal pipe sizes which it uses in preference to actual sizes if an actual and a nominal size fall within a predefined tolerance band. These tables comprise the following diameters: Metric Units (mm)
6.0 8.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 32.0 40.0 50.0 65.0 80.0 0.0 100.0 125.0 150.0 200.0 250.0 300.0 350.0 400.0 450.0 500.0 550.0 600.0 650.0 700.0 750.0 800.0 850.0

Imperial Units (inches


0.125 0.250 0.375 0.500 0.750 1.00 1.25 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 5.00 6.00 8.00 10.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 20.0 22.0 24.0 26.0 28.0 30.0 32.0 34.0

Metric Units (mm)


900.0 950.0 1000.0 1050.0 1100.0 1150.0 1200.0 1250.0 1300.0 1350.0 1400.0 1450.0 1500.0 1600.0 1650.0 1750.0 1800.0 1850.0 1900.0 1950.0 2000.0 2050.0 2100.0 2200.0 2400.0 2600.0 2800.0 3000.0 3200.0 3400.0 3600.0 3800.0 4000.0

Imperial Units (inches)


36.0 38.0 40.0 42.0 44.0 46.0 48.0 50.0 52.0 54.0 56.0 58.0 60.0 64.0 66.0 68.0 72.0 74.0 76.0 78.0 80.0 82.0 84.0 88.0 96.0 104.0 152.0 120.0 128.0 136.0 136.0 1 136.0

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Properties Constructor

17

Properties Constructor
The PROPCON (PROPerties CONstructor) is used to input and edit data within the Properties database (DB). PROPCON commands are input directly into the PARAGON command line. Properties data is used to hold properties of components and materials which may be needed for stress analysis or safety auditing of all or part of a design. PROPCON also includes data such as the material densities needed by the DESIGN structural applications for calculating weights and centres of gravity of steelwork items. The Properties DB hierarchy is as follows:

Figure 17:1. Properties Database Hierarchy

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Properties Constructor

17.1

Setting Up a Properties Database


A Properties database (DB) is created in the ADMIN module in the same way as a Design or Catalogue DB. The DB will be assigned, typically, to the team responsible for pipe stressing. The syntax for creating a Properties DB is:

>-- CReate -- DB -- teamname/dbname -- PROP -->


Before the Properties DB can be used, it must be added to a multiple database (MDB).

17.2

Description
Full details of the Properties database structure and of the elements held within it, refer to the Data Model Reference Manual. The types of data stored may be grouped into the following categories:

17.2.1

Design Layout Data


For a full description of Design layout data refer to the DESIGN Reference Manual.

17.2.2

Material Property Data


This consists of expansion coefficients, Youngs modulus of elasticity etc., for each material. This includes the actual pipe material, such as steel, and the fluid, such as water, which the pipe contains.

17.2.3

Case Data
Case data consists of the particular values of temperature and pressure that can be applied to a pipe at any one time. A pipe may have several cases if the temperature and/or pressure parameters vary.

17.2.4

Component Data
The Catalogue does not give extensive information on components, only size attributes. The Properties DB component data element can be referenced from individual specification components and consists of physical data, such as weight, flexibility factors, wall thickness, etc.

17.2.5

Constraint Data
This constraint data is split between the Properties DB and the Design DB. In the Design DB, an attachment point is created having a reference attribute which points to a constraint in the Properties DB. This constraint has data referring to forces, moments etc.

17.2.6

Run Data
This is the information needed to carry out a run that is not held elsewhere in PDMS and could consist of a header card, for instance, which would contain a persons name and the type of analysis to be performed. This run data will depend on the type of stressing package interfaced to the Properties DB.

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17.3
17.3.1

Material Property Data


Hierarchy Description
The Material World (MATW) comes below World in the Properties hierarchy. It is purely an administrative element that groups material data together. Below MATW are two elements: SOLI and FLUI. The material properties are subdivided such that SOLI holds data for the pipe itself and FLUI holds data for the fluid within the pipe.

17.3.2

Material Properties
The pipework material properties associated with flexibility and stress analysis are as follows:

POISSONS RATIO COEFFICIENT OF EXPANSION YOUNGS MODULUS ALLOWABLE STRESS DENSITY


There can also be three general properties known as A, B and C properties. These are used to store any additional properties that may be needed. Each of these may be a function of temperature and/or pressure. To enable the properties to be stored against temperature and pressure values, the data is stored in a tabular format which incorporates a table element for each type of property: TYOU (table of Youngs modulus values), TSTR (table of allowable stresses), etc. Below these are spot elements, SYOU, SSTR etc. The spot elements have attributes PRES and TEMP where values of pressure and temperature may be input. Each element also has an attribute to allow the input of the corresponding value of its own property; for example, SYOU has an attribute YOUN where a value of Youngs modulus may be stored, SAPR has an attribute APRO where a value of APROPERTY may be stored, and so on. At different temperatures and pressures, the value of Youngs modulus may vary, and so more spot Youngs modulus elements (SYOUs) may be created with different temperature, pressure and Youngs modulus values. Thus the attributes settings for a specific SYOU might be:

TYPE

SYOU

(Spot Youngs modulus)

NAME LOCK OWNE TEMP PRES YOUN 20 101EX+3 210EX+9


(Temperature) (Pressure) (Youngs modulus value; see Exponential Numbers for a description of the exponential format of numbers)

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The table that these spot properties create can then be used by a suitable stressing package. The table effectively forms a graph with the spot property, temperature and pressure. From this table, therefore, the stressing package can interpolate other values it may need. The PDMS unit for TEMP is degrees centigrade and for PRES and YOUN is N/m. Therefore, this material at a temperature of 20 degrees centigrade and a pressure of 101 kN/m would have a value for Youngs modulus (E) of 210 GN/m. For a change of units, see Use of Groups. Note: FLUI does not have the elements relating to allowable stress, nor Poisson's ratio, i.e. TSTR, TPOI, SSTR and SPOI. The elements SOLI and FLUI have an attribute DESC (Description) which is a 120character text string. The table elements (TPOI, TEXP etc) have an attribute PQUA (Property Qualifier) which is some qualification under which the property applies. There is provision for 4 characters. The table elements also have an attribute SREF (Source Reference). This may be the name of a book from where the spot values were obtained and is a 12-character text string. The elements TAPR, TBPR and TCPR also have an attribute PNAM (Property Name) which is a 12-character text string. At the same level as the table elements is an element TEXT which has an attribute STEX which is a 50-character text string.

17.3.3

Pointers from the Design DB and Specification


The Specification Component (SPCOM) has attributes MATR and FLUR. These are material reference and fluid reference, which point to the pipe material (SOLI) and the fluid within the pipe (FLUI), respectively. In the Design DB, Pipes and Branches also have these attributes MATR and FLUR. If these are set, the references from the Specification Component are ignored, but if they are unset, the references from the Specification Component are used.

17.4
17.4.1

Case Data
Hierarchy Description
The Case World (CASWL) is a member of World in the Properties hierarchy and is an administrative element used to keep all Case data together. Below CASWL come two elements, Case (CASE) and Case Type (CAST). CASE may be directly below CASWL or may come under CAST. CAST is an administrative element to further group cases if there are several of them and they can be split into case types. A Case has of a number of attributes which describe different conditions to which a pipe is subjected. For every run of a pipe there may be a number of cases.

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CASE has the following attributes:

TYPE NAME LOCK OWNE WEFA WPRE WIFA IPRE RPRE PTEM RTEM TGRA SHOC APPL

CASE

(weight factor) (wind pressure) (wind factor) (internal pressure) (reference pressure) (pipe temperature) (reference temperature) (temperature gradient) (shock load vector) (application)

The attributes WEFA, WPRE, WIFA, IPRE, RPRE, PTEM, RTEM and TGRA are all real numbers; SHOC is a 3-element real array; APPL is a 20-character text string.

17.4.2

Pointer from the Design DB


The elements Pipe and Branch in the Design DB have an attribute Case Reference (CASR) which points to a Group of Cases applicable for that pipe in the Properties DB. The use of Groups for Cases is described in Use of Groups.

17.5
17.5.1

Component Data
Hierarchy Description
The Component World (CMPWL) is a member of World in the Properties hierarchy. It is an administrative element to keep component data together. Below CMPWL there is Component Type (CMPT), which is also a purely administrative element. Under CMPT can be found Component Data (CMPD) and Tube Data (TUBD). Insufficient data is held in the Catalogue and Design DBs about components for a stressing run to take place. Therefore further data can be stored as attributes of CMPD or TUBD.

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CMPD has the following attributes:

TYPE NAME LOCK OWNE OUTD ACBO BTOL WTOL CWEI CIWE WDIA SHAP RINE SIF PRFC SDTH CORA EFAC BFLE DFFL DMFL RMFL MRKR

CMPD

(outside diameter) (actual bore) (bore tolerance) (weight tolerance) (component weight) (component insulation weight) (wind diameter) (shape factor) (rotational inertia vector) (stress intensification factor) (pressure factor) (saddle thickness) (corrosion allowance) (Youngs modulus factor) (bend flexibility) (displacement force flexibility) (displacement moment flexibility) (rotational moment flexibility) (component marker)

The element TUBD has the same attributes, except that it does not have DFFL, DMFL or RMFL and, instead of having CWEI and CIWE, it has UWEI, which is weight per unit length (unit weight), and UIWE, which is weight per unit insulation. The attributes OUTD, ACBO, BTOL, WTOL, CWEI, CIWE, WDIA, SHAP, PRFC, CORA, EFAC, PWAS, BFLE and MRKR are real numbers; RINE, SIF and SDTH are 3-element real arrays; DFFL, DMFL and RMFL are six- and nine-figure flexibility matrices. To enable Weight and Centre of Gravity calculations to be performed in all disciplines, the CWEI and UWEI attributes have been updated to use parameterised properties, i.e. they can be set using standard expression syntax such as:

(weight (ATTRIB PARA[2] + ATTRIB PARA[3])


Existing syntax is still valid, for example:

UWEI 2.5

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The rest of the real number attributes (other than MRKR) have also been parameterised.

17.5.2

Querying Calculated Results


The pseudo-attribute PROPRE is provided to allow the querying of the calculated result of a property attribute. This is a valid attribute at the design element which indirectly references the property component such as a pipe or branch. This attribute has a qualifier, which is the property attribute to be evaluated, for example:

Q PROPRE OUTD

17.5.3

Pointer from the Specification


The Specification Component (SPCOM) has a reference to the Component Data or Tube Data relevant to that particular component. This reference is called CMPR (Component Reference).

17.6
17.6.1

Constraints Data
Hierarchy Description
The Constraint World (CONW) is a member of World. It owns Constraint Type (CONT), which is an administrative element that groups constraint data into types. Below CONT is Constraint (CONS). This element has attributes that store particular conditions to which a constraint may be subjected. CONS owns the Case Table element (TCAS). This is a reference to a particular case for which the constraint data is applicable. One constraint may own more than one TCAS. This could mean that the attribute of constraint is valid for more than one case (for different temperatures and pressures etc.). If there is no TCAS, then this could mean that the attributes of CONS are valid for any particular case. CONS has the following attributes:

TYPE NAME LOCK OWNER APPL FORC MOME DISP ROTA DLIM RLIM

CONS

(application) (applied force (load)) (applied moment) (applied displacement) (applied rotation) (displacement limits) (rotation limits)

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FLIM MLIM DFLF RFLF FCOE CPUL CPUT

(force limits) (moment limits) (translational flexibility factor - distance/force) (rotation flexibility factor) (friction coefficient) (cold pull (translational)) (cold pull (twist))

The attribute APPL (application) is a 20-character text string; FORC, MOME, DISP, ROTA, FLIM, MLIM, DFLF, RFLF, FCOE, CPUL and CPUT are 3-element real arrays; DLIM and RLIM are 6-element real arrays. The element CONT has an attribute RTYP (Restraint Type) which is a 12-character text string. The element TCAS (Case Table element) has an attribute CASR (Case Reference) which references a case applicable for that constraint.

17.6.2

Pointer from the Design DB


In the Design DB, Pipe has a legal member called ATTA (Attachment Point). This element has an attribute CSTR (Constraint Reference) which points to a constraint in the Properties DB, and therefore to all its attributes and conditions.

17.7
17.7.1

Run Data
Hierarchy Description
The Run World (RUNW) is a member of World and owns the element RUN. RUN is a text element with an attribute DATE, which is a 9-character text string, and UNAME (User Name), which is a 12-character text string. RUN owns Card (CARD) which has attributes Card Type (CATY) and Card Text (CTXT), which is a 120-character text string. These text attributes are used to store information necessary to run a specific stress analysis package, e.g. a header card containing a persons name, type of analysis to be performed, etc.

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Use of Groups

18

Use of Groups
Groups are used in PROPCON to group Cases together. This is done to save space and time spent creating Cases. Several Cases with the same attributes may be reproduced in different Case Types if groups are not used. The syntax for adding or removing cases from a group is:

>---+--- ADD ------. .-----------. | | / | --- REMOVE ---+--- <gid> ---*--- <gid> --- | ----->
Note: Do not delete cases from a group or you will delete them from the Properties database. Use the REMOVE syntax The element Group has an attribute FUNC (Function) which is a 12-character text string.

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Exponential Numbers

19

Exponential Numbers
Exponential numbers may be input into PROPCON with the following syntax:
>--- attribute --- value --- EXponential --- exponent_value --->

For example:

YOUN 210 EX 9
means that the value of Youngs modulus input is 210 x 109. Values may be input non-exponentially subject to a maximum number of 11 digits. Use of the EX command allows larger numbers to be input, depending on the particular machine used. Negative exponential numbers may be input, if required, by using a minus sign. The default is positive. PROPCON will output numbers in exponential format if the number is large enough or small enough.

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20

PROPCON Command Syntax Diagrams


This section contains the legal command and interrogation syntax diagrams relevant to PROPCON. These diagrams formalise the precise command sequences which may be used and are intended to supplement the explanations given in the appropriate sections of this manual.

20.1

Syntax Diagrams
<sadj> >---+--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| --<satt> >---+--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| <watt> -------- word ---. | DESCription --- text ---| | SREFerence ---- text ---| | PNAMe --------- text ---| | APPLication --- text ---| | RTYPe --------- text ---| | UNAMe --------- text ---| | STEXt --------- text ---| | FUNCtion ------ text ---| | DATe ---------- text ---| | CTXT ---------- text ----+--->

OWNer --------------. | TEMPerature --------| | PRESsure -----------| | DENSity ------------| | STREss -------------| | POISsons -----------| | EXPAnsion ----------| | YOUNgs -------------| |

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|--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--|

APROperty ----------| | BPROperty ----------| | CPROperty ----------| | RTEMperature -------| | RPREssure ----------| | WEFActor -----------| | WPREssure ----------| | WIFActor -----------| | IPREssure ----------| | RPREssure ----------| | PTEMperature -------| | TGRAdient ----------| | SHOCkload ----------| | OUTDiameter --------| | ACBOre -------------| | BTOLerance ---------| | WTOLerance ---------| | UWEIght ------------| | UIWEight -----------| | WDIAmeter ----------| | SHAPe --------------| | RINErtia -----------| | SIF ----------------| | PRFC ---------------| | SDTHickness --------| | CORAllowance -------| | EFACtor ------------| | DFLFactors ---------| | FORCe --------------| | MOMEnt -------------| | DISPlacement -------| | ROTAtion -----------| |

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|--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| --<snoun> >---+--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--|

DLIMit -------------| | RLIMit -------------| | FLIMit -------------| | MLIMit -------------| | DFFLexibility ------| | FCOEfficient -------| | CPULl --------------| | CASReference -------| | CATYpe -------------| | CTXT ---------------| | DMFLexibility ------| | RMFLexibility ------| | CPUTwist -----------| | RFLFactors ---------| | BFLExibility -------| | CWEIght ------------| | CIWEight -----------| | PWAStage -----------+--->

MATWorlds --------. | SOLIds -----------| | FLUIds -----------| | TDENsity ---------| | TDENsities -------| | TSTResses --------| | TPOIssons --------| | TEXPansions ------| | TYOungs ----------| | TAPRoperties -----| | TAPRoperty -------| | TBPRoperties -----| | TBPRoperty -------| |

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|--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| ---

TCPRoperties -----| | TCPRoperty -------| | SDENsity ---------| | SDENsities -------| | SSTResses --------| | SPOIssons --------| | SEXPansions ------| | SYOUngs ----------| | SAPRoperty -------| | SAPRoperties -----| | SBPRoperty -------| | SBPRoperties -----| | SCPRoperty -------| | SCPRoperties -----| | CASWorlds --------| | CASEs ------------| | CMPWorlds --------| | CMPTypes ---------| | CMPData ----------| | CONWorlds --------| | CONTypes ---------| | CONStraints ------| | TCASes -----------| | RUNWorlds --------| | RUNdecks ---------| | CARDs ------------| | TEXts ------------| | CASTypes ---------| | TUBDatas ---------| | GPWLds -----------+--->

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<squer> >---+--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| |--| --<watt> >----+--- PQUAlifier -----. | | --- MRKR -----------+---> CTXT -------------. | <watt> -----------| | DESCription ------| | SREFerence -------| | PNAMe ------------| | APPLication ------| | RTYPe ------------| | UNAMe ------------| | STEXt ------------| | FUNCtion ---------| | DATe -------------+--->

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Index

A
ABREV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26 ACTIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4 ADEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26 AIDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4 ALPHA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 ALPHA FILE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 ALPHA LOG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 APARAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:7, 5:4 ATLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:25

Cursor-picking Identifier . . . . . . . . . . 2:4, 2:8

D
DATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:1 DDANGLE . . . . . . . . . .5:12, 5:16, 6:1, 6:11 DDHEIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:1, 6:11 DDRADIUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:1, 6:11 DECP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26 DES APARAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:8 DES OPARAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:8 DES PARAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:8 Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:4 DTAB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:24 DTEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5 DTSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5, 8:1

B
BLIS BLTA BLTP BOXI BTSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:23

E
Expressions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:4

C
CATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:3 Catalogue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:3 Catalogue Element Types . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:5 CATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:4 Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:4 CCTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:22, 10:6 CE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4, 6:1 CENTRELINE See CL . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:14 CL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:5, 6:14 COCO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:22, 10:6 COLOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4 comma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 COMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5, 4:10

F
filename . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 FINISH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2 FITT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6, 4:12

G
GETWORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1 GMSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5, 5:17, 7:5 GMSSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6, 5:20, 7:18

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I
INCBOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:29 INSULATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:17 integer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 IPARAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:7, 5:5

J
JOIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6, 4:11

L
LCYL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:8 LENGTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:18, 6:19 letter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 LEVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:5, 6:16 LINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:11 LPYR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:12 LSNO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:13 LTAB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:24

M
minus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 MMBOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:29 MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:1, 6:11 MSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:25 MTEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5 MTYP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:25 MULT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26

PBORE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:14 PCON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10:5, 10:6 PCONNECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:14 PDISTANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:13 PKEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:16, 5:17, 6:19 PLAXI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:16 PLINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:15, 7:3 PLINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:4, 6:5, 6:19 plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 PPOINT . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:9, 5:10, 5:11, 7:1 PPOINTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:2, 6:18 PROF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6, 4:11 PROFILE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:15 PSKEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:14 PTAXI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:9, 5:12, 7:2 PTCAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:10, 7:3 PTCDIRECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:14 PTMIX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:11, 7:3 PTSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5, 5:9, 7:1 PTSSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5, 5:15, 7:3 PURP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:29 PX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:13, 5:17 PY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:13, 5:17 PZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:13

Q
QUERY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:4 QUIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:2

R
REPRESENTATION 6:2, 6:4, 6:5, 6:14, 6:15, 6:16, 6:17, 6:18, 6:19

N
NA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:16 name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 NEW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:3 NGMSET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5, 7:16 NOMINB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:29 NRBWLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:29 NUMBER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:14 NUMBERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:18

S
SANN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:20, 7:19 SAVEWORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:1 SBOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:24 SBOX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:6 SCOM See COMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5 SCON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:7 SCTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:12 SCYL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:9 SDIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:10 SDSH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:11 SDTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:21 SDTE See DTEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5 SECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:4 Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:4 SETTINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:1, 6:11 SEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:15 SFIT See FITT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6

O
OBST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:6, 7:18 OBSTRUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:5, 6:17 OPARAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:7

P
PAAX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:22 PARAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6, 5:4 PAXI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:22

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12.0

Catalogues and Specifications Reference Manual

SIGF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26 SJOI See JOIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6 SKEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:14 SLOO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:15 SMTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:22 SMTE See MTEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:5 solid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 Specific Element Identifier . . . . . . . . . . . 2:7 SPRF See PROF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6 SPRO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:20 SPVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:20 SREC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:20, 7:18 SREV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:15 SRTO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:13 SSLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:9 SSPH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:14 star . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 STCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:4 STSEC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:4 SVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:15 Syntax diagram conventions . . . . . . . . . . 2:1

T
TEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4:6, 7:28 text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 TRACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:3 TUBE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6:5, 6:14, 7:14

U
UDEF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26 UNIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:25 UNITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26 USEC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:26

V
value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 varid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3 VISIBLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:4

W
word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2:3

Index page 3

12.0