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World Bank Group Strategy

World Bank Group Strategy

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The World Bank Group will focus its financial and technical resources to ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity in a sustainable manner, especially in fragile states, Sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia. To this end, it is pulling its specialized agencies (IBRD, IDA, IFC, MIGA) to work more closely in all the areas of engagement, from data collection to socio-economic analysis, technical policy advice, lending, investment, risk mitigation, training and knowledge, as well as looking to strengthen partnerships worldwide, especially within the private sector.
Implementation of the Strategy will require organizational change and a new framework for medium-term financial sustainability to ensure that its resources are commensurate with the roles and responsibilities it carries out on behalf of the international community. Translated into action, the Strategy will reposition the World Bank Group to help transform the lives of the nearly 4 billion people still living in or at the edge of extreme poverty.
The World Bank Group will focus its financial and technical resources to ending extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity in a sustainable manner, especially in fragile states, Sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia. To this end, it is pulling its specialized agencies (IBRD, IDA, IFC, MIGA) to work more closely in all the areas of engagement, from data collection to socio-economic analysis, technical policy advice, lending, investment, risk mitigation, training and knowledge, as well as looking to strengthen partnerships worldwide, especially within the private sector.
Implementation of the Strategy will require organizational change and a new framework for medium-term financial sustainability to ensure that its resources are commensurate with the roles and responsibilities it carries out on behalf of the international community. Translated into action, the Strategy will reposition the World Bank Group to help transform the lives of the nearly 4 billion people still living in or at the edge of extreme poverty.

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Publish date: Sep 10, 2013
Added to Scribd: Oct 09, 2013
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06/05/2015

73. The Bank, IFC, and MIGA have participated in a wide

variety of partnerships for development. Partnerships pro-

vide an opportunity to engage with diverse actors, including

CSOs, multilateral and bilateral agencies, academic institu-

tions and think tanks, foundations, and the private sector.

They provide a way to harmonize development policies

and practices—at the country level around country priori-

ties, and at the regional and global levels. Partnerships help

shape the global development agenda (e.g., gender, climate,

green growth, global health, governance and transparency)

and help ensure that the development community speaks

with one voice. They foster collective action, develop ideas,

and promote international standards. Partnerships repre-

sent a broad range of collaborative relationships. For exam-

ple, the WBG is:

n Working with better-off developing countries that are

increasingly providing knowledge, experience, and, in

some cases, finance to the poorest countries. The WBG

supports these emerging partners, encouraging South-

South exchanges.

n Working at the country level with governments and

partners to ensure that approaches are well coordinated

and contribute to national development priorities; and

collaborating with CSOs, local communities, nongov-

ernmental organizations, and grassroots organizations to

foster ownership, delivery, and feedback.

n Engaging in institutional partnerships (e.g., the UN for

FCS and the EU for accession countries) that focus on

specific development issues for certain client segments.

n Partnering with international bodies and other actors to

advance issues such as governance and anticorruption,

SME finance, capital markets, finance for women, road

safety, food security, urban development, and inclusive

business.

n Partnering with development finance institutions,

including by participating in, and sometimes managing,

investment vehicles.

n Collaborating with the IMF and other MDBs to share

standards, cofinance projects, and together influence the

broader development agenda.

n Entering into partnerships with foundations to share

good practice, convene key stakeholders, and develop

programs.

74. There has been a surge in partnership programs in

the WBG over the past decade. In 2011, some 186 Bank

programs received close to $7.5 billion in donor contribu-

tions and disbursed $6 billion. This substantial role illus-

trates that development partners have confidence in the

WBG to provide fiduciary oversight, entrée into country

programs, and support for global agendas and international

standard-setting. Trust funds—with funding from donors,

other multilaterals, and increasingly from private founda-

tions/philanthropy—account for one out of every 10 dollars

the Bank disburses to client countries today. They support

nearly one-quarter of the Bank’s administrative spend-

ing and are now solidly embedded in the Bank’s fiduciary

controls and operational systems. Trust funds are also an

important instrument for IFC, particularly for helping cli-

ents prepare and manage investments.

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