ABSTRACTS

th th
Date : 28 & 29 September 2013
Venue : MKSSS' Cummins College of Engineering for Women, Pune.
Esplanade House, Bombay.
23rd Nov. 1898
Dear Swami Vivekananda,
I trust, you remember me as a fellow-traveller on your voyage from Japan to Chicago.
I very much recall at this moment your views on the growth of the ascetic spirit in
India, and the duty, not of destroying, but of diverting it into useful channels.
I recall these ideas in connection with my scheme of Research Institute of Science for
India, of which you have doubtless heard or read. It seems to me that no better use
can be made of the ascetic spirit than the establishment of monasteries or
residential halls for men dominated by this spirit, where they should live with
ordinary decency and devote their lives to the cultivation of sciences–natural &
humanistic. I am of opinion that, if such a crusade in favour of an asceticism of this
kind were undertaken by a competent leader, it would greatly help asceticism,
science & the good name of our common country; & I know not who would make a
more fitting general of such a campaign than Vivekananda. Do you think you would
care to apply yourself to the mission of galvanizing into life our ancient traditions in
this respect ? Perhaps, you had better begin with a fiery pamphlet rousing our people
in this matter. I would cheerfully defray all the expenses of publication.”
With kind regards, I am, dear Swami
Yours faithfully,
Jamshedji Tata
Patrons
Dr. F. C. Kohli Dr. Anil Kakodkar Dr. Raghunath Mashelkar Dr. Jagannath Wani
Advisory Board
Dr. Vijay Bhatkar
Chairman
Members
Mr. Suresh Prabhu
Dr. Ashok Kukade
Dr. Sanjay Inamdar
Prof. Aniruddha Deshpande
Mr. Vishwas Deval
Mr. Girish G. Sohani
Dr. Ganesh Natarajan
Mr. Arun Wakhlu
Mr. S. K. Jain
Dr. Sudhir Rashingkar
Mr. Anant Sardeshmukh
Organising Committee
Secretary
Mr. Atul Nagras
Chairman
Mr. Ravindra Wanjarwadkar
Joint Secretary
Mr. Vivek Yatnalkar
Mr. Mukund Deshpande
Mr. Rajesh Gawade
Dr. Rajesh Manerikar
Member
Dr. Capt. S. G. Naravane
Co-ordinator
Mr. Shrikant Kulkarni Mr. Ravindra Deshpande Mr. Shrinivas Rairikar
Students Competition Committee
Chairman
Dr. Sanjay Inamdar
Co-Chairman
Dr. Mrs. M. A. Joshi
Members
Kaustubh Sakhare
Dr. Rajesh Manerikar
Jayant Deshkar
Vaibhav Vaijapurkar
Amit Khade
Technical Program Committee
Theme Leaders
Dr. Vidyasagar
Dr. Bhushan Patwardhan
Pandit
Chairman
Dr. Anil Sahasrabuddhe
Dr. Gajanan Dange
Dr. Vikram Ghole
Co-ordinators
Dr. Sunil Kulkarni
Mr. Ravindra Vaidya
Dr. Maneesha Khaladkar
Mr. Kapil Sahashrabuddhe
Mr. Vilas Kulkarni
Dr. Girish Tillu
Dr. Shailesh Deshpande
About Organizers
3
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
A National Movement dedicated for the integrated development of India
through intervention of Science, Engineering and Technology. VB operates
through 22 chapters in India with more than 6000 members. It has various
initiatives like WAF, Shakti, NEED mission, IIWM, VVVS, NASYA, VVM, GIST
Foundation, RYVM, VPB,
www.vijnanabharati.org
Seva Sahayog Foundation aims at engaging socially conscious corporates,
groups & individuals, with NGOs of matching interests and has a clear vision of
the role corporate India can play to support community initiatives. It is a
volunteer-run organization and has more than 5000 members.
www.sevasahayog.org
Under the leadership of Dr. Anil Kakodkar, an initiative was started to develop a
platform to connect the Indian Diaspora spread over the world with the local
scientists & technocrats to come together and provide sustainable and
inclusive solutions useful for societal development.
www.gistportal.org
Established in 1896 in Pune by Bharat Ratna Prof. D K Karve, MKSSS has
over sixty institutions where more than 25,000 girls and women take education
from primary schooling to engineering, architecture, management, nursing,
health, fashion designing etc. It also has hostel facilities for working women. It
is one of the premier institutes in Pune.
www.maharshikarve.ac.in
Mahratta Chamber of Commerce, Industries and Agriculture (MCCIA) has
been playing a significant role in accelerating the industrial & economic
development of Pune region for close to eight decades now. MCCIA is
presently having a membership of about 3000 members representing almost
all sectors of industry, business, commerce and agriculture. MCCIA has
continuously striven to make Pune a global business destination and has been
the catalyst for economic development of the region.
www.mcciapune.com
4
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Tech for Seva Concept
India has taken a giant leap in economic progress but at the same time
the need for inclusive development covering the larger segment of our
weaker populace has become far more critical. There are also serious
issues with regard to sustainability of natural endowments. The threat
of climatic change requires that we bridge our development deficit in
a manner that does not take us irreversibly close to the tipping point.
The Human Development Index (HDI) which is a composite statistic
of life expectancy, education and income indices shows that India
ranks 134th place globally, bringing out that lot needs to be done to
emancipate the situation that will strengthen the base of the mighty
pyramid of India.
The challenges that we face need actions at several levels. We need to
explore and reinvent innovative approaches for actions from different
stake holders that include not just Government agencies but also
NGOs, Corporates and Scientists and constructively supplement
these efforts. Clearly Science & Technology can play a crucial
catalytic role. Over 300,000 NGOs both small and large are closely
working in all earnestness as change agents with Government Welfare
5
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
agencies and Corporates through their CSR activities. While there are
many exemplary success stories, the ground reality is that the overall
picture remains dismal and large number of people still remain
unaffected by the fruits of opportunity, information and development.
Many Organizations have developed new technologies in the field of
Medicine, Energy, Agriculture, Environment, Information Technology
etc. with good societal relevance. However, all the three stake holders
shown in picture above i.e. Corporates, Research agencies, NGOs and
socially cognizant citizens need to partner on a common platform to
address various problems affecting the lives of millions. The NGOs
can benefit from access to information & technology and the
contributing companies can meet their CSR objectives through NGOs
as change agents.
The conference will provide an ongoing networking platform
resulting in participative partnership proposals for mutual benefit
ultimately benefitting the society.
Vision Statement
Tech for Seva will be a mobilizing platform of scientists, innovators,
academic & corporate institutions & NGOs to provide sustainable
solutions for inclusive growth and improved quality of life using
appropriate S & T interventions for the people of our country.
The Mission Statement
Tech for Seva aims to initiate an integrating and networking platform of
all those seeking inclusive and sustainable S & T solutions with those
who can provide them through partnership approach.
6
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Technical Program Committee Note
Dr. Anil Sahasrabuddhe
Director College of Engineering Pune
Chairman Technical Program committee, Tech for Seva
Conference
Do these words “social work of NGOs, sustainable development,
corporate social responsibility, research and innovation in research
laboratories and educational institutes, demographic dividend, un-
employability of Indian graduates, environmental degradation,
recession, financial crisis, poverty alleviation” ring the bell in your
ears!!!
If one opens a newspaper, these words are there in every page on
every day. Who are dealing with these aspects? Yes, the
Government, which is certainly responsible for taking care of these
issues. But is it enough to just throw the ball in the court of
Government and keep watching the scene? We and many believe
not.
That is why many NGOs are working in different sectors to address
these issues within the limited capacity of theirs. Corporate world has
been putting in their profits in CSR programs for quite some time.
Now it is indeed mandatory for all companies to do so. The research
organisations and educational institutes have been doing research,
innovation through the project based learning in their laboratories.
Most often innovative research work which could be useful to society
remains in the labs and at most appears in some journals. The work
of NGOs is known only in limited circles where they operate, hardly
being noticed by the media, industry or the educational institute.
Industry is often driven by timelines, productivity and profits, and
hence no special effort for utilising CSR fund effectively is made
except in few companies who had this vision even prior to mandatory
spending came into existence. Thus there had been no formal
meeting ground between these three Non Governmental entities,
although there were pockets of engagements and good work being
shared.
This is where Tech for Seva Conference came in as an enabler for
providing common ground for NGOs, Research and Educational
organisations and Industry.
The purpose of this conference is twofold. Bring all those who are
concerned about sustainable development on a common platform
and share with each other their success stories so that there is
replication as well as scaling up. Secondly, the challenges and
problems faced are opened up for discussion so that new research
work can be initiated to address the challenges and find acceptable
solutions. Scientific program committee has come up with four major
areas, Education, Health, Livelihood and Environment which in turn
includes water, energy, waste management and biodiversity.
Though all these areas appear to be different, they have a common
thread of sustainability and social good.
Thus this conference cannot be one time program where everyone
comes, meets and goes back and forgets about it.
A long term strategy needs to be evolved as to how these
organisations remain in touch with each other and continue strong
engagement. Here Technology will come in handy.
Number of experience based papers have been received which will
make us all to sit back, think and move ahead with dedication.
7
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
8
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Tech for Seva Poster Competition Program
th
27 September 2013
09:00 Registration
10:00 Inauguration of Competition & Exhibition
10:30 High Tea
11:00 Competition
13:00 Lunch Break
14:00 Competiton
16:00 Declaration of Results
Tech for Seva Conference Program
th
Saturday 28 September 2013
08:00 Registration
09:00 Inauguration : Concept of Tech for Seva Conference & its relevance with societal
improvements.
Inaugural speech by Padmavibhushan Dr Anil Kakodkar
10:15 Tea break and assembly for parallel sessions
10:45 Parallel session 1 Theme - Education
Invited Talk Padmashri Prof. Deepak Phatak-7 Presentations-Sum up by Dr. Vidyasagar
Parallel session 2 Theme - Health : Adressing Healthcare Challenges
Invited talk Padmashri Dr M G Deo - 6 presentations - Sum up Dr R K Mutatkar
Parallel session 3 Theme - Livelihood : Agricultural Mechanization
Invited Talk - 12 Presentations - Sum up by Dr V M Mayande
Parallel session 4 Theme - Environment : Water
Invited Talk Shri Popatrao Pawar - 8 Presentations - Sum up by Dr Vikram Ghole
13:15 Lunch Break & re-assembly for Parallel Sessions
14:15 Parallel session 5 Theme - Education
Invited Talk Dr. Mrs Joy Deshmukh - 7 Presentations - Sum up by Dr Uma Natarajan
Parallel session 6 Theme - Health : Innovative Healthcare Models
Invited talks and Sum up by Dr. Ashok Kukade
Parallel session 7 Theme - Livelihood : Non Timber Forest Produce
Invited talk Dr U V Ghate - 15 Presentations - Sum up by Dr. D N Kulkarni
Parallel session 8 Theme - Environment : Energy
Invited talk Shri Pradip Bhargav - 8 Presentations - Sum up by Dr Muralidhar Takawale
16:45 Tea break and assembly for Interactive Session
17:15 Group Interaction of three fraternities, NGO, Scientists & Innovetors, CSR
18:15 Visit to Exhibition & Posters
19:30 Dinner
th
Saturday 29 September 2013
08:00 Breakfast & Assembly for Plenary session
08:45 Presentations from NGO
09.15 Concept of Seva in action
10:15 Tea break and assembly for Parallel Sessions
10:45 Parallel Session No 9 - Special Session on R & D Initiatives from
DAE / BARC / AKRUTI / CSIR 800 / MGIRI
Parallel Session No 10 Theme - Livelihood : Conservation of Local seeds
Invited talk by Shri Raghunandan Velankar - 10 Presentations -
Sum up Dr Subhash Mehetre
Parallel Session 11 Theme - Environment : Waste Management & Bio Diversity
Invited talk by Prof. Milind Watve - 7 presentations - Sum up by session chair
13:15 Lunch Break and assembly for plenary session
14;15 Panel discussion on way ahead for Tech for Seva initiative
15:30 Tea break and reassembly for Plenary session
16:00 Results of student competition & Prize distribution
16:30 Conference & Valedictory session
Concluding speech by Padmashri Dr Vijay Bhatkar -
Vote of thanks
17:30 Conference ends with high tea
Detailed program giving sequence of speaker wise presentations will be given in the
delegate kit separately
9
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
10
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Tech for Seva – Student Competition
Tech For Seva (TFS) is working towards social change that can be done together and speed up all
our efforts to create more larger impacts in the society. Conference that is planned on 27-29 Sep
2013 going to be an great an opportunity to come all together to be part of this change that is going
at ground level and all the places. Youth are the key focused for our nation for next 20 years
considering this;to bring them all TFS conference came with Innovation Idea competition. Students
through this competition not only going to get information around problems and innovations that
are currently happening at different places but they will also be knowing the cascading effect of
same at country level and at village level where there is extreme need is there. They are going to
get an opportunity to interact with NGOs, Corporate groups, Scientist and individuals who are
actually working on different areas to make socio change to take out nation to next level.
Idea entries will be around 4 different theme of the conference covering
l
Health
l
Education
l
Environments
l
Livelihood
As a part of this conference and competition we have group of volunteers identified from different
collages across Pune, Mumbai and other part of Maharashtra as of now. They are actively getting
involved in all the activities including campaigning to get more entries, making students aware
about TFS and Innovation competition and also part of execution of this mega event.
Volunteers are getting involved into workshops, debates, visit to Innovation centers (Vigyan
Ashram, Pabal)& desk campaigning. Also they are getting an opportunity to connect with people
like Jahangir (real hero behind 3 Idiots movie). This in did a great exposure and eye opener for the
students to think globally and act locally to take part into this Social Change. Guidance from
different eminent personality like DrKakotkar, Dr Vijay Bhatkar ,Dr Raghunath Mashelkar &Dr. Anil
Saharsrabudhhe, Director, COEP motivating ambassadors to join this change.
th
Main event is on 27 Sep 2013 where everyone is very excited to see everyone together.
Participants for this competition include UG/PG Students from all streams including MSW, MBA,
Medical, Engineering, Science, Commerce and Arts. Student competition is sponsored by The
IET UK, where in prices includes cash and socio technical internship along with stipend for one
yearto the winners.
THEME
EDUCATION
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
12
INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
13 Dr. Pandit Vidyasagar Concept Note
Padmashri Prof. Deepak B Phatak Invited Talk 14
Dr Joy Deshmukh Using IT to for Adult Literacy 15
Ashok Kalbag A Perspective Based on Vigyan Ashram Tenents 16
Prof. C. T. Bhunia ICT based / E-learning education-Challenges 17
& Opportunities
Mithila Dalvi Learning through Emotional Well-Being 18
Sanjeevani Mahajan "Akash" tablet based application for trainers 19
and students in "Chhote Scientists" Programme
Ninad Vengurlekar Technology v/s Learning : What will disrupt 20
Education of the 21st Century
¬+|-| ¤|~| +|+·¤ ~|«| 21
|+·|~ .·¤ +--·¤|- ¬+·¬-| +-+¬+ 22
Abhay B. Joshi Learning with Computer Programming 23
Dr. Sanjay V. Kotabagi Fostering Social Innovation into Engineering 24
Curriculum for Building an Effective Students
Engagement with Society
Nilesh Nimkar Using Information Technology for 25
Teacher Education
Narayam V. Deshpande Using ICT for the bringing rural students in the 26
main stream of development
¬||:-| -|-¸ ~=|¤+ .·- - +|+++¬- ~|¤¬¬| --|· 27
Ranjana Baji Re-imaging schools 29
¬¤ -|+c +|-- +¬|+¤|¬ ¬+ +¤ ¡-- ·|·| -¬|++ 30
|++|¬|-| .·-
Rahul D. Bhivare JOYMETRY : Innovative geometry lab and 31
learning technique for 8th and 10th Std. Student
Vivek Ponkshe Use of simple technology in learning project 32
methodolog
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
13
Concept Note on Education
Dr. Pandit Vidyasagar
Vice Chancellor, Swami Ramanand Tirth Marathwada University
Nanded

Education helps an individual to develop intellectual and physical abilities to comprehend the
problem and offer solution for the some. Education also teaches how to learn and make learning a
continuous process. An individual does learn through social and environmental interaction. However
formal education equips the learner with the tools to apply the knowledge gained, effectively and
advantageously. At the primary level education creates an awareness which enthuse, the learner
to learn more. The general objectives for the leaner include appropriate attitude, perspective,
skills, insight, and understanding to perform desired functions. Leaner needs to acquire capacities
to build mental models, understand concepts and develop scripts and schemata. Learner should
learn to use prior knowledge to acquire additional knowledge. At the end, it should culminate in
creating new knowledge. This would not be possible unless learner learns intelligently. Intelligent
Learning requires ability to select new information to be internalized appropriately. Learner has to be
curious and should seek knowledge through discovery, experimentation and interpretation of the
information. Thus Learner should build knowledge & understanding through many ways available
to him. Organization of knowledge is cognitive in nature.
On this background the conference envisages a detailed discussion on the issues such as
provision of adequate and vocational education, student centric education, use of communication
technology and inculcation of moral values. The approach adopted is novel and unconventional.
The idea is to bring corporate, academia & non governmental organizations on the same platform.
This would certainly provide the strong academic inputs, possibilities for financial supports and the
innovativeness required for holistic and application oriented education. Experts from the field of
education would put forward their views along with the educational experiments with new dimensions
and perspectives. The education at all levels is at the cross road and unless practical, viable and
innovative models are evolved, the education many loose its purpose. The conference would give
impetus to this thought through paper presentations, invited talks & panel discussion. It is certainly
st
essential to develop knowledge based society in 21 century.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
12
INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
13 Dr. Pandit Vidyasagar Concept Note
Padmashri Prof. Deepak B Phatak Invited Talk 14
Dr Joy Deshmukh Using IT to for Adult Literacy 15
Ashok Kalbag A Perspective Based on Vigyan Ashram Tenents 16
Prof. C. T. Bhunia ICT based / E-learning education-Challenges 17
& Opportunities
Mithila Dalvi Learning through Emotional Well-Being 18
Sanjeevani Mahajan "Akash" tablet based application for trainers 19
and students in "Chhote Scientists" Programme
Ninad Vengurlekar Technology v/s Learning : What will disrupt 20
Education of the 21st Century
¬+|-| ¤|~| +|+·¤ ~|«| 21
|+·|~ .·¤ +--·¤|- ¬+·¬-| +-+¬+ 22
Abhay B. Joshi Learning with Computer Programming 23
Dr. Sanjay V. Kotabagi Fostering Social Innovation into Engineering 24
Curriculum for Building an Effective Students
Engagement with Society
Nilesh Nimkar Using Information Technology for 25
Teacher Education
Narayam V. Deshpande Using ICT for the bringing rural students in the 26
main stream of development
¬||:-| -|-¸ ~=|¤+ .·- - +|+++¬- ~|¤¬¬| --|· 27
Ranjana Baji Re-imaging schools 29
¬¤ -|+c +|-- +¬|+¤|¬ ¬+ +¤ ¡-- ·|·| -¬|++ 30
|++|¬|-| .·-
Rahul D. Bhivare JOYMETRY : Innovative geometry lab and 31
learning technique for 8th and 10th Std. Student
Vivek Ponkshe Use of simple technology in learning project 32
methodolog
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
13
Concept Note on Education
Dr. Pandit Vidyasagar
Vice Chancellor, Swami Ramanand Tirth Marathwada University
Nanded

Education helps an individual to develop intellectual and physical abilities to comprehend the
problem and offer solution for the some. Education also teaches how to learn and make learning a
continuous process. An individual does learn through social and environmental interaction. However
formal education equips the learner with the tools to apply the knowledge gained, effectively and
advantageously. At the primary level education creates an awareness which enthuse, the learner
to learn more. The general objectives for the leaner include appropriate attitude, perspective,
skills, insight, and understanding to perform desired functions. Leaner needs to acquire capacities
to build mental models, understand concepts and develop scripts and schemata. Learner should
learn to use prior knowledge to acquire additional knowledge. At the end, it should culminate in
creating new knowledge. This would not be possible unless learner learns intelligently. Intelligent
Learning requires ability to select new information to be internalized appropriately. Learner has to be
curious and should seek knowledge through discovery, experimentation and interpretation of the
information. Thus Learner should build knowledge & understanding through many ways available
to him. Organization of knowledge is cognitive in nature.
On this background the conference envisages a detailed discussion on the issues such as
provision of adequate and vocational education, student centric education, use of communication
technology and inculcation of moral values. The approach adopted is novel and unconventional.
The idea is to bring corporate, academia & non governmental organizations on the same platform.
This would certainly provide the strong academic inputs, possibilities for financial supports and the
innovativeness required for holistic and application oriented education. Experts from the field of
education would put forward their views along with the educational experiments with new dimensions
and perspectives. The education at all levels is at the cross road and unless practical, viable and
innovative models are evolved, the education many loose its purpose. The conference would give
impetus to this thought through paper presentations, invited talks & panel discussion. It is certainly
st
essential to develop knowledge based society in 21 century.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
14
Invited Talk By
Padmashri Prof. Deepak B Phatak
IIT, Mumbai
At a time when India needs to signigicantly increase the Gross Enrollment Ratio (GER) into higher
education, our existing academic infrastructure itself suffers from inadequate number of teachers
having requisite qualifications and experience. Problems of quality and scale are thus further
compounded. At IIT Bombay, we have been experimenting with the use of Information and
Communication Technologies to find alternate approaches to address these problems. In
particular, we have successfully implemented a method to train 10,000 teachers at a time,
engaging them in rigorous two-week workshops, using a blended mode. We will be offering
Massive Open On-Line Courses (MOOCs) starting next year. These will attempt to engage lacs of
students at a time. Affordable devices like Aakash tablet, are being integrated in the educational
process. We believe that, in coming years, technology will greatly alter the very educational
process. These changes will particularly affect the role of teachers, who need to be given
orientation and training so as to adapt and be very effective.
This talk briefly describes our experience and learning from these experiments, Future plans will
be outlined which include a further scale up in teacher training through multiple hubs, and our
massive efforts in creating Open Source Educational Contents.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
15
Using IT to for Adult Literacy
Dr. Joy Deshmukh
Global CSR Head Tata Consulting Services
Email : joy.d@tcs.com
According to the 2011 Indian census, 25.96 per cent of Indians cannot read or write. In 1998, a UN
report stated that about one-third of the world's non-literate people aged over 15 were Indians. The
problem is compounded by an ever-swelling population that grew by over 200 million between
1991 and 2001. India's nearly 273 million adult illiterates can speak their native language, but are
unable to read or write. Literacy level plays a major role in the economic development of a nation.
Literacy is key towards making the nation workforce efficient. As per Population Census of India
2011, the Literacy rate of India has shown as improvement of almost 9%. It has gone up to
74.04% in 2011 from 65.38% in 2001, thus showing an increase of 9% in the last 10 years.
It is important for markets and business to consider this as an issue. The entirety and inter-
connectedness of human life be it within the domains of consumption, production or distribution
requires economic principles to be understood within larger social realities.
TCS is part of the Tata Group which has a unique structure that ensures the giving back to community.
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is integral to the sustainability of Tata Consultancy Services.
Sustainability is seen as a state of 'being' and not a state of 'doing'. It is not seen as a list of
activities that are to be completed so that the company sustains in the market. Rather, at TCS,
sustainability is seen as a state of being in balance between Corporate Economic Responsibility
(CER) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).TCS strives to ensure that communities
engaged with through our CSR initiatives also experience certainty in their lives. While it is the
general CSR practice worldwide to use philanthropy and employee volunteering, TCS also uses
its core competencies in IT skills in its CSR strategy.
The Adult Literacy Programme (ALP) is the flagship CSR programme at Tata Consultancy Services.
CBFL relies on cognitive capabilities of individuals to associate complex visual patterns representing
words in Indian scripts with their meanings as well as their phonetic utterances. Since its inception
in 2000, ALP has reached 1,93,625 beneficiaries of which 1,500 were Burkinabé people in
Africa. Today the CBFL is available in 9 Indian languages,2 African Languages and in Arabic. A
website for ALP allows for modules in various languages to be downloaded one lesson at a time
and has the provision for registration allowing tracking and monitoring of users.
It is noteworthy that in the Approach Document to the XI Five Year Plan, Government of India
named the CBFL programme as an important ICT tool for addressing illiteracy. TCS was also
invited to participate in the first anniversary celebrations of the Sakshaar Bharat scheme.
The ALP has utilised TCS' core competency in providing innovative computer based solutions,
along with volunteering from associates. It is an example of the embeddedness of the TCS CSR
framework. The guiding principle of TCS' CSR programmes is “Impact through Empowerment”
where empowerment is a process of strengthening the future today so that risk is minimized, value
created and certainty experienced. Empowerment results in enabling communities and
people to take a lead in their own lives and improve their well being.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
14
Invited Talk By
Padmashri Prof. Deepak B Phatak
IIT, Mumbai
At a time when India needs to signigicantly increase the Gross Enrollment Ratio (GER) into higher
education, our existing academic infrastructure itself suffers from inadequate number of teachers
having requisite qualifications and experience. Problems of quality and scale are thus further
compounded. At IIT Bombay, we have been experimenting with the use of Information and
Communication Technologies to find alternate approaches to address these problems. In
particular, we have successfully implemented a method to train 10,000 teachers at a time,
engaging them in rigorous two-week workshops, using a blended mode. We will be offering
Massive Open On-Line Courses (MOOCs) starting next year. These will attempt to engage lacs of
students at a time. Affordable devices like Aakash tablet, are being integrated in the educational
process. We believe that, in coming years, technology will greatly alter the very educational
process. These changes will particularly affect the role of teachers, who need to be given
orientation and training so as to adapt and be very effective.
This talk briefly describes our experience and learning from these experiments, Future plans will
be outlined which include a further scale up in teacher training through multiple hubs, and our
massive efforts in creating Open Source Educational Contents.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
15
Using IT to for Adult Literacy
Dr. Joy Deshmukh
Global CSR Head Tata Consulting Services
Email : joy.d@tcs.com
According to the 2011 Indian census, 25.96 per cent of Indians cannot read or write. In 1998, a UN
report stated that about one-third of the world's non-literate people aged over 15 were Indians. The
problem is compounded by an ever-swelling population that grew by over 200 million between
1991 and 2001. India's nearly 273 million adult illiterates can speak their native language, but are
unable to read or write. Literacy level plays a major role in the economic development of a nation.
Literacy is key towards making the nation workforce efficient. As per Population Census of India
2011, the Literacy rate of India has shown as improvement of almost 9%. It has gone up to
74.04% in 2011 from 65.38% in 2001, thus showing an increase of 9% in the last 10 years.
It is important for markets and business to consider this as an issue. The entirety and inter-
connectedness of human life be it within the domains of consumption, production or distribution
requires economic principles to be understood within larger social realities.
TCS is part of the Tata Group which has a unique structure that ensures the giving back to community.
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is integral to the sustainability of Tata Consultancy Services.
Sustainability is seen as a state of 'being' and not a state of 'doing'. It is not seen as a list of
activities that are to be completed so that the company sustains in the market. Rather, at TCS,
sustainability is seen as a state of being in balance between Corporate Economic Responsibility
(CER) and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).TCS strives to ensure that communities
engaged with through our CSR initiatives also experience certainty in their lives. While it is the
general CSR practice worldwide to use philanthropy and employee volunteering, TCS also uses
its core competencies in IT skills in its CSR strategy.
The Adult Literacy Programme (ALP) is the flagship CSR programme at Tata Consultancy Services.
CBFL relies on cognitive capabilities of individuals to associate complex visual patterns representing
words in Indian scripts with their meanings as well as their phonetic utterances. Since its inception
in 2000, ALP has reached 1,93,625 beneficiaries of which 1,500 were Burkinabé people in
Africa. Today the CBFL is available in 9 Indian languages,2 African Languages and in Arabic. A
website for ALP allows for modules in various languages to be downloaded one lesson at a time
and has the provision for registration allowing tracking and monitoring of users.
It is noteworthy that in the Approach Document to the XI Five Year Plan, Government of India
named the CBFL programme as an important ICT tool for addressing illiteracy. TCS was also
invited to participate in the first anniversary celebrations of the Sakshaar Bharat scheme.
The ALP has utilised TCS' core competency in providing innovative computer based solutions,
along with volunteering from associates. It is an example of the embeddedness of the TCS CSR
framework. The guiding principle of TCS' CSR programmes is “Impact through Empowerment”
where empowerment is a process of strengthening the future today so that risk is minimized, value
created and certainty experienced. Empowerment results in enabling communities and
people to take a lead in their own lives and improve their well being.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
16
Education – A Perspective Based on
Vigyan Ashram Tenets
Ashok Kalbag
Member Managing Committee Vigyan Ashram & Secretary UCEE
Email: askalbag@gmail.com
Key words : Learning by doing
Education conjures different expectations from everyone's personal perspective.
An infant before entering the formal education system is enthusiastic and learns by gaining
experience of its environment. Its curiosity and motivation may be killed by the formal education
which focuses on the transfer of information and retrieval. When the enjoyment of discovery and
challenge is destroyed, most fail to keep going and are pushed out of the system as failures.
In the new age education system, we need to shift focus from transferring knowledge, to
facilitating and inspiring learners to be curious. They should go after challenges, and enjoy
themselves in the process. It should provide for individual pace of learning, while spotting and
nurturing, latent talent of the learner. It should not treat all learners in a group on the same basis
over given time, and segregate, on the basis of some standardized tests, to exclude as failures,
those who have not passed.
The Vigyan Ashram model of “learning by doing” has attracted school-dropouts from all over India
and many have become entrepreneurs in their own village having found an opportunity for making
a living and serving their own community. The model adapted to the formal school system, is
presently running in over 100 schools as an elective subject for SSC. The principals have
observed overall changes for the better in the students.
Experiments and studies done also indicate that meaningful education takes place once there is
curiosity leading to play, passion, and purpose in life. The focus in education should now shift to
ensure the learners have skills, and develop habits to make this a lifelong process. They should
adapt to the continually changing world. Also considering the humongous number of learners
needing education in the near future, there is little option but to use technology and a new
paradigm.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
17
ICT based/E-learning education- Challenges
& Opportunities
1 2 3
Prof. C. T. Bhunia , Prof. Alpana Mahapatra , Mohit Kumar De ,
4 5
Abhinandan Bhunia , Abhirup Bhunia
1 & 3
National Institute of Technology Arunachal Pradesh,
2 4 & 5
D. J. Sanghvi College of Engg., Mumbai, USA
Email : directornitap@gmail.com
The principal goal of any country decisively & precisely will be the generation of more & improved
human resources to become a leader in the world scenario of liberalization, globalization &
privatization. India is a country of vast population in the world, next highest to China only. Credible &
sustainable achievement in meeting the principal goal of the world, is leadership that requires
many inputs: Government initiative & investment, private initiatives & investment and deployment
of technology in JAST (Judiciously, Appropriately, Selectively & Technologically). Since the India's
participation in LPG in 1990s, much progress in this direction has been noticed in private initiation
although their appreciability & credibility need careful examinations. The enhanced Government
initiative has also noticed in this direction in recent past. Unfortunately in same pace, the JAST of
ICT based education/ E-learning has not made any noticeable impact. Therefore target research
to make JAST of ICT/ E-learning a process to reckon with is the need of the hour.
In order make education to reach the doors of vast rural Indians rather than they reaching the
doors of conventional educational centers (Schools/Colleges/Universities), the deployment of ICT
based education & E-learning in JAST will be a foregone choice.
In this paper, analysis has been done of the immense opportunities & scopes in the spread of
education by ICT/E-learning in India that is believed to be a far reaching impact in all around
societal development. At the same time, we find in our research the digital divide is a strong
bottleneck for the utilization of opportunities so opened. The non-affordability & non-accessibility
of ICT/ networking/computing resources by the rural vast population is a big challenge for Tech for
Seva impact of ICT/E-learning. We suggest a few solutions/approaches in socio-economic context in
India to remove the junk of digital divide in achieving Tech for Seva in ICT / E-learning mode of
education.
The National Institute of Technology, Arunachal Pradesh is in extreme spurt of innovations. Out of
many innovations two related to ICT based/E-learning educations are :
1. 100% online M. S. Programme by research,
2. Online regular examinations.
The process of innovations, its outcome are elaborately researched in the paper. We portray our
innovation and scientific solutions for expansion and excellence in higher technical education.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
16
Education – A Perspective Based on
Vigyan Ashram Tenets
Ashok Kalbag
Member Managing Committee Vigyan Ashram & Secretary UCEE
Email: askalbag@gmail.com
Key words : Learning by doing
Education conjures different expectations from everyone's personal perspective.
An infant before entering the formal education system is enthusiastic and learns by gaining
experience of its environment. Its curiosity and motivation may be killed by the formal education
which focuses on the transfer of information and retrieval. When the enjoyment of discovery and
challenge is destroyed, most fail to keep going and are pushed out of the system as failures.
In the new age education system, we need to shift focus from transferring knowledge, to
facilitating and inspiring learners to be curious. They should go after challenges, and enjoy
themselves in the process. It should provide for individual pace of learning, while spotting and
nurturing, latent talent of the learner. It should not treat all learners in a group on the same basis
over given time, and segregate, on the basis of some standardized tests, to exclude as failures,
those who have not passed.
The Vigyan Ashram model of “learning by doing” has attracted school-dropouts from all over India
and many have become entrepreneurs in their own village having found an opportunity for making
a living and serving their own community. The model adapted to the formal school system, is
presently running in over 100 schools as an elective subject for SSC. The principals have
observed overall changes for the better in the students.
Experiments and studies done also indicate that meaningful education takes place once there is
curiosity leading to play, passion, and purpose in life. The focus in education should now shift to
ensure the learners have skills, and develop habits to make this a lifelong process. They should
adapt to the continually changing world. Also considering the humongous number of learners
needing education in the near future, there is little option but to use technology and a new
paradigm.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
17
ICT based/E-learning education- Challenges
& Opportunities
1 2 3
Prof. C. T. Bhunia , Prof. Alpana Mahapatra , Mohit Kumar De ,
4 5
Abhinandan Bhunia , Abhirup Bhunia
1 & 3
National Institute of Technology Arunachal Pradesh,
2 4 & 5
D. J. Sanghvi College of Engg., Mumbai, USA
Email : directornitap@gmail.com
The principal goal of any country decisively & precisely will be the generation of more & improved
human resources to become a leader in the world scenario of liberalization, globalization &
privatization. India is a country of vast population in the world, next highest to China only. Credible &
sustainable achievement in meeting the principal goal of the world, is leadership that requires
many inputs: Government initiative & investment, private initiatives & investment and deployment
of technology in JAST (Judiciously, Appropriately, Selectively & Technologically). Since the India's
participation in LPG in 1990s, much progress in this direction has been noticed in private initiation
although their appreciability & credibility need careful examinations. The enhanced Government
initiative has also noticed in this direction in recent past. Unfortunately in same pace, the JAST of
ICT based education/ E-learning has not made any noticeable impact. Therefore target research
to make JAST of ICT/ E-learning a process to reckon with is the need of the hour.
In order make education to reach the doors of vast rural Indians rather than they reaching the
doors of conventional educational centers (Schools/Colleges/Universities), the deployment of ICT
based education & E-learning in JAST will be a foregone choice.
In this paper, analysis has been done of the immense opportunities & scopes in the spread of
education by ICT/E-learning in India that is believed to be a far reaching impact in all around
societal development. At the same time, we find in our research the digital divide is a strong
bottleneck for the utilization of opportunities so opened. The non-affordability & non-accessibility
of ICT/ networking/computing resources by the rural vast population is a big challenge for Tech for
Seva impact of ICT/E-learning. We suggest a few solutions/approaches in socio-economic context in
India to remove the junk of digital divide in achieving Tech for Seva in ICT / E-learning mode of
education.
The National Institute of Technology, Arunachal Pradesh is in extreme spurt of innovations. Out of
many innovations two related to ICT based/E-learning educations are :
1. 100% online M. S. Programme by research,
2. Online regular examinations.
The process of innovations, its outcome are elaborately researched in the paper. We portray our
innovation and scientific solutions for expansion and excellence in higher technical education.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
19
“Aakash” tablet based application for
trainers and students in “Chhote Scientists” Program
1 2, 3
Sanjeevani Mahajan , Abhay Chaware Ravindra Vaidya
1 & 2 3
KPIT Technologies Hinjewadi, Pune MES's IMCC, Pune
Email : sanjeevani.mahajan@kpitcummins.com, rpv.imcc@mespune.in
Key words: Aakash Tablet, Android, Science Experiments, multi lingual
'Chhote Scientists on Aakash tablet' is an Android based application for School Teachers/Trainers
and students.
The scope of this project includes developing an application framework for trainers that will help
them in teaching science fundamentals to the students of standard 8th and 9th. Later, the project
will be extended to include other subjects and also will include topics for all students till the 10th
standard.
This application framework will have science experiments that will be themed on various topics
such as motion, energy, pressure etc. These science fundamentals are explained in a simple and
lucid manner using various components of the application like pdf files, texts, video and audio files,
animations, PowerPoint presentations and so on.
These experiments demonstrate 'How-to-Make Scientific Toys' in an extremely simple way. The
toy-making is explained in a step-by-step method using text, animation and video files. With the
help of this application, the trainers will be acquainted with the skill of making toys by themselves.
This would be later taught to the students wherein they will be able to make toys using low cost and
easily available materials like straw, match sticks, rubber etc. After the toys are made, the teachers
will explain the science basics and mechanisms on which these toys work. This will enable the
students to better understand the application of these scientific fundamentals in their real life.
'Learning' with such practical exposure would make it all the more interesting and fun in school.
This not only helps in inculcating science culture in students but also helps in developing a
learning attitude.
The application will have a multilingual feature so that it empowers the students to learn by
themselves on a low cost 'Aakash' tablet. As this application is developed under Creative Commons –
an Open Source Platform, is free for download. Hence, the application on 'Aakash' can reach to all
students in India thereby growing the learning ability and fondness towards science.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
18
Learning through Emotional Well-Being
Mithila Dalvi
Samvaad
Email : mithila.dalvi@gmail.com
Children often face multiple challenges during their schooling. A typical 'chalk & talk' method of
teaching may not often suit their needs. To add to their woes, if children don't grasp a particular
concept well, they usually do not get a second chance to understand it better. A mere progression
to the higher standard only aggravates the situation. And last but not the least, school environment
conventionally provides recognition and glory to those who do well in academics, while self-
esteem of the rest may get badly dented.
Samvaad addresses these issues through a three-pronged approach:
1. Labs for children
2. Workshop for parents
3. Working with teachers in schools
LABS :
Children, who struggle on the academic front, obviously don't enjoy studies. Parents and teachers
may further aggravate the matter by continuously needling them, often being paranoid about
mistakes. These children develop a strong dislike or even a phobia for a subject.
Samvaad conducts 'labs' for children around various concepts like Reading, Word Problems, Map
reading, Balancing equations etc. These are short sessions of 2 hours each, conducted for a batch
of 5-6 children. Children of different ages from different standards attend these labs. The common
purpose is to get comfortable with the concept with emphasis on hands-on work.
The labs are designed keeping in mind the principles of Emotional Intelligence (EI). We nurture an
environment where mistakes are mere milestones in the path towards learning. This frees the child
from being pre-occupied with 'mistakes', helping him focus more on learning. Plus the labs ensure an
environment suitable for each child's 'Learning Style', and provide each child with positive strokes
in areas (s)he is strong in. Over 400 children have benefited from these labs so far.
WORKSHOPS FOR PARENTS
Workshops for parents address the issues that are very relevant to parenting. A child's early
development of motor muscles and visual discrimination abilities play a crucial role in his learning
to write and read. These aspects largely depend on the child's upbringing and the natural skill set
the child has. A child who is not comfortable with the 'chalk and talk' method may need more
support at home, to suit his own way of learning. Emotions are an integral part of the learning
process, and Emotional Intelligence is the backbone of overall success.
Workshops for parents not only create awareness on these aspects, but also provide handy
techniques that can be practised with children.
WORKING WITH TEACHERS IN SCHOOLS:
Samvaad's rich experience in the field of education adds a whole new dimension in its work with
schools. The projects undertaken address a range of topics from Reading, Mathematics,
Geography and Learning Styles.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
19
“Aakash” tablet based application for
trainers and students in “Chhote Scientists” Program
1 2, 3
Sanjeevani Mahajan , Abhay Chaware Ravindra Vaidya
1 & 2 3
KPIT Technologies Hinjewadi, Pune MES's IMCC, Pune
Email : sanjeevani.mahajan@kpitcummins.com, rpv.imcc@mespune.in
Key words: Aakash Tablet, Android, Science Experiments, multi lingual
'Chhote Scientists on Aakash tablet' is an Android based application for School Teachers/Trainers
and students.
The scope of this project includes developing an application framework for trainers that will help
them in teaching science fundamentals to the students of standard 8th and 9th. Later, the project
will be extended to include other subjects and also will include topics for all students till the 10th
standard.
This application framework will have science experiments that will be themed on various topics
such as motion, energy, pressure etc. These science fundamentals are explained in a simple and
lucid manner using various components of the application like pdf files, texts, video and audio files,
animations, PowerPoint presentations and so on.
These experiments demonstrate 'How-to-Make Scientific Toys' in an extremely simple way. The
toy-making is explained in a step-by-step method using text, animation and video files. With the
help of this application, the trainers will be acquainted with the skill of making toys by themselves.
This would be later taught to the students wherein they will be able to make toys using low cost and
easily available materials like straw, match sticks, rubber etc. After the toys are made, the teachers
will explain the science basics and mechanisms on which these toys work. This will enable the
students to better understand the application of these scientific fundamentals in their real life.
'Learning' with such practical exposure would make it all the more interesting and fun in school.
This not only helps in inculcating science culture in students but also helps in developing a
learning attitude.
The application will have a multilingual feature so that it empowers the students to learn by
themselves on a low cost 'Aakash' tablet. As this application is developed under Creative Commons –
an Open Source Platform, is free for download. Hence, the application on 'Aakash' can reach to all
students in India thereby growing the learning ability and fondness towards science.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
18
Learning through Emotional Well-Being
Mithila Dalvi
Samvaad
Email : mithila.dalvi@gmail.com
Children often face multiple challenges during their schooling. A typical 'chalk & talk' method of
teaching may not often suit their needs. To add to their woes, if children don't grasp a particular
concept well, they usually do not get a second chance to understand it better. A mere progression
to the higher standard only aggravates the situation. And last but not the least, school environment
conventionally provides recognition and glory to those who do well in academics, while self-
esteem of the rest may get badly dented.
Samvaad addresses these issues through a three-pronged approach:
1. Labs for children
2. Workshop for parents
3. Working with teachers in schools
LABS :
Children, who struggle on the academic front, obviously don't enjoy studies. Parents and teachers
may further aggravate the matter by continuously needling them, often being paranoid about
mistakes. These children develop a strong dislike or even a phobia for a subject.
Samvaad conducts 'labs' for children around various concepts like Reading, Word Problems, Map
reading, Balancing equations etc. These are short sessions of 2 hours each, conducted for a batch
of 5-6 children. Children of different ages from different standards attend these labs. The common
purpose is to get comfortable with the concept with emphasis on hands-on work.
The labs are designed keeping in mind the principles of Emotional Intelligence (EI). We nurture an
environment where mistakes are mere milestones in the path towards learning. This frees the child
from being pre-occupied with 'mistakes', helping him focus more on learning. Plus the labs ensure an
environment suitable for each child's 'Learning Style', and provide each child with positive strokes
in areas (s)he is strong in. Over 400 children have benefited from these labs so far.
WORKSHOPS FOR PARENTS
Workshops for parents address the issues that are very relevant to parenting. A child's early
development of motor muscles and visual discrimination abilities play a crucial role in his learning
to write and read. These aspects largely depend on the child's upbringing and the natural skill set
the child has. A child who is not comfortable with the 'chalk and talk' method may need more
support at home, to suit his own way of learning. Emotions are an integral part of the learning
process, and Emotional Intelligence is the backbone of overall success.
Workshops for parents not only create awareness on these aspects, but also provide handy
techniques that can be practised with children.
WORKING WITH TEACHERS IN SCHOOLS:
Samvaad's rich experience in the field of education adds a whole new dimension in its work with
schools. The projects undertaken address a range of topics from Reading, Mathematics,
Geography and Learning Styles.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
20
Technology v/s Learning: What will disrupt
st
Education of the 21 Century
Ninad Vengurlekar
Vice President, IL&FS Education and Technology Services Limited Mumbai
Email : Ninad.vengurlekar@ilfsindia.com
Technology in Education is the new buzzword for changing the way education in imparted in
schools. However, it is important to understand that the real challenges in changing education in
India are not in the sphere of technology, where a lot of misguided innovation is happening, but in
the sphere of learning itself.
The education ecosystem in India is driven by teachers, textbooks and tests. Unless technology
can coexist with these 3 Ts of education, they will have little chance of impacting educational
outcomes. Most technology solutions, by design or intent, are created to replace these Ts. Thus,
they are doomed from the very beginning. Traditional teaching methods and tools cannot be
replaced in an instant. It will take at least a generation for this to happen.
In a country that is so focused on marks, self-learning is a myth. Whether we like it or not, a
traditional teacher is here to stay. So, let us build solutions around the teacher rather than to
replace the teacher with self-learning education platforms.
Technology solutions for education have to have clear, demonstrable and measurable educational
outcome. In education sector, the online assessment engine will not work for the technology
features it offers, but the quality of assessment questions created by it, which enhances the
evaluation of student knowledge and understanding. The same applies to hi-tech hardware
solutions built for education. It is not the features of the tablets and mobiles, but the quality and
impact of the educational content that it streams which will lead to increased demand.
Innovations in educational technology work only at ground level. Not in the Cloud. A good education
technology product needs to have an even better servicing model at grassroots level to succeed.
Servicing includes product training, usage support, enhancing educational outcomes, and so on.
There are also challenges of getting teachers to use your product by working on their psychology
and fear. Without these aspects, the product will fail—however sound it may be.
And therefore, the real disruption in education will not come from Technology, but by changing
learning itself.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
21
unìuzw wìeì
g§JrVm Omoer
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Email : joshisn9265@gmail.com
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
20
Technology v/s Learning: What will disrupt
st
Education of the 21 Century
Ninad Vengurlekar
Vice President, IL&FS Education and Technology Services Limited Mumbai
Email : Ninad.vengurlekar@ilfsindia.com
Technology in Education is the new buzzword for changing the way education in imparted in
schools. However, it is important to understand that the real challenges in changing education in
India are not in the sphere of technology, where a lot of misguided innovation is happening, but in
the sphere of learning itself.
The education ecosystem in India is driven by teachers, textbooks and tests. Unless technology
can coexist with these 3 Ts of education, they will have little chance of impacting educational
outcomes. Most technology solutions, by design or intent, are created to replace these Ts. Thus,
they are doomed from the very beginning. Traditional teaching methods and tools cannot be
replaced in an instant. It will take at least a generation for this to happen.
In a country that is so focused on marks, self-learning is a myth. Whether we like it or not, a
traditional teacher is here to stay. So, let us build solutions around the teacher rather than to
replace the teacher with self-learning education platforms.
Technology solutions for education have to have clear, demonstrable and measurable educational
outcome. In education sector, the online assessment engine will not work for the technology
features it offers, but the quality of assessment questions created by it, which enhances the
evaluation of student knowledge and understanding. The same applies to hi-tech hardware
solutions built for education. It is not the features of the tablets and mobiles, but the quality and
impact of the educational content that it streams which will lead to increased demand.
Innovations in educational technology work only at ground level. Not in the Cloud. A good education
technology product needs to have an even better servicing model at grassroots level to succeed.
Servicing includes product training, usage support, enhancing educational outcomes, and so on.
There are also challenges of getting teachers to use your product by working on their psychology
and fear. Without these aspects, the product will fail—however sound it may be.
And therefore, the real disruption in education will not come from Technology, but by changing
learning itself.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
21
unìuzw wìeì
g§JrVm Omoer
+|+·¤ :=-| +-
Email : joshisn9265@gmail.com
+|+·¤ :=-| +- ¡| ¬~|¬+| ¬ª¤| +¬| -- ++ +|+·¤ =+|- +|·- ¬|¡. c|¤ +¡|-+·+|¬|+| ¡
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
22
u¬zcnì¬ »nz»nì =&mnn
{Jare à^wUo
Email : gurukulam.pune@gmail.com
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¬||¤ +|·||+· |-+|¤ ¡|-|¬ ¬||¤ |-| | |++|-| +|c|++ +|œ·¸+| -|¡| ¬|¡ ·|·| +=| ¡ ¬·¬ c·-|¬.
¬+·¬ ¬+|¤|·| |-|+-|¬|c| =| +-+¬-+| ·|+c·|-| ·|·-|¬| |--|- ¬|+·+-| ¬|¡ ¬¬ .++|- +|c-.
Learning with Computer Programming
Abhay B. Joshi
SPARK Institute Pune
E-mail : abjoshi@yahoo.com
This paper describes how computer programming helps children develop valuable 21st century
skills.
It is universally accepted that in the 21st century, facts and information will matter less. Our
children will need intellectual curiosity and a life-long interest in learning. They will need the ability
to learn on their own. They will use creativity and multi-disciplinary skills to solve real-life problems.
They will need to be entrepreneurial in their thinking.
When children do programming, they undertake design-based projects to create artwork, puzzles,
animation, games, simulations, etc. They use languages like Scratch and Logo, which have a
simple syntax and an intuitive environment. Children get immediate feedback when they program.
These languages have been designed specifically to make “learning” happen when one programs
in them. When children do programming, the teacher's role is that of a facilitator or coach. Children
spend most of their time in hands-on activity and group collaboration, and they enjoy the overall
experience immensely.
When children do programming, they talk with the brain of the computer and thus develop a life-
long friendship with the “real” computer. Their perspective changes from being just a “software user”
to becoming a “software builder”. They get introduced to ideas in computational thinking. They
gain valuable insights through exploration and through the mistakes they make. And every child
gets to taste the joy of achievement.
When children do programming they work on a series of design projects. Projects foster creativity
and active learning. They allow conceptual learning to happen gradually and indirectly. When
children do projects, their learning acquires a sense of purpose.
By letting children work on creative design work, we sustain the next generation of Creators and
Innovators. Programming skill gives the power to solve real-life problems. It prepares students for
future careers & endeavors related to science and technology.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
23
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
22
u¬zcnì¬ »nz»nì =&mnn
{Jare à^wUo
Email : gurukulam.pune@gmail.com
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-|· +·¤.
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-++|~- ¤¬ ~-|, ·|¤|+|¬| ¬|++·, ++|ªcu-, ·|++||c+|, +|¤+|+, +|¡-:-ª-|, -¬|++, ·++|+ ;.
+·|+·- +¸|-+¬|, ¬+|-, |-++¬| ;. ~· |+·|+|- +|+:~- +¬ ¤|-. +-|+¤|, +=||-·|=¤, u+|¬ |-·|=¤
|-|¡| ¬·|¬ ·-¬| ¤|-|. |+|+¤ u«|- +|+:~- +¬ ¤|-. ¡ ¬+ ¬-|+-||·+ +·:-|- .|·|=+|:+|·
|~+|+¬ ¤|-. ~|«| |-+|¬| ¬¬-|- ¡ ~Š ¡|- . +- +|+ |+ · ¬|¤||·- ª+--+ |++|¬- + ¬- | ¬·|¬+ +|--¸
|~+¸- ¡| +¬ - ¤| ·| |~-+-|| +|·=¬| +¬-|-. -¬- ·|+c|¬ -~ +| +-·| +·|=| :-|-. |+¤|·|
+·|+·- |~=+|-| ¡| ¬+|+|¤ |++|¬ ·¡|+| |¡-- |+|+¤ -+++ ·|++¬ ¤|-|-. -:|. -) +¸-|~=¤, ~)
:-|:-|, ,) |+¤|-, -) ~=|¤+¬¡¬|
+-+¬+ +¤|¬ ¬+ |+¤|·|-| ¬|+|+-| =+|-|¬ .|¤|++ .|- -+¤-- ¬|¡. |+¤|·|- +-+¬|- :|u¬
¡|-|+¸+|- +«|-|¬ +·+·|+- +|~-|- .|- |- |-·|=¤ +-- ·|-| ª+-…-| º+ ¬·|¬++ -|· +¬|
¤|-|. |+« |+¤|¤| ·|·| |++|- ¬++· +|·+- ¡|¤ ~Š ¡|-.

¤· |+.|- + -+.|- ¬ª¤| + +|+|·c ++-|-| +-+¬+ +¤|¬ |+¤|·|·| +|·+||·+ +¬¬| ¬|¤|-+--|
¤|· :¤|· |~=¤ |:¬ -· ¡ |+¤|¤| ·|·| +¬- ¬|¤+ +|·+- ¡|-|¬. |·|-¸-- +c --|+ -+., +¬|+-
¬||¤ +|·||+· |-+|¤ ¡|-|¬ ¬||¤ |-| | |++|-| +|c|++ +|œ·¸+| -|¡| ¬|¡ ·|·| +=| ¡ ¬·¬ c·-|¬.
¬+·¬ ¬+|¤|·| |-|+-|¬|c| =| +-+¬-+| ·|+c·|-| ·|·-|¬| |--|- ¬|+·+-| ¬|¡ ¬¬ .++|- +|c-.
Learning with Computer Programming
Abhay B. Joshi
SPARK Institute Pune
E-mail : abjoshi@yahoo.com
This paper describes how computer programming helps children develop valuable 21st century
skills.
It is universally accepted that in the 21st century, facts and information will matter less. Our
children will need intellectual curiosity and a life-long interest in learning. They will need the ability
to learn on their own. They will use creativity and multi-disciplinary skills to solve real-life problems.
They will need to be entrepreneurial in their thinking.
When children do programming, they undertake design-based projects to create artwork, puzzles,
animation, games, simulations, etc. They use languages like Scratch and Logo, which have a
simple syntax and an intuitive environment. Children get immediate feedback when they program.
These languages have been designed specifically to make “learning” happen when one programs
in them. When children do programming, the teacher's role is that of a facilitator or coach. Children
spend most of their time in hands-on activity and group collaboration, and they enjoy the overall
experience immensely.
When children do programming, they talk with the brain of the computer and thus develop a life-
long friendship with the “real” computer. Their perspective changes from being just a “software user”
to becoming a “software builder”. They get introduced to ideas in computational thinking. They
gain valuable insights through exploration and through the mistakes they make. And every child
gets to taste the joy of achievement.
When children do programming they work on a series of design projects. Projects foster creativity
and active learning. They allow conceptual learning to happen gradually and indirectly. When
children do projects, their learning acquires a sense of purpose.
By letting children work on creative design work, we sustain the next generation of Creators and
Innovators. Programming skill gives the power to solve real-life problems. It prepares students for
future careers & endeavors related to science and technology.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
23
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
24
Fostering Social Innovation into Engineering
Curriculum for Building an Effective Students
Engagement with Society
Dr. Sanjay V Kotabagi, Dr. Prakash G. Tewari, Dr. Ashok S. Shettar
B. V. Bhoomaraddi College of Engineering & Technology, Hubli
Email : pg_tewari@bvb.edu
The present challenge of engineering education in India is to develop social concern, problem
solving and leadership skills in undergraduate students. The learning experience created through
a well designed course at the early stages of their program will help the students' to develop better
capabilities to find technological solutions to the societal problems. To achieve these outcomes a
course on 'Social Innovation' was designed and delivered at the first year level of undergraduate
engineering programs at B.V. Bhoomaraddi College of Engineering & Technology (BVBCET).
This paper presents the experience of BVBCET in design and delivery of this course.
The basic objective of the course is to prepare the students to develop an awareness of key social
issues facing the local community and identify areas ripe for innovation. In the process, the
students acquire the requisite skills to tackle the problems through innovative and sustainable
solutions. The course also builds communication, analytical thinking and decision making skills
into the students, to make them more effective and creative leaders. The student groups work on
societal issues by analyzing the cause and effects, understanding the strength and weaknesses
through SWOT and finally arrive at solutions. The developed solutions are piloted in the field to
understand their impact on the community. Every year over 200, student lead, social innovation
projects are carried out by first year engineering students.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
25
Using Information Technology for
Teacher Education
Nilesh Nimkar, Nitin Nimkar, Shamin Padalkar
Quality Education Support Trust
Email : shamin.padalkar@quest.org.in
Maintaining and improving quality of education at the mass level is one of the major challenge.
One of the solutions for this problem is to give high quality inputs to teachers using information
technology. The Quality Education Support Trust (QUEST) has used the electronic medium in
three ways. 1. preparing short duration distance courses for teachers; 2. preparing short films for
teachers and 3. running a teachers' discussion forum online.
The most important feature of these activities is that, it is in Marathi (the state language of
Maharashtra). This was essential, considering that most of the teachers are not comfortable with
English. Another important feature is, since the material is for teachers, it always integrates the
subject content with the teaching practices. It has been seen that many times teachers themselves
are not competent in the subject matter knowledge which largely hampers their ability to teach.
Hence the courses aim to clarify the essential concepts in the specific subjects such as mathematics
and science. At the same time the courses also introduce teachers to the relevant pedagogic
practices. The films are shot in the real classroom when competent teachers are teaching. They
are later edited & annotated to present only the important points. They can be seen independently
or can be used as the supplementary material for the courses. The teachers from all over
Maharashtra and sometimes from outside of Maharashtra share their experiences, problems,
opinions on the forum.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
24
Fostering Social Innovation into Engineering
Curriculum for Building an Effective Students
Engagement with Society
Dr. Sanjay V Kotabagi, Dr. Prakash G. Tewari, Dr. Ashok S. Shettar
B. V. Bhoomaraddi College of Engineering & Technology, Hubli
Email : pg_tewari@bvb.edu
The present challenge of engineering education in India is to develop social concern, problem
solving and leadership skills in undergraduate students. The learning experience created through
a well designed course at the early stages of their program will help the students' to develop better
capabilities to find technological solutions to the societal problems. To achieve these outcomes a
course on 'Social Innovation' was designed and delivered at the first year level of undergraduate
engineering programs at B.V. Bhoomaraddi College of Engineering & Technology (BVBCET).
This paper presents the experience of BVBCET in design and delivery of this course.
The basic objective of the course is to prepare the students to develop an awareness of key social
issues facing the local community and identify areas ripe for innovation. In the process, the
students acquire the requisite skills to tackle the problems through innovative and sustainable
solutions. The course also builds communication, analytical thinking and decision making skills
into the students, to make them more effective and creative leaders. The student groups work on
societal issues by analyzing the cause and effects, understanding the strength and weaknesses
through SWOT and finally arrive at solutions. The developed solutions are piloted in the field to
understand their impact on the community. Every year over 200, student lead, social innovation
projects are carried out by first year engineering students.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
25
Using Information Technology for
Teacher Education
Nilesh Nimkar, Nitin Nimkar, Shamin Padalkar
Quality Education Support Trust
Email : shamin.padalkar@quest.org.in
Maintaining and improving quality of education at the mass level is one of the major challenge.
One of the solutions for this problem is to give high quality inputs to teachers using information
technology. The Quality Education Support Trust (QUEST) has used the electronic medium in
three ways. 1. preparing short duration distance courses for teachers; 2. preparing short films for
teachers and 3. running a teachers' discussion forum online.
The most important feature of these activities is that, it is in Marathi (the state language of
Maharashtra). This was essential, considering that most of the teachers are not comfortable with
English. Another important feature is, since the material is for teachers, it always integrates the
subject content with the teaching practices. It has been seen that many times teachers themselves
are not competent in the subject matter knowledge which largely hampers their ability to teach.
Hence the courses aim to clarify the essential concepts in the specific subjects such as mathematics
and science. At the same time the courses also introduce teachers to the relevant pedagogic
practices. The films are shot in the real classroom when competent teachers are teaching. They
are later edited & annotated to present only the important points. They can be seen independently
or can be used as the supplementary material for the courses. The teachers from all over
Maharashtra and sometimes from outside of Maharashtra share their experiences, problems,
opinions on the forum.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
26
Using ICT for the bringing rural students
in the main stream of development
Narayan V. Deshpande
Email : yeralaproject@gmail.com
The rural area where YPS (Yerala Projects Society) is working has many shortfalls in imparting
quality education. The area is situated at 145 kms away from district place at the border of
Karanataka hence bilingual people stay in this area. The remoteness keeps these people away
from the resources and the world outside. The teachers have their limitations in delivering quality
learning process for the children of this area. Whereas, the children in the area have been solely
dependent on teacher's knowledge as they don't have access to other resources & the parents are
illiterate. The Secondary school YPS has started at Jalihal (bk), Jath block of Sangli dist. is the
educational laboratory hence named as “School of Progressive Education” i.e. SCOPE. The
school has used technology to overcome limitations of local teachers and allowing students to
explore the knowledge while teachers have to play their role as Facilitator.
The developed “Digital School” at village Jalihal in which every classroom is equipped with a
computer and 32” LCD TV. Along with the school curriculum based program software, every
classroom is connected to internet and dish TV.
The teachers conduct lessons in a class with the use of digital system to elaborate concepts in
much better ways. The language barrier in delivering good Marathi or English of these bi-lingual
teachers has been overcome through the CDs on the syllabus. The concepts from science and
geography are made easy to understand with the effective use of digital system. The results of this
digitalization are amazing!
Similarly the center is established for introducing basic technologies involving children of 8th and
9th std. to know basic technologies i.e. energy, technical, masonry work, electrician, carpentry,
home and nutrition. This helps the children to know different technologies and how they like it.
This promotes these children to select technical side or science side for further education.
Advantages of ICT based education :
- The children don't miss the academic part due to being absent on the day.
- The audio –visual used in software makes the concepts more clear.
- The internet, Dish TV helps in keeping these students up to date with the current happenings
and the world outside.
- The school runs on the principle of “Knowledge is generated by Children” hence the system
supports the principle by allowing children to explore through many options to get the
knowledge they are seeking.
- The students gain confidence to compete with the urban educational level.
- The school shows 100% results every year.
- The number of students selecting science side after 10th std. has increased.
- The number of girls enrolling in school has increased.
.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
27
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¬||:+|¬| +¬|-| +|· +c|¤ ¤|- ¡|-. +·|c| ¡| ·|·|¬|c| º+ +·+| ·|+|- ¡|-|. ·|·|+·|+· -·,-~
++ +|+ +-|--·, ·|+| |~=¤|- |+|+¤ .|+ +-|--· +|+++¬- ¬|·|·+ ¬u- +|--|¬|c| +|-¸ |
|¬¡¸ | +|ª-+|-| ¬- +¬|¬|c| .+||~- +¬|. ·|+| |~=¤|·| |+|+¤ +||-| |+-|· +¬|. ·|·|
¬|¤|· +¬ +·|c| ++|- |~+¸ ~+¬|. +|¬| ·|++·¸- .+|¤ ·|++· +«¤ ¡ ·|-| ¬|+ +¬.
:¬·| ¬|+|++ .·- ¬|+-|¬+|· -| -| +·|c| +|·+|·| ~|«| ¬|¬ +·- -|¬-| ¬|¡- ¬||¤ ;+¤|
+|·+|·| ~|«|+· .+~ |+«- -|¡|. ¬+:| ¬+¬|+|- +|¤¬|-| ¬|+-| +¬|- ;+¤| ~|«- |~+|+ ¬¬
+|c-. +|·¤|·| +«|~| +-|¬ ¬=|- ¬¬ - +| ;+¤| ¡| .|-·|+| ¬|¡ ¬||¤ +c|¬ ª+¤·| +|- ;+¤|
- -|¡| -¡¤¸- ¬|+¬ +¸¬ +|+ +·¸ - ¬¬ +|¬+|-| +|c-.
l
;+¤| ¡| ·|+| -¡¤¸- ¤ ¬||¤ ¬+- |++ ;+¤|-¸- |~+¤ | :|-¡|+· +·+ ¬|¡.
l
+|-·|+-¸- |~+¤ ¬||¤ ;+¤|+· .··+ |+«+¤ ¡ +|«|-| +·¤ ¬|¡.
| :|-¡| +|-|-| |+-|· +-- +|+++¬- |¦·|+| +|++ ¡|-| ·-¬|. +·|c| +|·+|·| ~|«- |~+¤||
+¬|-| ;+¤|-| +|+· .·|+|+¤ +·-| |+| |¬|c| + ++ ,,- -¡¤¤ |~~¸+|·| +|¬¸- ·|+| º+¤, +|¬¤,
·|¤·| ·+¡|·|- +|+·-| ¤ ¬~| ¬·+|- +-- |-¬·| +- -¡¤¤ +|·| c,· | ++| ;+¤| ¬u-|¬|
¬·+|- +·¤ | ++|- ¤|+- +c +c|¤ +|c¤|· ;+¤| ¬u-, +|--, ¬|··Š-| +|·| -·,-~ ++|+|¬¸-
+·-| ¤ +¬|-| ¬¡¤ ¤+¸ ~+- |- -+- +|+++¬- -|· +¬ ¬|¡-.
~|=|¬ - ~|¬ +|-«|+· +¬ .·+ |++|-| ¬·|¬ ++++«| +·- ¬¬-|-. u· -· ¬+ |++ ¡
info@grammangal.org
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
26
Using ICT for the bringing rural students
in the main stream of development
Narayan V. Deshpande
Email : yeralaproject@gmail.com
The rural area where YPS (Yerala Projects Society) is working has many shortfalls in imparting
quality education. The area is situated at 145 kms away from district place at the border of
Karanataka hence bilingual people stay in this area. The remoteness keeps these people away
from the resources and the world outside. The teachers have their limitations in delivering quality
learning process for the children of this area. Whereas, the children in the area have been solely
dependent on teacher's knowledge as they don't have access to other resources & the parents are
illiterate. The Secondary school YPS has started at Jalihal (bk), Jath block of Sangli dist. is the
educational laboratory hence named as “School of Progressive Education” i.e. SCOPE. The
school has used technology to overcome limitations of local teachers and allowing students to
explore the knowledge while teachers have to play their role as Facilitator.
The developed “Digital School” at village Jalihal in which every classroom is equipped with a
computer and 32” LCD TV. Along with the school curriculum based program software, every
classroom is connected to internet and dish TV.
The teachers conduct lessons in a class with the use of digital system to elaborate concepts in
much better ways. The language barrier in delivering good Marathi or English of these bi-lingual
teachers has been overcome through the CDs on the syllabus. The concepts from science and
geography are made easy to understand with the effective use of digital system. The results of this
digitalization are amazing!
Similarly the center is established for introducing basic technologies involving children of 8th and
9th std. to know basic technologies i.e. energy, technical, masonry work, electrician, carpentry,
home and nutrition. This helps the children to know different technologies and how they like it.
This promotes these children to select technical side or science side for further education.
Advantages of ICT based education :
- The children don't miss the academic part due to being absent on the day.
- The audio –visual used in software makes the concepts more clear.
- The internet, Dish TV helps in keeping these students up to date with the current happenings
and the world outside.
- The school runs on the principle of “Knowledge is generated by Children” hence the system
supports the principle by allowing children to explore through many options to get the
knowledge they are seeking.
- The students gain confidence to compete with the urban educational level.
- The school shows 100% results every year.
- The number of students selecting science side after 10th std. has increased.
- The number of girls enrolling in school has increased.
.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
27
wqlwm us¬ - =ìnn=n¬ wìnnnl arìz
Am{XVr ZmVy
¬|-+, +|+++¬
Email :
+|+++¬ ¡| ¬ª¤| +¬| ,· ++ ¬||:+|¬|, +|+|¤ ¬||¤ ~¡·| ·|+|- |~=¤|- +|+ +·¤|·| ¬ª¤| ¬|¡.
|+|+¤ ·|+|- +|+ +·- ¬¬-|-| |+|+¤ ~=|¤+ .·- ¬ª¤¬+|· ¬|¬. +¤| - +¬|¬:·|- ¡|-, +¤|
·+ª¤ ¬:·|- -· +¤| +|¬+ .+|¤-| ¬:·|-|¬ .·- ¬|¡-. - ¬|·+|¬| +||¡¤- º+c|- ·¸|++| - ·-|
·| .·-|-| ¬|+|· ¤|+- ·|+· +|¡| -+| ~|¤¤ +||-| |+-|· +·¤ ¡ ¬ª¤- ¬|+¬ +|+ +|-¬ ·|-|
+|¡| -:|¡·¤ -
¬||:+|¬| ·|+|- +|+ +·- ¬¬-|-| ·|-| +|¬| ·|+| +|·¬| ¬||¤ .+||¤- ·|+| |-|¬ :+| ¬|¤¤
¬||:+|¬| +¬|-| +|· +c|¤ ¤|- ¡|-. +·|c| ¡| ·|·|¬|c| º+ +·+| ·|+|- ¡|-|. ·|·|+·|+· -·,-~
++ +|+ +-|--·, ·|+| |~=¤|- |+|+¤ .|+ +-|--· +|+++¬- ¬|·|·+ ¬u- +|--|¬|c| +|-¸ |
|¬¡¸ | +|ª-+|-| ¬- +¬|¬|c| .+||~- +¬|. ·|+| |~=¤|·| |+|+¤ +||-| |+-|· +¬|. ·|·|
¬|¤|· +¬ +·|c| ++|- |~+¸ ~+¬|. +|¬| ·|++·¸- .+|¤ ·|++· +«¤ ¡ ·|-| ¬|+ +¬.
:¬·| ¬|+|++ .·- ¬|+-|¬+|· -| -| +·|c| +|·+|·| ~|«| ¬|¬ +·- -|¬-| ¬|¡- ¬||¤ ;+¤|
+|·+|·| ~|«|+· .+~ |+«- -|¡|. ¬+:| ¬+¬|+|- +|¤¬|-| ¬|+-| +¬|- ;+¤| ~|«- |~+|+ ¬¬
+|c-. +|·¤|·| +«|~| +-|¬ ¬=|- ¬¬ - +| ;+¤| ¡| .|-·|+| ¬|¡ ¬||¤ +c|¬ ª+¤·| +|- ;+¤|
- -|¡| -¡¤¸- ¬|+¬ +¸¬ +|+ +·¸ - ¬¬ +|¬+|-| +|c-.
l
;+¤| ¡| ·|+| -¡¤¸- ¤ ¬||¤ ¬+- |++ ;+¤|-¸- |~+¤ | :|-¡|+· +·+ ¬|¡.
l
+|-·|+-¸- |~+¤ ¬||¤ ;+¤|+· .··+ |+«+¤ ¡ +|«|-| +·¤ ¬|¡.
| :|-¡| +|-|-| |+-|· +-- +|+++¬- |¦·|+| +|++ ¡|-| ·-¬|. +·|c| +|·+|·| ~|«- |~+¤||
+¬|-| ;+¤|-| +|+· .·|+|+¤ +·-| |+| |¬|c| + ++ ,,- -¡¤¤ |~~¸+|·| +|¬¸- ·|+| º+¤, +|¬¤,
·|¤·| ·+¡|·|- +|+·-| ¤ ¬~| ¬·+|- +-- |-¬·| +- -¡¤¤ +|·| c,· | ++| ;+¤| ¬u-|¬|
¬·+|- +·¤ | ++|- ¤|+- +c +c|¤ +|c¤|· ;+¤| ¬u-, +|--, ¬|··Š-| +|·| -·,-~ ++|+|¬¸-
+·-| ¤ +¬|-| ¬¡¤ ¤+¸ ~+- |- -+- +|+++¬- -|· +¬ ¬|¡-.
~|=|¬ - ~|¬ +|-«|+· +¬ .·+ |++|-| ¬·|¬ ++++«| +·- ¬¬-|-. u· -· ¬+ |++ ¡
info@grammangal.org
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
28
º+¬¤+¤ |~+-| ¬|¬ +||¡¤-. ·|.+|¤ ·| ·| |++|~| ¬+¤|- ¬+ ¬||¡·, +|-|+·¤ +¬|-| |+«|¬
+||¡¤. ·|¬|c| .·+ |++|- :|¬- -|· +¬¬ ¬|¡. +¬|- ¬|+¬ ¬|+¤ |~+-|¬|c| ++|- +|c¤ ¡|-
¤|¤|·| ¬|~+¤, ¬|+·+ -¤ |~=+|-| +:-, ª++¸-+|+-|·| ¬¤| ¬||¤ ºu|:| |++ - ¬+¤-|¬
+-¡| |~+-|-| ¬¤| ¡ ~|=|¬ | ¬+-+--| -|:- ¬|¡.
+|-+| - :¡|+| | +|+c|-|¬ |+¤|¤| ¡ |++|·| ~|=|¬|- ¤|+- -| -| |++ |~+-|-. ·|¬|c|
+-|~|¬ ¬-·+, |+|+¤ +|·+|-| +|+·, ¬|:·|+·¤|·| |+|+¤ ¬¤| +¬|-| |+«-|-. ·| ·| |++|~|
(|++|-|¬ ·c+|~|) ¬+¤|- +++|·¤|, -|c, ~=|¤+ ¬|¤- ¬||¤ +¬|-| +¬¬ |· ¬u- ¬|+-|-|
·+ª¤| ·| ·| :|¬-|- +¬¬| ¬|¡.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Re-imagining schools
Ranjana Baji, Jinan.KB
Sadhana Village School, Pune
adm@sadhana-village.org
Key words : Biological roots of cognition, Natural learning, Wholistic, Experiential, context,
learning condition.
Re imagining school is an initiative to relook at the whole components of learning ecology vis-a-vis
the learner, process of learning, learning environment and what is learnt. The idea is to enlarge the
scope of school so as to include the whole community life which enables the growth of the natural,
biological process in children to lead a sustainable, contended and harmonious life - in harmony
with nature, culture, society, family and self. To let the child to learn the world without fragmenting
in to language, mathematics, science or in to categories of play, learn, work. In natural learning
content, context and pedagogy merge into one as where the child is present, is the context, what
the child experiences is the content and how the child experiences is the pedagogy. Children start
learning from the moment they are born and may be from the time of conception. In natural
learning there is nothing to remember and nothing to forget.
Children make sense of the world and awaken and structure their cognitive processes through
autonomous play in an atmosphere of freedom. Children's play is grounded in their concrete
experience. Through play, children understand how things look, how things function and how
things relate. Play structures the child's cognitive apparatus. When the child learns to speak, it is
actually learning to articulate its understanding of the world. The child's language cannot be
separated from the experience it is having of the world. If the children is left alone to make sense of
the world, they do it in the most scientific and appropriate manner retaining the primacy of
experience. Whatever role the adults play will be imbibed and emulated by children. So adults are
encouraged to do what they are passionate about and this would naturally help children to be
passionate.
29
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
28
º+¬¤+¤ |~+-| ¬|¬ +||¡¤-. ·|.+|¤ ·| ·| |++|~| ¬+¤|- ¬+ ¬||¡·, +|-|+·¤ +¬|-| |+«|¬
+||¡¤. ·|¬|c| .·+ |++|- :|¬- -|· +¬¬ ¬|¡. +¬|- ¬|+¬ ¬|+¤ |~+-|¬|c| ++|- +|c¤ ¡|-
¤|¤|·| ¬|~+¤, ¬|+·+ -¤ |~=+|-| +:-, ª++¸-+|+-|·| ¬¤| ¬||¤ ºu|:| |++ - ¬+¤-|¬
+-¡| |~+-|-| ¬¤| ¡ ~|=|¬ | ¬+-+--| -|:- ¬|¡.
+|-+| - :¡|+| | +|+c|-|¬ |+¤|¤| ¡ |++|·| ~|=|¬|- ¤|+- -| -| |++ |~+-|-. ·|¬|c|
+-|~|¬ ¬-·+, |+|+¤ +|·+|-| +|+·, ¬|:·|+·¤|·| |+|+¤ ¬¤| +¬|-| |+«-|-. ·| ·| |++|~|
(|++|-|¬ ·c+|~|) ¬+¤|- +++|·¤|, -|c, ~=|¤+ ¬|¤- ¬||¤ +¬|-| +¬¬ |· ¬u- ¬|+-|-|
·+ª¤| ·| ·| :|¬-|- +¬¬| ¬|¡.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Re-imagining schools
Ranjana Baji, Jinan.KB
Sadhana Village School, Pune
adm@sadhana-village.org
Key words : Biological roots of cognition, Natural learning, Wholistic, Experiential, context,
learning condition.
Re imagining school is an initiative to relook at the whole components of learning ecology vis-a-vis
the learner, process of learning, learning environment and what is learnt. The idea is to enlarge the
scope of school so as to include the whole community life which enables the growth of the natural,
biological process in children to lead a sustainable, contended and harmonious life - in harmony
with nature, culture, society, family and self. To let the child to learn the world without fragmenting
in to language, mathematics, science or in to categories of play, learn, work. In natural learning
content, context and pedagogy merge into one as where the child is present, is the context, what
the child experiences is the content and how the child experiences is the pedagogy. Children start
learning from the moment they are born and may be from the time of conception. In natural
learning there is nothing to remember and nothing to forget.
Children make sense of the world and awaken and structure their cognitive processes through
autonomous play in an atmosphere of freedom. Children's play is grounded in their concrete
experience. Through play, children understand how things look, how things function and how
things relate. Play structures the child's cognitive apparatus. When the child learns to speak, it is
actually learning to articulate its understanding of the world. The child's language cannot be
separated from the experience it is having of the world. If the children is left alone to make sense of
the world, they do it in the most scientific and appropriate manner retaining the primacy of
experience. Whatever role the adults play will be imbibed and emulated by children. So adults are
encouraged to do what they are passionate about and this would naturally help children to be
passionate.
29
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
30
ulun nnìnnln »n =w µ&¬ cnì·nì ¬»l=m
lumì»ìuì unc¬
lr. g§O` Vm§~Q>
ª+·+ +|¤-|,+¤
Email : wardhinee@gmail.com
E-learning
+|·|ª¤-|-| ~|+ + +|-|+·¤|-| -|+ -¬- |· ¬¤|-| ¬·|+ ·|+« ¬-+ ¡~|·, +¤+|- +¬|-| +c
-|¬ ¬¤| |+«- -|¡| ¬~| |+¤|·|+¤¸- -¤|- --·+ ··|+-|-| -+++ -¡¤¤- ª+-·++|¤-|.
|-|¬ -+.|- |+++ ++«+¤ -¡¤¤- ~|¬ |~=¤|-|¬ |+|+¤-|.
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¡ |~++¬ ¤|-. ~|=|-|¬ .|+ ª+-·¬-·+- ¬+¤|+¸- ·-¬ ¤|-|-. ·|-.+|¤ ;|-¡|¬ -|c··+|- -·
¬- |++ ¡ |+|+¤ .+-+ ·+|- ¬+¤|+-|-| .·- + ¬| ¤|-|. |-| -+|+ |+¤|·|- | ~|¬ ¬·|¬ ++|-
++| +« |- ¬|·+¬|- +·-|- ¡|- |. -·¬- | +« |- ¬+|+ |¤ |++|¬|¬|c| -+¬ |++ |~+-|¬|c| + ¬| ¤|-|.
~) +|-- ++ +|c|+¤ ¡ª-|=· ¬¤ |·¤, ·|+·¤|-| ¬·|¬, ¬ª + -¬|·u -+|+ | |++, ¬· ||+-, +|c|- ·,
¬·|+¤ +¬| |¬|··| ¬-+ |++|-| ¬·|¬ ·-¬| ¤|-|. |+« |+¤|·|-| |~=¤|- -.-|
|+«|+-|¬ +:- ¡|-. ++| +«|- ¤|ª- -|+¬| ¬·|¬ +·-|- -+ ¬++- ¡|-.
,) (;- ¬|-+ ) ¡| |++ ¬+ |+¤|·|- | ¬·| ¬|+·-| ¬|¡. ª+-·++|¤- |- ¡ -+ +|+·- |+¤|·||
|~+-|-. |·| +|+·|- -|+-| |~=+|+·|¬ ¬+¬+¸- ·|¡¤ ¬+¬. + +-|-|¬ -c ·|+|- º+|- +,-|-
+¤ .·|+| |~=¤ |+«-. | +|·+|-¸- |+|+¤ ¡+ ¬|· +|·+|-¸- |~++|- +¬ |- .|~=¤ |:¬ ¤|-.
-) ¬||¤+ ¡-| +++ +- ++|- |¬ |+¤|·|+ · ··|-|¬ + ¬|¤+¸ |¤·¸ | +|-|+·¤|-|¬ ¬·-¤| u+¸ ¬¬-|-.
·|+« | +¬|-| +|-|¬+-| ¬+¤|+¸- ·+¸- +|-¬~|=| -.|·| +:-|- | +¬|-| u«, ¬·|¬ + ¬-
-+++|- +|~- |+«|+-|¬ +:- ¡|-. |¬|c| +|-¬~|= -.|+·|+· ¬~| .+|··| +¬|-| ¬+|:
··|+¬| ¤|-|. |-¸- +·- .·- ¬c-|-. + +¬ ·|·| ¬|+·|·| |++|- .+-| +·-|-.
-) ¬+|| +¤ |++|¬|-| .|+ ~|«| - ¡| ,.- |:+¬ -|¬¤|·| -++ + -¡¤¤ -- · +, +¬ ·+, |+|+¤ +¬| |~+¤,
·|- +|~- .|+ +·- - ¬|+-| +=| ¬¡|- |+¤|·|-| |~++¤. ·|¤- -+-+|- |~=¤ + ¬|+||¤+
|++|-|¬ .|+ ¡|- |- . ·|--¸ |+¤|¤| ··-|-. ·|+« ·|¬|+c|+· +|¬ ¤, ºu|:| |++ |~+|+¤ ¡ ¬¡¤ ¤+-.
+-| ,, ++ -|¬¤|| +|+|¬| +:¬·| +|«|- +|¡| ¬+ª| ··¬|+- ¬|¡-. |- +· -¡¤¤ .¬|·
+|·+|+« +|c¤|·| ·¬-, +|;c ¬+|, +:¬¬-| ¬|+·|, ¬ª+-|-| ¡|¬ ;. ¬-+ +|+|+« ¬·|¬|+·
:¬=, -- +·-|-| ¤·+· ;. |++ ¬+|· -|-. |+|¬¸- |+¤|·|-| |++|¬|+· +¬ +«+-| ;¬ ¡| +|c|
.·- |-+|¤ ~|¬| ¬|¡. -·|¡| |-¸- |+«|¬¬ ~ +|¡-| ¬¬ |:¬- +| ¬+|¤|- ¬~| +|+|-| +·¤ u¸+ ¬|¡
+ ¤+c ¤|ª- ¬|+ ¬¡·|+| ¡|-|¬ -+c| +c-| |+c| ¬++· | ¬+ª|+¤¸- +|¡· ;¬.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
31
JOYMETRY : innovative geometry lab
and active learning technique for 8th to 10th std. students
Rahul D. Bhivare, Manoj Janavekar
University of Pune
Email : rahul.bhivare@gmail.com
Many times students understand the theorem / proof in the class, but they cannot validate it.
Hence they forget it, if they do not practice it.
There are many methodologies developed in the field of algebra, like Vedic mathematics, abacus
to quote a few. But geometry, though equally important- both academically and practically, has not
been given its due attention. Many students remember by-heart geometry problems given in text
book including given data, construction and even the solutions.
This is mainly because, by reading the problem, students cannot think of a theorem/basic principle
which can be applied to solve this problem and this results in loss of fun in geometry learning and
study.
“Joymetry” is “laboratory for the subject Geometry”. Just like science laboratory, here students will
perform experiments to validate what they have learnt and apply their knowledge. They will write
experiments in Geometry lab book in a pattern innovated by us. Here, Students will learn 'thinking
in and about geometry' along with the text book geometry.
To achieve this, an innovative methodology to teach geometry and to make that methodology a
success, a special instrument named "Geom-ease” was designed and developed which could be
converted into configurations of parallel lines, triangles, quadrangles and can be connected to a
circle.
This way it covers syllabus from 5th standard to 10th standard. Along with Geom-ease the Lab
book, physical models, posters & experiment sheets make the Joymetry a wholesome laboratory
dedicated to Geometry subject.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
30
ulun nnìnnln »n =w µ&¬ cnì·nì ¬»l=m
lumì»ìuì unc¬
lr. g§O` Vm§~Q>
ª+·+ +|¤-|,+¤
Email : wardhinee@gmail.com
E-learning
+|·|ª¤-|-| ~|+ + +|-|+·¤|-| -|+ -¬- |· ¬¤|-| ¬·|+ ·|+« ¬-+ ¡~|·, +¤+|- +¬|-| +c
-|¬ ¬¤| |+«- -|¡| ¬~| |+¤|·|+¤¸- -¤|- --·+ ··|+-|-| -+++ -¡¤¤- ª+-·++|¤-|.
|-|¬ -+.|- |+++ ++«+¤ -¡¤¤- ~|¬ |~=¤|-|¬ |+|+¤-|.
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¡ |~++¬ ¤|-. ~|=|-|¬ .|+ ª+-·¬-·+- ¬+¤|+¸- ·-¬ ¤|-|-. ·|-.+|¤ ;|-¡|¬ -|c··+|- -·
¬- |++ ¡ |+|+¤ .+-+ ·+|- ¬+¤|+-|-| .·- + ¬| ¤|-|. |-| -+|+ |+¤|·|- | ~|¬ ¬·|¬ ++|-
++| +« |- ¬|·+¬|- +·-|- ¡|- |. -·¬- | +« |- ¬+|+ |¤ |++|¬|¬|c| -+¬ |++ |~+-|¬|c| + ¬| ¤|-|.
~) +|-- ++ +|c|+¤ ¡ª-|=· ¬¤ |·¤, ·|+·¤|-| ¬·|¬, ¬ª + -¬|·u -+|+ | |++, ¬· ||+-, +|c|- ·,
¬·|+¤ +¬| |¬|··| ¬-+ |++|-| ¬·|¬ ·-¬| ¤|-|. |+« |+¤|·|-| |~=¤|- -.-|
|+«|+-|¬ +:- ¡|-. ++| +«|- ¤|ª- -|+¬| ¬·|¬ +·-|- -+ ¬++- ¡|-.
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|~+-|-. |·| +|+·|- -|+-| |~=+|+·|¬ ¬+¬+¸- ·|¡¤ ¬+¬. + +-|-|¬ -c ·|+|- º+|- +,-|-
+¤ .·|+| |~=¤ |+«-. | +|·+|-¸- |+|+¤ ¡+ ¬|· +|·+|-¸- |~++|- +¬ |- .|~=¤ |:¬ ¤|-.
-) ¬||¤+ ¡-| +++ +- ++|- |¬ |+¤|·|+ · ··|-|¬ + ¬|¤+¸ |¤·¸ | +|-|+·¤|-|¬ ¬·-¤| u+¸ ¬¬-|-.
·|+« | +¬|-| +|-|¬+-| ¬+¤|+¸- ·+¸- +|-¬~|=| -.|·| +:-|- | +¬|-| u«, ¬·|¬ + ¬-
-+++|- +|~- |+«|+-|¬ +:- ¡|-. |¬|c| +|-¬~|= -.|+·|+· ¬~| .+|··| +¬|-| ¬+|:
··|+¬| ¤|-|. |-¸- +·- .·- ¬c-|-. + +¬ ·|·| ¬|+·|·| |++|- .+-| +·-|-.
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JOYMETRY : innovative geometry lab
and active learning technique for 8th to 10th std. students
Rahul D. Bhivare, Manoj Janavekar
University of Pune
Email : rahul.bhivare@gmail.com
Many times students understand the theorem / proof in the class, but they cannot validate it.
Hence they forget it, if they do not practice it.
There are many methodologies developed in the field of algebra, like Vedic mathematics, abacus
to quote a few. But geometry, though equally important- both academically and practically, has not
been given its due attention. Many students remember by-heart geometry problems given in text
book including given data, construction and even the solutions.
This is mainly because, by reading the problem, students cannot think of a theorem/basic principle
which can be applied to solve this problem and this results in loss of fun in geometry learning and
study.
“Joymetry” is “laboratory for the subject Geometry”. Just like science laboratory, here students will
perform experiments to validate what they have learnt and apply their knowledge. They will write
experiments in Geometry lab book in a pattern innovated by us. Here, Students will learn 'thinking
in and about geometry' along with the text book geometry.
To achieve this, an innovative methodology to teach geometry and to make that methodology a
success, a special instrument named "Geom-ease” was designed and developed which could be
converted into configurations of parallel lines, triangles, quadrangles and can be connected to a
circle.
This way it covers syllabus from 5th standard to 10th standard. Along with Geom-ease the Lab
book, physical models, posters & experiment sheets make the Joymetry a wholesome laboratory
dedicated to Geometry subject.
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Use of simple technology in learning
project methodology
Ponkshe Vivek, Nitsure Nachiket
Jnana Prabodhini Pune
Email : vivek.ponkshe@jnanaprabodhini.org
Keywords – Investigatory projects, futurology projects,
th
9 Grade students of JnanaPrabodhiniPrashala do investigatory projects in Science. They analyze a
simple system, list dependent and independent variables, state hypotheses, design experiments,
gather & analyze data and state their conclusions. The authors would like to elaborate the role of
simple technological tools that are accessible to majority of people in doing this process. Therefore
the present paper contrasts working methods that were used before widespread of simple
technologies with current working methods that are used while doing projects.
The examples we offer involve use of simple technologies, software & applications like 1) Mobile
stopwatch, 2) Mobile or handy cam camera and simple software like windows movie maker, 3)
Mobile or digital camera for microscopy, 4) folder sharing software like Drop box, 5) RGB scale
about colours, 6) Statistical packages within Excel, 7) Change Tracking in Microsoft word and
obviously the 8) Internet, especially for the availability of research papers. These examples have
illustrated that technology has to be a very important part in Investigatory project making. Another
point the authors would like to raise is that the use of such examples have enabled the
development of thinking process in economically and geographically challenged area of India.
Such use has also identified some needs about the technology that remain to be satisfied, a
remarkable example being the development of economically viable weighing machine that
measures with a resolution of up to 0.01 g.
th
The 10 Grade students similarly study a social system using methods of futurology. Apart from
the examples given above, they would need the statistical data kept in any electronic record. The
use of such records is increasingly prevalent.
The goal of any technology is increase in self-sufficiency. The use of these techniques increase
the self-sufficiency in learning.
THEME
HEALTH
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Newer models for healthcare :
shifting focus from medicine to wellness
Dr. Bhushan Patwardhan
Professor & Director, Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences,
University of Pune
Email : bpatwardhan@gmail.com
Background
Last century has been very remarkable and unique years in the entire history of medical sciences.
In fundamental sciences, discovery of double helix and completion of human genome project
were achievements that had no parallel. In diagnostics, technologies like MRI & PET scan added
brightest feathers ever to our caps. In surgery, bypass, transplants, and prosthetics changed life
expectancies upwards dramatically. Several development in therapeutics can revolutionized
longevity and quality of life. These developments have opened newer understanding in genomics
now leading to epigenomics and progressing towards personalized medicine.
Global scenario of rising diseases
Still the world is broadly divided in two parts as rich and poor. However, interestingly, both these
world seemingly running parallel are facing a major crisis in health. The nature of problems differ
widely however, the outcomes are quite similar. Rich world is encountered with more of non
communicable diseases as a result of sedentary lifestyle, coupled with over nutrition and
environmental challenges; while poor countries are facing resource crunch, poverty, malnutrition,
pollution, poor sanitation, hygiene and communicable diseases. Developing countries lately have
come to be identified & distinguished from the developed world through three key characteristics:
disproportionate population growth, disproportionate affliction with a small number of (mainly
infectious) diseases and, health care going increasingly out of reach for the most of their
inhabitants. Apart from this distinction, there is an urban-rural divide evident in both developed and
developing countries in nutrition, disease burden, healthcare services and health outcomes.
Despite of these differences, the global challenges related to health and disease remains similar in
east or west regions. Leaders, policy makers, and scholars, world over are grappling with possible
solutions to these complex, not just complicated problems - because there is no magic bullet, or no
single solution.
Many developing countries carry typical double burden of disease. India paints a poor picture
when it comes to the health of its citizens. The latest estimates for the vital statistics in India reveal
Crude Birth Rate of 22.5, Crude Death Rate of 7.3 and Infant Mortality Rate of 50. There are
considerable disparities across India. For example, the IMR in Kerala is four times less than India
average and five times less than Uttar Pradesh. Communicable diseases continue to pose a
problem in India. Almost 1.5 million cases of Malaria have been reported over the past five years.
The number of Dengue Fever cases has doubled from 12,317 in 2006 to 27,247 in 2009. More
than 10 million cases of Diarrhoea, 1 million cases of Typhoid Fever and almost 2.5 million cases
of Acute Respiratory Infections were reported in 2010. India continues to harbour the largest
number of Tuberculosis patients in the world.
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India is often refereed as Diabetic capital because it is ranked first among the top ten countries & is
very likely to maintain the same status until 2030. The number of diabetics in India is projected to rise
from 31.7 million in 2000 to 79.4 million by 2030. Hypertension prevalence of about 16% was observed in
India. Over 13 million people are estimated to be suffering from it out of which 62% are estimated
to be males. Thus, India is bearing a double burden of disease, with significant increase in the
incidence of non-communicable diseases while retaining burden of most of the communicable diseases.
The paradox that a heavily interventionist State has never, since independence, made health a
priority in public policy or in the allocation of public resources. The Indian state's conception of
development has allowed little space for the importance of health and wellbeing. Conversely, the
political economy of health care in India has been characterized by widespread privatization, and
the large, perhaps dominant, role of the private and informal sector in providing healthcare, even
to the very poor. A history of under-investment and poor health infrastructure in the colonial period
continued to shape the conditions of possibility for health policy in India after independence.
Present situation posed many questions about our understanding and approach towards the
concept of health. We also need to orient technologies to develop newer models, those will be
health centric and just curative services.
Healthcare or Medical care
Today's health care is actually a medical care. The WHO defines health as 'a state of complete
physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity'.
However, there is no way to measure 'well-being' and so generally absence of disease or infirmity
is considered as 'health'. In many parts, terms 'health' and 'medicine' are actually used as
synonyms. The present approaches to healthcare as disease treatments, focus on 'medicine' or
'drugs' is actually medical care. It has roots in the modern definition and understanding of health.
The modern definitions of health mostly restrict to body and to some extent mind. However, the
holistic picture of mind-body-spirit is completely missing in most modern descriptions of health.
While the advances in science & technology have helped us to understand etiology, pathophysiology
and treatments they have hardly helped us to understand 'health'. While we may have many
powerful drugs to treat infectious diseases like antibiotics or to alleviate symptoms or conditions
like fever, pain or inflammation, we have no medicine to achieve health. Doctors can treat
diseases but cannot give health. Health seeking is not passive like disease cure. Achieving health
requires active participation of individuals and communities. Because of this situation the entire
healthcare sector remains dominant either from pharmaceutical or surgical interventions. Therefore
we have started thinking that discovering more and more new drugs will increase our chances to
achieve health. This mindset seems to be global phenomenon, which cuts across east and west,
rich and poor or developed and developing countries. In a capitalistic consumerism society this
seem to be an attractive business proposition for various industries including pharmaceutical,
diagnostics, and even insurance. Therefore, from the policy makers to practitioners seem to be
happy and comfortable to keep real public health at bay and continue to focus on curative aspects
of so called 'healthcare'. If one analyzes actual functioning and budgets of ministries or departments
of health, it will be clear that majority of the budgets are spent on medicines, equipments,
diagnostics, surgeries & salaries. In general true 'health' promotion or disease prevention always
takes a back seat.
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Determinants of health
While it is possible to diagnose and treat diseases, it is very difficult to diagnose or attain true
health. There are medicines and surgeries to treat diseases or infirmity but not a single pill for
attaining health. There are four factors, which determine 'health'. Nutrition, Life style, Environment
and Genetics are the key determinants of health, which are like four pillars of any foundation.
When any one becomes weak, a support system is needed as treatment or health care services.
Sadly, present focus is mainly on the support system and not much on the determinants. Probably,
for this reason, most of the 'Health Sciences' Universities in India deal more with 'medicine' and not
enough with 'health'. Such curative approach in contrast to promotion and prevention strategies
remain one of the main cause of deteriorating 'health' conditions in India.
Integrative approach for universal healthcare
India has several healthcare challenges however, she also has huge resources in terms of rich
biodiversity, traditional health wisdom, technology savvy community and committed human
resource. India is known for its unique social structure and voluntary approach in personal and
social life. Many voluntary organizations are working on grassroots and in tribal areas. Several
important voluntary efforts have evolved newer models for India. Comprehensive healthcare
model of Jamkhed conceptualized and implemented by Dr Rajanikant Arole, SEARCH in
Gadchiroli pioneered by Dr Abhay and Rani Bang, Dr Kukade's Vivekananda hospital as an
example of selfless services in Latur, Dr N.H. Antia, Manisha Gupte, Dr Ashok Dayalchand, Dr
Meera Sadgopal, Dr D Banerjee, Darshan Shankar and so many such committed volunteers have
tried to shape people centric healthcare in India. The voluntary sector in India indeed has played
significant role in attempting to remodel, reshape, revitalize local health traditions, community
health, rural health, women and child health. However, the involvement of corporate sector in such
efforts was not sufficient. I hope that Tech for Seva will be able to effectively bridge this gap in
involving, inspiring and enthusing young volunteers from corporate India.
We need to harness these resources with an approach of people centric – health oriented
systems. The Integrative models of healthcare effectively utilized strengths of traditional wisdom
and emerging technology. The World Health organization has published a policy on traditional
medicine and urged all the countries to develop their own models for healthcare including
traditional medicine of respective countries. India has the opportunity to be a successful model for
the world if we utilize strengths of indigenous systems like Ayurveda and Yoga. We need people
centric accessible, affordable and better models for healthcare based on integration of modern
and traditional knowledge.
Tech For Seva conference is right platform to bring all the stakeholders together for discussing the
issues related to health. True healthcare should not be limited to providing medical care but should
focus more on public health. Many experts are criticizing present pseudo health care and a public
health policy by asking where is 'public' in public health programs and 'health' in public. Healthcare
has interdependent implications on various sectors like environment, education and livelihood.
India needs more preventive and promotive efforts in healthcare and not medicine or treatment
dominated care. The costs of medicines and medical interventions are already unaffordable to
majority of populations. Accessibility and availability also remain serious issues.
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India needs to move forward with the idea of people centric health and wellness by revitalizing
Indian traditional practices comprising of AYUSH rather than building on western ideas of health.
New healthcare models can be built through integrative approaches for healthy and productive
community. India needs such serious attempts to innovate mechanisms to achieve health by the
people for the people by leveraging advances in science and technology. Tech for Seva initiative
should trigger this required transformation by liberating corporate social responsibility beyond a
mere budget line in balance sheet. This is possible by innovating and involving talents and
energies especially from the young agents of change from the corporate, technology, voluntary
and government sectors.
References :
1
Kong AP, Xu G, Brown N, So WY, Ma RC, Chan JC. Diabetes and its co morbidities-where East
meets West. Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2013 May 28. doi: 10.1038/nrendo.2013.102. [Epub ahead of
print]
2
Sample Registration Bulletin 2011. Registrar General of India, New Delhi
3
National Health Profile 2010. Central Bureau of Health Intelligence, New Delhi
4
http://www.who.int/diabetes/actionnow/en/mapdiabprev.pdf
5
http://www.whoindia.org/SCN/AssBOD/08-Hypertension.pdf
6
Preamble to the Constitution of the World Health Organization as adopted by the International
Health Conference, New York, 19-22 June, 1946;
7
Patwardhan B. Integrative medicine: Future of universal healthcare, KLE University Oration, April
13, 2013, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belgaum.
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SUB-THEME
ADDRESSING HEALTHCARE
CHALLENGES
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INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Dr. Bhushan Patwardhan Newer models for healthcare : 35
shifting focus from medicine to wellness
Dhananjay Bhole Accessibility research, need for uplift of 41
persons with disabilities
Ms. Yogini A. Dolke Saving Lives - Home Based Neonatal 42
In Zhari Block of Yavatmal District
Dr. Medha Dhurandhar Mobile based Malaria Surveillance system 44
using information technology : A Public Health
Research Intervention
Deepa Kulkarni Strengthening Anganwadi Workers : 45
Niramay's Experience
Niranjana S. Mahantashetti Kangaroo Mother Care : A Reprise 46
Prof. R. V. Kulkarni Thalassemic Children - Need for care, 48
Support and Prevention
Dr. Jayshree P. Zend Kaizen for the Flour Mill Workers All India 49
Co-ordinated Research Project
Dr. Preeti Damle Samavedana Onco-Screening Program 50
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Accessibility research, need for uplift of
persons with disabilities
Dhananjay Bhole
Coordinator, Accessibility research group-ATBSLC,
Department of Education and Extension, University of Pune, Ganesh Khind Road, Pune
Email : drbhole@unipune.ac.in,
Key words : web accessibility, persons with disabilities, accessibility research, assistive technologies
In Indian society, there are innumerable obstacles and barriers that hinder persons with disabilities.
These include among other issues, accessibility to buildings environment, transportation, information
and communications, which makes it impossible for persons with disabilities to take part in the life
of a community. Education, employment and other community services are not fully reachable to
the larger section of the disabled population in India despite existence of various standards,
guidelines, policies, directives and laws. Several government, non government and corporate
organizations are working towards betterment of persons with disabilities in their own pace and
ways. But very few contribute to international accessibility research for facilitation of persons with
disabilities as well as systematic implementation of national and international accessibility
standards and guidelines in products, services, programs and activities.
This presentation emphasizes the need for accessibility research and effective utilization of
advanced assistive technologies for empowerment of persons with disabilities through a case
study of accessibility research lab at Blind student learning centre, Department of Education and
Extension, University of Pune. It highlights various activities of the lab such as international research
contribution in assistive technology development and web accessibility implementation,
accessibility awareness and its impact on society and systematic implementation of accessibility
standards and guidelines in university programs, services and activities with limited resources in
last 3 years. Some success stories of mainstreaming the persons with disabilities especially their
inclusion in higher education settings will be shared. It also presents observation of parallel
contribution of various stakeholders such as universities, national research centers, non government
organizations working for persons with disabilities and corporate social responsibility activities of
multinational companies around Pune.
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Saving Lives – Home Based Neonatal Care
In Zhari Block Of Yavatmal District
Ms. Yogini A Dolke ; Ms. Sangita M Atram
Nagpur
Email : yoginidolke@gmail.com
Introduction :
The Sample Registration System, in 2010, estimated that, out of the total deaths reported, 14. 5%
are infant deaths (< 1 years), 3.9% are deaths of 1-4 years children, 18.4% are deaths of children
of 0-4 years and 2.7% deaths pertained to children of 5-14 years. Social, cultural, economic and
environmental factors affect the neonatal mortality rates but equally responsible are the
infrastructural facilities in different parts of the country.
Society for Rural and Urban Joint Activities undertook a study of measuring child mortality under
the guidance of SEARCH, Gadchiroli in 1999- 2000 in the tribal belt of Yavatmal district in a
population of 10,000. It was established that nearly 110 children per 1000 live births die every year
in Yavatmal district. The high and unacceptable mortality in children under 5 called for immediate
intervention to save these children and especially the infants and neonates whose deaths
contribute largely to the total deaths of children under the age of 5. The study apart from revealing
the quantum and severity of the issue also brought out the major causes of child death in Yavatmal
district. The major causes reported were; Asphyxia, Pneumonia, Sepsis, Diarrhea, Skin diseases,
Anemia & Malnutrition.
Being a community based health program, awareness, consent and acceptance of services to be
provided by the trained village health worker (VHW) was necessary. Creating awareness
regarding the problem of children's deaths due to non availability of timely and proper care
enabled obtaining consent from the community for provision of the home based service by a VHW.
The VHW undertook visits to the expectant mothers, neonates, children below 5 years of age, and
other sick people to carry out the treatments taught to her and in complicated cases provided
referral services. Asphyxia and sepsis are the major causes of mental retardation and physical
handicap in children. Attendance of trained health worker at birth resulted in asphyxia treatment
which eventually helped in bringing down rate of mentally retarded and physically handicapped
children due to these causes.
The HBCC approach comprises provision of home-based health care to pregnant women /
mothers and neonates through a trained semiliterate female village health worker preferably
resident of the same village. The hypothesis was :
· Semiliterate female health workers if imparted quality training and under supportive
supervision would be able to provide child health care services in their villages - (such
special care includes management of birth asphyxia, hypothermia, identification and
management of high risk babies;; Diagnosis and management of ARI & neonatal sepsis)
· Simple low cost methods would be enough to reduce the infant mortality rates in tribal
rural areas;
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Results :
CMR (Child mortality rate has gone down from 110 per 1000 live births to 57 per live birth; Health
education of family members and pregnant women has resulted in increase in ANC (ante natal
care) check-ups at PHC (public health centre) by 40%; 32 trained Village health workers catering
to a population of 22000; Change in the beliefs and practices regarding child bearing and child
birth; 12 VHW's of SRUJAN now selected as ASHA (Accredited Social health Activist)) in their
respective villages;
Conclusion :
SRUJAN's intervention has lead in identification of committed women who now also happen to be
the role models to young girls in their community. It has also lead to respecting lives of new born by
the elders of their community. But this does not end the problem of child health as a complete life
cycle approach is essential to have a new healthy generation.
It is essential to address anemia amongst adolescent girls to have a population of healthy mothers
to reduce neonatal mortalities as well as morbidities. To achieve this SRUJAN plans to work on
food and nutrition security of tribal community; monitoring of Hb – to be done by VHWs. Simple
interventions can save lives and help children to lead normal healthy lives.
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Mobile based Malaria Surveillance System
using Information Technology :
A Public Health Research Intervention
Dr. Medha Dhurandhar
Associate Director, C-DAC, Pune
Email : mdhurandhar@gmail.com
Keywords : C-DAC, Health Informatics, Public Health, Disease Surveillance, Mobile platform
MoSQuIT (Mobile based Surveillance Quest using Information Technology) software system is a
Disease Surveillance System for Malaria using Mobile and ICT platforms with the following
objectives: a) to keep a watch/vigil over the status of Malaria, which is a public health problem in
several parts of India, particularly in tribal and hilly areas which are often inaccessible. There is a
pressing need to combat this problem through Surveillance of community; b)to detect changes in
Trend, Distribution of Malaria in order to initiate investigative and control measures, to identify
potential outbreak of Malaria, and provide early warning to the State Health system, to plan for
control of Malaria in the community; c) to measure the effectiveness of anti-malaria program; d)
to prevent and control Malaria.
MoSQuIT enables data-collection using the ubiquitous mobile phone and updation of centralized
IT-based surveillance system, thereby reducing the time duration needed in information
proliferation, and initiation of appropriate timely action by Public Health system. Components of
MoSQuIT software : a) Mobile based component for data collection in the field by Health
workers; b) Server based Data Mart and Computational engine component for data storage &
data analytics for Healthcare Experts.
MoSQuIT has been deployed in Dibrugarh, Assam, in collaboration with Regional Medical Research
Centre/Indian Council of Medical Research (RMRC/ICMR), and is being used directly by the
following stakeholders of Public Health System: a) 50 Health Workers (Accredited Social Health
Activist, ASHA) who reach out to about 50,000 people in about 50 villages of Tengakhat Primary
Health Centre (PHC), Dibrugarh district, Assam for purpose of Surveillance of Malaria; b)
Laboratory technicians at PHC for Laboratory result updation; c) Medical officers at PHC for for
data validation & data analysis; d) Public Health Researchers / Epidemiologist at RMRC
(ICMR) for data analysis and report generation
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Strengthening Anganwadi Workers :
Niramay's Experience
Deepa Kulkarni
Niramay, C123, Chandranil housing society, Near Ramkrishna Math Pune 411030,
E-mail : niramay.pune@gmail.com
Niramay (www.niramaybharat.org ) is working in slums in Pune for providing vaccination and
basic health services. It is striving to achieve 100% vaccination, eradication of malnutrition cases,
training adolescent girls in life skills. Strategies adopted by Niramay showed that Govt scheme if
implemented innovatively are able to deliver the required results. They have engaged Anganwadi
workers and leverage support from ICDS scheme to effectively achieve 100% vaccination in 135
slums in Pune. Mobile vaccination van helped to reach the population where no PHC is available.
Without availability of PHC and vaccination facility in neighborhood, Anganwadi workers may not
able to achieve 100% immunization , expected by them. Technical support for fighting anemic
cases, malnutrition cases is needed by Anganwadi workers. Due to help of Niramay, these issues
are address in the selected slums. Handling adolescent issues needed special expertise and it is
necessary that experts must work with anganwadi workers to engage adolescent girls. Niramay
has piloted their model for improving public health service in 135 slums in Pune. There is scope for
much wider replication of the program. It will need active support of different stakeholders. The
paper discusses approaches and program implemented by Niramay in details.
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Kangaroo Mother Care : A Reprise
Niranjana S. Mahantashetti, Vishwanath D. Patil and Gowda P. Prashanth
Department of Pediatrics, KLE University's Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belgaum
Background
Worldwide, nearly 21 million infants (15.5% of all births) are estimated to be born with low birth
weight (LBW) and 95% of them are born in developing countries. India alone contributes up to 40
per cent of LBW births in the developing-world. Globally, LBW is a major cause of infant mortality
.
accounting for up to 80% of neonatal deaths and two thirds of infant deaths Hypothermia and not
being breastfed are the major underlying contributors to morbidity in LBW infants which
predispose to infection and death.
Why Kangaroo mother care (KMC)?
The prohibiting costs of providing conventional hospital care to these tiny infants in resource-poor
settings lead to exploration of alternative, cost-effective strategies to manage LBW. Proposed by
Edgar Rey in 1978 at Instituto Materno Infantil in Colombia, the term Kangaroo Mother Care

(KMC) was adopted by the First International Workshop on Kangaroo Care in Trieste. Initially
conceptualized for use in developing countries as a cost-efficient intervention, the practice of KMC
is adopted worldwide and currently, is considered an integral part of the care of low birth weight
infants, more so in developing countries. KMC is simple and safe; its practice is conducive to
humanized care of newborn, enhancing emotional bonding between the mother and baby in poor
& rich countries alike. The psychological, physiological, clinical, & cost benefits of KMC including
pain and stress relief in preterm infants are widely reported. The three essential components of
Kangaroo mother care are Kangaroo positioning, Kangaroo feeding and Kangaroo discharge
(practice of continuous skin-to-skin contact by mother at home)
How KMC works?
The kangaroo position consists of skin-to-skin contact (SSC) between the mother and the infant.
The physiological benefits of KMC are based on the finding that the heart and respiratory rates,
oxygenation, oxygen consumption, blood glucose, sleep patterns & behavior observed in preterm
/ LBW infants held skin-to-skin tend to be similar to or better than those observed in infants
separated from their mothers.
Our Experience with Kangaroo Mother Care
We conducted a randomized control trial to assess the effectiveness KMC in LBW. We recruited
30 LBW babies each in the KMC group and conventional method of care (CMC) group. Results of
our study showed that Kangaroo care promoted better thermoregulation when compared with the
th
CMC group (p=0.019) as measured by 4 hourly axillary temperatures. On reaching the target
weight of 2.5 kg during follow-up, babies receiving Kangaroo care had higher mean daily weight
gain (15.73 vs. 11.63 g; p=0.0001), higher mean length (48.8±1.05 vs. 48.3±1.48 cm; p=0.1) and
greater gain in head circumference (34.4±0.54 vs. 32.2±1.05 cm; p=0.0001). The confidence level
in mother and bonding between the mother and baby in mothers assessed using Likert scale on
day-2 and day-7 of initiation of KMC was significantly higher than that in conventional care group
(p=0.001 & p=0.0001 respectively). On follow-up, majority of mothers accepted and practiced
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KMC. Our study effectively demonstrated KMC as a cost effective, safe, acceptable method of
caring for LBW babies in our tertiary care teaching hospital; neither did it affect routine work of
caregivers at home. Neurodevolpmental assessment at 12 months using Bailey scale (BSID-II),
showed that more babies in KMC group had normal PDI (psychomotor developmental index) (15
vs. 8; p=0.05) and MDI (mental development index) scores (29 vs. 18; p=0.05) when compared
with those in conventional care group.
What's the way ahead?
KMC is one of the most promising neonatal health care initiatives. The most recent Cochrane
review has found compelling evidence that KMC is associated with a reduction in mortality, severe
infection/sepsis, hypothermia, and length of hospital stay, and an increase in weight gain and
exclusive or any breastfeeding at discharge and at one to three months follow up. Moreover, there
was some evidence that KMC increases head circumference gain, maternal satisfaction with the
[9]
method, maternal-infant attachment, and home environment. However, more rigorous research
into KMC is needed concerning its effectiveness and safety in unstable LBW infants, its long term
neurodevelopmental outcomes, and impact on mothers, families, and the community. Future trials
in different socioeconomic settings should aim to elucidate the effect of community-based KMC on
LBW neonatal mortality to pave the way for implementing community-based KMC programs and
inclusion of community-based KMC in essential newborn care. Further, the role of KMC in high
income settings and its impact on infant morbidity needs to be worked out.
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Thalassemic Children - Need for Care,
Support and Prevention
1 2
Prof. R. V. Kulkarni , Dr. Vijay Ramanan D. M.
1
Hon. Secretary, Indian Red Cross Society, Pune District Branch , Director, Thalssemia Centre
Thalassemia is a severe inherited disorder in which bone marrow of a child cannot form sufficient
Red Cells, which have a major role in carrying oxygen to various parts of the body. The individual
males and females who have the Thalassemia trait in their gene but do not manifest the disorder
are called Thalassemia minors or carriers. When 2 Thalassemia carriers marry, there is a 25%
chance of their child being a Thalassemia-major i.e. the child develops symptoms of the disorder
such as fatigue, weakness, breathing inefficiency, yellow discoloration of skin, irritability, anaemia,
slow growth, facial bone deformities, protruding abdomen and dark urine.
Detailed technical discussion on causes of Thalassemia is beyond scope of this paper which
discusses health and social issues related to Thalassemia and its preventive aspects.
Every year, about 10,000 children with Thalassemia-major are born in India. One out of every 8
carriers of Thalassemia lives in India. Maharashtra state has about 13,000 registered thalassemic
children out of which 750 are in Pune district. Certain communities such as Gujarathis, Punjabis,
Sindhi, Lohana, Saraswats and Aadivasis show higher proportion of Thalassemia-major.
Parents of the thalassemic children face serious financial issues and agonies due to costly
treatments and availability of facilities. The thalassemic children need a good day-care facility for
regular periodical blood transfusions, availability of safe blood of the specific blood-group which
may be rare, periodical investigations such as HCV, Serum Ferritin etc., Disferal injections or
Chelation therapy medications which take care of accumulated iron in their body, blood filters,
nutritional and medical support, psycho-medical counseling etc.
For an average income family, the heavy costs of the treatment pose serious financial problems to
the parents which in-turn pose a threat to the life of thalassemic children. Very few parents can
afford bone-marrow transplant treatment which may cure the Thalassemia.
The Pune district branch of Indian Red Cross Society has set up a state of art Thalassemia centre
in Pune. The centre has adopted over 80 thalassemic children for permanent care. The Red Cross
will be pleased to adopt maximum children and even support for bone marrow transplant if
corporates, philanthropic institutions and individuals who can adopt thalassemic children support
the society. The average cost of complete care of a child is INR 70,000/-only per annum in addition
to expenses on appointment of qualified staff to take care of the children.
Of course, the prevention is better than cure. Pre-marital screening of Thalassemia status can
reduce the incidence of Thalassemia-major in society. Pre-natal and post-natal testing can help
parents take careful decisions to prevent the incidence of Thalassemia.
We need to create awareness on Thalassemia through education and promote pre-marital testing
by opening affordable testing facilities. Corporates can certainly help a lot through CSR to resolve
the problems of thalassemic children. Let us all unite & deal with problems of thalassemic children.
2
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Kaizen for the Flour Mill Workers
All India Coordinated Research Project
Dr. Jayshree P. Zend, Manjusha S. Revanwar, Sandhya N. Admankar
Senior Scientist, AICRP (FRM), Dept. of Family Resource Management
College of Home Science, VNMKV Parbhani
Email : jpzend@rediffmail.com
Healthy non smoking 30 flourmill workers (16 women and 14 men) working at flour mill for 4-8
hrs/day and 6 days/ week and having minimum 5 years experience of work in flour mill were
selected for the study. Age of the flour mill workers ranged between 25 to 50 yrs. Health status of
flour mill workers indicated that majority of the workers had low average aerobic capacity and
belonged to normal category of BMI. Respiratory symptoms and health problems related to the
occupation were cough and cold, chest tightness, sputum production with flour dust, heat stress,
skin itching and hearing impairment. As per the ambient temperature and relative humidity
recorded in the flour mill premises, the Humidex value ranged between 34 to 50 indicated that heat
stress experienced by the workers was very high. Noise level recorded in the 93 per cent selected
flour mills was exceeding PEL of 65 dB by 26 to 60 percent. Illumination level recorded in flour mills
ranged between 80 to 90 lux which was highly inadequate by 17 to 94 per cent in all the selected
flour mills. These findings indicate a vital need to use personal protective aid for noise control and
increasing illumination level in flour mill by increasing number of light fixtures i.e. two bulb of 100
watt for 10'x 12' room. Concentration of Oxygen was adequate in all the flour mills and Carbon
Monoxide and Sulphur Dioxide level was within the limit of IAQ standards (NIOSH). But Carbon
Dioxide percentage (0.18%) in flour mill atmosphere was exceeding limit of IAQ standard i.e. 0.1
percent in 17 per cent flour mills. There was significant reduction in drudgery of flour mill workers
(21 %) when work was performed by wearing newly developed personal protective noise and dust
controlling mask and using flour presser. Dust controlling bag (DCB) was found significantly
effective in reducing IFD level in flour mill by 79 percent.
Research findings revealed that there is vital need to increase adequate ventilation in flour mills
with exhaust fan facility and use of personal protective noise and dust controlling mask by flour mill
workers. Dust controlling measures such as dust controlling bag for flour outlet of mill and use of
flour presser for reducing frequency of bending posture should be promoted.
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Samavedana Onco-Screening Program
Dr. Preeti Damle
Samavedana, Pune
Introduction
The incidence of cancer in India is rising day by day. At present there are 1 million new cancer
cases diagnosed each year, most of these are in urban areas. As there are limited resources in our
country, the death rate from cancer is very high, about 6 lakh patients per year. This is because
most cancer patients present in a very late stage. When detected early, the cure rate for most
cancers is over 70-80%. In late stages, this drops to less than 20%.
In the Metropolitan cities of India like Delhi, Mumbai and Pune, breast cancer has overtaken
cervical cancer as the most common cancer. It is estimated that 1 in 22 women will get breast
cancer during their lifetime in these cities. Still, cervical cancer is most common occurring cancer,
causing maximum no. of deaths. The rate of occurrence of cervical cancer is 1 in 40-50 in urban
women. Cancer prevention therefore plays a vital role in reduction of this number. Unfortunately,
there is no program, which will perform preventive check up of women from lower economic strata.
About Samavedana :
Samavedana is an NGO that gives financial aid to poor patients for their tertiary care treatment.
Gynaec Cancer Prevention (Onco-Screening Program - OSP) for women from urban slums is a
part of its community outreach program. These unfortunate women come to Samavedana for
availing help for treatment. So, we thought of providing preventive services to them, as in the cost
required for treating one breast cancer in stage 3, we can screen about 30 women.
Cancer Screening Program Features :
l
Diagnosis of cancer in very early stages and sometimes even in precancerous stages,
before it shows any symptoms
l
Only method available of increasing early diagnosis
l
Thereby reducing the mortality from cancer.
l
Ad hoc facilities available in most hospitals without a streamlined dedicated service.
Methodology :
We have tied up with various NGOs. Their members, who are in the age group of 40 and 60 years,
undergo the program. 8 -10 women are screened every day. The program includes:
A. At their basti: Health Awareness talks
B. At hospital: Gynaec check up, Mammography, Pap Smear, Sonography, Sono-mammography,
if indicated, Counseling by oncologist
All these tests are done free for them. The transport facility to and fro their Basti is also provided
free of cost to them.
Samavedana started this program in December 2009 at Pune and then in September 2010 at
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Karad. Work done so far: 4165 screenings (till June 13), total needed further intervention till April
st nd
2013:333 (281 women) and abnormalities in found to have cancer in 1 or 2 stage are 27.
We very strongly believe that such programs should be funded under CSR activity of corporate.
rd
Currently it is supported partly by Persistent Foundation. About 1/3 of women are sponsored by
the foundation. We are aware that the problem is too huge to be handled by Samavedana alone.
But, we are doing our bit. Considering Pune city's population of around 50 lacs, and other
demographic details, a few lacs* of women need to be screened.
Objective of Samavedana is to reach out to all these women. However, there are constraints and
limitations to the effort viz. availability of funds, enough infrastructures etc.
Total population : > 31.15 Lacs (>50 Lacs considering Pune Agglomerate). There are 49.1%
women in total population (15.29Lacs) of which 40.38% reside in slums (6.17 Lacs). We are
facilitating treatment & rehabilitation services to the diagnosed patients. Those will be discussed in
the presentation.
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2
Sub-Theme
Innovative Healthcare Models
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INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Dr. Shyam Ashtekar Health Kiosks : A nano-model for Primary care 55
and health information at remote and unserved
locations
Dr. Madhav Sathe Low Cost Sustainable Hospital 56
Dr. G. Geetha Krishnan Concept and Experiences of Integrative Medicine 58
at Medanta Medicity
Dr. Anil Saraf Herbotechnik : A BAIF Program for the 59
understanding, conservation, cultivation
and utilization of medicinal herbs
Dr. Radheshyam Kulkarni Vivekanand Hospital, Latur : A Case Study 60
Dr. Anant Kulkarni Nutritional Supplements through Intergrative 62
Approach : A Project by RSS Janakalyan Samiti
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Health Kiosks: A nano-model for Primary care
and health information at remote and unserved locations
Dr. Shyam Ashtekar
Public Health Scientist, Nasik
Email : shyamashtekar@yahoo.com,
Huge gaps still remain in the primary health care sector in many backward states, and many
clusters and situations even in better states. An IT assisted health kiosk can offer (A) trained
paramedic services and (B) health info on tabs or mobiles apart from net users. A group of medicos
can guide multiple remote kiosks. The kiosk needs modest infrastructure and 10-15 medicines
from each healing system are sufficient for about 40 common ailments. The paramedic can screen
for BP and blood sugar, offer protocol based primary care, advice and referral. Grampanchayats
can own kiosks on demand. The fixed initial costs (Rs. 80000 to 100000) can come from village
panchayat and CSR funds, while the users provide running costs of services at standard rates
which will cost less than travelling costs and wage loss. The legal ground for kiosk is to be tested
and negotiated. A kiosk network can provide affordable and accessible primary care, preventive
services with participation by panchayats and users. Some useful experience is so far available. A
complimentary and independent project for health information in local language (HILL) is essential
for not only health kiosks but also for the wider community through net. A free Marathi version is
available (arogyavidya.net) and a similar Hindi project (bharatswasthya.net) is halfway. We can
make this in more languages with help of regional experts. The HILL resources will be useful to
kiosks and even hospital waiting rooms and homes everywhere in India. Let us create a better
primary health care system in India, with wider participation and use of IT. The essentials are IT
support, HILL and economics for supporting the paramedic.
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Low Cost Sustainable Hospital
Dr. Madhav Sathe
Bombay Mothers and Children Welfare Society
Email : sathe.madhav@gmail.com
Recent studies on health care revealed that in India, 71 percent of the patients bear the expenditure
from their hard earned earnings, State including Central, State and local bodies together pay for
20 percent of the patients, Others including Insurance companies pay to the remaining 9 percent
of the patients.
Vision : Modern medical care for all at the most affordable cost.
Mission : Low cost medical treatment with ultra-modern hospitals in urban & rural area.
This obviously makes a good case for establishing hospitals, which can charge affordable rates so
that health care becomes accessible to the majority of the population in India. A debate is seriously
taking place whether Government can cater into the needs of people by expanding the public
sector hospitals. Empirical studies show that this does not work. Governments instead are referring
the people below the poverty line to get their emergency cases treated in Global hospitals and
Government is compensating those hospitals. Sometimes this is resulting in false claims by global
hospitals and the cost of compensation at Macro level is becoming gigantic to the Government.
Accordingly, an idea is generated wherein, is it possible to encourage the Social Entrepreneurs to
start Health Care centres which can cater to the needs of majority of the people by charging
affordable rates? If we can identify few good social entrepreneurial doctors to start hospitals that
can charge affordable prices to the masses India, it would be a good health care policy.
Objectives are Best possible treatment at the most affordable cost; Primary and secondary
medical care; clean hygienic surrounding; ultramodern facilities with best possible doctors;
modern & pleasant ambiences; very reasonable rates.
We at Bombay Mothers and Children Welfare Society have taken a challenge and established
three hospitals. One Urban and two Rural hospitals.
Urban hospital - Dr Tilak Hospital is a hospital in heart of Mumbai and has 40 beds. It has well
appointed ultra modern hospital with primary and secondary facility. Charges are Rs.3600/- only
for normal delivery , Rs.7500 for Caesarian section and includes stay and doctors charges. Similar
charges are applicable for all major & minor surgeries. Computerised pathology is at 30% discount
over normal outside charges. Medicines are available at 8% discount over MRP. Special ward and
Special room charges are designed in such manner that doctors are well compensated for their
services adequately. Highest cost for major surgery in special room is Rs 20000/- only. We share
50 % of total bill with doctors. Our billing is simple and does not give breakups. This gives a
complete transparency to all beneficiaries. We have been able to keep charges same for last 5
years. Hospital is spread over 8000 sq. ft. This hospital is aesthetically beautiful. Staff and doctors
have a very positive attitude and deliver best treatment. We have used technology to improve
record keeping, to improve security and reduce the waiting period of the patients.
Rise in patients for last 7 years is significant (indoor patient - 142% and OPD Patient - 264%). In
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2005-6, OPD and IPD patients were 2430 and 13470 respectively. The number rose in 2011-12 to
3450 and 36500. This statistics amply suggests the impact of keeping the cost constant. Volume
increase can offset the cost rise. Need has increased the income to Rs.16 lakhs/pm. Today from
Rs.4 lakhs in 2005-6. Here we have incorporated business thinking to deliver the best. Concept of
Social Entrepreneurship works well in introducing Low Cost Hospitals in India. NGO when
incorporate the business principles, then the delivery of quality service is very easily possible.
1. Social Entrepreneur works for offering Health Care at affordable prices.
2. It is possible to sustain a hospital which charges prices at affordable rates to the customers
and offers high quality services in the long run
3. Breakeven turnover required for running the hospital at affordable prices is very high and
works on high volumes only.
4. Perceived Costs to a Patient is very important and has to be understood ? Only Social
Entrepreneur does understand the Perceived Costs of the Patients.
5. Output of every worker has to be the best and full to achieve this. Constant motivation and
training along with opportunities to grow are important factors.
6. Keeping a close look on satisfaction Laval of workers is a task has to be looked at with
considerate mind.
This hospital is not only sustainable but it's profitable and allows us to invest for up-gradation of
hospital with additions and up-gradations of equipments and better facilities for patients.
Tilak hospital was simulated in Rajgurunagar as rural hospital and has now become sustainable.
Perceivable cost is a very important factor and just 2 yrs after renovation this hospital has gone up
from 150000/-pm to 450000/- pm.
This was the factor most neglected by Erstwhile NGO as unnecessary and wasteful.
We can certainly say with experience in urban and rural areas that this is the factor which can
change the perspective of services.
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Concept and Experiences of Integrative Medicine
at Medanta Medicity
Dr. G Geetha Krishnan
Head, Department of Integrative Medicine, Medanta-the Medicity hospital, Gurgaon, India
Email: drgk2000@gmail.com
Medanta the Medicity is the largest, perhaps the most advanced and most experienced hospital in
India in terms of patient capacity, advanced technology and medical expertise. Here an attempt to
conceptualise and practically implement an integrative medical program has been underway
since 2010. The out come of the patient care modalities tried and tested here includes the
development of the "Axial model" and successful implementation of the processes of integration
starting with parallel practice, to complementary medicine and protocol based interventions.
Integrative Medicine (IM) is when different known medical sciences are utilised or not utilised
together for the benefit of a patient based on the knowledge of their combined efficacy, its
comparative benefits, economic viability and practical possibility. Thus Integrative medicine is a
path to follow, not just a goal to attain. Here the processes we have developed and implemented
play a major role.
We have put in place structured algorithms for 84 diseases / clinical conditions. Starting from ICU
to diet management, there are 28 clinical areas where at present patient centric integration
("fusion" in the words of chairman Dr Naresh Trehan, who spearheads the movement with
conviction extra-ordinary) happens. We have devised tools for data collection in routine clinical
practice, panchakarma therapies, and yoga sessions. We also have devised 11 outcome
measures for assessing the objective and subjective effectiveness of the interventions.
Notable attempts of IM at Medanta would include the specialities of radiation-oncology, surgical
oncology; Robotic assisted minimally invasive thoracic surgery, thoracic surgery, cardiology,
sleep medicine, neurology, neuro-surgery, internal medicine, urology and intensive-care areas of
patient-care. An area of intense interest across the specialities is pain management, from
gangrene to migraine, from prostatitis to mental agony.
Utilizing the information generated from the integrative process we propose that diseases causing
immense burden to the society be addressed in the integrative manner, by mainstreaming Ayurveda
into primary health care programs. Examples are management of chikungunya, dengue, viral
hepatitis, recurrent respiratory infections, and diarrhoea.
Belief, Collocation, Attitude, Freedom & Knowledge are the five essential ingredients in creating a
successful IM model. There are many hurdles to IM in practice and could be classified as those
arising from a) Lack of knowledge, experience and expertise, b) Mind-set of practitioner, (professional
distrust & antagonism), c) Mind-set of society (conditioned disbelief), d) Regulations, and e)
Fundamental differences among the integrating medical sciences, in interpreting and understanding
the “truth”, even to the extent of defining the aim of treatment.
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Herbotechnik: A BAIF Program for the
understanding, conservation, cultivation
and utilization of medicinal herbs.
1 2
Dr. Anil Saraf and Mr. Girish Sohani
1
Additional Program Director, BAIF Development Research Foundation, Pune.
2
President, BAIF Development Research Foundation, Pune
Traditional medicine, encompassing concepts and methods for the protection and restoration of
health, has served as a fount of alternative medicine, new pharmaceuticals and healthcare
products.
The folk knowledge been retained, nurtured and built upon by an extended line of unknown and
unremembered traditional healers who have passed it on from generation to generation. This line
exists even today, more commonly in relatively remote communities. The future existence of this
living knowledge system is however seriously threatened by the existing societal forces of change.
Interest in medicinal plants as a re-emerging health aid has been fuelled by the rising costs of
prescription drugs in the maintenance of personal health and wellbeing, and the bio-prospecting
of new plant-derived drugs. Over exploitation of several herbs has significantly reduced their
quantities and have endangered their existence.
The development of medicinal plant-based bio-industries in the developing countries is
dependent upon the availability of facilities and information concerning bio-processing, extraction,
purification, and marketing. Absence of such infrastructure compounded by lack of governmental
interest and financial support restricts the evolution of traditional herbal extracts into authenticated
market products.
It is necessary to dovetail these opportunities into a coherent program for the conservation,
cultivation, and utilization of medicinal herbs. Herbotechnik is planned to be such a program.
Herbotechnik has the following four cornerstones: Help in the continuation of the traditional
knowledge systems on medicinal herbs in a living form; promote availability of medicinal herbs in
all their diversity; integrate use of medicinal herbs in the community health program; enable
processing and marketing of herbal medicines with a flow-back of benefits to communities who
have contributed the knowledge.
The program is being successfully implemented by BAIF in select areas, the details of which will
be presented in the Conference.
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Vivekanand Hospital, Latur: A Case Study
Dr. Radheshyam Kulkarni
Medical Superintendent, Vivekanand Hospital, Latur
Email : vhlatur@gmail.com
Vivekanand Medical Foundation & Research Centre is established in 1979 with the aim to render
best possible medical services at least possible expenses. To start with it was a private
partnership firm, later transformed into public charitable trust. Now hospital has its own 4
buildings, 50 Doctors (maximum full timer) & about 300 paramedical staff. Hospital has now grown
to Vivekanand family which includes Trauma Centre, two rural sub centres, one Rehabilitation
Centre (for Cerebral Palsy children) & an old age home. This progress has been achieved
without commercial approach & without compromising with medical ethics.
This institution is known for its excellent organized services. Hospital is committed to provide
appropriate, optimum & quality healthcare services to the patients from all sections & strata's of
the society with a sense of social commitment. This Charitable Organization established its
identity as professionally excellent, socially oriented, transparent in financial transactions &
ethically nurtured.
Since inception of the institution, free health diagnostic camps in rural area are arranged. Hospital
had organized free medical camps during calamities of epidemic diseases like Chikangunia,
Swine Flu etc. Since last 7 years, hospital is providing free medical checkup for 10 days during
Pandharpur Aashadhi Vari. Seminars, workshops and conferences are arranged regularly for
doctors in this area with an intention to update their medical knowledge and make them aware of
the advanced technology and medicines, which can be applied for the betterment of the patients at
root level. This activity is done without any fees.
As a routine, poor patients are given concession in hospital bills, that comes in lacks of rupees
every year. On every Thursday, OPD consultations are totally free, and routine investigations are
charged at 25% subsidized rate. Cataract operations, Haemodialysis, MRI, CT Scan done at very
low cost. Superspeciality services are given at a very low cost compare to elsewhere in the private
sector. Emergency admissions are done without any prepayment. No admission/ treatment
is withheld for want of money.
A separate Ayurvedic dept is working in the hospital since last 15 years. Many patients are
benefited with Ayurvedic treatment & Panchkarma. Hospital has a well equipped Cardiac Ambulance
& running a medical store open for 24 hours. Recently, a well equipped Advanced Cardiac Neuro
Superspeciality Centre is started. Three Angiography camps were taken and in indicated cases
angioplasty was done in concessional rate. Total knee replacement & total hip replacement
surgeries done routinely. The Institution has sponsored a scheme of Preventive Comprehensive
Health Check-up. It is only to promote health awareness in the society. The institution has
shouldered the responsibility of evolving the cancer hospital with updated facility of radiation therapy.
Hospital is affiliated for the employees and their families from various Govt. and Central Govt.
departments like BSNL, ECHS, MPKAY etc. Hospital has got ISO certification by TUV Rheinland.
Hospital is also recognized as Scientific Industrial Research Organization (SIRO) by Department
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of Scientific & Industrial Research (DSIR), Central Govt. of India. Having accreditation as a Post
Graduate Teaching Centre by Diplomat National Board (DNB).

The institution was deeply involved in the rescue & rehabilitation work after Killari earthquake
calamity. Hundreds of patients were treated for a long time free of cost. This huge work was
appreciated by number of national & international organizations. AAPI (American Association of
Physicians of Indian origin) & Rotary International donated large amount to launch a Trauma
Centre. Hospital has served in other national calamities like Gujarat Earthquake, Tsunami
Cyclone, Mumbai & Bihar Floods.
v Salient Features :
ØMulti superspeciality unit at a district place.
ØAcademics, Teaching, research activities.
ØBest modern technologies available.
ØEverything under one roof.
ØDoctors working full time with voluntary ceiling on income.
ØCharitable nature in letters and spirit.
ØA novel experiment of devoted & committed organization in medical field.
ØA dedicated team of doctors, devoted to the cause, is the backbone of this institution.
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Nutritional Supplements through
Integrative Approach : A Project by RSS Janakalyan Samiti
Dr. Anant Kulkarni, Dr. Vikrant Mungi
RSS Janakalyan Samiti, Nasik
Email : anantkulkarni101@gmail.com
Background
RSS Janakalyan Samiti is a voluntary organization with a mission of building healthy, self-reliant,
knowledgeable, discrimination free society with modern outlook that also maintains respect to our
rich cultural heritage and ageless traditional values. Samiti operates in education, health, culture,
agriculture, self-reliance & disaster management sectors. Samiti's health projects are ongoing in
1016 villages of 18 districts of Maharashtra. One of the important activities is nutritional
supplement in tribal area. Malnutrition is one of the basic problems responsible for deterioration of
maternal and child health. RSS Janakalyan Samiti (JS) decided to address this issue at the level of
antenatal care. High prevalence of malnutrition and related conditions is observed in Thane
district. In 2005, volunteers of JS surveyed the district and identified Javhar-Palghar and Kalyan-
Murbad region for nutritional supplement project.
The project
Two blocks in Thane districts were selected for this project. Initially the volunteers of JS
approached 8 hamlets (including 6 from Javhar, 1 each from Murbad and Shahapur). Volunteers
and doctors observed low weight in pregnant and lactating mothers hence the objectives were
promotion of maternal health and supplementation of nutritional food to children from 1 to 6 years.
Awareness and diagnosis of malnutrition pose serious challenges especially in tribal areas due to
various social and cultural factors. Few notable of them are early marriage, lack of nutritious diet in
pregnancy, low income, low education status and migration. We need to understand the
community perspective in various angles that helps for sustainable development on various
fronts. JS trained village health workers (ladies) from the community itself to ensure participatory
approach. They health workers also initiated various activities in health-education and
environment aspects at respective hamlets. For example, they distributed saplings of Tulsi and
Neem. Volunteers of Seva Sahayog helped in educational activities and distributed school bags in
two Zilla Parishad schools that benefitted around 200 students. Nutrition supplements were
finalized with Ayurveda Vyaspeeth (an organization of Ayurveda practitioners) that also
participated in various diagnostic and treatment activities of the project.
We decided to provide nutritional supplement that is known to community, based on Ayurveda
concepts of nutrition and offers holistic diet. Rajgira vadi (prepared with amaranth seeds and
jaggary), Moong Dal (green gram) Khichadi with cow ghee and Sattu flour is being provided (thrice
a week) to children. Pregnant and lactating mothers are given Shatavari Kalpa additionally along
with above mentioned diet. A team of 10 volunteers is involved in this activity that includes on full
time coordinator, a doctor and 8 village health workers. The project activities are regularly
monitored every three months.
Impact of the project
In last eight years, 917 children, 469 pregnant and 419 lactating mothers have benefitted with this
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project. The project impact was evaluated in a comparative study of surrounding villages having
similar nutrition, socioeconomics and geographical status employing qualitative methods. All the
children were assessed and improvement in their weights, physical and psychological
appearance and general health status was noticed. The hamlets participated in this projects were
having more institutional deliveries, less number of malnutrition cases and more birth weight.
Moreover we observed improvement in hygiene and sanitation of the villages and hamlets those
participated in this activity. We think that community involvement of village health workers,
culturally acquainted nutritional supplement & holistic approach of development may have
contributed to the success of the project.
We gratefully acknowledge contributions from many doctors, donors and participants from several
voluntary organizations.
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THEME
SUSTAINABLE RURAL LIVELIHOOD
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¬·|¡-| ~|ª+-| +|; ¡, - +|- ¡+ +|·+||-+- +·-| ¡ ++· |++|¬ + -¬- ¡+|· ¬|+- -º--º .·-
·| -··+· ¬|+- ¬| ·¡ ¡ ¡| ¬+ ¡ +| |++|¬ ¬+ =+ ·|+|, ¬+ ¬+|+~|, ~|·+- ¬|· ¬-|¬- +|-
¬ ¬|+ +c ;¬ ¡- ¡+ |++|¬ .|+| -¤| +-||·+ +e·¸|+ +| |¬¡|+¬|+- +· ¬·a|; + ¬|¤ ¬|¤ +|¬
¬¬+- --||-| +| ¬+~ ¬|· ¬+-| ¬+-| ·¸|++| ¬+~+· |++|¬--¬+,-¬¤¬|+-¬+¬|+ ·|·- +|
ª+-- ¬|+|· +·
·|·- + +c-| ¬|+|:|, -¬|++ ¬¬|¤-| +| =|-, +|-|+·¤ + +:¬|+ ¤~| ¬+ª|¬|- +|+|¤ ¬|¤||++|
+ +|· + |--|+ª- +|¡|¬ +-|| ¡ +|ª-+ + +¡- ·|·| +|+| + +|++||¬|+| ¬·|=- ¬|¤||++| +| -¬|~
+ ~¡·| +| ¬|· ¤|- + |¬º +¤+¸· ¡|-| +· ·¡| ¡ º¬| |--| +| |ª¤-| + ·| ¬+|·|·++ +:¬|+ ¡-
|+|·-- =+ +, ¬¬+ ¬¬+ ¤+¡| + ¡· ¬·+ .|¬ ¡| ·¡ ¡ ¡ ¡+|·| +|ª-|++ ~Š-| ¡ ¤-·- ¡ º¬
¬¬+ ¬¬+ .|¬|+| ¬+ ·|+| +-|- +| c+ +|· ¬+| ¬+|e| ;¬ |:~| + ¡| ·¡| º+ ¬|œ|¬+ +¡¬ ¡
·|·- +| +|~-+¸¤ |+|+¤-|- +|+|¤ ¬|¤||++| ¡-¸ ¬-+ |++-+ -+¬·¤ |+º ¡ ;¬ ¡-|¬ ~|·+- +|+|¤
¬|¤||++| ¬+- ¬|+ + º+ +·| |++ ¡ |¤¬+ ¬-+ ¬||+ ¡ +|+|¤ ¬|¤||++| ¬ ¬+|¤- ;¬ ¬+|e| +
+|+|¤ ¬|-¬ +| ¬|¤+|~ ¤-¬·| +| ¬|¤||++| .·||+- +·- +|¬ |--- --| ¬+=|- ¡
¤) «-i¤¬ ¤i¤ilªa ¤i¬ll«+i -
·|·-| +-| ¬ +¡¸, +|¬, +¤¸, +|:, +|¤, +¬|~ + +¬, ¬-+|·| + +-|, ,|¤ ¬||: -|¤ +-|- + |¬º
-+Š- |+|·-- +=, ¬|+¤||, +¬+ ¬||: + +¬, +·|:| ¬||: -|¤ |+¬- ¡ ¡ -+|+| +:|¤
|-+|¬+· +-+· ¬|¤||++| .|+ +·- + +¡-¬ ¤-¤||- ¬|+ ¤· ¡ --+| ¬|¤||++| +| ¡ º+ +¡-
+·| ¬|¤- ¡ +-| +| +c|;, |+|·-- |++|¬ +|+| + |¬º +-| +| +· +- + -+|-·¤, +|-|+·¤ +:¬|+, ¡
-|¤ |-+|¬- +| ¬~|·+- +,-|| ¬||: |+|·-- +|·¤| ¬ ¡ ¬|¤||++| |++-+ u-·| + +c| ¡ ;¬
¬+|e| + +-|+¤ ¬ ¤¸· .·-, -+¬·¤ -+.|-, ~ª+| .|+ ;¬ |+:¸¬| +· --| ¬|·.- ¡
¤i) ª¤il-« +l¢ l«l«¤ai =4i¤- =«¤- -
ª+-+-| + +|: |+.|- + ¬|¤|·+· ++| -·+|: +c|- ¡- |+|·-- .|¬ |+º +º, ¡| ·¡ ¡ |+|~- +¤| +
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
67
wìsun =ìnlw vìl×lumì »zlqnnì m ln¤
lupì¬ vìz n¤pì¬
si. 4¬i-- si4
«i¬+ - Center for Research and Strategic Planning for Sustainable Development, Pune
Email : dange@yojak.org.in
·|·- ¬+-| .|+|-+ ¬+:|, +.||-+, -·+., +|·- ¬|+ ¬|· ~|¬-, .~|¬- ;¬ ¬++ +¬+-+·
|++|¬ +| ¡-|¬ ¬+¬· ¡| ·¡| ¡ ª+-+-| + +|: ¡+|· ·|- ¤|+- + |+|·-- =+| + |++|¬ ¡-c| ¬ ¡+-
¬·|¡-| ~|ª+-| +|; ¡, - +|- ¡+ +|·+||-+- +·-| ¡ ++· |++|¬ + -¬- ¡+|· ¬|+- -º--º .·-
·| -··+· ¬|+- ¬| ·¡ ¡ ¡| ¬+ ¡ +| |++|¬ ¬+ =+ ·|+|, ¬+ ¬+|+~|, ~|·+- ¬|· ¬-|¬- +|-
¬ ¬|+ +c ;¬ ¡- ¡+ |++|¬ .|+| -¤| +-||·+ +e·¸|+ +| |¬¡|+¬|+- +· ¬·a|; + ¬|¤ ¬|¤ +|¬
¬¬+- --||-| +| ¬+~ ¬|· ¬+-| ¬+-| ·¸|++| ¬+~+· |++|¬--¬+,-¬¤¬|+-¬+¬|+ ·|·- +|
ª+-- ¬|+|· +·
·|·- + +c-| ¬|+|:|, -¬|++ ¬¬|¤-| +| =|-, +|-|+·¤ + +:¬|+ ¤~| ¬+ª|¬|- +|+|¤ ¬|¤||++|
+ +|· + |--|+ª- +|¡|¬ +-|| ¡ +|ª-+ + +¡- ·|·| +|+| + +|++||¬|+| ¬·|=- ¬|¤||++| +| -¬|~
+ ~¡·| +| ¬|· ¤|- + |¬º +¤+¸· ¡|-| +· ·¡| ¡ º¬| |--| +| |ª¤-| + ·| ¬+|·|·++ +:¬|+ ¡-
|+|·-- =+ +, ¬¬+ ¬¬+ ¤+¡| + ¡· ¬·+ .|¬ ¡| ·¡ ¡ ¡ ¡+|·| +|ª-|++ ~Š-| ¡ ¤-·- ¡ º¬
¬¬+ ¬¬+ .|¬|+| ¬+ ·|+| +-|- +| c+ +|· ¬+| ¬+|e| ;¬ |:~| + ¡| ·¡| º+ ¬|œ|¬+ +¡¬ ¡
·|·- +| +|~-+¸¤ |+|+¤-|- +|+|¤ ¬|¤||++| ¡-¸ ¬-+ |++-+ -+¬·¤ |+º ¡ ;¬ ¡-|¬ ~|·+- +|+|¤
¬|¤||++| ¬+- ¬|+ + º+ +·| |++ ¡ |¤¬+ ¬-+ ¬||+ ¡ +|+|¤ ¬|¤||++| ¬ ¬+|¤- ;¬ ¬+|e| +
+|+|¤ ¬|-¬ +| ¬|¤+|~ ¤-¬·| +| ¬|¤||++| .·||+- +·- +|¬ |--- --| ¬+=|- ¡
¤) «-i¤¬ ¤i¤ilªa ¤i¬ll«+i -
·|·-| +-| ¬ +¡¸, +|¬, +¤¸, +|:, +|¤, +¬|~ + +¬, ¬-+|·| + +-|, ,|¤ ¬||: -|¤ +-|- + |¬º
-+Š- |+|·-- +=, ¬|+¤||, +¬+ ¬||: + +¬, +·|:| ¬||: -|¤ |+¬- ¡ ¡ -+|+| +:|¤
|-+|¬+· +-+· ¬|¤||++| .|+ +·- + +¡-¬ ¤-¤||- ¬|+ ¤· ¡ --+| ¬|¤||++| +| ¡ º+ +¡-
+·| ¬|¤- ¡ +-| +| +c|;, |+|·-- |++|¬ +|+| + |¬º +-| +| +· +- + -+|-·¤, +|-|+·¤ +:¬|+, ¡
-|¤ |-+|¬- +| ¬~|·+- +,-|| ¬||: |+|·-- +|·¤| ¬ ¡ ¬|¤||++| |++-+ u-·| + +c| ¡ ;¬
¬+|e| + +-|+¤ ¬ ¤¸· .·-, -+¬·¤ -+.|-, ~ª+| .|+ ;¬ |+:¸¬| +· --| ¬|·.- ¡
¤i) ª¤il-« +l¢ l«l«¤ai =4i¤- =«¤- -
ª+-+-| + +|: |+.|- + ¬|¤|·+· ++| -·+|: +c|- ¡- |+|·-- .|¬ |+º +º, ¡| ·¡ ¡ |+|~- +¤| +
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
68
|¬º ¬¤||·- ¬|· ¡|+|· +|¤| +| |-+|¤ º++ .¬|· ¡ ;¬ +| º+ +¡·++¸¤ +¬¸ ¡ ;¬| + -¬- ¡+-
u|¤|-- + ¬|·+|-··-| +|; ¡ º¬| +.||-+|+| +|--| ¡
|++|¬ +| ;¬ .|+| + :|·|- ª¤|-| +·+·|+- +|¤| + |++|,- ¬·=¤ -¤| ¬+¤- +| ¬|· ++ ·|-
:|| +| ;¬¬ ¡+- +; +|¤|+| ª¤|-| |+|+¤-|, |+ª+ u|; ¡ ¬|· +; |+¬¸+| +| ++|· +· ¡ u|¤|--
¬·|=--| + ¬|¤ ¬|¤ ª¤||- +|¤ ¬+¤- ¦|·| ¬|·+|-·· |+¬|- ¡ ·|·- +| ¤·|¡· ·¡| ¡
¬+|e| + ;¬ |++ ¬ ¤¸· .·-, |+¬|-| + ;¬¬ ¤¸· .|¬ ¬|+|+| |-|¤- º¬ |+:¸¬|+· --| ¬|·.- ¡
;) +l¢ «ilx+i+ªm -
·|·- + |:|-· |+¬|- ·¸ ¤|·¤| +| ¡-| ¬ a|c ¬|· +·+ |+¬|- ¬¤| + ¬|- ¡ + +·-+ ¬ ++|
¬|¤||·- u-| +·- ¡ ¬|· u|¤|-- -+|- ¡. -:|. +|·, +|¤·|, ++|, -|+¬, -¬·, ++, -·:, -|+¬|
(¬+|), ·+·, +|:| +c+| ¤¬ a|c |+¬c ;. ¬|+- +|+·¤ + ¡| ·¡ +:¬|+, ·¸|+ +| =+-| + ¡| ·¡| ++|
;. +|·¤| ¬ |+¬|-| +| +|=+-| ++ ¡| ·¡| ¡
;- |+¬|- +|·+|·| +| ~|·+- ¬|¤||++| ¡- |--- |¬|u- -+-+| +| ¬·- ¬|+·+-| ¡
-) +¬ -|¬- +
~) u-| + +|¡¬|¬| + ¬+ ++ +·-+|¬ ¬|¤|·
,) +|+ -+¤ +| .|¤|++ ª+·a-|, .-+|·| ¡- +
-) +|+ -+¤+· .|¤|++ .|+| ¡- +
-+·|Š- + +-|- + ++¬ |+|·-- ¬-¬¤|- ¬ª¤|º ¤·| ¡ º¬| ¡| -¡| ¬||+-¸ ¬-+ ª¤|-|+·
¬|+·+-|¬|+| :u- ¡º -¤+¸¬ ¬~|¤+|¦|·| ·| |+:|- ¡| ·¡| ¡ ;¬ ¬|· |++-+|+· -¤| +|+ .-|·
.¬|· +· --| ;¬ ¬+|e| + ¡|+|
c+ +|· ¬+| ¡ ¬+- ¬|+ + º+ +|~-+¸¤ ¬+|e| ¡ ;¬+ |+|·-- ª-· +· .|+·¤ ¬·| ¬|+ ¤· ;¬|¬º
¡·¬·+ .|¬ ¡| ·¡ ¡ |++|¬ ¡- .|+·- ª¤||- ¬ª¤| º++ -¤+¬ª-·| ¬~|¤+ .|· ¬+- .|+|+
+|· + +¡- ++ |¬u-. +|¬- ¡ ++· ;-+ .|+ ª¤|-| ¡-|¬ +¡¸- ¬¡+ +¡·+ ·u- ¡ º¬ .|+|+|
|¬u- ¡-¸ ;¬ :·+||- ·|;c ~|-¬ ¬¤|- ¬u- +|~|¬| +| ¬||¤- |+| +| ¤|¬+ ¬-+ ¬·a
¬-·+|+| :ª-º+¤ +-| ¤| ;¬ ¬+|e| +| º+ +¬ª¤|- ¡
;¬ ¬+|e| + ª+¬+| ¬ª¤|º, +.||-+, ¬-¬¤|- ¬ª¤|º, ¤-¬·c-, ~|¬- .|-|-¤|, ¤-:|-|
¬ª¤|¬|+ .|-|-¤|, ¬|+||¤+ --|·:||·+ +|--+|¬| ++-||, -·+., |~=+, |+¤|¤| º++ -¤+¸¬ª-|·
¬~|¤+ ¬|+|¬ ¡| ·¡ ¡ ;-+ ¦|·| ¬+|e| + +|+|¤ ¬|¤||++| + +|· + ¤| +¤- ¡|+| -¬¬ -··
+|~-c·+¸¤ .|+|+| |++ +|~- -¤| ª¤|- |+|~--| +| ·|- + ·u- ¡º .-|·-.¬|· +| ¡-|¬ ¬·-
¡-¸ ¬|-+ ¬¬|-¬ +|· ··¡¬++c ¬¤|- |++|¬ ¡-¸ ¬·-~|¬ +c+¤- ;¬ ¬+|e| +·-|- -|· ¡| º¬|
.|+||¤+ ;·a| ¡ ;¬ +c+¤-¦|·| ~ª+| .|+|+ .-|·-.¬|· +| ¬·- +||¤-| +| |-+|¤ ¡| -·|
¡ ~|·+- |++|¬ ¡| ¡-|¬ ¬|·+|¬+ +:+ ¬|+|- ¡|+|.
SUB-THEME
AGRICULTURE MECHANIZATION
FOR SMALL FARMERS
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
68
|¬º ¬¤||·- ¬|· ¡|+|· +|¤| +| |-+|¤ º++ .¬|· ¡ ;¬ +| º+ +¡·++¸¤ +¬¸ ¡ ;¬| + -¬- ¡+-
u|¤|-- + ¬|·+|-··-| +|; ¡ º¬| +.||-+|+| +|--| ¡
|++|¬ +| ;¬ .|+| + :|·|- ª¤|-| +·+·|+- +|¤| + |++|,- ¬·=¤ -¤| ¬+¤- +| ¬|· ++ ·|-
:|| +| ;¬¬ ¡+- +; +|¤|+| ª¤|-| |+|+¤-|, |+ª+ u|; ¡ ¬|· +; |+¬¸+| +| ++|· +· ¡ u|¤|--
¬·|=--| + ¬|¤ ¬|¤ ª¤||- +|¤ ¬+¤- ¦|·| ¬|·+|-·· |+¬|- ¡ ·|·- +| ¤·|¡· ·¡| ¡
¬+|e| + ;¬ |++ ¬ ¤¸· .·-, |+¬|-| + ;¬¬ ¤¸· .|¬ ¬|+|+| |-|¤- º¬ |+:¸¬|+· --| ¬|·.- ¡
;) +l¢ «ilx+i+ªm -
·|·- + |:|-· |+¬|- ·¸ ¤|·¤| +| ¡-| ¬ a|c ¬|· +·+ |+¬|- ¬¤| + ¬|- ¡ + +·-+ ¬ ++|
¬|¤||·- u-| +·- ¡ ¬|· u|¤|-- -+|- ¡. -:|. +|·, +|¤·|, ++|, -|+¬, -¬·, ++, -·:, -|+¬|
(¬+|), ·+·, +|:| +c+| ¤¬ a|c |+¬c ;. ¬|+- +|+·¤ + ¡| ·¡ +:¬|+, ·¸|+ +| =+-| + ¡| ·¡| ++|
;. +|·¤| ¬ |+¬|-| +| +|=+-| ++ ¡| ·¡| ¡
;- |+¬|- +|·+|·| +| ~|·+- ¬|¤||++| ¡- |--- |¬|u- -+-+| +| ¬·- ¬|+·+-| ¡
-) +¬ -|¬- +
~) u-| + +|¡¬|¬| + ¬+ ++ +·-+|¬ ¬|¤|·
,) +|+ -+¤ +| .|¤|++ ª+·a-|, .-+|·| ¡- +
-) +|+ -+¤+· .|¤|++ .|+| ¡- +
-+·|Š- + +-|- + ++¬ |+|·-- ¬-¬¤|- ¬ª¤|º ¤·| ¡ º¬| ¡| -¡| ¬||+-¸ ¬-+ ª¤|-|+·
¬|+·+-|¬|+| :u- ¡º -¤+¸¬ ¬~|¤+|¦|·| ·| |+:|- ¡| ·¡| ¡ ;¬ ¬|· |++-+|+· -¤| +|+ .-|·
.¬|· +· --| ;¬ ¬+|e| + ¡|+|
c+ +|· ¬+| ¡ ¬+- ¬|+ + º+ +|~-+¸¤ ¬+|e| ¡ ;¬+ |+|·-- ª-· +· .|+·¤ ¬·| ¬|+ ¤· ;¬|¬º
¡·¬·+ .|¬ ¡| ·¡ ¡ |++|¬ ¡- .|+·- ª¤||- ¬ª¤| º++ -¤+¬ª-·| ¬~|¤+ .|· ¬+- .|+|+
+|· + +¡- ++ |¬u-. +|¬- ¡ ++· ;-+ .|+ ª¤|-| ¡-|¬ +¡¸- ¬¡+ +¡·+ ·u- ¡ º¬ .|+|+|
|¬u- ¡-¸ ;¬ :·+||- ·|;c ~|-¬ ¬¤|- ¬u- +|~|¬| +| ¬||¤- |+| +| ¤|¬+ ¬-+ ¬·a
¬-·+|+| :ª-º+¤ +-| ¤| ;¬ ¬+|e| +| º+ +¬ª¤|- ¡
;¬ ¬+|e| + ª+¬+| ¬ª¤|º, +.||-+, ¬-¬¤|- ¬ª¤|º, ¤-¬·c-, ~|¬- .|-|-¤|, ¤-:|-|
¬ª¤|¬|+ .|-|-¤|, ¬|+||¤+ --|·:||·+ +|--+|¬| ++-||, -·+., |~=+, |+¤|¤| º++ -¤+¸¬ª-|·
¬~|¤+ ¬|+|¬ ¡| ·¡ ¡ ;-+ ¦|·| ¬+|e| + +|+|¤ ¬|¤||++| + +|· + ¤| +¤- ¡|+| -¬¬ -··
+|~-c·+¸¤ .|+|+| |++ +|~- -¤| ª¤|- |+|~--| +| ·|- + ·u- ¡º .-|·-.¬|· +| ¡-|¬ ¬·-
¡-¸ ¬|-+ ¬¬|-¬ +|· ··¡¬++c ¬¤|- |++|¬ ¡-¸ ¬·-~|¬ +c+¤- ;¬ ¬+|e| +·-|- -|· ¡| º¬|
.|+||¤+ ;·a| ¡ ;¬ +c+¤-¦|·| ~ª+| .|+|+ .-|·-.¬|· +| ¬·- +||¤-| +| |-+|¤ ¡| -·|
¡ ~|·+- |++|¬ ¡| ¡-|¬ ¬|·+|¬+ +:+ ¬|+|- ¡|+|.
SUB-THEME
AGRICULTURE MECHANIZATION
FOR SMALL FARMERS
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
70
INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Dr. Jayashree P. Zend Women friendly technologies developed by VNMKV Parbhani 71
Jayant N. Uttarwar Stream cut off indicator - a tool for efficient border irrigation 72
Jayant N. Uttarwar Maize husk remover 73
Jayant N. Uttarwar The Design and development of Mogi-improved Wheel Hoe 74
Shri. Laxman B. Datvi Rice Seed Drumer 75
Shri. Sunil A. Shinde Single Bull Operated Weeder 76
Shri. Ganpat J. Mawal Onion Grading Machine 77
Shri. Deelip Kulkarni Person Operated and bul Operated Weeder 78
Shri. Jayawant H. Wadekar Multipurpose Tools 79
Prof. S. K. Saha De-husking Machine for Minor Millets 80
Dr. Hemu Rathore Comb stripper - an asset for women farmers 81
for manual groundnut stripping
Dr. Suman Singh Alleviating drudgery of women farmers in harvesting cotton 82
Prof. S. K. Saha Utilization of the Standardized Animal Driven 83
Gear Box for Multiple Rural Applications
Prof. S. K. Saha A Device for Making Tulsi Mala Beads 84
Prof. S. K. Saha A Technology Package for Garlic Processing for Value Addition 85
Dr. P. U. Shahare Agricultural Mechanization in Maharashtra : Status and Scope 86
Pradyumna V. Senad Use of bull power for slurry pump of Cow-dung 87
gas at Goshala in Aurangabad
Harshita Jain Improved Weeders : to alleviate drudgery of women farmers 88
Dr. Hemu Rathore Drudgery reduction of women farmers by apron 89
style vegetable picking bag
Shri. Babarao U. Jadhav Sara Yantra 90
Shri. Babhuta B. Patel Tractor Operated Seed Fertilizer Dispenser 91
Shri. Anil R. Patel Motorcycle Operated Sprayer 92
Shri. Santosh P. Kurkute Fodder Cutter 93
Shri. Chandrashekhar Etarkar Solar Operated Sprayer 94
Shri. Ravindra D. Kharde Person Operated Seeder 95
Shri. Ramdas Shivram Sanap Tractor Operated Seeder 96
Shri. Balbheem Doke Stick for Forest Plantation 97
Shri. Rajendra Hujare Green Mannure Crop Cutter 98
Shri. Madhavrao S. Malewar Borewell Motor Puller 99
Shri. Madhavrao S. Malewar Person Operated Seeder 100
Shri. Pravin S. Lad Single Bull Operated Weeder 101
Shri. Avinash M. Patangrao Pahari Khat Yantra 102
Shri. Rajendra R. Suryawanshi Cotton Uprooter 103
Shri. Aditya N. Ponkshe Person Operated Compressor 104
Women friendly technologies developed
by VNMKV Parbhani
Dr. Jayshree P. Zend, Manjusha S. Revanwar, Sandhya N. Admankar
AICRP (FRM), Dept. of Family Resource Management,
College of Home Science, VNMKV Parbhani,
Email : jpzend@rediffmail.com
All India coordinated research project on Home Science is being implemented in the College of
Home ScienceVNMKV since 1997.The main objective of this research is mitigation of farm
women's drudgery. An inventory of the drudgery prone farm and allied activities revealed that the
farm women adopt unnatural posture while working in the field and they perform all these activities
manually. Hence, an attempt was made to reduce their drudgery by developing kaizen especially
for women. Apron for cotton picking, Trishulweeder for performing weeding in standing posture,
Eared cutter for Jowarharvesting,GopalKhore for dung collection, revolving stool and stand for
milking activity and mittens for vegetable harvesting.Field trials revealed that all these
technologies reduced drudgery, injuries and musculo skeletal disorders of women. The output of
the work was increased and the total time required for performing the work was reduced
significantly.
71
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
70
INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Dr. Jayashree P. Zend Women friendly technologies developed by VNMKV Parbhani 71
Jayant N. Uttarwar Stream cut off indicator - a tool for efficient border irrigation 72
Jayant N. Uttarwar Maize husk remover 73
Jayant N. Uttarwar The Design and development of Mogi-improved Wheel Hoe 74
Shri. Laxman B. Datvi Rice Seed Drumer 75
Shri. Sunil A. Shinde Single Bull Operated Weeder 76
Shri. Ganpat J. Mawal Onion Grading Machine 77
Shri. Deelip Kulkarni Person Operated and bul Operated Weeder 78
Shri. Jayawant H. Wadekar Multipurpose Tools 79
Prof. S. K. Saha De-husking Machine for Minor Millets 80
Dr. Hemu Rathore Comb stripper - an asset for women farmers 81
for manual groundnut stripping
Dr. Suman Singh Alleviating drudgery of women farmers in harvesting cotton 82
Prof. S. K. Saha Utilization of the Standardized Animal Driven 83
Gear Box for Multiple Rural Applications
Prof. S. K. Saha A Device for Making Tulsi Mala Beads 84
Prof. S. K. Saha A Technology Package for Garlic Processing for Value Addition 85
Dr. P. U. Shahare Agricultural Mechanization in Maharashtra : Status and Scope 86
Pradyumna V. Senad Use of bull power for slurry pump of Cow-dung 87
gas at Goshala in Aurangabad
Harshita Jain Improved Weeders : to alleviate drudgery of women farmers 88
Dr. Hemu Rathore Drudgery reduction of women farmers by apron 89
style vegetable picking bag
Shri. Babarao U. Jadhav Sara Yantra 90
Shri. Babhuta B. Patel Tractor Operated Seed Fertilizer Dispenser 91
Shri. Anil R. Patel Motorcycle Operated Sprayer 92
Shri. Santosh P. Kurkute Fodder Cutter 93
Shri. Chandrashekhar Etarkar Solar Operated Sprayer 94
Shri. Ravindra D. Kharde Person Operated Seeder 95
Shri. Ramdas Shivram Sanap Tractor Operated Seeder 96
Shri. Balbheem Doke Stick for Forest Plantation 97
Shri. Rajendra Hujare Green Mannure Crop Cutter 98
Shri. Madhavrao S. Malewar Borewell Motor Puller 99
Shri. Madhavrao S. Malewar Person Operated Seeder 100
Shri. Pravin S. Lad Single Bull Operated Weeder 101
Shri. Avinash M. Patangrao Pahari Khat Yantra 102
Shri. Rajendra R. Suryawanshi Cotton Uprooter 103
Shri. Aditya N. Ponkshe Person Operated Compressor 104
Women friendly technologies developed
by VNMKV Parbhani
Dr. Jayshree P. Zend, Manjusha S. Revanwar, Sandhya N. Admankar
AICRP (FRM), Dept. of Family Resource Management,
College of Home Science, VNMKV Parbhani,
Email : jpzend@rediffmail.com
All India coordinated research project on Home Science is being implemented in the College of
Home ScienceVNMKV since 1997.The main objective of this research is mitigation of farm
women's drudgery. An inventory of the drudgery prone farm and allied activities revealed that the
farm women adopt unnatural posture while working in the field and they perform all these activities
manually. Hence, an attempt was made to reduce their drudgery by developing kaizen especially
for women. Apron for cotton picking, Trishulweeder for performing weeding in standing posture,
Eared cutter for Jowarharvesting,GopalKhore for dung collection, revolving stool and stand for
milking activity and mittens for vegetable harvesting.Field trials revealed that all these
technologies reduced drudgery, injuries and musculo skeletal disorders of women. The output of
the work was increased and the total time required for performing the work was reduced
significantly.
71
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
72
Stream cut off indicator – a tool for
efficient border irrigation
Jayant N. Uttarwar
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, A/P : Kolda, Tal. Dist . Nandurbar
Email : jayant.u@rediffmail.com
Wheat is a major cereal, rabi crop in Nandurbar district covering about 14000 ha area. The border
method of irrigation is generally adopted for wheat. The farmers turn off the stream of water, when
the water front reaches the downstream end. After the irrigation stream is cut off the tail water
recedes downstream. The water is stagnated at the lower end. This usually causes percolation
losses and breaching of bunds at the downstream of the borders. These losses decreases the
water application efficiency of the method .The losses of irrigation water due to percolation at the
upstream and excess impounding at the downstream ends of the borders can be minimised with
the use of stream cut off technology.
In this method, water stream at the upstream end is cut off as soon as the water front reaches to the
prefix cut off length of the borders. (Anjaneyulu, 1973, Jadia,1979 and Gawande et. al.1992)
The water man notices the advance of water front up to prefix point and runs to upstream end to
turn off the stream. Hence it is impossible to cut off the stream exactly at prefix point. Thus we
cannot reap the benefits of stream cut off technology.
To overcome the situation, KVK, Nandurbar designed and developed a Stream cut off indicator.
The stream cut off indicator is inserted into soil at prefix length and the waterman stands at the
upstream end. When the water front reaches to the prefix cut off point, the stream cut off indicator
gives alarm. In response to the alarm (indication), the water man turns the water stream to the next
border.
The experiments were conducted at Kolda and SamsherpurTq. Dist. Nandurbar on seven
different farmers' fields as well as on KVK, farm. The results showed 8.6 and 8.17 % saving of
irrigation time & water respectively over the 100 % stream cut off treatment. Besides saving of
irrigation time & water the drudgery which would have been induced in running from prefix point to
the upstream end is found nil. The stream cut off method with stream cut off indicator is found
efficient and comfortable to the water man.
Maize husk remover
Jayant N. Uttarwar
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, A/P :Kolda, Tq. Dist . Nandurbar
Email : jayant.u@rediffmail.com
Maize is a major cereal crop in the tribal area of Nandurbar district. Almost every tribal farmers
cultivate maize for his daily dietary purpose. Shelling of maize is done manually by these farmers.
Before shelling, the husk covering the maize cob has to be removed manually. During surveys,
group meetings, personal visits, and the problem of husk removal – dehusking was identified.
The manual dehusking of maize cob is time consuming and drudgery inducing operation. It
involves stripping off the husk strips while holding open end of the husk strip. This stripping has to
be done 3-4 times for complete removal of the husk. This problem of dehusking the maize cob is
the concern of to every maize grower, especially in tribal area where hand shelling is being
practiced. We worked on minimizing time and drudgery for maize dehusking.
After rigorous attempts to find a suitable tool for dehusking the maize cob, a fruitful idea came
across. Working on this idea, we designed a tool- Maize husk remover. The trials were conducted
with this new tool and satisfactory results were obtained for its application.
73
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
72
Stream cut off indicator – a tool for
efficient border irrigation
Jayant N. Uttarwar
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, A/P : Kolda, Tal. Dist . Nandurbar
Email : jayant.u@rediffmail.com
Wheat is a major cereal, rabi crop in Nandurbar district covering about 14000 ha area. The border
method of irrigation is generally adopted for wheat. The farmers turn off the stream of water, when
the water front reaches the downstream end. After the irrigation stream is cut off the tail water
recedes downstream. The water is stagnated at the lower end. This usually causes percolation
losses and breaching of bunds at the downstream of the borders. These losses decreases the
water application efficiency of the method .The losses of irrigation water due to percolation at the
upstream and excess impounding at the downstream ends of the borders can be minimised with
the use of stream cut off technology.
In this method, water stream at the upstream end is cut off as soon as the water front reaches to the
prefix cut off length of the borders. (Anjaneyulu, 1973, Jadia,1979 and Gawande et. al.1992)
The water man notices the advance of water front up to prefix point and runs to upstream end to
turn off the stream. Hence it is impossible to cut off the stream exactly at prefix point. Thus we
cannot reap the benefits of stream cut off technology.
To overcome the situation, KVK, Nandurbar designed and developed a Stream cut off indicator.
The stream cut off indicator is inserted into soil at prefix length and the waterman stands at the
upstream end. When the water front reaches to the prefix cut off point, the stream cut off indicator
gives alarm. In response to the alarm (indication), the water man turns the water stream to the next
border.
The experiments were conducted at Kolda and SamsherpurTq. Dist. Nandurbar on seven
different farmers' fields as well as on KVK, farm. The results showed 8.6 and 8.17 % saving of
irrigation time & water respectively over the 100 % stream cut off treatment. Besides saving of
irrigation time & water the drudgery which would have been induced in running from prefix point to
the upstream end is found nil. The stream cut off method with stream cut off indicator is found
efficient and comfortable to the water man.
Maize husk remover
Jayant N. Uttarwar
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, A/P :Kolda, Tq. Dist . Nandurbar
Email : jayant.u@rediffmail.com
Maize is a major cereal crop in the tribal area of Nandurbar district. Almost every tribal farmers
cultivate maize for his daily dietary purpose. Shelling of maize is done manually by these farmers.
Before shelling, the husk covering the maize cob has to be removed manually. During surveys,
group meetings, personal visits, and the problem of husk removal – dehusking was identified.
The manual dehusking of maize cob is time consuming and drudgery inducing operation. It
involves stripping off the husk strips while holding open end of the husk strip. This stripping has to
be done 3-4 times for complete removal of the husk. This problem of dehusking the maize cob is
the concern of to every maize grower, especially in tribal area where hand shelling is being
practiced. We worked on minimizing time and drudgery for maize dehusking.
After rigorous attempts to find a suitable tool for dehusking the maize cob, a fruitful idea came
across. Working on this idea, we designed a tool- Maize husk remover. The trials were conducted
with this new tool and satisfactory results were obtained for its application.
73
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
74 75
The Design and development of
Mogi- improved Wheel Hoe
Jayant N.Uttarwar
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, A/P :Kolda, Tq. Dist . Nandurbar
Email : jayant.u@rediffmail.com
Weeding is one of the most important farm operations in crop production system.Crop
establishment is necessary to eliminate the effect of weeds, pests and disease infestation and to
provide suitable conditions for optimum yield. Weed control measures must be put in place to
check the growth and propagation of weeds. Manual weeding requires huge labour force and
accounts for about 25 per cent of thetotal labour requirement (900-1200 man-hrs/ha). In India
thisoperation is mostly performed manually with khurpi or trench hoe that requires higher
labourinput and also is a very tedious and time-consuming process. Often several weeding are
necessary to keep the crop weed free. Weeding and hoeing is generally done 15-20 days after
sowing. The weed should be controlled and eliminated at their early stage Reduction in yield due
to weed alone is estimated to be 16-42 % depending on the crop and the location and involves 1/3
rd of the cost of cultivation. The most common methods of weed control are mechanical, chemical,
biological and cultural. Out of these four methods, mechanical weeding, either by hand tools or
weeders,is the most effective in both dry land and wet land.
The process involved in the operation of all wheel hoes is push and pull action. This action leads to
pain in arms of the operator. Hence there was need to design a wheel hoe which is comfortable to
operator.
To achieve this objective, Improved Wheel Hoe - a row crop weeder was developed at Krishi
Vigyan Kendra, Nandurbar (M.S,). The handle of this wheel hoe was designed as 'U',shaped . The
operator has to hold the handle at waist level with the two ends of the handle in both the hands. To
be suitable for all row crops, three 'V' shaped sweep blades (15, 20, 30 cm) were provided with
wheel hoe. Thisweederwas evaluatedto find itsperformance under product testing at AICRP on
Farm Implement and Machinery, Dept. of Farm Implements and machinery, MPKV,Rahuri (M.S.).
The weeding efficiency and field capacity was found 82.58 % and 0.036ha /hr. respectively. It has
performed very efficient as compared to other wheel hoes. It is found suitable for light and medium
types of soils.
Improved Wheel Hoe is simple, cost effective and useful for small to medium scale farm holders. It
is also a positive step towards reduction of drudgery involved in row crop weeding.
This Mogi- Improved Wheel Hoe is becoming popular among the farmers. The farmers in three
states,35 districts and 131 villages are using the Mogi- Improved Wheel Hoe and enjoying the
weeding operation with the least drudgery.
¤ìn uzwl n¤
ml. a=¤m «i«ªi« ;=«l
·|+·
Rice Seed Drumer
Shri. Lakshman Baburao Dalvi
Raigad
·|- ~-|-| +·¤| +·-|-| +|~-|- +|+ ¬¬- ·|-|-| ¬|+¤|. |¬|c| +|¡| + -+¬·¤ ¬|¡-. +¤ +
|-u¬|-¸- ¬|c-|-| ¤|ª- ¬+ ¬|+-|-. -¬- ·|+|-| º+ ¬|«|- +·¤| - ¡|+- ¤|+| ¬c-, +¬¬| +·¤|
|· ·|-|- - ~|-|- ~-|- -··| ·|¡¸- ++|+·¸- -|¬|·| ¡|-|-| +|c| ¤|+| ¬¬-|. +¤¸· c-|; + ·|-
+|c- :· | ¬+«| +|+|+·|+· ¡| +|+ ·|·| +|=+-+· ¬+¬+¸- ¬¬-|-. |-¸-- ·+¬|·· -¡¤¤-
·|- +·¤| + -|· +·-|-| +-+-| ¬-¬|. ¡,|+|: ¤|¬ ·|- ¬~|¤- ¬-|¬-|¬|- |-|+-| +¬-|
·|- +·¤| +|-| ¬u|¬ ¬·|¬ +¬|. ·|-|¬ +c| :¸· +-- ¬¤||·- + ~··º ¬|¬| +-+¬.
¬¤||·- +·¤| +|¬| ¬|u·| -|+|º+¤| ¬|+¬|-| :|- -|+ +¬|+-|- ¬|¬| ¬¬¸- ·|·|+· º+ ++
+¬+¬| ¬|¡. |+« |+|-|-| ¬|c+¤ =+-| +|c¸- |+|¤ +-···-|¬|c| +·¤| .|+| +|·+|· ¤|++|+|
¬|+- -|¡|. º+ - :|- ;- ¬|+|·|-| +-«+|· ¬|u·| :|·| +¬|+-|- ¬|¡. ·|+· +|.·¡|.¬|. +|;+ +¬+¸-
º.- |+.+|. -| -· |a, .·+| :|- ;- ¬-·|+· ¬¬¸- ~-+ |+|¤ +|···| +|-|+· |++| ¬+·¬ |+|¤
¬|-| +|-|+· +·-| -. - +¸c x ~ +¸c ¬|+|·|-| ¬|u·| ++ + ¬|c-|¬|c| |:¬¬| ¬¬¸- ¬|u·|
¬+¬+_| ¤|·¬| ¬|¡. ¬+¬+|+ ·+·| -¬+ |:-|- +| +|-|- ~|+¬ ¤|-. º+·| -- |+¬| |+|¤ ¬|+-.
º+| |:+¬|- :|- º+·-| +·¤| :|- +|¤¬ ¬¡¤ +- ~+-|-. ¬¤||·- +|¦|· -· - -~ |++| u~¬ +|
+·¬ ¤|-. º+ ·Š-| ¡ + ¬¡¤ ¬|c¸ ~+-.
+·¤| +·-|-| ¬|«|+· ¤|+| ¬c- -|¡|, +|·¤|+| º+|- +«|¬ -|· ¬|«|+· ¬|+|- +·¤| ¡|-. ¬|«|-|¬
¬-· ~.- ¬+|. ¬¬¸- - +|c+¸- ~~.- ¬+|. +¬. º+- ·Š-| º+| +«¬ -|· ¬|«|- +| +·¤| +- ~+-.
|++|·| ¬|«| ¬·« ·+- -|-. :|- ·|+|+¤|¬ ¬-· º ;- + -·| ·|++· ~ ;- ¬-· c+¸- ¡ + +·¤|
+·-. +¤ .+|¤ ++| ¡|+- ·|- ·|+|-| ¬-+|-|-| º++ =+|+·|¬ ·--| ++| ·|¡-.
+|-| ¬|¤|·¤ |++- ,,-·· - -,··· -+ ¬|¡. + +|-· +·-| +- +|¡-+|·| ¡-|- ¬¬· -¬-
|-u¬|-¸- ¬|c-|-| +|¬ -·· ++| ~|¬| ¬|¡. ¬¤||·- + +¤-|- ¡¬+ ¬¬¸- +-+ + |=| +|¤|¡| ¡
+ ¡|-|«¸ ~+-|-.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
74 75
The Design and development of
Mogi- improved Wheel Hoe
Jayant N.Uttarwar
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, A/P :Kolda, Tq. Dist . Nandurbar
Email : jayant.u@rediffmail.com
Weeding is one of the most important farm operations in crop production system.Crop
establishment is necessary to eliminate the effect of weeds, pests and disease infestation and to
provide suitable conditions for optimum yield. Weed control measures must be put in place to
check the growth and propagation of weeds. Manual weeding requires huge labour force and
accounts for about 25 per cent of thetotal labour requirement (900-1200 man-hrs/ha). In India
thisoperation is mostly performed manually with khurpi or trench hoe that requires higher
labourinput and also is a very tedious and time-consuming process. Often several weeding are
necessary to keep the crop weed free. Weeding and hoeing is generally done 15-20 days after
sowing. The weed should be controlled and eliminated at their early stage Reduction in yield due
to weed alone is estimated to be 16-42 % depending on the crop and the location and involves 1/3
rd of the cost of cultivation. The most common methods of weed control are mechanical, chemical,
biological and cultural. Out of these four methods, mechanical weeding, either by hand tools or
weeders,is the most effective in both dry land and wet land.
The process involved in the operation of all wheel hoes is push and pull action. This action leads to
pain in arms of the operator. Hence there was need to design a wheel hoe which is comfortable to
operator.
To achieve this objective, Improved Wheel Hoe - a row crop weeder was developed at Krishi
Vigyan Kendra, Nandurbar (M.S,). The handle of this wheel hoe was designed as 'U',shaped . The
operator has to hold the handle at waist level with the two ends of the handle in both the hands. To
be suitable for all row crops, three 'V' shaped sweep blades (15, 20, 30 cm) were provided with
wheel hoe. Thisweederwas evaluatedto find itsperformance under product testing at AICRP on
Farm Implement and Machinery, Dept. of Farm Implements and machinery, MPKV,Rahuri (M.S.).
The weeding efficiency and field capacity was found 82.58 % and 0.036ha /hr. respectively. It has
performed very efficient as compared to other wheel hoes. It is found suitable for light and medium
types of soils.
Improved Wheel Hoe is simple, cost effective and useful for small to medium scale farm holders. It
is also a positive step towards reduction of drudgery involved in row crop weeding.
This Mogi- Improved Wheel Hoe is becoming popular among the farmers. The farmers in three
states,35 districts and 131 villages are using the Mogi- Improved Wheel Hoe and enjoying the
weeding operation with the least drudgery.
¤ìn uzwl n¤
ml. a=¤m «i«ªi« ;=«l
·|+·
Rice Seed Drumer
Shri. Lakshman Baburao Dalvi
Raigad
·|- ~-|-| +·¤| +·-|-| +|~-|- +|+ ¬¬- ·|-|-| ¬|+¤|. |¬|c| +|¡| + -+¬·¤ ¬|¡-. +¤ +
|-u¬|-¸- ¬|c-|-| ¤|ª- ¬+ ¬|+-|-. -¬- ·|+|-| º+ ¬|«|- +·¤| - ¡|+- ¤|+| ¬c-, +¬¬| +·¤|
|· ·|-|- - ~|-|- ~-|- -··| ·|¡¸- ++|+·¸- -|¬|·| ¡|-|-| +|c| ¤|+| ¬¬-|. +¤¸· c-|; + ·|-
+|c- :· | ¬+«| +|+|+·|+· ¡| +|+ ·|·| +|=+-+· ¬+¬+¸- ¬¬-|-. |-¸-- ·+¬|·· -¡¤¤-
·|- +·¤| + -|· +·-|-| +-+-| ¬-¬|. ¡,|+|: ¤|¬ ·|- ¬~|¤- ¬-|¬-|¬|- |-|+-| +¬-|
·|- +·¤| +|-| ¬u|¬ ¬·|¬ +¬|. ·|-|¬ +c| :¸· +-- ¬¤||·- + ~··º ¬|¬| +-+¬.
¬¤||·- +·¤| +|¬| ¬|u·| -|+|º+¤| ¬|+¬|-| :|- -|+ +¬|+-|- ¬|¬| ¬¬¸- ·|·|+· º+ ++
+¬+¬| ¬|¡. |+« |+|-|-| ¬|c+¤ =+-| +|c¸- |+|¤ +-···-|¬|c| +·¤| .|+| +|·+|· ¤|++|+|
¬|+- -|¡|. º+ - :|- ;- ¬|+|·|-| +-«+|· ¬|u·| :|·| +¬|+-|- ¬|¡. ·|+· +|.·¡|.¬|. +|;+ +¬+¸-
º.- |+.+|. -| -· |a, .·+| :|- ;- ¬-·|+· ¬¬¸- ~-+ |+|¤ +|···| +|-|+· |++| ¬+·¬ |+|¤
¬|-| +|-|+· +·-| -. - +¸c x ~ +¸c ¬|+|·|-| ¬|u·| ++ + ¬|c-|¬|c| |:¬¬| ¬¬¸- ¬|u·|
¬+¬+_| ¤|·¬| ¬|¡. ¬+¬+|+ ·+·| -¬+ |:-|- +| +|-|- ~|+¬ ¤|-. º+·| -- |+¬| |+|¤ ¬|+-.
º+| |:+¬|- :|- º+·-| +·¤| :|- +|¤¬ ¬¡¤ +- ~+-|-. ¬¤||·- +|¦|· -· - -~ |++| u~¬ +|
+·¬ ¤|-. º+ ·Š-| ¡ + ¬¡¤ ¬|c¸ ~+-.
+·¤| +·-|-| ¬|«|+· ¤|+| ¬c- -|¡|, +|·¤|+| º+|- +«|¬ -|· ¬|«|+· ¬|+|- +·¤| ¡|-. ¬|«|-|¬
¬-· ~.- ¬+|. ¬¬¸- - +|c+¸- ~~.- ¬+|. +¬. º+- ·Š-| º+| +«¬ -|· ¬|«|- +| +·¤| +- ~+-.
|++|·| ¬|«| ¬·« ·+- -|-. :|- ·|+|+¤|¬ ¬-· º ;- + -·| ·|++· ~ ;- ¬-· c+¸- ¡ + +·¤|
+·-. +¤ .+|¤ ++| ¡|+- ·|- ·|+|-| ¬-+|-|-| º++ =+|+·|¬ ·--| ++| ·|¡-.
+|-| ¬|¤|·¤ |++- ,,-·· - -,··· -+ ¬|¡. + +|-· +·-| +- +|¡-+|·| ¡-|- ¬¬· -¬-
|-u¬|-¸- ¬|c-|-| +|¬ -·· ++| ~|¬| ¬|¡. ¬¤||·- + +¤-|- ¡¬+ ¬¬¸- +-+ + |=| +|¤|¡| ¡
+ ¡|-|«¸ ~+-|-.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
76
¤m unulnn umz
ml. =-la ¤¬-ªi« lu;
¤|¬-|
Single Bull Operated Weeder
Shri. Sunil Arjunrao Shinde
Jalna
~-|- +|+ +·-|¬|c| +·|- +« ¬|+|-|. +u· -|¬+||-| ~|¬| -· +¬|-| ¤|·| ¬|+. +|-:|
~-+|+· º+- +¬ ¬¬-|. -¬- +|+ +|c| ~|-|+· :|- +¬|-| +u·¤| +·-|-| +|+ +|·-|-. |
¬·-¤| ¬=|- ·+- º+ +¬-¬|- ¬+¤|· +-|+-|-| .·- +¬|.
º+| ¬|u·| +_|¬| -.- :|-· +-· +¬ ¬|¡-. +¬|·| ¤¸¬| ¤|·¤|· +|;+ ¬|+·| ¬|¡-. +_| + ¬|+¸·
¤|·-|¬|c| +_|¬| + ¬|+·|¬| ·|+ ¬¬¸- -|·- - :|-¡| +|¤¬ ¤|-|-. ¤¸ + ¬|+¸· º+++|-
¬·++-|¬|c| ¬,| -|· +|+·¬| ¤|-.
+|-+«| +¬, ¬||¡·|-| ++| + ++-·-| -:|. +|-·+ +~|- -¬¤ ;·|:| ¬·-¤| ¬|-|. ¬||¡·
+-+-|-| +¸¤ ¡|- ¬|¬ -·| ++-·-| ·||¡-|- ·|·|- +·- ¬¤|·¤| +·¤ ¬||¤ -|·|·| +¸¤·+|+·
¬¬-|-| ¬¬+¬ ~|-|+· ·|+· +-¡| ++«| +,-|·| ¤|·¤|-| -+|+ +-- +¸¤ + -|· +·|+
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+|+ ¬¡¤·|·| +|· +·¸ ¬|+¬|.
+|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ¬¡| - ¬|- ¡¤|· -+ ¬|¡. ¬|-|+- ~-| -+Š- ~, ¬+¤|· +-+¬| ¬|¡-.
77
mìcì unuìzl n¤
ml 4m¤a ¬4¤i¤ ¤«i=
-||~+
+|¤|-| |++| +·-|-| º+¬|·u| ¬|+|· (¬|;¤) -¬-|+« +|¤|·|- ¬·|¬·|+=| ++| :· |+«-|.
+«|+«| +|: |-+·-|-| +¤·| u- + +« ¤|ª- ¬|+- ¡|-| ¬||¤ +|¤|-| ¬|;¤ º+¬|·u| - -·¡-|
·|+« +|¤| +· -¡¤|+| ¬¬| +|:| ¡|- -·¡-|. ·|-¸- +|:| .-+|·| + -|· +·-|-| +-+-| +c
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+|¤|-| ¬|¤+ ¬|¬ |-·- -|¡|- -¬- +|:| +·-|+· +|;++· c·||++ ++- ¡|- ·|+« +|¤|¬| ¡|-|
+|¡-- -|¡|.

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·|+|-¸- c|+¬¬| +|:| ¬|+|· + +¤-|-¬|· ++++«| c--|-¸- -|· ·|+|- u|¬| +·-|. ª+-|¬- +|-
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cŠc· -¡¤¤ .·· |ac¬·| ¬|¬+|¬ +|¬|-| .-+|·| ¡|-.
+|:| .-+|·| +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- º+ ¬|u ·+ +- ¬|¡.
Onion Grading Machine
Shri. Ganpat Jagannath Mawal
Nashik
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
76
¤m unulnn umz
ml. =-la ¤¬-ªi« lu;
¤|¬-|
Single Bull Operated Weeder
Shri. Sunil Arjunrao Shinde
Jalna
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+|-+«| +¬, ¬||¡·|-| ++| + ++-·-| -:|. +|-·+ +~|- -¬¤ ;·|:| ¬·-¤| ¬|-|. ¬||¡·
+-+-|-| +¸¤ ¡|- ¬|¬ -·| ++-·-| ·||¡-|- ·|·|- +·- ¬¤|·¤| +·¤ ¬||¤ -|·|·| +¸¤·+|+·
¬¬-|-| ¬¬+¬ ~|-|+· ·|+· +-¡| ++«| +,-|·| ¤|·¤|-| -+|+ +-- +¸¤ + -|· +·|+
¬|+¬. º+ +¬-|¬- +u· -|· +-|+« +¬|·| ¤|·|+· ¬+¬+¸- - ·|¡-| º+ +¬-|¬- +u·|+· ~-|-|
+|+ ¬¡¤·|·| +|· +·¸ ¬|+¬|.
+|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ¬¡| - ¬|- ¡¤|· -+ ¬|¡. ¬|-|+- ~-| -+Š- ~, ¬+¤|· +-+¬| ¬|¡-.
77
mìcì unuìzl n¤
ml 4m¤a ¬4¤i¤ ¤«i=
-||~+
+|¤|-| |++| +·-|-| º+¬|·u| ¬|+|· (¬|;¤) -¬-|+« +|¤|·|- ¬·|¬·|+=| ++| :· |+«-|.
+«|+«| +|: |-+·-|-| +¤·| u- + +« ¤|ª- ¬|+- ¡|-| ¬||¤ +|¤|-| ¬|;¤ º+¬|·u| - -·¡-|
·|+« +|¤| +· -¡¤|+| ¬¬| +|:| ¡|- -·¡-|. ·|-¸- +|:| .-+|·| + -|· +·-|-| +-+-| +c
¬|¬|. ~··. ¬|¬| +|·|·| +|·:|-|-| ¬|¤+ +|+· +-- -|«¤ -|· +¬|. |+· .-+|·| -·· +-
¡|-|. +¤ --|· ¤|ª- ¬¬-|- +|: ¬c+¤,a|c·| ¬|+|·|·| +|¤|- .+|¤ +|c¤ ;·|:| ¬-+
¬+ª|-| -|· ¤|+ ¬|+- ¡|-. ~··c ¬|¬| +|;+, ++ + |+¤- -¤·| ¬|=|- ª+-|¬- +,-|- -|«¤|
+ +-|+¬. -·| -|«¤|- .-+|·| c-· +- +¬|. +-|+¬-| +|·| +c|-| ~|¤ ·- + ·--- +:¬
+·|- .-|+|·|- .+|¤ ··· +- +|¡-¬ ¬|¡. -|«¤|+· -¬|ªc+ + +|.·¡|.¬|.+|;+-| +|+· +-|+«
+|¤|-| ¬|¤+ ¬|¬ |-·- -|¡|- -¬- +|:| +·-|+· +|;++· c·||++ ++- ¡|- ·|+« +|¤|¬| ¡|-|
+|¡-- -|¡|.

|+¤- + ¡ª--|¬- ¬~| :|-¡| +¤| |- ¬¬¸- +|-| +-| ++|-¬|¤+ +·-|-| ¬| |+« +··|
·|+|-¸- c|+¬¬| +|:| ¬|+|· + +¤-|-¬|· ++++«| c--|-¸- -|· ·|+|- u|¬| +·-|. ª+-|¬- +|-
.-| |+|-c|¬| ,~.··· |+¬|+|+ +|¬ | .+|¤ º+| -|¬|¬| -º - ~· c- +|¤|-| .-+|·| ¡|- ¬||¤ ¡
.+|¤ º-· +- ¬¬-. +¤·|- ¬|¤+| ¬|¤+ +-- + º+¬|·u| +|:| |+«¸ ¬|+¬| ¬|¡. |:+¬|¬| ~·
cŠc· -¡¤¤ .·· |ac¬·| ¬|¬+|¬ +|¬|-| .-+|·| ¡|-.
+|:| .-+|·| +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- º+ ¬|u ·+ +- ¬|¡.
Onion Grading Machine
Shri. Ganpat Jagannath Mawal
Nashik
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
78
n¬rnulnn vìlw unulnn mzuwl n¤
ml. l;al¤ +a+ml
¬|-¸·
u·+¤| ¡ ~-|-|¬ º+ +¡·+|- +|+ ¬¬¸- - +·-… |=| +·-|-. ¡ +|+ +¬¸-, ¬|¤+ ¡|+- +·|+
¬|+-. | +|+|¬| u¸+ +« ¬|+-| + +|¤·¡| u¸+ ¬|+-|-. -¬- u·+¤|- +|+ +·-|-| +--|·|
+¤Š|¬| +|¬ ¡|-|. ·|+« ¡| +|¬ ++| + u·+¤|-| +« ++| +·¤|· ¬¬ u·+¤| + -|· +·-|-
c·|+¬.
¬+.¤+ u·+¤| +|-| |·~|;- ª+-… +-+¬|. | +· ¬|u·| ++ ¬| -|- +|« +¬|+¬ ¬|¡-. |-|¬
¬-· ¬¬ c+¬ ¬|¡ +| | |+ -|¤ +«|+|¬¸- |-·¸- ;¬.
~-| |+++ .|- ¤·| -¬¬ -·|¡| ·|-| ;-·|-| +:- |+«+-|¬ ¬·+|- +¬|. ·|-| ¬+¤|· +-+-|·|
+|+|- ¬+.¤+ ¬|.c|.¬|. |+¤|·|-| +:- ·-¬|. - +¬-¬|- ¬|¡. +|+|+· +¬|-| ¬·| ++| ¡|-
¬|¡ ¡ +|¡¸- - + ¬|-| ¬|+¬ -|¬- +¬ ¬|¡.
| +|+|+· ¬·-¤| ¬|-|. ¬·+|-|¬| ·|·+¬ |+«|¬ -|¡|. -¬- |+¤|+|c|- .+|¤++ - |+«¤ +
~|¬+| |+·|+|+·¸- ~-| |++|¬|¬|c| +:-|-| ¬·|+ ¬·| ¬·-¤| ¬|-|.
¬|-|+- -- |¤-=|- ·|·| +|-| .¬|· ~|¬| ¬¬¸-. ·|-| ¬|+-| +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ··· - -~··
·+ c+¬| ¬|¡.
Person Operated and Bul Operated Weeder
Shri. Deelip Kulkarni
Latur
79
cìcì uìsmzìul uµunì=l n¤
ml ¬««a ¶lª«¦ «is+ª
c|¤
+||+¤ ·|+|-|¬ ~-+|-| ++| ¬+|- ¬|¤+ +|+ +·-| |+ |¬|c| +|-| |-|+-| +¬| +¬|. ¡|-|-
+·|+ ¬|+¤|| +-|+« ··+¸· ¬+ +« + +¤·|-| ¬|¤+ +¬| ¤|+| ¬|+|-|, +|¤|·|-|¬ ¬|¤|· +¡|+·|
¬¬|-|, ·|-| +|·+|· :·ª-| +·|+| ¬|+, ·|+· ¬|¤+ u- - ¬¬, |+«, +¡|· |-| +|·+|· ¤|·
¬|+|¬| ¬|+|-|. |+· +| -¡¤¸- ++| |++-|-|¬ +·-¸ ¬¡¬| :·ª- - +·|+| ¬|+¤|| ¬||¤ ¤|ª-|-
¤|ª- +|« |c+¤|·| ¬+¤|·|-| |-|+-| +¬| +¬|.
¡| ¬+¤|· +-+-|¬|c| +|¬|: +|¡-- ¬|¤|+ ¬|+¬. :|- +|·|-| +|~-, +c|¬| ¬|+|· :-|-| +~|-
-¬¤ | ¬+ª| ¡|·| +·-¸ ·|+· +|- +·- ¬+¤|· +-+¬|.
¬|¤|·¤ -c ¬¡|- +|c| ¬+¤|· +-+¬| ¬|¡-. ¡| ¬+«|- ¬+¤|· ~-+|-| ¬|¤+ -+|+|-| ¬|¡-.
-¤|+«| +-+-|¬|c| +|¬|:¬| +«¤:|· ¬|+|· :+- +c|·| ¬¬|+· +|+ :-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡, ¡|
-¤|+«| ¬+:| ¡¬+| + +|-« ¬¬-|- ++- +|+|¬| ¬|+ ¤|- ¬||¤ ¤|· ¬|+|+| ¬|+- -|¡| -¬- ¡|
|+«| ·|·| ¡|-|·| ¬|+|-| :u|¬ -|+-| .+|· +|+·-| -|.
:|+| |+«| ¡| -¤|+«|.+|¤- ¬¬¸- ¤|··| ¤|+| :|-| +|·-| +-| ¬|¡-. ¬~|- .+|·- |+« +-|+¬
¬|¡-.
·|-+·|+· ++| +¡|·|¬| ¬|+·| :|·| +¬+¸-, +|·|-|¡| ¬¤| ·|+ ¬|+·| ¬|¡ ·|+· a|c +|- +¬|+¬
¬|¡. u·-|- :u|¬ ¬|+·|-| ¬|¤+ +|+· +-- +¬ :|-·| +|¬|:| ¬|¡-. ·|cŠ|- ¡···| ·|c ¬¡¤
+|c-| |+ |¬|c| :|- +|¬|:|-| ¬«|+· ¬|u·| ·|· ¬|+¬| ¬|¡.
¬|+| ~-|¬| ¬|+·| -- +c +|·|¬| |+~+| +|¤¸- +| +|·-|¬|c| +|+| +¬+¬| ¬|¡. ¬~| ¬+«|-
¬-·| ¬+¤|·|-| |-|+-| ¬~| ¬¡|- ¬¡|- +·+|- +¬| ¬|¡. |++|¬|c| |-| |++- -· - -.· ·+|
º+c|- ¬|¡.
Multipurpose Tools
Shri. Jayawant Harichandra Wadekar
Thane
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
78
n¬rnulnn vìlw unulnn mzuwl n¤
ml. l;al¤ +a+ml
¬|-¸·
u·+¤| ¡ ~-|-|¬ º+ +¡·+|- +|+ ¬¬¸- - +·-… |=| +·-|-. ¡ +|+ +¬¸-, ¬|¤+ ¡|+- +·|+
¬|+-. | +|+|¬| u¸+ +« ¬|+-| + +|¤·¡| u¸+ ¬|+-|-. -¬- u·+¤|- +|+ +·-|-| +--|·|
+¤Š|¬| +|¬ ¡|-|. ·|+« ¡| +|¬ ++| + u·+¤|-| +« ++| +·¤|· ¬¬ u·+¤| + -|· +·-|-
c·|+¬.
¬+.¤+ u·+¤| +|-| |·~|;- ª+-… +-+¬|. | +· ¬|u·| ++ ¬| -|- +|« +¬|+¬ ¬|¡-. |-|¬
¬-· ¬¬ c+¬ ¬|¡ +| | |+ -|¤ +«|+|¬¸- |-·¸- ;¬.
~-| |+++ .|- ¤·| -¬¬ -·|¡| ·|-| ;-·|-| +:- |+«+-|¬ ¬·+|- +¬|. ·|-| ¬+¤|· +-+-|·|
+|+|- ¬+.¤+ ¬|.c|.¬|. |+¤|·|-| +:- ·-¬|. - +¬-¬|- ¬|¡. +|+|+· +¬|-| ¬·| ++| ¡|-
¬|¡ ¡ +|¡¸- - + ¬|-| ¬|+¬ -|¬- +¬ ¬|¡.
| +|+|+· ¬·-¤| ¬|-|. ¬·+|-|¬| ·|·+¬ |+«|¬ -|¡|. -¬- |+¤|+|c|- .+|¤++ - |+«¤ +
~|¬+| |+·|+|+·¸- ~-| |++|¬|¬|c| +:-|-| ¬·|+ ¬·| ¬·-¤| ¬|-|.
¬|-|+- -- |¤-=|- ·|·| +|-| .¬|· ~|¬| ¬¬¸-. ·|-| ¬|+-| +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ··· - -~··
·+ c+¬| ¬|¡.
Person Operated and Bul Operated Weeder
Shri. Deelip Kulkarni
Latur
79
cìcì uìsmzìul uµunì=l n¤
ml ¬««a ¶lª«¦ «is+ª
c|¤
+||+¤ ·|+|-|¬ ~-+|-| ++| ¬+|- ¬|¤+ +|+ +·-| |+ |¬|c| +|-| |-|+-| +¬| +¬|. ¡|-|-
+·|+ ¬|+¤|| +-|+« ··+¸· ¬+ +« + +¤·|-| ¬|¤+ +¬| ¤|+| ¬|+|-|, +|¤|·|-|¬ ¬|¤|· +¡|+·|
¬¬|-|, ·|-| +|·+|· :·ª-| +·|+| ¬|+, ·|+· ¬|¤+ u- - ¬¬, |+«, +¡|· |-| +|·+|· ¤|·
¬|+|¬| ¬|+|-|. |+· +| -¡¤¸- ++| |++-|-|¬ +·-¸ ¬¡¬| :·ª- - +·|+| ¬|+¤|| ¬||¤ ¤|ª-|-
¤|ª- +|« |c+¤|·| ¬+¤|·|-| |-|+-| +¬| +¬|.
¡| ¬+¤|· +-+-|¬|c| +|¬|: +|¡-- ¬|¤|+ ¬|+¬. :|- +|·|-| +|~-, +c|¬| ¬|+|· :-|-| +~|-
-¬¤ | ¬+ª| ¡|·| +·-¸ ·|+· +|- +·- ¬+¤|· +-+¬|.
¬|¤|·¤ -c ¬¡|- +|c| ¬+¤|· +-+¬| ¬|¡-. ¡| ¬+«|- ¬+¤|· ~-+|-| ¬|¤+ -+|+|-| ¬|¡-.
-¤|+«| +-+-|¬|c| +|¬|:¬| +«¤:|· ¬|+|· :+- +c|·| ¬¬|+· +|+ :-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡, ¡|
-¤|+«| ¬+:| ¡¬+| + +|-« ¬¬-|- ++- +|+|¬| ¬|+ ¤|- ¬||¤ ¤|· ¬|+|+| ¬|+- -|¡| -¬- ¡|
|+«| ·|·| ¡|-|·| ¬|+|-| :u|¬ -|+-| .+|· +|+·-| -|.
:|+| |+«| ¡| -¤|+«|.+|¤- ¬¬¸- ¤|··| ¤|+| :|-| +|·-| +-| ¬|¡-. ¬~|- .+|·- |+« +-|+¬
¬|¡-.
·|-+·|+· ++| +¡|·|¬| ¬|+·| :|·| +¬+¸-, +|·|-|¡| ¬¤| ·|+ ¬|+·| ¬|¡ ·|+· a|c +|- +¬|+¬
¬|¡. u·-|- :u|¬ ¬|+·|-| ¬|¤+ +|+· +-- +¬ :|-·| +|¬|:| ¬|¡-. ·|cŠ|- ¡···| ·|c ¬¡¤
+|c-| |+ |¬|c| :|- +|¬|:|-| ¬«|+· ¬|u·| ·|· ¬|+¬| ¬|¡.
¬|+| ~-|¬| ¬|+·| -- +c +|·|¬| |+~+| +|¤¸- +| +|·-|¬|c| +|+| +¬+¬| ¬|¡. ¬~| ¬+«|-
¬-·| ¬+¤|·|-| |-|+-| ¬~| ¬¡|- ¬¡|- +·+|- +¬| ¬|¡. |++|¬|c| |-| |++- -· - -.· ·+|
º+c|- ¬|¡.
Multipurpose Tools
Shri. Jayawant Harichandra Wadekar
Thane
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
80
De-husking Machine for Minor Millets
Prof. S. K. Saha, Prof. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Jagpal Singh,
Mr. Raj Kumar Gupta
Rural Technology Action Group (RuTAG), IIT Delhi110016
Email : drjagpals@gmail.com
The problem related to de-husking of Minor Millets was highlighted by the Director, Paryavaran
Sanrakshan Avam Adivasi Vikas Kendra, Jabalpur during the visit of RuTAG-Team at, Jabalpur.
The tribals of Mahakaushal Region of Madhya Pradesh produce minor millets in Mandla Region.
These are Kangni/Kauni (Foxtail or Italian Millet), Ragi/Madua/Madia Dana (Finger Millet),Kutki
(Little Millet), Sanwan (Barnyard millet) and Kodo Millet The de-husking of minor millets (Rice
making) is done by traditional method using wooden Okhli and Moosal which involve hard labour.
To reduce the drudgery, development of improved method/technology/machine for de-husking of
Minor Millets was identified. The technology should be tribal friendly. It should be mechanical
rather than electric/diesel operated as it is not available in remote villages of the tribal districts.
Searching for the suitable machine for de-husking it was discovered that Vivek Thresher-cum-
Pearler for Finger millet and Barnyard millet was developed by Vivekananda Parvatiya Krishi
Anusandhan Sansthan (VPKAS) (ICAR), Almora. A team from RuTAG-IITD visited the Sansthan
on January 09-10, 2012. During testing of this machine, it was observed that the machine (Vivek
Thresher-cum-Pearler) performs the dual operation of threshing and pearling of Finger millet
simultaneously and threshing, de-husking and polishing operation of Barnyard millet using
separate runs with suitable sieves. But it is not suitable for de-husking of other millets such as
Kangni/Kauni (Foxtail Millet), Kutki (Little Millet), Kodo Millet, etc. The machine is being
manufactured by M/S Punjab Agricultural Implements Private Limited, Railway Road,
SaharanPur (UP). Four sieves of different size are used in the operations. The machine is
available in two sizes: One which run by a generator cost Rs.12,800/- and other one which is
operated by Electric Motor costs Rs. 22,850/- They had supplied more than 100 machines as yet.
Mostly machines have been supplied through VPKAS, Almora and by Government of Uttrakhand.
During testing of the machines it was found that New Millet De-huskar (Prototype) later developed
at VPKAS might solve the problem of threshing and de-husking of all the minor millets being grown
in Mahakaushal Region of M.P. However, the team suggested VPKAS to replace the electric motor
from 5HP to 3HP as 3 HP Motor would run on single phase electric connection. Besides, some
minor modifications were also suggested in the existing Prototype model. These modifications
were carried out by VPKAS in new version. It was field tested and found working satisfactorily.
One of the manufacturers - M/s DMT Hydraulics, Agra has agreed for commercial manufacturing
of the machine. The Company has to sign MoA with VPKAS. The NGO - SahajivanSamiti,
Shahadol has indicated to provide the machines to the SHGs for which finance is being arranged
from financing institution.
81
Comb stripper – an asset for women farmers
for manual groundnut stripping
Dr. Hemu Rathore, Dr. Suman Singh, Ms. Charu Sharma,
Ms. Pratiksha Singh
AICRP-FRM-Dept. of Family resource management College of Home Science,
MPUAT, Udaipur
Email : sumanfrm@rediffmail.com
The developing countries account for nearly 95% of world production of groundnuts . In India the
cultivation of Groundnut is mostly confined to the southern Indian states, viz., Gujarat, Andhra
Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra. The other important states where it is grown
are Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and Punjab. In India groundnut is an important
oilseed crop, cultivated on 7.5 million hectares, with an annual production of 8 million tons. More
than nine million small and marginal farmers depend on this and other small oilseed crops for their
livelihoods.
Farmers aerate and dry newly harvested peanut in field which can either be handpicked or strip/
thresh pods from vines by beating. Traditionally to shake off the pods from the vines women
farmers repeatedly strike vines against a hard surface-the most common being a stone slab. This
task is very drudgery prone. The women feel tired and have body ache after stripping pods from
vines continuously for hours together. This job becomes more tiring when the vines are wet and a
little easier for dried ones.
To reduce the hardship in stripping task a small tool, Comb stripper was designed and tested on 30
women farmers engaged in the cultivation of groundnut from the last 5 years.
The results showed that traditionally 2-3 kg/hr pods were trashed but with the use of stripper it was
6-8 kg/hr. Overall drudgery reduction was 74% and times saved was 400%. Five prototypes of
newly designed stripper were tested and the final model was adopted by 80% of the beneficiaries.
Reduction of 45% in the health problems and 200% satisfaction was achieved by the women who
used the comb stripper.
Thus it can be concluded that comb stripper was very efficient in reducing drudgery. It saved time
and was found very efficient in reducing drudgery
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
80
De-husking Machine for Minor Millets
Prof. S. K. Saha, Prof. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Jagpal Singh,
Mr. Raj Kumar Gupta
Rural Technology Action Group (RuTAG), IIT Delhi110016
Email : drjagpals@gmail.com
The problem related to de-husking of Minor Millets was highlighted by the Director, Paryavaran
Sanrakshan Avam Adivasi Vikas Kendra, Jabalpur during the visit of RuTAG-Team at, Jabalpur.
The tribals of Mahakaushal Region of Madhya Pradesh produce minor millets in Mandla Region.
These are Kangni/Kauni (Foxtail or Italian Millet), Ragi/Madua/Madia Dana (Finger Millet),Kutki
(Little Millet), Sanwan (Barnyard millet) and Kodo Millet The de-husking of minor millets (Rice
making) is done by traditional method using wooden Okhli and Moosal which involve hard labour.
To reduce the drudgery, development of improved method/technology/machine for de-husking of
Minor Millets was identified. The technology should be tribal friendly. It should be mechanical
rather than electric/diesel operated as it is not available in remote villages of the tribal districts.
Searching for the suitable machine for de-husking it was discovered that Vivek Thresher-cum-
Pearler for Finger millet and Barnyard millet was developed by Vivekananda Parvatiya Krishi
Anusandhan Sansthan (VPKAS) (ICAR), Almora. A team from RuTAG-IITD visited the Sansthan
on January 09-10, 2012. During testing of this machine, it was observed that the machine (Vivek
Thresher-cum-Pearler) performs the dual operation of threshing and pearling of Finger millet
simultaneously and threshing, de-husking and polishing operation of Barnyard millet using
separate runs with suitable sieves. But it is not suitable for de-husking of other millets such as
Kangni/Kauni (Foxtail Millet), Kutki (Little Millet), Kodo Millet, etc. The machine is being
manufactured by M/S Punjab Agricultural Implements Private Limited, Railway Road,
SaharanPur (UP). Four sieves of different size are used in the operations. The machine is
available in two sizes: One which run by a generator cost Rs.12,800/- and other one which is
operated by Electric Motor costs Rs. 22,850/- They had supplied more than 100 machines as yet.
Mostly machines have been supplied through VPKAS, Almora and by Government of Uttrakhand.
During testing of the machines it was found that New Millet De-huskar (Prototype) later developed
at VPKAS might solve the problem of threshing and de-husking of all the minor millets being grown
in Mahakaushal Region of M.P. However, the team suggested VPKAS to replace the electric motor
from 5HP to 3HP as 3 HP Motor would run on single phase electric connection. Besides, some
minor modifications were also suggested in the existing Prototype model. These modifications
were carried out by VPKAS in new version. It was field tested and found working satisfactorily.
One of the manufacturers - M/s DMT Hydraulics, Agra has agreed for commercial manufacturing
of the machine. The Company has to sign MoA with VPKAS. The NGO - SahajivanSamiti,
Shahadol has indicated to provide the machines to the SHGs for which finance is being arranged
from financing institution.
81
Comb stripper – an asset for women farmers
for manual groundnut stripping
Dr. Hemu Rathore, Dr. Suman Singh, Ms. Charu Sharma,
Ms. Pratiksha Singh
AICRP-FRM-Dept. of Family resource management College of Home Science,
MPUAT, Udaipur
Email : sumanfrm@rediffmail.com
The developing countries account for nearly 95% of world production of groundnuts . In India the
cultivation of Groundnut is mostly confined to the southern Indian states, viz., Gujarat, Andhra
Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra. The other important states where it is grown
are Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and Punjab. In India groundnut is an important
oilseed crop, cultivated on 7.5 million hectares, with an annual production of 8 million tons. More
than nine million small and marginal farmers depend on this and other small oilseed crops for their
livelihoods.
Farmers aerate and dry newly harvested peanut in field which can either be handpicked or strip/
thresh pods from vines by beating. Traditionally to shake off the pods from the vines women
farmers repeatedly strike vines against a hard surface-the most common being a stone slab. This
task is very drudgery prone. The women feel tired and have body ache after stripping pods from
vines continuously for hours together. This job becomes more tiring when the vines are wet and a
little easier for dried ones.
To reduce the hardship in stripping task a small tool, Comb stripper was designed and tested on 30
women farmers engaged in the cultivation of groundnut from the last 5 years.
The results showed that traditionally 2-3 kg/hr pods were trashed but with the use of stripper it was
6-8 kg/hr. Overall drudgery reduction was 74% and times saved was 400%. Five prototypes of
newly designed stripper were tested and the final model was adopted by 80% of the beneficiaries.
Reduction of 45% in the health problems and 200% satisfaction was achieved by the women who
used the comb stripper.
Thus it can be concluded that comb stripper was very efficient in reducing drudgery. It saved time
and was found very efficient in reducing drudgery
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
82
Alleviating drudgery of women farmers
in harvesting cotton
Dr. Suman Singh, Dr. Hemu Rathore,Charu Sharma, Pratiksha Singh,
Harshita Jain
AICRP-FRM, Dept. of Family Resource Management,
College of Home Science, MPUAT, Udaipur
Email : sumanfrm@rediffmail.com
Key words : Cotton picking machine, drudgery prone, occupational health hazards.
Cotton accounts for 40% of the total global fiber production and is the most important fiber in the
world. India is one of the major cotton producers in the world having largest acreage under cotton
and also the second largest consumer for cotton.A study was conducted in Sakrawas village of
Railmagra Panchayat Samitiin Rajasthan with the following objectives :
1. To assess the drudgery in sowing, weeding and harvesting of cotton.
2. To explore the health hazards during sowing, weeding and harvesting of cotton
3. To mechanize the harvesting activity and study impact of cotton picking machine in
drudgery reduction.
The study was conducted on a sample of 30 women farmers engaged in cotton cultivation using
an interview schedule and an experimental protocol. The results revealed that cotton sowing,
weeding and harvesting, all the three activities are drudgery prone. They cause various
occupational health hazards viz skin irritation, nausea, pain in lower back and shoulders.The use
of battery operated cotton picking machine reduced drudgery up to 70% and doubled the output.It
can be concluded that technological intervention are a boon in reducing drudgery and
occupational health hazards.
83
Utilization of the Standardized Animal Driven
Gear Box for Multiple Rural Applications
Prof. S. K. Saha, Prof. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Jagpal Singh,
Mr. Raj Kumar Gupta
Rural Technology Action Group (RuTAG), IIT, Delhi 110 016
Email : drjagpals@gmail.com
From the ancient time animal has been a holistic as well as eco-friendly resource of energy.
Presently, about 68 million animals in India are used for draught purpose. The annual utilization of
draught animals in different regions varies from about 300 hrs to 1500 hrs against the ideal
utilization period of about 2400 hrs, which is quite low. It is imperative to enhance the use of animal
power in present context. As there is a lot of potential for animal power in rural areas, the use of
draught animals should be increased. In spite of it, animal power does not get proper attention
because it possess maintenance burden on the animal based farmers. The operational cost of the
draught animal power could be substantially reduced by their increased use. One of the areas
could be to use them in rotary mode for low-power post-harvest machines (up to 1 hp) while they
are idle.
In this direction, various agencies have made efforts in the past but still the use of draught animal
power could not be popularized, even it is reducing day by day. An evaluation of various designs of
Animal Driven Gear Box (ADGB) developed at various parts of the country has been made, which
shows that there is a need of enhancing its efficiency. A modified gearbox for the ADGB was
fabricated and placed in field for testing. This gearbox is having three pairs of Spur gears. The
overall gear ratio of this box is 1:63. Besides water pumping, it is being tried for other rural
applications such as Chaff cutter, Thresher, Atta Chakki, Electricity generation etc.ADPM can be a
potential technology for rural areas to enhance the use of draught animals to make them
economically viable.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
82
Alleviating drudgery of women farmers
in harvesting cotton
Dr. Suman Singh, Dr. Hemu Rathore,Charu Sharma, Pratiksha Singh,
Harshita Jain
AICRP-FRM, Dept. of Family Resource Management,
College of Home Science, MPUAT, Udaipur
Email : sumanfrm@rediffmail.com
Key words : Cotton picking machine, drudgery prone, occupational health hazards.
Cotton accounts for 40% of the total global fiber production and is the most important fiber in the
world. India is one of the major cotton producers in the world having largest acreage under cotton
and also the second largest consumer for cotton.A study was conducted in Sakrawas village of
Railmagra Panchayat Samitiin Rajasthan with the following objectives :
1. To assess the drudgery in sowing, weeding and harvesting of cotton.
2. To explore the health hazards during sowing, weeding and harvesting of cotton
3. To mechanize the harvesting activity and study impact of cotton picking machine in
drudgery reduction.
The study was conducted on a sample of 30 women farmers engaged in cotton cultivation using
an interview schedule and an experimental protocol. The results revealed that cotton sowing,
weeding and harvesting, all the three activities are drudgery prone. They cause various
occupational health hazards viz skin irritation, nausea, pain in lower back and shoulders.The use
of battery operated cotton picking machine reduced drudgery up to 70% and doubled the output.It
can be concluded that technological intervention are a boon in reducing drudgery and
occupational health hazards.
83
Utilization of the Standardized Animal Driven
Gear Box for Multiple Rural Applications
Prof. S. K. Saha, Prof. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Jagpal Singh,
Mr. Raj Kumar Gupta
Rural Technology Action Group (RuTAG), IIT, Delhi 110 016
Email : drjagpals@gmail.com
From the ancient time animal has been a holistic as well as eco-friendly resource of energy.
Presently, about 68 million animals in India are used for draught purpose. The annual utilization of
draught animals in different regions varies from about 300 hrs to 1500 hrs against the ideal
utilization period of about 2400 hrs, which is quite low. It is imperative to enhance the use of animal
power in present context. As there is a lot of potential for animal power in rural areas, the use of
draught animals should be increased. In spite of it, animal power does not get proper attention
because it possess maintenance burden on the animal based farmers. The operational cost of the
draught animal power could be substantially reduced by their increased use. One of the areas
could be to use them in rotary mode for low-power post-harvest machines (up to 1 hp) while they
are idle.
In this direction, various agencies have made efforts in the past but still the use of draught animal
power could not be popularized, even it is reducing day by day. An evaluation of various designs of
Animal Driven Gear Box (ADGB) developed at various parts of the country has been made, which
shows that there is a need of enhancing its efficiency. A modified gearbox for the ADGB was
fabricated and placed in field for testing. This gearbox is having three pairs of Spur gears. The
overall gear ratio of this box is 1:63. Besides water pumping, it is being tried for other rural
applications such as Chaff cutter, Thresher, Atta Chakki, Electricity generation etc.ADPM can be a
potential technology for rural areas to enhance the use of draught animals to make them
economically viable.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
84
A Device for Making Tulsi Mala Beads
Prof. S. K. Saha, Prof. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Jagpal Singh,
Mr. Raj Kumar Gupta
Rural Technology Action Group (RuTAG), IIT, Delhi 110 016
Email : drjagpals@gmail.com
In the villages of Mathura and Brindavan districts of Uttar Pradesh and Bharatpur District of
Rajasthan some of the women are engaged in making beads from the stem/twigs of Tulsi plant.
They make Tulsi Mala(Garlands) of 108 beads, sale these Mala and earn their livelihood. They
were using a Wooden structure, a device in which a tailstock was fixed on the right side of a
wooden base. A randomly selected DC Motor connected with a 12 Volts DC Battery was used in
the device. The motor was held in hand for forward movement while turning, boring and cutting of
beads from stem of Tulsi. The user used to sit on the ground, bent her body towards the device
while working and hold the DC Motor along with the stem holder (Chuck) pressing by her thumb
and finger to stop the movement of chuck for taking the bead out of the tailstock. The Women who
use this device used to feel irritation due to vibration by holding the DC Motor in hand, stopping the
motor with chuck pressing by her thumb and finger, neck and back pain due to continuous bending
the body while working. Besides, the productivity was low.
A Bharatpur based NGO-Lupin Human Welfare & Research Foundation which organized such
400 women of 18 villages of Bharatpur district in Self Help Groups (SHGs) presented the problems
being faced by these women in making Tulsi Mala beads.
RuTAG-IIT Delhi studied the problems and developed an improved device for making beads for
Tulsi Mala. Earlier the DC Motor which was held in hand, causing lot of strain, drudgery and
inconsistency is now pushed forward and backward on a platform/guide made for the purpose.
Users are very happy working on this improved device. Smt. Omvati Devi of Nadbai village,
Bharatpur district told that her family operates this device even for about 12 hrs a day without any
tiredness and earn Rs.1100-1200/- per day while the earlier machine was giving only Rs.300-
400/- per day and could not work more than eight hours a day.
One more version has been developed for fixing on a table and to be operated sitting on a chair.
Four numbers of the machines could be fixed on a table and all four motors could be connected
with a single DC power supply.
85
A Technology Package for Garlic Processing
for Value Addition
Prof. S. K. Saha, Prof. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Jagpal Singh,
Mr. Raj Kumar Gupta
Rural Technology Action Group (RuTAG), IIT, Delhi 110 016
Email : drjagpals@gmail.com
Garlicproduction is an important crop particularly in the states of Rajasthan, U.P., M.P. etc. The
prominent garlic production areas of Rajasthan state are in the districts of Chittorgarh, Jhalawar,
Baran and Kota. Rajasthan has a specific Mandi for marketing of garlic at Chhipabarod in Baran
district. As true for any other perishable crop, the garlic producers and several NGOs of Rajasthan
have repeatedly expressed the need for a small scale low cost technology for processing of garlic
for value addition. The processing operations with garlic particularly include grading, bulb
breaking, clove flaking, peeling, grinding etc. These operations are helpful for preparing garlic
powder, garlic paste, garlic pickle, garlic oil etc. For want of the value addition processing at their
disposal, the farmers are compelled to sell their produce at very low prices or face large-scale
spoilage. So the availability of a suitable set of machines to carry out the necessary operations
was articulated as a widespread need by the garlic growers. During our Regional Workshop in
Rajasthan one of the problems identified by field agencies was processing of Garlic for value
addition.
In response to the above need our survey revealed that only large scale processing were
prevalent and suitable technology package for small scale operation was not available in the
market. However, it was discovered that Department of Processing & Food Engineering., College
of Technology & Engineering (CTAE), MaharanaPratap University of Agriculture and Technology
(MPUAT), Udaipur had developed the set of machines which were available with them but had not
yet been field tested and proven for their viability in context of the actual users. CTAE, MPUAT,
Udaipur had showed their willingness to collaborate in the process of field testing and
standardization of this package. These machines installed were required to be field-tested at
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Anta,Distt. Baran with the participation and feedback of the prospective
users and necessary modifications were to be incorporated to make them user-friendly.
A commercial testing cum training programme in garlic processing was organized by RuTAG-IIT
Delhi for farmers/entrepreneurs from 28-9-12 to 01-10-12 at KVK Anta for the participants deputed
by the NGO – ParyavaranParishad, Kota. A team from RuTAG-IITD participated in the same. In
the course of this project, the performance of the machines developed by CTAE, MPUAT, Udaipur
were evaluated for commercial application at KVK Anta with the help of rural entrepreneurs.
Some problems were observed in the operation of the machines. These were brought to the notice
of MPUAT with suggestions for improvements. In the process, improvisation (as needed) and
standardization of the complete technology package have been carried out in the next generation
of machines available at MPUAT. The commercial feasibility of using these for required processing
has also been established. Also recently the Govt. of Rajasthan has declared 75% subsidy on
these machines.This will enable the small farmers of the region to adopt thistechnology. The
manufacturer of these machines has been identified at Udaipur through CTAE, MPUAT. The
farmers/entrepreneurs may place orders for the purchase of the machines from the identified
manufacturer.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
84
A Device for Making Tulsi Mala Beads
Prof. S. K. Saha, Prof. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Jagpal Singh,
Mr. Raj Kumar Gupta
Rural Technology Action Group (RuTAG), IIT, Delhi 110 016
Email : drjagpals@gmail.com
In the villages of Mathura and Brindavan districts of Uttar Pradesh and Bharatpur District of
Rajasthan some of the women are engaged in making beads from the stem/twigs of Tulsi plant.
They make Tulsi Mala(Garlands) of 108 beads, sale these Mala and earn their livelihood. They
were using a Wooden structure, a device in which a tailstock was fixed on the right side of a
wooden base. A randomly selected DC Motor connected with a 12 Volts DC Battery was used in
the device. The motor was held in hand for forward movement while turning, boring and cutting of
beads from stem of Tulsi. The user used to sit on the ground, bent her body towards the device
while working and hold the DC Motor along with the stem holder (Chuck) pressing by her thumb
and finger to stop the movement of chuck for taking the bead out of the tailstock. The Women who
use this device used to feel irritation due to vibration by holding the DC Motor in hand, stopping the
motor with chuck pressing by her thumb and finger, neck and back pain due to continuous bending
the body while working. Besides, the productivity was low.
A Bharatpur based NGO-Lupin Human Welfare & Research Foundation which organized such
400 women of 18 villages of Bharatpur district in Self Help Groups (SHGs) presented the problems
being faced by these women in making Tulsi Mala beads.
RuTAG-IIT Delhi studied the problems and developed an improved device for making beads for
Tulsi Mala. Earlier the DC Motor which was held in hand, causing lot of strain, drudgery and
inconsistency is now pushed forward and backward on a platform/guide made for the purpose.
Users are very happy working on this improved device. Smt. Omvati Devi of Nadbai village,
Bharatpur district told that her family operates this device even for about 12 hrs a day without any
tiredness and earn Rs.1100-1200/- per day while the earlier machine was giving only Rs.300-
400/- per day and could not work more than eight hours a day.
One more version has been developed for fixing on a table and to be operated sitting on a chair.
Four numbers of the machines could be fixed on a table and all four motors could be connected
with a single DC power supply.
85
A Technology Package for Garlic Processing
for Value Addition
Prof. S. K. Saha, Prof. Rajendra Prasad, Dr. Jagpal Singh,
Mr. Raj Kumar Gupta
Rural Technology Action Group (RuTAG), IIT, Delhi 110 016
Email : drjagpals@gmail.com
Garlicproduction is an important crop particularly in the states of Rajasthan, U.P., M.P. etc. The
prominent garlic production areas of Rajasthan state are in the districts of Chittorgarh, Jhalawar,
Baran and Kota. Rajasthan has a specific Mandi for marketing of garlic at Chhipabarod in Baran
district. As true for any other perishable crop, the garlic producers and several NGOs of Rajasthan
have repeatedly expressed the need for a small scale low cost technology for processing of garlic
for value addition. The processing operations with garlic particularly include grading, bulb
breaking, clove flaking, peeling, grinding etc. These operations are helpful for preparing garlic
powder, garlic paste, garlic pickle, garlic oil etc. For want of the value addition processing at their
disposal, the farmers are compelled to sell their produce at very low prices or face large-scale
spoilage. So the availability of a suitable set of machines to carry out the necessary operations
was articulated as a widespread need by the garlic growers. During our Regional Workshop in
Rajasthan one of the problems identified by field agencies was processing of Garlic for value
addition.
In response to the above need our survey revealed that only large scale processing were
prevalent and suitable technology package for small scale operation was not available in the
market. However, it was discovered that Department of Processing & Food Engineering., College
of Technology & Engineering (CTAE), MaharanaPratap University of Agriculture and Technology
(MPUAT), Udaipur had developed the set of machines which were available with them but had not
yet been field tested and proven for their viability in context of the actual users. CTAE, MPUAT,
Udaipur had showed their willingness to collaborate in the process of field testing and
standardization of this package. These machines installed were required to be field-tested at
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Anta,Distt. Baran with the participation and feedback of the prospective
users and necessary modifications were to be incorporated to make them user-friendly.
A commercial testing cum training programme in garlic processing was organized by RuTAG-IIT
Delhi for farmers/entrepreneurs from 28-9-12 to 01-10-12 at KVK Anta for the participants deputed
by the NGO – ParyavaranParishad, Kota. A team from RuTAG-IITD participated in the same. In
the course of this project, the performance of the machines developed by CTAE, MPUAT, Udaipur
were evaluated for commercial application at KVK Anta with the help of rural entrepreneurs.
Some problems were observed in the operation of the machines. These were brought to the notice
of MPUAT with suggestions for improvements. In the process, improvisation (as needed) and
standardization of the complete technology package have been carried out in the next generation
of machines available at MPUAT. The commercial feasibility of using these for required processing
has also been established. Also recently the Govt. of Rajasthan has declared 75% subsidy on
these machines.This will enable the small farmers of the region to adopt thistechnology. The
manufacturer of these machines has been identified at Udaipur through CTAE, MPUAT. The
farmers/entrepreneurs may place orders for the purchase of the machines from the identified
manufacturer.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Agricultural Mechanization in Maharashtra :
Status and Scope
Dr. P. U. Shahare
HoD Department of Farm Machinery and Power
CAET, Dr. B.S. Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Dist: Ratnagiri 415 712
Email : shahare_prashant@rediffmail.com
The role of agricultural mechanization is very important to bring the improvement in the present
scenario of agriculture in the state. Various farm operations are needed to be carried out using
agricultural machinery, implements and tools. The availability of adequate farm power viz.
mechanical, animal, human etc. is very crucial for timely operations for operating machinery,
implements and the tools for increasing production, productivity and handling crop produce to
reduce the losses. In Maharashtra the farm power availability increased almost five times since
last forty years from 0.255 kW/ha to 1.11 kW/ha in year 2011-2012. This is not sufficient.
Agricultural mechanization is essential for timeliness in agricultural operation, better quality work;
reduction is human drudgery and cost of operation and healthy agriculture. Most of the state is
under rain fed agriculture and land holding per head is very less and going down drastically. Efforts
are being made by the state government to enhance the present status of agricultural
mechanization. Promotion to custom hiring practice of machinery, tractors, power tillers,
cooperative management of machinery through social groups, better sales &service network,
increase in direct subsidy to marginal and medium farmers, credit facility from banks at lower
interest rate, massive awareness amongst farmers etc. are some of the key points for betterment
of small and marginal farmers.
86
Use of bull power for slurry pump of Cow-dung
gas at Goshala in Aurangabad
Pradyumna Vasantrao Senad
Aurangabad
Mixing of slurry in large Cow-dung gas plant is an important process. The Slurry pumps are
available which operates on electricity or diesel. Electricity availability is scares in rural areas and
diesel operations are non economical. Use of bull power for such operations could be useful
where bulls are available. Goshala in Aurangabad has good number of bulls.
For this purpose, differential gearbox used in cars is used to convert energy from bulls to operate
slurry pump. Bull rotates 6 times in a minute with a radius of 3 meters from centre point. Differential
gear box with proportion 1:5.5 will give 33 rpm speed at the end. The speed is then increased with
a gear train having proportion 1:3:3 i.e 9 times. It is again increased by combination of sprockets
and chains to 8.57 times. The result is that approx 2800 rpm speed will be received by slurry pump.
This will drive slurry pump.
The same unit can be used for kadaba-kutti machine and flour grinding machine and also for
charging the batteries which further can be used for various domestic purposes (for eg: operating
lights and fans).
87
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Agricultural Mechanization in Maharashtra :
Status and Scope
Dr. P. U. Shahare
HoD Department of Farm Machinery and Power
CAET, Dr. B.S. Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth, Dapoli, Dist: Ratnagiri 415 712
Email : shahare_prashant@rediffmail.com
The role of agricultural mechanization is very important to bring the improvement in the present
scenario of agriculture in the state. Various farm operations are needed to be carried out using
agricultural machinery, implements and tools. The availability of adequate farm power viz.
mechanical, animal, human etc. is very crucial for timely operations for operating machinery,
implements and the tools for increasing production, productivity and handling crop produce to
reduce the losses. In Maharashtra the farm power availability increased almost five times since
last forty years from 0.255 kW/ha to 1.11 kW/ha in year 2011-2012. This is not sufficient.
Agricultural mechanization is essential for timeliness in agricultural operation, better quality work;
reduction is human drudgery and cost of operation and healthy agriculture. Most of the state is
under rain fed agriculture and land holding per head is very less and going down drastically. Efforts
are being made by the state government to enhance the present status of agricultural
mechanization. Promotion to custom hiring practice of machinery, tractors, power tillers,
cooperative management of machinery through social groups, better sales &service network,
increase in direct subsidy to marginal and medium farmers, credit facility from banks at lower
interest rate, massive awareness amongst farmers etc. are some of the key points for betterment
of small and marginal farmers.
86
Use of bull power for slurry pump of Cow-dung
gas at Goshala in Aurangabad
Pradyumna Vasantrao Senad
Aurangabad
Mixing of slurry in large Cow-dung gas plant is an important process. The Slurry pumps are
available which operates on electricity or diesel. Electricity availability is scares in rural areas and
diesel operations are non economical. Use of bull power for such operations could be useful
where bulls are available. Goshala in Aurangabad has good number of bulls.
For this purpose, differential gearbox used in cars is used to convert energy from bulls to operate
slurry pump. Bull rotates 6 times in a minute with a radius of 3 meters from centre point. Differential
gear box with proportion 1:5.5 will give 33 rpm speed at the end. The speed is then increased with
a gear train having proportion 1:3:3 i.e 9 times. It is again increased by combination of sprockets
and chains to 8.57 times. The result is that approx 2800 rpm speed will be received by slurry pump.
This will drive slurry pump.
The same unit can be used for kadaba-kutti machine and flour grinding machine and also for
charging the batteries which further can be used for various domestic purposes (for eg: operating
lights and fans).
87
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
88
Improved Weeders: to alleviate drudgery
of women farmers
Harshita Jain, Dr. Suman Singh, Dr. Rekha Vyas, Dr. Hemu Rathore
Dept of Family Resource Management, College of Home Science, MPUAT,
Udaipur Rajasthan
Email : Jainharshita24@gmail.com
Woman is the backbone of agricultural workforce but worldwide her hard work is mostly unpaid
and underestimated. She performs the most tedious tasks in agriculture, animal husbandry as
well as at home hence, face drudgery both at home and at farm. The old and traditional farming
methods are drudgery prone and the available tools and technologies are not women friendly.
Weeding is one of the tedious works among all other agricultural work which is mostly done by
women. It is performed by women in awkward posture of bending and squatting.
The present study was conducted on 100 farm women engaged in agriculture work since last 10
years with the aim to find out the occupational health problems and postural deformities while
performing weeding work. The body map was used to find out the MSDs and its severity and
OWAS tool was used to assess the postural deformities and intervention prioritization based on
the posture.
The data revealed that all the farm women had severe to moderate pain in their back, thighs, neck
and arms while performing the weeding work by traditional method. The result of OWAS
assessment depicted that there is urgent need to change the working posture adopted by women
while weeding, as it is harmful and may cause many deformities.
In the second phase of study, improved wheel hoe weeder was introduced to the group of 30 farm
women. They were provided training to develop skill in using the tool. The women were asked to
use this improved tool for 30 day and then again the data was collected. The result of the Body
Map assessment portrayed that the severity of body pain reduced from severe to moderate. The
result of OWAS assessment also revealed that the tool introduced was a better option for women
farmers as it improved the distorted posture. The opinion of the women about the tool was also
positive. The inference from interview and group discussion with women elicited that the weeder
was time saving, drudgery reducing and provided comfort while performing weeding activity.
89
Drudgery reduction of women farmers by
apron style vegetable picking bag
Dr. Hemu Rathore, Dr. Suman Singh, Pratiksha Singh, Charu Sharma
AICRP-FRM, Dept. of Family resource management,
College of Home Science, MPUAT, Udaipur, Rajasthan
Email : sumanfrm@rediffmail.com
Key words : Drudgery, Okra, Efficiency, Vegetable picking
Vegetable picking is purely weather dependent. To beat the sun, women prefer going for picking of
vegetables early morning or late evening. Farm women engaged in vegetable cultivation are
prone to severe cuts, wounds, itching etc. Traditionally, women usedtheir sarees/ odhaniand tie it
in a special way to make it like a 'jholi' (a bag) to collect the pickedvegetables.Direct contact with
the plants caused allergy, itching and cuts on the hands and the body of women.The study was
taken with the objective to assess the suitability of the designed 'apron –vegetable picking bag' for
collecting okra.
The designed apron was evaluated on participatory mode for its suitability in reducing health
disorders in comparison to the traditional method, using an 'odhni', on the following parameters,
the picking efficiency, carrying capacity, ease, comfort, safety and loading/ unloading etc. The
results revealed that the ergonomically designed vegetable picking bag was having 45% higher
carrying capacity. It could be easily tied on the waist of women and proved superior over the
traditional method adopted by women farmers. These bags can be taught to stitchlocally as they
are used daily by the women. The women felt relief from allergic reactions and itching by use of
these bags. They also expressed that they had to walk less for emptying the bag again and again
when used the bag thus were relieved of fatigue and that they could use both the hands now for
picking Okra, thus increasing the efficiency of picking.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
88
Improved Weeders: to alleviate drudgery
of women farmers
Harshita Jain, Dr. Suman Singh, Dr. Rekha Vyas, Dr. Hemu Rathore
Dept of Family Resource Management, College of Home Science, MPUAT,
Udaipur Rajasthan
Email : Jainharshita24@gmail.com
Woman is the backbone of agricultural workforce but worldwide her hard work is mostly unpaid
and underestimated. She performs the most tedious tasks in agriculture, animal husbandry as
well as at home hence, face drudgery both at home and at farm. The old and traditional farming
methods are drudgery prone and the available tools and technologies are not women friendly.
Weeding is one of the tedious works among all other agricultural work which is mostly done by
women. It is performed by women in awkward posture of bending and squatting.
The present study was conducted on 100 farm women engaged in agriculture work since last 10
years with the aim to find out the occupational health problems and postural deformities while
performing weeding work. The body map was used to find out the MSDs and its severity and
OWAS tool was used to assess the postural deformities and intervention prioritization based on
the posture.
The data revealed that all the farm women had severe to moderate pain in their back, thighs, neck
and arms while performing the weeding work by traditional method. The result of OWAS
assessment depicted that there is urgent need to change the working posture adopted by women
while weeding, as it is harmful and may cause many deformities.
In the second phase of study, improved wheel hoe weeder was introduced to the group of 30 farm
women. They were provided training to develop skill in using the tool. The women were asked to
use this improved tool for 30 day and then again the data was collected. The result of the Body
Map assessment portrayed that the severity of body pain reduced from severe to moderate. The
result of OWAS assessment also revealed that the tool introduced was a better option for women
farmers as it improved the distorted posture. The opinion of the women about the tool was also
positive. The inference from interview and group discussion with women elicited that the weeder
was time saving, drudgery reducing and provided comfort while performing weeding activity.
89
Drudgery reduction of women farmers by
apron style vegetable picking bag
Dr. Hemu Rathore, Dr. Suman Singh, Pratiksha Singh, Charu Sharma
AICRP-FRM, Dept. of Family resource management,
College of Home Science, MPUAT, Udaipur, Rajasthan
Email : sumanfrm@rediffmail.com
Key words : Drudgery, Okra, Efficiency, Vegetable picking
Vegetable picking is purely weather dependent. To beat the sun, women prefer going for picking of
vegetables early morning or late evening. Farm women engaged in vegetable cultivation are
prone to severe cuts, wounds, itching etc. Traditionally, women usedtheir sarees/ odhaniand tie it
in a special way to make it like a 'jholi' (a bag) to collect the pickedvegetables.Direct contact with
the plants caused allergy, itching and cuts on the hands and the body of women.The study was
taken with the objective to assess the suitability of the designed 'apron –vegetable picking bag' for
collecting okra.
The designed apron was evaluated on participatory mode for its suitability in reducing health
disorders in comparison to the traditional method, using an 'odhni', on the following parameters,
the picking efficiency, carrying capacity, ease, comfort, safety and loading/ unloading etc. The
results revealed that the ergonomically designed vegetable picking bag was having 45% higher
carrying capacity. It could be easily tied on the waist of women and proved superior over the
traditional method adopted by women farmers. These bags can be taught to stitchlocally as they
are used daily by the women. The women felt relief from allergic reactions and itching by use of
these bags. They also expressed that they had to walk less for emptying the bag again and again
when used the bag thus were relieved of fatigue and that they could use both the hands now for
picking Okra, thus increasing the efficiency of picking.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
»zì n¤
ml. «i«iªi« o-i¤ªi« ¬i¤«
+||~+
~-+|+· ¬¬¤|| +«|·|+ -|+·|- -|+·¤| --|+ +·-| - +·-¸ -:--· +-¡| ¬| +|·|·| ¬|+-|-.
|¬|c| ++«| +¤¸· u-, ¬+, +« +|| ¤|-|. |+· +| -¡¤¸- +«| -|+·|¬| cŠc··| +·|·| +|«|
¬|+¸- ¬| +|·¤|· a|c + -|· +¬ ¬|¡. +|«|+« -|+·¤| +·- ¬¬-|-|- ¬|+|·+|- ¬|¤+
~|-|+« + +|«|-| -:| +|c-|- +|-| :¸· ¬|c¬| ¤|-, ++| +«|-, ++| ¬+|- ¬| | +|¦|· +·-|
¤|-|-.
-+-|+- .|+|-¸- ·|-| +·¤| +, +|«+ ;·|:| ¬+¤|· +-|+¬| ¬|¡-. |¤-=|- ·|-| +|:| ¬|¤+
~-+|-| ¡|- ¬|¡. +|+·|+·- +|·¸«u- +« ~|·|-| ¬|++·, |¡·+«|- u-, +|¤.|+|, ¬,| +|¬|-|
+|++ + |++| ¡ :u|¬ +·- ¬¬-|-.
90 91
¿Š¿zulnn ul u mn uzwl n¤
ml. «=¸ai «=l ¤ea
-:¸·+|·
Tractor Operated Seed Fertilizer Dispenser
Shri. Babhuta Bansi Patel
Nandurbar
+ -|· +·-|·| ¬|¤| ~-|- |+|¤ +·¤| +|¬¸- u- c|+¤|+- ¬+ +|+ +|-+| +|~-|·| ¬|¤|·
¡|- ¡|-|. +¤ ·|-|¬ |+|+¤ +|+|+· -:|¡·¤|¤ u- c|+¤ |+· ;-+ +|~- |++|¬- ~|¬ -|¡|.
|+« c-· u- +|| ¤|+- +Š- ~-· u- ~|·|¬| ·|¡|-. ++| u|·|+·¸- |++- ·¬--| +¬-¬|-
+|¬| ··+¸· u- ¬|+- +| + u- +·¤|·| +|+|¬|c| ¬|¤+ ¬+ ¬||¤ +« +|| ¤|-. +|·+||·+ +·¤|
¬+¤|·|- +·¤|-| u|¬| ++| ¤|ª- ¡|+- +|¤|+· ·+|ª¤- ¡|- -·¡-. |· ¬-·|+· + u|¬|+· |+|¤ +
u-|-| +|+| |· .+|¤|- |:¬| ¤|- -·¡-|. -¬- | +|+|¬|c| +|¬|+¤| ¤|ª- ¬|+ ¬||¤ ¬+«|-
+¡·+|- -¡¤¤ ¡| ¬+ +|+ +¤·|·| +¬| + +|=+-+· ¬+¬+¸- ¬¬-. -¡¤¸- +¬-¬|- +|-
cŠc·-|¬- +|- -+|-· +¬.
| +|·| ¬|+|··|+· º+ +¤+¸- +c| +¬|+¬¬| ¬¬¸- ·| +c|- |+|¤ + u- |¬|c| :|- ++++« ·|+
+¬ ¬|¡-. +c|·| u|¬| ¬¬¤|| ¬-|+|-+ +|Š¬+¤|¬ ¬-|+|-+ |+¬·¬| ¤|+-|+· -|¬¤||
:|-·| -|+|¦|· +-| |:¬¬| ¬|¡. +|-| +|¡-¸+ ¬¬· ¡|-|+|·-| |- :|- :|-·| -|+|-| +:- ¡|-. +|¤
+c|-|¬ ¬||¤ u- +c|-|¬ |+|¤ ¬||¤ u- .+||¤- +,-|- ¤|-|+·-| ¬-|+|-+ ¤|-¸- ·|¬· |:¬¬
¬¬¸- ¬|+·+--¬|· |+|-|-| ¬|+|·+|-|.+|¤ ¬|+| ++| ¤|ª- +·|+| ¬|+-. |¬|c| +|c· .¤|¬|-|
+¤| |:¬¬| ¬¬¸- ·|-¦|· |+|¤ + u-|-| +|+| ++| ¤|ª- +·|+| ¬|+-. +|- :|- ¬|··| |ª¤-|+·
º, -~, -- ¬||¤ -· ;-|+- c+-| -|-. ·|+|·-| +|·| -|+|-| +|;++· u¤| |:¬-| ¬|¡-. +|-
:|- ¤|+-|- ¬|+·+ u|¬|-¬|· ---|+·|-| |a, ¬¬¬-| -|+|-| -¬c·| ¬¡|·|- +· u|¬| +·-|
-|-. ·|+« +||¡¤ ·| u|¬|+· |+|-|-| +·¤| +·-|¬ +:- ¡|-.
¬·---¬|· |+|¤ .·+ ¬|«|+· c-· ¬+| ¬-·|+· c|+-|¬ ¬¬ ¬+|=- ¬|¡-. -|· +¬-| +·¤|
+|+« u-|-| -··· +|+· ¡|+- - ~|·|·| +«|¤+« +·-. ¤+c| +¤·| ¤|+| ¬|+ -+c·| u-|- cŠc·
¦|·| u- c|+¬ ¤|- -¬- u·+¤|, +u·¤| | .|+| +|·| ¬¡|·|- ¬¡¤·|·| ¡|-|-. + cŠc· -|¬-
+·-|¬|c| -,···,- -+ u- ¬|¬|. +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- -. c,···,- ¬¬¸- -¸·, ¡···|, ++, -|«
;·|:| |++|·| +·¤|¬|c| -+Š- -¬- u- :-|¬|c| +|:~|· + ¬||- ¬|¡.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
»zì n¤
ml. «i«iªi« o-i¤ªi« ¬i¤«
+||~+
~-+|+· ¬¬¤|| +«|·|+ -|+·|- -|+·¤| --|+ +·-| - +·-¸ -:--· +-¡| ¬| +|·|·| ¬|+-|-.
|¬|c| ++«| +¤¸· u-, ¬+, +« +|| ¤|-|. |+· +| -¡¤¸- +«| -|+·|¬| cŠc··| +·|·| +|«|
¬|+¸- ¬| +|·¤|· a|c + -|· +¬ ¬|¡. +|«|+« -|+·¤| +·- ¬¬-|-|- ¬|+|·+|- ¬|¤+
~|-|+« + +|«|-| -:| +|c-|- +|-| :¸· ¬|c¬| ¤|-, ++| +«|-, ++| ¬+|- ¬| | +|¦|· +·-|
¤|-|-.
-+-|+- .|+|-¸- ·|-| +·¤| +, +|«+ ;·|:| ¬+¤|· +-|+¬| ¬|¡-. |¤-=|- ·|-| +|:| ¬|¤+
~-+|-| ¡|- ¬|¡. +|+·|+·- +|·¸«u- +« ~|·|-| ¬|++·, |¡·+«|- u-, +|¤.|+|, ¬,| +|¬|-|
+|++ + |++| ¡ :u|¬ +·- ¬¬-|-.
90 91
¿Š¿zulnn ul u mn uzwl n¤
ml. «=¸ai «=l ¤ea
-:¸·+|·
Tractor Operated Seed Fertilizer Dispenser
Shri. Babhuta Bansi Patel
Nandurbar
+ -|· +·-|·| ¬|¤| ~-|- |+|¤ +·¤| +|¬¸- u- c|+¤|+- ¬+ +|+ +|-+| +|~-|·| ¬|¤|·
¡|- ¡|-|. +¤ ·|-|¬ |+|+¤ +|+|+· -:|¡·¤|¤ u- c|+¤ |+· ;-+ +|~- |++|¬- ~|¬ -|¡|.
|+« c-· u- +|| ¤|+- +Š- ~-· u- ~|·|¬| ·|¡|-. ++| u|·|+·¸- |++- ·¬--| +¬-¬|-
+|¬| ··+¸· u- ¬|+- +| + u- +·¤|·| +|+|¬|c| ¬|¤+ ¬+ ¬||¤ +« +|| ¤|-. +|·+||·+ +·¤|
¬+¤|·|- +·¤|-| u|¬| ++| ¤|ª- ¡|+- +|¤|+· ·+|ª¤- ¡|- -·¡-. |· ¬-·|+· + u|¬|+· |+|¤ +
u-|-| +|+| |· .+|¤|- |:¬| ¤|- -·¡-|. -¬- | +|+|¬|c| +|¬|+¤| ¤|ª- ¬|+ ¬||¤ ¬+«|-
+¡·+|- -¡¤¤ ¡| ¬+ +|+ +¤·|·| +¬| + +|=+-+· ¬+¬+¸- ¬¬-. -¡¤¸- +¬-¬|- +|-
cŠc·-|¬- +|- -+|-· +¬.
| +|·| ¬|+|··|+· º+ +¤+¸- +c| +¬|+¬¬| ¬¬¸- ·| +c|- |+|¤ + u- |¬|c| :|- ++++« ·|+
+¬ ¬|¡-. +c|·| u|¬| ¬¬¤|| ¬-|+|-+ +|Š¬+¤|¬ ¬-|+|-+ |+¬·¬| ¤|+-|+· -|¬¤||
:|-·| -|+|¦|· +-| |:¬¬| ¬|¡. +|-| +|¡-¸+ ¬¬· ¡|-|+|·-| |- :|- :|-·| -|+|-| +:- ¡|-. +|¤
+c|-|¬ ¬||¤ u- +c|-|¬ |+|¤ ¬||¤ u- .+||¤- +,-|- ¤|-|+·-| ¬-|+|-+ ¤|-¸- ·|¬· |:¬¬
¬¬¸- ¬|+·+--¬|· |+|-|-| ¬|+|·+|-|.+|¤ ¬|+| ++| ¤|ª- +·|+| ¬|+-. |¬|c| +|c· .¤|¬|-|
+¤| |:¬¬| ¬¬¸- ·|-¦|· |+|¤ + u-|-| +|+| ++| ¤|ª- +·|+| ¬|+-. +|- :|- ¬|··| |ª¤-|+·
º, -~, -- ¬||¤ -· ;-|+- c+-| -|-. ·|+|·-| +|·| -|+|-| +|;++· u¤| |:¬-| ¬|¡-. +|-
:|- ¤|+-|- ¬|+·+ u|¬|-¬|· ---|+·|-| |a, ¬¬¬-| -|+|-| -¬c·| ¬¡|·|- +· u|¬| +·-|
-|-. ·|+« +||¡¤ ·| u|¬|+· |+|-|-| +·¤| +·-|¬ +:- ¡|-.
¬·---¬|· |+|¤ .·+ ¬|«|+· c-· ¬+| ¬-·|+· c|+-|¬ ¬¬ ¬+|=- ¬|¡-. -|· +¬-| +·¤|
+|+« u-|-| -··· +|+· ¡|+- - ~|·|·| +«|¤+« +·-. ¤+c| +¤·| ¤|+| ¬|+ -+c·| u-|- cŠc·
¦|·| u- c|+¬ ¤|- -¬- u·+¤|, +u·¤| | .|+| +|·| ¬¡|·|- ¬¡¤·|·| ¡|-|-. + cŠc· -|¬-
+·-|¬|c| -,···,- -+ u- ¬|¬|. +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- -. c,···,- ¬¬¸- -¸·, ¡···|, ++, -|«
;·|:| |++|·| +·¤|¬|c| -+Š- -¬- u- :-|¬|c| +|:~|· + ¬||- ¬|¡.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
92
nì¿ìz »ìnmn unln wuìzwl n¤
ml. ¤l-a ª¤-i¤ ¤ea
-:·+|·
Motorcycle Operated Sprayer
Shri. Anil Raghunath Patel
Nandurbar
~-|+|+|-|¬ .+u c-+| ¬¬-| +·¤|. +·¤| ~|-|+|¬¸- +|¡-|·| +|¬|+¤|--· |++|+· ++|·¤| +·|+|
¬|+-. |¬|c| +··+ +·¤ ¬¬- -| +¤·|-|. ¬·|·| +|·|ª¤-|-| |+-|· +·-| +¤¸· c-|; ¤|ª-
.+|¤|- ·|¬+- ¬|¡. ++|·¤| + -|· +·-|¬|¤| º+| +¤·|¬| .|- |:+¬|¬| :|·~ - :|-~ -+ +¤¸·|
¤|+| ¬|+. -¬- ;-+| +¤·| :+-¡| º+ +¤¸· |:+¬|¬| +Š- :|- º+· ++|·¤| +·-|. +¤·|+·¸- ++|·¤|
|· .+|· ¡|;¬- |-| ~|·+-| -¬. ++|·¤|¬|c| +« ¬|+.
| ¬+«| ¬+ª|-| ¬·|¬ +·- ~·-~ ¬|¬| ¡ + -|· +¬. + +-+-|¬|c| ¬|+¤|· a|c a|c ª+¸,
-c-+|-c +|¬¸- - +|-| ¬+¸¤ ¬c, -|~-¬ +|;+, -«| ++· ;·|:| +|-| +¤·|- ·||+¤|¬ ·|¤+|c
~¡·|-¸- ¬|¤¬. +|- ~- |¬c··| :|- -¬|ªc+ c|Š| ¬¬¸- ·| +|c|·¬|+¬·| +|+|¬ +|¤¸¬
+¬+¬-| ¬¬-|-. +·¤-¬|· .·+ c|+|-|¬ ¬|+¤ |+¬¤|-| .+|¡ ¬|¬c¸- +|¬c¸- ¬- ¬¤+| +: +-
~+-|. -.- - ~ ;-|·| ~ -¬|ªc+ -«| |¬|c| +|+·-|- ¬|-| ¬¬¸- c| ¦|· -«| ++|¬| ¤|·¬-|
¬|¡-. +|c|·¬|+¬·| |+¬· .¤|¬|+· |¬|c| ~|+· +¬+¬¬| ¬¬¸- +¬| ¦|· -| +c ++|¬| ¤|·-|-
¬|¬| ¬|¡. ++|¬| º+ ¬|+c¬c -«| ¤|·¬¬| ¬¬¸- +|c|·¬|+¬·| +|+|¬ +|¤¸¬ ¬|u·| +|;+·|
¬¡|·|- -«|-| ¬|¤|· :-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. -«|+· ¬||.+|¤ º+| ¬|«|¬|c| ~ - , -|~¬ |:¬ ¬|¡-.
+|+« +|c|· ¬|+¬|·| ¬¡|·|- |:+¬|¬| --· -+ +c|¬ +|+-- ¬|- - ¬|c º+· +|·¬·|- ¬|+¤
++|·¤| ¡|+ ~+-. -|· -|¬|- ¬|- - ¬|c º+· ++|·¤| -¡¤¤- +¤¸·|+=| -|· +c ¤|ª- ++|- ¡ +|+
¡|-. + +| +·- ¬¬-|-| º+| +«|¬ :|- ¬|«|- -¬- -|- ¬|«|- ¬,| -|~¬ -|¬+-|-. -|~-¬¬|
¡+| ·| +|-|- ¬¤+| |:~- +¬+¸- º+| |++|¬| -|-¡| +|¤¸-| ++|·¤| ¡|-. +·¤-¬|· ºu|: -|~¬ +:
c+-| -. º+| +¸c| +|¬¸- -|· +¸c|+- ++|·¤| ¡|-. +|c|·¬|+¬·| +|¡-|- |+¬·+· ++|·¤| +·-|
-. :¬| |+¬·+· ++|·¤| +¬| ¬¬-| ;|¤-+· ¬|· +- - +: +·-.
¡ + º+| |c+|¤|¡¸- :¬| |c+|¤| +|¡¸- --|¬|c| ¬||ª+· ¬¬¸- +·¤ -¬-|-| -¬- ++|·¤|·|
+|+|¬|c| +|+· +-|--· ¬-|- ·|+ ++« +-- +|c¸- c+-| -|-. ~-+·| ¬||-¬|· +|-| ¤|·¤|
¬¤+| +|c¤| +- ~+-|. +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- -. -,···,- ¬¬¸- - ¬||+|-, ·;++, +|+¸¬, +|·|,
++|, +¡¸, |+·¤| ;·|:| |++ -¬- -|· +¸c|+--| --| ¬¬¤|| +« + |++|¬|c| -+Š- ¬|¡.
93
uì»mìuwl n¤
ml.=ai¢ ¤=i+ª +ª+e
¬¡+:-+·

++| =+|- +¤¸· |+«- -|¡|-. +|¡| +«| +¤·|·| ¬|·+|c| ¤|·¤|+« ~-|-| +|+ ¬·¸- ·|¡-|-. +¤|+¤|
~-+|¬| º+c·|¬| +|+ +·|+ ¬|+-. ª+-… ·| ·|¬ ¬|++·|¬| +|+¤|¬|c| +¤¸· |+«¤ ¡| +|c| ¬+ª|
¡|-|. |-¸- ·|¬ +|+¤| +|-| +-+-| ¬-¬|.
|+· º+| ¬|u«|¬| ·|¬ +|+¤|· ·¬· ¤|·¬¬ ¬|¡-. |+¬· + +¬|·| ¬¡|·|- + +|c|··| ~¬|- -
|+·|+¬ ¤|- + ·|¬ +|+¬| ¤|-|. ¡ + |·~¬ ;|¤- +· -|¬-. + -|· +-|--· ·|¬++- +|+¬ ¤|-
+·-¸ +|«| ¡|- -·¡- - +|- +-¬ ¤|+ ¬|+-|- +|c¤|·| +«| ¤|ª- +« ¬|+¸ ¬|+¬|. ·|+« ++-
;-ª--… +¬- - -¡¤¸- ·¬· ·|+· ++| ¬|+¬|. |+« º+¬|·u| ¬|+|·|- ++- ¬¡¤·|·| +|+¬ ¤|-,
+|«| +·-| -, +-|+- ¡|- -|¡|, +« +|--|. |-| |++- ¬|¤|·¤ ,···· · ¬|¡.
Fodder Cutter
Shri. Santosh Prabhakar Kurkute
Ahmednagar
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
92
nì¿ìz »ìnmn unln wuìzwl n¤
ml. ¤l-a ª¤-i¤ ¤ea
-:·+|·
Motorcycle Operated Sprayer
Shri. Anil Raghunath Patel
Nandurbar
~-|+|+|-|¬ .+u c-+| ¬¬-| +·¤|. +·¤| ~|-|+|¬¸- +|¡-|·| +|¬|+¤|--· |++|+· ++|·¤| +·|+|
¬|+-. |¬|c| +··+ +·¤ ¬¬- -| +¤·|-|. ¬·|·| +|·|ª¤-|-| |+-|· +·-| +¤¸· c-|; ¤|ª-
.+|¤|- ·|¬+- ¬|¡. ++|·¤| + -|· +·-|¬|¤| º+| +¤·|¬| .|- |:+¬|¬| :|·~ - :|-~ -+ +¤¸·|
¤|+| ¬|+. -¬- ;-+| +¤·| :+-¡| º+ +¤¸· |:+¬|¬| +Š- :|- º+· ++|·¤| +·-|. +¤·|+·¸- ++|·¤|
|· .+|· ¡|;¬- |-| ~|·+-| -¬. ++|·¤|¬|c| +« ¬|+.
| ¬+«| ¬+ª|-| ¬·|¬ +·- ~·-~ ¬|¬| ¡ + -|· +¬. + +-+-|¬|c| ¬|+¤|· a|c a|c ª+¸,
-c-+|-c +|¬¸- - +|-| ¬+¸¤ ¬c, -|~-¬ +|;+, -«| ++· ;·|:| +|-| +¤·|- ·||+¤|¬ ·|¤+|c
~¡·|-¸- ¬|¤¬. +|- ~- |¬c··| :|- -¬|ªc+ c|Š| ¬¬¸- ·| +|c|·¬|+¬·| +|+|¬ +|¤¸¬
+¬+¬-| ¬¬-|-. +·¤-¬|· .·+ c|+|-|¬ ¬|+¤ |+¬¤|-| .+|¡ ¬|¬c¸- +|¬c¸- ¬- ¬¤+| +: +-
~+-|. -.- - ~ ;-|·| ~ -¬|ªc+ -«| |¬|c| +|+·-|- ¬|-| ¬¬¸- c| ¦|· -«| ++|¬| ¤|·¬-|
¬|¡-. +|c|·¬|+¬·| |+¬· .¤|¬|+· |¬|c| ~|+· +¬+¬¬| ¬¬¸- +¬| ¦|· -| +c ++|¬| ¤|·-|-
¬|¬| ¬|¡. ++|¬| º+ ¬|+c¬c -«| ¤|·¬¬| ¬¬¸- +|c|·¬|+¬·| +|+|¬ +|¤¸¬ ¬|u·| +|;+·|
¬¡|·|- -«|-| ¬|¤|· :-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. -«|+· ¬||.+|¤ º+| ¬|«|¬|c| ~ - , -|~¬ |:¬ ¬|¡-.
+|+« +|c|· ¬|+¬|·| ¬¡|·|- |:+¬|¬| --· -+ +c|¬ +|+-- ¬|- - ¬|c º+· +|·¬·|- ¬|+¤
++|·¤| ¡|+ ~+-. -|· -|¬|- ¬|- - ¬|c º+· ++|·¤| -¡¤¤- +¤¸·|+=| -|· +c ¤|ª- ++|- ¡ +|+
¡|-. + +| +·- ¬¬-|-| º+| +«|¬ :|- ¬|«|- -¬- -|- ¬|«|- ¬,| -|~¬ -|¬+-|-. -|~-¬¬|
¡+| ·| +|-|- ¬¤+| |:~- +¬+¸- º+| |++|¬| -|-¡| +|¤¸-| ++|·¤| ¡|-. +·¤-¬|· ºu|: -|~¬ +:
c+-| -. º+| +¸c| +|¬¸- -|· +¸c|+- ++|·¤| ¡|-. +|c|·¬|+¬·| +|¡-|- |+¬·+· ++|·¤| +·-|
-. :¬| |+¬·+· ++|·¤| +¬| ¬¬-| ;|¤-+· ¬|· +- - +: +·-.
¡ + º+| |c+|¤|¡¸- :¬| |c+|¤| +|¡¸- --|¬|c| ¬||ª+· ¬¬¸- +·¤ -¬-|-| -¬- ++|·¤|·|
+|+|¬|c| +|+· +-|--· ¬-|- ·|+ ++« +-- +|c¸- c+-| -|-. ~-+·| ¬||-¬|· +|-| ¤|·¤|
¬¤+| +|c¤| +- ~+-|. +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- -. -,···,- ¬¬¸- - ¬||+|-, ·;++, +|+¸¬, +|·|,
++|, +¡¸, |+·¤| ;·|:| |++ -¬- -|· +¸c|+--| --| ¬¬¤|| +« + |++|¬|c| -+Š- ¬|¡.
93
uì»mìuwl n¤
ml.=ai¢ ¤=i+ª +ª+e
¬¡+:-+·

++| =+|- +¤¸· |+«- -|¡|-. +|¡| +«| +¤·|·| ¬|·+|c| ¤|·¤|+« ~-|-| +|+ ¬·¸- ·|¡-|-. +¤|+¤|
~-+|¬| º+c·|¬| +|+ +·|+ ¬|+-. ª+-… ·| ·|¬ ¬|++·|¬| +|+¤|¬|c| +¤¸· |+«¤ ¡| +|c| ¬+ª|
¡|-|. |-¸- ·|¬ +|+¤| +|-| +-+-| ¬-¬|.
|+· º+| ¬|u«|¬| ·|¬ +|+¤|· ·¬· ¤|·¬¬ ¬|¡-. |+¬· + +¬|·| ¬¡|·|- + +|c|··| ~¬|- -
|+·|+¬ ¤|- + ·|¬ +|+¬| ¤|-|. ¡ + |·~¬ ;|¤- +· -|¬-. + -|· +-|--· ·|¬++- +|+¬ ¤|-
+·-¸ +|«| ¡|- -·¡- - +|- +-¬ ¤|+ ¬|+-|- +|c¤|·| +«| ¤|ª- +« ¬|+¸ ¬|+¬|. ·|+« ++-
;-ª--… +¬- - -¡¤¸- ·¬· ·|+· ++| ¬|+¬|. |+« º+¬|·u| ¬|+|·|- ++- ¬¡¤·|·| +|+¬ ¤|-,
+|«| +·-| -, +-|+- ¡|- -|¡|, +« +|--|. |-| |++- ¬|¤|·¤ ,···· · ¬|¡.
Fodder Cutter
Shri. Santosh Prabhakar Kurkute
Ahmednagar
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
94
»ìza×ì ulnn wuìzwl n¤
ml. ¤¦uoª ;ªa+ª
+|~|+
+¤¸· ª¤¬|-·|+« +|¡| +«| -· +¤·|¬|c| ;-|· +|+|-¸- +|¬|+¤| +·|+| ¬|+-. +c|¬ -|¬- ++|·¤|
+|+« u- +|c-|. | ¬+«| +|-|-| ¬·|¬ +-- +| ··|- ¬·+«|- +·¬-| ¬|·-¤| +-¬, +¤|+|«|
+|·¬|c| ¬¬¬-| -~ +|c+· -|¬¤|·| +c·| ¬||¤ +|+·¬|c| +|+·|- ¤|·| +|c·, -¬- +c|¬ ++|-|
c|+| |-| +|+· +¬|. ¬~| ¬+ ¬||¡·|-| ¤|·¤| +-- ++|·¤| + |++|¬- +¬. ¬|¬· +-¬-| ++|·¤|
++|·| +·|¬ +|¤¸¬ -· +c·| u|¬·| +|¤¸¬ ¬|¡. ++|·¤| +·-+«| +c·| -|¤ ¡|- ¬¬-|- +: +·-
-|¡|. ++|·¤|¬|c| -¡+|·| +|+·|-¬| -|~¬ +|+·¬| ¬¬¸- ¬|+·+ ·|+«| ++|·¤|- +|+ ¤|++|-
¬¬-|¬ -|~¬ ¬· ¬¤+| +: +·-|¬|c| ª+|- ¬|+-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. ++|·¤| + +|c|+· +|¡¸-
--|¬|c| ¬|u·| -|+c-| ¬·--| -|· +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬¬¸- ++|·¤| +-¬ -¬- ¬||·| |c+|¤| +|·|+
¬|u·| :|··|¬| ¬|¤|· :-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. ¬|+¤| ++|·¤| c|+|¬| º+ ;-¬c + :|- ¬|+c¬c ¬¬¸-
++|·¤|¬|c| ªc|¬ -«|-| +|+· +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡.
¡ + ++| =+|- ·-|- ¤|| |++|¬|c| ¤¬ +|¬+, +|+|, :|·+| | ¬|··| ·|¤|+|¬| |++|¬|c|
-+¬ ¬|¡. |·| ~|+| -+|¬¤|-| +·¤ ¬|¡. ¬+|· .·· ·+|-| +c·|, -··· ·+|- ¬|·-¤| +-¬,
++|-| c|+| + ;-· |+·+|« ¬||¡·|-| +|+· +¬| ¬¬¸- +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- +|- ¡¤|· ·+ ¬|¡.
Solar Operated Sprayer
Shri. Chandrashekhar Etarkar
Washim
95
¿Š¿zuz uìnwìz uµaunì=l zunulnn
uzwl n¤

ml. ªi¤;i= lu«ªi¤ =i-¤
-||~+

+·¤| ¡| ~-|-|¬ º+ +¡·+|-| ·|+ ¬|¡. +«- +·¤| ¡|¤ + +|c·| =+|+· º+¬|·u| +·¤| ¡|¤ ¡
-·+|:-|·| ¡-|- +¡·+|- ¬|¡. ¬·| +:¬-| ¡+|+|-|- -+¬·¤ ++| +«- +|·| ¬¡|·|- ¡ ~Š
¬|¡. +¤ +|¤|·|- -+¬·¤ + ¡ ~-+|·| ¬+ª| ¬|·+- -|¡|-. ++-| |· - +|+:~-, ¬„| :-
-|¡|-. ¡ +·¸- ª+-… ¬¬ + +-|+-|- c·|+¬.
¬+|- +··| +|¤¸¬| º+ +·|-| º+ +c| |:¬¬| ¬|¡. |-- :|- ·|+ +¬¬ ¬|¡-. º+|- |+|¤ c+-|¬|c|
+ :¬| +· u- c+-|¬|c|. ·| u|¬| º+ ¬|u·| ++ ¤|·¬| ¬|¡. | ++ +· |· ¬-·|+· -¬||ªc+
-|-| ¤|·¬-| ¬|¡-. | ++·| +··| ·|+|- ¬|+¬·| -- ¬|·u| ·--| ¬¬¸- -| cŠc··| ¬¡|·|-
-|¬-.
¬¤+ .·-|-¸- |+-| + +|c·| cŠc·¬| ¤|·-| ;¬ ¬~| ª+-|¬- +·¤| + -|· +¬|. |+· |+|¤ +
u- |¬|c| ++++« |+·|+|- º+| ¤|++· º++|+·¤ +-- º+|+- ª+·+|- |++|¬| |+|¤ + u- :-|
-|¬ ¬~| ·--| +¬| ¬|¡ ¬||¤ ·|¦|· +·¬¬ |+|¤ |· u|¬|- º+¬|·u ·¤-. | +~|- ¦|·
¬||+|-, +¡¸, +|¤·|, +|·|, -¸·, -·|:, +|:| |+|¤, +¤|, ¤-, +|+¸¬, ~+:|¤ | ¬|·u| +|+ +·-|
-|-.

·|·| +·¤| +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ~· - -· ¡¤|· ·+ ¬|¡.
Tractor Operated Seeder
Shri. Ramdas Shivram Sanap
Nashik
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
94
»ìza×ì ulnn wuìzwl n¤
ml. ¤¦uoª ;ªa+ª
+|~|+
+¤¸· ª¤¬|-·|+« +|¡| +«| -· +¤·|¬|c| ;-|· +|+|-¸- +|¬|+¤| +·|+| ¬|+-. +c|¬ -|¬- ++|·¤|
+|+« u- +|c-|. | ¬+«| +|-|-| ¬·|¬ +-- +| ··|- ¬·+«|- +·¬-| ¬|·-¤| +-¬, +¤|+|«|
+|·¬|c| ¬¬¬-| -~ +|c+· -|¬¤|·| +c·| ¬||¤ +|+·¬|c| +|+·|- ¤|·| +|c·, -¬- +c|¬ ++|-|
c|+| |-| +|+· +¬|. ¬~| ¬+ ¬||¡·|-| ¤|·¤| +-- ++|·¤| + |++|¬- +¬. ¬|¬· +-¬-| ++|·¤|
++|·| +·|¬ +|¤¸¬ -· +c·| u|¬·| +|¤¸¬ ¬|¡. ++|·¤| +·-+«| +c·| -|¤ ¡|- ¬¬-|- +: +·-
-|¡|. ++|·¤|¬|c| -¡+|·| +|+·|-¬| -|~¬ +|+·¬| ¬¬¸- ¬|+·+ ·|+«| ++|·¤|- +|+ ¤|++|-
¬¬-|¬ -|~¬ ¬· ¬¤+| +: +·-|¬|c| ª+|- ¬|+-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. ++|·¤| + +|c|+· +|¡¸-
--|¬|c| ¬|u·| -|+c-| ¬·--| -|· +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬¬¸- ++|·¤| +-¬ -¬- ¬||·| |c+|¤| +|·|+
¬|u·| :|··|¬| ¬|¤|· :-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. ¬|+¤| ++|·¤| c|+|¬| º+ ;-¬c + :|- ¬|+c¬c ¬¬¸-
++|·¤|¬|c| ªc|¬ -«|-| +|+· +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡.
¡ + ++| =+|- ·-|- ¤|| |++|¬|c| ¤¬ +|¬+, +|+|, :|·+| | ¬|··| ·|¤|+|¬| |++|¬|c|
-+¬ ¬|¡. |·| ~|+| -+|¬¤|-| +·¤ ¬|¡. ¬+|· .·· ·+|-| +c·|, -··· ·+|- ¬|·-¤| +-¬,
++|-| c|+| + ;-· |+·+|« ¬||¡·|-| +|+· +¬| ¬¬¸- +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- +|- ¡¤|· ·+ ¬|¡.
Solar Operated Sprayer
Shri. Chandrashekhar Etarkar
Washim
95
¿Š¿zuz uìnwìz uµaunì=l zunulnn
uzwl n¤

ml. ªi¤;i= lu«ªi¤ =i-¤
-||~+

+·¤| ¡| ~-|-|¬ º+ +¡·+|-| ·|+ ¬|¡. +«- +·¤| ¡|¤ + +|c·| =+|+· º+¬|·u| +·¤| ¡|¤ ¡
-·+|:-|·| ¡-|- +¡·+|- ¬|¡. ¬·| +:¬-| ¡+|+|-|- -+¬·¤ ++| +«- +|·| ¬¡|·|- ¡ ~Š
¬|¡. +¤ +|¤|·|- -+¬·¤ + ¡ ~-+|·| ¬+ª| ¬|·+- -|¡|-. ++-| |· - +|+:~-, ¬„| :-
-|¡|-. ¡ +·¸- ª+-… ¬¬ + +-|+-|- c·|+¬.
¬+|- +··| +|¤¸¬| º+ +·|-| º+ +c| |:¬¬| ¬|¡. |-- :|- ·|+ +¬¬ ¬|¡-. º+|- |+|¤ c+-|¬|c|
+ :¬| +· u- c+-|¬|c|. ·| u|¬| º+ ¬|u·| ++ ¤|·¬| ¬|¡. | ++ +· |· ¬-·|+· -¬||ªc+
-|-| ¤|·¬-| ¬|¡-. | ++·| +··| ·|+|- ¬|+¬·| -- ¬|·u| ·--| ¬¬¸- -| cŠc··| ¬¡|·|-
-|¬-.
¬¤+ .·-|-¸- |+-| + +|c·| cŠc·¬| ¤|·-| ;¬ ¬~| ª+-|¬- +·¤| + -|· +¬|. |+· |+|¤ +
u- |¬|c| ++++« |+·|+|- º+| ¤|++· º++|+·¤ +-- º+|+- ª+·+|- |++|¬| |+|¤ + u- :-|
-|¬ ¬~| ·--| +¬| ¬|¡ ¬||¤ ·|¦|· +·¬¬ |+|¤ |· u|¬|- º+¬|·u ·¤-. | +~|- ¦|·
¬||+|-, +¡¸, +|¤·|, +|·|, -¸·, -·|:, +|:| |+|¤, +¤|, ¤-, +|+¸¬, ~+:|¤ | ¬|·u| +|+ +·-|
-|-.

·|·| +·¤| +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ~· - -· ¡¤|· ·+ ¬|¡.
Tractor Operated Seeder
Shri. Ramdas Shivram Sanap
Nashik
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
96
n¬rnunln nwnì«n uzwl n¤
ml.ªl«¦ ;-iix« os
¬¡+:-+·
+|·|, +|¤·| ¬|·u| -¤¤|- +·¤| +·-|-| .|+·|- +·¤| +·¤||+· ¬+¬+¸- ·|¡|+ ¬|+¤, ++| ¬|¤+
.+|¤|- +|¡| ¤|++· +|.-|.+·¤| ¡|¤, +·¤| +·-|-| ¡+| ··+¸· ¬¬-|- +| ¤|+-|+· c|+-|+· º+|
+|¤¬| +·¤, --|· ¬|·u| - ¤ | ¬+ª| |-+|¤ ¡|-|-. +·-|¬|c| ¬|+¤|· +| ¤|ª- ¬|+-. -¬- +|¡|
+«| ~-|+· ¬= :-|¬ +|¤|¡| -¬-|+« ¬|¤+ +|+ +·-, ··+¸· +« +|| ¤|-| ¬||¤ +¤¸· |+«-
-|¡|-. | ¬+«| +|-|-| |+-|· +-|--· +·¤| |· ·¡|+| -¡¤¸- .·-~|¬ +·¤| + +-+-|-| +-|-
|+-|· ¬|¬|. ª¤||-+ -+¬·¤ +ª-¸-¸- - +-|+¬ -· -+|+| ¡|;¬ + ++| u-|- ¡|;¬ ¬¬ +|c¬.
¬·+|-|¬| +¡| +|¬ +--, ·|¬| ·|+ +|·¬|. +¡| -c-|-, +| + +|-| ¬·+¸- +¬|-|, +cc·|- -+·
+·-. |¬| ¬|+¬|·| c|·-| -|+ +¬+¬|. + -- ~|-|+« +| +·|¬| ¬·-¤ +- - º+| |c+|¤|
+|«| ¡|+ ¬|+¬ ·|+« ++| ¬|¤+ .+|¤|- |+|¤|-| +·¤| ¡|- ¬¬. --· +cc·|·| ¤|+| +|.·¡|.¬|.
+|;+-| +|+· +¬|. +|;+¬| |· ¬-·|+· ·|+ +|·¬|. ·|¬| ¬|u·| -|+ +¬|+¬|. ¬·+|-|¬| +|·:|-|-
+| c|+¸- +||¡-| --· - ¬|-¬ -|¡| |++| |+u·¬¬ +¬ -|¡| + º+¬|·u +·|¬| ¬|+¬.
º+¬|·u +| c|+-|¬|c|, +|+ + :|- |+|+¤|¬ ¬-· ·+|ª¤- -|¬|c| | +|-| -+|+ ¡|-|. +|-|
¬:|¤ |++- ~-·· ·+ ¬|¡.
Person Operated Seeder
Shri. Ravindra Dattatray Kharde
Ahmednagar
97
u¬ mìðl
ml «a=l¤ si+
+|·
+|+·¤|·| ·=¤|¬|c| +=|·|+¤ +·¤ +·¤- ¬|¡ +·-¸ ·|-| +|+|¡| ¡+| -+c| .·|+|+¤ ¡|- -|¡|.
¬|+¤|-+ |c+|¤| +=¬|++· +·-|-| ¬|+¤|·| +«, +--+«, u- |-| |+-|· +¬| -· ·|-| ~|ª+--|
++| |+«-. | +|-|-| |+-|· +-- +=|·|+¤ ¬|+ ·¡|+ -¡¤¸- +-+|c| | ¬·| + ¬|-| -++·¤|-|
|-|+-| +¬|.
+=·|+¤|¬|c| ¬·|·| ¬|++· +,-|- |+|¤ ¬|++· +·-|-| u¡ u|:|+ ¬|+-|-. ·|- |+|¤ ·|+¸-
|++| ·|++||c+- |+|¤ -|· +·|+ ¬|+-. |¬|c| +|-|,u- + ·|+|¬|c| -¬||ªc+·| |+~·| ¬|+-|-
¬||¤ --· +|¡| |:+¬ ·|-| |-+| |+« ·|++||c+¬| +|c| u- -|.+--+« ¬||¤ +=·|+¤|¬|c|
¬|+¤|·| |-| .- -¬- ¡ +|+ ¤|ª- ¬+|- ¬||¤ +«u|+ ¡|-.
¡| º+ +|- +c ¬|+|-| ¬|u·| +|;+ ¬|¡. :|-¡| +|¤¸ +|+«| ¬|¡-. |+|¤ ·|+-|-| ;+· |-+· -
+·-|¬|c| +|c|·| º+| +|¤¸¬| ·|-| .+|¤ c|+:|· ¬|+|· |:¬|. :¬·| +|¤¸ a+|·| :|··| ¬|·u|
+«+¸- ·|- :|·| +¬| ¬|¡. +«|+¬-| +|¤¸ +· º+ |a, +|·¬ ¬|¡ |-¸- +| c|+-| ;¬.
| +|c|- +|c| ++| +«|- ¤|ª- +|+ ¡|-. -¬- +|+¸- |+¤|·|+¤|-| +|¬ ¡| ++| ¡|-|. +-+|c|+«
¤|++· ¬·« -· ·|¡¸- ·|-|¬ |a,|-¸- |+|¤ c|+-| -. ¬|++· +·-|-| - - . ;- ¡ -++·¤ ¤|+-|-
|-·+ u|-|+ ¬|+- ¬||¤ +-¡| º· ¬~|- -· +-- |a,|-¸- |+|¤ c|+¬ +-|- - ¤c ¤|+-|- ,
¬c|+|c· +- u|¬ +·-. +|c| +|¡· +|c¬| +| +|¤¸-| +|-| ¬|+|¬|+ |+|¤|+· +·¸- - +|-|- +·¬ ¤|-.
| .+|· |+|--| -++¤ =+-| ·· - º· c+ ¬¬¸- ·|++||c+- ¡|- =+-| c·· ¬¬-. ¬·-+ u-,
+--+«, +« + +¤·|- +--, ¬~| .+|· ··| -|· +·-| ¤|· -++·¤ ¬¬¸- |+|-| +·|+·- u-¡|
+|c|·| +|·+|-¸- :-| -|-. +-+|c|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ~-· ·+
Stick For Forest Plantation
Shri. Balbheem Doke
Beed
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
96
n¬rnunln nwnì«n uzwl n¤
ml.ªl«¦ ;-iix« os
¬¡+:-+·
+|·|, +|¤·| ¬|·u| -¤¤|- +·¤| +·-|-| .|+·|- +·¤| +·¤||+· ¬+¬+¸- ·|¡|+ ¬|+¤, ++| ¬|¤+
.+|¤|- +|¡| ¤|++· +|.-|.+·¤| ¡|¤, +·¤| +·-|-| ¡+| ··+¸· ¬¬-|- +| ¤|+-|+· c|+-|+· º+|
+|¤¬| +·¤, --|· ¬|·u| - ¤ | ¬+ª| |-+|¤ ¡|-|-. +·-|¬|c| ¬|+¤|· +| ¤|ª- ¬|+-. -¬- +|¡|
+«| ~-|+· ¬= :-|¬ +|¤|¡| -¬-|+« ¬|¤+ +|+ +·-, ··+¸· +« +|| ¤|-| ¬||¤ +¤¸· |+«-
-|¡|-. | ¬+«| +|-|-| |+-|· +-|--· +·¤| |· ·¡|+| -¡¤¸- .·-~|¬ +·¤| + +-+-|-| +-|-
|+-|· ¬|¬|. ª¤||-+ -+¬·¤ +ª-¸-¸- - +-|+¬ -· -+|+| ¡|;¬ + ++| u-|- ¡|;¬ ¬¬ +|c¬.
¬·+|-|¬| +¡| +|¬ +--, ·|¬| ·|+ +|·¬|. +¡| -c-|-, +| + +|-| ¬·+¸- +¬|-|, +cc·|- -+·
+·-. |¬| ¬|+¬|·| c|·-| -|+ +¬+¬|. + -- ~|-|+« +| +·|¬| ¬·-¤ +- - º+| |c+|¤|
+|«| ¡|+ ¬|+¬ ·|+« ++| ¬|¤+ .+|¤|- |+|¤|-| +·¤| ¡|- ¬¬. --· +cc·|·| ¤|+| +|.·¡|.¬|.
+|;+-| +|+· +¬|. +|;+¬| |· ¬-·|+· ·|+ +|·¬|. ·|¬| ¬|u·| -|+ +¬|+¬|. ¬·+|-|¬| +|·:|-|-
+| c|+¸- +||¡-| --· - ¬|-¬ -|¡| |++| |+u·¬¬ +¬ -|¡| + º+¬|·u +·|¬| ¬|+¬.
º+¬|·u +| c|+-|¬|c|, +|+ + :|- |+|+¤|¬ ¬-· ·+|ª¤- -|¬|c| | +|-| -+|+ ¡|-|. +|-|
¬:|¤ |++- ~-·· ·+ ¬|¡.
Person Operated Seeder
Shri. Ravindra Dattatray Kharde
Ahmednagar
97
u¬ mìðl
ml «a=l¤ si+
+|·
+|+·¤|·| ·=¤|¬|c| +=|·|+¤ +·¤ +·¤- ¬|¡ +·-¸ ·|-| +|+|¡| ¡+| -+c| .·|+|+¤ ¡|- -|¡|.
¬|+¤|-+ |c+|¤| +=¬|++· +·-|-| ¬|+¤|·| +«, +--+«, u- |-| |+-|· +¬| -· ·|-| ~|ª+--|
++| |+«-. | +|-|-| |+-|· +-- +=|·|+¤ ¬|+ ·¡|+ -¡¤¸- +-+|c| | ¬·| + ¬|-| -++·¤|-|
|-|+-| +¬|.
+=·|+¤|¬|c| ¬·|·| ¬|++· +,-|- |+|¤ ¬|++· +·-|-| u¡ u|:|+ ¬|+-|-. ·|- |+|¤ ·|+¸-
|++| ·|++||c+- |+|¤ -|· +·|+ ¬|+-. |¬|c| +|-|,u- + ·|+|¬|c| -¬||ªc+·| |+~·| ¬|+-|-
¬||¤ --· +|¡| |:+¬ ·|-| |-+| |+« ·|++||c+¬| +|c| u- -|.+--+« ¬||¤ +=·|+¤|¬|c|
¬|+¤|·| |-| .- -¬- ¡ +|+ ¤|ª- ¬+|- ¬||¤ +«u|+ ¡|-.
¡| º+ +|- +c ¬|+|-| ¬|u·| +|;+ ¬|¡. :|-¡| +|¤¸ +|+«| ¬|¡-. |+|¤ ·|+-|-| ;+· |-+· -
+·-|¬|c| +|c|·| º+| +|¤¸¬| ·|-| .+|¤ c|+:|· ¬|+|· |:¬|. :¬·| +|¤¸ a+|·| :|··| ¬|·u|
+«+¸- ·|- :|·| +¬| ¬|¡. +«|+¬-| +|¤¸ +· º+ |a, +|·¬ ¬|¡ |-¸- +| c|+-| ;¬.
| +|c|- +|c| ++| +«|- ¤|ª- +|+ ¡|-. -¬- +|+¸- |+¤|·|+¤|-| +|¬ ¡| ++| ¡|-|. +-+|c|+«
¤|++· ¬·« -· ·|¡¸- ·|-|¬ |a,|-¸- |+|¤ c|+-| -. ¬|++· +·-|-| - - . ;- ¡ -++·¤ ¤|+-|-
|-·+ u|-|+ ¬|+- ¬||¤ +-¡| º· ¬~|- -· +-- |a,|-¸- |+|¤ c|+¬ +-|- - ¤c ¤|+-|- ,
¬c|+|c· +- u|¬ +·-. +|c| +|¡· +|c¬| +| +|¤¸-| +|-| ¬|+|¬|+ |+|¤|+· +·¸- - +|-|- +·¬ ¤|-.
| .+|· |+|--| -++¤ =+-| ·· - º· c+ ¬¬¸- ·|++||c+- ¡|- =+-| c·· ¬¬-. ¬·-+ u-,
+--+«, +« + +¤·|- +--, ¬~| .+|· ··| -|· +·-| ¤|· -++·¤ ¬¬¸- |+|-| +·|+·- u-¡|
+|c|·| +|·+|-¸- :-| -|-. +-+|c|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ~-· ·+
Stick For Forest Plantation
Shri. Balbheem Doke
Beed
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
98
lµzuelu ulm nìswl n¤

ml. ªi¬¦ ¶¬ª
+|-¡|+¸·
|¡·+«|- |++ +|·-|- ¬||¤ |¡·+« u- +|·-|- ++| u-|- ¬|¤ ¬|+ + ¬|¡. u- +|·-|·| +,-|-
-||+- ¬|¤¸- ¬||¤ -+¬·¤ ¬|¤-|-| +|+· +-|+« +¤¸·, ¬+ ¬||¤ +«-| +-- ~|¬|.
|++|- -·+|:- ·-|-| ¤|+-|-| ¬|++-| |c+|+¤, ¤|+-|-| .- -|+¬| ·|¡¤ ¬||¤ ·|¬||-+ u-,
+|c+-|~+ + +|-|-| ¬-| +|+· ++| +·¤ +·¤- ¬|¡. |¡·+«|- |++ ¬-+ ++|+|¬¸- ·- ¬¬-|-| |++
¤|+-|- +|·-|-| .-|¬- +,-|-¬|· u- + +« :|-¡|¡| +|| ¤|- -¡¤¸- -+¬·¤ ¬|¤-|-| +|+· +-- ¡
+ +-|+¬. ¬·+|-|¬| +|«-|·| :|··|¬| :|- +|c·| +|¤¸- -|+ +|·-|-| .·- +¬|. ·|+« -|+ -·
+|·|¬| ¬|+¬ +¤ - ;-ª- |+ª+c-|- - +|«| +·-|¬|c| +-¡| ºu|:| +¤¸· ¬|+|-|. ·|-| ª+-…+·
+¸+| ¬¬¬-| º+| +¡¸-:|~ +|+ +|+·|- -¬¬-| ¬+¤|·|-| +|¡| ·|+ +|+·|- ¬|¤¸- :|-¡| +|¤-| :|-
+|c·| ¬|+¸- ·|- ¬|¤u| ¬¬·-| ¬|¤¬|.
¬|u·|·| ¬|- +c :|··|¬| u|¬·| +|¤¸¬| :|- +c ·: ¬|u·| +_| +¬|+-|- ¬|¬¬| ¬|¡. | +_|¬|
:|-¡| +|¤¸¬| -|- +c ¬|+ +|+¸ +¬|+¬ ¬|¡-. +¬|·| ¬¡|·|- ¡ + |++|- |+·+-| -.
-|+ ¬·|- +|·-| --· +|-|- ·¤+¤ +¡-+|- +|+ ¬¬-. ·|¬|c| cŠc··| ¬|=|- ¬·|-| +·+| +
+··|-| ¬·| | +,-|·| +|+·|+« cŠc·- -|+ -|+|+-- ¤|+¸- ¤|+-|- :|+¬| ¤|-|. +|+|+|+ +-c|·|
¬|=|- +|-| ·|+· c+¬¬| ¤|+¸- -|+ ¬¤+| ¬- |¡·+«|- u- -|+-| .+|· +|-|- +|·¬ ¤|- |
+|+« ¬+ u-|-| +-- ¡|+¸- +«¡| ++| ¬|+-|. º+| |:+¬|- ¬+|· :|- º+· -|+ ¡ + +-c|·| ¬|=|-
·+|ª¤-+¤ +|·¬ ¤|+ ~+-. ¡ + -··-c·· · +--.
Green Mannure Crop Cutter
Shri. Rajendra Hujare
Kolhapur
99
mu¬lnmn vsmnn nì¿ìz, uì;u mìcwl n¤

ml. ¤i¤«ªi« l=¦i¤ ¤ia«iª
-|:·
+|-|·| c-|;+·|¬ -+| -¡¤¸- ++-¬|+-| ¬++ -+|+ +¬| ¤|-|. +·-¸ +|¡| +«| ++-|¬+| ,··
+c|+- u|¬ u|:|+| ·|+| ¬|+-. -| u|:- ¬¬-|-| +|- +«| +|;+ ¬·+¸- ·|¡¤, +|c|· ¬·+¤,
:+· +·¤ ;. +ª-¸ ¬·+¸- ·|¡-|- + +¬¬| u-, +«, ¬+,+|| ¤|-|-. |+· -+| -¡¤¸- | ¬+¤|·|-|
|-|+-| +·-|- ¬|¬|.
+|¡-|·| ~-|- +-+¬-| ++-|¬+- +|c|· ¬·+¸- ·||¡¬| +·|- uc|c|+ +-- -| +|c|· +|c-|- ~
¬|¬. | +,-|- -| +|c|· +|c¬| +¬| -~|- +,-|-| :|-| +-- ¡ +|c¤| + +-+-|- ¬|¬ ¬|¡. ¡
-++·¤ +-+- ¬¬-|-| - +c ¬|+ ¬|u·| +|;+¬| - |+¬| +¤-|- ·+|·|-¸- ¤+| +¬-| -++ +|;+·|
u|¬·| +|¤¸¬ ¤|·¬ ¬|¡. ·| -++|·| +|¤¸¬| :|-·| u|¬+c ¡|-·· +¬+¬| ¬|¡ -++|·| ¬¡|·|-
+|c|· u-¬| ¤|- -· :|-·| ¡|-··+« +|c|· ·_ +¬- ¬c+¸- u|¬| +·- -|¡|. ·|- ¬|u·| +|;+¬| +c·
¤|·¬| ¬|¡. ¬|+·+-| + ¬·¤«| +|c-|¬ +|;+ +|¬ |+·+¸- ~-- +|;+ +c +·-| -|.
¡ +|c¤| + +-+-|¬|c| ¬|¤|·¤- -· ++|-| +|¬|+¤| ¬|+¬| ¬¬¬| -·| ¬|¤ ¡ + +|·¬·|- ---| +
+|.| ·+¬||-| º+ +· =|- +-¬ ¬|¡ | +|+·|+·- ¬¤¸-¡| ·|¤|+|¬|, +·¤| +, +¸+-|¬+-
¬·+¬¬ +|¡-|¬|c|-| ++·|, +_· +~|-,u- +·¤| + ;. +|-| |-|+-| +¬| ¬|¡.
Borewell Motor Puller
Shri. Madhavrao Sidram Malewar
Nanded
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
98
lµzuelu ulm nìswl n¤

ml. ªi¬¦ ¶¬ª
+|-¡|+¸·
|¡·+«|- |++ +|·-|- ¬||¤ |¡·+« u- +|·-|- ++| u-|- ¬|¤ ¬|+ + ¬|¡. u- +|·-|·| +,-|-
-||+- ¬|¤¸- ¬||¤ -+¬·¤ ¬|¤-|-| +|+· +-|+« +¤¸·, ¬+ ¬||¤ +«-| +-- ~|¬|.
|++|- -·+|:- ·-|-| ¤|+-|-| ¬|++-| |c+|+¤, ¤|+-|-| .- -|+¬| ·|¡¤ ¬||¤ ·|¬||-+ u-,
+|c+-|~+ + +|-|-| ¬-| +|+· ++| +·¤ +·¤- ¬|¡. |¡·+«|- |++ ¬-+ ++|+|¬¸- ·- ¬¬-|-| |++
¤|+-|- +|·-|-| .-|¬- +,-|-¬|· u- + +« :|-¡|¡| +|| ¤|- -¡¤¸- -+¬·¤ ¬|¤-|-| +|+· +-- ¡
+ +-|+¬. ¬·+|-|¬| +|«-|·| :|··|¬| :|- +|c·| +|¤¸- -|+ +|·-|-| .·- +¬|. ·|+« -|+ -·
+|·|¬| ¬|+¬ +¤ - ;-ª- |+ª+c-|- - +|«| +·-|¬|c| +-¡| ºu|:| +¤¸· ¬|+|-|. ·|-| ª+-…+·
+¸+| ¬¬¬-| º+| +¡¸-:|~ +|+ +|+·|- -¬¬-| ¬+¤|·|-| +|¡| ·|+ +|+·|- ¬|¤¸- :|-¡| +|¤-| :|-
+|c·| ¬|+¸- ·|- ¬|¤u| ¬¬·-| ¬|¤¬|.
¬|u·|·| ¬|- +c :|··|¬| u|¬·| +|¤¸¬| :|- +c ·: ¬|u·| +_| +¬|+-|- ¬|¬¬| ¬|¡. | +_|¬|
:|-¡| +|¤¸¬| -|- +c ¬|+ +|+¸ +¬|+¬ ¬|¡-. +¬|·| ¬¡|·|- ¡ + |++|- |+·+-| -.
-|+ ¬·|- +|·-| --· +|-|- ·¤+¤ +¡-+|- +|+ ¬¬-. ·|¬|c| cŠc··| ¬|=|- ¬·|-| +·+| +
+··|-| ¬·| | +,-|·| +|+·|+« cŠc·- -|+ -|+|+-- ¤|+¸- ¤|+-|- :|+¬| ¤|-|. +|+|+|+ +-c|·|
¬|=|- +|-| ·|+· c+¬¬| ¤|+¸- -|+ ¬¤+| ¬- |¡·+«|- u- -|+-| .+|· +|-|- +|·¬ ¤|- |
+|+« ¬+ u-|-| +-- ¡|+¸- +«¡| ++| ¬|+-|. º+| |:+¬|- ¬+|· :|- º+· -|+ ¡ + +-c|·| ¬|=|-
·+|ª¤-+¤ +|·¬ ¤|+ ~+-. ¡ + -··-c·· · +--.
Green Mannure Crop Cutter
Shri. Rajendra Hujare
Kolhapur
99
mu¬lnmn vsmnn nì¿ìz, uì;u mìcwl n¤

ml. ¤i¤«ªi« l=¦i¤ ¤ia«iª
-|:·
+|-|·| c-|;+·|¬ -+| -¡¤¸- ++-¬|+-| ¬++ -+|+ +¬| ¤|-|. +·-¸ +|¡| +«| ++-|¬+| ,··
+c|+- u|¬ u|:|+| ·|+| ¬|+-. -| u|:- ¬¬-|-| +|- +«| +|;+ ¬·+¸- ·|¡¤, +|c|· ¬·+¤,
:+· +·¤ ;. +ª-¸ ¬·+¸- ·|¡-|- + +¬¬| u-, +«, ¬+,+|| ¤|-|-. |+· -+| -¡¤¸- | ¬+¤|·|-|
|-|+-| +·-|- ¬|¬|.
+|¡-|·| ~-|- +-+¬-| ++-|¬+- +|c|· ¬·+¸- ·||¡¬| +·|- uc|c|+ +-- -| +|c|· +|c-|- ~
¬|¬. | +,-|- -| +|c|· +|c¬| +¬| -~|- +,-|-| :|-| +-- ¡ +|c¤| + +-+-|- ¬|¬ ¬|¡. ¡
-++·¤ +-+- ¬¬-|-| - +c ¬|+ ¬|u·| +|;+¬| - |+¬| +¤-|- ·+|·|-¸- ¤+| +¬-| -++ +|;+·|
u|¬·| +|¤¸¬ ¤|·¬ ¬|¡. ·| -++|·| +|¤¸¬| :|-·| u|¬+c ¡|-·· +¬+¬| ¬|¡ -++|·| ¬¡|·|-
+|c|· u-¬| ¤|- -· :|-·| ¡|-··+« +|c|· ·_ +¬- ¬c+¸- u|¬| +·- -|¡|. ·|- ¬|u·| +|;+¬| +c·
¤|·¬| ¬|¡. ¬|+·+-| + ¬·¤«| +|c-|¬ +|;+ +|¬ |+·+¸- ~-- +|;+ +c +·-| -|.
¡ +|c¤| + +-+-|¬|c| ¬|¤|·¤- -· ++|-| +|¬|+¤| ¬|+¬| ¬¬¬| -·| ¬|¤ ¡ + +|·¬·|- ---| +
+|.| ·+¬||-| º+ +· =|- +-¬ ¬|¡ | +|+·|+·- ¬¤¸-¡| ·|¤|+|¬|, +·¤| +, +¸+-|¬+-
¬·+¬¬ +|¡-|¬|c|-| ++·|, +_· +~|-,u- +·¤| + ;. +|-| |-|+-| +¬| ¬|¡.
Borewell Motor Puller
Shri. Madhavrao Sidram Malewar
Nanded
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
100
n¬rnunln uzwl n¤

ml ¤i¤«ªi« l=¦i¤ ¤ia«iª
+|:s
--¢|¤ ¤=| +t¤| =tª¢|=|=| -=¤=|- =¤=|t|¤t =¤=-¸+ t|r|¤ =|º-. -= =¤¤ +t¤s- +|r| -=¤
+t¤| =t¤|-¢| ·¢=|¤t :o|= =¤=-¸+ t|r|¤ =|º|¢¤. |-¢|ª¢|¤| +t¤| =t- ==-|+| |-¢|¤|¤| º=|¤
|==|¤| =|¤= ·|=¤ -t =|r| |==|¤| =|r|¤ -| +t= =|¢¤ +|r|. ¢|-= |-¢|¤ +º¤¸+ =|·¢|¤t ·¢|-¢|-
:|· |=¤| -·= +º¤¤ ·r|¢¤| ¤ |+=|¤| +|=|s| ·r|¢¤|. r =¤=|t -+¤·¢|+-t ¤|=|+|=| +t¤| ·¢¤|-«-
¤ ¢|·¢ +;-|+ ·r|¢=| =|º=| |-¢|¤|¤| +|=|s| ·|==| º=|.
r +t¤| ¢+ -+-¢ ¤|=- ==¸+ ·¢|-¢|¤t =|os| =- -+¤=| =|r. ·¢|=| -|+ =|= =|s= =|r-, º= +c ¤
-|º =n| t¤+| ==¸+ ·¢| =|=|-¢| =¤=¤ +|·r|=| +|:+ =|s=| =|r. ¢|¤| =|s¤| · =·|+|=¸+ - -
=·|+¢- =|¢|+-|¤ =t-| ¢-. ¢| ¢+|¤| +t¤| ¬--| º= º=t +|- |:+ =|r. -¤|t|, =|¢|-|+, -|=t|, -º
:·¢|:|¤| +t¤| ¢|·:|t =t-| ¢-.
r ¢+ -+¤ª¢|=|=| - ¤+ =|=|¤¤| =|º=| ==¸+ ·¢|¤| :|+ |=·n|- =|¤= +=|t =|=| =|r +·¢¬ n-=t|
¤|+=+ ·¢|¤| ++¢||º-| ¤-|-. r ¢+ -+¤|¢=| =|¤|t¤-… .··· {- -. o¤ =|=| ==¸+ ¢| ¢+|-t|-t¤
o- +t¤| ¢+, =++|==- =s=== =|c¤| ¢+ ·¢|=|=| +|rª¢|=|=| =-t| ¤ =·t -n|+ :. ¢+|¤| |+|--|
==| =|r.
.
Person Operated Seeder
Shri. Madhavrao Sidram Malewar
Nanded
101
¤m unulnn mìeu
ml. ¤l«m mlª4 ais
¤|¬-|
+·|¬ +·|- ¬¬¬-| ~-|- +|+ +·- ¬¬-|-| .·= ¤|| ¬·-¤| + ¬·-¤|+· +|·¬|-|- ¬-+¬¬|
--|· |+|¬¸- | +|-| |-|+-| ~|¬| ¬|¡. +|+ ¬|¤+ +·|+ ¬|+- +·-¸ +|+|.+|¤ -·+· |+«- -|¡|.
~-|- -|c| ¬¡- +·|+| ¬|+|-|, +«+· +¤¸· |+«|- -|¡|-, +¤·|+· ¡|¤|·| ¬·|· u-, :|- +¬|+·
¬+¬+¸- ·|¡¤, :|- +¬|·| +|+·|- ¬¡|- |++|- ¡|¤|· -+¬|- |+« ~-+·| ¡+|¬|:¬ ¬¬|- |
¬+ª+· +|- +·- | +|-| ¬+¬+ +·-|- ¬|¬|.
+|«+ +-+-|-| ¬|u·| +|;+-| +|+· +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡ - +|;+ ¤ ¬| -c+|-c·| ¬|¡|·|- ¤|·-|-
¬|¬ ¬|¡-. +|«-|·| u|¬·| ·|+|- +|-·+·| +-- :|- :|- +¬|+¬ ¬|¡- + ·|- +|-| +¬+-| |+|
|¬|c| ·+ª¤| +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. +|«+ ++·-|¬|c| ·|¬| +|-·+ +-- :|· +c -- +|;+ ·+-
·|¬| +c +-+-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡.
¬-- º+ ++ .·-|- ~ ¬|¬. +|-| |++- ,-··,- ·. ¬|¡.
~-|-|¬ +- ++| ¡|-|·| ¡-|- -+|+| ¬~| +¬-|¬-, +|-+-|¬- ¬¡|- +|c| -· .+|·-| +
+-+-|- ¬|¬ ¬|¡-.
Single Bull Operated Weeder
Shri. Pravin Shrirang Lad
Jalna
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
100
n¬rnunln uzwl n¤

ml ¤i¤«ªi« l=¦i¤ ¤ia«iª
+|:s
--¢|¤ ¤=| +t¤| =tª¢|=|=| -=¤=|- =¤=|t|¤t =¤=-¸+ t|r|¤ =|º-. -= =¤¤ +t¤s- +|r| -=¤
+t¤| =t¤|-¢| ·¢=|¤t :o|= =¤=-¸+ t|r|¤ =|º|¢¤. |-¢|ª¢|¤| +t¤| =t- ==-|+| |-¢|¤|¤| º=|¤
|==|¤| =|¤= ·|=¤ -t =|r| |==|¤| =|r|¤ -| +t= =|¢¤ +|r|. ¢|-= |-¢|¤ +º¤¸+ =|·¢|¤t ·¢|-¢|-
:|· |=¤| -·= +º¤¤ ·r|¢¤| ¤ |+=|¤| +|=|s| ·r|¢¤|. r =¤=|t -+¤·¢|+-t ¤|=|+|=| +t¤| ·¢¤|-«-
¤ ¢|·¢ +;-|+ ·r|¢=| =|º=| |-¢|¤|¤| +|=|s| ·|==| º=|.
r +t¤| ¢+ -+-¢ ¤|=- ==¸+ ·¢|-¢|¤t =|os| =- -+¤=| =|r. ·¢|=| -|+ =|= =|s= =|r-, º= +c ¤
-|º =n| t¤+| ==¸+ ·¢| =|=|-¢| =¤=¤ +|·r|=| +|:+ =|s=| =|r. ¢|¤| =|s¤| · =·|+|=¸+ - -
=·|+¢- =|¢|+-|¤ =t-| ¢-. ¢| ¢+|¤| +t¤| ¬--| º= º=t +|- |:+ =|r. -¤|t|, =|¢|-|+, -|=t|, -º
:·¢|:|¤| +t¤| ¢|·:|t =t-| ¢-.
r ¢+ -+¤ª¢|=|=| - ¤+ =|=|¤¤| =|º=| ==¸+ ·¢|¤| :|+ |=·n|- =|¤= +=|t =|=| =|r +·¢¬ n-=t|
¤|+=+ ·¢|¤| ++¢||º-| ¤-|-. r ¢+ -+¤|¢=| =|¤|t¤-… .··· {- -. o¤ =|=| ==¸+ ¢| ¢+|-t|-t¤
o- +t¤| ¢+, =++|==- =s=== =|c¤| ¢+ ·¢|=|=| +|rª¢|=|=| =-t| ¤ =·t -n|+ :. ¢+|¤| |+|--|
==| =|r.
.
Person Operated Seeder
Shri. Madhavrao Sidram Malewar
Nanded
101
¤m unulnn mìeu
ml. ¤l«m mlª4 ais
¤|¬-|
+·|¬ +·|- ¬¬¬-| ~-|- +|+ +·- ¬¬-|-| .·= ¤|| ¬·-¤| + ¬·-¤|+· +|·¬|-|- ¬-+¬¬|
--|· |+|¬¸- | +|-| |-|+-| ~|¬| ¬|¡. +|+ ¬|¤+ +·|+ ¬|+- +·-¸ +|+|.+|¤ -·+· |+«- -|¡|.
~-|- -|c| ¬¡- +·|+| ¬|+|-|, +«+· +¤¸· |+«|- -|¡|-, +¤·|+· ¡|¤|·| ¬·|· u-, :|- +¬|+·
¬+¬+¸- ·|¡¤, :|- +¬|·| +|+·|- ¬¡|- |++|- ¡|¤|· -+¬|- |+« ~-+·| ¡+|¬|:¬ ¬¬|- |
¬+ª+· +|- +·- | +|-| ¬+¬+ +·-|- ¬|¬|.
+|«+ +-+-|-| ¬|u·| +|;+-| +|+· +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡ - +|;+ ¤ ¬| -c+|-c·| ¬|¡|·|- ¤|·-|-
¬|¬ ¬|¡-. +|«-|·| u|¬·| ·|+|- +|-·+·| +-- :|- :|- +¬|+¬ ¬|¡- + ·|- +|-| +¬+-| |+|
|¬|c| ·+ª¤| +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. +|«+ ++·-|¬|c| ·|¬| +|-·+ +-- :|· +c -- +|;+ ·+-
·|¬| +c +-+-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡.
¬-- º+ ++ .·-|- ~ ¬|¬. +|-| |++- ,-··,- ·. ¬|¡.
~-|-|¬ +- ++| ¡|-|·| ¡-|- -+|+| ¬~| +¬-|¬-, +|-+-|¬- ¬¡|- +|c| -· .+|·-| +
+-+-|- ¬|¬ ¬|¡-.
Single Bull Operated Weeder
Shri. Pravin Shrirang Lad
Jalna
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
102
uµìzl mn n¤
ml. ¤l«-iu ¤¤+ª ¤a4ªi«
+-+|«
+¡|+|+ +|·¬·|- u-|-| ¡|¤|·| ¬+· c|«¬| ¤|+|, u- ~-¤|+-|- ++¬ ¤|- - +|-|·| .+|¡|+·|+·
+|¡¸- ¤|¤, ¡+~| ¬+¤ ¬|-|- |-¤ ¡|¤, ¤|+-|·| +··| ¤·|+· ·||¡-|- - |++|+=| -¤|¬ ¬|¤+
+|++ ¬¬-|- ¬|c«¸- ¬|¬ |+· -+| -¡¤¸- +¡|·| +,- u- +|-| ¬+¬+ + |-|+-| +·-|- ¬|¬|.
-¬|¬| u- :-|¬|c| -,· ¬.+|. ¬|+ +¡|·|¬| u|¬·| ·|+|¬ c|+:|· ¬|+|· :-|- ¬|¬|. ·|·| º+
+¸c ¬-·|+· ¬|u·| ¤|«| +¬|+-|- ¬|¬| :¬| c|+|¬| ¡·¬ +¬+-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. .·= +|+ +·-|-|
-¬|·| +·|¬| º+ +¸c +|+ ·|+¬ ¤|-. ¤|«|+· +||- + ¡·¬+· ¡|-|- :|+ |:¬| ¤|-| + ¤|+-|- |a,
+-+¬ ¤|- ·|- u- c|+¬ ¤|- + - |a, +¤+¬ ¤|- ¡ +«u|+ +|+ ¬¬¬ -·| u-|-| ¬+¤ ¤c
+«|~| ¬|-|- +¬ -·+|:-|¬ -|+¬| +|:| ¡|-|, u-|-| ¬+· ¬¡¤ c|«-| -|.
¡ -++·¤ ¬|¡|·|+· ¬¡¤ +-+¸- |+«- ·|¬|c| ¬|¤|·¤-| --· ,- ·. º+c| u- -|.
103
mìu¸» »ì¿ mìcwl n¤ {m쿬 vuz¿z}
ml. ªi¬¦ ª¤u =¸««ul
-:·+|·
+|+¬|-| +-¤| ~|-|--· .+u +|+ ¬¬- - ~|·|- ¬|c +|c¤ ¬||¤ ¡ +|+ u¸+ |¤+·|- ¬¬-. -¬-
+|+¬|- ¬|c +|c-|¬|c| ·|-| +¤¸· |+«¤ ¡| ¬+ª| ¡|-|. -¬- ··+¸· +¤·| ¤|+| ¬|+. | .+u
¬+ª+· +|- +·-|¬|c| +| ª+-+-+--¸- +|+¬|- ¬|c +|c-|- + -¡¤¤- +|c- ¬+·c· ¡ ¬+.¤+
~··- ¬|¬| -|· +¬. ¡ + -|· +·-|-| +|- ¬·-¤|-| ¬|+|· ¤|+ ¬|+¬. |++|-| ¬·|¬ +·|-,
.|+ +·-| +·-|, ¬¤|·¤| +·- - -|· ~|¬.
¡ + -|· +·-|-| +|¡-|:| ¬|u·|·| +|c·| ·+- ¤|· ¬|+|+| ¬|+-. --· +|-·+ +-- +|c·|
cŠc··| -|+·¤| +|¬| ¤|·|+ ¬|+-. ·+|· +¤|¬ ++| u-|-|¬ ¤-| c|+|+ +ª-¸-| +|+· +-- +
.¤+ +«| ~ª+||··| +-+¬. ¬|u·|·| +cc·|-| ¬¬¬-| ¤|·+« +|+¬|- ¬|c -+c¸- c|+¬ ¤|-.
-¬- +|-·+ +-|+« ¬|u··|·| +cc·| -c-|-| ~Š-| ++| ¬¬-. ·|+« ¬|u·|·| +cc·|-| ¤|·
|c+¸- ·|¡-.
+¸+| +|+¬|- ¬|c +|c-|¬|c| - c . +¤¸· ¬|+- ¡|- +|+ ¡ + -|· +-|+« +¬ º+- +¤¸·
¬|+·+-| ·|¬-|¬ ¬|+-|. ¡ + º+ º+· +|+¬|- ¬|c ,· - -- |+|-c|- +|c- -· |:+¬|¬| -· -
-- º+· ¤|+-|+·|¬ ¬|c +|c-. +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ¬|¤|·¤-… ,··· ,- ·+ ¬|¡.
Cotton Uprooter
Shri. Rajendra Ramesh Suryawanshi
Nandurbar
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
102
uµìzl mn n¤
ml. ¤l«-iu ¤¤+ª ¤a4ªi«
+-+|«
+¡|+|+ +|·¬·|- u-|-| ¡|¤|·| ¬+· c|«¬| ¤|+|, u- ~-¤|+-|- ++¬ ¤|- - +|-|·| .+|¡|+·|+·
+|¡¸- ¤|¤, ¡+~| ¬+¤ ¬|-|- |-¤ ¡|¤, ¤|+-|·| +··| ¤·|+· ·||¡-|- - |++|+=| -¤|¬ ¬|¤+
+|++ ¬¬-|- ¬|c«¸- ¬|¬ |+· -+| -¡¤¸- +¡|·| +,- u- +|-| ¬+¬+ + |-|+-| +·-|- ¬|¬|.
-¬|¬| u- :-|¬|c| -,· ¬.+|. ¬|+ +¡|·|¬| u|¬·| ·|+|¬ c|+:|· ¬|+|· :-|- ¬|¬|. ·|·| º+
+¸c ¬-·|+· ¬|u·| ¤|«| +¬|+-|- ¬|¬| :¬| c|+|¬| ¡·¬ +¬+-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. .·= +|+ +·-|-|
-¬|·| +·|¬| º+ +¸c +|+ ·|+¬ ¤|-. ¤|«|+· +||- + ¡·¬+· ¡|-|- :|+ |:¬| ¤|-| + ¤|+-|- |a,
+-+¬ ¤|- ·|- u- c|+¬ ¤|- + - |a, +¤+¬ ¤|- ¡ +«u|+ +|+ ¬¬¬ -·| u-|-| ¬+¤ ¤c
+«|~| ¬|-|- +¬ -·+|:-|¬ -|+¬| +|:| ¡|-|, u-|-| ¬+· ¬¡¤ c|«-| -|.
¡ -++·¤ ¬|¡|·|+· ¬¡¤ +-+¸- |+«- ·|¬|c| ¬|¤|·¤-| --· ,- ·. º+c| u- -|.
103
mìu¸» »ì¿ mìcwl n¤ {m쿬 vuz¿z}
ml. ªi¬¦ ª¤u =¸««ul
-:·+|·
+|+¬|-| +-¤| ~|-|--· .+u +|+ ¬¬- - ~|·|- ¬|c +|c¤ ¬||¤ ¡ +|+ u¸+ |¤+·|- ¬¬-. -¬-
+|+¬|- ¬|c +|c-|¬|c| ·|-| +¤¸· |+«¤ ¡| ¬+ª| ¡|-|. -¬- ··+¸· +¤·| ¤|+| ¬|+. | .+u
¬+ª+· +|- +·-|¬|c| +| ª+-+-+--¸- +|+¬|- ¬|c +|c-|- + -¡¤¤- +|c- ¬+·c· ¡ ¬+.¤+
~··- ¬|¬| -|· +¬. ¡ + -|· +·-|-| +|- ¬·-¤|-| ¬|+|· ¤|+ ¬|+¬. |++|-| ¬·|¬ +·|-,
.|+ +·-| +·-|, ¬¤|·¤| +·- - -|· ~|¬.
¡ + -|· +·-|-| +|¡-|:| ¬|u·|·| +|c·| ·+- ¤|· ¬|+|+| ¬|+-. --· +|-·+ +-- +|c·|
cŠc··| -|+·¤| +|¬| ¤|·|+ ¬|+-. ·+|· +¤|¬ ++| u-|-|¬ ¤-| c|+|+ +ª-¸-| +|+· +-- +
.¤+ +«| ~ª+||··| +-+¬. ¬|u·|·| +cc·|-| ¬¬¬-| ¤|·+« +|+¬|- ¬|c -+c¸- c|+¬ ¤|-.
-¬- +|-·+ +-|+« ¬|u··|·| +cc·| -c-|-| ~Š-| ++| ¬¬-. ·|+« ¬|u·|·| +cc·|-| ¤|·
|c+¸- ·|¡-.
+¸+| +|+¬|- ¬|c +|c-|¬|c| - c . +¤¸· ¬|+- ¡|- +|+ ¡ + -|· +-|+« +¬ º+- +¤¸·
¬|+·+-| ·|¬-|¬ ¬|+-|. ¡ + º+ º+· +|+¬|- ¬|c ,· - -- |+|-c|- +|c- -· |:+¬|¬| -· -
-- º+· ¤|+-|+·|¬ ¬|c +|c-. +|-| ¬:|¤ |++- ¬|¤|·¤-… ,··· ,- ·+ ¬|¡.
Cotton Uprooter
Shri. Rajendra Ramesh Suryawanshi
Nandurbar
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
104
nì¬u ulnn =»sl n¤
ml. ¤il;·« -;+¤iª ¤iu

Email : an.ponkshe@gmail.com
~-|-|¬ ++-, +c| ¬~| +:|¤|-| +c+« ·--| (+-+ ·|-¬c|) ++| ¬¬-|- ¡|-|«¤| + +|¡-¸+ ¡|
+c+c|-| .|+| ¬¬-. =| +|¬|-|, ¡|-|«¤| + +|¡-¸+ +·-|- ¬¬·-| ¬|¤¤|· +|-+ -|¬- +¬·| +
+| -|· +¬ ¬|¡. ¡ + ++« ~-|-|¬ ++-, +c| ¬¬ +:|¤- -·¡ -· +c+«·--| (+-+ ·|-¬c|) ++|
¬¬¬¬ ¬- +:|¤¡| ¡|-|«-|¬ -+|+| ¬|¡.
·|·-|-, :· ¬|¬, +|¤~| ¬+|· - |+¬| -¬|ªc+ +|+·¬ ¤|-. ·|·-|-| ¬|+ ¬·| -~- +|c| ¬|¡.
-¡¤¤- :·++| -~· +|c| |+¬| -¬|ªc+ ·|·-|- +|+·¬ ¤|-. =|-|¬ -~· -¬|ªc+ +-¤ (Packing)
-|· +·-|¬|c| ¡|-|.
+-|- :··|¤ ··- c- +-·| +|«| ¡|-|. ·-|¬ +-+|+· ¡|-|¬|·u| +-·| ¬+|· ,-· c- ¬¬-|. =|
+--|- +|-, ¤|-¸, +|+: + -¬|ªc+ =| +:|¤|-| ¬+|+~ ¡|-|. +|+:|- .+|¤ -- c- + - c- :¤
|+~·| + +-¤| ¬|c| (~·¬.«+¬) +|+·|+|- -¬|ªc+ ¬¬-. +-¤|¬|c| +|+·-| ¤|¤|-| -¬|ªc+¬|
+-·| +-+|·| ·|+- ++| -¡¤-|-.
++|, :¤|-| |+~+| + +|+: =| -|- .+|··| +-|-| +c+«·--| (+-+ ·|-¬c|) ++| ¬¬-|-
¡|-|«¤| + +|¡-¸+ ¡| +c+c|-| .|+| ¬¬-. =| +|¬|-|, ¡|-|«¤| + +|¡-¸+ +·-|- ¬¬·-| ¬|¤¤
+|-+ -|¬- +¬·| +|- ¬¡|·|- ~Š ¡|;¬. ¬|+|-+¤ ++| + -·¬+ +|¬ +|c| ¬|+|·|·| +|·|-
··¬| ¤|-|. =| +|¬|-| ·--| (+-+ ·|-¬c|) ++| ¬¬-|- º+| +|·|- ¬|¤|·¤+¤ -· - -- |+¬|-
++| +¬-|.
=| +|·|-| +¡|-+ ·|Š|+· ·+- ¬¤+| a|c| +|¡-|-¸- ¡|-. +|·|-| ¬|+· u¸+ +|¡| ¬¬-|-
·|Š|+·- +¬¬| +|¡-¸+ +|¬:|+ ¬¬-. +|·|-| ¬|+· u¸+ +|¡| ¬¬-|- + ·| +|-|- +¤- ++|
¬¬-|- +|¡-|·| =+--| ¤+-+ -· - -· c+- +|+· ¡|-|. ·|+« ;¤- +|| ¤|- + +|¡-¸+ u-¡|
+|c-|. ¡| +-·| -|+|-| +¬·|·| ª+·+|- +|¤-|¬ +-·| +-+|- +- + +¬ :|-¡|- +-- ¡|;¬.
Person Operated Compressor
Shri. Aditya Nandkumar Ponkshe
Pune
SUB-THEME
NON TIMBER FOREST PRODUCE
AS LIVELIHOOD RESOURCE
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
104
nì¬u ulnn =»sl n¤
ml. ¤il;·« -;+¤iª ¤iu

Email : an.ponkshe@gmail.com
~-|-|¬ ++-, +c| ¬~| +:|¤|-| +c+« ·--| (+-+ ·|-¬c|) ++| ¬¬-|- ¡|-|«¤| + +|¡-¸+ ¡|
+c+c|-| .|+| ¬¬-. =| +|¬|-|, ¡|-|«¤| + +|¡-¸+ +·-|- ¬¬·-| ¬|¤¤|· +|-+ -|¬- +¬·| +
+| -|· +¬ ¬|¡. ¡ + ++« ~-|-|¬ ++-, +c| ¬¬ +:|¤- -·¡ -· +c+«·--| (+-+ ·|-¬c|) ++|
¬¬¬¬ ¬- +:|¤¡| ¡|-|«-|¬ -+|+| ¬|¡.
·|·-|-, :· ¬|¬, +|¤~| ¬+|· - |+¬| -¬|ªc+ +|+·¬ ¤|-. ·|·-|-| ¬|+ ¬·| -~- +|c| ¬|¡.
-¡¤¤- :·++| -~· +|c| |+¬| -¬|ªc+ ·|·-|- +|+·¬ ¤|-. =|-|¬ -~· -¬|ªc+ +-¤ (Packing)
-|· +·-|¬|c| ¡|-|.
+-|- :··|¤ ··- c- +-·| +|«| ¡|-|. ·-|¬ +-+|+· ¡|-|¬|·u| +-·| ¬+|· ,-· c- ¬¬-|. =|
+--|- +|-, ¤|-¸, +|+: + -¬|ªc+ =| +:|¤|-| ¬+|+~ ¡|-|. +|+:|- .+|¤ -- c- + - c- :¤
|+~·| + +-¤| ¬|c| (~·¬.«+¬) +|+·|+|- -¬|ªc+ ¬¬-. +-¤|¬|c| +|+·-| ¤|¤|-| -¬|ªc+¬|
+-·| +-+|·| ·|+- ++| -¡¤-|-.
++|, :¤|-| |+~+| + +|+: =| -|- .+|··| +-|-| +c+«·--| (+-+ ·|-¬c|) ++| ¬¬-|-
¡|-|«¤| + +|¡-¸+ ¡| +c+c|-| .|+| ¬¬-. =| +|¬|-|, ¡|-|«¤| + +|¡-¸+ +·-|- ¬¬·-| ¬|¤¤
+|-+ -|¬- +¬·| +|- ¬¡|·|- ~Š ¡|;¬. ¬|+|-+¤ ++| + -·¬+ +|¬ +|c| ¬|+|·|·| +|·|-
··¬| ¤|-|. =| +|¬|-| ·--| (+-+ ·|-¬c|) ++| ¬¬-|- º+| +|·|- ¬|¤|·¤+¤ -· - -- |+¬|-
++| +¬-|.
=| +|·|-| +¡|-+ ·|Š|+· ·+- ¬¤+| a|c| +|¡-|-¸- ¡|-. +|·|-| ¬|+· u¸+ +|¡| ¬¬-|-
·|Š|+·- +¬¬| +|¡-¸+ +|¬:|+ ¬¬-. +|·|-| ¬|+· u¸+ +|¡| ¬¬-|- + ·| +|-|- +¤- ++|
¬¬-|- +|¡-|·| =+--| ¤+-+ -· - -· c+- +|+· ¡|-|. ·|+« ;¤- +|| ¤|- + +|¡-¸+ u-¡|
+|c-|. ¡| +-·| -|+|-| +¬·|·| ª+·+|- +|¤-|¬ +-·| +-+|- +- + +¬ :|-¡|- +-- ¡|;¬.
Person Operated Compressor
Shri. Aditya Nandkumar Ponkshe
Pune
SUB-THEME
NON TIMBER FOREST PRODUCE
AS LIVELIHOOD RESOURCE
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
106
INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Rajendra S. Dahatonde Techno skill based Amchur Processing in Akkalkuwa 107
Tehsil of Nandurbar District
Rajendra S. Dahatonde Oil extraction at consumer's doorstep with the help 108
of Hand operated oil expeller
Rajendra S. Dahatonde Low cost solar for drying of aonla candy 109
Ajay Dolke Storage and Processing of Mahua flowers Livelihood 110
secutiry for tribal of Yavatmal district of Maharashtra
Amit Kulkarni Livelihood generation for tribes through sustainable 111
wild honey harvesting in Pandharkawada (Mah.)
Sunil Ukidve Livelihood generation based local fruit processing units in Konkan 112
Shri. Dadarao Daphal Beekeeping through Migration 113
Shri. Chandrashekhar Livelihood strengthening through Karvand and other tree 114
Dharmadhikari species of Sahyadri
Shri. Chyitram Pawar Forest Conservation lead new livelihood source - Mahua Seed Oil 115
Shri. Bhagwan Wagh Round the year livelihood through wild fruit farming 116
Sadanand S. Bhadauriya Lakh production of beneficiary business in Chhattisgarh 117
Dr. Nirupama Deshpande Eco-Friendly Employment - Bamboo Treatment & Natural dyeling 118
(Sampoorna Bamboo Kendra's experiment)
I. I. Hugar Tasar for tribal prosperity - an experience of BAIF in 119
livelihood promotion in Maharashtra
Dr. Utkarsh Ghate NTDP's India : Status, Problems and Opportunities 120
Zakir Hussain Plantation and conservaton of important medicinal plant of 121
Commiphora wightil (Local name : Guggul) along the Chamba river
Milind Joshi Livelihood security of women through Bibba processing 122
in Ajantha ranges of Aurangabad, district Maharashtra
Vijay Sambare NTFP conservation, value addition & tribal right to ownership for 123
sustainable livelihood in Akole block, Ahmadnagar District
Satish Dongare 'Palas' (Butea monosperma) tea - a new venture of 124
employment generation for local tribes of Yavatmal
Ashiwini Chothe Conservation and Preservation of wild edible food resources with 125
people's participation for food security and livelihood generation
in Jawhar, a tribal block of Thane district
Keshav Gurnule Honey harvest - A successfully driven livelihood venture 126
in Gadchiroli district in Maharashtra
Shri. Bhalchandra Kanade Farm level processing unit 127
Shri. Subhash Mhaske Conservation of Medicinal Plants 128
Shri. Nyaneshwar Wadekar Status of Hirda in Bhimashankar area 129
Dr. Pratibha Phatak Problems in collection and processing of Charoli 131
Shri. Unmesh U. Lande Farming of Karvand 132
Techno skill based Amchur Processing in
Akkalkuwa Tehsil of Nandurbar District
Rajendra Sahebrao Dahatonde
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Nandurbar, A/P- Kolda Tal- NandurbarDist-Nandurbar
Email : kvk_ndb@yahoo.com
Keywords – satpuda hills, amchur making, improved technologies, increased income
Mango is one of the most important fruit crop in Dhadgaon, Akkalkuwa and is popular both in the
fresh and processed form for consumption. Mango is one of the important fruit which can be
utilized by the processing industry during the different stages of its growth i.e. development,
maturity and ripening. The product prepared both from ripe and green mangoes are highly
popular. e.g. Amchur, mango pickle, mango chutney, green mango drink (panna), mango pulp,
slices, mango leather.
During summer season in Nandurbar districts mainly in Dhadgaon & Akkalkuwa Tehsil preparation
of Amchur is important traditional business for thousands tribal families. Though the raw mango
processing season lasts for about two months it involves turnover approximately or more than of
Rs 2 crores. The main labor intensive operations involved in the Amchur making are harvesting,
washing, peeling, cutting of fruit flesh, and sun drying of slices. Most of the work is carried out
manually. Almost all the operations are manual; the hygienic conditions are not maintained during
preparation of Amchur in traditional way.
Generally a tribal farmer has 3-4 mango trees around their residence. Amchur is made from raw
green mangoes. Mangoes are peeled and the flesh is cut into 4-5 slices then dried into open place
known as khadafor 2-3 days in the sun. After drying of slices they sell them at local level. Amchur
was sold in Three grades a, b and c according to whiteness of amchur.
In traditional process, there issues of appropriate timing and method of harvest, use of iron peelers
and open, direct sun drying. Due to all these problems, more than 70% amchur was sold in grade
c. To overcome problem, we introduced various improved technologies and processes i.etraining
of harvesting, mango zolas for harvesting, improved peelers and bamboo based solar dryers. This
has helped to increase quality of amchur. Now c grade amchur has reduced 30-40 % where as a
and b grade covers 70-60%. This has increased net income of each family by 20%. There is scope
to use this simple technology in more than100 villages. These can double the total turnover of
amchur industry in tribal belt.
107
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
106
INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Rajendra S. Dahatonde Techno skill based Amchur Processing in Akkalkuwa 107
Tehsil of Nandurbar District
Rajendra S. Dahatonde Oil extraction at consumer's doorstep with the help 108
of Hand operated oil expeller
Rajendra S. Dahatonde Low cost solar for drying of aonla candy 109
Ajay Dolke Storage and Processing of Mahua flowers Livelihood 110
secutiry for tribal of Yavatmal district of Maharashtra
Amit Kulkarni Livelihood generation for tribes through sustainable 111
wild honey harvesting in Pandharkawada (Mah.)
Sunil Ukidve Livelihood generation based local fruit processing units in Konkan 112
Shri. Dadarao Daphal Beekeeping through Migration 113
Shri. Chandrashekhar Livelihood strengthening through Karvand and other tree 114
Dharmadhikari species of Sahyadri
Shri. Chyitram Pawar Forest Conservation lead new livelihood source - Mahua Seed Oil 115
Shri. Bhagwan Wagh Round the year livelihood through wild fruit farming 116
Sadanand S. Bhadauriya Lakh production of beneficiary business in Chhattisgarh 117
Dr. Nirupama Deshpande Eco-Friendly Employment - Bamboo Treatment & Natural dyeling 118
(Sampoorna Bamboo Kendra's experiment)
I. I. Hugar Tasar for tribal prosperity - an experience of BAIF in 119
livelihood promotion in Maharashtra
Dr. Utkarsh Ghate NTDP's India : Status, Problems and Opportunities 120
Zakir Hussain Plantation and conservaton of important medicinal plant of 121
Commiphora wightil (Local name : Guggul) along the Chamba river
Milind Joshi Livelihood security of women through Bibba processing 122
in Ajantha ranges of Aurangabad, district Maharashtra
Vijay Sambare NTFP conservation, value addition & tribal right to ownership for 123
sustainable livelihood in Akole block, Ahmadnagar District
Satish Dongare 'Palas' (Butea monosperma) tea - a new venture of 124
employment generation for local tribes of Yavatmal
Ashiwini Chothe Conservation and Preservation of wild edible food resources with 125
people's participation for food security and livelihood generation
in Jawhar, a tribal block of Thane district
Keshav Gurnule Honey harvest - A successfully driven livelihood venture 126
in Gadchiroli district in Maharashtra
Shri. Bhalchandra Kanade Farm level processing unit 127
Shri. Subhash Mhaske Conservation of Medicinal Plants 128
Shri. Nyaneshwar Wadekar Status of Hirda in Bhimashankar area 129
Dr. Pratibha Phatak Problems in collection and processing of Charoli 131
Shri. Unmesh U. Lande Farming of Karvand 132
Techno skill based Amchur Processing in
Akkalkuwa Tehsil of Nandurbar District
Rajendra Sahebrao Dahatonde
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Nandurbar, A/P- Kolda Tal- NandurbarDist-Nandurbar
Email : kvk_ndb@yahoo.com
Keywords – satpuda hills, amchur making, improved technologies, increased income
Mango is one of the most important fruit crop in Dhadgaon, Akkalkuwa and is popular both in the
fresh and processed form for consumption. Mango is one of the important fruit which can be
utilized by the processing industry during the different stages of its growth i.e. development,
maturity and ripening. The product prepared both from ripe and green mangoes are highly
popular. e.g. Amchur, mango pickle, mango chutney, green mango drink (panna), mango pulp,
slices, mango leather.
During summer season in Nandurbar districts mainly in Dhadgaon & Akkalkuwa Tehsil preparation
of Amchur is important traditional business for thousands tribal families. Though the raw mango
processing season lasts for about two months it involves turnover approximately or more than of
Rs 2 crores. The main labor intensive operations involved in the Amchur making are harvesting,
washing, peeling, cutting of fruit flesh, and sun drying of slices. Most of the work is carried out
manually. Almost all the operations are manual; the hygienic conditions are not maintained during
preparation of Amchur in traditional way.
Generally a tribal farmer has 3-4 mango trees around their residence. Amchur is made from raw
green mangoes. Mangoes are peeled and the flesh is cut into 4-5 slices then dried into open place
known as khadafor 2-3 days in the sun. After drying of slices they sell them at local level. Amchur
was sold in Three grades a, b and c according to whiteness of amchur.
In traditional process, there issues of appropriate timing and method of harvest, use of iron peelers
and open, direct sun drying. Due to all these problems, more than 70% amchur was sold in grade
c. To overcome problem, we introduced various improved technologies and processes i.etraining
of harvesting, mango zolas for harvesting, improved peelers and bamboo based solar dryers. This
has helped to increase quality of amchur. Now c grade amchur has reduced 30-40 % where as a
and b grade covers 70-60%. This has increased net income of each family by 20%. There is scope
to use this simple technology in more than100 villages. These can double the total turnover of
amchur industry in tribal belt.
107
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Oil extraction at consumer's doorstep with the
help of Hand operated oil expeller
Rajendra Sahebrao Dahatonde
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Nandurbar, A/P- Kolda Tal- Nandurbar Dist-Nandurbar
Email : kvk_ndb@yahoo.com
Keywords – Mahutolambi oil, extraction, drudgery, hand operated oil expeller, improved output

Nandurbar district is tribal district comprising 67% tribal population. In the hilly terrain of satpuda
the tribal family mostly consume Tolambi oil for culinary purpose. Tolambi is abundantly available
in this region. They extract Tolambi oil from Tolambi seeds by using local instrument- shipda.
The process of deriving oil from Tolmbi is quite cumbersome. The recovery of oil is also
less.Extraction of oil from Tolambi with the help of local wooden instrument – Shipda involved
drudgery and also pre treatment is required separately. It requires more time with lower oil
extraction efficiency.Hence there is need for an expeller to extract oil from Tolambi which will
operate manually and efficiently. We assessed Hand operated oil expeller. As compared to
traditional oil extraction, hand operated oil expeller has achieved 15-20 percent more oil recovery
with of capacity 4-5 kg/hr. Expeller to extract oil from Tolambi which will operate manually and
efficiently and easy to maintain.
108
Low cost solar for drying of aonla candy
Rajendra Sahebrao Dahatonde
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Nandurbar, A/P- Kolda Tal- NandurbarDist-Nandurbar
Email : kvk_ndb@yahoo.com
Keywords – aonla candy, low cost solar dryer, increased temperatures, higher rate
In Akkalkuwa Tehsil of Nandurbar district, mango, aonla as a fruit crops, chilli, onion, garlic as a
vegetable crops and ambadi ,palas as flowers are the processing potential commodities. In the
aonla candy making small businesses, open drying is carried out preservation as well as value
addition of Aonla candy.
The process has several disadvantages like spoilage of product, loss of material due to birds and
animals, deterioration of material by insect and fungus etc. This process is highly labor intensive
and expensive, time consuming and requires large area for drying.
KVK, Nandurbar assessed Low cost solar for drying of aonla candy. As compared to open drying
for preservation as well as value addition low cost solar provides higher temperature difference
o
(10-15 c) than room temperature, decrease in drying time by 1-1.5 days per batch and increase in
rate by Rs 40-60 per kg of aonla candy.
109
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Oil extraction at consumer's doorstep with the
help of Hand operated oil expeller
Rajendra Sahebrao Dahatonde
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Nandurbar, A/P- Kolda Tal- Nandurbar Dist-Nandurbar
Email : kvk_ndb@yahoo.com
Keywords – Mahutolambi oil, extraction, drudgery, hand operated oil expeller, improved output

Nandurbar district is tribal district comprising 67% tribal population. In the hilly terrain of satpuda
the tribal family mostly consume Tolambi oil for culinary purpose. Tolambi is abundantly available
in this region. They extract Tolambi oil from Tolambi seeds by using local instrument- shipda.
The process of deriving oil from Tolmbi is quite cumbersome. The recovery of oil is also
less.Extraction of oil from Tolambi with the help of local wooden instrument – Shipda involved
drudgery and also pre treatment is required separately. It requires more time with lower oil
extraction efficiency.Hence there is need for an expeller to extract oil from Tolambi which will
operate manually and efficiently. We assessed Hand operated oil expeller. As compared to
traditional oil extraction, hand operated oil expeller has achieved 15-20 percent more oil recovery
with of capacity 4-5 kg/hr. Expeller to extract oil from Tolambi which will operate manually and
efficiently and easy to maintain.
108
Low cost solar for drying of aonla candy
Rajendra Sahebrao Dahatonde
Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Nandurbar, A/P- Kolda Tal- NandurbarDist-Nandurbar
Email : kvk_ndb@yahoo.com
Keywords – aonla candy, low cost solar dryer, increased temperatures, higher rate
In Akkalkuwa Tehsil of Nandurbar district, mango, aonla as a fruit crops, chilli, onion, garlic as a
vegetable crops and ambadi ,palas as flowers are the processing potential commodities. In the
aonla candy making small businesses, open drying is carried out preservation as well as value
addition of Aonla candy.
The process has several disadvantages like spoilage of product, loss of material due to birds and
animals, deterioration of material by insect and fungus etc. This process is highly labor intensive
and expensive, time consuming and requires large area for drying.
KVK, Nandurbar assessed Low cost solar for drying of aonla candy. As compared to open drying
for preservation as well as value addition low cost solar provides higher temperature difference
o
(10-15 c) than room temperature, decrease in drying time by 1-1.5 days per batch and increase in
rate by Rs 40-60 per kg of aonla candy.
109
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Storage and Processing of Mahua flowers – Livelihood
security for tribal of Yavatmal district of Maharashtra
Ajay Dolke
SRUJAN, Nagpur
Email : ajaydolke@gmail.com
Keywords – mahua flowers, storage techniques, new products
SRUJAN conducted different studies to improve economic status of tribal communities since
2002. Mahua flowers found to be inseparable pat of the livelihood since many years. During the
People Biodiversity Register, villagers themselves studied few trees of economic importance and
also found out different problems associated with the Mahua flower storage. Survey in 7 villages of
Zhari block of Yavatmal district, it was revealed that Mahua flower collection could go up to four
thousand kilograms per year in one season. Due to poor facility of storage, collector themselves
used to sell mahua flowers at lower rate of Rs.6-8 per kg in summer and buy back from the local
market at the rate of Rs.25 per kg. SRUJAN initiated work of scientific storage facility of Mahua,
capacity building of villagers for procurement of license from excise department for retention of
Mahua after September, training for preparation of non-alcoholic nutritional food products from
Mahua flowers and establishing market network for food products at national and international
level. This influenced villagers to form Mahua study group to understand laws related to Mahua
flowers storage. Also villagers themselves started study of Mahua tree population in their nearby
forest and also showed keen interest in preparation of food products from flowers. Ability to retain
Mahua beyond September resulted in 15% increase in the profit margin by sale of mahua flowers.
Mahua food products found to be potential livelihood resource throughout the year. About 100
families from 7 villages received benefits of it.
110
Livelihood generation for tribes through sustainable wild
honey harvesting in Pandharkawada (Maharahstra)
Amit Kulkarni
Navi Umed Santha, Yavatmal
Email : naviummed@gmail.com
In Pandharkavada area of Maharashtra, 'Kolam' tribes involved in honey harvest from Rock bee
hive. Organization revealed that honey harvest as the main ancillary income source and tribes
harvest honey from the hive in unsustainable and non scientific way. Annual potential of the honey
production from the area was found to be around 15 tons. After studying methods of collection and
potential of honey production of the area, organization started training programmes for tribal
community on scientific method of honey harvest, processing and storage techniques of honey.
Improved techniques of honey collection involved use of water spraying and safety dress for
collector. Small honey chamber detached with knife from large beehive was found to be efficient
techniques of honey harvest and non-violent as against traditional method. Around 250 people
received training for honey collection from organization. New techniques of collection showed
positive increase in per kg price for honey.
111
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Storage and Processing of Mahua flowers – Livelihood
security for tribal of Yavatmal district of Maharashtra
Ajay Dolke
SRUJAN, Nagpur
Email : ajaydolke@gmail.com
Keywords – mahua flowers, storage techniques, new products
SRUJAN conducted different studies to improve economic status of tribal communities since
2002. Mahua flowers found to be inseparable pat of the livelihood since many years. During the
People Biodiversity Register, villagers themselves studied few trees of economic importance and
also found out different problems associated with the Mahua flower storage. Survey in 7 villages of
Zhari block of Yavatmal district, it was revealed that Mahua flower collection could go up to four
thousand kilograms per year in one season. Due to poor facility of storage, collector themselves
used to sell mahua flowers at lower rate of Rs.6-8 per kg in summer and buy back from the local
market at the rate of Rs.25 per kg. SRUJAN initiated work of scientific storage facility of Mahua,
capacity building of villagers for procurement of license from excise department for retention of
Mahua after September, training for preparation of non-alcoholic nutritional food products from
Mahua flowers and establishing market network for food products at national and international
level. This influenced villagers to form Mahua study group to understand laws related to Mahua
flowers storage. Also villagers themselves started study of Mahua tree population in their nearby
forest and also showed keen interest in preparation of food products from flowers. Ability to retain
Mahua beyond September resulted in 15% increase in the profit margin by sale of mahua flowers.
Mahua food products found to be potential livelihood resource throughout the year. About 100
families from 7 villages received benefits of it.
110
Livelihood generation for tribes through sustainable wild
honey harvesting in Pandharkawada (Maharahstra)
Amit Kulkarni
Navi Umed Santha, Yavatmal
Email : naviummed@gmail.com
In Pandharkavada area of Maharashtra, 'Kolam' tribes involved in honey harvest from Rock bee
hive. Organization revealed that honey harvest as the main ancillary income source and tribes
harvest honey from the hive in unsustainable and non scientific way. Annual potential of the honey
production from the area was found to be around 15 tons. After studying methods of collection and
potential of honey production of the area, organization started training programmes for tribal
community on scientific method of honey harvest, processing and storage techniques of honey.
Improved techniques of honey collection involved use of water spraying and safety dress for
collector. Small honey chamber detached with knife from large beehive was found to be efficient
techniques of honey harvest and non-violent as against traditional method. Around 250 people
received training for honey collection from organization. New techniques of collection showed
positive increase in per kg price for honey.
111
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Livelihood generation based on local fruit
processing units in Konkan
Sunil Ukidve & A. V. Natu, Dr. Hedgewar Smruti
Seva Prakalp, Mangaon.
Email : sunilukidwe@yahoo.in
'Kokan' belt of Maharashtra is enriched by variety of fruits like mango, Cashew, Jambhul,
karwand, kokam of which many are getting internal market value but also face problems like wide
variation in size color, texture nutritional properties of fruits. Organization after preliminary study
on fruit industry problems initiated training programmes on fruit processing methods for local fruits
with the help of new technology and machines. About 4000 people, educated and uneducated
from 4 districts, were trained for cashew seed processing from different age class. Local people
run over 2000 farm level units of processing with approximate turnover of Rs.150 crores.
Organization designed and developed a farm level cashew processing machine which was
recognized & accepted by farmer. About 1000 people received fruit processing training. About 125
fruit processing units were established with approximate turnover of 50 crores. Fruit products
mainly includes ready to drink juices, Fruit Juice concentrates , Jack fruit & mango poli , mango
juice, Cashew bars Jambhul juice , kokam juice etc. Organization also involved in training of youth
for honey conservation &collection . Organization plays important role as a nodal agency for
implementing programs run by Agricultural department of Maharashtra & Center government and
also receives help from Agricultural universities & institutes to run different programme. Guidance
regarding food business licenses registration legal matters, technology helping local people to
stand in food business world.
112 113
lwzn nnnìwl uìn¬- vìnl¬m mìeìnnì
lwznì rnu»ìn
ml. ;i;iªi« s¤=
ª+|+| |+++|-: ¬+|¤ .+|¤- +¡-:~| ¬ª¤|
|¬„|· ¬|·+|+|:
Beekeeping through Migration
Shri. Dadarao Daphal
Sillod Aurangabad
+¤+|~| +|¬- ¡| ~-|+·|+· ¬|·+|+|: |¤-=|-|¬ ~-+|-| ¤|·¤:| +-+|+| =| -:~|- ¬ª¤- ¬·|¬
¬· +¬|. +|·¬·|- .¤+ +c--| +-- +¤+|~| +|¬- ·+¬||-|¬ ¬+ª| ¤|¤¸- ·--|. ++·· u|¤
-+¬·¤ -¬-|- +¤+|~| +c·| +· c+¸- :u|¬ |¤+- ·|¡- -|¡|- ¡| +· .- ~-+|¬+|· ¬|¡ ¡
¬|c«¸- ¬|¬. ++ u|¤ +¬ + +|c -+¬·¤ ¡|;¬ |-| ¬·|¬ +·|¬| ¬·+|- +¬|. +¡|·|-|-
¬|·+|+|:, +¡|+«œ·, ¬|-|·|, ¬|+¬|, +|c¤, +|-¡|+¸· ¬~| +¤+|~| +|¬- +|·¬·|- ¬·|¬ :|·|
+·-|- ¬|¬|. ª¤||-+ ¬+ª|-| -|: +¬|. -¬- |-¤ -+¬·¤ ¬||¤ +¤+|~| +·|-| ¬|+·+ u|¤|-|
|:| +-|+-|- ¬|¬|. ·|·| -+¬·¤--¬|· º+ ++| +¬·· -|· +·-|- ¬|¬. =|-+·|+· +¡|·|-
·| u|:| +|+|¤|+ .|~=¤ +, +¤¸- ,· |:+¬|- .|~=¤ ·-¬ ¬||¤ -· +c·| ·+- -+++|¬| ¬·+|-
+¬|. |+· |¬„|· +|·¬·|- -¬- +|·-+ +¡|·|- + +·|c+|·| ¤|¬ · |c+|¤| -¤|¬ u|¤
-+¬·¤--¬|· +c·| c+-|- c·|+¬. =| +c·| ª¤||-+ ¬¡·|+| ~-+|·| ~-|- c+-|. ¬+ |c+|¤|
=|·| -|:| c+-|- ¬|¬|. | +c·| ª¤||-+ u|¤ -+¬·¤--¬|· ,· - -· |:+¬|-| ++++«| |c+|¤|
¡¬|+-|- ¬|-|.+|¡-| ++| ¬+ u- +¤| +-- - |Š+c¬ +¤ -|· ~|¬| ¬||¤ ~-··· ·+ -+|
~|¬|.+|¡-| ++|·| ¬-·+|+· ++++«| +|+|+¤-| u|¤ -+¬·¤--¬|· :¬| ++|+|¬¸- +c·|
¡¬|+-| +-|. ¬~| .+|· |+·ª-| ¬|¤||·- ·+¬||¬| ¬·+|- ¡|+ ~+-|.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Livelihood generation based on local fruit
processing units in Konkan
Sunil Ukidve & A. V. Natu, Dr. Hedgewar Smruti
Seva Prakalp, Mangaon.
Email : sunilukidwe@yahoo.in
'Kokan' belt of Maharashtra is enriched by variety of fruits like mango, Cashew, Jambhul,
karwand, kokam of which many are getting internal market value but also face problems like wide
variation in size color, texture nutritional properties of fruits. Organization after preliminary study
on fruit industry problems initiated training programmes on fruit processing methods for local fruits
with the help of new technology and machines. About 4000 people, educated and uneducated
from 4 districts, were trained for cashew seed processing from different age class. Local people
run over 2000 farm level units of processing with approximate turnover of Rs.150 crores.
Organization designed and developed a farm level cashew processing machine which was
recognized & accepted by farmer. About 1000 people received fruit processing training. About 125
fruit processing units were established with approximate turnover of 50 crores. Fruit products
mainly includes ready to drink juices, Fruit Juice concentrates , Jack fruit & mango poli , mango
juice, Cashew bars Jambhul juice , kokam juice etc. Organization also involved in training of youth
for honey conservation &collection . Organization plays important role as a nodal agency for
implementing programs run by Agricultural department of Maharashtra & Center government and
also receives help from Agricultural universities & institutes to run different programme. Guidance
regarding food business licenses registration legal matters, technology helping local people to
stand in food business world.
112 113
lwzn nnnìwl uìn¬- vìnl¬m mìeìnnì
lwznì rnu»ìn
ml. ;i;iªi« s¤=
ª+|+| |+++|-: ¬+|¤ .+|¤- +¡-:~| ¬ª¤|
|¬„|· ¬|·+|+|:
Beekeeping through Migration
Shri. Dadarao Daphal
Sillod Aurangabad
+¤+|~| +|¬- ¡| ~-|+·|+· ¬|·+|+|: |¤-=|-|¬ ~-+|-| ¤|·¤:| +-+|+| =| -:~|- ¬ª¤- ¬·|¬
¬· +¬|. +|·¬·|- .¤+ +c--| +-- +¤+|~| +|¬- ·+¬||-|¬ ¬+ª| ¤|¤¸- ·--|. ++·· u|¤
-+¬·¤ -¬-|- +¤+|~| +c·| +· c+¸- :u|¬ |¤+- ·|¡- -|¡|- ¡| +· .- ~-+|¬+|· ¬|¡ ¡
¬|c«¸- ¬|¬. ++ u|¤ +¬ + +|c -+¬·¤ ¡|;¬ |-| ¬·|¬ +·|¬| ¬·+|- +¬|. +¡|·|-|-
¬|·+|+|:, +¡|+«œ·, ¬|-|·|, ¬|+¬|, +|c¤, +|-¡|+¸· ¬~| +¤+|~| +|¬- +|·¬·|- ¬·|¬ :|·|
+·-|- ¬|¬|. ª¤||-+ ¬+ª|-| -|: +¬|. -¬- |-¤ -+¬·¤ ¬||¤ +¤+|~| +·|-| ¬|+·+ u|¤|-|
|:| +-|+-|- ¬|¬|. ·|·| -+¬·¤--¬|· º+ ++| +¬·· -|· +·-|- ¬|¬. =|-+·|+· +¡|·|-
·| u|:| +|+|¤|+ .|~=¤ +, +¤¸- ,· |:+¬|- .|~=¤ ·-¬ ¬||¤ -· +c·| ·+- -+++|¬| ¬·+|-
+¬|. |+· |¬„|· +|·¬·|- -¬- +|·-+ +¡|·|- + +·|c+|·| ¤|¬ · |c+|¤| -¤|¬ u|¤
-+¬·¤--¬|· +c·| c+-|- c·|+¬. =| +c·| ª¤||-+ ¬¡·|+| ~-+|·| ~-|- c+-|. ¬+ |c+|¤|
=|·| -|:| c+-|- ¬|¬|. | +c·| ª¤||-+ u|¤ -+¬·¤--¬|· ,· - -· |:+¬|-| ++++«| |c+|¤|
¡¬|+-|- ¬|-|.+|¡-| ++| ¬+ u- +¤| +-- - |Š+c¬ +¤ -|· ~|¬| ¬||¤ ~-··· ·+ -+|
~|¬|.+|¡-| ++|·| ¬-·+|+· ++++«| +|+|+¤-| u|¤ -+¬·¤--¬|· :¬| ++|+|¬¸- +c·|
¡¬|+-| +-|. ¬~| .+|· |+·ª-| ¬|¤||·- ·+¬||¬| ¬·+|- ¡|+ ~+-|.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
114
»mì¢lnnln mzuc u ;nz znìl¬m nìsìu컸¬
acu«¬ìu ¬ul »ìn
ml. ¤¦uoª ¤¤il¤+iªl
¤-·|·-| -|¬, +|-¡|+¸·
Livelihood strengthening through Karvand and other tree
species of Sahyadri
Shri. Chandrashekhar Dharmadhikari
Janabharati Nyas, Kolhapur
+|-¡|+¸· |¤-=|+¤|¬ ¬=|,|- ¬|- -|¬+ +-|-| -c¬ ¬|¡-. +¤ ¤|¬ +-·|¤|-¸- ª¤||-+ ¬|+|-| ¤c
¬||¤+ +|:| -¬-|- ·|-| -+¤||++¬|c| +|¡· ~¡·|- ¤|+ ¬|+- ¬|¡. | +-| +¤ +|c·| .+|¤|-
¬|+·¤|· º+ +« -¡¤¤ +·+:. | +·+:|·| ¤|«| ;-Š| ¬|¡- +| ¬|+|-| ·|- +-|+· +|¡|-
¬.¸+ -|¡|. ¡| +·+: +|«| +·¤ + ~¡·|- |++¤ ¡| ¤|¬ º+ ·+¬|. +·-… +|¡¬| + +¬ | +·
¬¡·|+| ¬¬-|-. +¤ |-¸- -¡¤|+ ¬¬ -·+· |+«- -·¡-. -¬- +·+: +¬ + +|¡-|- ¬¬-|- ·|+«
|-¸- ~|œ- ·|¤+|· -·¡-|. |+« +·+: ¬·+- + ;-· +|¡| +:|¤ +-+¸- -·+· +|c+-| - +| ¡ +·-|¬
¬·+|- +¬|. .|+ +·-|-| ¬=|- ¬|¬ +|, -¡+|·| +-+·|~· +¤¸- |-| ·¬ |-·- -|¡| +|·¤ +«|·|
:|-¡| +|¤¸¬| |-+ ¬|¡, ¬|¬ +|-« ¬|¡. ++ º+ ª¤||-+ -+.|- ¡|c¬ +· +|: +|+|·| +| +·
+:¬ +-- +·+:|-| ·¬ +|c-|- + +-+¸- |:¬. +|-¡|+¸· +¤|¬ +|¡| ¬|+|-| +:- +-- |+-·|¤|
+¤ |:¬. ++- |+·| +c +-+¸- | +|+- +·+: -·+|:- ¬· +¬. +¬ -|- ++ -·+|:- + |++| ¬· ¬|¡.
·-¬ +¤ +|¡-| ++| +·- +¬. +-| -|- ++|- +c|-|¬ +|¡¬|-| ¬·|¬·| c··· · .|- ++ -·+· |+«|¬
¬|¡. |-¸- ¬|¤|·¤ -· +c+|-| ¤c +|:| ~|¬| ¬|¡. |-¸- ª+¸-| ·+- +|¤¸·| +|| ¤|¤|| +|·|
+|¬¸- ¬·+- +-|+-|¬ | ++| +|¬¸- ¬·+|- +¬| ¬|¡.
115
nµ¸ ¿ìnuln¸¬ vnì׬ - u¬ »zqwìu we

ml. ¤xi¤ ¤«iª
+-+|¬| +-|¤ ¬|¬+, +¡|·|-
Forest Conservation lead new Livelihood Source
Mahua Seed Oil
Shri. Chyitram Pawar
Maharashtra
+|·|+|·| +|+|+· +-| +|¬ ++|+|¬¸- +- ¬·=¤ ¬|+-| +|+- ¤-¤|-| ¬|+|-| ¬·|+-|¬- --·· º+·
¤+¬ ¬|·|«¬ ¬|¡. - +|c|+-|-| .·- +¬| ¬|¡. |-¸- +|+|·|- -|¡| -· ¬|¤¸+|¤¸·| +|- - :¡|
+|+|-| +|:| ~|¬|. +|·|+|··|-¸- | +|+|-| c-|;+· +|¤| +·+c| ¡|-|. ¤|¬-|¬|c| ¬|+¸· |+«-. +¤ |
+- ¬·=¤|+« ¬|-| +|·|+|··|-|¬ ¬|+|-| ¤c ¬||¤+ ¬|· |+«¸ ¬|+¬| ¬|¡.
+|·|+|··|·| ¤+¬|- º+¸¤ --,· +¡¸-| ~|· ¬|¡-. ·|-|¬ -·· ~|· +- ¬|+-| +|=+|- -|-.
·|·| +¬|-| :|- +|«-|¬|c| +|+· ¡|-|. | ¬|¤| ¬|+ ·|-| +« - -¡¤¤ c|¬+| -¬-|- ·|+||-|
|++|-. ·|- +|·- ++| +¬ |+«|-. c|¬+|- -¬ +|:-¬| .+|¤ u|+ ~+-|-. ·|+« +|++|-|
+|+|-- -¬|-| ·|¤| +¬+¬| ¬|¡. ·|+« ª+-… ¬|c| -¬ |+«¸- ++|- --~ ¡¤|· +|--|-- +¤ c|¬+|-
-¬ +¤ |++¸- ¬|+|-| +¬ |+«-|-. ¬·|-| ·|+ .·-.- · |+¬| ¬|¡. ·|-¸- .·+ +c+|¬| -··· -
c··· · |+«-|-.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
114
»mì¢lnnln mzuc u ;nz znìl¬m nìsìu컸¬
acu«¬ìu ¬ul »ìn
ml. ¤¦uoª ¤¤il¤+iªl
¤-·|·-| -|¬, +|-¡|+¸·
Livelihood strengthening through Karvand and other tree
species of Sahyadri
Shri. Chandrashekhar Dharmadhikari
Janabharati Nyas, Kolhapur
+|-¡|+¸· |¤-=|+¤|¬ ¬=|,|- ¬|- -|¬+ +-|-| -c¬ ¬|¡-. +¤ ¤|¬ +-·|¤|-¸- ª¤||-+ ¬|+|-| ¤c
¬||¤+ +|:| -¬-|- ·|-| -+¤||++¬|c| +|¡· ~¡·|- ¤|+ ¬|+- ¬|¡. | +-| +¤ +|c·| .+|¤|-
¬|+·¤|· º+ +« -¡¤¤ +·+:. | +·+:|·| ¤|«| ;-Š| ¬|¡- +| ¬|+|-| ·|- +-|+· +|¡|-
¬.¸+ -|¡|. ¡| +·+: +|«| +·¤ + ~¡·|- |++¤ ¡| ¤|¬ º+ ·+¬|. +·-… +|¡¬| + +¬ | +·
¬¡·|+| ¬¬-|-. +¤ |-¸- -¡¤|+ ¬¬ -·+· |+«- -·¡-. -¬- +·+: +¬ + +|¡-|- ¬¬-|- ·|+«
|-¸- ~|œ- ·|¤+|· -·¡-|. |+« +·+: ¬·+- + ;-· +|¡| +:|¤ +-+¸- -·+· +|c+-| - +| ¡ +·-|¬
¬·+|- +¬|. .|+ +·-|-| ¬=|- ¬|¬ +|, -¡+|·| +-+·|~· +¤¸- |-| ·¬ |-·- -|¡| +|·¤ +«|·|
:|-¡| +|¤¸¬| |-+ ¬|¡, ¬|¬ +|-« ¬|¡. ++ º+ ª¤||-+ -+.|- ¡|c¬ +· +|: +|+|·| +| +·
+:¬ +-- +·+:|-| ·¬ +|c-|- + +-+¸- |:¬. +|-¡|+¸· +¤|¬ +|¡| ¬|+|-| +:- +-- |+-·|¤|
+¤ |:¬. ++- |+·| +c +-+¸- | +|+- +·+: -·+|:- ¬· +¬. +¬ -|- ++ -·+|:- + |++| ¬· ¬|¡.
·-¬ +¤ +|¡-| ++| +·- +¬. +-| -|- ++|- +c|-|¬ +|¡¬|-| ¬·|¬·| c··· · .|- ++ -·+· |+«|¬
¬|¡. |-¸- ¬|¤|·¤ -· +c+|-| ¤c +|:| ~|¬| ¬|¡. |-¸- ª+¸-| ·+- +|¤¸·| +|| ¤|¤|| +|·|
+|¬¸- ¬·+- +-|+-|¬ | ++| +|¬¸- ¬·+|- +¬| ¬|¡.
115
nµ¸ ¿ìnuln¸¬ vnì׬ - u¬ »zqwìu we

ml. ¤xi¤ ¤«iª
+-+|¬| +-|¤ ¬|¬+, +¡|·|-
Forest Conservation lead new Livelihood Source
Mahua Seed Oil
Shri. Chyitram Pawar
Maharashtra
+|·|+|·| +|+|+· +-| +|¬ ++|+|¬¸- +- ¬·=¤ ¬|+-| +|+- ¤-¤|-| ¬|+|-| ¬·|+-|¬- --·· º+·
¤+¬ ¬|·|«¬ ¬|¡. - +|c|+-|-| .·- +¬| ¬|¡. |-¸- +|+|·|- -|¡| -· ¬|¤¸+|¤¸·| +|- - :¡|
+|+|-| +|:| ~|¬|. +|·|+|··|-¸- | +|+|-| c-|;+· +|¤| +·+c| ¡|-|. ¤|¬-|¬|c| ¬|+¸· |+«-. +¤ |
+- ¬·=¤|+« ¬|-| +|·|+|··|-|¬ ¬|+|-| ¤c ¬||¤+ ¬|· |+«¸ ¬|+¬| ¬|¡.
+|·|+|··|·| ¤+¬|- º+¸¤ --,· +¡¸-| ~|· ¬|¡-. ·|-|¬ -·· ~|· +- ¬|+-| +|=+|- -|-.
·|·| +¬|-| :|- +|«-|¬|c| +|+· ¡|-|. | ¬|¤| ¬|+ ·|-| +« - -¡¤¤ c|¬+| -¬-|- ·|+||-|
|++|-. ·|- +|·- ++| +¬ |+«|-. c|¬+|- -¬ +|:-¬| .+|¤ u|+ ~+-|-. ·|+« +|++|-|
+|+|-- -¬|-| ·|¤| +¬+¬| ¬|¡. ·|+« ª+-… ¬|c| -¬ |+«¸- ++|- --~ ¡¤|· +|--|-- +¤ c|¬+|-
-¬ +¤ |++¸- ¬|+|-| +¬ |+«-|-. ¬·|-| ·|+ .·-.- · |+¬| ¬|¡. ·|-¸- .·+ +c+|¬| -··· -
c··· · |+«-|-.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
116
×=nìnln wenìs wnln vìw¸¬ mnl uìzìµl
nlµ¬ au×llumì l¬lnnl
ml. =4«i- «i¤
¬|·+|+|:
Round the year Livelihood through wild fruit farming
Shri. Bhagwan Wagh
Aurangabad
+|~| ª+-… -| , º+· +|··+|¡¸ ~-| ¬|¡. ¬|·+|+|: |¤-=|¬|··| ++| +|+¬|·| .:~|- +|·| +|¡- c|¬
-+¤||++| .|+ ¡|-|+·|-| +|+ ~|¤¤ +·¤- ¡|-. ª¤||-+ -+¬·¤ +|-|-| -|c ¬·|¬ +-- +«~-|
+·-|- c·+-|- ¬|¬..¤+ =| .|+|- |·¬+· +· -·+|:- :¤|| |-- ¬||¤ +|· =| ~|·|-| ¬|++·
+¬|. ···| ¬|·|-| |++| ¬· +-- ¬¤¸- -· ¬|·|-| ¬|++· +¬|. ~· |-+¸-| ~|· ¬|+¬|.
¤|·¸«,+¬,|+·+|,c-+¤|,·|+· =| +|-| ¤+¬|-¸- +|«| +-| ¤|·|. =| ~|·|-| ¬|++· ~-|+·-
+·-|- ¬|¬|.~·· ¬|-|+«|-| ~|· ¬|·|·| ~|·|+· ¬|+-|- ¬|¬|. ¬|·|·| ¬|+¬|- ¬|-|+«
-|+¬| -|- ¡ ¤+¬|- +|·--|+· ¬+¤-. ~-|·| +|¤|+· c-+¤|-| ~-, |+·+|-| --, ·|+·|-| -·,
+¬|-| -· ~|· ¬|+-|- ¬|¬|. =| .·+|- -·+|:- ++|--| ++++«| +|¡-|- ·-|- -. =|
.|+|·| ¬+|:· ~|·|·| +¡·|-| -|c ¬·|¬ +·-|- ¬|¬|.¤+«¤+« ~· ++ ¡ -·+·|- ¬|¤- -¡¤¸-
+|+·-|- ¬|¬.+|+|- -· - -· ~-+·| | .+|· -·+|:- ·- ¬|¡-.=| .|+|-| .¬|· ¬||++|+|; +¬
¬+|¤ º+|·+ +·« =|·| +|·+|-¸- ¬|+|- -· +|+|- .+|¤- +¬. ¡ ¬+« +·- ¬¬-|-| ~-|·|
+·|+· ~«|,-¡~|- +|¬- =|-¸- :·¤ -·+|:- ¬¬ ·+¬| +¬ ¤|- ¡|-.
Lakh production a beneficiary business
in Chhattisgarh
Sadanand Sing Bhadauriya
Shri. Sadagaru Seva Foundation, Korba, Chhattisgarh
Shri Sadagaru Seva Foundation in Chhattisgarh started research on Lakh production due to lack
in brood Lakh and low productivity and income due to poor package and process practices. Forest
department, Korba helped foundation in understanding scientific techniques of Lakh production.
After receiving this training, foundation started doing experiment. It was aimed at development of
lakh production model on 1 acre through cultivation practices. Survey conducted for plant species
involved in Lakh production. Technological needs for production and processing were also
studied. Further training received from Indian Institute for Natural Resins and Gums clarified
different doubts on production. The experiment was transplanting lakh insects from forest to ber
trees present in farms and other areas. Scientific techniques and direct people participation
successfully resulted into first experiment of Lak production from 180 'Ber' trees. Out of total sale
of 2,85,000 Rupees, 2,60000 was mere profit. People started showing more interest in Lak
production from tree plantation to package as well as conservation. Around three thousand people
received direct benefit. Per 'Ber' trees income varies from 2000 Rs. to 7000 Rs. Along with Lakh
production, foundation also tried vegetable intercropping among ber trees. This scientifically
developed model of Lakh production is effectively working to generate employment for local
people including women group.
117
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
116
×=nìnln wenìs wnln vìw¸¬ mnl uìzìµl
nlµ¬ au×llumì l¬lnnl
ml. =4«i- «i¤
¬|·+|+|:
Round the year Livelihood through wild fruit farming
Shri. Bhagwan Wagh
Aurangabad
+|~| ª+-… -| , º+· +|··+|¡¸ ~-| ¬|¡. ¬|·+|+|: |¤-=|¬|··| ++| +|+¬|·| .:~|- +|·| +|¡- c|¬
-+¤||++| .|+ ¡|-|+·|-| +|+ ~|¤¤ +·¤- ¡|-. ª¤||-+ -+¬·¤ +|-|-| -|c ¬·|¬ +-- +«~-|
+·-|- c·+-|- ¬|¬..¤+ =| .|+|- |·¬+· +· -·+|:- :¤|| |-- ¬||¤ +|· =| ~|·|-| ¬|++·
+¬|. ···| ¬|·|-| |++| ¬· +-- ¬¤¸- -· ¬|·|-| ¬|++· +¬|. ~· |-+¸-| ~|· ¬|+¬|.
¤|·¸«,+¬,|+·+|,c-+¤|,·|+· =| +|-| ¤+¬|-¸- +|«| +-| ¤|·|. =| ~|·|-| ¬|++· ~-|+·-
+·-|- ¬|¬|.~·· ¬|-|+«|-| ~|· ¬|·|·| ~|·|+· ¬|+-|- ¬|¬|. ¬|·|·| ¬|+¬|- ¬|-|+«
-|+¬| -|- ¡ ¤+¬|- +|·--|+· ¬+¤-. ~-|·| +|¤|+· c-+¤|-| ~-, |+·+|-| --, ·|+·|-| -·,
+¬|-| -· ~|· ¬|+-|- ¬|¬|. =| .·+|- -·+|:- ++|--| ++++«| +|¡-|- ·-|- -. =|
.|+|·| ¬+|:· ~|·|·| +¡·|-| -|c ¬·|¬ +·-|- ¬|¬|.¤+«¤+« ~· ++ ¡ -·+·|- ¬|¤- -¡¤¸-
+|+·-|- ¬|¬.+|+|- -· - -· ~-+·| | .+|· -·+|:- ·- ¬|¡-.=| .|+|-| .¬|· ¬||++|+|; +¬
¬+|¤ º+|·+ +·« =|·| +|·+|-¸- ¬|+|- -· +|+|- .+|¤- +¬. ¡ ¬+« +·- ¬¬-|-| ~-|·|
+·|+· ~«|,-¡~|- +|¬- =|-¸- :·¤ -·+|:- ¬¬ ·+¬| +¬ ¤|- ¡|-.
Lakh production a beneficiary business
in Chhattisgarh
Sadanand Sing Bhadauriya
Shri. Sadagaru Seva Foundation, Korba, Chhattisgarh
Shri Sadagaru Seva Foundation in Chhattisgarh started research on Lakh production due to lack
in brood Lakh and low productivity and income due to poor package and process practices. Forest
department, Korba helped foundation in understanding scientific techniques of Lakh production.
After receiving this training, foundation started doing experiment. It was aimed at development of
lakh production model on 1 acre through cultivation practices. Survey conducted for plant species
involved in Lakh production. Technological needs for production and processing were also
studied. Further training received from Indian Institute for Natural Resins and Gums clarified
different doubts on production. The experiment was transplanting lakh insects from forest to ber
trees present in farms and other areas. Scientific techniques and direct people participation
successfully resulted into first experiment of Lak production from 180 'Ber' trees. Out of total sale
of 2,85,000 Rupees, 2,60000 was mere profit. People started showing more interest in Lak
production from tree plantation to package as well as conservation. Around three thousand people
received direct benefit. Per 'Ber' trees income varies from 2000 Rs. to 7000 Rs. Along with Lakh
production, foundation also tried vegetable intercropping among ber trees. This scientifically
developed model of Lakh production is effectively working to generate employment for local
people including women group.
117
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Eco-Friendly Employment -Bamboo Treatment
and Natural dyeing (Sampoorna Bamboo Kendra's experiment)
Dr. Nirupama Deshpande
Sampoorna Bamboo Kendra, Lawada ,Po. Duni, Ta .Dharni, DistAmaravati 444702
Email : sampoornabamboo@gmail.com
Sampoorna Bamboo Kendra (SBK) is working in Melghat, since 1995, with aim of providing eco-
friendly Bamboo based employment to tribal and Basod(bamboo artisan community) in
Melghat, Dharni and Chikhaldara Blocks of Amaravati District. Predominant tribe of the area is
Korku. People in the region are dependent on traditional farming and forests. Agriculture is the
main occupation of the region. Unemployment, poverty, Migration, Health Problem, poor living
condition, scarcity of water, soil erosion, difficult terrain, development conflict with forest, village
resettlement and the loss of traditional wisdom are the major issues in this region.
To improve economic conditions of tribal and Basod in Melghat SBK has developed various
scientific and simple techniques for treatment of bamboo to improve its usability, develp new
products etc.
Bamboo Treatment prevents fungus growth and borers –Natural treatment was developed to
treat Bamboo strips used for handicraft making.
Use of Bamboo oil – We have developed a new technique of extraction of Bamboo Oil from
bamboo. Idea of this extraction of oil was emerged during discussion of experts and master
craftsman's of the group. As there is some wastage in the production process, we developed a
process for extraction of oil from Bamboo. In the demonstration of this technique 250 ml of oil was
extracted from 3.5 kg Bamboo waste.
Smoke treatment - We regularly use and promoted I.I.T. Mumbai developed smoke chamber for
treatment of Bamboo Products. We have developed two new smoke chambers as per
requirement of treating Bamboo on large scale for construction purposes.
Natural dyeing - Regular training is provided to artisans for using natural dyes in handicraft items.
We have developed 23 color shades with the help natural material.
118 119
Tasar for tribal prosperity –
an experience of BAIF in livelihood promotion
in Maharashtra
I. I. Hugar., D. V. Jadhav., V. Y. Deshapande., A. B. Pande and B. K. Kakade
BAIF Development Research Foundation, Pune, Maharashtra – India, 411058
Email : hugarii@yahoo.com
Keywords : Tasar, Livelihood, allied activity, Distress, vanya Improved Agriculture, Livestock
Over a period of 25 years, BAIF has taken up several activities related to different aspects of
sericulture through number of projects in the field of research, extension, training, technology
development and demonstrations, field testing and adoption of technologies to meet farmers
requirement.
However, National Agricultural Innovation Project (NAIP) supported livelihood improvement
project has opened a new ray of hope in Tasar based livelihood promotion in Maharashtra. BAIF
Development Research Foundation, Pune has been working as a Consortium Leader to
implement the Sustainable Rural Livelihood Security Project (SRLS) in Maharashtra under NAIP
Component 3.
By considering the potential and co-existing the unique ecosystem, covered with forest and
abundant tasar host plantations in Gadchiroli district, offered a great opportunity to introduce
highly remunerative NTFP activities like tasar sericulture for tribal families.
Tasar sericulture is subsidiary occupation of forest and forest-fringe dwellers and practiced
traditionally by Dhivar community. However, Tasar silkworm rearing was unpredictable source of
income because rearer uses very crude method of handling silkworms and worms susceptible to
various climatic fluctuations.Wefocused at strengthening traditional activity by appropriate
technology interventions.viz training, capacity building demonstration, exposures, formation of
activity groups, scientific rearing of silkworms, host plantation utilization and management, seed
production, post cocoon processes, value addition, natural resource management and marketing
linkage. This enable to make 'vanya' sericulture enterprise come within the reach of poor tribal, in
order to stop distress migration, rejuvenating their degraded natural recourses and offering them
a way out of their poverty and bring prosperity.
It was documented that, participating family under NAIP project have adopted appropriate
technology intasar culture and brushed 75000 disease free silkworm layings and harvested
1500000 numbers of tasar cocoons worth of Rs. 1500000, along with the income from other allied
activities. It was experienced that, active participation and involvement of concerned tribal
community in various stages of development from planning stage leads to sustainable and
replicable development model.The efforts in the project resulted in increased brushing capacity of
the family, followedby improved cocoon productivity their by enhanced income & employment
which lead into stop migration.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Eco-Friendly Employment -Bamboo Treatment
and Natural dyeing (Sampoorna Bamboo Kendra's experiment)
Dr. Nirupama Deshpande
Sampoorna Bamboo Kendra, Lawada ,Po. Duni, Ta .Dharni, DistAmaravati 444702
Email : sampoornabamboo@gmail.com
Sampoorna Bamboo Kendra (SBK) is working in Melghat, since 1995, with aim of providing eco-
friendly Bamboo based employment to tribal and Basod(bamboo artisan community) in
Melghat, Dharni and Chikhaldara Blocks of Amaravati District. Predominant tribe of the area is
Korku. People in the region are dependent on traditional farming and forests. Agriculture is the
main occupation of the region. Unemployment, poverty, Migration, Health Problem, poor living
condition, scarcity of water, soil erosion, difficult terrain, development conflict with forest, village
resettlement and the loss of traditional wisdom are the major issues in this region.
To improve economic conditions of tribal and Basod in Melghat SBK has developed various
scientific and simple techniques for treatment of bamboo to improve its usability, develp new
products etc.
Bamboo Treatment prevents fungus growth and borers –Natural treatment was developed to
treat Bamboo strips used for handicraft making.
Use of Bamboo oil – We have developed a new technique of extraction of Bamboo Oil from
bamboo. Idea of this extraction of oil was emerged during discussion of experts and master
craftsman's of the group. As there is some wastage in the production process, we developed a
process for extraction of oil from Bamboo. In the demonstration of this technique 250 ml of oil was
extracted from 3.5 kg Bamboo waste.
Smoke treatment - We regularly use and promoted I.I.T. Mumbai developed smoke chamber for
treatment of Bamboo Products. We have developed two new smoke chambers as per
requirement of treating Bamboo on large scale for construction purposes.
Natural dyeing - Regular training is provided to artisans for using natural dyes in handicraft items.
We have developed 23 color shades with the help natural material.
118 119
Tasar for tribal prosperity –
an experience of BAIF in livelihood promotion
in Maharashtra
I. I. Hugar., D. V. Jadhav., V. Y. Deshapande., A. B. Pande and B. K. Kakade
BAIF Development Research Foundation, Pune, Maharashtra – India, 411058
Email : hugarii@yahoo.com
Keywords : Tasar, Livelihood, allied activity, Distress, vanya Improved Agriculture, Livestock
Over a period of 25 years, BAIF has taken up several activities related to different aspects of
sericulture through number of projects in the field of research, extension, training, technology
development and demonstrations, field testing and adoption of technologies to meet farmers
requirement.
However, National Agricultural Innovation Project (NAIP) supported livelihood improvement
project has opened a new ray of hope in Tasar based livelihood promotion in Maharashtra. BAIF
Development Research Foundation, Pune has been working as a Consortium Leader to
implement the Sustainable Rural Livelihood Security Project (SRLS) in Maharashtra under NAIP
Component 3.
By considering the potential and co-existing the unique ecosystem, covered with forest and
abundant tasar host plantations in Gadchiroli district, offered a great opportunity to introduce
highly remunerative NTFP activities like tasar sericulture for tribal families.
Tasar sericulture is subsidiary occupation of forest and forest-fringe dwellers and practiced
traditionally by Dhivar community. However, Tasar silkworm rearing was unpredictable source of
income because rearer uses very crude method of handling silkworms and worms susceptible to
various climatic fluctuations.Wefocused at strengthening traditional activity by appropriate
technology interventions.viz training, capacity building demonstration, exposures, formation of
activity groups, scientific rearing of silkworms, host plantation utilization and management, seed
production, post cocoon processes, value addition, natural resource management and marketing
linkage. This enable to make 'vanya' sericulture enterprise come within the reach of poor tribal, in
order to stop distress migration, rejuvenating their degraded natural recourses and offering them
a way out of their poverty and bring prosperity.
It was documented that, participating family under NAIP project have adopted appropriate
technology intasar culture and brushed 75000 disease free silkworm layings and harvested
1500000 numbers of tasar cocoons worth of Rs. 1500000, along with the income from other allied
activities. It was experienced that, active participation and involvement of concerned tribal
community in various stages of development from planning stage leads to sustainable and
replicable development model.The efforts in the project resulted in increased brushing capacity of
the family, followedby improved cocoon productivity their by enhanced income & employment
which lead into stop migration.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
NTFP's India: Status, Problems and
Opportunities
Dr. Utkarsh Ghate
Gram Moolige (Village herbs) Company Limited (GMCL),Durg, Chhattisgarh and member,
th
NTFP Committee, 12 Five Year Plan Preparation,
Planning Commission of India
Non timber forest products (NTFP) contribute nearly 50% of the forestry income today &is growing
rapidly, supporting the livelihoods of about 14 % of the Indian population, mostly the poor, tribal in
the hilly, forested, remote areas. The products include Tendu leaf, Mahuaflowers & fruit/ seed
(oil), Sal & other oilseeds, Gums & resin such as Babul, Dhaura & Pine , Nuts like Chironji, honey,
Lac, Tassar Silk, Leaf plates & medicinal plants. The size of the NTFP trade could be Rs. 100
billion i.e. $ 1550 million a year. It is only nearly 1% of the farm sector GDP but supports lives of
nearly 14% of the population engaged in farming & allied activities. The main NTFP are industries
lie in the food (gums), leather (tannins), textile (dye), paper (gum & resin), health& cosmetics
sector. Lack of technology development & poor social outreach has caused poor or declining yield
of NTFP, preventing future growth. There is need to promote strong pro-people forestry extension
model, as done successfully in the farming sector in India.
120
Plantation and conservation of important medicinal plant of
Commiphora wightii (Local name:Guggul)
along the Chamba river
Zakir Hussain
SujagrutiSamajSevi Sanstha Morena,Madhya Pradesh
Keywords – Chambal ravines, soil erosion Guggal, plantation
Ravine formation by Chambal area found to be changing over the time which ultimately engulfing
fertile land where Agarian community families used to cultivate and survive. Continuous changes
made Agarian family to think over alternate resources for livelihood and living. Insecurity about
livelihood was somehow leading to over exploitation of natural resources. Organization decided to
find sustainable and long term solution. Study by the organization revealed that area along the
Chambal river as semi arid zone enriched with deciduous forest, thorny forest. Plantation of
Commiphorawightii( Local name-Guggul), easily grown in semi arid zone, was carried out with the
help of local community. Barren hills in the area now flourished with Guggul plants. Plantation also
resulted in reduction of soil erosion. Guggul recorded as a medicinal plant and also generate resin
as a potential commercial non timber forest product. Present plantation can act as a cash crop
after 7-8 years due to its various properties. Guggul also listed by International Union for
Conservation of Nature (IUCN) giving it conservation importance at international level. Ancillary to
income generated through plantation to local community, nurseries and maintenance of plantation
also proved as potential livelihood.
121
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
NTFP's India: Status, Problems and
Opportunities
Dr. Utkarsh Ghate
Gram Moolige (Village herbs) Company Limited (GMCL),Durg, Chhattisgarh and member,
th
NTFP Committee, 12 Five Year Plan Preparation,
Planning Commission of India
Non timber forest products (NTFP) contribute nearly 50% of the forestry income today &is growing
rapidly, supporting the livelihoods of about 14 % of the Indian population, mostly the poor, tribal in
the hilly, forested, remote areas. The products include Tendu leaf, Mahuaflowers & fruit/ seed
(oil), Sal & other oilseeds, Gums & resin such as Babul, Dhaura & Pine , Nuts like Chironji, honey,
Lac, Tassar Silk, Leaf plates & medicinal plants. The size of the NTFP trade could be Rs. 100
billion i.e. $ 1550 million a year. It is only nearly 1% of the farm sector GDP but supports lives of
nearly 14% of the population engaged in farming & allied activities. The main NTFP are industries
lie in the food (gums), leather (tannins), textile (dye), paper (gum & resin), health& cosmetics
sector. Lack of technology development & poor social outreach has caused poor or declining yield
of NTFP, preventing future growth. There is need to promote strong pro-people forestry extension
model, as done successfully in the farming sector in India.
120
Plantation and conservation of important medicinal plant of
Commiphora wightii (Local name:Guggul)
along the Chamba river
Zakir Hussain
SujagrutiSamajSevi Sanstha Morena,Madhya Pradesh
Keywords – Chambal ravines, soil erosion Guggal, plantation
Ravine formation by Chambal area found to be changing over the time which ultimately engulfing
fertile land where Agarian community families used to cultivate and survive. Continuous changes
made Agarian family to think over alternate resources for livelihood and living. Insecurity about
livelihood was somehow leading to over exploitation of natural resources. Organization decided to
find sustainable and long term solution. Study by the organization revealed that area along the
Chambal river as semi arid zone enriched with deciduous forest, thorny forest. Plantation of
Commiphorawightii( Local name-Guggul), easily grown in semi arid zone, was carried out with the
help of local community. Barren hills in the area now flourished with Guggul plants. Plantation also
resulted in reduction of soil erosion. Guggul recorded as a medicinal plant and also generate resin
as a potential commercial non timber forest product. Present plantation can act as a cash crop
after 7-8 years due to its various properties. Guggul also listed by International Union for
Conservation of Nature (IUCN) giving it conservation importance at international level. Ancillary to
income generated through plantation to local community, nurseries and maintenance of plantation
also proved as potential livelihood.
121
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Livelihood security of women through Bibba
in Ajantha ranges of Aurangabad, district Maharashtra
Milind Joshi, Suhas Sakharam Ajgaonkar
Savitribai Phule Mahila Ekatm Samaj Mandal, Aurangabad
Email : suhas.ajgaonkar@gmail.com
Ajantha ranges of Maharashtra harbors large population of medicinal plant, Semecarpus-
anacardium locally known as 'Bibba'. About 3,67,500 kilograms of Bibba fruits collected and
processed by Scheduled tribes population in the vicinity area. 'Kernels of Bibba ' is the main
product which fetchgood price ranging from Rs.150-300 per kg .Traditional method for dehulling
practiced by women causes health problems like blisters, burns on head and face . Present project
aimed to generate effective model of natural resource management, upgrade Bibba processing
methods and generate livelihood from 'Bibba' processing for scheduled tribes women .
Systematic protocol from forest conservation awareness to training and development programme
on bibba processing has been resulted into involvement of 582 families from 11 villages in the
process and protection 200 ha forest with the help of other stakeholders. The strategies involved in
the project were providing simple mechanical solution to improve the yield, strengthening market
links, encouraging Bibba plantations and conservation to ensure the steady supply, promoting oil
production from waste nutshells to fetch additional income. Social status of 50 families engaged in
Bibba processing improved & 200 families have changed their mindset towards processing. Hand
bibbadehuller (50 available) and paddle operated dehuller (6 available) showed improved
efficiency at each level of processing & also resulted into low chances of health hazards.
processing
122
NTFP conservation, value addition &tribal right to
ownership for sustainable livelihood in
Akole block, Ahmadnagar District
Vijay Sambare, Ramnath Pachore, Sahebrao Bharmal, Nanda Bande
Lokpanchayat, Sangamner
Email : lokpanchayatsnr@gmail.com
Tribal communities viz. Mahadeokoli&Thakar from Western Ghats area of AkoleTaluka mainly
practice cooperative agriculture and non timber forest products collection for livelihood. 'Hirda' &
'Honey' are main NTFPs collected by them. Study conducted by organization revealed that many
NTFPs including 'Karvand', 'Behda', 'Amla' were poorly explored for livelihood and on the other
side 'Honey' harvested unsustainably and 'Hirda' collection increased to such an extent that its
future availability is in danger. In last 20 years, hirda production reduced by approximately 45%.
Organization started innovative programme of 'Conservation – livelihood – ownership' for tribal
communities. NTFP related interventions were preliminary started in 6 villages now spread over
20 villages in the area. Youth groups from 5 villages were formed for sustainable wild honey
harvest. Training programme for 'Karvand', 'Jambhul', 'Amba' processing were arranged for
women groups. Women group from Ratanwadi village sold 'Karvand' of 18 thousand rupees and
bought pulses for daily food. Groups from remote villages likeKumshet, Janewadi and Ambit
successfully sold 6 tonn 'Karvand' fruits. It has helped in improving income of families.
123
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Livelihood security of women through Bibba
in Ajantha ranges of Aurangabad, district Maharashtra
Milind Joshi, Suhas Sakharam Ajgaonkar
Savitribai Phule Mahila Ekatm Samaj Mandal, Aurangabad
Email : suhas.ajgaonkar@gmail.com
Ajantha ranges of Maharashtra harbors large population of medicinal plant, Semecarpus-
anacardium locally known as 'Bibba'. About 3,67,500 kilograms of Bibba fruits collected and
processed by Scheduled tribes population in the vicinity area. 'Kernels of Bibba ' is the main
product which fetchgood price ranging from Rs.150-300 per kg .Traditional method for dehulling
practiced by women causes health problems like blisters, burns on head and face . Present project
aimed to generate effective model of natural resource management, upgrade Bibba processing
methods and generate livelihood from 'Bibba' processing for scheduled tribes women .
Systematic protocol from forest conservation awareness to training and development programme
on bibba processing has been resulted into involvement of 582 families from 11 villages in the
process and protection 200 ha forest with the help of other stakeholders. The strategies involved in
the project were providing simple mechanical solution to improve the yield, strengthening market
links, encouraging Bibba plantations and conservation to ensure the steady supply, promoting oil
production from waste nutshells to fetch additional income. Social status of 50 families engaged in
Bibba processing improved & 200 families have changed their mindset towards processing. Hand
bibbadehuller (50 available) and paddle operated dehuller (6 available) showed improved
efficiency at each level of processing & also resulted into low chances of health hazards.
processing
122
NTFP conservation, value addition &tribal right to
ownership for sustainable livelihood in
Akole block, Ahmadnagar District
Vijay Sambare, Ramnath Pachore, Sahebrao Bharmal, Nanda Bande
Lokpanchayat, Sangamner
Email : lokpanchayatsnr@gmail.com
Tribal communities viz. Mahadeokoli&Thakar from Western Ghats area of AkoleTaluka mainly
practice cooperative agriculture and non timber forest products collection for livelihood. 'Hirda' &
'Honey' are main NTFPs collected by them. Study conducted by organization revealed that many
NTFPs including 'Karvand', 'Behda', 'Amla' were poorly explored for livelihood and on the other
side 'Honey' harvested unsustainably and 'Hirda' collection increased to such an extent that its
future availability is in danger. In last 20 years, hirda production reduced by approximately 45%.
Organization started innovative programme of 'Conservation – livelihood – ownership' for tribal
communities. NTFP related interventions were preliminary started in 6 villages now spread over
20 villages in the area. Youth groups from 5 villages were formed for sustainable wild honey
harvest. Training programme for 'Karvand', 'Jambhul', 'Amba' processing were arranged for
women groups. Women group from Ratanwadi village sold 'Karvand' of 18 thousand rupees and
bought pulses for daily food. Groups from remote villages likeKumshet, Janewadi and Ambit
successfully sold 6 tonn 'Karvand' fruits. It has helped in improving income of families.
123
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
'Palas' (Butea monosperma) tea- a new venture of
employment generation for local tribes of Yavatmal
Satish Dongare
Sahara Multipurpose Society, Yavatmal
Email : saharams@rediffmail.com
Studies conducted by Society in the forest area revealed number of non timber forest products
(NTFP) and medicinal plants used by local tribes in their daily life. Society received information on
medicinal properties of 'Palas' flowers through pamphlets .More research carried out by society on
uses of 'Palas' and its possibility as one of the important livelihood option. Major problem in the
process was to convince tribal communities to collect 'Palas' flower and prepare tea from it.
Trainings for flower collection, processing and marketing were carried out which generated faith in
local tribal to use 'Palas' flower for livelihood. Changes in machinery, techniques and final product
quality have been done to improve flavor, quantity & quality of 'Palas' tea. Door to door promotion
helped to reach 25 to 30 thousand people. 400 people were linked with new source of livelihood for
1 month and 15 people receivedemployment for 4 month. 10 people are employed for entire year.
Consumption of 'Palas' tea showed positive effects in curing diseases like diabetes menopause,
uterus problem joint pain and akin problems.
124
Conservation and Preservation of wild edible food
resources with people's participation for food security and
livelihood generation in Jawhar, a tribal block of Thane district
Ashiwini Chothe and Sanjay Patil
BAIF Development and research foundation, Pune
Email : ashwinichothe@gmail.com, sanjaypatil21@gmail.com
Wild edible plants (WEPs) have been traditionally used as a sources of subsistence mainly by
rural communities. During stress conditions there is a scarcity of food these wild foods helps them
to survive in scarcity period to assure their hunger. Consumption of wild plant species can be
dated long back among different communities and tribes. Tribal communities make up their
deficiency in food stock by supplied it with WEPs in their daily diet. During the, monsoon season
wild leafy vegetable play important part in providing essential proteins, micronutrients and
vitamins. Now day these plants are getting wiped out because of habitat destruction and changing
trends in agriculture.
Jawhar is a tribal block of Thane district in Maharashtra. Hilly areas of Jawhar having amazing
diversity of Wild food resources which was collected by the Tribal communities including wild
fruits, vegetables, nuts, berries, tubers and leafy plants etc. from nearer forest area to fulfil their
nutritional food requirement. They have rich crop biodiversity and abundant traditional knowledge
of plant resources, but now days their living and consumption pattern has been changed and
these valuable food resources becoming rare and extinct day by day.
During this study, documented 95 plant wild plants consisting of 58 vegetable species 20 fruits
species and 17 tuber species. Peoples enjoying the wild fruits during the summer and rainy
season and the forest products are the main source of vegetable in daily diet. The newly emerged
shoots, tender leaf, tender stalks, inflorences are used for vegetable preparation having minimum
processing and seasoning requirements. Some of them preserved for short duration with simple
local preservation techniques like pickling, salting, drying etc.
Present research work was undertaken to standardize propagation methods for shortlisted wild
edible plant and suitable methods of preservation. It is essential to establish a nursery to develop
the propagation standards for these wild plant species and create awareness among tribal's about
its market potential.
125
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
'Palas' (Butea monosperma) tea- a new venture of
employment generation for local tribes of Yavatmal
Satish Dongare
Sahara Multipurpose Society, Yavatmal
Email : saharams@rediffmail.com
Studies conducted by Society in the forest area revealed number of non timber forest products
(NTFP) and medicinal plants used by local tribes in their daily life. Society received information on
medicinal properties of 'Palas' flowers through pamphlets .More research carried out by society on
uses of 'Palas' and its possibility as one of the important livelihood option. Major problem in the
process was to convince tribal communities to collect 'Palas' flower and prepare tea from it.
Trainings for flower collection, processing and marketing were carried out which generated faith in
local tribal to use 'Palas' flower for livelihood. Changes in machinery, techniques and final product
quality have been done to improve flavor, quantity & quality of 'Palas' tea. Door to door promotion
helped to reach 25 to 30 thousand people. 400 people were linked with new source of livelihood for
1 month and 15 people receivedemployment for 4 month. 10 people are employed for entire year.
Consumption of 'Palas' tea showed positive effects in curing diseases like diabetes menopause,
uterus problem joint pain and akin problems.
124
Conservation and Preservation of wild edible food
resources with people's participation for food security and
livelihood generation in Jawhar, a tribal block of Thane district
Ashiwini Chothe and Sanjay Patil
BAIF Development and research foundation, Pune
Email : ashwinichothe@gmail.com, sanjaypatil21@gmail.com
Wild edible plants (WEPs) have been traditionally used as a sources of subsistence mainly by
rural communities. During stress conditions there is a scarcity of food these wild foods helps them
to survive in scarcity period to assure their hunger. Consumption of wild plant species can be
dated long back among different communities and tribes. Tribal communities make up their
deficiency in food stock by supplied it with WEPs in their daily diet. During the, monsoon season
wild leafy vegetable play important part in providing essential proteins, micronutrients and
vitamins. Now day these plants are getting wiped out because of habitat destruction and changing
trends in agriculture.
Jawhar is a tribal block of Thane district in Maharashtra. Hilly areas of Jawhar having amazing
diversity of Wild food resources which was collected by the Tribal communities including wild
fruits, vegetables, nuts, berries, tubers and leafy plants etc. from nearer forest area to fulfil their
nutritional food requirement. They have rich crop biodiversity and abundant traditional knowledge
of plant resources, but now days their living and consumption pattern has been changed and
these valuable food resources becoming rare and extinct day by day.
During this study, documented 95 plant wild plants consisting of 58 vegetable species 20 fruits
species and 17 tuber species. Peoples enjoying the wild fruits during the summer and rainy
season and the forest products are the main source of vegetable in daily diet. The newly emerged
shoots, tender leaf, tender stalks, inflorences are used for vegetable preparation having minimum
processing and seasoning requirements. Some of them preserved for short duration with simple
local preservation techniques like pickling, salting, drying etc.
Present research work was undertaken to standardize propagation methods for shortlisted wild
edible plant and suitable methods of preservation. It is essential to establish a nursery to develop
the propagation standards for these wild plant species and create awareness among tribal's about
its market potential.
125
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Honey harvest - A successfully driven livelihood venture in
Gadchiroli district of Maharashtra
Keshav Gurnule
Srushti Sanstha, Gadchiroli
Gadchiroli district of Maharashtra enriched with floral and faunal diversity is also known for its
good quality honey production. Livelihood of tribal communities from the area mainly dependent
on different forest produces. Honey collection from wild beehive play important role as a income
source. Study done by Srushti organization found that collection methods used by tribes were
unsustainable and harmful for bees. Organization started training programmes on scientific
methods of honey collection with financial support from Forest department. The programmes and
other related work were started in 12 villages of three taluks.150 families of scheduled tribes
involved in scientific and sustainable technique of honey collection. In this area, honey is collected
in two seasons November-December and March-May. March-May found to be highly productive.
Honey processing unit was established with the help of Collector Office, Gadchiroli. Processing
and marketing center run by organization buy honey from families. Tribal community individuals
are involved in processing center of organization. Income per day of collectors varied from Rs.700
to Rs.2000 during honey collection seasons. 15 to 20 groups are working for honey collection.
Organization is working towards community owned and run honey processing and marketing
units.
126 127
wnìn a¤ìznn weulmnì m¢- acu«¬
uìclu¤nìuì »n¤ nì=
ml. =ia¤¦ +i-s
+|-· ¬+| +|+
Farm level processing unit
Shri. Bhalchandra Kanade
Kanade Agro Farm
¬|·+|+|: ¬|··| |¤-=|+· +|·+·, ¬|+«| =|¬|·u +|+ ·-¬ ¤|-.¬|+-| ª+-…-| ¬|+«| +
+|·|+·-| ~-| ¬|¡. +·- +|-+«| =| |++|-| +|¤|·+c - |+«-|- -c+ ¬|¬|+ ¬|+-|-. |¡ +|·|ª¤-|
¬=|- ·+- ~-|+· +« .|+| +, -·|·-| ;¬ +| =|+|·-| .·- ¬· ~|¬. ¬·|¬|-¸- ¬|+«|
¬|··| +«|-| .|+| +~| +·-|- =|-| +||¡-| +|«| +·-|- ¬|¬|. ¬|·+|+|: ¤|¬ ++| u|·|-¸-
+«.|+- .|~=¤ ¬||¤ +|+:~- |+«|+-|- ¬|¬.+« .|+| +-- -|· ~|¬-| +|¬|¬|c|
¬|·|+|+|: ~¡·|- |++¤-|¬|c| ¬+=¤ +·-|- ¬|¬. ¬·+|- +·-|-| ¬|+«| +|¬¸- ¬|+«| +|·| ¬|·u
+:|¤ +-+¸- +|·|--|- ¬~| .+|··| +:|¤|- +- ¤|¤¸- ·-¬. +:|¤|+:¬ -|+¬ .|-¬|: |+«|-|+·
+|c·| .+|¤|+· -¤|+ +·-|¬|c| +¬|++| |++- ·-|- ¬|¬|. ¬:· +, ~-|-- -· +-|+«
~-+|¬|- -+¬|- ++| ¡|+- ¤|ª-|- ¤|ª- +|:| .|+ ¡|- ¬|¡.+-| ¬|- ++|+|¬¸- -|¬¸ ¬¬¤|| =|
.·-|-| :· ++| -|+¬ ¬||¤+ ~ |+«- ¬|¡. ¬~| .+|·- +, ~ - - º+· ~-|+|·-| ¤|ª- -+|+|
+·-. |++¤-|¬|c| +|¤|·+c ¤+« ¬¬¤ :u|¬ =|+|·-| ¬|+·+ ¬|¡
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Honey harvest - A successfully driven livelihood venture in
Gadchiroli district of Maharashtra
Keshav Gurnule
Srushti Sanstha, Gadchiroli
Gadchiroli district of Maharashtra enriched with floral and faunal diversity is also known for its
good quality honey production. Livelihood of tribal communities from the area mainly dependent
on different forest produces. Honey collection from wild beehive play important role as a income
source. Study done by Srushti organization found that collection methods used by tribes were
unsustainable and harmful for bees. Organization started training programmes on scientific
methods of honey collection with financial support from Forest department. The programmes and
other related work were started in 12 villages of three taluks.150 families of scheduled tribes
involved in scientific and sustainable technique of honey collection. In this area, honey is collected
in two seasons November-December and March-May. March-May found to be highly productive.
Honey processing unit was established with the help of Collector Office, Gadchiroli. Processing
and marketing center run by organization buy honey from families. Tribal community individuals
are involved in processing center of organization. Income per day of collectors varied from Rs.700
to Rs.2000 during honey collection seasons. 15 to 20 groups are working for honey collection.
Organization is working towards community owned and run honey processing and marketing
units.
126 127
wnìn a¤ìznn weulmnì m¢- acu«¬
uìclu¤nìuì »n¤ nì=
ml. =ia¤¦ +i-s
+|-· ¬+| +|+
Farm level processing unit
Shri. Bhalchandra Kanade
Kanade Agro Farm
¬|·+|+|: ¬|··| |¤-=|+· +|·+·, ¬|+«| =|¬|·u +|+ ·-¬ ¤|-.¬|+-| ª+-…-| ¬|+«| +
+|·|+·-| ~-| ¬|¡. +·- +|-+«| =| |++|-| +|¤|·+c - |+«-|- -c+ ¬|¬|+ ¬|+-|-. |¡ +|·|ª¤-|
¬=|- ·+- ~-|+· +« .|+| +, -·|·-| ;¬ +| =|+|·-| .·- ¬· ~|¬. ¬·|¬|-¸- ¬|+«|
¬|··| +«|-| .|+| +~| +·-|- =|-| +||¡-| +|«| +·-|- ¬|¬|. ¬|·+|+|: ¤|¬ ++| u|·|-¸-
+«.|+- .|~=¤ ¬||¤ +|+:~- |+«|+-|- ¬|¬.+« .|+| +-- -|· ~|¬-| +|¬|¬|c|
¬|·|+|+|: ~¡·|- |++¤-|¬|c| ¬+=¤ +·-|- ¬|¬. ¬·+|- +·-|-| ¬|+«| +|¬¸- ¬|+«| +|·| ¬|·u
+:|¤ +-+¸- +|·|--|- ¬~| .+|··| +:|¤|- +- ¤|¤¸- ·-¬. +:|¤|+:¬ -|+¬ .|-¬|: |+«|-|+·
+|c·| .+|¤|+· -¤|+ +·-|¬|c| +¬|++| |++- ·-|- ¬|¬|. ¬:· +, ~-|-- -· +-|+«
~-+|¬|- -+¬|- ++| ¡|+- ¤|ª-|- ¤|ª- +|:| .|+ ¡|- ¬|¡.+-| ¬|- ++|+|¬¸- -|¬¸ ¬¬¤|| =|
.·-|-| :· ++| -|+¬ ¬||¤+ ~ |+«- ¬|¡. ¬~| .+|·- +, ~ - - º+· ~-|+|·-| ¤|ª- -+|+|
+·-. |++¤-|¬|c| +|¤|·+c ¤+« ¬¬¤ :u|¬ =|+|·-| ¬|+·+ ¬|¡
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
128
vìunl u¬zunlu »un¬
ml. ==i¢ -¶ª+
-¡¬
Conservation of Medicinal Plants
Shri. Subhash Mhaske
Mhase
u·+· ¡ ·|+|~+· ¬·|·-|- :|=¤ +·|¬ c|+|- +|+. | +|·¬·|- ¤+¬|- .+|¤ ¬|¤+ ¬|¡. ·|+«
+-|+¤ +|«| +·¤ ¡ -·+·|- +¡·+|- ¬|¤- ¬|¡. +¤ +¬ +|«| +-- -+|+ -|¡| -· - +|c+¬ +||¡¤ |
·|+--¸- +- |+·|+ +·|+· ¤+¬ ¬+¤- +|++ ¬·+|- +¬|. ¬++· +|c-|¬ + -·+- :-|¬ ¬~| ~|·,
+¬| ¬|+-|- c·|+¬. |¬|c| +|++|~| --| +-- +|¤·| +-ª+-|-| ¬|++· +·|+| ¡ c·|+¬. |
+|·¬·|- |~++|; -|+¬| -. ·|+« |~++|;-| ¬|++· +·|+| ¬~| ¬+-+-| +|·-|- ¬|¬|. - +|c· -
+|c· ¬-·|+· u¡ u|:¸- +|- ¡Šc· =+|+· :|- ¡¤|· |~++|; ·|+|-| ¬|++· +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. |
·|+|·| :u·|¬|-| ·+ª¤| +|+|-|¬ +-- +c|+· ¬|+|+¬| ¬|¡. |¬|c| +¤·|-| ·+ª¤| +-|+·|+|-
+¬| ¬|¡. +c||-¡| ·|+|-| +|¤| |:¬ ¤|- º- c+ ·|+ |¤+- ¬¬¸- ·|-| ¬~¬ +|c ~|¬| ¬|¡.
|+·|+·- +-|+¤|¬ |+|+¤ ¬|+¤| ¬||¤ ;-· +-|+¤ +|«| +-- ¬||¤+ -·+· +|+ª¤ |+«+|- ¬|¡-.
|~++|;, |¡··|, +|·+|, +|+|·+ |+|¬¸- -·+· |+«- .·+ +c+|¬| ¬·|¬·| ¡+|+|-¡| -|· - +|- ¡¤|·
·+ |+«-|-. ¡+|+|- +| ¬|+, +·+:, ¤|·« |++|-¸- -·+· |+«- -¬- |~++|; +|+··, +·+| -¸¤,
|++«|-¤, |-·+·| -¬, -|-¤| +|+·, ¬|+| +·+: ¬|¤- ¬~| |+|+¤ +-|+¤|+· .|+| +-- ·|-| |++|
+¬| ¤|-. |-¸- +|+|¤ ~-+|-| +|:| ¡|- ¬|¡. ·|¤+|· -+¬·¤| + ª¤¬|-·¤ ¤|++-|¬ |+« +:-
~|¬| ¬|¡.
129
l¤nìwmz uIz»zìnln lµzsuìul lznnl
ni-œª «s+ª, -ª¦ ¤s=, =¢= ¤·¤i
+-+|¬| +-|¤ ¬|¬+, +¤
Status of Hirda in Bhimashankar Area
Shri. Nyaneshwar Wadekar, Shri. Narendra Pendse, Shri. Rushabh Mutha
Wanwasi Kalyan Ashram, Pune
|·+|~+· +|·¬·|-|¬ ¬|++|+, ¤··, u· | ·|+|- |¡··| ¡| +-|+¤| +|c·| .+|¤|+· ¬|c«¸- -.
ª¤||-+ +¡|:+ +|«| ¤+|-|-| ~-| --·- -·+·|- ¬|¤- -¡¤¤ |¡··| + ;-· +-|+¤ +|«| +·¤ ¡| ¬|¡.
|-|¬ ¬¬|¤ - ¬|¡+ ·|+|- ¡ ++ +|c·| .+|¤|+· -|¬-. ¡| ¬·|¬ | +|·¬·|+· +¬| ¬|¡.
|¡·|··|-| += ¬¬-|. ·|-| +« +|«| +¬| ¤|-|-. |¡··| ¬|¤|·¤-… º|.¬ +|¡-|·| ~+c| +|«|
+·-|¬ .|·· +¬| ¤|-|. |¡···|- :|- .+|· ¬|c«-|-. :|-¡| +· ++++« +¤¤+ +|¡|¬| |+«-|-.
-) +|« |¡··|
~) c|+«| |¡··|
+|¬ |¡··| -¡¤¤ |¡···|- +« +|c ¡|-| ¬|¤|-| |ª¤-|. +|« |¡··| +¡·+|-| ¬¬¸- ¬¡|- +¬|·|
¬|·|·|¬|c|- |¬·+ -¡¤¸- -+|+ +·-|- -¬- u|+¬|, :+| |+·|¬ ¬|+¤|¬|c|¡| |¡·|·|-| -+|+
+¬| ¤|-|. ¬|¤|·¤-… ¡| |¡··| +|«| +·-|-| +|¬|+¤| º+ +|¡-|-| ¬¬-| º+ +c+ ¬·|¬·| c···,-
·+ | +-|+¤|+|¬¸- ¡+|+|- |+«+-|-. .|-|+¬|¬ -- - .- ·. º+c| ·|+ |+«-|.
|¡··| +|c-|+|¬¸- +|·|- ¬|c+-|+- ·|-| +|«¤| ·|+| ¬|+-. ¡| |¡··| +|·+a - ¡|+- :-|
+|c|+| ¬|+-|. ··| ¤|+| ª+·a +-- +|«+¬| ¤|-|. ·|-| |¡··| ·+ +|«-|--· +|«| ·+|- ·+|-·
¡|-| -|·-|-|-| ¬|+|· +|«+-|--· |--|- ++| ¡|-|. |++|- · |:+¬ ·|¤ +|«+¤ + ·-- c+¤ ¡ +·|+
¬|+-.
|-|¬ c|+«| |¡··| ¡| +|« |¡···|--·-| ¬+ª¤| -¡¤¤- |¡··| +|·+a ¡|+- ¤|+-|+· +·-|. ¡| |¡··|
¬|Šc|+· , -|·¡+· ·| :·-|- +|«| +¬| ¤|-| ·|¬|¡| ¬++|¬| ¬|+-. ¡| .|+| :u|¬ ¬|c |:+¬|-|
¬¬- ¬|¤|·¤ ¡| |¡··| +|«+-|--· |++«¬· ·+ -| ·|+|¬¸- ·+|-|+-| +¬| ¤|-. .|-|+¬|¬ · - --
-+ |+«-|-.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
128
vìunl u¬zunlu »un¬
ml. ==i¢ -¶ª+
-¡¬
Conservation of Medicinal Plants
Shri. Subhash Mhaske
Mhase
u·+· ¡ ·|+|~+· ¬·|·-|- :|=¤ +·|¬ c|+|- +|+. | +|·¬·|- ¤+¬|- .+|¤ ¬|¤+ ¬|¡. ·|+«
+-|+¤ +|«| +·¤ ¡ -·+·|- +¡·+|- ¬|¤- ¬|¡. +¤ +¬ +|«| +-- -+|+ -|¡| -· - +|c+¬ +||¡¤ |
·|+--¸- +- |+·|+ +·|+· ¤+¬ ¬+¤- +|++ ¬·+|- +¬|. ¬++· +|c-|¬ + -·+- :-|¬ ¬~| ~|·,
+¬| ¬|+-|- c·|+¬. |¬|c| +|++|~| --| +-- +|¤·| +-ª+-|-| ¬|++· +·|+| ¡ c·|+¬. |
+|·¬·|- |~++|; -|+¬| -. ·|+« |~++|;-| ¬|++· +·|+| ¬~| ¬+-+-| +|·-|- ¬|¬|. - +|c· -
+|c· ¬-·|+· u¡ u|:¸- +|- ¡Šc· =+|+· :|- ¡¤|· |~++|; ·|+|-| ¬|++· +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡. |
·|+|·| :u·|¬|-| ·+ª¤| +|+|-|¬ +-- +c|+· ¬|+|+¬| ¬|¡. |¬|c| +¤·|-| ·+ª¤| +-|+·|+|-
+¬| ¬|¡. +c||-¡| ·|+|-| +|¤| |:¬ ¤|- º- c+ ·|+ |¤+- ¬¬¸- ·|-| ¬~¬ +|c ~|¬| ¬|¡.
|+·|+·- +-|+¤|¬ |+|+¤ ¬|+¤| ¬||¤ ;-· +-|+¤ +|«| +-- ¬||¤+ -·+· +|+ª¤ |+«+|- ¬|¡-.
|~++|;, |¡··|, +|·+|, +|+|·+ |+|¬¸- -·+· |+«- .·+ +c+|¬| ¬·|¬·| ¡+|+|-¡| -|· - +|- ¡¤|·
·+ |+«-|-. ¡+|+|- +| ¬|+, +·+:, ¤|·« |++|-¸- -·+· |+«- -¬- |~++|; +|+··, +·+| -¸¤,
|++«|-¤, |-·+·| -¬, -|-¤| +|+·, ¬|+| +·+: ¬|¤- ¬~| |+|+¤ +-|+¤|+· .|+| +-- ·|-| |++|
+¬| ¤|-. |-¸- +|+|¤ ~-+|-| +|:| ¡|- ¬|¡. ·|¤+|· -+¬·¤| + ª¤¬|-·¤ ¤|++-|¬ |+« +:-
~|¬| ¬|¡.
129
l¤nìwmz uIz»zìnln lµzsuìul lznnl
ni-œª «s+ª, -ª¦ ¤s=, =¢= ¤·¤i
+-+|¬| +-|¤ ¬|¬+, +¤
Status of Hirda in Bhimashankar Area
Shri. Nyaneshwar Wadekar, Shri. Narendra Pendse, Shri. Rushabh Mutha
Wanwasi Kalyan Ashram, Pune
|·+|~+· +|·¬·|-|¬ ¬|++|+, ¤··, u· | ·|+|- |¡··| ¡| +-|+¤| +|c·| .+|¤|+· ¬|c«¸- -.
ª¤||-+ +¡|:+ +|«| ¤+|-|-| ~-| --·- -·+·|- ¬|¤- -¡¤¤ |¡··| + ;-· +-|+¤ +|«| +·¤ ¡| ¬|¡.
|-|¬ ¬¬|¤ - ¬|¡+ ·|+|- ¡ ++ +|c·| .+|¤|+· -|¬-. ¡| ¬·|¬ | +|·¬·|+· +¬| ¬|¡.
|¡·|··|-| += ¬¬-|. ·|-| +« +|«| +¬| ¤|-|-. |¡··| ¬|¤|·¤-… º|.¬ +|¡-|·| ~+c| +|«|
+·-|¬ .|·· +¬| ¤|-|. |¡···|- :|- .+|· ¬|c«-|-. :|-¡| +· ++++« +¤¤+ +|¡|¬| |+«-|-.
-) +|« |¡··|
~) c|+«| |¡··|
+|¬ |¡··| -¡¤¤ |¡···|- +« +|c ¡|-| ¬|¤|-| |ª¤-|. +|« |¡··| +¡·+|-| ¬¬¸- ¬¡|- +¬|·|
¬|·|·|¬|c|- |¬·+ -¡¤¸- -+|+ +·-|- -¬- u|+¬|, :+| |+·|¬ ¬|+¤|¬|c|¡| |¡·|·|-| -+|+
+¬| ¤|-|. ¬|¤|·¤-… ¡| |¡··| +|«| +·-|-| +|¬|+¤| º+ +|¡-|-| ¬¬-| º+ +c+ ¬·|¬·| c···,-
·+ | +-|+¤|+|¬¸- ¡+|+|- |+«+-|-. .|-|+¬|¬ -- - .- ·. º+c| ·|+ |+«-|.
|¡··| +|c-|+|¬¸- +|·|- ¬|c+-|+- ·|-| +|«¤| ·|+| ¬|+-. ¡| |¡··| +|·+a - ¡|+- :-|
+|c|+| ¬|+-|. ··| ¤|+| ª+·a +-- +|«+¬| ¤|-|. ·|-| |¡··| ·+ +|«-|--· +|«| ·+|- ·+|-·
¡|-| -|·-|-|-| ¬|+|· +|«+-|--· |--|- ++| ¡|-|. |++|- · |:+¬ ·|¤ +|«+¤ + ·-- c+¤ ¡ +·|+
¬|+-.
|-|¬ c|+«| |¡··| ¡| +|« |¡···|--·-| ¬+ª¤| -¡¤¤- |¡··| +|·+a ¡|+- ¤|+-|+· +·-|. ¡| |¡··|
¬|Šc|+· , -|·¡+· ·| :·-|- +|«| +¬| ¤|-| ·|¬|¡| ¬++|¬| ¬|+-. ¡| .|+| :u|¬ ¬|c |:+¬|-|
¬¬- ¬|¤|·¤ ¡| |¡··| +|«+-|--· |++«¬· ·+ -| ·|+|¬¸- ·+|-|+-| +¬| ¤|-. .|-|+¬|¬ · - --
-+ |+«-|-.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
130
| :|-¡| ¡+|+|- |¡··| +|c¤|¬| ¬||¤ +|«+¤|¬| ¬|¤+ +- +·-|-. +|« |¡··| +|c- ¬¬-|-| ~|·|+·
-c¸- ¬|+··|- +|:| ¤-- :¬| ¡|-|- |¡··| -|·|+| ¬|+-|, | :·-|- ºu|:| ¤·| ¡|- ¬c+¬| -·|
+·¸- ¤|+ ¤|+¸ ~+-|. ¬¬| +|- ¬|+|-| =| +|¬|+¤|- ¤|+ +++|+| ¬|+¬| ¬|¡, -· ~|·|+-- +·¸-
¬-+ ¤¤ ¬++ ~|¬ ¬|¡-. |¡··| ¤+| +·- ¬¬-|-| |:+¬··|- ~· - ,· +«| -- ~|·|+· -c|+ ¬|+-,
|+« +|c :u¤, -« ··¤. =| ¬+ª| ¤|¤+-|-. |¡··| -|·- ¬¬-|-| -| ¤+| +·-|¬|c| +«|- |++|
++·¬| ~|«| +|¤¬¬| ¬¬-, |-·|- |¡··| ¤+| +·-|-. |:+¬·· ~|«|- ¬|¤|·¤ +¤- -· - -- |+.
¡|-. |+« +|- + ++· :u¸- -.
+|«+¤| +·-+«| ·|¤ |:+¬| - +¬·|+ ¬|+- + ·|+| ¤+| +-- c+|+ ¬|+-. ¡ +|+ ¬¬+ +|¡-|·· ¬--
+·|+ ¬|+-. ¤«|~| ¬++ ¬|-|¬ |¡··| ¬|¬ +·-|. ++ ·|¬| ++| ·|+ |+«-|. |¡···| +·|+·- ++··|-
+|·¬·|- +-|+¤|, +·+:, ¬|+, +¤, ¬|+«|, ¤|·¸«, |-+·+, -|·¤ ;·|:| +|¬¸-¡| -·+· |+«-. +·-¸
·|¬|c| +|¤-|¡| .|+| ¤ ¡|- -|¡|. ·|+« ·|+||-| +ƒ| +|¬ |++¤ ¡|- +| |~„+ ·¡|-|.
131
uìzìel =ìeì mz¤nìnln u ulmnì mz¤nìnln uw
si ¤la=i ¤ie+
¬||++|+|; +¬ ¬+|¤ º+|·+ +·«, ¬|·+|+|:
Problems in Collection and Processing of Charoli
Dr. Pratibha Phatak
Sawitribai Phule Samaj Ekatma Mandal, Aurangabad
¬|·+|+|: ~¡·|·| +¸+¬| ¬=|,|·| +|«| +|+|¤|- u·c·| ¤+¬|- ¬¡¤ -+¬·¤ ¬¬¬¬ -|·|«|-
~|·-+¤ ·|+|¬¸- -|·|«| u|-||· +·-|- -+ |++|¬- -¬-|+« :¬|=- ¬|¡. -|·|«|·| ~|·|-|
+|c·| .+|¤|- -|· ¡|- ¬|¡. +¤ .·=|- +|+ ~¡·|- -|·|«|¬| .-· +|+¤| ¬|¡ ¬||¤ ·| ¬·- +¡|+
|++-| ¤|-|-.
¬¤c| + ¬+-·| ·|+|+¤|¬ ·|+· :| +· ¬|¤¡| ¡ ~|· +|c·| .+|¤- |~„+ ¬|¡. ¬|-¡| |
+|·¬·|-|¬ -· +|+|+· |·| ¬·|¬ +¬|. .·+ +|+|-¸- |++|- -· |ac¬ -|·|«| +« |+«¸ ~+¬
¬~| +|·|ª¤-| ¬|¡. ¬·| º+¸¤ :¡| +|+|-|¬ +¬ - |ac¬ +ƒ| +|¬ +« |++|¬|c| +|+·¬| ¤|-|.
¡ +« ¤+¬|-|¬ ~|·| +· |+«-. a|c +« ¬¬-|- ~|·|+· -c¸- +|c|+ ¬|+- |++| ¤|+-|+· ~|¤|+
¬|+-. ~|·|+· -c-|¬|c| +|~-| ¬|+- -¬- |+· ¤|+ ¬|¡-. +¬¸- +|«| +·-|+« +|c|+· -|¤
- |. | +«| +|¬-¸ -|·|« | |+«+-|-| ¬·|-| .|+ | ¬·- +-:|+ ¬|¡. ·|+« +·|+ ·|¸ +¡|- +|¡¬|-
+¬ ¡| .|+| +-- -|· +¬ |+«+-|-| .·- +·-|- . | +· ¬|¬| +« ¤+¸- +·+ +|«+-|-. ·|-|¬
+|· +¤¸ +|«-¸ ¤|-|. ·| -- · :|- +|c |· | |-+c|- ¤-- º+ º+ +| :+·|- ,¡|-|· ·|- +|· |+| ¬|+-. +|¡|
+|¡¬| ¤|·|+· ···¸- -|·|«| -|· +·-|-| .·- +·-|- +¤ ·|- ¡|¤|·| -¸c -·· +=| ¤|ª- ¬|¡.
| ¬|c| ¬|-¡| ¬|+|+· ¤|+-+-|, +« + -|·|«| |++- ·¤, -+. ¬|+|·| +:-|- +« +|·¤ -¬-
;-· +:|¤ +| +--|¬ |-| ~|¤ + ª¤||-+ +-|+· -|·|«| ~|· ¬|+¤ ¬¬ .·- +-- +||¡¬.
|-¸- ¬¬ ¬=|- ¬|¬ +| +«|+|¬¸- --|+ .-|- |+-+|· +-- +|¡¬. ¤|·|+· ···¸- +|¡-|-| +|· ¤|ª-
-¸· ¡|- ¡ ¬=|- ¬|-|+« ·|-| ¤|·|·| :|- +|·|- +··|+| º+ +|~· c|+¸- -¸· ++| +·-|-| .·-
+¬| +¤ .·=|- ¡| .|+¡| ~ª+| ¡|+¸ ~+¬| -|¡|.
·|+« -|·|«| +«| +|¬¸- -|·|«| ¬¬+ +·-|¬|c| + -|· ~|¬ -· +|¡¬|- +- ++| ¡|-|¬ + º+
·|¤+|·|- ¬|¤- |+«¸ ~+¬. ¬|-|| -+¬·¤ -|·|«| +«| +|¬¸- .·+ +|+| +· |++|- -···· · -|¬.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
130
| :|-¡| ¡+|+|- |¡··| +|c¤|¬| ¬||¤ +|«+¤|¬| ¬|¤+ +- +·-|-. +|« |¡··| +|c- ¬¬-|-| ~|·|+·
-c¸- ¬|+··|- +|:| ¤-- :¬| ¡|-|- |¡··| -|·|+| ¬|+-|, | :·-|- ºu|:| ¤·| ¡|- ¬c+¬| -·|
+·¸- ¤|+ ¤|+¸ ~+-|. ¬¬| +|- ¬|+|-| =| +|¬|+¤|- ¤|+ +++|+| ¬|+¬| ¬|¡, -· ~|·|+-- +·¸-
¬-+ ¤¤ ¬++ ~|¬ ¬|¡-. |¡··| ¤+| +·- ¬¬-|-| |:+¬··|- ~· - ,· +«| -- ~|·|+· -c|+ ¬|+-,
|+« +|c :u¤, -« ··¤. =| ¬+ª| ¤|¤+-|-. |¡··| -|·- ¬¬-|-| -| ¤+| +·-|¬|c| +«|- |++|
++·¬| ~|«| +|¤¬¬| ¬¬-, |-·|- |¡··| ¤+| +·-|-. |:+¬·· ~|«|- ¬|¤|·¤ +¤- -· - -- |+.
¡|-. |+« +|- + ++· :u¸- -.
+|«+¤| +·-+«| ·|¤ |:+¬| - +¬·|+ ¬|+- + ·|+| ¤+| +-- c+|+ ¬|+-. ¡ +|+ ¬¬+ +|¡-|·· ¬--
+·|+ ¬|+-. ¤«|~| ¬++ ¬|-|¬ |¡··| ¬|¬ +·-|. ++ ·|¬| ++| ·|+ |+«-|. |¡···| +·|+·- ++··|-
+|·¬·|- +-|+¤|, +·+:, ¬|+, +¤, ¬|+«|, ¤|·¸«, |-+·+, -|·¤ ;·|:| +|¬¸-¡| -·+· |+«-. +·-¸
·|¬|c| +|¤-|¡| .|+| ¤ ¡|- -|¡|. ·|+« ·|+||-| +ƒ| +|¬ |++¤ ¡|- +| |~„+ ·¡|-|.
131
uìzìel =ìeì mz¤nìnln u ulmnì mz¤nìnln uw
si ¤la=i ¤ie+
¬||++|+|; +¬ ¬+|¤ º+|·+ +·«, ¬|·+|+|:
Problems in Collection and Processing of Charoli
Dr. Pratibha Phatak
Sawitribai Phule Samaj Ekatma Mandal, Aurangabad
¬|·+|+|: ~¡·|·| +¸+¬| ¬=|,|·| +|«| +|+|¤|- u·c·| ¤+¬|- ¬¡¤ -+¬·¤ ¬¬¬¬ -|·|«|-
~|·-+¤ ·|+|¬¸- -|·|«| u|-||· +·-|- -+ |++|¬- -¬-|+« :¬|=- ¬|¡. -|·|«|·| ~|·|-|
+|c·| .+|¤|- -|· ¡|- ¬|¡. +¤ .·=|- +|+ ~¡·|- -|·|«|¬| .-· +|+¤| ¬|¡ ¬||¤ ·| ¬·- +¡|+
|++-| ¤|-|-.
¬¤c| + ¬+-·| ·|+|+¤|¬ ·|+· :| +· ¬|¤¡| ¡ ~|· +|c·| .+|¤- |~„+ ¬|¡. ¬|-¡| |
+|·¬·|-|¬ -· +|+|+· |·| ¬·|¬ +¬|. .·+ +|+|-¸- |++|- -· |ac¬ -|·|«| +« |+«¸ ~+¬
¬~| +|·|ª¤-| ¬|¡. ¬·| º+¸¤ :¡| +|+|-|¬ +¬ - |ac¬ +ƒ| +|¬ +« |++|¬|c| +|+·¬| ¤|-|.
¡ +« ¤+¬|-|¬ ~|·| +· |+«-. a|c +« ¬¬-|- ~|·|+· -c¸- +|c|+ ¬|+- |++| ¤|+-|+· ~|¤|+
¬|+-. ~|·|+· -c-|¬|c| +|~-| ¬|+- -¬- |+· ¤|+ ¬|¡-. +¬¸- +|«| +·-|+« +|c|+· -|¤
- |. | +«| +|¬-¸ -|·|« | |+«+-|-| ¬·|-| .|+ | ¬·- +-:|+ ¬|¡. ·|+« +·|+ ·|¸ +¡|- +|¡¬|-
+¬ ¡| .|+| +-- -|· +¬ |+«+-|-| .·- +·-|- . | +· ¬|¬| +« ¤+¸- +·+ +|«+-|-. ·|-|¬
+|· +¤¸ +|«-¸ ¤|-|. ·| -- · :|- +|c |· | |-+c|- ¤-- º+ º+ +| :+·|- ,¡|-|· ·|- +|· |+| ¬|+-. +|¡|
+|¡¬| ¤|·|+· ···¸- -|·|«| -|· +·-|-| .·- +·-|- +¤ ·|- ¡|¤|·| -¸c -·· +=| ¤|ª- ¬|¡.
| ¬|c| ¬|-¡| ¬|+|+· ¤|+-+-|, +« + -|·|«| |++- ·¤, -+. ¬|+|·| +:-|- +« +|·¤ -¬-
;-· +:|¤ +| +--|¬ |-| ~|¤ + ª¤||-+ +-|+· -|·|«| ~|· ¬|+¤ ¬¬ .·- +-- +||¡¬.
|-¸- ¬¬ ¬=|- ¬|¬ +| +«|+|¬¸- --|+ .-|- |+-+|· +-- +|¡¬. ¤|·|+· ···¸- +|¡-|-| +|· ¤|ª-
-¸· ¡|- ¡ ¬=|- ¬|-|+« ·|-| ¤|·|·| :|- +|·|- +··|+| º+ +|~· c|+¸- -¸· ++| +·-|-| .·-
+¬| +¤ .·=|- ¡| .|+¡| ~ª+| ¡|+¸ ~+¬| -|¡|.
·|+« -|·|«| +«| +|¬¸- -|·|«| ¬¬+ +·-|¬|c| + -|· ~|¬ -· +|¡¬|- +- ++| ¡|-|¬ + º+
·|¤+|·|- ¬|¤- |+«¸ ~+¬. ¬|-|| -+¬·¤ -|·|«| +«| +|¬¸- .·+ +|+| +· |++|- -···· · -|¬.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
132
zì¬nuì mzuc wnl
ml. o-¤¢ o¡«ªi« ais
+|~|+
Farming of Karvand
Shri. Unmesh Udhawrao Lande
Washim
+|¤|+·|¬ ++¤ -¡¤¸- +||¡-| ¤|¤|| +·+:|-|¡| ·|+¬||+ ~-| ¡|+ ~+- ¡| ¤|·~| .|+ +||~+
|¤-=|- ¬+.¤+ ··+¸- ¬|¤¬|.
+·|+:|¬| +|+ ··+¸· - +·-¸ ·|+· ·+¬| -¡¤¸- +|¡¬ ¤|- -|¡|. ·+¬||- |· +|+:~- |+«|¬ +
¤|·¬| +-||- +·+: ~-|+· +«¬|. ~··- ¬|¬| :|· º+· =+|- +|·¬·|-|¬ ·|-c| +·+:|·| ·|+|-|
~-|- ¬|++· +¬|.
¬·+|-|·| +|- ++|·| +|«|- +·+: ~-|+|¬¸- +|¡|- -·+· |+«|¬ -|¡|. +·-¸ +·+:|·| ~-|-
¬|-·+|+ -¡¤¸- ·;++, ¬||+|- +¤|, +|¬+, ;·||: +|¬¸- -·+|:- |+«+¬. +|- ++|--· +·+: ~-|-¸-
-·+· |+«-|¬ ¬·+|- ~|¬|.
º+·| º. ¡¤|· ;-|· u- +¤| ¤|-| |-·+« -+| +·+: ~-|-¸- ¡|- ¬|¡.
SUB-THEME
LOCAL SEED CONSERVATION
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
132
zì¬nuì mzuc wnl
ml. o-¤¢ o¡«ªi« ais
+|~|+
Farming of Karvand
Shri. Unmesh Udhawrao Lande
Washim
+|¤|+·|¬ ++¤ -¡¤¸- +||¡-| ¤|¤|| +·+:|-|¡| ·|+¬||+ ~-| ¡|+ ~+- ¡| ¤|·~| .|+ +||~+
|¤-=|- ¬+.¤+ ··+¸- ¬|¤¬|.
+·|+:|¬| +|+ ··+¸· - +·-¸ ·|+· ·+¬| -¡¤¸- +|¡¬ ¤|- -|¡|. ·+¬||- |· +|+:~- |+«|¬ +
¤|·¬| +-||- +·+: ~-|+· +«¬|. ~··- ¬|¬| :|· º+· =+|- +|·¬·|-|¬ ·|-c| +·+:|·| ·|+|-|
~-|- ¬|++· +¬|.
¬·+|-|·| +|- ++|·| +|«|- +·+: ~-|+|¬¸- +|¡|- -·+· |+«|¬ -|¡|. +·-¸ +·+:|·| ~-|-
¬|-·+|+ -¡¤¸- ·;++, ¬||+|- +¤|, +|¬+, ;·||: +|¬¸- -·+|:- |+«+¬. +|- ++|--· +·+: ~-|-¸-
-·+· |+«-|¬ ¬·+|- ~|¬|.
º+·| º. ¡¤|· ;-|· u- +¤| ¤|-| |-·+« -+| +·+: ~-|-¸- ¡|- ¬|¡.
SUB-THEME
LOCAL SEED CONSERVATION
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
134
INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Raghunandan Velankar Local seeds and markets 135
Dr. Suryaji G. Patil Experiences in conservation of traditional varieties 136
Avil Borkar Successful implementation of SRI method in conservation 137
of traditional varieties
Sanjay Patil Community led Conservation & Revival of Indigenous 138
Crop Diversity in Jawhar (Thane) and Dhadgaon (Nandurbar)
tahsil of Maharashtra
Sarang Pande Conservation of Seeds of traditional varieties and value addition 139
and marketing through the means of Producer's Company
Shreenivas Bagal Conservation of seeds of traditional verieties at Kolhapur 140
Nagesh Mahaling Swami Conservation of seeds of traditional varieties of Satara 141
Shri. Subhash Kamdi Conservation and Seed Production of 9 Wheat varities 142
Shri. Deepak N. Barade Conservation of local varieties of crops for home food security 143
Shri. Anant Praphuajgaonkar Red Bhandi from Kokan Area 144
Shri. Gulabrao Yadav Shalu - sweet jowar variety 145
Shri. Gangaram Gindhale Marketing of local rice varieties for livelihood 146
Local seeds and markets
Raghunandan Velankar
Independent Researcher, New Delhi
Email : raghu.velankar@gmail.com
The paper discusses local seeds and role of markets in their sustainable utilization. Local seeds
are those produced by farmers through selection and repeat cultivation over the years. In general,
local seeds arean undervalued resource. Some often citedcausative factors oftheir
undervaluation are higher transaction cost for the producers, imperfect market and limited
information available to consumers leading to limited demand.
The intrinsic importance of local seeds is that they provide genetic basis for all commercial seeds.
However, market share of local seeds in financial terms is negligible as compared to commercial
seeds. By volume, the market share of local seeds is more than 60%.
There is to intervene at various levels to ensure local seeds get their necessary due in the market.
The interventions like seed banks, farmer producer companies and low cost effective techniques
for seed conservation have shown positive results in different parts of country. Various cases of
collective efforts, experience of individual farmers and progressive provisions of India's Protection
of Plant Varieties and Farmer Rights Act 2001 can help us to take forward conservation of local
seeds in future.
135
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
134
INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Raghunandan Velankar Local seeds and markets 135
Dr. Suryaji G. Patil Experiences in conservation of traditional varieties 136
Avil Borkar Successful implementation of SRI method in conservation 137
of traditional varieties
Sanjay Patil Community led Conservation & Revival of Indigenous 138
Crop Diversity in Jawhar (Thane) and Dhadgaon (Nandurbar)
tahsil of Maharashtra
Sarang Pande Conservation of Seeds of traditional varieties and value addition 139
and marketing through the means of Producer's Company
Shreenivas Bagal Conservation of seeds of traditional verieties at Kolhapur 140
Nagesh Mahaling Swami Conservation of seeds of traditional varieties of Satara 141
Shri. Subhash Kamdi Conservation and Seed Production of 9 Wheat varities 142
Shri. Deepak N. Barade Conservation of local varieties of crops for home food security 143
Shri. Anant Praphuajgaonkar Red Bhandi from Kokan Area 144
Shri. Gulabrao Yadav Shalu - sweet jowar variety 145
Shri. Gangaram Gindhale Marketing of local rice varieties for livelihood 146
Local seeds and markets
Raghunandan Velankar
Independent Researcher, New Delhi
Email : raghu.velankar@gmail.com
The paper discusses local seeds and role of markets in their sustainable utilization. Local seeds
are those produced by farmers through selection and repeat cultivation over the years. In general,
local seeds arean undervalued resource. Some often citedcausative factors oftheir
undervaluation are higher transaction cost for the producers, imperfect market and limited
information available to consumers leading to limited demand.
The intrinsic importance of local seeds is that they provide genetic basis for all commercial seeds.
However, market share of local seeds in financial terms is negligible as compared to commercial
seeds. By volume, the market share of local seeds is more than 60%.
There is to intervene at various levels to ensure local seeds get their necessary due in the market.
The interventions like seed banks, farmer producer companies and low cost effective techniques
for seed conservation have shown positive results in different parts of country. Various cases of
collective efforts, experience of individual farmers and progressive provisions of India's Protection
of Plant Varieties and Farmer Rights Act 2001 can help us to take forward conservation of local
seeds in future.
135
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Experiences in conservation of traditional varieties
Dr. Suryaji Ganpat Patil
Parite, Kolhapur
Seeds of traditional varieties of rice, pulses and vegetables are cultivated since the year 2000.
Various problems encountered in the maintenance of these seeds are as follows: erroneous
mixing with hybrid seeds at the time of sowing, low germination percentage, need to sow all the
varieties every year, higher labour requirement. It was noted that use of chemical fertilisers in
cultivation of these varieties resulted in adverse effect on taste and flavour. Use of organic
fertilisers, is therefore, recommended. There are currently 125 varieties being conserved on farm.
One noteworthy variety of rice is “Kala Jigara”. It is easy to digest, non-shattering, non-sticky and
fragrant. It is included in the diets of pregnant women, critically ill patients, and patients of TB and
diabetes. However, the preference by the farmers for this variety is lesser due to its low
productivity, need of longer duration for completing the life cycle and tendency of plants to topple
after attaining maturity.
136
Successful implementation of SRI method in
conservation of traditional varieties
Avil Borkar
Gramin Yuva Pragatik Mandal Bhandara
Email : gypmbhandara@gmail.com
Keywords – traditional varieties, SRI method, conservation
Introduction of hybrid seeds, chemical fertilisers and pesticides have resulted in many problems
like decrease in traditional varieties, decrease in agro-bio-diversity, increased costs & increased
water pollution. Gramin Yuva PragatikMandal (GYPM), Bhandara is working to conserve and
spread the traditional varieties especially in Eastern Vidarbha districts. GYPM is involved in study
of agro-bio-diversity to identify traditional varieties with favourable characteristics like disease
resistance, pest resistance, increased yield, improved flavour and so on. 7-8 traditional rice
varieties like luchai, dubhraj, chennor, kalidumo, hirankki were identified with help of farmers. But
these varieties yield was low in traditional cultivation practices. GYPM follows “SRI” method of
Hyderabad University for conservation of traditional varieties. SRI method deals with use of green
manure crops, seed selection, seed treatment, use of raised beds, early transplanting at specified
spacing, use of light-weight weeder, wet and dry stress by controlled irrigation and treatments with
“Amrut-pani”. This has resulted in higher yields (20 – 35 quintals per acre against 7 – 8 quintals per
acre), decreased costs and higher prices for the produce. GYPM has 60 “krishi-preraks” – trainers
to help farmers. About 200 farmers are cultivating traditional varieties using improved method.
1600 farmers of Bhandara andGondia district follow this SRI method. Traditional kodoweeder
(12kg wt) was replaced with Mandvaweeder (5kg wt) developed by farmers of Orissa.
137
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Experiences in conservation of traditional varieties
Dr. Suryaji Ganpat Patil
Parite, Kolhapur
Seeds of traditional varieties of rice, pulses and vegetables are cultivated since the year 2000.
Various problems encountered in the maintenance of these seeds are as follows: erroneous
mixing with hybrid seeds at the time of sowing, low germination percentage, need to sow all the
varieties every year, higher labour requirement. It was noted that use of chemical fertilisers in
cultivation of these varieties resulted in adverse effect on taste and flavour. Use of organic
fertilisers, is therefore, recommended. There are currently 125 varieties being conserved on farm.
One noteworthy variety of rice is “Kala Jigara”. It is easy to digest, non-shattering, non-sticky and
fragrant. It is included in the diets of pregnant women, critically ill patients, and patients of TB and
diabetes. However, the preference by the farmers for this variety is lesser due to its low
productivity, need of longer duration for completing the life cycle and tendency of plants to topple
after attaining maturity.
136
Successful implementation of SRI method in
conservation of traditional varieties
Avil Borkar
Gramin Yuva Pragatik Mandal Bhandara
Email : gypmbhandara@gmail.com
Keywords – traditional varieties, SRI method, conservation
Introduction of hybrid seeds, chemical fertilisers and pesticides have resulted in many problems
like decrease in traditional varieties, decrease in agro-bio-diversity, increased costs & increased
water pollution. Gramin Yuva PragatikMandal (GYPM), Bhandara is working to conserve and
spread the traditional varieties especially in Eastern Vidarbha districts. GYPM is involved in study
of agro-bio-diversity to identify traditional varieties with favourable characteristics like disease
resistance, pest resistance, increased yield, improved flavour and so on. 7-8 traditional rice
varieties like luchai, dubhraj, chennor, kalidumo, hirankki were identified with help of farmers. But
these varieties yield was low in traditional cultivation practices. GYPM follows “SRI” method of
Hyderabad University for conservation of traditional varieties. SRI method deals with use of green
manure crops, seed selection, seed treatment, use of raised beds, early transplanting at specified
spacing, use of light-weight weeder, wet and dry stress by controlled irrigation and treatments with
“Amrut-pani”. This has resulted in higher yields (20 – 35 quintals per acre against 7 – 8 quintals per
acre), decreased costs and higher prices for the produce. GYPM has 60 “krishi-preraks” – trainers
to help farmers. About 200 farmers are cultivating traditional varieties using improved method.
1600 farmers of Bhandara andGondia district follow this SRI method. Traditional kodoweeder
(12kg wt) was replaced with Mandvaweeder (5kg wt) developed by farmers of Orissa.
137
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Community led Conservation & Revival of
Indigenous Crop Diversity in Jawhar (Thane) and Dhadgaon
(Nandurbar) tahsil of Maharashtra
Sanjay Patil
BAIF Development and research foundation, Pune
Email : sanjaypatil21@gmail.com
Keywords – community conservation, landraces, seed bank, seed exchange
Genetic diversity is a key element in farmer's livelihood strategies particularly in areas under high
ecological, climatic and economic stresses and risks. It has taken hundreds of years of dedicated
efforts of farmers to develop and conserve crop land races suitable for agro-climatic conditions.
However, in recent years traditional practices of agriculture have been vanishing due to high
external input. Farmers are forced to depend on external sources such as hybrid seeds,
chemical fertilizers and highly toxic insecticides which resulted in steep escalation in input cost,
environmental degradation, reduction in the biodiversity and rise in mono-cropping.
Development of dwarf varieties for higher grain production has resulted in shortage of fodder.
Problems associated with climate change are unpredictable. The agricultural systems all over the
world are required to find suitable solutions for food security in the backdrop of above challenges.
India has a number of landraces of food crops that are resistant to pests, can grow on poor soils
and can sustain under the changed climatic conditions with high nutritive values. It is essential to
conserve these landraces.
Present paper throws light on BAIF's community led conservation and revival of crop landraces in
Thane and Nandurbar districts of Maharashtra since 2007. The process and methodologies
adopted are mapping of crop landraces, on-farm conservation, characterization and evaluation
with community level with community seed banking and seed exchange programme for
sustainable livelihood.
138
Conservation of Seeds of traditional varieties
and value addition and marketing through
the means of Producers' Company
Sarang Pande, Balnath Sonawane, Vijay Sambre, Ganga Charude
Lokpanchayat Sanstha, Sangamaner and Baliraja Krushak Producer's Company, Sangamner
Email : lokpanchyatsnr@gmail.com
Keywords – producer company, traditional varieties, brand development
Focussing on equitable justice to all, sustainable development of villages, conservation of seeds
of traditional varieties and demonstrations of organic farming, “Lokpanchayat” movement started
in Sangamnertaluka, Maharashtra in 1993. “Ideal Village Projects” focussing on catchment area
development were successfully implemented by Lokpanchayat in eight villages. The movement
maintained that the farmers themselves should be instrumental in obtaining solutions to their
problems. Group discussions, meetings, active participation by female farmers were immensely
useful in conservation of seeds of traditional varieties. “Eravad” and “Maaliv” are two special
types of mixed farming observed in this area. These deal with simultaneous sowing of monocot
and dicot in a specified area. Lokpanchayat is active in maintaining seed bank of traditional
varieties with 150 varieties of 90 crops being maintained. “Krushakpanchayat” was established
with self sufficient financially feasible agriculture as goal. Framers' groups jointly decide strategy
on seasonal crop selection, choices of fertilisers and seeds and sales. As a combination of a private
limited company and co-operative society, a “BalirajaKrushak Producers' Company” was
established in October 2009 with more than 200 farmers as its members. The Company is
presently working production and marketing of local rice variety like Kalbhat, Chandoshi wheat,
DevthanBajara and other millets, pulses etcThe marketing is undertaken through brand – Irjik.
139
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Community led Conservation & Revival of
Indigenous Crop Diversity in Jawhar (Thane) and Dhadgaon
(Nandurbar) tahsil of Maharashtra
Sanjay Patil
BAIF Development and research foundation, Pune
Email : sanjaypatil21@gmail.com
Keywords – community conservation, landraces, seed bank, seed exchange
Genetic diversity is a key element in farmer's livelihood strategies particularly in areas under high
ecological, climatic and economic stresses and risks. It has taken hundreds of years of dedicated
efforts of farmers to develop and conserve crop land races suitable for agro-climatic conditions.
However, in recent years traditional practices of agriculture have been vanishing due to high
external input. Farmers are forced to depend on external sources such as hybrid seeds,
chemical fertilizers and highly toxic insecticides which resulted in steep escalation in input cost,
environmental degradation, reduction in the biodiversity and rise in mono-cropping.
Development of dwarf varieties for higher grain production has resulted in shortage of fodder.
Problems associated with climate change are unpredictable. The agricultural systems all over the
world are required to find suitable solutions for food security in the backdrop of above challenges.
India has a number of landraces of food crops that are resistant to pests, can grow on poor soils
and can sustain under the changed climatic conditions with high nutritive values. It is essential to
conserve these landraces.
Present paper throws light on BAIF's community led conservation and revival of crop landraces in
Thane and Nandurbar districts of Maharashtra since 2007. The process and methodologies
adopted are mapping of crop landraces, on-farm conservation, characterization and evaluation
with community level with community seed banking and seed exchange programme for
sustainable livelihood.
138
Conservation of Seeds of traditional varieties
and value addition and marketing through
the means of Producers' Company
Sarang Pande, Balnath Sonawane, Vijay Sambre, Ganga Charude
Lokpanchayat Sanstha, Sangamaner and Baliraja Krushak Producer's Company, Sangamner
Email : lokpanchyatsnr@gmail.com
Keywords – producer company, traditional varieties, brand development
Focussing on equitable justice to all, sustainable development of villages, conservation of seeds
of traditional varieties and demonstrations of organic farming, “Lokpanchayat” movement started
in Sangamnertaluka, Maharashtra in 1993. “Ideal Village Projects” focussing on catchment area
development were successfully implemented by Lokpanchayat in eight villages. The movement
maintained that the farmers themselves should be instrumental in obtaining solutions to their
problems. Group discussions, meetings, active participation by female farmers were immensely
useful in conservation of seeds of traditional varieties. “Eravad” and “Maaliv” are two special
types of mixed farming observed in this area. These deal with simultaneous sowing of monocot
and dicot in a specified area. Lokpanchayat is active in maintaining seed bank of traditional
varieties with 150 varieties of 90 crops being maintained. “Krushakpanchayat” was established
with self sufficient financially feasible agriculture as goal. Framers' groups jointly decide strategy
on seasonal crop selection, choices of fertilisers and seeds and sales. As a combination of a private
limited company and co-operative society, a “BalirajaKrushak Producers' Company” was
established in October 2009 with more than 200 farmers as its members. The Company is
presently working production and marketing of local rice variety like Kalbhat, Chandoshi wheat,
DevthanBajara and other millets, pulses etcThe marketing is undertaken through brand – Irjik.
139
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Conservation of seeds of traditional
varieties at Kolhapur
Shreenivas Bagal
Vasundhara Shashwat Sheti Samvardhan Sanstha, Kolhapur
Keywords – traditional cultivars, conservation, seed production
VasundharaShashwatShetiSamvardhan Sanstha, VSSSS, Kolhapur has 67 farmers as members
and has in all 182 hectares of area under cultivation. The Sanstha is active in maintaining seeds of
around 28 traditional varieties of 20 crops since 2007. Traditional cultivars of cereals, legumes,
pulses, millets, banana and sugarcane are maintained by the Sanstha. These seeds are
promoted by internal exchange amongst member farmers and by marketing at different seed
festivals. Major hurdles encountered in maintaining these traditional breeds are as follows :
difficulties in maintaining purity of the breed, chance contamination by hybrid seeds in surrounding
agricultural fields, low productivity, need to spread awareness about the traditional breeds. We are
active in obtaining and maintaining the traditional seeds and has a collection of many local seeds
from and around Kolhapur. The products are sold either as grains for consumption or as seeds for
sowing.
140
Conservation of seeds of traditional
varieties at Satara
Nagesh Mahaling Swami
Shiwade (Satara)
Seeds of traditional varieties of different pulses, vegetables and sugarcane are collected and
maintained. Different varieties have different promising characteristics of better taste, different
colours, better productivity, insect-pest and disease resistance, ability to grow on residual
moisture, ability to grow without application of fertilisers. Awareness about these seeds is spread
at agro-exhibitions and in workshops related to agriculture. The difficulties associated with this
exercise is insufficient information about seed selection, problems in maintaining germination
percentage over different seasons / years, storage, characterisation and documentation of
cultivar specific qualities and high labour requirement. Intensive cropping and harvesting is
challenging.
141
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Conservation of seeds of traditional
varieties at Kolhapur
Shreenivas Bagal
Vasundhara Shashwat Sheti Samvardhan Sanstha, Kolhapur
Keywords – traditional cultivars, conservation, seed production
VasundharaShashwatShetiSamvardhan Sanstha, VSSSS, Kolhapur has 67 farmers as members
and has in all 182 hectares of area under cultivation. The Sanstha is active in maintaining seeds of
around 28 traditional varieties of 20 crops since 2007. Traditional cultivars of cereals, legumes,
pulses, millets, banana and sugarcane are maintained by the Sanstha. These seeds are
promoted by internal exchange amongst member farmers and by marketing at different seed
festivals. Major hurdles encountered in maintaining these traditional breeds are as follows :
difficulties in maintaining purity of the breed, chance contamination by hybrid seeds in surrounding
agricultural fields, low productivity, need to spread awareness about the traditional breeds. We are
active in obtaining and maintaining the traditional seeds and has a collection of many local seeds
from and around Kolhapur. The products are sold either as grains for consumption or as seeds for
sowing.
140
Conservation of seeds of traditional
varieties at Satara
Nagesh Mahaling Swami
Shiwade (Satara)
Seeds of traditional varieties of different pulses, vegetables and sugarcane are collected and
maintained. Different varieties have different promising characteristics of better taste, different
colours, better productivity, insect-pest and disease resistance, ability to grow on residual
moisture, ability to grow without application of fertilisers. Awareness about these seeds is spread
at agro-exhibitions and in workshops related to agriculture. The difficulties associated with this
exercise is insufficient information about seed selection, problems in maintaining germination
percentage over different seasons / years, storage, characterisation and documentation of
cultivar specific qualities and high labour requirement. Intensive cropping and harvesting is
challenging.
141
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
142
=rµì·nì s uìwìu »zqw u ul× acuìc¬

ml. ==i¢ «=aªi« +i¤sl
+¤|
Conservat in and Seed Production of 9 wheat varieties
Shri. Subhash Kamdi
Vardha
+|-|+·¤|- ¡|- ¬¬¬¬| ¬---| +:¬, +|+¬|-| ¬|-|+--| +|+¬|·| +|-|+· ¬+¬+¸- ¬¬¤|·| ~-|,
|++|+· ¤|· |+|+¤ ·|+, ¬,| -·+|:-|¬| |+«¤|·| +|c-| .|-¬|: | +|·¤|+« |++|·| +|·+||·+
+|¤|- ¬·=¤ +·- ~-| +·-|-| .·- -|¬¸ ¬|¡.
+·¡|·| -+ ¤|-| ~-|- ¬|¡-. ·|+« -·+·|-| ¡+| ¬|¡. +·¡|- +:·- +|¤ ¬|¤+ ¬|+|. ~|¬ ¬|¡. -
+|·¬·|- ¬|¤+ ·-¬ ¬|¡. | ¤|-| +c|¬ .+|¤ ¬|¡- - +¡¸, +:·-, ¡|+·|, ¬|++-, º++|+|·, +·¡|«|,
+|¬+-, u+¬|, ¤|¤«|, -|+¬+|c|. ¡ ¬+« +|¤ ·|·| +|·+·|¬| +|¬¸- ¬|·|«¬¬ ¬|¡-. |- ¤|·|¬|
+·¡|-| |++| ·+ª¤| + +|·¬·|-|¬ +|+|-|¬ ;-· +|¡| ¬|+|-| +·|+· ·+- |+|+¤ +|¤|- -·+|:- ¬·
+¬ ¬|¡. | -+ +|¤|- +|¤ -·+|:- +-- ·|-| |++| +¬| ¤|-.
+·¡|·| ¤|-| ¤|+|¬- ¬¬-|-|- +|·+||·+ :+¬+|·|, +|·|, |+·-|, +·+·|, -·, ++ ;·|:|- :u|¬
-·+· ~-|- ·-|.
143
uzìul vn »zlqnnì ×uwì-nì uìzuìIzm uìwìu »zqw
ml. ;l¤+ -i-i¬l «ªs
+¤|
Conservation of local varieties of crops for home food security
Shri. Deepak Nanaji Barade
Wardha
+|·¬|+|¤- ~-|- ¬|¤|-+-| - ¬|¤-| ¬,| +,-|- -ºc· ·| ¬+|:· +|¬¸- ¬-+ +|¤|-| ¤|+|¬-|
+·¤ ¬· ¬|¡. ~-|+· ++|·¬ ¤|¤|· |++|·| +|c+-|~+, -¤-|~+, ·¬|- |+« ~-|- -·+|:- +|c-
+·-¸ ·|+|¬¸- ¬-+ ·|+|-| ¬|+-| :|u¬ +·|+| ¬|+-| ¡ ¬+¤-|- ¬,| ~-| ¬· +¬|.
-¸·, ++, ¤·|+, +·+·|, +|·|, +|+c, +|«¸+, +|¡«|, :|·+|, +|+·|, ¬|+|, ++|·, ··|, :+¬+|·|,
+|+¸¬, +|¬, -+c|, ·¡·|¡¸- +|¬+-|, +|+|, |+·-|, c+|c, ·|¤|+·|, |-«, +¡¸, --|, ¤+¬, +c|-| ;·|:|
|++|·| .·+| :|- -|· ¤|-| ¬|·|«-| ¤|-|-, ¡| ¬+«| |++ :·++| ·-¬| ¤|-|-.
-·+|:- ++| +¤ ~|œ--| ¬|¡ + ··|·| ¬· ¬·|=--¬|c| |+· ¬|¤+||¤+ ~-+|-| +«|+ |¬|c|
.·- -|¬¸ ¬|¡-. ¬|¤+ |+|¤ ~-+|-| +|+- :+- +|¤ ¤|+|¬¬ ¤|+ |¬|c| .·- +·-|. +|¤
¬|·|«-|·| +|¬|+· +|¤ |:¬ ¤|- ¡| º+ ++«| ¬ª+-| ¤+-|- +|+ -|¬¸ ¬|¡. .·+ +|¤|- |+|¤
-+¬·¤ ¬|¡. |-|¬ ¬|¤+ -·+· ¤|| +|¬|-| |++| ·+ª¤| -·|·¬| ¬|¡..
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
142
=rµì·nì s uìwìu »zqw u ul× acuìc¬

ml. ==i¢ «=aªi« +i¤sl
+¤|
Conservat in and Seed Production of 9 wheat varieties
Shri. Subhash Kamdi
Vardha
+|-|+·¤|- ¡|- ¬¬¬¬| ¬---| +:¬, +|+¬|-| ¬|-|+--| +|+¬|·| +|-|+· ¬+¬+¸- ¬¬¤|·| ~-|,
|++|+· ¤|· |+|+¤ ·|+, ¬,| -·+|:-|¬| |+«¤|·| +|c-| .|-¬|: | +|·¤|+« |++|·| +|·+||·+
+|¤|- ¬·=¤ +·- ~-| +·-|-| .·- -|¬¸ ¬|¡.
+·¡|·| -+ ¤|-| ~-|- ¬|¡-. ·|+« -·+·|-| ¡+| ¬|¡. +·¡|- +:·- +|¤ ¬|¤+ ¬|+|. ~|¬ ¬|¡. -
+|·¬·|- ¬|¤+ ·-¬ ¬|¡. | ¤|-| +c|¬ .+|¤ ¬|¡- - +¡¸, +:·-, ¡|+·|, ¬|++-, º++|+|·, +·¡|«|,
+|¬+-, u+¬|, ¤|¤«|, -|+¬+|c|. ¡ ¬+« +|¤ ·|·| +|·+·|¬| +|¬¸- ¬|·|«¬¬ ¬|¡-. |- ¤|·|¬|
+·¡|-| |++| ·+ª¤| + +|·¬·|-|¬ +|+|-|¬ ;-· +|¡| ¬|+|-| +·|+· ·+- |+|+¤ +|¤|- -·+|:- ¬·
+¬ ¬|¡. | -+ +|¤|- +|¤ -·+|:- +-- ·|-| |++| +¬| ¤|-.
+·¡|·| ¤|-| ¤|+|¬- ¬¬-|-|- +|·+||·+ :+¬+|·|, +|·|, |+·-|, +·+·|, -·, ++ ;·|:|- :u|¬
-·+· ~-|- ·-|.
143
uzìul vn »zlqnnì ×uwì-nì uìzuìIzm uìwìu »zqw
ml. ;l¤+ -i-i¬l «ªs
+¤|
Conservation of local varieties of crops for home food security
Shri. Deepak Nanaji Barade
Wardha
+|·¬|+|¤- ~-|- ¬|¤|-+-| - ¬|¤-| ¬,| +,-|- -ºc· ·| ¬+|:· +|¬¸- ¬-+ +|¤|-| ¤|+|¬-|
+·¤ ¬· ¬|¡. ~-|+· ++|·¬ ¤|¤|· |++|·| +|c+-|~+, -¤-|~+, ·¬|- |+« ~-|- -·+|:- +|c-
+·-¸ ·|+|¬¸- ¬-+ ·|+|-| ¬|+-| :|u¬ +·|+| ¬|+-| ¡ ¬+¤-|- ¬,| ~-| ¬· +¬|.
-¸·, ++, ¤·|+, +·+·|, +|·|, +|+c, +|«¸+, +|¡«|, :|·+|, +|+·|, ¬|+|, ++|·, ··|, :+¬+|·|,
+|+¸¬, +|¬, -+c|, ·¡·|¡¸- +|¬+-|, +|+|, |+·-|, c+|c, ·|¤|+·|, |-«, +¡¸, --|, ¤+¬, +c|-| ;·|:|
|++|·| .·+| :|- -|· ¤|-| ¬|·|«-| ¤|-|-, ¡| ¬+«| |++ :·++| ·-¬| ¤|-|-.
-·+|:- ++| +¤ ~|œ--| ¬|¡ + ··|·| ¬· ¬·|=--¬|c| |+· ¬|¤+||¤+ ~-+|-| +«|+ |¬|c|
.·- -|¬¸ ¬|¡-. ¬|¤+ |+|¤ ~-+|-| +|+- :+- +|¤ ¤|+|¬¬ ¤|+ |¬|c| .·- +·-|. +|¤
¬|·|«-|·| +|¬|+· +|¤ |:¬ ¤|- ¡| º+ ++«| ¬ª+-| ¤+-|- +|+ -|¬¸ ¬|¡. .·+ +|¤|- |+|¤
-+¬·¤ ¬|¡. |-|¬ ¬|¤+ -·+· ¤|| +|¬|-| |++| ·+ª¤| -·|·¬| ¬|¡..
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
144
nìn nìnl·nì mìmwìnln nìn-=nìul ¤sl
ml. ¤-a l;4«ª ¤=¸¤i¬4i«+ª
|¬¤:+
Red Bhendi from Kokan Area
Shri. Anant Digambar Praphuajgaonkar
Sindhudurga
+|+¤|- ª¤||-+ |¡·+| +|c·| ··| ¬|¤+ .+|¤|- ¬¬¸- ·|·| -|---|· ¤|-| ¬|¡-. ·|·|- ¬|¬
+¬|+| ·+|·| ac| ++| ¬|¤+ .+|¤|- ¬|c«-|-. | ª¤||-+ ¤|-|-| ¬|¤|· ·- ·| ¬+|¬- +--
+|c+-|¬ ¬·+|- ¬||¤ ·| --· ¬|¬-+¬|+| ac| +|c+-|-| .|+ ¬· ~|¬| ¬||¤ |-+· +,-|- ¬|¬
··|- +|¤ |++¬|- +¬. .|+| ¬-| º+:| º+ ··| ·+|- +¤ ¬|¬-+¬|+| ¬|c«¬|. ·| ~|·|+|¬¸- ¬|¬
··|- +|¤ +|,+- +¬. .·+ ~|·|+· ++| ¤|ª- ¬|¬ -· +|¡| +«| -¡+|-| |¡·+|- ··| |+«- ¡|-|. ¡
.|+ ·|-| ··|+|¬¸- :¸· ¬||¤ ·|· -·+|+· ¬¬¬-| ~-|- +¬. ¬+«|- +¡·+|- -¡¤¤ ·|+|-| -¬|++
¬|+-||+|¬¸- +|«¤| ·-¬|. ¬-- ¬|- ++ .|+ +-|--· ¬u· ¬|¬-+¬|+| ··|- +|¤ |++|¬- +¬.
¡| ··| ¬·- +¡-+|-| ¬¬¸- ¬|+¤| +¤¤+ ¬¬-|-| ~Š-| ¬|¡. -¬- -+|¬| --|+ ¬||¤ u·|+ +
--¡|«| ¬~| :|-¡| ¡+|+|- ·-| ¤|·| ¬|¡. -¬- ¬·+|-|¬| |¡·+| ·|--· -|+¬c| + ~+c| ¬|¬ +¬|+|
|+« ¬|+++ + -c|+:|· |:¬-. ¬|¬ ··|- |-+c+¤| -¬¸- .|- ~|· -· c c· |+¬| ··| |+«-.
145
=ìs ¤ìmzluì wìe¸
ml. 4ai«ªi« ;-ii¬l «i;«
Shalu - Sweet Jawar Variety
Shri. Gulabrao Dattaji Yadav
¬|¤|-+ ~-| +·-| +·-| +|·+||·+ ¬,| ~-|- +¡-+ ++| ¡|- ¬|¡ ¬¬ +|c-|+|¬¸- ¬,| ~-|
+·-|+· ¬|¤+ ¤|· ¬|+¬|. +|·¬|·| ··+~|+· -|¬- ¬|¬-| ~-|- ¬= :-|¬ ¬·+|- +¬|.
-|¬+|+ +|·¬·|-|¬ |+|¤|-| ¤|+|¬-| ·¡|+| |¬|c| .·- +·-|¬ ¬·+|- +¬|. +|·¬·|-|¬ ~|«¸, +¡¸,
++, +|¬·+·|, +-|c+ +|+| ;·|:| +|+ + ·|·| +|¤|-| ¤|+|¬-| +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡.
|-|¬ ~|«¸ +|¤ +|c·~· ¬¬¸- +|·¬·|-|¬ º+ ¡¤|· ~-+|+- - +|¡-¬ ¬|¡. ~|«¸- ¡ +|¤ +|~|
¤¸- ¬|¤¬ ¬|¡. º+++|-| |+|¤ :+- |+|¤|- ¬+¤- +¬ ¤|-. | +|¤|- ¤|+-¬·+ ¬|¤+ ¬¬-,
+¤|¬ º+c ·_ ¬¬- +| +=|-| ·|+· -|- ·|¬-| - -|¡|, ++| +|+¬|+· ¡|¤|· ¡ +|+ ¬|¡. ¬|¤|·¤
|++| +·-|-| |¬| .|-|+¬|¬ ~· - -· ·+ ·|+ |+«-|. | +|¤|-| ¤|+|¬-| ~··, ¬|¬|+|¬¸- +·-|-
¬|¬| ¬|¡.
~-|- |++¤|| ¬+«|- +|¤|-| º+ a|c| |+c +-- ~-+|-| :|- -¡¤¸- |:¬ ¡|- +·-¸ ·|-|
+|+:-|- ·| |++|- +|¡| +| ¤+| +·|+ + ;-·|-| ¤|+ ¬¬| .|+ +¬| +¤ -| +|¬ c·¬|, ++c |:-|-
+|¬ ¬=|- ¬|¬ -|¡|.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
144
nìn nìnl·nì mìmwìnln nìn-=nìul ¤sl
ml. ¤-a l;4«ª ¤=¸¤i¬4i«+ª
|¬¤:+
Red Bhendi from Kokan Area
Shri. Anant Digambar Praphuajgaonkar
Sindhudurga
+|+¤|- ª¤||-+ |¡·+| +|c·| ··| ¬|¤+ .+|¤|- ¬¬¸- ·|·| -|---|· ¤|-| ¬|¡-. ·|·|- ¬|¬
+¬|+| ·+|·| ac| ++| ¬|¤+ .+|¤|- ¬|c«-|-. | ª¤||-+ ¤|-|-| ¬|¤|· ·- ·| ¬+|¬- +--
+|c+-|¬ ¬·+|- ¬||¤ ·| --· ¬|¬-+¬|+| ac| +|c+-|-| .|+ ¬· ~|¬| ¬||¤ |-+· +,-|- ¬|¬
··|- +|¤ |++¬|- +¬. .|+| ¬-| º+:| º+ ··| ·+|- +¤ ¬|¬-+¬|+| ¬|c«¬|. ·| ~|·|+|¬¸- ¬|¬
··|- +|¤ +|,+- +¬. .·+ ~|·|+· ++| ¤|ª- ¬|¬ -· +|¡| +«| -¡+|-| |¡·+|- ··| |+«- ¡|-|. ¡
.|+ ·|-| ··|+|¬¸- :¸· ¬||¤ ·|· -·+|+· ¬¬¬-| ~-|- +¬. ¬+«|- +¡·+|- -¡¤¤ ·|+|-| -¬|++
¬|+-||+|¬¸- +|«¤| ·-¬|. ¬-- ¬|- ++ .|+ +-|--· ¬u· ¬|¬-+¬|+| ··|- +|¤ |++|¬- +¬.
¡| ··| ¬·- +¡-+|-| ¬¬¸- ¬|+¤| +¤¤+ ¬¬-|-| ~Š-| ¬|¡. -¬- -+|¬| --|+ ¬||¤ u·|+ +
--¡|«| ¬~| :|-¡| ¡+|+|- ·-| ¤|·| ¬|¡. -¬- ¬·+|-|¬| |¡·+| ·|--· -|+¬c| + ~+c| ¬|¬ +¬|+|
|+« ¬|+++ + -c|+:|· |:¬-. ¬|¬ ··|- |-+c+¤| -¬¸- .|- ~|· -· c c· |+¬| ··| |+«-.
145
=ìs ¤ìmzluì wìe¸
ml. 4ai«ªi« ;-ii¬l «i;«
Shalu - Sweet Jawar Variety
Shri. Gulabrao Dattaji Yadav
¬|¤|-+ ~-| +·-| +·-| +|·+||·+ ¬,| ~-|- +¡-+ ++| ¡|- ¬|¡ ¬¬ +|c-|+|¬¸- ¬,| ~-|
+·-|+· ¬|¤+ ¤|· ¬|+¬|. +|·¬|·| ··+~|+· -|¬- ¬|¬-| ~-|- ¬= :-|¬ ¬·+|- +¬|.
-|¬+|+ +|·¬·|-|¬ |+|¤|-| ¤|+|¬-| ·¡|+| |¬|c| .·- +·-|¬ ¬·+|- +¬|. +|·¬·|-|¬ ~|«¸, +¡¸,
++, +|¬·+·|, +-|c+ +|+| ;·|:| +|+ + ·|·| +|¤|-| ¤|+|¬-| +·-|- ¬|¬| ¬|¡.
|-|¬ ~|«¸ +|¤ +|c·~· ¬¬¸- +|·¬·|-|¬ º+ ¡¤|· ~-+|+- - +|¡-¬ ¬|¡. ~|«¸- ¡ +|¤ +|~|
¤¸- ¬|¤¬ ¬|¡. º+++|-| |+|¤ :+- |+|¤|- ¬+¤- +¬ ¤|-. | +|¤|- ¤|+-¬·+ ¬|¤+ ¬¬-,
+¤|¬ º+c ·_ ¬¬- +| +=|-| ·|+· -|- ·|¬-| - -|¡|, ++| +|+¬|+· ¡|¤|· ¡ +|+ ¬|¡. ¬|¤|·¤
|++| +·-|-| |¬| .|-|+¬|¬ ~· - -· ·+ ·|+ |+«-|. | +|¤|-| ¤|+|¬-| ~··, ¬|¬|+|¬¸- +·-|-
¬|¬| ¬|¡.
~-|- |++¤|| ¬+«|- +|¤|-| º+ a|c| |+c +-- ~-+|-| :|- -¡¤¸- |:¬ ¡|- +·-¸ ·|-|
+|+:-|- ·| |++|- +|¡| +| ¤+| +·|+ + ;-·|-| ¤|+ ¬¬| .|+ +¬| +¤ -| +|¬ c·¬|, ++c |:-|-
+|¬ ¬=|- ¬|¬ -|¡|.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
146
znìl¬m ¤ìn uìwì·nì lumln¸¬ vì×llumnì µìn¤ìz

ml. 44iªi¤ ¤is¸ l4¤=, ml. ¤i¶- =«i¬l l4¤=, ml. +sla+ ¤i=al l4¤=,
ml. ¶ªl «i=¸ l4¤=
+-· ~-+·| ·|- + +·¤|- +c |¬·+¤|, ¬+|¬ ¬¡+:-+·
Marketing of local rice varieties for Livelihood
Shri. Gangaram Gindhale, Shri, Mohan Sayaji Gindhale, Shri. Kundalik Maruti
Gindhale, Shri. Hari Balu Gindhale
Kartavya Shetkari Bhat va Kadadhanya Gat Sirpunji, Akola Ahamadnagar

+|+|¤ ·|+|- +|·+||·+-| + ¬,| +,- ¡| |+c|¤|- -|¬¸ ¬|¡. +·- | ¬,| + +|·+||·+ +|¤|¬| |· ·|+
|+«- -¬ -¬- ·|·| |++|-| ·+ª¤-| .- ¬+|¬+|· ¬¬- ¬¬ ¬+« ¬|+|+¬| |+-|· +·- ¬¬-. |
+|¬|-| |++| +·|-| ¬¬¬ -· ¬+«|-| º++ ¬|¬ +||¡¤ + +c ª¤|+¸- |-| |++| +¬| +||¡¤ ¬¬
c·+¬. ·|-¬|· ~· ¬|+|-| º+ +c -|· +¬|.
+|·¬·|- ·|-|·| ¬+·| ¤|-| -+¬·¤ ¡|·|. +|«+|, ·|·|+, u·Š|, +|«·|-, -|++·;, +·+«, |+·,
;,|¤|, +|¬+-|, ¬+,|, +¬| ;·||: +|¤ +·|¬·|- +·+·|+- ~-|- ·-¬ ¤|- ¬|¡-. |++| +|«·|- +
·|·|+ ¡ :|- +|¤ +|~-+¸¤ ¬¬¸- ·|-| +|¬ -|+¬| -|. ¬|·|·|·| ¡-|- ·||+c|¬ ·|·|¬| ¡| ·|-
u|¬¬| -|¬-| -¬- +|«|-¤ +|;¬ =| ·|-|-| +¤ |:¬| ¤|-, +--|¬ ¬|+, -+c + ª+||:- ¡ +|¡| +¤ =|
·|-|- ¬|¡-.
¡ +|¤ ¤+-|-| +|¡| ¬·-¤| -|- ¡ -- +|c- + +a ¡|-|+¸+| ¤|+-|+· +·-, ·|-|¬| ¬|¤+ +« ¬¬-,
--|·| ++| ¬¬-| =| ¬+ª| ¬|¡- -¬- ¬|c+¤+|¬| ¬|¤- -¬¤, -:|·, ·~| |-| +|¬, +c|-| +|¬
¬¬-|- ·· ·|··|- ·|+ ¬|+-, +|++-| u- ¬|¤+ ¡|-|. ·|-|-| ·|+ +·¤ =| ¬·-¤|-¸- ¡ +|¤ ¤+|+
¬|+-.
|=|+·¸- ·|- ¡|- ¬·; +-- ·-¬ ¤|-. ¡|-¬·;·| -|:«|-| .· ·+ -· ;-· -|:«|-| ,· ·+ ·|+
|+«-|.
THEME
ENVIRONMENT
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
Concept Note on Environment
Prof. Vikram S Ghole
Co-ordinator Academic Cell National Institute of Virology, Pashan, Pune
Email : gholevs@yahoo.com
I am happy to express the feelings of our group, about our environment which is close to every
body's heart. Our day to day life is very closely related to our surrounding and if our surrounding is
not good then we get disturbed. e.g. if garbage bin is overflowing then you think why municipal
corporation is not taking care of it. You go further and you find an autoriksha in front of you
generating heavy smoke, you immediately think what RTO and Police force is doing in such
situation. You keep going to work and suddenly a window of very nice and expensive car gets
rolled down and one hand comes out and throws of an empty packet of some junk food.
These are very few incidences that I have brought to your notice that disturbs you. But have you
thought what you are doing for keeping your environment favorable to you. No doubt that this is
very gloomy side of our life and society. I do not get discouraged but I feel confidently that there is a
silver lining because many organizations are working in very positively to improve our environment.
As per United Nations Organization (UNO) recommendations the development of any country
should be sustainable and it will be sustainable only if one takes proper care of environment.
When serious thought is given to such problems few shortcomings in the implementation of the
policies of the Government and enforcement of laws related to Environment come forward. Every
organization is working in their area with their best but end results are not achieved to 100%. We
studied this very issue and decided to split important topics in four groups. These four groups do
have direct bearing on wellness of the society which are 1) Energy, 2) water, 3) waste disposal and
4) Biodiversity.
Many NGOs are working in these fields for many years but their efforts are not being recognized to
full extent and are not being replicated at many places that could be implemented. At the same
time many scientists & technocrats are doing experiments on small scale, developing prototypes
but their work cannot be pushed to industrial level or does not get wide recognition by the society
so such important work either remains in paper or abandoned by the inventor itself. This is a great
loss to the country.
There are many reasons for such situation such as shortage of money or there are no takers for
their technology (at the same time there are many NGOs who need such technology for
implementation in their working area as they are totally unknown to such efforts of individual). The
field level applicability of any technology as well as replicating success stories manifold requires
funding. Many industries through their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) work as resource
house for many such events which will be useful for sustainable development. These companies
are unknown to such inventors and reliable NGOs who can utilize new technology.
Therefore we expect the present conference to bring scientists, technocrats, NGOs and CSRs on
the same platform and exchange their views, deliberate, discuss and get solutions for their work,
otherwise it will remain half done and finally society will not get benefitted.
149
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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SUB THEME
WATER
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
¬|. +|+c·|+ ++|· ¤¬ ¬¤|·¤|- -+.|-|- +¡·+ 153
Prof. R. V. Saraf Water Foot Print and Concept of Virtual Water 155
Prabhakar J. Rangari HRCM Nanotechnology of Water Purification... 156
An Invention of 21st Century by Prof. V. I. Petrik
S. P. Pawde Maximizing Water Use Efficiency through Innovative 157
Wireless Sensor Control for Agriculture
Dr. P. Kamalasanan Pillai Holistic model for Grey water treatment 158
Dr. Sonali Shinde A Study of water management with special 159
Reference to GGP
Pradnyesh Agre Eco-technology for betterment of community : 160
case study of Ecological restoration of Ahar
River Udaipur
¬||-+|¬ +|+c -:| +|¡-| +·-|-| +¤:~| .+-+ 161
¬|. |-·¤ |:+ |c+|+ ¤- ¬·=¤ +| +¤| - .|-|- ·|·-| ¤-~|= 163
Dr. Milind Dandekar Need based Technology Transfer for Seva - 164
A Jhabua Experience
Geetika Kalha Sustainable Waster water Management in Rural 165
Punjab : Getting the Local Community Involved
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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Water Foot Print And Concept Of Virtual Water
Prof. R. V. Saraf
Viraj Envirozing India Pvt. Ltd.
Email - watersgs@vsnl.net
Key words : Concept of virtual water, Blue, Green & Grey Water Footprint, water consumption-
direct/ indirect
Together with the water needed for any biological life on the earth, water is required for
commercial, domestic, agricultural & industrial activities. It is derived from underground & surface
water. Depending upon the quality needs of water, it is used fresh as it is, or after treatment.
As per National Building Code, the water consumption in urban area is 135 liter per person per day.
This is called as the direct consumption of water since one can visualize it easily.
However far too higher water requirement is there for producing agriculture products, engineering
goods, textiles, and so on. The list covers practically every manmade activity.
By definition, Virtual water is the amount of water that is embedded in any product which is needed
during its production, but cannot be seen directly in the finished product.
The glaring examples of water footprint of some of the products are,
l
Milk 1,000 liter of water / lit milk
l
Coffee 140 liter of water / cup coffee
l
Pepsi Cola 55 liter of water / lit Pepsi
l
Rice 3,400 liter of water / kg rice
l
Chocolate 17,200 liter of water / kg chocolate
l
Chicken 3,900 liter of water/ kg chicken
l
One pair of jean 1,900 liter of water / pair of Jean
One can calculate virtual water need of every product considering water consumed in each of its
manufacturing step.
Water Footprint is further divided into three types of water needs such as Green (direct use of rain water),
Blue (use of natural& manmade stored water) & Grey (water required to counteract the impact of
pollutant in receiving water body)
This paper discusses Importance of water footprint. framework to calculate the Water Footprint &
methods to reducing it.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
HRCM Nanotechnology of
Water Purification…
st
An Invention of 21 Century by Prof. V. I. Petrik
Prabhakar J. Rangari
Chief Engineer, MIDC, Nanded
E-mail: Prabhakar.rangari@hotmail.com
Key words : HRCM, Nano Structural Carbon complexes,
Water is one of the main natural resource available on mother earth. Fresh water available is only
2.5% of total water available. Due to intensifying of industrial and urban culture, this water source
is getting polluted day by day and now it is under alarming situation. Hence it is essential to protect
the available surface water and also the water table from getting polluted due to industrial and
urban sewage.
At present there are many methods of recycling and purifying water such as pressure filter,
conventional water and sewage treatment plant, effluent treatment plant, reverse osmosis
process etc. But it is observed that these systems are not found sufficient day by day for controlling
all the parameters at all the times within the permissible limit of drinking water standard of WHO,
and Bureau of Indian Standards.
Hence there is a need to have such a type of technique / system to get the water / industrial and
urban sewage to be purified in a best effective manner than the present facilities known to
mankind.
Now the world has received the best technology known as HRCM sorbent, i.e. High Reactivity
Carbon Mixture. By using HRCM sorbent water can be purified to the best level, and the results are
st
excellent and consistent. It is recognized as the discovery of the 21 century invented by Prof.
Victor I. Petrik, a renowned Russian Scientist.He has innovated a "Phenomenon of formation of
nano-structural carbon complexes."
The discovery is highly appreciated by the international science society and widely used in
Russia, Europe, United States of America.
HRCM Nanotechnology is brought to India by ''Water Freedom Revolution''
156
Maximizing Water Use Efficiency through
Innovative Wireless Sensor Control for Agriculture
1 2 3 4 5
S. P. Pawde , C. D. Mahajan , Sudi Rao , Y. S. Talele , N. G. Bendale
1,2,4 3 5
JalaSRI Watershed Surveillance and Research Institute , ICRISAT , KCE Society Jalagaon
Email : spp.jalasri@gmail.com
Soil degradation and Nutrient Depletion have become serious threats to agricultural productivity in
most of the regions. The major NRM issues of rained agriculture area water scarcity, land
degradation, low productivity and unsustainability. To increase productivity, latest techniques such
as improved land practices viz. BBF.
Jalgaon district falls under semi-arid climatic region. Hence precise use of water resource is the
prime requisite for the sustainable livelihood in this region, which includes use of advanced micro-
irrigation techniques, precise use of fertilizers and micronutrients and tailor-made field practices.
For all these purposes accurate and timely measurements of soil, crop and climatic parameters
are essential. The precision farming system includes a) Sensing agricultural parameters, b) Data
collection and transferring for decision making and c) Actuation and control decision based on
sensed data.
Objectives:
l
Identify and deploy appropriate sensors and design an automatic irrigation control system
to predict and regulate the optimum water requirement of crop fields.
l
Evaluate the effectiveness of land configuration and nutrient management practices
The technology is established as a split-pot design with two treatments and four replications. Flat
Bed (FB) and Broad Bed Furrow (BBF). The subplot treatments include 1) Without INM (Integrated
Nutrient Management) and 2) With INM (Integrated Nutrient Management). The soil on the
experimental field is black clay loam with 1-2% slope & tested by ICRISAT, Hyderabad. Automatic
Weather Station with smart sensors has been installed and Soil moisture sensors are placed in
each demonstration plots within a field at depths of 15cm and 60 cm to monitor and control the
real-time irrigation needs of the soil. The field observations (data) are being monitored and stored
in Hydrological stations and transmitted through the GPRS on web server, which is available any
time for the analysis and formulation of decision upon real time guidance to the farmers.
A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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Holistic model for Grey water treatment
Dr. P. Kamalasanan Pillai
Senior Scientist
Vivekananda Kendra – NARDEP Kanyakumari – 629702
Email: vknardep@gmail.com
Vivekananda Kendra - NARDEP has worked on creating a Grey water treatment through both
physical filters as well as selected plants for removing the minerals from the grey water emanating
from sewage and hotels. This system uses plants, micro-organisms and physical filters to treat the
sewage and grey water.
Initial pollutants are removed by physical filters (double filter mechanism) and the water is
released to the planting lines for bio-remediation. We are experimenting this grey water treatment
coming out from the canteen and surrounding lodges to the range of 50,000 to 70,000 liters per
day. The grey water is allowed to pass through two treatment drains, planted on both sides with
selected plants. Water is released alternately from each drain for 15 days. The soil micro-flora,
growth of the plants, total solids etc were measured periodically and compared with the control.
It is found that there is an appreciable reduction in the total solids, BOD and minerals content like
Ca, Na, Potassium etc and also phosphates and nitrates before and after treatment. There was an
improvement in the growth and productivity of the plants; there was also an appreciable
improvement in the soil microbial count, rhizosphere micro flora etc of the plant in the treatment
area over the control.
The paper also discusses the cost-effective nature of the treatment and provides how an ordinary
household can replicate the model.
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
A Study of water management with special
Reference to GGP
Dr. Sonali Shinde
Gram Gaurav Pratisthan
Email : drsonalishinde@hotmail.com
Key Words : Farmer & Villager's participation, integrated water management,
community lift irrigation, watershed management
Farmers' & villagers' participation in operation and maintenance of water harvest development
system can be an effective approach and solution to the problem of water management. Past and
present experiences have shown that without farmer's participation operating and maintaining a
water harvest system is a continuous headache for persons or agencies that manage it. Today it is
different story in PurandarTahasil. Gram Gourav Pratishthan (GGP) and villager's realize the
importance of supporting each other in a successful management of water irrigation through water
conservation. Through this paper, the author wishes to introduce a successful project completion
report of water conservation in kumbharvalan village.
Gram Gourav Pratishthan (GGP) has been working for sustainable, equitable & integrated water
management (surface and groundwater) by the local community to stabilize and enhance the
agriculture - based economy and provide productive employment in the rural area. GGP has
implemented 54 small community lift irrigation schemes in TehasilPurandar of Pune district and
also in the tribal area of Junnar-Ambegaon-Khed of Pune district under tribal sub plan since 2004.
GGP has worked with neighboring villages around the training center at village Khalad Tal -
Purandar to develop a “Panchcroshi “model based on local resource mapping,(land, water,
energy), planning for food security for the local Community and marketable surplus with assured
price and gainful employment for the local youths through livelihood multi skill training.
Acute water shortage and drought situation was prevailing in the area since the year 2011. 2011
and 2012 were scarcity years due to scanty rainfall of less than 250mm. Kumbharwalan was
selected as the first village for the intervention and within couple of months, the project was
executed with local participation and could harvest the water in the coming monsoon to give relief
to the local community. Drinking water, water for farms, animals & fodder all could be assured.
Government is implementing integrated watershed development in 52 villages in Purunder
tahasil, and Kumbharwalan is one of it.
This is a good cost effective model in which storage capacity is maximized and the villagers have
ownership to this water harvesting work. GGP is also creating water literacy so villagers can do
crop planning according to water availablability.
159
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Eco-technology for betterment of community:
case study of Ecological restoration of Ahar River Udaipur
Pradnyesh Agre, Pallavi Patil, Sayali Joshi
SERI
Email : seriecotech@yahoo.co.in
Key words : ILBM, Green Bridge, Eco-restoration, Ahar River, Sustainable development
Ecological restoration of Ahar River in Udaipur and the subsequent improvement in the aquatic life
in Udaisagar Lake is a good ILBM impact leading to successful eco restoration of a dead river into
a living lotic system.
During the Eco-restoration of Ahar river, Udaipur (about 150 MLD) all the six pillars - policy,
institutions, finance, public participation, knowledge and technology- of Integrated Lake Basin
Management (ILBM) worked together to give sustainable solution to the community dependent on
the river for their livelihood. It was a first of its kind project of public participation with contribution by
professionals, industries and supported by government agencies to improve the quality of highly
polluted water due to domestic and industrial discharges.
Various studies on Lake Ecosystem pointed to the deteriorated status of Udaisagar and Ahar
River. Survival of aquatic organisms, especially fish, depends upon the level of dissolved oxygen
(DO) in water. The DO values once very good in Udaisagar now reduced to the alarming level and
there was no aquatic biodiversity. Low concentration of oxygen in lake water has created
anaerobic conditions. Further, the process of decay of organic matter releases the free carbon
dioxide and it causes depletion of oxygen which usually results in foul smell and fish mortality.
Biochemical oxygen demand, electrical conductivity, hardness, total phosphates, nitrates, chlorides,
sulphates, silicates and total alkalinity had also increased during the last 30 years. Excessive
growth of water hyacinth created many problems such as undesirable odor, taste and color. Water
was not suitable even for bathing purpose.
Implementation started with removal of aquatic weed water hyacinth mingled with non-
biodegradable plastic material at a selected point 10 km downstream of Udaipur by JSS in
association with Pune based Green Infrastructure. Six green bridges (horizontal eco-filtration) in-
situ ecological treatment systems with metal screen across the river were installed in the course of
river in a stretch of about 1.6 km. Green bridges were seeded with mixed bacterial cultures helpful
in treating organic and inorganic wastes and local green plants were grown to support the activity
of microorganisms symbiotically.
Eco-logical Restoration not only corrected water quality of Ahar River but simultaneously it
improved groundwater quality while establishing complete food chains in river ecosystem. This
resulted in better quality crops from the farms dependent on this river and increased fish quantity
and quality in Udaisagar Lake. This change is reflected in the livelihood of the community along the
river bank and downstream.
This ecological restoration work has strengthened the faith that appropriate network and timely
actions with thorough knowledge of ecology can result in Successful revitalization of lentic and
lotic systems & also promotes the healthy livelihood and sustainable development in ecosystem.
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A Socio-Technical Conference on Inclusive & Sustainable Social Development
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163
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Need based Technology Transfer for Seva –
A Jhabua Experience
1 2 3
Dr. S. M. Narulkar , Dr. Milind D. Dandekar , Harsh Chouhan
1 & 2 3
SGSITS, Indore, Shivganga Samagra Gram Vikas Parishad, Jhabua.
Email : shivgangajhabua@gmail.com
Key words : Tribal Society, Native Knowledge
Even after six decades of independence, the rural and tribal areas of our country are deprived of
basic amenities such as housing, drinking water and sustainable energy solutions.In spite of lot of
efforts by various governmental and non governmental agencies, the people have not been
benefited to the required extent for the want of appropriate technologies considering the need of
the individual places and communities. The major hurdle for this failure does not lie in financial or
socio-political reasons, but is attributed to the fact that the appropriate technologies were not
selected for find solutions. The mindset of the technocrats and scientist are preoccupied by certain
premises that “Technocrats and scientist are the best judges for identifying requirements of a
society” and “Requirements and Road map for development of all the societies is same”.
Moreover non participation of the stake holders particularly the local people in decision making &
implementation has further worsen the situation.
To overcome all these difficulties a new experiment was initiated in Jhabua district of Madhya
Pradesh by Shivganga Samagra Gram Vikas Parishad with the technical supports of the Shri
G.S.Institute of Technology & Science, Indore. In this participative model, the local tribal youths
were involved in the whole process beginning with identification of problems to the implementation
of solutions. These tribal youths identified water scarcity as their main problem. In this experiment
instead of imposing solution from outside an interactive and brain storming decision making
process was adopted. The native knowledge of the locals and the technical expertise of faculties
of SGSITS and field experts were blended in training and execution of the project. The maps and
drawings etc. were created on the black board or even on the ground surface in bilingual mode.
The execution work of creation and reconstruction of water bodies was carried out by local
villagers without any monitory return. The motivation model for this type of work comes through the
deep rooted value of 'Paramaartha' in tribal society. This model has resulted in construction of
hundreds of water bodies and water reliving structures including a few major ponds solely done by
the tribal villagers themselves. The Jhabua experience has depicted the strength of value based
knowledge system of the tribal societies and their capacity to adopt the modern technology for
development for all.
Sustainable Waste water Management in
Rural Punjab : Getting The Local Community Involved
Geetika Kalha, M. P. Singh
Life Improvement Foundation Chandigarh
Email : geetikakalha@gmail.com
Village Life Improvement Foundation helps directly and visibly those villages who want to help
themselves to start a bottom up process of modernization. Our focus is on integrated development
of basic infrastructure facilities such as – Clean drinking water, modern sanitation facilities and a
clean environment –to enable people live healthy and productive lives.

In most villages, wastewater flows into in the open, into ponds or nearby drains, polluting the
environment and attracting flies and filth which adversely affects health.
VLIF provides sewerage connection to each household , lay an underground sewerage system
using the Simplified Sewerage System , augments drinking water , concretes all streets , and has
adopted the DEWATS system of water treatment.
The simplified sewerage system allows for shallower and small bore pipes layout.
The Decentralized Wastewater Treatment (DEWATS), follows the age-old path of the water
moving towards ponds. Underground Anaerobic treatment with settler-cum-baffled-reactor at
crossroads or near existing ponds, followed by horizontal, subsurface, planted filter.
In this system both anaerobic and aerobic techniques are applied. Natural sewage treatment
processes are achieved by using methods that utilize the naturally occurring physical principles
combined with biological activities of microorganisms.
Components :
ŸPre-treatment and sedimentation in settlement tank or in septic tank : 30% reduction of BOD &
COD
ŸSecondary anaerobic treatment in baffled reactors 70% reduction.
ŸAerobic / anaerobic treatment in planted filter using the Vetiver System 85-90% reduction
Aerobic treatment in ponds: with Vetiverfloat.The clean environment in all the village improves
health and brings a sense of pride to the community. This is achieved with funds from the
community , the NRIs and the Punjab govt.
Impact : An independent impact assessment was done by the Punjab University to evaluate the
impacts on Social, Environmental and Health.
It has reported excellent results on all markers.
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SUB THEME
ENERGY
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INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
C. S. Solanki Localization of Solar Energy through Local Assembly, 169
Sale and Usage of One Million Solar Study Lamps
Dr. Vaibhav Tidke Solar Conduction Dryer 170
Prasad KulKarni Mini grids for remote village electrification 171
M. D. Pendse Development of Small and Micro Hydel Power in 172
Konkan Region of Maharashtra - Key to Sustainable
Rural Development
Mrs. Aparna Gondhalekar Garden Waste to Fuel Pellets 173
Smt. Alpana Vijaykumar Decentralized Waste Processing cum Power generation 174
system in Pune Urban Area
Mayur D. Sarode Household Electrification through solar energy in 175
rural and tribal region of India
Naresh Joshi Financial Viability of Solar Home Lights - A case study 176
by Aryavart Gramin Bank Up
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Localization of Solar Energy through
Local Assembly, Sale and Usage of
One Million Solar Study Lamps
This young
generation should be well-educated and well-trained for their personal as well as Nation's growth.
The concept of "localization" of solar energy is promoted wherein with the proper training and
workshops, solar study lamps will be assembled, serviced and distributed by the local people
themselves. They
C. S. Solanki
Department of Energy Science and Engineering, IIT Bombay
Email : chetanss@iitb.ac.in
Key words : Right to Education, LED, Solar Urja Lamps, MNRE, IP,
Can we guarantee light to EVERY child in the country?As per census 2011,approximately 350
million of total population comes below age 14, which means school going children.
The 'Right to Education' is successfully implemented by Govt. but 'Right to clean light' is also the
need of the time. Even today, more than 40% families in India use kerosene for lighting (census
2011). The Lack of electricity hampers young generation's growth, especially rural young.
If a student uses LED for lighting, he requires only 1 unit of electricity per year! Can't we supply
even this much of electricity? For that solar energy comes as the quickest, cheapest, and
economically viable and environment friendly solution. With this belief IIT Bombay has undertaken
a pilot project to provide 1 Million Solar Urja Lamp (SOUL) to these many students of the country. It
is only a start.
The solar lamps will be sold to students at subsidized price; as in remote rural areas every rupee
counts. The cost of the SOUL is planned to be shared by Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
(MNRE) through NCEF, state governments, philanthropic partners and beneficiary students.
will be the Institutional Partners (IP) of project. A network will be maintained with
local mobile and electrical shops as Repairing and Maintenance Partners to provide free repairing
of SOUL for the first two years of purchase. This will ensure long term sustainability of project
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Solar Conduction Dryer
Dr. Vaibhav Tidke, Dr. Shital Somani, Ashwin Pawade, Dr. Bhaskar Thorat
Science for Society (S4S) - Institute of Chemical Technology (ICT), Mumbai, India
Email : scienceforsociety@gmail.com
Key words : Solar Conduction Dryer, food dehydration, dehydrated fruits and vegetables
Solar conduction dryer (SCD) is solar powered food dehydrator for rural farmers, to reduce food
spoilage and generate additional income through preserved food. SCD removes water from fruits
and vegetables and increases their shelf life to 1 year. Widespread use of SCD will provide year
wise availability of food to all sectors of Indian population at affordable price and also open up
dehydrated fruit and vegetable market of Rs. 80,000 crore to Indian farmers.
SCD uses principles of conduction, convection and radiation to dehydrate material resulting into a
technology giving following features :
l
Totally electricity free operation resulting into zero operating cost
l
Reduction in capital cost by 3-5 times than conventional solar dryers
l
Modular system providing dryer that suits to individual farmer as well as food processing
industry
l
One of the highest drying efficiencies in world resulting into highest productivity for given
solar collector area
l
A system that can be easily assembled and dismantled and provides ease of transport
and installation
Unique features of SCD makes it ideally suitable for farmers and rural application area. 22 units of
SCD are serving to farmers across India for products covering vegetables, fruits, spices, fish and
sprouts.
Simplicity of transport, use, maintenance, modularity makes it unique and it brings recognitions for
SCD from UN, UNEP, University of Texas (USA), Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (USA). SCD
is developed and patented by Institute of Chemical Technology and is being marketed by Science
for Society.
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Mini grids for remote village electrification
Prasad Kulkarni, Sumeet Sutar, Kiran Auti
Gram Oorja Solutions Private Limited
Email : prasad@gramoorja.in
Keywords : Mini grid, Renewable energy, Solar photovoltaic, Distributed decentralized
generation, Off-grid electrification
The paper describes success story of mini grids based on renewable energy sources for remote
village electrification and case study of first mini grid installed by Gram Oorja Solutions Pvt Ltd.
along with Bosch Solar Energy AG.
Gram Oorja commissioned its first mini grid in the village Darewadi, in Junnar tehsil of Pune.. The
objective was to provide electricity to achieve basic hygiene, entertainment, mechanization,
employment generation & skill development.
The village consists of 40 households with the population of around 220. The mini grid is powered
by solar PV of capacity of 9.4 kWh. The capex was sponsored by Bosch Solar Energy AG as a pilot
project. The project is run by 'Vandev Gramodyog Nyas', and totally managed by the villagers. The
grid operates at normal 230 Volt, 50 Hz. It is running 24 x 7 since its commissioning in July 2012.
Roughly 70% of the total energy used is earmarked for productive uses like pump and flour mill.
Each consumer paid Rs. 1000/- to the trust as connection charge. Monthly average electricity bill
consumers pay is Rs. 130, typically benchmarked against kerosene which is a very expensive
source of lighting on a per unit basis.
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Development of Small and Micro Hydel Power
in Konkan Region of Maharashtra – Key to
Sustainable Rural Development
M. D. Pendse
Former Secretary, WRD GOM & President Hydro Power Association (India)
Email : mdpendse@hotmail.com
Key words : Seasonal Power, Micro Hydel Gen-sets, appropriate technology, community.
The Coastal Region of Maharashtra, popularly known as Konkan, is a part of Western Ghats. It is
endowed with rich bio diversity and has abundant water resources, dense forests, numerous river
basins consisting of hilly terrain and wealth of minerals. The judicious and sustainable planning of
these natural resources would guarantee a very bright future for Konkan region with wealth and
prosperity of the society.
The concept of seasonal Micro Hydel Development in Western Ghats of Maharashtra has been
first studied by the Author nearly three decades ago. In western ghats of Maharashtra there are
hundreds of such potential Small Hydro sites with head of 5 to 50 meters and flow rate of 0.1 to 1.5
cumecs. The rainwater is available in rivers for 150 to 180 days during monsoon.
The challenge for development planners for Konkan is that how to convert the abundant water
wealth, available every year, into rupees, for the overall financial, social, industrial development,
of the region. Use of the water resources has, therefore, to be judiciously planned in a
complementary manner, for agricultural production and through the input of Hydro Power, from
locally run Micro / Mini Hydro Power Stations.for domestic and industrial use.
The Small and Micro Hydel Power Stations are scattered over villages at remote places. They
play a key role in promoting agro based Industries in backward area and provide rural
employment. Mahatma Gandhi, the Father of Nation, has said “What India needs is not Mass
production but production by Masses”. The Micro Hydel Development helps to achieve this
objective of self sufficiency at rural level .
The paper deals with conceptual and operational aspects of this issue and offers the present day
constraints in development of Micro Hydel Power on large scale in Konkan, along with possible
remedies. It also describes, in brief, very commendable efforts by a few motivated engineers from
Konkan, who developed such Gen-sets locally and commissioned for community purposes in
their village.
The scientists and technologists have to accept the challenge of developing appropriate, cost
effective technology of manufacture and operation of the Micro Hydel Gen-sets. Concurrently the
government organisation should change their mindset and freely allow use of such Gen-sets by
farmers in Konkan, as a farmer uses a pump set elsewhere. Such an approach will work wonders,
once the Gen-sets become part of the rural life.
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Garden Waste to Fuel Pellets
Mrs. Aparna Gondhalekar, Mrs. Aditi Pathak
Gangotree Eco Technologies Pvt. Ltd.
Email : aparnagondhalekar@gmail.com
Key words : garden waste, fuel pellets, sustainable,energy, environment, replicable, green coal,
biomass stove
Disposal of Garden Waste is one of the critical challenges in disposal of waste. Though many
technologies have been tried like Biogas, Composting etc., the disposal still remains a challenge.
Gangotree Eco Technologies Pvt. Ltd. has a vision to develop Biomass based decentralized and
replicable energy solutions to help rural and urban areas to fulfill energy needs at low cost.
Gangotree proposes an ideal technical solution of converting 'Garden Waste' to 'Fuel Pellets' also
known as Green Coal.
Gangotree has developed a concept and a technology which is technically feasible, economically
viable, socially acceptable and environmentally sustainable, and provides productive solution to
Garden Waste Management. The concept is to manufacture Fuel Pellets from tree cuttings, grass
cuttings, leaf litter, tender coconut, coconut fronds, tree branches, etc. Fuel Pellets produced can
be used as cooking fuel. Gangotree also provide Biomass Cooking Stoves that utilizes these
pellets. These biomass stoves are smokeless, they can cook faster than conventional LPG. Fuel
pellets can substitute commercial LPG at almost half the cost.
The Pellet production process can be summarized in 5 steps: segregation of garden waste,
chipping or shredding of segregated waste, sun drying, fine shredding of dried material and
pelletization.
Fuel pellets are used for replacement of LPG, coal and oils used for industrial boilers or furnaces.
The total cost of pellet production is such that, by selling pellets, it can give a pay back of 2 years for
processing 1 ton of Garden Waste per day. We do not look at waste as nuisance but, as an Energy
Resource. Gangotree's value added technical process brings revenue rather than expenditure for
disposal; along with sustainable alternative for replacement of fossil fuel!
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Decentralized Waste Processing cum
Power generation system in Pune urban area.
Smt. Alpana Vijaykumar
Enprotech Solutions Bavdhan Pune -411021
Email : alpana.vijaykumar@gmail.com
Key words : Urban Waste, decentralised waste management, bio-methanation
Pune is one of the typical fast growing cities in India. The problem of collection and disposal of
urban waste within Pune is also characteristic to any other city. The solution implemented and put
in place by the Technology partners, the Municipal Corporation and NGO's to solve this problem is
unique and one of its kind which can be emulated and replicated.
Till 2010, almost entire municipal solid waste generated in the city was dumped without any
processing in the nearby village Devachi-Urali. The environmental and health hazards caused
were nightmarish and grave enough to create a public outcry.
The Pune pattern of solid waste management is to create a number of decentralized waste
processing plants producing electricity and manure by bio-methanation route. The electricity
generated is fed into the grid or used for street-lighting. Appointed NGOs do door to door
collection, segregation and transportation to local sites. A service charge is levied to households
and waste producers. This collection system has given livelihood for many under privileged, at the
same time improved hygiene in the city with safe working for waste pickers.
Salient features
l
12 Nos of 5 TPD each Wet Waste to Bio-gas plants processing units @1500 tons of wet
waste per year generating 300KWh of electricity and 150 tons of manure.
l
15 more units are under processing.
l
Organized training of the rag pickers to collect, segregate and transport the wastes.
l
Annual maintenance contract to technology provider.
l
Electricity generated is fed in MSEB grid or utilized for street lighting.
l
The manure is utilized in the municipal gardens and sold locally.
l
The Unit at Model colony in Pune achieved the distinction of ISO certification EN ISO
9001:2008
This presentation is about the experience, successes and problems during of the Pune pattern of
solid waste management for the past three years. While the success of the model has given
confidence to expand further, the operations of the existing plants have not been completely
devoid of teething problems in terms of public acceptability and sometimes operational and
technical glitches.
However over a period of three years, these problems have been ironed out and the system has
been as an established success story.
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Household Electrification through solar energy
in rural and tribal region of India
Mayur Damodar Sarode
Director, Renergize Planet Pvt. Ltd.
Sometimes it is hard to realize that basic access to clean energy has impacts that are multifold and
uplifts numerous poor families towards a higher quality of life. Some of these influences are
immediate while others are long term. Just a feeling of entering a well-lit home after a daylight work
of hard labor itself uplifts the moods of the people, one that cannot be quantified in terms of money.
Switching from dim-lit kerosene lights to LED lights itself can make a student study better and
infuse more confidence to regularly attend school. Lack of simple lighting forces many of the poor
to sacrifice on their existing skill sets like making pottery, embroidery etc. The reliability of four
hours of light in the evening or in early morning ushers in new opportunities for the poor, which
otherwise would have been spent in darkness on chores that are confined to non-productive
purposes.
Through solar technology it has been shown that there are solutions whose social impacts are
immense and are fundamental in building a truly holistic society: a society that is socially and
environmentally sustainable. The solutions take a bottom to top approach with need based
solutions (technology and finance) at the doorstep of the poor. Various success stories had
already proved that public goods like better health and electricity can be provided by
governments, private sector, NGOs if appropriate sustainable technologies, like solar are adapted
to local needs and conditions.
All these solutions have been tailor made according to the needs of the community or individual,
the most powerful way to eradicate poverty that emphasizes partnership and sustainability.
Decentralized energy approach to solutions has been a very important catalyst of bringing the
poor from informal citizens in the society to being formal. It's not just a light which comes into the
life of these people; it's the beginning of their upliftment towards the better health, education,
security and economic status in the society.
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Financial Viability of Solar Home Lights
A case study by Aryavart Gramin Bank UP
Naresh Joshi
Former Ban Manager Bank of India
E-mail : nkjoshi1948@gmail.com
Key Words : Gramin Bank, Solar Home Lights, business facilitators, Ashden award
The Aryavart Gramin Bank formulated a novel scheme for financial inclusion in remote
villages of Uttar Pradesh where electricity supply was not available or if available was erratic. The
villagers were dependent only on kerosene lamps for their lighting needs and often kerosene had
to be bought from black markets, which was affecting their incomes.
The scheme envisaged providing solar energy lights to the villages. The bank identified Tata BP
Solar, for providing 'Solar Home Lighting System' for the village homes. The company and the
dealer were ready to sacrifice their margins as the bank was agreeing to finance the system on a
large scale. The system costing Rs.13, 000/- consisted of a ready-to-use kit containing a 35 watt
solar panel, low maintenance battery, MCR charge controller and two luminaries. The system
could light two CFLs of 14 watt for more than 7 hours and could also support one mobile charger,
one table fan and a television.
The bank extended finance of around Rs. 10,000/- with Rs. 3,000/- as margin money to be
contributed by the beneficiary. The amount together with interest was to be repaid in 60 equated
monthly installments of approximately Rs.222 per month. This was much less than the amount
that the villagers had to spend for their kerosene requirement per month The bank had identified
literate village youths as business facilitators who were trained by the company for maintenance of
the systems. The bank is paying an honorarium of Rs.10,000 per annum to the business
facilitators for maintaining 100 such systems. The bank, provided Solar Home Lighting Systems to
more than 1,300 households in Unnao district and about 500 houses in Barabanki district.
The bank received Ashden award at the hands of Dr. Maathai & Prince Charles in the year 2007
SUB THEME
WASTE MANAGEMENT AND BIO DIVERSITY
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INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Bhau Katdare Conservation of Endangered Vultures in Kokan Region 179
Bhau Katdare Conservation of Olive Ridley turties in Maharashtra 180
Neha Phansalkar Tapping Eternity for Posterity : Restoration of 181
Sacred Groves
Mr. Sachin Kulkarni Livelihood Generation Through Decentralized 182
Municipal Waste Management System
Rahul Bakare Closing the Nutrient Loop - the Use of Human 183
Urine and Excreta as a Fertilizer
Shri. V. Ramakrishnan Green ways of Green Waste Management - 184
Biomethanation
Dr. Hemangee Jambhekar Value Added Fertiliser From Bio-gas Slurry 185
Manjushree Tadvalkar Sustainable Decentralized Solid Waster Management 186
Models and Case Studies
M. Subburaman Ecological Sanitation 187
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179
Conservation of Endangered Vultures
in Kokan Region
Bhau Katdare, Ramashish Joshi
Nisarg Mitra Mandal, Chiplun, Dist. Ratnagiri, 415605
e-mail: sahyadricpn@gmail.com
Key Words : Diclofenac, White Backed Vultures, nest conservation
A study shows that Diclofenac - a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) administered to
cattle becomes a cause of vulture deaths when they eat the flesh of such dead animals. This has
resulted in declining of vulture population by 90%. The ban on veterinary usage of this drug has not
trickled down in all villages.
In last few years, burial of dead cattle created food scarcity for vultures. In Konkan region White
Backed Vultures nests nest on coconut trees. The acidic effect of their droppings reduces the
coconut produce, which prompts the farmers to whisk away the vultures. Sahyadri Nisrag Mitra
SNM has been working on these three issues and creating awareness about the vulture
conservation. SNM has taken up the diclofenac issue with veterinarians and chemists to ensure
proper implementation of ban. Food scarcity problem was partially resolved through a vulture
restaurant at Sukondi in district Ratnagiri which dropped the rate of false incubation from 46% to
13% and increased the breeding success rate from 16% to 40%.
SNM's continuous follow up with the state government helped such coconut farmers to get
compensation for protecting the vultures to nest on their trees. SNM has undertaken periodic
monitoring of the vulture colonies at Anjarle in district Ratnagiri, Shrivardhan in district Riagad
through the network of local farm owners and labours.
Dedicated efforts, scientific methodologies and the right use of technology have been key
parameters of SNM's projects.
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Conservation of Olive Ridley turtles
in Maharashtra
Bhau Katdare, Ramashish Joshi
Sahyadri Nisarga Mitra, Chiplun
sahyadricpn@gmail.com
Key words : Marine Turtle Conservation, Olive Ridley, Eco-Tourism, Collaborative Conservation.
Turtle (Olive Ridley) conservation is being executed since the last 11 years in more than 48
villages along the720 Kms of Maharashtra's coast. Initial study of the Olive Ridley and poaching
related data clearly highlighted the declining state of their nesting grounds which would have
eventually resulted in the extinction of this species on the Konkan coast. Due to these frightening
facts SNM decided to take up this project. Three to four years of continuous field work through
turtle hatchery management during the nesting season and awareness camps throughout the
Konkan region resulted in substantially decreasing instances of poaching. Publishing the results
of this work through scientific journals, media and the related departments, helped in getting this
project funded by Forest Department, Environment Department of Maharashtra, UNDP and
various other organizations. Making the model sustainable through eco-tourism, readiness of
villagers to shoulder the conservation responsibility, monitoring and funding support given by
Forest Department are some of the success factors of the project. As of May 2013, 839 nests have
been conserved by SNM and 36,451 hatchlings have been released into the sea.
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181
Tapping Eternity for Posterity : Restoration
of Sacred Groves
Neha Phansalkar, Dr. Rajashree Joshi, Dr. D. K. Kulkarni
BAIF Development Research Foundation Pune 58.
Nehaphansalkar@baif.org.in,
Key word : Eco restoration, Sacred Grove , Ecosystem services
Sacred Groves in India, remains a tradition of local communities to reserve a patch of forest in the
name of God. This also demonstrates ways in which communities respect and care the Nature.
There are approximately 1600 sacred groves in the state of Maharashtra, mostly concentrated in
districts like Raigarh, Ratnagiri, Pune and Kolhapur. These have remained as natural ecosystems
having repositories of native biodiversity of the region. More importantly there are community
conserved areas thus linking local communities with conservation action.
These sites are facing numerous issues in the form of decreasing forest cover, disruption of
natural processes, washing off of top fertile soil, depletion of water resources , expansion of
agriculture and invasion by non native species, shrinking in size and problems of open grazing
etc. The role of sacred groves from the point of view of provision of multiple ecosystem services
also remains to be fully explored.
Against this backdrop, BAIF is pilot testing an approach of participatory ecological restoration of
two sacred grove sites in Jawhar and Junnar region. The work covers activities under three
components- Ecological survey, ecological restoration and Social Engineering.
These measures include- Plantation of native species, site specific soil and water conservation
measures, Zoning, Fencing, Development of buffer zone, Forest protection, creating of micro
habitats , setting in process of natural regeneration etc.
This piloting is supported by PRAJ Foundation and technical help is provided by Oikos-a firm
working for ecological services. This has shown a way to foster a PPP (Public, Private- Panchayat
Partnership ) for such environment and people friendly action.
Lot of useful insights have been generated through this piloting important one is that, various stake
holders like NGOs, CSRs, Forest department, Gramsabhas, Temple trust, Citizen's forums,
individual scientist need to get involved and contribute their bit in work of restoration.
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Livelihood Generation Through
Decentralized Municipal Waste Management System
Mr. Sachin Kulkarni
Janadhar Sewabhavi Sanstha, Latur
Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) in urban areas has become acute problem in
current years. Presently, most of the solid waste is dumped at landfill areas, most of which are not
operated scientifically. In future, land availability for creating scientific landfill will be difficult,
considering the costs of land. Hence there is need of solution which can help to manage solid
waste management in urban and semi urban areas.
Decentralized integrated municipal solid waste management may be one of the solutions which
can solve the problem of solid waste management as well as livelihood generation for waste
pickers.
Presently about 350 waste pickers are working with JanAdharSevabhavi Sanstha, Latur, in day to
day municipal solid waste management in the city of Latur. Each waste-picker collects waste from
household in segregated condition with the help of Ghanta-gadi. This will create clean wet waste,
which is being transformed into good quality compost, which has good salable value.
The dry waste collected during door to door waste collection, is being sold to the recyclers through
'SheshakKharediVikri Kendra' (i.e. remaining dry waste purchase-sell shop) run by the
organization of waste pickers. Especially glass, metal, hard plastic is sold to recyclers through this
system. Plastic carry bags were cleaned at collection center and transformed into plastic pallets
which are sold to recyclers as value added product. Such system is now implemented in municipal
councils of Ausa, Ahmedpur, Udgir&Umarga. The organization mainly works for those who are
deprived of basic needs such as food, cloths and shelter. The waste pickers associated with the
organization are mainly suffering from leprosy.
Preparation of value added products from municipal solid waste will provide respectable livelihood
to the people. One of the efforts in this line is, conversion of organic waste in Latur city into
briquettes using briquetting machine which will be used as fuel, instead of wood and coal.
Typically briquetting machine will utilize organic waste collected from 5 wards of Latur Municipal
Corporation, through 35 women waste pickers. There is direct employment for 50 waste pickers
through waste collection, processing of waste and manufacturing of briquettes. These briquettes
can be sold at commercial level at price of Rs. 4000/ton. The value addition has increased the
selling cost of products from waste, ultimately causing benefits to the waste collectors.
These efforts to prepare briquettes in decentralized manner, will restrict municipal waste from
dumping on landfill, vehicular pollution from transportation of waste from ward to landfill, and
create employment at local level. Thus, this project will tries to solve four problems of the society:
Employment, Energy, Economics and Environmental problems.
janadharsanstha@yahoo.co.in
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Closing the Nutrient Loop - the Use of Human
Urine and Excreta as a Fertilizer
Rahul Bakare
Arghyam
Email : rahul@arghyam.org
Increased population is putting stress on world's Food Production and hence increasing Poverty.
The use of chemical fertilizers have caused pollution of soil and water resulting into degradation of
soils and reduced food production.
The concentrated and nutrient rich excreta generated due to heavy urbanization has caused
serious environmental issues. On the other side the over dependence of farming on chemical
fertilizers has resulted into higher food costs, heavy energy inputs, commercial unviability, loss of
biological diversity, loss of quality of soils and hence the reduced yields. This asymmetry of
demand and supply can be solved through using right sanitation technology, transport, treatment
and application of excreta for enhanced food security.
In its quest to close the nutrient loop locally Arghyam supported University of Agricultural Sciences
(UAS), Bangalore for a project on'Utilisation of Anthropogenic wastes for Agricultural purposes'.
The UAS has successfully developed protocol on frequency and quantity of application of human
urinefor various crops and vegetables like, Banana, Maize, Tomato, Ash Gourd, Ladies Finger,
French bean, Radish, Brinjal, Ragi, Potato etc.
Various permutations and combinations of human urine, cow urine, chemical fertilizers, etc. were
tried out in lab and field trials. The application of human urine resulted into superior crop
performance in terms of growth parameters and yield attributes like pods/plants, pod length, pod
yield, plant height, leaf size etc. Use of Human urine was found to be more cost effective,
economical and yielded better production of vegetables. Higher organic carbon content and soil
biota were found with human urine application.
Advanced sanitation technologies such as Ecosan was tried out by farmers to segregate urine and
used it to fertilize their farms. On site excreta management and disposal technologies such as
Honey suckers, were tried out as a solution for fast urbanization and closing the nutrient loop for
per-urban farming.
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Green ways of Green waste Management -
Biomethanation
Shri. V. Ramakrishnan
Vivekananda Kendra – NARDEP
With cooking fuel gases sky-rocketing de-centralized domestic energy solutions are gaining
importance. Shakti Surabhi is one such decentralized women-centric backyard energy producing
plant. This is a Biomethanation plant developed by Vivekananda Kendra – Natural Resources
Development Project (VK-nardep). The plant produces cooking gas from kitchen & vegetable waste.
This is a living system which is essentially based on the functioning of a stomach with methogenic
bacteria initially derived from cattle dung, produces methane from starch as well as fat rich
material of domestic kitchen waste. The waste can be mixed with water after crushing before
feeding to the plant. About 5 kg of kitchen waste is required for 1 cum. plant. Apart from the blue
flame for cooking, the slurry coming out from the outlet can be used as manure. The gas generated
will have 60 - 70% methane, 5 to 10% water vapour (moisture) and the balance is CO .
2
The plant is designed in such a way that it can efficiently tolerate underfeeding but its performance
will be affected by overfeeding.
Community Bio-Methanation Plant
A scaled up Bio-Methanation plant, becomes community-solution for waste management.
Mamallapuram town panchayat, in Tamil Nadu, is an internationally renowned tourist area with its
thousands of years old shore cave temple sculptures. Even though the town has only a moderate
population of about 12,400 with only 400 households, it generates a huge volume of organic waste
– mainly kitchen waste from various hotels and restaurants because of floating population of
tourist.
Every day the kitchen waste amounting to more than 550 ~ 600 kg is collected. The 100 cum plant
has a floating drum of FRP with a water jacket. The biogas plant is attached to the Gen-set having
a H S scrubber specially designed for 100 percent biogas. Today the Gen-set generates 10 KW of
2
electricity from the waste.
The plant design is recognized by Ministry for New and Renewable Energy, Government of India.
This is a plant suitable for both rural and urban use. The domestic design comes in both fixed and
portable model. It's easy to manage and can withstand relatively short periods of non-feeding like
from 15 – 20 days, which means even if the family has to go for a tour, on returning the plant can
function.This small plant thus has a huge potential to change the energy scenario of India in her
domestic backyard – in a very literal s
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Value Added Fertiliser From Bio-gas Slurry
Dr Hemangee Jambhekar,
Vasumitra Life Energies Pvt Ltd, Pune.
Bio Gas is becoming popular as the best energy source, as well as its slurry has good fertilizer
value. However, it is not becoming popular and adopted easily as an alternative source of energy
thanks to its very high establishment cost.
At VASUMITRA we have worked on converting biogas slurry into very good value added fertilizer,
so that bio gas technology not only become cost effective,but profitable.
Bio gas slurry is mixed with rock phosphate and blended with herbal extract for solublisation of
phosphate. In this way Phosphate Rich Organic Manure (PROM) is developed having combination of
P and Organic Carbon.
PROM has been proven as the best substitute for chemical phosphate fertilizer. 2 MT of PROM
can be prepared from 1 MT of gas slurry
Comparison between D.A.P., S.S.P. and PROM
Contents :
Particulars D.a.p. S.s.p. Prom (samved
Humiphos)
% of Phosphate 46.0% 16.0% 10.4%
% of Nitrogen 18.0% 0.0% 0.0%
% of Calcium 0.0% 0.0% 6.0%
% of Silica 0.0% 0.0% 8.0%
Usability and Costing :
PARTICULARS D.A.P. S.S.P. PROM (SAMVED HUMIPHOS)
Weight of bag (kg) 50.00 50.00 40.00
Weight of Phosphate (kg) 23.00 8.00 4.16
Weight of Nitrogen (kg) 9.00 - -
Weight of Calcium (kg) - - 2.40
Weight of Silica (kg) - - 3.20
Fixation of Phosphate 70% 70% 0%
Weight of Fixed Phosphate 16.10 5.60 -
Total Available Phosphate 6.90 2.40 4.16
Rate Per Bag 1,250.00 400.00 510.00
Cost per kg of Phosphate 78.62 166.67 52.25
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Sustainable Decentralized Solid Waste
Management Models and Case Studies
Manjsuhree Tadvalkar, NutanBhajekar, Neha Singh
Know How Foundation-Inora, Inora.india@gmail.com,
www.inoraindia.com
Universally waste management in urban scenario is very challenging due to the increasing
quantum of waste generated, non availability of scientific landfill facility required for the treatment
of MSW, lack of master planning, area, transportation, logistics, labour required for the processing
and the cost involved in all of the above is not sustainable. Most contributing factor for making the
process un sustainable is un-segregated waste which makes treatment processes like Bio
methanation and composting difficult.
At source segregation of waste and processing in decentralized manner is the only sustainable
solution. Know How Foundation-Inora has developed of simple low cost yet scientific methods
for biowaste conversion . The said methods are simple for adoption and are cost effective.
This paper presents case studies for the unique techniques of “City Farming, Garden from waste,
Aerobic & Vermicomposting” methodologies developed fordecentralised waste management.
For technological handholding we have established-
· Satellite Centres in cities for awareness & demonstration of city farming, vermicomposting,
composter planters
· Organic gardeners clubs
· Social entrepreneurs to provide service for Planning, Setup, Monitoring, Training and
Awareness of Decentralised Waste Management.
· Integrated vermi technology course to train Master Composters and City farmers
· Women farmers training for agro-waste and household waste composting and use in
farming
All above methods vary in implementation design, employ different approaches with the common
factor of treating waste at the point of generation, in eco friendly manner. The review examines the
impact and potential of all the methods employed. . The results and effects of each of methods
employed are significantly more positive than treating waste in centralized manner.
The main opportunities are in creating social awareness, developing sustainable business
models out of the waste management sectorand strategic planning and policy development, for
decentralized waste management before MSW becomes unmanageable.
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Ecological Sanitation
M. Subburaman
No: 40,Ramalinga Nagar, West Extension Part II, Trichy – 620 003.
e-mail: scopeagency1986@gmail.com
According to studies conducted by the Department of Drinking Water and Sanitation (DDWS)
Government of India and World Health Organization, 60% of the people in India do not have
access to toilets and are resorting to Open Defecation. Open defecation leads to serious health
and environmental hazards.
Of the number of toilets in the country 30 percent are dysfunctional The existing models of toilets
namely pit latrines, septic tank & underground drainage systems are all having serious limitations.
They are all water centered requiring use of 10 litres of precious water for every use. A country
facing severe water shortage cannot afford to popularize the water centered toilets. In this context
Ecosan Urine Diversion and Dehydration Toilet (UDDT) acquires a critical role in providing a safe
and hygienic toilet system which will protect water sources of the country from pollution, save
enormous quantities of water, save environment and help us recover and reuse the rich nutrients
in human waste (Urine and faeces).
Scope is the pioneer in the field of Ecosan in the country and is working with Government of India,
9 State Governments, UNICEF, WHO, International and National funding agencies, and is
technical consultant of public sector Bharat Dynamics Limited, Hyderabad for its CSR programmes.
It has built the first Ecosan community toilet in the country in 2005, conducted research on urine
and compost with National and International organizations with funding from Indian and Overseas
agencies, is Key Resources Center of the DDWS and awarded the Nirmal Gram Puraskar for the
best NGO in the country from the President of India.
An Ecosan UDDT is an onsite toilet. It has three collection systems and two outlets fixed on the
squatting slab or Mounted toilet. Urine, faeces and washwater are collected separately. The toilet
is so designed that urine from the urine bowl through a pipe is collected outside the toilet and is
used for raising a vegetable garden. The washwater from the wash bowl is sent through a pipe and
passed through a filter bed outside the toilet and helps irrigate the kitchen garden.
The human faecesare collected in a chamber via the drophole in the squatting slab. The human
faeces consists 80% of water and 20% of the nutrients in the food we eat. The faeces through the
dropholeare collected in a chamber built with cement flooring and brick walls on all four sides so
that it will not come into contact with outside air water or soil. A small quantity of ash is applied over
the faeces after defecation. The ash acts both as a dehydration agent and disinfectant. This
prevents any foul smell emanating in the chamber. After one year the human faeces is converted
into an excellent soil conditioner which will promote higher farm productivity and production.
An Ecosan toilet consists of two separate chambers. One chamber will get filled up in about one
year for a family of five persons. When the first chamber is full it is sealed and the second chamber
is used. By the time the second chamber is full the faeces in the first chamber is ready to be taken
out for use in farming. Thus the Ecosan toilet collects, confines and converts potentially deadly
human faeces into a safe usable compost.
Urine is an excellent liquid fertilizer. It is collected separately in the UDDT and is used for raising
crops after dilution.
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Innovations by R & D Institutions
with Social Relevance
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INDEX
Author Theme Page
No.
Vinoth Balasunder CSIR-800 : The Science for Society Program 191
Dr. Prabhakar Ingle Gram Vigyan Kutir of CSIR-NCL 193
Smt. Smita S. Mule S&T Based Rural Inclusive Developemt Programme 200
Vishvas M. Kulkarni BARC's Banana Tissue Culture Know-How for Rural India 202
Dr. P. B. Kale A Gandhian approach for Sustainable Rural Economic 203
development through innovative approaches in
Rural Industrialisation
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CSIR-800 : The Science for Society Program
Vinoth Balasunder, PG Rao and E Desa
Email : vbian1020@gmail.com
Genesis :
In over 600 villages across India, CSIR has initiated a program expanding on its earlier successes
of technology out-reach for communities at the base of the economic pyramid. The last decade
saw scientists from 26 CSIR laboratories spread across the country involved in various out-reach
projects that created measureable impacts on incomes of farmers & artisans (leather, ceramics,
and wealth from waste) and on the quality of their lives through the provision of potable water from
a variety of polluted sources (arsenic, fluoride, iron, and high sedimentation).
Strategy :
CSIR's earlier societal interventions were successfully made in 105 villages, mostly outreaching a
single technology. Building on these successes, the 12 Plan formulated an integrated program,
CSIR-800, to create 'critical mass' by bringing all appropriate CSIR technologies to address the
needs of communities in some 30 clusters located in backward districts, each cluster comprising
some 5000 to 10,000 households. We expect to address the needs of about 1 million target
beneficiaries below the poverty line through appropriate technologies. Essentially the program will
act as a technologies' incubator in these communities' with the final vision of :
l
Augmenting incomes of the target group by :
3 Creating new business opportunities, with environmentally sustainable technological
interventions, for budding entrepreneurs in local communities;
3 Developing the capacity of entrepreneurs through skill development and training in aspects
of small business enterprises;
3 Providing entrepreneurs with end-to-end business plans; and
l
Improving the quality of lives of the target group by:
3 Providing potable drinking water in water-scarce regions;
3 Dignifying rural women through access to sanitation; and
3 Improving food security in the TECHVILs
3 Providing eco-friendly S&T intervention solutions that remove drudgery.
Implementation plan and First results
The 7 point implementation plan given below is being followed in all the TECHVILS:
1. Informal walk-about in the villages to gain first-hand idea of the needs of each village.
2. Augmenting first hand information with district level information on needs, maping these needs
to technologies, and implementing the technologies.
3. Appointing local project coordinators between community entrepreneurs and technologies.
Constructing a cottage (Gram Vigyan Kutir)to outreach technologies in village clusters.
4. Selecting implementing partners from among respected NGO/SHG/state agencies to rollout
the technologies.
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5. Conducting a Needs Assessment survey to map the initial economic status of the TECHVIL so
that quantitative livelihood improvements can be reported.
6. Bringing on-board NGOs to outreach complementary projects such as greening, sanitation,
smokeless cooking, and health awareness.
7. Bringing on-board corporate CSR projects to the TECHVILS thus enhancing the impact of
technology efforts.
First results on the 7 point implementation plan show that the first hand information in most of the
600 villages has been collected and augmented with data received from district offices.
Community discussions have been conducted with village communities and Gram Panchayat
members to further refine the definition of the needs of the community. Based on these
interactions, identified technologies are being brought from different CSIR labs to the villages. A
prototype needs assessment survey was tested in many of the TECHVILS. We have also created
10 cross-cutting themes that generally reoccur in the TECHVILS and set up teams to offer the best
advice across different agro-climatic zones and water polluted areas.
Partnerships
The long term plan is for the CSIR-800 program to provide leadership in the TECHVILS during the
12 Plan, and to simultaneously create enabling platforms for a variety of like-minded entities to
contribute in the TECHVILS beyond the 12 Plan. In other words we are looking at sunset clause
from CSIR-Led to CSIR-enabled. We are in discussion with some corporates and NGOs and take
the opportunity of this conference to invite like-minded organizations to partner with us in this
venture.
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Gram Vigyan Kutir of CSIR-NCL
Dr. Prabhakar K. Ingle
Head, Publication & Science Division
National Chemical Laboratory Pune
Email : pk.ingle@ncl.res.in
Various CSIR (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) Labs over last six decades have
developed technologies that could be useful for rural sector. These technologies are grouped
under the categories such as: Food and Agro-based Technologies, Building and Construction
Technologies, Drinking Water, Environment and Sanitation, Cultivation and Processing of
Economic Plants, and Cottage and small Industries.
CSIR has resolved to reach out to the weaker sections of the society through the CSIR-800
programme. The Gram Vigyan Kutirs are being established by the laboratories to disseminate
appropriate technology solutions and typical technological assistance. CSIR-NCL is setting-up
Gram Vigyan Kutir in Wada Block in Tribal belt of Thane District of Maharashtra. This Gram Vigyan
Kutir will be focusing on Value added Agriculture, Waste to Wealth, Energy efficiency, Low cost
housing, Affordable healthcare, Potable Water supply, Sustainable energy, Means of protecting
environment, etc.
As per the 2011 census the population of state of Maharashtra is: 11,23,74,333 (9.3%). The SC
population constitutes 11.8 % with Akola 20.1%, Latur 19.6%, Washim 19.2% and Nanded 19.1%
as leading districts.The ST population constitutes 9.4% with Nandurbar 69.3%, Gadchiroli 38.7%,
Dhule 31.6% and Nashik 25.6%.
There are 35 Districts in the State and the tribal population is largely concentrated in the western
hilly Districts of Dhule, Nandurbar, Jalgaon, Nashik and Thane and the eastern forest districts of
Chandrapur, Gadchiroli, Bhandara, Gondiya, Nagpur, Amravati and Yavatmal.
Thane District population constituted 9.84 percent of total Maharashtra population and is tenth
district by ST Population. Some of the blocks of Thane districts has as high as 91% of tribal
population (Dahanu, 65%; Talasari, 89%; Jawhar, 90%, Mokhada, 91%; Wada, 53%; Vikramgad,
90%).
Maharashtra Industrial Policy 2013 classifies Jawhar, Mokhada, Talasari, Wada and Vikramgad
blocks in Group D+ (Group D+ denotes the least developed areas). CSIR-NCL has planned to set-
up the GVK in tribal belt (Wada Block) of Thane district.
The technologies listed below give the idea about the work by the laboratories:
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Food and Agro-Based Technologies
l
Cereals And Pulses
1. Bread Manufacture
2. Energy Food
3. High-Protein Bun
4. Integrated Mini Wheat Mill
5. Jowar Flakes
6. Mini Grain Mill
7. Mini Maize Mill
8. Mini Rice Mill
9. Multipurpose Food
10. Nutritious Rusk
11. Papad Press
12. Parboiled Paddy
13. Paushtik Atta
14. Ready Mix For Payasam
15. Ready Mixes For Savouries
16. Ready Mixes For Sweetmeats
17. Rice Bran Stabilization
18. Rice Flakes
19. Rice Husking-Cum-Oil Extraction System
20. Simple Pulse Dehusking
21. Sugar-Free Cup Cake
22. Versatile Dal Mill
23. Weaning Food: Balahar
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Fruits And Vegetables
1. Apple Cider
2. Apricot Leather
3. Brine Stored Morel
4. Bulk Storage Of Cherry
5. Chilli Sauce
6. Dehydrated Fruits And Vegetables
7. Dehydrated Oyster Mushroom
8. Drumstick Powder
9. Dry Apricots
10. Fruit Bar
11. Fruit Squash And Syrup
12. Fruit Toffee
13. Ginger Preserve And Candy
14. Grape Raisin
15. Improved Jaggery Production
16. Instant Pickle
17. Jam, Jelly And Marmalade
18. Maraschino Cherry
19. Modified Atmosphere Packaging Of
Vegetables
20. Osmo-Air Dried Fruits
21. Papain
22. Pickle And Chutney
23. Pomegranate Aril Extractor
24. Potato Products
25. Ready-To-Serve Fruit Beverage
26. Sugarcane Beverage
27. Tomato Products
28. Tutti-Fruity
29. Upgraded Tart Apple Juice
30. Vinegar
31. Wax Emulsion For Fruits And Vegetables
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1. Anardana
2. Bleached Dry Ginger
3. Compounded Asafoetida
4. Dehydrated Green Pepper
5. Drying Of Red Chilli
6. Garlic Powder
7. Ginger Powder
8. Iodised Salt
9. Kokum Powder
10. Mustard Powder
11. Natural Food Colours And Dyes
12. Pepper Products
13. Saffron Processing
14. Spice Powders
15. Spice Oleoresins
16. Tamarind Powder
17. Turmeric: Curing And Polishing
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Nuts And Oilseeds
1. Beneficiation Of Sunflower Seeds
2. Cashewnut Decorticator
3. Coconut Cream
4. Confectionery Grade White Sesamum
Spices And Condiments
CSIR Technologies for Rural Sectors
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5. Dehulled Sesame Seed
6. Desiccated Coconut
7. Detection Of Butter Yellow In Mustard Oil
8. Detoxification Pads For Groundnut Oil
9. Modern Oil Expeller
10. Peanut Chikki
11. Portable Oil Iodine Value Meter
12. Soy Protein Chewy Candy
13. Walnut Processing System
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1. Animal Feed
2. Animal Feed From Apple Pomace
3. Cattle Licks
4. Egg Preservation
5. Ensiled Rumen Feed
6. Ham And Bacon
7. Meat Gravy Concentrate
8. Meat Pickles
9. Poultry Dressing
10. Suasage Casings
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Farming
1. Artemia Culture
2. Biofertilisers
3. Button Mushroom Cultivation
4. Field Usable Ph Meter
5. Grain Storage Bin
6. Liquid Seaweed Fertilizer
7. Mussel Culture
8. Oyster Mushroom Cultivation
9. Paddy Thresher-Cum-Winnower
10. Portable Grain Moisture Meter
11. Portable Soil Salinity Tester
12. Quail Farming
13. Rabbit Farming
14. Sea Cage Fish Culture
15. Sericulture
16. Soil Specific Ion Analyser
Building and Construction Techonologies
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Bricks
1. Brick Manufacture: Semi-Mechanised
2. Brick Moulding Table
Poultry And Meat
3. Bricks From Black Soils
4. Bricks From Marine Clays
5. Bricks From Red Soils
6. Bricks From Saline / Alkaline Soils
7. C-Brick
8. Flyash-Clay Bricks
9. Flyash-Sand-Lime Bricks
10. High Draught Brick Kiln
11. Semi Automatic Pneumatically Operated
Wire Cutting Table.
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1. Concrete Block Making Machine
2. Hollow Clay-Flyash Block
3. Hollow Concrete Block
4. Mud Block Making Machine
5. Solid Concrete Block
6. Solid Stone Block
7. Stabilized Mud Block
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Tiles
1. 2.3.3 Terracotta Tiles
2. 2.3.4 Flooring & Wall Tiles
3. Clay Tiles
4. Doubly Curved Tiles
5. Imitation Granite Tiles
6. Matt Glazed Tiles
7. Self Glazed Tiles
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Cementitious Binders
1. Activated Lime Pozzolana Mixture
2. Masonry Cement From Industrial Waste
3. Multi-Blend Cement
4. Red Mud Cementitious Binder
5. Rice Husk Hydaulic Pozzolana
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Compositers/Particle Boards
1. Banana Fabric Polymer Composite
2. Coconut Husk Particle Board
3. Coir-Cement Board
4. Coir-Cnsl Board
5. Fibrous Gypsum Plaster Board
Blocks
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6. Glass Reinforced Gypsum Composite
7. Medium Density Fibre Board
8. Polycoir
9. Wood Substitutes From Red Mud
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1. Beneficiation Of Phosphogypsum
2. Hydrated Lime
3. Lime Manufacture
4. Plaster Of Paris
5. Pollution Mitigation In Lime Kilns
6. Sintered Flyash Aggregates
7. Solar Timber Seasoning Kiln
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Precast Building Components
1. Coconut Shell Panel System
2. Ferro – Concrete Arched Panels
3. Fire Retardant For Thatch Roofing
4. Kulhar Panel System
5. Non Erodable Mud Plaster
6. Plinth Protection Of Mud Walls
7. Precast Rc Filler Slab
8. Precast Thin Lintel
9. Precast ‘L’ Panel
10. Precast Concrete Panel System
11. Precast Cored Unit
12. Precast Rc Plank And Joist
13. Precast Thin Ribbed Slab
14. Precast Waffle Unit
15. Prefab Brick Panel System
16. Prefab Jack-Arch Panel
17. Recast Rc Channel Unit
18. Small Brick Panel And Concrete Joist
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Roofing Planks And Sheets
1. Clay-Concrete Roofing Plank
2. Ferrocement Roofing Element
3. Sisal Fibre-Cement Roofing Sheet
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Other Building Components
1. Clay Pipe
2. Ferrocement Door/Window Frame
3. Ferrocement Wall Unit
Other Building Materials
4. Frameless Door And Window Fixture
5. Water Proofing Composition For Masonry
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1. Balli Skeleton System
2. Brick Masonry In Mud Mortar
3. Brick Skeleton System
4. Concrete Skeleton System
5. Grouted Reinforced Brick Masonry
6. Integrated Thin Wall And Column System
7. Kitchen Chimney
8. Mini Grouted Pile
9. Pedestal Pile
10. Power Trowel
11. Rapid Brick Laying Device
12. Rapid Repair Of Concrete Structures
13. Tamping Machine For Terracing
14. Timber Skeleton System
15. Un-Reinforced Pyramidal Roof
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Shelters
1. Cattle Shed
2. Cyclone Resistant Core Units
3. Design For Primary Health Centres
4. Design For Primary Schools
5. Design For Solar Heating In Hill
Shelters
6. Design For Ventilation And Lighting In
Rural Shelters
7. Houses For Earthquake Prone Areas:
Karnkuti
8. Houses For Earthquake Prone Areas:
NandKuti
9. Houses For Flood Prone Areas
10. Instant Shelter For Disaster Relief
11. Low Cost Houses In Hills
12. Poultry Shed
13. Ultra Low Cost House
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Rural Roads
1. Rural Road Network: Planning
2. Rural Roads: Construction
3. Rural Roads: Tractor Based Construction
4. Soil Stabilization For Road Construction
Building Systems
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Drinking Water
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Water Supply
1. Artificial Recharge Of Groundwater
2. Fc Water Storage Tank
3. Ground Water Prospecting
4. Pedal Pump
5. Rain Water Harvesting
6. Rejuvenation Of Clogged Borewells
7. Watershed Development
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Water Purification
1. Arsenic Removal From Water
2. Bacteria/Chemical Free Water Pot: Amrit
Kumbh
3. Desalination Of Brackish Water By
Electrodialysis
4. Desalination Of Brackish Water By
Reverse Osmosis
5. Drip Chlorinator For Wells
6. Electronic Water Disinfection Pot : Bact-
O-Kill
7. Hand Pump Attachable Iron Removal
Plant
8. Multipurpose Domestic Water Filter
9. Pot Chlorinator For Wells
10. Slow Sand Water Filter
11. Terracotta Water Filtration Disc: Terafil
12. Water Defluoridation: Nalgonda Technique
13. Water Defluoridation: Electrolytic Technique
14. Water Filter Candle
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Water Quality Assessment
1. Digital Water Turbidity Meter
2. Field Kit For Iron Analysis
3. Portable Nitrogen And Phosphorus
Measuring System
4. Rapid Bacteriological Aqua Tester
5. Rapid Chemical Aqua Tester
6. Titrimetric Water Analysis Kit
7. Wat er Test Ki t For Chemi cal /
Bacterological Quality
Environment and Sanitation
1. Disinfection of Sewage Water
2. Disposal Of Domestic Waste Water
3. Disposal Of Street Water
4. Dual Flushing Cistern
5. Fc Septic Tank
6. Hand-Flush Water-Seal Pit Latrine
7. Low Cost Latrine
8. Red Clay Sanitaryware
9. Single Stack Drainage System
10. Stone Sanitaryware
Cultivation and Processing
of Economic Plants
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Aromatic Plants
1. Celery
2. Cinnamon
3. Citronella
4. Clary Sage
5. Clocimum
6. CymbopogonNardus
7. Eucalyptus
8. Geranium
9. Hops
10. Jamrosa
11. Lavender
12. Lemongrass
13. Menthol Mint
14. OcimumCanum
15. Palmarosa
16. Patchouli
17. Peppermint
18. Vetiver
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Medical Plants
1. Ashwagandha
2. Asparagus
3. Bhumyamalaki
4. Brahmi
5. Chamomile
6. Kalmegh
7. Mandookparni
8. Medicinal Yam
9. Opium Poppy
10. Pyrethrum
11. Quinghaosu
12. Sarpagandha
13. Shatavari
14. Solanum Khasianum
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1. Damask Rose
2. Gladiolus
3. Lily
4. Marigold
5. Tulip
Other Economic Plants
1. Annatto
2. Bamboo Nursery
3. Betelvine
4. Energy Plantations
5. JatrophaCurcas
6. Jojoba
7. Pilu
8. Seaweed
9. Tea Husbandry
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Miscellaneous
1. Biotech Approach For Reclaiming Mined
Lands
2. Distillation System For Essential Oils
3. Herbal Deodorant Detergent
4. Herbal Mosquito Repellent Coil
5. Low Cost Greenhouse
6. Menthol Production
7. Plant Tissue Culture
8. Water Hyacinth: Cellulase Production
Cottage and Small Industries
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Leather Processing
1. Buff Softie And Upholstery Leather
2. Carcass Utilisation
3. Enzymatic Dehairing Of Skins
4. Finished Leather From Wet Blue Chrome
5. Improved Tool Kits For Leather Artisans
6. Leather Footwears
7. Leather Tanning Through Drum System
8. Leathergoods
9. Milled Grain Side Leather
10. Recovery Of Used Common Salt
11. Sheep Nappa Leather
12. Upgradation Of Lower Leather Ends
Floral Plants
13. Wet Blue Chrome Tanning
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1. Black Pottery
2. Blue Pottery
3. Bone China Procelein
4. Glazed Terracotta Crockery & Handicrafts
5. Pottery Onewheel
6. Queen Pottery Kiln
7. White Stoneware Crockery
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Metal Working
1. Bell-Metal DokraArtefacts
2. Brassware
3. Cast Iron Alloy For Farm Tools
4. Fishing Hooks
5. Gold Plating Solution
6. Mini Cupola Furnace
7. Rural Blacksmithy Package
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Energy
1. Biogas From Garbage
2. Biomass-Fired Bakery Oven-Bukhari-
Drier
3. Domestic Briquette Fuel
4. Multi-Fuel Cookstove
5. Softcoke-Fired Cookstove
6. Solar Water Heater
7. Wood-Fired Ceramic-Lined Cookstove
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Fibres
1. Banana Fibre And Products
2. Coir Rope
3. Natural Fibre Yarn
4. Sisal Fibre Handicrafts
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Stationery
1. Adhesive For Corrugated Boxes
2. Carbon Paper
3. Coloured Wax Crayons
4. Gum Adhesive
5. Gummed Paper Tape
6. Hand Made Paper
7. Low-Dust Chalk
Pottery
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8. Paper Slate
9. Plastic Slate
10. Printing Ink
11. Seaweed Greeting Cards
12. Synthetic Stationery Adhesive
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1. Bioplates And Leaf Cup Machine
2. Button Hole Making
Miscellaneous
3. Floral Crafts
4. Ornamental Fish Aquarium
5. Rice Bran Wax
6. Shoe Polish
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S&T Based Rural Inclusive
Development Programme
Smt. Smita S. Mule
Principal AKRUTI Co-ordinator,
Technology Transfer & Collaboration Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre,
Trombay, Mumbai-400085
E-mail : smule@barc.gov.in / akruti@barc.gov.in
BARC working in high-tech area not only uses its knowledge base for benefit of industry alone but
also for the larger weaker community base in rural sectors through a structured programme called
“AKRUTI-KRUTIK-FORCE” formulated and being implemented by BARC for techno-economic
growth of the rural sector to derive technology enabled societal benefits. 'AKRUTI' is an acronym
for 'Advanced Knowledge and RUral Technology Implementation' initiative from locals. This
programme has been worked out to compliment, supplement and augment the efforts of all
existing similar programmes of different organisations, departments and ministries. AKRUTI
programme will enable to take the fruits of technology to grass-root level to every villager in the
remote corner and provide inclusive growth to the rural sector and tap the hidden innovative
capability of large rural population.
The programme is designed to create structured and scalable network of technology nodes in
rural areas providing easy access to modern technologies to all villagers in their own villages.
Through this programme an AKRUTI is set up in a village for technology demonstration and
deployment under the guidance of BARC, through technically oriented manpower working in that
village. AKRUTI houses technologies for use by villagers.These technologies are demonstrated
and taken to different villages around AKRUTI via working centres established in different villages
called KRUTI Kendra viz. KRUTIK acronym for 'Knowledge & RUral Technology Implementation
Kendra which works with villagers and farmers' groups and deploy these technologies in their own
villages and in the fields. These technology users groups are known as FORCE meaning
Farmers' Organised group for Rural Creative Entrepreneurship. Each member of FORCE group is
made familiar with technologies of AKRUTI through KRUTIK. AKRUTI and KRUTIKs will be
managed by technology oriented villagers in the village. All the activities are carried out by
villagers under the guidance of BARC-DAE scientists and engineers.
BARC has demonstrated the feasibility of this programme by setting more than 10 AKRUTIs in
villages in different states and making them operational with the help of rural manpower.
Technologies deployed through AKRUTI programme are mainly in the area of water, agriculture,
organic farming and agro processing. Implemented technologies in villages are 'Water Filter'
without electricity for bacteria free clean drinking water, Soil Testing Kit for detection of Organic
Carbon content of the soil on field by farmer himself, Vibro Thermal Disinfestor and Foldable Solar
Dryer for agriculture produce, new mutant seeds for sowing, promoting organic farming and
renewable energy through advanced biogas plant called 'NISARGRUNA', consultancy in Isotope
Hydrology for underground water management and setting up of Tissue culture laboratories and
Integrated fruit processing plants.
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The `AKRUTI' programme, promotes further rural techno-entrepreunership through offer of a
technology package at an affordable cost called “AKRUTI Tech Pack” consisting of optional eight
technologies and two technical consultancy services exclusively for rural sector. The technologies
are (i) Nisargruna biogas plant, (ii) Soil organic carbon detection and testing kit, (iii) Vibrothermal
disinfestor (iv) Foldable solar dryer, (v) Litchi processing for preservation (vi) Domestic Water
Purifier, (vii) Solar Energy driven Portable Domestic Brackish Water Reverse Osmosis (BWRO)
technology, (viii) Dip and Drink membrane pouch technology and two technical consultancy
services are Preservation of Agri-Produce by Irradiation and BARC New seed varieties. More than
twenty rural entrpreuners have already availed this opportunity of AKRUTI Tech Pack for
deployment of technologies in rural sector.
The objective of this offer is to encourage techno-entrepreneurship at all levels in society, with
specific emphasis on prosperity-growth in rural-India. Any individual or organization, irrespective
of prior educational or business background, is encouraged to apply for it. What is desired is
strong drive for entrepreneurial pursuit and execution ability for technology-based prosperity-
growth in rural-India.
Application form can be availed from BARC website: www.barc.gov.in/akruti-tp/application.html
Based on this experience, a concept of Ci-llages i.e. Best of City and village in group of villages
has been introduced for Creation of 'Integrated work-living environment' in rural sector.
Details will be covered in presentation.
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BARC's Banana Tissue Culture Know-How
for Rural India
Vishvas M. Kulkarni (Ph.D.)
Scientific Officer
Nuclear Agriculture & Biotechnology Division BARC Mumbai - 400085, India.
E-mail: vmk@barc.gov.in
The Plant Cell & Tissue Culture techniques, popularly known as “Plant Tissue Culture”, have
several useful applications in the field of agriculture including large scale production of healthy
planting materials of commercially important species in a short time period and small space. The
commercial Tissue Culture Production of banana plants is one amongst the success stories in
India and on the globe.
BARC has developed and transferred the banana tissue culture know-how for large and small-
scale commercial production to several users including Mahabeej (Akolka, now at Nagpur), P.K.
Krishi Vigyan Kendra (Puducherry), Anandwan (Warora), CARD (an NGO at Anjangaon-Surji)
and recently to SunShine Agri (Jalgaon).
The small-scale Tissue Culture laboratory established for CARD has demonstrated that an
unskilled individual farmer can successfully utilize the high-tech knowledge for the betterment of
his livelihood. The spread and popularization of “BARC's Banana Tissue Culture know-how” at
grass-root level will open up new avenues for sustainable developments in rural India.
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A Gandhian approach for Sustainable
Rural Economic development through innovative
approaches in Rural Industrialisation
Dr. P. B. Kale
Director, Mahatma Gandhi Institute for Rural Industrialisation (MGIRI),
Maganwadi, Wardha-442001, Maharashtra, India.
Email: pb_kale@rediffmail.com
th
The industrial revolution, which took place in 19 century, has given maximum thrust on the
mechanization, automation, productivity and luxury of life. This had impacted into urbanization
and disturbed social order since it had conducive environment for industries and the rural sector
became weaker and weaker. In the same era, Gandhiji had foreseen the drawbacks and its
inapplicability in Rural India hence he started the 'Swadeshi movement' of sustainable village
economy. In the new Gandian model of “Village Development” he emphasized on village
reconstruction which was negatively viewed as an onslaught on the exploitative tendency inherent
in industrialism and dominance by urbanization and positively viewed as an attempt to establish a
non-violent social order from which exploitation is completely done away with a sustainable rural
economic development. 'Rural Industrialization' was never the term used by Gandhi, however,
two basic components of Gandhian development, self-sufficient villages and decentralization of
economic and political powers, gave a very important place to development of Khadi and Village
Industries. The belief of Gandhi's 'work for all' was rationalized through Khadi and village
industries. Many village economy based developments have been taken up by KVIC, and many
Gandhian institutions for the betterment of rural masses. Mahatma Gandhi himself initiated this
movement through All India Village Industries Association (AIVIA), present campus of Mahatma
Gandhi Institute for Rural Industrialisation (MGIRI), Wardha, involving prominent Scientists like
J.C. Bose & Sir C.V. Raman and Industrialists like Birla and Bajaj. In the new context a new
dimension of his philosophy has been taken up by MGIRI and some Gandhian institutions with the
new technological developments, which can be adopted in villages for employment generation. It
is also noted that how this successful models can be adopted with new dimension.
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NOTES
NOTES
Walk together. Talk together. Let your minds apprehend together,
like the Devas concurred and accepted their portions of sacrifice
g§ JÀN>Üd§ g§ dXÜd§ g§ dmo _Zm§{g OmZVm_² &
Xodm ^mJ§ `Wm nyd} g§OmZmZm CnmgVo &&
Common be their prayer. Common be their receipt, purpose and desire
I repeat for you their common prayer. I offer you a common oblation.
g_mZmo _ÝÌ: g{_{V: g_mZr g_mZ§ _Z: gh {MÎm_ofm_² &
g_mZ§ _ÝÌ_{^_ÝÌ`o d: g_mZoZ dmo h{dfm Owhmo{_ &&
Common be your intention. Common be your hearts' wishes.
Common be your thoughts so that there may be union among you.
g_mZr d AmHy${V: g_mZm öX`m{Z d:&
g_mZ_ñVw dmo _Zmo `Wm d: gwghmg{V &&
(F$½doX g§{hVm Xe_ _§S>b
gyŠV 191, F$Mm 2.3.4)