Critical Assessment of the Research Methodology used in SRG Bangladesh Limited

Critical Assessment of the Research Methodology used in SRG Bangladesh Limited

Submitted to Professor Golam Mohammed Chowdhury Chairman, Internship & Placement Program

Supervised by Dr. M Z Mamun Professor and Director

Submitted by Noman Ahmed Khan Roll No. 16 MBA 41 (D)

Internship Period: 23rd March to 14th June

Institute Of Business Administration (IBA) University Of Dhaka
Date of Submission: July 11, 2009

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
First of all I must thank Dr. M Z Mamun, Professor & Director, IBA for his insisting on the brevity of the report. He helped me determine the objective of the report and guided me through to get to the end. He made me grateful with his valuable suggestions from time to time during my internship. I can never forget his fatherly guidance and his utmost friendly and sincere attention toward me. The second person to acknowledge will surely be my supervisor at SRGB: Mr. M Saidul Haq, Managing Director of SRG Bangladesh Limited. He has been a great support from the choice of the topic, learning of different part of research and understanding the difference between theory and practice. Special thank goes to Mr. Ziauddin Kamal, Senior Research Executive and Mr Emrul Kayes, Manager, HR for providing me every kind of information related to my study. I really should thank every other employee of SRGB, whom I found during different phases of my internship. Most of them have been very open and friendly with me and provided me with the answers I needed from them. Lastly I would like to thank my classmates working in OrgQuest and the Nielsen Company Bangladesh Limited for providing me with brief but useful information about the practices in their organization.

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July 11, 2009 Chairperson Internship and Placement Institute of Business Administration University of Dhaka Dhaka – 1000 Subject: Submission of Internship report on Critical Assessment of the Research Methodology used in SRG Bangladesh Limited Dear Sir: As a part of the internship program, I have prepared this report on the topic “Critical Assessment of the Research Methodology used in SRG Bangladesh Limited”. The report contains a detailed study and analysis on the qualitative and quantitative methodology used by SRG Bangladesh Limited. I judged the matter through the projects in which I had to work as an internee. I have tried my best to utilize the opportunity of working as an internee in an established marketing research company like SRGB. This report is based on information acquired from the project Awareness and Acceptance of UK Qualifications in Bangladesh, conducted by SRGB. Here I have tried to compare the methodology used in that study with the thery we have been taught in the classroom and probable reason of difference with the theory if any. I have maintained the internship learning as per the instructions I have got from my supervisor Dr M Z Mamun. I enjoyed preparing this report because it provides an opportunity for me to increase my understanding of the real life marketing research practices. I thank you for such an opportunity. I will be available for any clarification at your convenience.

Sincerely yours Noman Ahemd Khan Roll # 16 Batch – 41(D)

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Table of Contents
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.............................................................................................. ..............vii 1.0 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................... ............................1
1.1 Origin of the Report............................................................................................................. ..............1 1.2 Objective..................................................................................................................... ......................1 1.3 Methodology................................................................................................................................ ......2 1.4 Scope................................................................................................................................. ...............2 1.5 Limitations......................................................................................................................... ................2

2.0 Industry Overview............................................................................................ ......................3
2.1. Research and Consultancy Industry around the World.............................................. ......................3 2.1.1 Market segments........................................................................................... ...................3 2.1.2 Player groups................................................................................................................... .5 2.2 Research and Consultancy Industry in Bangladesh............................................................. .............7 2.2.1 ORG-Quest Research Ltd (OrQuest)..................................................................................... .....7 2.2.2 Sirius Marketing and Social Research Ltd................................................................. .................7 2.2.3 The Nielsen Company........................................................................................ ........................8

3.0 Company Overview............................................................................................................ ....9
3.1 Background and History of SRG Bangladesh Limited......................................................... ..............9 3.2 Organization Chart...................................................................................................... ....................10 3.4 Qualitative Research........................................................................................................ ...............12 3.5 Quantitative Research........................................................................................................... ..........12 3.6 Recent Projects.................................................................................................................. .............13 3.7 Key Clients .................................................................................................................... .................14 3.8 Key Person of SRG Bangladesh Limited.................................................................................... .....18

4.0 Jobs Performed During Internship....................................................................................... .20
4.1 Duties and Responsibilities ..................................................................................... .......................20 4.2 Completion of the Assignments ......................................................................................... .............20 4.2.1 Awareness and acceptance of UK Qualification........................................... ...........................20 4.2.2 Assessment of Grameen Kalyan Clinics.................................................................. .................21 4.2.3 Global Opinion Poll on Social, Economic and Political Issues 2009, Project Green, Wave 9. . .21 4.2.4 Mystery Shopping on Banking Products and Service......................................... ......................21 4.3 Benefits of the Program ............................................................................................................. .....21

5.0 Critical Assessment of the Methodology of the Project “Awareness and Acceptance of UK Qualifications in Bangladesh”................................................................................................... ..22
5.1 Background of the study............................................................................................................. .....22 5.1.1 Definition of the Business Problem............................................................................ ...............22 5.1.2 Research Objectives............................................................................................................ .....22 5.2 Methodology.............................................................................................................................. ......23 5.2.1 Criticism on Selection and Implementation of Quantitative Study.................................... .........23 5.2.2 Criticism on Selection and Implementation of Qualitative Study (KII and IDI)...........................25 5.2.3 Criticism on FGD............................................................................................ ..........................26 5.2.4 A Mixed-Methodology Approach to the Study................................................... ........................27

6.0 Conclusion and Recommendation............................................................. ..........................28 Bibliography................................................................................................................ ...............29 Annexure I: Questionnaire of Key Informant Interview (KII)........................... ............................30 Annexure II: Questionnaire for In-Depth Interview (IDI)............................................................. .36

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List of Figures
Figure 1: Revenues of Research and Consultancy Firms by Services............................... ..........4 Figure 2: Growth Rate of Research and Consultancy Firms by Services......................... ............4 Figure 3: Groups of Research and Consultancy Players by Size and Origin.............................. ..5 Figure 4. Percentage of Market Share Depending on Size of Businesses...................................6

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This report has been written with a focused ultimate goal of identifying the gaps between theory and practice of research in SRG Bangladesh Limited. It has been found that the effectiveness of a research firm SRGB in preparing research works fairly supported by theory practitioners. Difference between theory and practice is a very old phenomenon which we can see here too. But it can be concluded easily
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that though the practice is not perfectly similar with the suggestions from theory, the practice will work effectively to bring out the result, which is the goal of all research works. Market research and consultancy is an old art which is becoming more important in Bangladesh day by day. The activities of market research include defining marketing opportunities and problems, generating and evaluating marketing ideas, monitoring performance, and understanding the marketing process. At the same time management consultancy refers to both the industry of, and the practice of, helping organizations improve their performance, primarily through the analysis of existing business problems and development of plans for improvement. Organizations hire the services of management consultants for a number of reasons, including gaining external (and presumably objective) advice, access to the consultants' specialized expertise, or simply as extra temporary help during a one-time project, where the hiring of more permanent employees is not required. Internship opportunity in a market research and management consultancy house can be considered a great opportunity for a student to learn some most important and effective skills. Bangladesh is comparatively new in Market Research and Management Consultancy sector. We can find very few big players and a number of small players here. But the industry is expanding day by day. The total revenue is also increasing every year. Mainly four companies can be considered the topmost players in this industry. One of them SRG Bangladesh Limited is the company where the author completed his internship. The Survey Research Group of Bangladesh [SRGB] was initiated in October 1987 as a Management and Industrial Consulting house. Since the early 90s, SRGB ventured into providing Qualitative and Quantitative Research Services. Since then SRGB has successfully conducted hundreds of studies ranging from broad based sectoral studies to micro level case studies for domestic and international clients. SRGB maintains a countrywide panel of more than 800 male and female Field Investigators, who are recruited locally resulting in substantial cost efficiency. Moreover, local investigators ensure operational efficiency and accuracy in collecting relevant information. In terms of organizational philosophy, to remain updated with the rapid changes in the global survey research scenario and to benefit from the hard-earned experience of developed economies, SRGB remains in constant touch with a number of overseas firms engaged in research and consulting. Most of the assignments handled in SRGB were long-term projects that had already been started. Some were in the beginning phase and some were in their final stages. Some of them are also a type of continuous research with several waves. The discussed research study that was used to prepare this report is Awareness and Acceptance of UK Qualifications in Bangladesh. It was an ongoing project. It therefore made sense to continue doing what the rest of the team was doing (taking interviews of different
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types and writing those down). It required all three interns from IBA to take interviews of different people. At the very beginning tough job of taking face to face interviews was assigned. Some visits to a private university (BRAC University for this author) and a multinational (Novartis Bangladesh Limited) helped the job done. Then the qualitative part commenced. A 7 day tour to Chittagong was made to take the KII of a number of Deans and department heads. The tour was successful with nice opportunities to learn interview and communication skills. Then again a 5 day tour to Rajshahi, the land of heat and mango. It was also a very successful tour with acquiring of huge experiences. Finally different top management personnels from different organizations and universities like University of Dhaka, International Islamic University Chittagong Dhaka Campus, Square, Grameenphone, Dhaka Bank, BMET, UGC etc. were interviewed.

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1.0 INTRODUCTION
Market research and consultancy is an old art which is becoming more important in Bangladesh day by day. The activities of market research include defining marketing opportunities and problems, generating and evaluating marketing ideas, monitoring performance, and understanding the marketing process. At the same time management consultancy refers to both the industry of, and the practice of, helping organizations improve their performance, primarily through the analysis of existing business problems and development of plans for improvement. Organizations hire the services of management consultants for a number of reasons, including gaining external (and presumably objective) advice, access to the consultants' specialized expertise, or simply as extra temporary help during a one-time project, where the hiring of more permanent employees is not required. Internship opportunity in a market research and management consultancy house can be considered a great opportunity for a student to learn some most important and effective skills. 1.1 Origin of the Report As a compulsory part of Internship program, this particular report is being prepared by the author on the proposed topic “Critical Assessment of the Research Methodology used in SRG Bangladesh Limited”. The intention was to give an opportunity to the students to gain some real world experience by working in a practical environment. The internship supervisor was Mr. M Saidul Haq, Managing Director, SRG Bangladesh Limited and the faculty advisor was Dr. M Z Mamun, Professor & Director of Institute of Business Administration. 1.2 Objective The Primary Objective of this report is: • To measure the gap between theory and practice for the selection of the methodology.

Secondary objectives are: • • • • To study the methodology used in the project under study in SRGB. To observe the implementation of the methods. To measure the gap between selection and implementation of the methods. Search for the justifications behind the gaps.

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1.3 Methodology The research will be composed of literature review for theories and qualitative research mainly. An extensive study of the research methodology literature will be the base. Then the practical experiences and observations from the project worked for during internship will be compared with the literature. Finally qualitative in-depth interviews and key informant interviews will lead us to our answers. 1.4 Scope SRGB selects and follows different kinds of methodology for different projects. It changes with the change of projects. Here only the study project in which the author worked- ‘Awareness and Acceptance of UK Qualifications in Bangladesh’ will come under consideration. The author will try to reveal the theoretical requirements to selection of methodology for this particular study project and the practical happenings in this project only. The other two studies which were taking place at SRGB at the time of internship will not be considered though the author worked for those in some few instances. 1.5 Limitations Some limiting factors were faced while conducting the research and preparing the report. These could be summarized as follows: • • • No secondary information was found, such as, any report or research papers on this particular issue. For finding out reasons behind gap between theory and practice, enough number of projects could not be studied due to shortage of time and scope. Only internal specialists were interviewed.

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2.0 Industry Overview
Before starting description of the main parts of the internship report, some light on the industry of the worked for company should be addressed. A short story about the industry will help the reader understand the situation with more depth. 2.1. Research and Consultancy Industry around the World The management consultancy industry shows a very fragmented picture with various segments and player groups. This first part of the industry analysis starts with an analysis of the market segments and player groups. Afterwards it will elaborate on the competitive situation. The second part of this analysis – Future Prospects - discusses driving forces and possible futures for the industry. Due to availability of data here the focus is on the German market, for which it provides figures and statistics. All statements about trends, competition, drivers and possible future developments, however, can easily be transferred to management consultancies in all major markets.
2.1.1 Market segments

In Germany there are 14700 management consultancies and sole practitioners. They employ 68000 consultants. The market for management consultancy in Germany has shown rapid growth throughout the last years. Total revenues rose from 16.4 bn DM in 1997 to 18.8 bn in 1998, 21.3 bn in 1999, and 23.8 bn DM in 2000. Although the annual growth rate declined from 14.6 % in 1998 to 11.8 % in 2000, it is still significantly above the growth rate of the German GDP, being below 3 %. However, growth is not equally spread across the market segments. Today management consultancy is much more than the traditional strategy consulting. The Bundesverband Deutscher Unternehmensberater e.V. (BDU, Association of German Management Consultants) distinguishes between consulting for strategy, organisation, IT and human resources. Analysis of these segments reveals their different contributions to overall revenue and growth:

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Figure 1: Revenues of Research and Consultancy Firms by Services

Figure 2: Growth Rate of Research and Consultancy Firms by Services

These figures indicate that IT- and organisational consulting fuelled growth in 1999. This was driven by the current developments in the IT-sector. The BDU names year 2000 solutions, Euro-implementations, SAP implementations and e-business activities. These changes in the customers' environment change their industries more or less and hence create enormous needs for consulting. Without the impact of Y2K and Euro-implementation, the growth of IT consulting slowed down in 2000. However, this sector remains the most important field of consulting with 43.4% of total consulting revenues in 2000. The
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BDU predicts, that the proportion of consulting projects that include at least partly some e-commerce consulting, will grow from 38% in 2000 to about 50% in 2001. All in all the whole industry shows a dynamic growth. Besides the influence of IT this is driven by globalisation, technological change and the deregulation of markets.
2.1.2 Player groups

In recent years the industry has seen the entry of many non-traditional consultants into the market. Barriers to entry are considerably low with little investments into fixed assets needed. In addition – on the contrary to the auditing business – there are no legal regulations limiting the entry to this profession. Many former employees of large consultancy firms or senior managers from other businesses start up as sole practitioners or small consulting firms. On the other hand, many companies from outside the consulting industry enter this market. These are mainly IT-companies as IBM or Cap Gemini, but also designers, technologists, marketing agencies, employment agencies and others.

Figure 3: Groups of Research and Consultancy Players by Size and Origin

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Rassam (1998) distinguishes as follows: In Germany there are 14700 consulting businesses employing 68500 consultants. The BDU distinguishes small, medium and large consultancies. Not surprisingly, the large consultancies, being smallest in numbers make nearly a third of the total industries revenues:

Figure 4. Percentage of Market Share Depending on Size of Businesses

This is an ongoing trend. By 2000 the market share of large consultancies has risen to 47%, share of medium sized firms fell to 36% and share of small firms fell to 17%. This is because large firms show by far the highest growth rates with an average of 18% in 2000. Medium and small firms grew by an average of 9% and 2.5% only. With this small number of large dominant players the market can be characterised as an oligopoly. Competition is especially strong within the market segments and within the player groups. Due to the limited growth rates in some segments and the entry of new players there is also a rising competition across the segments and player groups. Smaller specialised consultants start to serve customers of all sizes. The large consultants discover small and start-up enterprises as customers, seeing them as future clients for further consulting and auditing activities. According to this competition consultancies have developed different strategies. The large consultancies establish themselves as generalist. They offer their clients a one-stop-shop service for all the consulting needs they might have. Thus their focus is on long-lasting customer relationships and cross-selling opportunities. Many smaller and medium sized consultancies have specialised in certain areas of expertise like IT, HR or business recovery. A number of them operate only in their home area. An important area of competition in consulting business is the supply-side. Consultancies compete heavily to attract highly qualified people. Demand for these people is rising due to the growth aspirations of the large consulting firms. The German member firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers created
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more than 1000 additional jobs during its first year after the merger and still continues to grow at high rates. On the other hand, many graduates from universities and business schools choose to join start-ups in the "new economy" in 2000. 2.2 Research and Consultancy Industry in Bangladesh Bangladesh is comparatively new in Market Research and Management Consultancy sector. We can find very few big players and a number of small players here. But the industry is expanding day by day. The total revenue is also increasing every year. Mainly four companies can be considered the topmost players in this industry. One of them SRG Bangladesh Limited is the company where the author completed his internship, description of that company is coming latter. Here we find short description of other three firms.
2.2.1 ORG-Quest Research Ltd (OrQuest)

ORG-QUEST RESEARCH LTD. (OrQuest) is a joint venture company with ORG India (pvt) Ltd. It has been founded in 2003, though serving from 1994. Number of employees is 40 and interviewers is 300. We are a research & consulting firm with strong survey research and analytical skills that bring to bear a blend of insights and Pan-Asian experience of a highly competent team of professionals. We have been providing research services to our valued clients including MNCs, UN agencies, development partners (World Bank, ADB, IFC-SEDF, Swisscontact, etc.), local conglomerates, international research agencies, etc. in the country since 1994, using both quantitative and qualitative techniques. Our qualitative wing owns a viewing facility with one way mirror in Dhaka. With a dedicated team of researchers, having client and agency side experience and multi country exposures, we offer high standard market, social and opinion research services in the areas mentioned under the fields of operation later.
2.2.2 Sirius Marketing and Social Research Ltd.

Sirius is a full service research organization and offers the entire spectrum of consumer and media research, social research, syndicated Media and Panel research services and business-to-business research conforming to international standards. It has been founded in 1995 and it has 60 employees and 350 interviewers presently. The company is an associate of IMRB International and has full access to IMRB's expertise. Today, Sirius is one of the leading research agencies and the clientele includes multinationals based in Bangladesh, bilateral agencies and international companies. The company has conducted large scale national level studies (all Bangladesh) and has field offices in the 6 Divisional headquarters of Bangladesh. The company pioneered syndicated media research in the country that includes TV
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audience measurement, National Media Study (covering all media), TV Ad tracking,and has in place a national level household consumer panel since 2005.
2.2.3 The Nielsen Company

The Nielsen Company, offering services in over 100 countries, is the world's leading provider of market research, information, and analysis. By delivering unrivalled combinations of insights, advanced analytical tools and integrated marketing solutions, Nielsen provides complete views of consumers and their markets. Nielsen Consumer Research helps clients address the issues of brand health, shopper loyalty and behavior, marketing mix management and consumer motivations. By integrating proprietary research applications with in-market understanding from our retail and consumer panel services we don’t conduct consumer research in a vacuum, and are uniquely positioned to deliver business solutions in their market context. BASES, a service of The Nielsen Company and a world leader in STM’s, uses industry-leading forecasting models, rich databases, and proprietary analytical techniques to consult on a range of business issues, including innovation strategy, concept and marketing plan optimization, and initiative commercialization. BASES is widely known for expertise in the CPG sector, but tools have been adapted to sectors such as pharmaceuticals, alcohol, quick-serve restaurants, and more.

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3.0 Company Overview
The company selected for internship was Survey Research Group of Bangladesh (SRGB). It is one of the leading Research and Consultancy firm of the country. A short description of the company will complement the story. 3.1 Background and History of SRG Bangladesh Limited The Survey Research Group of Bangladesh [SRGB] was initiated in October 1987 as a Management and Industrial Consulting house. Its professional integrity and service excellence rapidly gained a lasting reputation for delivering result-oriented consultancy services. Subsequently, activities were diversified to provide development consultancy, continuing professional development programs, data processing & analysis and event management services. Since the early 90s, SRGB ventured into providing Qualitative and Quantitative Research Services. Since then SRGB has successfully conducted hundreds of studies ranging from broad based sectoral studies to micro level case studies for domestic and international clients. SRGB's studies are carried out under the leadership of highly competent and experienced team members who are well acknowledged experts in their respective fields, appropriately drawn from SRGB's panel with their consent and total commitment. Logistically, SRGB is more than well equipped with all necessary and state of the art office facilities including computers, printers, photocopier, scanner, continuous power generator, etc. A team of highly experienced staff remains dedicated to carry out survey research activities. Moreover, SRGB maintains a countrywide panel of more than 800 male and female Field Investigators, who are recruited locally resulting in substantial cost efficiency. Moreover, local investigators ensure operational efficiency and accuracy in collecting relevant information. In terms of organizational philosophy, to remain updated with the rapid changes in the global survey research scenario and to benefit from the hard-earned experience of developed economies, SRGB remains in constant touch with a number of overseas firms engaged in research and consulting. These close associations have proved mutually rewarding and SRGB maintain an open-end policy in acquiring further overseas strategic alliances. Moreover, SRGB's consultants are well practiced in looking objectively at the challenges that a business or an intervention faces and developing appropriate, workable and cost effective solutions. SRGB's role as a consultancy house is to provide expert, independent, practical and pragmatic decisions. With the truest partnership spirit, SRGB works "alongside" with the clients instead of working "for" them. SRGB's approach is based on hard-earned experience, rather than on textbook solutions. The hard-core professionalism, undaunted integrity and

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uncompromising excellence of service of SRGB have duly earned high level of customer satisfaction and reliability. The total range of services from SRGB is delivered through three distinct operating divisions:
Centre for Research & Management Consulting Centre for Continuing Professional Development Centre for Data Processing & Analysis

All three centres have both intellectual and logistical resource-base that is unmatched in the country. Each of the centres is highly professional, unparalleled in functional efficiency and strategically organized to provide ample scope for future expandability and relentless enhancement of service quality. The Centre for Research & Management Consulting concentrates on providing consolidated business management and development research solutions, while the Centre for Continuing Professional Development offers wide range of skill development programs for practicing and prospective business professionals to enhance their experience and functional capability. Finally, the Centre for Data Processing & Analysis offer a spectrum of digitization services, which covers almost every document conversion process including data, text, PDF, illustrator and XML/SGML conversion services. 3.2 Organization Chart The organization is headed by the CEO or President. It has an organogram which is slim but centralized. Here a diagram of the organization chart has been shown in the next page.

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3.3 Services Offered The services offered are modern and useful. They are as follows: • • • • • • • • • • • • Social & Environmental Research Business Communication Service Automotive Research Agricultural Research Business to Business Research HR Management Service Media Research Mystery Shopping Qualitative Research Quantitative Research Retail Study Healthcare Research
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Sales Force Effectiveness Practice

Among the available services here we only highlight the qualitative and quantitative research. 3.4 Qualitative Research SRGB has a specialist qualitative research division. This division forms a core part of the overall business. This division has a team with an experience base of over 15 years. Keeping in mind the need to bring in different perspectives in understanding human behavior, this team has been selected from diverse backgrounds such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, marketing, economics and so on. The qualitative division also has its own specialized field structure that handles all aspects of the field operations. No fieldwork is sub-contracted. In addition to our own team of highly experienced and motivated researchers, the qualitative division draws into the expertise of international consultants in the fields of qualitative research and communication. This allows us access to global perspective as well. The qualitative division has handled hundreds of studies spanning categories as diverse as FMCG products, financial products, durables, automobiles, media, telecommunication and so on. It has considerable experience in handling the following types of research studies: • • • • • • • Usage and attitude studies Brand equity studies Segmentation studies Positioning research Communication development and evaluation Packaging evaluation studies New product development studies

The experience pool also includes studies among a wide variety of target groups ranging from housewives, chief wage earners, children, teenagers, young adults, different socio-economic groups including high net worth individuals; specialist groups such as corporate, specific professions, etc. The qualitative research division boasts of having a large number of specialized techniques such as: • Conflict Groups • Peer Interactions • Triads • Paired Interviews • Slice of life • Semiotics • Extended creativity groups • Hybrid Approaches • Benefit Inhibitor chains • Thematic Apperception Tests • Mind Mapping • Value Equation • World views • Bring your Homework etc. 3.5 Quantitative Research The quantitative research division is a specialized research with a combined experience of over 18 years in handling quantitative research in a wide range of areas - such as FMCGs, personal grooming products, automobiles, durables, telecom, IT media, pharmaceutical products, cigarettes, retail, financial
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products and web research. The team, of over 15 quantitative researchers is adept at handling all aspects of the research right from problem definition, to the analysis and data interpretation, to providing implementable solutions to the clients needs. The use of a wide array of tools and techniques, such as multivariate techniques adds value and helps provide meaningful insights to the client. A team of experienced programmers ensure a quick and efficient data summarization and interpretation, which ensure a quicker turnaround time for the project. At any point of time, there are 800+ investigators for collecting data and they are spread across the country. High quality in data collection is ensured through a systemized and stringent data collection procedure-training sessions, mock calls, pilot interviews, back-checks by the company staff ensure that data collected adheres to the quality standards laid down by the company. Specialized teams of experts in various fields with in-depth knowledge of the global market add value to the project. We have consultants with a global experience of at least 20 years in the following areas. • • • • • • • Customer satisfaction Mystery shopping Product testing Retailing sector Modeling and data mining Insurance sector Banking sector

3.6 Recent Projects There were twelve ongoing projects during internship of the author. Among them three were bigger and more important. The author worked in various jobs of four projects, project number 4, 5, 6 and 7.

Table 1: Recent Projects by SRGB Sl Project Name No.

Client CPTU, IMED Ministry of Planning Govt. of Bangladesh British America Tobacco (through Engage HR, Pakistan) AED, USA [USAID funded AI.COMM Project] Princeton Survey Research Associates International

Period of Study June 2009 to June 2013 [Ongoing Study] June to July 2009 [Ongoing Study] April to June 2009 [Ongoing Study] April to June 2009
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Monitoring and Evaluation Consulting: Public Procurement Reform Project–II (PPRP-II) [A World Bank funded Project] Employee Preference Survey for Bangladesh Monitoring and Evaluation of Cross Border Communication – South Asia (Multi-country study involving Bangladesh, Nepal & India) Global Opinion Poll on Social, Economic and Political Issues 2009, Project Green, Wave 9

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3 4

(PSRAI), Washington, USA 5 Grameen Kalyan Clinics Needs Assessment Market Research on Awareness and Acceptance of UK Qualifications in Bangladesh Mystery Shopping on Banking Products and Services Social Impact Assessment For Bangladesh Railway DPL Project Pfizer Inc. USA British Council Dhaka HSBC Bangladesh Dhaka The World Bank Dhaka, Bangladesh Grunfeld, Desiderio, Lebowitz, Silverman & Klestadt LLP USA Pearson VUE/AQ Services International, Singapore Pearson VUE/AQ Services International, Singapore Pearson VUE through AQ Services, Singapore US Embassy Dhaka, Bangladesh

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7

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9

Surrogate Value Research on Fish, 2009

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Mystery Shopping on Cisco Certified Examination Centre Performance Mystery Shopping on GMAT Registration & Scheduling Procedures

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Mystery Shopping - CompTIA Police Perception Survey in Chittagong, Bandarban, Rangamati and Khagrachhari Districts

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[Ongoing Study] March to October 2009 [Ongoing Study] January to July 2009 [Ongoing Study] August 2008 to December 2009 [Ongoing Study] May 2008 to June 2009 [Ongoing Study] January to December 2009 [Ongoing Study] January to December 2009 [Ongoing Study] January to December 2009 [Ongoing Study] January to December 2009 [Ongoing Study] October 2008 to March 2009

3.7 Key Clients SRGB has a huge number of different category clients. They have been listed below: A: International Clients • • • • • • • • Cisco, USA HSBC, Hong Kong Telenor, Norway Nokia, Hong Kong Microsoft, USA Hewlett-Packard (HP) Asia Pacific Pte Ltd, Singapore ARD Inc, USA BHP-Engineering, Australia
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BHP-Laysaght (SEA) Pte Ltd, Singapore Nomura Research Institute, Japan International Executive Service Corps (IESC), USA Carana Corporation, USA International Trade Centre (ITC), Switzerland SKF Distribution Asia Pte Ltd, Singapore ECI Telecom Inc, USA Dacom Corporation, Korea Korea Telecom, Korea Tata Steel, India Bare Associates International, USA Bharat Starch Industries Ltd, India Tessival SPA, Italy G P Group of Companies, Thailand Singer Worldwide, USA Overseas Projects Corporation of Victoria (OPCV), Australia Carana Corporation, USA TOTAL FINA ELF, France Princeton Survey Research Associates (PSRA), USA Tianjin Machinery Import Export Group, China Quantum Market Research, India BAIGlobal Inc (A Market Facts Company), USA Pew Research Centre, USA Mitsubishi Corporation, Singapore Kuraray Specialties Pte Ltd, Singapore Thai Wah Public Co. Ltd, Thailand Horizon Research, Singapore Tashi Group of Companies, Bhutan Kalasha Woolen Industry (Pvt) Ltd, Nepal Ecotech Pty Ltd, Australia Habib Bank Ltd, Pakistan Asia Market Intelligence (Malaysia) Sdn. Bhd, Malaysia Syngenta, Hong Kong Arthur D. Little, Singapore/Malaysia
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Sungwon Corporation, Korea Kong Ma Engineering Co Ltd, Taiwan Fullway Enterprises Co Ltd, Taiwan Quest International, UK Veraz Telecom, USA Canadian High Commission, Dhaka Rhone Poulence Asia Pacific Pte Ltd, Australia China Resources Ltd, Hong Kong BlueScope Steel, Australia International Business Linkages, Inc. (IBL), USA WorldFish Centre, Malaysia Redma Consultants Ltd, Canada Acorn Marketing and Research Consultants, Hong Kong Synovate, Hong Kong Cairn Energy Bangladesh AQ Services International, Singapore Access Markets International (AMI) Partners, Inc, USA Columbia University, USA The World Bank United Nations Development Program (UNDP) United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) UNICEF Bangladesh Asian Development Bank (ADB) International Finance Corporation (IFC) Commonwealth Secretariat, UK Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA) United States Agency For International Development (USAID) Ministry of Economy, Trade & Industry (METI), Japan Japan International Co-operation Agency (JICA) International Jute Organization (IJO) CARE Bangladesh SouthAsia Enterprise Development Facility (SEDF)
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B: International Development Agencies/NGOs Clients

• • • • • • •

Swisscontact-Katalyst World Vision of Bangladesh JOBS [A USAID Project] OXFAM Bangladesh Concern Bangladesh German Technical Cooperation (GTZ), Bangladesh DFID Bangladesh

C: Domestic Clients • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Unilever Bangladesh British America Tobacco Syngenta (Bangladesh) Ltd Social Marketing Company (SMC) Olympic Industries Bengal Group of Industries A K Khan Group Bashundhara Group of Companies Mutual Group Baraka Group SQ Group Rangs Electronics Ltd Alfa Tobacco Group Micro Industries Development Assistance Society (MIDAS) Sea Resources Group (Rangs Group) Sena Kalyan Sangstha (SKS) M M Ispahani Ltd (Ispahani Group) Givenchy Group Grameen Bank Alfa Tobacco Group Toka Ink (BD) Ltd (A Bangladesh Japan Joint Venture) BASIC Bank Ltd Grameen Uddog Holycrescent Hospital Ltd McDonald Bangladesh Ltd
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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Grameen Shamogree Tripti Industries Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Govt of Bangladesh Ministry of Jute, Govt of Bangladesh Industrial Development Leasing Company of Bangladesh Ltd (IDLC) Brothers Group Syngenta Giant Group Bell Corporation Anlima Group Grameen Telecom Grameen Phone Pacific Telecom Ltd (City Cell) Bangladesh Telegraph & Telephone Board (BTTB) Department of Environment, Govt of Bangladesh Ministry of Environment, Govt of Bangladesh Modern Erection, Dhaka BRAC Bank Bangladesh

3.8 Key Person of SRG Bangladesh Limited M Saidul Haq, MBA, CMC (Australia), FCIM (UK), FIMC, is the Founder President of SRG Bangladesh Limited [SRGB]. He is an entrepreneurship /business development specialist. He did his MBA from Institute of Business Administration, University of Dhaka in its 14th batch. He has unparallel combination of multivariate qualifications and achievements. Some are highlighted below: • • • • • • • • CMC (Certified Management Consultant) from Institute of Management Consultants, Australia FCIM (Fellow Member) of The Chartered Institute of Marketing, UK - the top marketing professionals’ organization of the world. More than twenty(20) years experience in Management Consulting and Market/Social Research (qualitative and quantitative) Conducted hundreds of research and consulting projects as Project Director/Team Leader Organized and conducted hundreds of training programs, workshop, seminar, technical presentation on various management and business promotion issues. Extensive experience in trade & business development, promotions, investment and joint venture match-making.
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• • • •

Extensive experience in private sector and SME enterprises development, entrepreneurship development. National Consultant, International Trade Centre, WTO/UNCTAD, Geneva Retainer consultant/adviser of about a dozen leading business houses in Bangladesh Experience with many international organizations including World Bank, ADB, International Labor Organization (ILO), USAID, CIDA, UNDP, UNIDO, UNICEF, UNEP, SDC, commonwealth Secretariat, etc. Worked for about five years as the Consultant/National Monitor for Industrial Commodity Program, Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) and Canadian High Commission, Dhaka. Registered Consultant of Asian Development Bank (ADB), The World Bank, Commonwealth Secretariat, International Labor Organization (ILO), UNICEF, etc. Served as Member of the Advisory Board of GERIAP, United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok, Thailand. Founder President of the Institute of Management Consultants Bangladesh [IMCB], the national forum for the consultants of Bangladesh. Trustee of The International Council of Management Consulting Institutes [ICMCI], the apex body of the consulting institutes worldwide. ICMCI representative to ECOSOC, United Nations (UN) for Geneva/Vienna and AsiaPacific region. Immediate past National Representative for Bangladesh and Member of European Society for Opinion and Market Research [ESOMAR]. Member of the American Marketing Association [AMA] Widely traveled person and visited more than hundred countries/cities of the world.

• • • • • • • • •

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4.0 Jobs Performed During Internship
While the work performed during this period was particularly glamorous and equally thrilling, true is that this internship period exposed the author to experiences which have significantly altered the perception of marketing research and management related issues towards a more real and global holistic model. 4.1 Duties and Responsibilities The internship program was started on 23rd March, 2009. The internship was to last for twelve (12) weeks to three (3) months and as a result my internship came to an end on 14th June, 2009. In somewhat more concrete terms, SRGB provides the country and the world with timely, scientifically credible, policy-relevant research answers for decision-making and action planning for development. While with SRGB, it was involved in a range of different tasks and smaller explorations that extensively helped learning of the methods of marketing research. The central themes around which most of the works at SRGB was organized is presented here. 4.2 Completion of the Assignments Most of the assignments handled were long-term projects that had already been started. Some were in the beginning phase and some were in their final stages. Some of them are also a type of continuous research with several waves. The four research studies that were been participated are described here.
4.2.1 Awareness and acceptance of UK Qualification

It was an ongoing project. It therefore made sense to continue doing what the rest of the team was doing (taking interviews of different types and writing those down). It required all three interns from IBA to take interviews of different people. At the very beginning tough job of taking face to face interviews was assigned. Some visits to a private university (BRAC University for this author) and a multinational (Novartis Bangladesh Limited) helped the job done. Then the qualitative part commenced. A 7 day tour to Chittagong was made to take the KII of a number of Deans and department heads. The tour was successful with nice opportunities to learn interview and communication skills. Then again a 5 day tour to Rajshahi, the land of heat and mango. It was also a very successful tour with acquiring of huge experiences. Finally different top management personnels from different organizations and universities like University of Dhaka, International Islamic University Chittagong Dhaka Campus, Square, Grameenphone, Dhaka Bank, BMET, UGC etc. were interviewed.

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4.2.2 Assessment of Grameen Kalyan Clinics

This was a new project altogether. The preparation and translating of questionnaires were taking place. Tough job of doing most effective translation to Bangla of the English questionnaires were done effectively.
4.2.3 Global Opinion Poll on Social, Economic and Political Issues 2009, Project Green, Wave 9

This is a regular project taken by SRGB every year. The author participated in a three day internal training session to see how the field coordinators trained and assigned their jobs. It is a survey that takes place throughout Bangladesh. The real world way of survey was learned here.
4.2.4 Mystery Shopping on Banking Products and Service

It was done for HSBC Bank. The author visited GEC and Agrabad branch in Chittagong where he observed the customer care quality of the branches and wrote a report with assigning points. 4.3 Benefits of the Program Benefit from the internship programme was more than what was expected in a number of ways: Having a rare opportunity to use the knowledge and skills that had been acquired back at the institute to provide critical real world research method information. Career-wise, the internship programme undoubtedly enriched my curriculum vitae (CV). Also, having gotten a chance to interact with most staff, it gave an insight on how to shape the career towards a research job in the near future. The internship programme gave me a chance not only to work with SRGB but also a chance to learn from the research experts and consultants. Working with people from different parts of the world was a rare chance that you can’t easily get from any other organization in Kenya. Therefore to me this was another opportunity to make friends and share ideas. To conclude, the internship at SRGB was a rewarding experience and provided with some new perspectives that was not came across during studies back at the institute.

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5.0 Critical Assessment of the Methodology of the Project “Awareness and Acceptance of UK Qualifications in Bangladesh”
This is the main focus of this report. Methodology is one of the most important part of any research study. Literally methodology is the way in which the data are collected for the research project. Methodology can be defined as:  "the analysis of the principles of methods, rules, and postulates employed by a discipline"  "the systematic study of methods that are, can be, or have been applied within a discipline" or  "a particular procedure or set of procedures." Selection of methodology mainly depends on the objective of the research, but in real life the objective comes with different factors and dimensions unlike pure independent research. Here it will be shown what the methodology for this project was, probable mistakes both in crafting and executing of the methodology and finally the justification for it. 5.1 Background of the study This study was taken for British Council, the United Kingdom’s cultural relation’s organization. Here some important parts of the research will be shown. These will help us understand the requirements and the goal of this study.
5.1.1 Definition of the Business Problem

The business was defined as – “Although UK qualifications are popular and growing, recognition and acceptance by employers, government and higher education providers is variable. We need to be able to: 1. Identify where recognition and acceptance are weak but critical 2. Identify new sectors for growth 3. Review our product portfolio so that it meets market requirements.
5.1.2 Research Objectives

To ascertain the current level of awareness and acceptance of UK qualifications (school levels and professional) among the leading Bangladeshi private and public sector employers and the higher education institutions (both public and private). To identify the main reasons for the variable levels of awareness and acceptance. Assess the impact of the growth of the private sector and the continued policy of privatizing of state run assets by the government.
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• •

In order to achieve this we would require research to be carried out with:

1. Top 6 public universities. 2. Top 5 private universities. 3. Professional associations 4. Government 5. Private sector Suggested areas of research: • • • • • • Which foreign qualifications are known Which foreign qualifications are accepted Apart from subject knowledge what skills are essential and how are they currently assessed Reasons for acceptance/non-acceptance Number of students from English medium schools applying for places- at private universities (plus which ones) at public universities and overseas. Profile of students following professional/vocational exams – school medium attended (English/Bangla), reason for doing this rather university course.

5.2 Methodology After turning the idea into a research question and reviewing any necessary literature, the method of research must be considered. The methodology selected should be the one that will be the most effective to collect the data needed to answer the research question or to test the hypothesis. Research studies may be either quantitative or qualitative, although it is possible to use both approaches in the same research project and this has been used in this project on UK qualifications. The choice of research design must be appropriate to the subject under investigation (Patton, 1987). So it should be investigated that whether a research on education really admits the opportunity of blending two methodologies.
5.2.1 Criticism on Selection and Implementation of Quantitative Study

In quantitative research the data collected takes the form of measurements or counts which can be statistically analysed. The process of quantitative research follows standard procedures, methods, forms of analysis and reporting the results of the research undertaken. This standardisation maximises objectivity. Quantitative methods can be used for comparison of subgroups and analysis is generally conducted through statistics. The method is based on meanings derived from numbers and results are numerical and standardised data.
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Quantitative methods use numbers and statistics. General sequence is as follows: 1. Observe/present questionnaire/ask questions with fixed answers 2. Tabulate 3. Summarise data 4. Analyse data 5. Draw conclusions Quantitative research designs are characterised by the assumption that human behaviour can be explained by what may be termed "social facts", which can be investigated by methodologies that utilise "the deductive logic of the natural sciences" (Horna, 1994, p. 121). Quantitative investigations look for "distinguishing characteristics, elemental properties and empirical boundaries" (p. 121) and tend to measure "how much", or "how often" (Nau, 1995). They are appropriate to examine the behavioural component, such as attendance at class. So, it can be seen that quantitative methodologies do have strengths for becoming appropriate for educational research like this project on UK qualifications. These may be summarised as follows: • • • • Quantitative methodologies are appropriate to measure overt behaviour. They are also strong in measuring descriptive aspects, such as the composition of the students. Quantitative methodologies allow comparison and replication. Reliability and validity may be determined more objectively than qualitative techniques.

These strengths however, are not the sole prerogative of quantitative designs. Indeed, many of the arguments for the use of quantitative research, especially in an academic climate where resources are limited, have pragmatic origins in terms of allowing large scale data collection and analysis at reasonable cost and effort, as well as providing statistical "proof". So this problem of large scale data collection could also be proved unwise in this situation. So this shows a negative opinion about the choice of quantitative methodology for this study. A further weakness of quantitative approaches lies in their tendencies to take a "snapshot" of a situation, that is to measure variables at a specific moment in time. Acceptance of UK may be affected by temporal changes, such as the current image of the country, or the quality of opposition (like USA, Australia), which cannot always be identified within a single quantitative study. According to Colon, Taylor, and Willis (2000) qualitative research emphasizes “participant observation” whereas quantitative methods rely on the “research instrument through which measurements are made” (p. 2). Weiler (2001) adds that if teachers want “deeper understandings of their students and their learning,” they will not be able to achieve this through quantitative research-they will need to be “intimately involved” in the process (p. 415). Qualitative research would provide this opportunity. As Labuschagne (2003) says, “qualitative data provide depth and detail through direct
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quotation and careful description of situations, events, interactions and observed behaviours” (p. 1) or what Jones (1997) describes as “empathetic understanding” (p. 3). Winter (2000) concurs that while “quantitative research limits itself to what can be measured or quantified,” qualitative research “attempts to ‘pick up the pieces’ of the unquantifiable, personal, in depth, descriptive and social aspects of the world” (p. 8). So now it looks like the decision for this project should be more inclined toward qualitative approach.
5.2.2 Criticism on Selection and Implementation of Qualitative Study (KII and IDI)

Qualitative research offers insights and understandings of participants, which is unobtainable by quantitative research, but is more than just non-numerical research. It aims to study the subject in their natural surroundings and to collect naturally occurring, non-biased data. It describes in words, rather than numbers, the qualities of the subject through observation. Methods of qualitative research include structured and unstructured interviews, group interviews and focus groups. Qualitative methods can highlight key themes or patterns emerging in the project, are used to comprehend and manage data and used to develop and test hypotheses. Qualitative methods use descriptions and categories. General sequence here is as follows: 1. Observe/ask questions with open-ended answers 2. Record what is said and/or done 3. Interpret 4. Return to observe/ask more questions 5. (recurring cycles of 2-4 iteration) 6. Theorising 7. Draw conclusions Qualitative research designs are associated with interpretative approaches, from the informants' emic point of view, rather than etically measuring discrete, observable behaviour. Qualitative methodologies are strong in those areas that have been identified as potential weaknesses within the quantitative approach, e.g. the use of interviews and observations to provide a deep, rather than broad, set of knowledge about a particular phenomenon, and the appropriateness to investigate cognitive and affective aspects of students. This depth allows the researcher to achieve "Verstehen", or empathetic "understanding". The concept of Verstehen is the basis for a critique of quantitative research designs, and their empiricist emphasis. The argument used is that quantitative methods measure human behaviour "from outside", without accessing the meanings that individuals give to their measurable behaviour. If, as many authors have suggested, behavior of students contains psychological, as well as sociological dimensions, then the emphasis should rather be upon gaining an understanding of how the subjects themselves view their own particular situations. A qualitative research design allows these understandings to be investigated from the informant’s point of view. So the choice of qualitative
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research is very appropriate here. Both KII and IDI seem appropriate. The only problem that could be marked is the number of qualitative interviews for this particular study; it is about around 200, which is practically most difficult to make possible with effectiveness. Again accumulating such a high number of interview results to make a summary is also so difficult. But answer could be found on the real world practice to satisfy customer needs.
5.2.3 Criticism on FGD

By focus group discussions, we refer to a group of 4-12 people brought together to participate in the discussion of an area of interest. Trained moderators run the discussions, and records are made of the course of the discussions. Focus groups, of course, are a popular (some even think too popular) method in marketing research (Nancarrow, Vir, & Barker, 2005), but they have had a role in serious social science research since the seminal work of R. K. Merton and P. Lazarsfeld (Hollander, 2004; Morgan, 1988). During the past decades, they have established their role in sociology and communications research. In recent years, they have also become increasingly popular in applied fields such as nursing research, urban and community studies, development studies, and educational research (e.g., Barbour & Kitzinger, 2001; Gibbs, 1997). A distinctive feature of focus groups is that they create research data by generating social interaction. This is done by assembling a group of participants to discuss a specific topic and then observe how the ensuing discussion evolves (Boddy, 2005). The underlying assumption is that meaning is created in social interaction (e.g., Wilkinson, 2001). Organized and focused group discussions provide a context for participants to articulate the meaning of their experiences and elaborate on them in a collective sensemaking process. Of course, focus groups are also used to obtain individual viewpoints; it is typical to instruct discussants that the aim is not to reach consensus, but to explore the different viewpoints that emerge. The method is popular in marketing research because it is a quick and easy way to gain a wealth of perspectives on a novel or relatively unexplored topic (Threlfall, 1999). By observing, recording, and analyzing the interaction in the group, researchers can also gain an understanding of how the participants approach the topic and what kind of language they use to frame the issues. Interaction also allows participants to pose questions to each other and to redefine their own views as the discussion evolves. The result of FGD depends sometimes largely on the skill of the moderator, which is a variable thing. In this study on awareness and acceptance of UK qualifications it may suffer to this problem due to time and budget constraints.

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5.2.4 A Mixed-Methodology Approach to the Study

Although the use of a single methodology has been advocated by a number of authors, many of the supporting arguments are decidedly pragmatic, such as time constraints, the need to limit the scope of a study, and the difficulty of publishing the findings (Creswell, 1994). Here in this study, only time constraint is the factor which could have been considered for a single methodology approach. Denzin and Lincoln (1994) write that "objective reality can never be captured" (p. 2). To assume that even with binocular vision one can "have" all the information, or even "know" what is true is a dangerous positivistic position. The rub between the two methodologies comes when we analyze the assumptions behind each one. These are clearly spelled out in detail by Denzin and Lincoln (1994, pp. 4-6) and can be summarized as follows. The differences between quantitative and qualitative research is that the first is positivist, limiting, unable to capture the subjects' perspective, abstract, and based on flat descriptions. Qualitative research, the critics claim, tends to be unscientific and based on slipshod methodologies. It's proponents claim that it offers a postmodern and post-positivist view more in keeping with prevailing social attitudes. They also claim that such a research method is able to capture the voices of many and provide what Geertz (1973) called a "thick description" of everyday life. The crucial aspect in justifying a mixed methodology research design is that both single methodology approaches (qualitative only and quantitative only) have strengths and weaknesses. The combination of methodologies, on the other hand, can focus on their relevant strengths. The researcher should aim to achieve the situation where "blending qualitative and quantitative methods of research can produce a final product which can highlight the significant contributions of both" (Nau, 1995, p. 1), where "qualitative data can support and explicate the meaning of quantitative research" (Jayaratne, 1993, p. 117). By adopting the following assumptions, the researcher should ensure that the final product maximises the strengths of a mixed methods approach. So the research team of SRGB should be given credit for mixing nicely qualitative and quantitative to get the most out of it if we look over the difficulty of implementation and greater sample size for its qualitative part.

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6.0 Conclusion and Recommendation
It can be concluded by raising the voice to show the effectiveness of a research firm SRGB in preparing research works fairly supported by theory practitioners. Difference between theory and practice is a very old phenomenon which we can see here too. But it can be concluded easily that though the practice is not perfectly similar with the suggestions from theory, the practice will work effectively to bring out the result, which is the goal of all research works. So it is seen that the period of attachment with SRGB has given the author an utmost opportunity to understand situations and practical requirements in real life which would have never been possible without this exposure. It also provide many small and detailed experiences and understandings which is tough to express in an internship report. So one should first of all recommend for the necessity of a tough internship program, as it was in SRGB, for the students to complete the institutional learning process more effectively. Secondly the internship provider should always try to give important practical tips and shares from practical experiences. It was available in SRGB, but could have become more. An orientation program for the internees to make them better understand the practices in real organizations should be a must everywhere. They may design a training program on this issue. Otherwise always small mistakes were required to understand and learn which could have been minimized with a training program. A rare combination of specialists in the institution and at the organization is not a matter of recommendation; it is a favor of luck which became very helpful for an interne like the author. The helpful attitude that was available both from the institutional adviser and organizational supervisor should be a must part of internship program. Choosing an organizational supervisor from the pool of alumni of the same institution may had given some extra benefits. SRGB is a steadily growing company which should now try to make their infrastructure more modern, human resources more committed, research works more allied with theoretical developments and a better system to make the implementation of the methodology more effective. Change itself is a power. A successful style may not work when days have changed. The corporate world in Bangladesh is becoming bigger, so as the intensity of competition and so as the importance of research. So in the coming days competition among research firms will become fiercer, SRGB should start taking the preparation and building it as a strong local brand.

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Bibliography
Barbour, R. S., & Kitzinger, J. (Eds.). (2001). Developing focus group research: Politics, theory, and practice. London: Sage. Colon, B., Taylor, K. A., & Willis, J. (2000). Constructivist instructional design: Creating a multimedia package for teaching critical qualitative research. The Qualitative Report, 5(1-2). Retrieved from http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR5-1/colon.html Creswell, J. (1994). Research design: Qualitative and quantitative approaches. London: Sage. Denzin, N. K., & Lincoln, Y. S. (1994). Introduction: Entering the field of qualitative research. In N. K. Denzin and Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), Handbook of qualitative research (pp. 1-17). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Geertz, C. (1973). The interpretation of cultures. New York: Basic Books. Hollander, J. (2004). The social context of focus groups. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 33(5), 602-637. Horna, J. (1994). The study of leisure. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Jayaratne, T. (1993). Quantitative methodology and feminist research. In M. Hammersley (Ed.), Social research: Philosophy, politics and practice (pp. 109-123). London: Sage. Jones, I. (1997). Mixing qualitative and quantitative methods in sports fan research. The Qualitative Report, 3(4). Retrieved from http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR3- 4/jones.html Labuschagne, A. (2003). Qualitative research – airy fairy or fundamental? The Qualitative Report, 8(1), 100-103. Retrieved from http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR8-1/labuschagne.pdf Nancarrow, C., Vir, J., & Barker, A. (2005). Ritzer´s McDonaldisation and applied qualitative marketing research. Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, 8(3), 296-311. Nau, D. (1995, December). Mixing Methodologies: Can Bimodal Research be a Viable Post-Positivist Tool? The Qualitative Report [On-line serial], 2 (3), Available: http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR23/nau.html Patton, M. (1987). How to use qualitative methods in evaluation. London: Sage Publications. Boddy, C. (2005). A rose by any other name may smell as sweet but “group discussion” is not another name for a “focus group” nor should it be. Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, 8(3), 248-255. Threlfall, K. D. (1999). Using focus groups as a consumer research tool. Journal of Marketing Practice, 5(4), 102-105. Wilkinson, S. (2001). How useful are focus groups in feminist research? In R. S. Barbour & J. Kitzinger (Eds.), Developing focus group research: Politics, theory, and practice (pp. 64-78). London: Sage. Winter, G. (2000). A comparative discussion of the notion of “validity” in qualitative and quantitative research. The Qualitative Report, 4(3-4). Retrieved from http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR43/winter.html

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Annexure I: Questionnaire of Key Informant Interview (KII)

srgb
SRG Bangladesh Limited
1.1.1.1 House 45, Road 7, Block F, Banani, Dhaka 1213, Bangladesh Tel: 9871839, 9871927 Fax: 9871436 E-mail: srgbangladesh@gmail.com, srgb@btcl.net.bd Web Site: http://www.srgb.org

Centre For Research & Management Consulting

b

Awareness and Acceptance of UK Qualifications in Bangladesh
Key Informant Interview (KII) - Top Management
[University/Associations/Government]
I am____________________________ from SRG Bangladesh Limited (SRGB). SRGB is an independent and impartial social & marketing research and management consulting firm of Bangladesh. Currently SRGB is conducting a market research on awareness and acceptance of UK qualification in Bangladesh. In this perspective, we have randomly selected you for an interview. We will research on the opinions provided by you and others. The information that you give shall be kept strictly confidential. Division Code Rajshahi 1 Khulna 2 Dhaka 3 Chittagon 4 g Barisal 5 Sylhet 6 ___________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________

Respondents Name

Name of the Institution/Company

Designation __________________________________ Department________________________ Mobile/Telephone _______________________ Email ______________________________

Institution/Company Address _______________________________________________________ Institution/Company Public Unversity 1 Government 4 Gender Iterviewer’s Name Supervisor’s Name Male 1 Private University2 Multinational 5 Female 2 Association 3 Local 6

____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Quality Controllar’s Name ___________________________________________________________ 30

Date of Interview

_____________________________________________________________

31

Issues to be Discussed
Objective: 1. To know about acceptance and recognition of UK education in Bangladesh 2. To identify the main reasons for the variable levels of awareness and recognition of UK qualifications. 3. To assess the impact of the growth of the private sector and the continued policy of privatizing of state run assets by the government. Sl 1 Questions
Which foreign qualifications are known in Bangladesh? Which UK qualifications are known in Bangladesh?

2

Which foreign qualifications are accepted? What are their relative acceptance levels in different categories of organizations such as private universities, public universities, GoB, multinational companies, national large private companies, etc? What are the subject level variations of the acceptance? What are their relative acceptance levels at your organization or member organizations?

3

Which UK universities are known in Bangladesh? What are their acceptance levels in general? What are the subject level variations of the acceptance? What are their acceptance levels at your organization?

4

Apart from subject knowledge, what skills are essential and how are they currently assessed? What are their relative importance or weight levels? Do you test level of English of your prospective employees? If yes, How? Do you provide training to improve level of English of your current employees? If yes, how do you provide the training?

5

What are reasons for acceptance/non-acceptance of foreign qualifications, in general, and UK qualifications, in particular? Are their priorities and preferences regarding to local and foreign degrees in different organizations in Bangladesh? What are the recruitment policies of your company in terms of • Education • Universities • Degree or subject • Others What are the reasons behind those polices?

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What are numbers of professionals having degrees from following categories of universities are working at your company? • • • • • • Local o Private o Public USA Australia Canada UK Others

What are company policies regarding professional development of their staff in long term as well as short term? What are the areas your organization provides trainings to employees? How are they delivered? Are their variations in policies of professional development for staff members having different categories of degrees? Would you please comment on the variations in salary/benefit/promotion based on categories of degrees at your industry level? • • • Local university degrees o Private o Public Foreign degrees and professional qualifications UK degrees and professional qualifications

What are their variations at your own company?

6

In general, what are the ratios between students coming from Bangla and English medium schools applying for private and public universities of Bangladesh, and universities of overseas countries? What are the profiles of students following professional/vocational exams-school medium attended (English/Bangla)? Why are they doing this rather than university course?

7

8

What are the emerging areas of growth for university education? How many students will be willing of pursuing studies in these areas in public, private, and foreign universities? How many students could be interested for UK universities?

9

Would the market accept vocational award which are tested through locally marked practical but moderated overseas? Would these have the same level of acceptance as qualifications tested through formal exams?

1 0

How are following factors shaping the demand of education provided by top private, UK, and other foreign universities and professional bodies: • accessibility • availability • variety of degrees • price competitiveness • quality

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• • • • • •

lead time name or brand recognition Recognition of by prospective employers Getting immigration Others

1 1

What are the sectors where recognition and acceptance of UK education is weak, but market opportunities are high and UK universities are capable to serve them? Why are recognition and acceptance weak? How should UK universities address them? What is the attractiveness of UK/foreign university education through local study or couching centers? What could be likely public policies shaping delivery of UK/foreign university education through local study or couching centers?

1 2 1 3 1 4 1 5

What are the areas of opportunities where UK education and service providers could be competitive? At what level awareness and acceptance are affecting the UK education in Bangladesh? What are the main sources of knowledge to know about UK education? What are the key reasons for the variable levels of awareness and recognition of UK education in different subject areas? What are the opportunities and constraints faced by the private sector education to grow in Bangladesh? What are policy constraints to improve capacity, quality, and diversity of degrees? What are relative weights of these constraints? What are quality levels of private education? Why are the areas the quality is suffering in private universities? How is public policy framework forcing private universities to improve quality of education? What is the role of competition among private universities to improve the quality of education? Is the revenue earned by private universities enough to improve quality education to a satisfactory level? Is their any development to deal with access to finance issue to make private education more affordable among top grade students? What is the acceptance level of qualifications provided by private universities among • Local private companies • Multinationals • Government organizations • Foreign job markets • Foreign universities • Immigration authorities of USA, UK, Canada, Australia, etc

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Why are the limitations of private universities to improve the quality of education? How much progress private universities are making to improve the quality of education? What are the strengths and weaknesses of graduates of top five private universities of Bangladesh? How is acceptance level of private university education changing in Bangladesh? How far is it becoming a substitute to foreign university education? What are the impacts of the growth of the private sector and the continued policy of privatizing of state run assets by the government on UK education?

1 6

What are the opportunities of addressing potential market failures (i.e, imbalance between supply and demand) in providing quality education in the private sector? How far the imbalance between supply and demand of quality education provided by private universities? How far private university management and governance committed to address quality issues of private university education? How far universities can mobilize resources to address constraints to quality education? Is willingness to pay of the society for quality education good enough to finance the delivery of such education? How far the public policy can play conducive role to improve the quality?

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Annexure II: Questionnaire for In-Depth Interview (IDI)

SRG Bangladesh Limited
1.1.1.2 House 45, Road 7, Block F, Banani, Dhaka 1213, Bangladesh Tel: 9871839, 9871927 Fax: 9871436 E-mail: srgbangladesh@gmail.com, srgb@btcl.net.bd Web Site: http://www.srgb.org

Centre For Research & Management Consulting

sr gbb

Awareness and Acceptance of UK Qualifications in Bangladesh
In-depth Interview (IDI) – Teachers [Public/Private Universities]
I am____________________________ from SRG Bangladesh Limited (SRGB). SRGB is an independent and impartial social & marketing research and management consulting firm of Bangladesh. Currently SRGB is conducting a market research on awareness and acceptance of UK qualification in Bangladesh. In this perspective, we have randomly selected you for an interview. We will research on the opinions provided by you and others. The information that you give shall be kept strictly confidential. Division Code Rajshahi 1 Khulna 2 Dhaka 3 Chittagon 4 g Barisal 5 Sylhet 6 ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________

Respondents Name

Name of the University

Designation __________________________________ Department_________________________ Mobile/Telephone Type of University Gender ____________________ Email __________________________________ Public Private 2 Female 2

1 Male 1

36

Interviewer’s Name Supervisor’s Name

____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Quality Controllar’s Name ___________________________________________________________ Date of Interview _____________________________________________________________

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Issues to be Discussed
Objective: 4. To know about acceptance and recognition of UK education in Bangladesh 5. To identify the main reasons for the variable levels of awareness and recognition of UK qualifications. 6. To assess the impact of the growth of the private sector and the continued policy of privatizing of state run assets by the government. Note: Private and public universities mean private and public universities of Bangladesh only Sl 1 Questions Which foreign qualifications are known in Bangladesh? Which UK qualifications are known in Bangladesh? 2 Which foreign qualifications are accepted? What are their relative acceptance levels in different categories of organizations such as private universities, public universities, GoB, multinational companies, national large private companies, etc? What are their relative acceptance levels at your organization? 3 Which UK universities are known in Bangladesh? What are their acceptance levels in general? What are their relative acceptance levels at your organization? 4 Apart from subject knowledge, what skills are essential and how are they currently assessed? What are their relative importance or weight levels? What are reasons for acceptance/non-acceptance of foreign qualifications, in general, and UK qualifications, in particular? Are their priorities and preferences regarding to local and foreign degrees in different organizations in Bangladesh? What are the areas employers provide trainings to their employees? How do they deliver these trainings? 6 In general, what are the ratios between students coming from Bangla and English medium schools applying for private and public universities of Bangladesh, and universities of overseas countries? How is English tested in the admission test by different categories of universities? 7 What are the profile of students following professional/vocational exams-school medium attended (English/Bangla)? Why are they doing this rather than university course? 8 What are the emerging areas of growth for university education? How many students will be willing of pursuing studies in these areas in public, private, and foreign universities? 38

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How many students could be interested for UK universities? What are the trends of students studying for foreign qualifications by distance learning? 9 Would the market accept vocational award which are tested through locally marked practical but moderated overseas? Would these have the same level of acceptance as qualifications tested through formal exams? 1 0 How are following factors shaping the demand of education provided by top private, UK, and other foreign universities and professional bodies: • accessibility • availability • variety of degrees • price competitiveness • quality • lead time • name or • brand recognition • Recognition of by prospective employers • Getting immigration • Others What are the sectors where recognition and acceptance of UK education is weak, but market opportunities are high and UK universities are capable to serve them? Why are recognition and acceptance weak? How should UK universities address them? What is the attractiveness of UK/foreign education through local study or couching centers? What could be likely public policies shaping delivery of UK/foreign university education through local study or couching centers? 1 2 1 3 What are the areas of opportunities where UK education and service providers could be competitive? At what level awareness and acceptance are affecting the UK education in Bangladesh? What are the main sources of knowledge to know about UK education? 1 4 1 5 What are the key reasons for the variable levels of awareness and recognition of UK education in different subject areas? What are the opportunities and constraints faced by the private sector education to grow in Bangladesh? What are policy constraints to improve capacity, quality, and diversity of degrees? What are quality levels of private education? Why are the areas the quality is suffering in private universities? How is public policy framework forcing private universities to improve quality of education? 39

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What is the role of competition among private universities to improve the quality of education? Is the revenue earned by private universities enough to improve quality education to a satisfactory level? Is their any development to deal with access to finance issue to make private education more affordable among top grade students? What is the acceptance level of qualifications provided by private universities among • Local private companies • Multinationals • Government organizations • Foreign job markets • Foreign universities • Immigration authorities of USA, UK, Canada, Australia, etc Why are the limitations of private universities to improve the quality of education? How much progress private universities are making to improve the quality of education? What are the strengths and weaknesses of graduates of top five private universities of Bangladesh? How is acceptance level of private university education changing in Bangladesh? How far is it becoming a substitute to foreign university education? What are the impacts of the growth of the private sector and the continued policy of privatizing of state run assets by the government on UK education? What are the impacts of the growth of the private sector and the continued policy of privatizing of state run assets by the government on UK education? 1 6 What are the opportunities of addressing potential market failures (i.e, imbalance between supply and demand) in providing quality education in the private sector? How far the imbalance between supply and demand of quality education provided by private universities? How far private university management and governance committed to address quality issues of private university education? How far universities can mobilize resources to address constraints to quality education? Is willingness to pay of the society for quality education good enough to finance the delivery of such education? How far the public policy can play conducive role to improve the quality?

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