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Business Builder 

Paul Emmerson 

A series of three photocopiable Business English Teacher’s Resource Books at 
intermediate level. They provide a flexible approach to teaching and include excellent 
material for in­company classes, summer schools or supplementary use, allowing the 
teacher to design their own course. The series provides activities for language 
development as well as activities for skills training. 
Each book is divided into three modules (1 to 9): 
M odules 1, 2, 3: Social English, Telephoning, Job interviews 
M odules 4, 5, 6: Discussions and meetings, Business correspondence, Report writing 
M odules 7, 8, 9: Presentations, Company product and customer relations, Negotiations 
Each book contains a needs analysis which can be given to each new student to assess 
their needs. Business Builder gives you the flexibility of ready­made lessons which can be 
chosen individually for your students in any profession or business area. Activities all 
stand alone and can be mixed in any order to cover the full range of business 
communication skills. Most activities are extendable to higher or lower levels. 
A wide variety of communicative activities makes this series ideal for one­to­one or group 
teaching. Full teacher’s notes are provided with each lesson. Unit maps provide a clear 
indication of language focus and time required for each activity.
B u s i n e s s Builder Modules 1 2 3

Contents
Introduction
Needs Analysis
Social English Minutes Activity type

1.1 Introductions 40– 50 Language Work


Introducing yourself and someone else. Welcoming a visitor and making ‘small talk’
1.2 Hello and goodbye 40– 50 Language Work
Starting and ending a conversation with someone you know
1.3 Showing interest 40– 50 Language Work
‘Echoing’, asking questions, making a personal response
1.4 Making a personal comment 30– 40 Language Work
Apparently, Actually, Obviously, Luckily, To be honest, Between you and me
1.5 Thinking time and turn-taking 30– 40 Language Work
Well, I mean, Actually, So, Anyway, Still, By the way
1.6 Requests 30– 40 Language Work
Indirect question forms. Polite requests. Positive and negative replies
1.7 Offering help 30– 40 Language Work
Offering help, accepting and refusing
1.8 Saying yes 30– 40 Language Work
Saying yes in a way that develops the conversation
1.9 Saying no 30– 40 Language Work
Saying no in a polite way
1.10 Disagreeing 40– 50 Language Work
Questions to show doubt. Negative questions. Yes, but ..., Actually, ...
1.11 Describing food 40– 50 Language Work
Food vocabulary. Describing local dishes
1.12 In a restaurant 1 40– 50 Language Work
Recommending and ordering. Leaving, paying and thanking
1.13 Your free time and home 40– 50 Skills Practice
Sports and hobbies. Cultural interests and holidays. Home
1.14 Your country and city 40– 50 Skills Practice
Regions. City: description, culture and people. Local products
1.15 Current affairs and the economy 40– 50 Skills Practice
The political and economic situation. The state of the market
1.16 At a hotel 50– 60 Skills Practice
A telephone booking. Checking in and out. Complaining
1.17 In a restaurant 2 40– 50 Skills Practice
Preparing to order. ‘Small talk’during the meal, leaving and paying
1.18 Showing a visitor your workplace 30– 40 Skills Practice
Giving a guided tour of your workplace to a visitor
1.19 Dialogue building: arriving at a company variable Skills Practice
Open framework for writing a dialogue

This page has been downloaded from www.businessenglishonline.net. It is photocopiable,


but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers Limited 2002.
B u s i n e s s Builder Modules 1 2 3

Telephoning Minutes Activity type


2.1 Leaving a message 1 40– 50 Language Work
The alphabet. Giving a name and address. Messages. Checking information
2.2 Leaving a message 2 40– 50 Language Work
Recycling of leaving, taking and checking a message
2.3 Exchanging information 1 30– 40 Language Work
Saying numbers. Checking facts and figures
2.4 Exchanging information 2 30– 40 Language Work
Silence fillers. Exchanging information and checking
2.5 Arranging a meeting 40– 50 Language Work
Beginning and ending a call. Arranging a meeting. Cancelling and rearranging
2.6 Arranging a company visit 30– 40 Skills Practice
Discussing a schedule for a company visit. Offering help
2.7 Yoghurt sales 30– 40 Skills Practice
Exchanging information and checking. Discussing sales and markets
2.8 Travel information 30– 40 Skills Practice
Making/receiving an enquiry about trains and flights
2.9 Office furniture 40– 50 Skills Practice
A customer/supplier conversation. Ordering, discussing terms of sale, apologizing
2.10 The Lucky Lobster 40– 50 Skills Practice
Booking a table in a restaurant. Asking questions and checking information
2.11 Pacific City 40– 50 Skills Practice
Interview:Asking for/giving information about a city: facts, figures, plans
2.12 Pharmalab 40– 50 Skills Practice
Interview:Asking for/giving information about a company: facts, figures, strategy
2.13 Global ambitions 30– 40 Skills Practice
Discussing markets and pricing policy. Persuading
2.14 Dialogue building: phone call variable Skills Practice
Open framework for writing a dialogue

Job interviews Minutes Activity type


3.1 Your CV/Resume 50– 60 Language Work
CVs and resumes: content, style, layout. Preparing a CV
3.2 Job interview 60– 90 Language Work
Interview tips. Interview based on students’ own CVs/Resumes
3.3 Covering letter 60– 90 Language Work
Writing a job application letter. Mini-interview for the job
3.4 Difficult questions 50– 60 Language Work
Dealing with difficult interview questions. Practice mini-interview
3.5 Mini-interview: your background and job 50– 60 Skills Practice
Interview practice: education, previous job, current job, personal qualities
3.6 Mini-interview: the job itself 50– 60 Skills Practice
Interview practice: questions about a specific job
3.7 Mini-interview: your management abilities 50– 60 Skills Practice
Interview practice: teamwork, negotiation, planning, decision-making
3.8 Mini-interview: using a case-study 50– 60 Skills Practice
Interview practice: a real situation as evidence of abilities/personal qualities

This page has been downloaded from www.businessenglishonline.net. It is photocopiable,


but all copies must be complete pages. Copyright © Macmillan Publishers Limited 2002.
Business Builder

1.2
Hello and goodbye
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 5 Explain to the students that you are now going to


To practise starting and ending a conversation with practice ending a conversation. Refer to section C
someone you know. and ask students to cover the phrases a–k with a
piece of paper. Divide the class into pairs and start
TIME. the activity: students predict and write down two or
40–50 minutes three phrases. Take class feedback on their
PREPARATION. suggestions.
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in 6 Ask students to take away the piece of paper. Ask
the class. the pairs to match phrases a–k with stages 1–11.

PROCEDURE. ANSWERS.
1 Say two or three of the opening lines from section A a-1 b-10 c-4 d-2 e-3 f-9 g-6 h-5 i-11
of the worksheet to different students. Monitor the j-7 k-8
replies to see whether they develop the 7 Tell the students that they are going to practise a
conversation. similar dialogue without using their notes. Divide
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student the class into new pairs and appoint hosts and
and ask them to look at section A. Study the visitors. They change roles and repeat when they
examples in class. Then refer to the task underneath finish. Ask students to turn over their worksheets
the examples and ask the students to cover the (it is not a memory test). Start the activity, circulate
replies with a piece of paper. Divide the class into and make a note of good/bad language use.
pairs and appoint As and Bs. Ask the As to say 8 (Optional) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-
opening lines A1–8, and the Bs to invent a reply play for the class.
that develops the conversation in a friendly way (it 9 Hold a short feedback slot.
is not a memory test). They can continue for a few 10 Now, or in the next class as recycling: Refer to the
more lines.They change roles and repeat when they instructions for section D. Set the scene: you are in
finish. Start the activity and circulate. an airport lounge and by chance meet a colleague
3 Ask students to remove the piece of paper. As class who you know well. Each pair will start a
feedback, look at the replies on the worksheet and conversation, make some small talk, and then end it.
compare with the students’ own replies. Divide the class into new pairs. Start the activity,
4 Refer to the instructions for section B. Set up the circulate and make a note of good/bad language use.
activity: imagine that you are all colleagues and it is 11 Hold a short feedback slot.
9:00 on Monday morning. Students will walk
around saying hello to each other, have short
conversations and then move on. Start the activity:
join in yourself.

Business Builder Teacher Resource Series © 1999. Published by Macmillan Heinemann English Language Teaching.
Business Builder

1.2
Hello and goodbye
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A When you start a conversation try to reply in a way that develops the conversation.

1 How are you? © Fine thanks. And you? You’re looking well.
2 Nice to see you again. © Nice to see you too. How are you?
3 It’s been a long time, hasn’t it. © Yes, I think we last met two years ago in Manila.
4 Nice weather today, isn’t it. © Yes, lovely. I hope it stays like this for the weekend.
5 Terrible weather, isn’t it. © Yes, awful. I think it’s rained every day since I arrived.
6 That’s a nice shirt/blouse. © Thanks. I bought it from Harrods.
7 This coffee’s a bit weak. © Yes, it is, isn’t it. Not like the coffee you get in Italy.
8 Did you get that report I sent you? © Yes, I did, thanks. It was very useful.

Now cover the replies with a piece of paper. Start conversations with a partner and continue naturally
for a few lines.

B It’s Monday morning. Walk around. Say hello to your colleagues.

C A host and a visitor are having a drink in the bar after a successful business meeting. The visitor
is flying back to Tokyo tomorrow. Study this model and write down two or three phrases you
might hear.
Visitor Host

1 Start a ‘leaving’ dialogue 2 Reply to the visitor


3 Say why you must leave 4 Show interest in the visitor’s plans
5 Give more information 6 Make a final reference to business
7 Thank the host for his/her help 8 Reply – say it’s been a pleasure
9 Make a second reference to leaving 10 Wish the visitor a good trip and send your
11 Refer to the next meeting and say goodbye regards to someone

Match phrases a–k below to the stages 1–11 above.

a Is that the time? I guess I should be going.


b It’s been nice meeting you again. Have a good trip, and give my regards to your wife.
c Really? What time do you get there?
d Oh, so soon?
e I’m afraid so, I’ve got a long day tomorrow – I’m flying back to Tokyo.
f Well, I really must go now.
g Well, thank you very much for coming. I think we had a very useful meeting.
h Around six in the evening local time, and then I have to catch a train.
i Thanks. I’ll do that. See you next month in Hamburg. Bye.
j Yes, I agree, the meeting was very productive. And thanks very much for your help. I really appreciate it.
k Not at all. It’s been a pleasure.

D Work with a new partner. You are in an airport lounge. You see someone you know. Start and end
a conversation.

© Paul Emmerson 1999. Published by Macmillan Heinemann English Language Teaching


©
PHOTOCOPIABLE
Business Builder

1.3
Showing interest
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 10 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 11 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.4
Making a personal comment
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 12 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 13 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.5
Thinking time and turn-taking
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 14 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 15 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.6
Requests
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 16 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 17 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.7
Offering help
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 18 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 19 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.8
Saying yes
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 20 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 21 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.9
Saying no
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 22 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 23 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.10
Disagreeing
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 24 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 25 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.11
Describing food
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 26 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 27 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.12
In a restaurant 1
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 28 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 29 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.13
Your free time and home
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Refer to the instructions for section B. Explain that


To practise talking about sports and hobbies, cultural students should write notes about themselves,
interests, holidays and home. working individually. Start the activity and circulate,
helping with vocabulary.
TIME. 4 Refer to the instructions for section C. Divide the
40–50 minutes class into groups of two or three students. Remind
PREPARATION. students to listen carefully, to use the questions in
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in section A and to use other questions as well. Start
the class. the activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
language use.
PROCEDURE. 5 (Option) Ask the pairs/threes from the previous
1 Write up on the board Your free time. Ask the group activity to regroup. The new groups start by talking
how they spend their free time and write ideas on a little about their previous partner/s and then find
the board. out about their new partner/s.
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the
instructions. Explain that they will use the questions
to interview other people later. Divide the class
into pairs, start the activity and circulate. Take
class feedback by writing additional questions
on the board.
POSSIBLE ANSWERS.
1 Do you like to cook? Is football popular in your
country?
2 Do you ever go to the theatre/opera? What is the
traditional music from your country?
3 What is your flat/house like? Are you married? Does
your husband/wife work?

Business Builder Teacher Resource Series © 1999. Published by Macmillan Heinemann English Language Teaching.
Business Builder

1.13
Your free time and home
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Look at the example questions, then write one more for each group.
1 Sports and hobbies

So, what do you do in your free time? Are you interested in sport?

Do you collect anything? –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

2 Cultural interests and holidays

What sort of music/films do you like? Do you read books about management?

Where do you go for your holidays? –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

3 Home

So, where do you live? Do you live in a house or a flat?

Do you live in the centre or the suburbs? –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

B Make some notes about yourself. Use the ideas below and add more ideas of your own.
1 Sports and hobbies

I play a little –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

I used to play ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– but now –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

I like to go ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (+ verb with -ing)

I collect –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

2 Cultural interests and holidays

(books) I like –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

(music) I like –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

(films) I like –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

(magazines) I read –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

(holidays) On my last holiday I went to –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

3 Home

I live near –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

I was born in –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

I’m married with two children. Their names are –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

My husband/wife/partner –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

I’m single at the moment./I’m divorced.

C Use the questions in section A to find out about other people.

© Paul Emmerson 1999. Published by Macmillan Heinemann English Language Teaching


©
PHOTOCOPIABLE
Business Builder

1.14
Your country and city
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Refer to the instructions for section B. Explain that


To practise talking about regions and cities, people and students should write notes about themselves,
culture, local products. working individually. Start the activity and circulate,
helping with vocabulary.
TIME. 4 Refer to the instructions for section C. Divide the
40–50 minutes class into groups of two or three students. Start the
PREPARATION. activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in language use.
the class. 5 (Option) Ask the pairs/threes from the previous
activity to regroup. The new groups start by talking
PROCEDURE. a little about their previous partner/s, and then find
1 Write up on the board the word stereotype and elicit out about their new partner/s.
the meaning (a fixed idea or image that people have 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
of something, but which is often not true). Ask the
students if they can think of any examples of
national stereotypes. Prompt by giving nationalities
other than those represented in the group (this will
be covered in section A of the worksheet). Ask what
the stereotype of that nationality is, whether the
students agree with it etc.
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the
questions and develop a class discussion. Students
are usually very keen to discuss this topic provided
that they first have a chance to confirm, deny or
clarify their own stereotype before other students
comment.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 32 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.14
Your country and city
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A What is the stereotype of your country that other people have? Is there any truth in it?
Are there regional differences in people’s characteristics?

B Make some notes about your own country and city. Use the ideas below and add more
ideas of your own.
1 Country: regions, weather etc.

The north/south/interior is different to the rest of the country because –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

By the coast –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

In the summer/winter the weather is –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

If you want to come for a holiday, the best time is –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

2 City: description

I live in the capital city/a small town/a large port –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Most tourists who come like to see –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Personally, I would recommend visiting –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

All over the city there are a lot of very traditional –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

The most modern area of the city is –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

They have plans to –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

3 City: culture

We have a lot of good music/theatre/opera. For example, –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

My favourite museum is the ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– It’s got a good collection of

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Every year there’s a festival to celebrate –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

4 City: people

Most people live in the centre/suburbs in houses/flats.

It can take ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– hours to get to work.

At the weekends people often –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

In the summer people usually –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Young people –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Old people –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

5 Local products

If you want to buy something to take back with you, I suggest –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

C Talk together in small groups about your countries and cities.


 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 33 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.15
Current affairs and the economy
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. POSSIBLE ANSWERS.


To practise talking about the political and economic 1 What policy does your government have for
situation and the state of the market. privatization/interest rates/regional trade etc. ?
What sort of Government do you have?
TIME.
2 What are the main economic problems in your
40-50 minutes
country at the moment?
PREPARATION. Are houses expensive?
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in Does your country have a nuclear power industry?
the class. 3 What new opportunities do you have to expand
your market?
PROCEDURE.
What are the threats that your company faces?
1 Write up on the board the phrase Current Affairs
Do you have an international market?
and elicit the meaning (events of political
importance happening in the world at the present 3 Refer to the instructions for section B. Explain that
time). Ask the students whether they talk about students should write notes about themselves,
current affairs and politics with foreign visitors, working individually. Start the activity and circulate,
when it is acceptable etc. helping with vocabulary.
(Despite its apparent sensitivity business people do 4 Refer to the instructions for section C. Divide the
talk about these topics in a general way because class into groups of two or three students. Remind
‘stability’ is one of the things that investors are most students to listen carefully, to use the questions in
interested in.) section A and to use other questions as well. Start
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student the activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the language use.
instructions. Explain that they will use the questions 5 (Option) Ask the pairs/threes from the previous
to interview other people later. Take class feedback activity to regroup. The new groups start by talking
by writing additional questions on the board. a little about their previous partner/s, and then find
out about their new partner/s.
6 Hold a short feedback slot.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 34 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.15
Current affairs and the economy
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Look at the questions, then write one more for each group.
1 Politics
I’m a bit out of touch. What’s been happening in your country?
What do you think about the health care/education/unemployment policy in your country?
I’ve been reading a lot in the newspapers about –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– . Can you tell me something
about that?
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

2 Economy
So what are your main industries?
Do you have a problem with inflation?
What’s the unemployment situation at the moment?
How is your Stock Market doing?
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

3 Market
What are the main factors that affect your market?
What’s happening in your market at the moment?
How is your company doing?
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

B Make some notes about your own country and market. Use the ideas below and add more ideas of
your own.
1 Politics

We have a –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– government at the moment. They are trying to


––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Public opinion changed when ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
These days people are worried about ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
In the future, ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

2 Economy

Older industries like –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– arebeing replaced by new areas like


–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– and ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
We have a strong –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– industry, although it will have problems in
the next few years because of ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Inflation –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Unemployment –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

3 Your own market

We’re in a difficult market situation because ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––


We’re responding to the competition by ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
We’re changing our product range and we’re moving more into –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

C Use the questions in section A to find out about other people.


 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 35 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.16
At a hotel
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 6 Hold a short feedback slot.


To practise a series of typical hotel interactions such as 7 Refer to the instructions for section C. Read out the
telephone booking, checking in and out and role notes on the worksheet. Elicit a few phrases
complaining. that the manager and guest can use and write them
on the board. Possible phrases are:
TIME. Manager: Good morning Sir/Madam. May I have
50–60 minutes your name?
PREPARATION. Your room is on the second floor. Turn left when
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in you come out of the lift.
the class. Here are your keys.
Guest: Is it possible to have an early morning call?
PROCEDURE. Start the activity, circulate and make a note of
1 Write up on the board the word Hotel and the good/bad language use.
headings Good service and Bad service. Elicit and 8 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
discuss real examples of each from the students’ for the class.
own experience. 9 Hold a short feedback slot.
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student 10 Refer to the instructions for section D. Read out the
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the role notes on the worksheet and ask guests to invent
instructions and questions. Explain to the students a problem of their own choice. Elicit a few phrases
that pairs will work together to invent the details of that the manager and guest can use and write them
an imaginary hotel by answering all the questions. on the board. Possible phrases are:
Divide the class into pairs and start the activity. Guest: Hello? Is that reception? I’m having a
Circulate and help with vocabulary. problem with …. It’s very inconvenient.
3 Divide the class into new pairs and explain that for Manager: Really? I’m very sorry about that. It’s
the remaining activities they will work with their most unusual. I’ll deal with it immediately.
new partner to do a series of hotel role-plays based Start the activity, circulate and make a note of
on guest and manager. Explain that the managers good/bad language use.
are managers of the hotel they created with their 11 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
previous partner. for the class.
4 Refer to the instructions and role notes for section 12 Hold a short feedback slot.
B. Appoint guests and managers. Ask the managers 13 Refer to the instructions for section E. Read out the
to write down on a piece of paper the name and city role notes on the worksheet and elicit a few phrases
of their hotel and give it to the guest. Elicit a few that the manager and guest can use and write them
phrases that the manager and guest can use at the on the board. Possible phrases are:
start of a telephone call and write them on the Guest: Can I pay by credit card?
board. Possible phrases are: I wonder if I could leave a message for …
Manager: Good morning, Hotel X, how can I help Manager: Of course Sir/Madam, that’s no problem.
you? Have a safe journey.
Guest: Good morning, I’m calling to find out if you Start the activity, circulate and make a note of
have any rooms available for … good/bad language use.
Manager: Certainly Sir/Madam. 14 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
Start the activity, circulate and make a note of for the class.
good/bad language use. 15 Hold a short feedback slot.
5 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
for the class.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 36 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.16
At a hotel
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A You are going to open a hotel. Use the questions to help you make plans.
Where is the hotel?
What is the hotel’s name?
What is its main selling point to attract customers?
What is the cost per night of a single/double room?
Will you have a restaurant? What kind of food will it serve?
Which facilities will you offer? Choose from this list and add a few more of your own.

© fully equipped business centre © free transport from the airport

© 24-hour reception ©

© gymnasium and sauna ©

B Work with a new partner. Decide who is the guest and who is the hotel manager.

Guest Make a telephone call to the hotel and ask Manager Answer the guest’s questions, ask
questions about the availability of rooms, him/her questions and write down the
prices and facilities. Make a reservation. important details.

C Keep the same roles and partner. The guest has just arrived at the hotel.

Guest Go to the reception desk and check in. Manager Welcome your guest. Check the
Ask for an early morning call. Ask about reservation. Tell the guest where
breakfast. his/her room is.

D Keep the same roles and partner. It is later the same evening.

Guest You have a problem with the room. Call the Manager You are on duty at reception.
reception desk and explain the problem.

E Keep the same roles and partner. The guest is leaving the hotel.

Guest Go to the reception desk and check out. Manager Check the guest out of the hotel.
You want to: Be helpful. Wish the guest a good trip
■ pay by credit card back.
■ book a taxi to the airport

■ leave a message for a colleague who is

arriving tomorrow.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 37 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.17
In a restaurant 2
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 4 Ask students to read through the points on the


To practise a series of interactions in a restaurant such as worksheet silently and to imagine what they will say
preparing to order, explaining dishes, making ‘small for each one. Set a time limit of 2 minutes for this.
talk’, leaving and paying. 5 Explain to the students that you want them to have a
natural conversation. They can leave the worksheet
TIME. on the table to help them, but they don’t have to
40–50 minutes follow the same points or use the same phrases. Set
PREPARATION. a time limit of 20 minutes. Ask the students to go
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in outside the classroom and wait in their groups for
the class. the waiter to show them to their tables. Start the
Each table will need a simple menu (see stage 3). If activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
students have done worksheet 1.11 the dishes in section B language use.
can be used, otherwise students think of their own dishes 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
as indicated below. Alternatively, use a real menu, a menu CULTURAL HINTS.
from a coursebook or a menu you have made. Ä In America, northern Europe, Japan and south-east
Be prepared to arrange the room like a restaurant at stage 3. Asia business may be discussed at lunch toward the
Consider playing the role of the waiter yourself. You can end of the meal, if the host introduces it. At dinner
make language notes as you go round the tables, take business is almost never discussed.
orders, ask students if they are enjoying their meal, Ä In Latin American countries, southern Europe and the
handle complaints etc. Middle East business is rarely discussed in a restaurant,
PROCEDURE. even at lunch.
1 Write up on the board In a restaurant and ask
students how often they entertain visitors and
clients, and what they talk about. Then write up
the three stages of the meal referred to on the
worksheet. For each stage, elicit and write up a few
phrases (see worksheet).
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student
and refer to the instructions at the top. Appoint a
waiter, unless you are going to be the waiter
yourself.
3 Rearrange the room like a restaurant with small
groups of students sitting around tables. Ask the
students to prepare a menu for each table: each table
takes one piece of blank paper and writes Starters,
Main Course and Dessert as sections. Then each
student on that table contributes one item to each
section (they just write the name of the dish). Note
that every table will have a different menu. If a
student is acting as waiter, ask them to look at their
phrases at the bottom of the sheet while the other
students are doing the menu preparation. They can
think of a few more phrases.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 38 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.17
In a restaurant 2
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

You are going to have a meal together in a restaurant. You will need a menu for each table.
■ Choose one person to be the waiter.

■ Study the boxes below to see how your conversation might develop.

■ Start the activity outside the room. The waiter will show you to your table.

Preparing to order

© Look through the menu


© Ask your colleagues about the dishes
© Drinks During the meal
© Call the waiter when you are ready to order
© Talk about your city and country
I’d recommend the ... © Talk about your free time and interests
It’s a type of ... It’s made with ... © Talk about your home and family
I think I’ll have the ..., please. © Talk about the food

Enjoy your meal!


How’s your …?
Would you like some more wine?
– Yes, please./No thanks, I’m fine.

End of the meal

© Start a ‘leaving’ dialogue


© Ask for the bill – one person offer to pay
© Refer to the future and say goodbye

Well, I must get back now.


– Oh, so soon?
Can we have the bill, please? Do you take
VISA? Can I have a receipt?
Thank you for a very enjoyable evening.
– Not at all, it was my pleasure.

Waiter

© Ask if the guests are ready to order


© Take the order. Find out what they’d like to drink
© During the meal check everything is satisfactory

Are you ready to order now?


What would you like? ... And for you, Sir/Madam?
Anything to drink?
So, that’s ... (repeat the order)
Is everything satisfactory? Can I get you anything else? (during the meal)

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 39 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.18
Showing a visitor your workplace
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student


To practise giving a guided tour round work premises and refer to the instructions. Check understanding of
using a ‘virtual’ office/factory. the word ‘virtual’ (artificial, but like the real thing;
simulated). Explain to the students that you want
TIME. them to draw a diagram of their workplace for
30–40 minutes homework, and remind them to include everything
PREPARATION. that they would show a visitor.
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in 3 In the next lesson, divide the class into pairs and
the class. appoint hosts and visitors. They change roles and
Note that drawing the plan (stage 2 below) is best done repeat when they finish. Start the activity, circulate
for homework. and make a note of good/bad language use.
4 Hold a short feedback slot.
PROCEDURE.
1 Write on the board Showing a visitor your
workplace. Establish that ‘workplace’ can refer to an
office, factory or anywhere that people work. Find
out how often the students show visitors round their
workplace, and what they show/talk about when
they do.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 40 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.18
Showing a visitor your workplace
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Use the floor plan below to draw a diagram of your workplace. Include all the rooms/areas that you want to
show your visitor. Draw symbols to represent the objects (e.g. machines) you will talk about. Then use your
plan to give a ‘virtual guided tour’ of your workplace.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 41 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.19
Dialogue building: arriving at a company
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. ALTERNATIVE PROCEDURE (CLASSWORK).


To provide a framework for practising greeting and 1 (Same as above)
welcoming a visitor, thanking and saying goodbye. 2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student
and refer to the instructions and model. Remind the
TIME.
students that the dialogue is to practise social
Variable
English, and that they should use their real-life
PREPARATION. experience. Divide the class into pairs. Explain that
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in the pair will think of and write the dialogue
the class. together, and that both students should keep a record
Consider which of the two procedures below you will of the whole dialogue. Set a time limit for the task.
use. Start the activity and circulate. Give a five minute
warning before the end and make sure that every
PROCEDURE (INDIVIDUAL HOMEWORK).
pair moves on to the final part of the dialogue.
1 Write up on the board Arriving at a company. Ask
3 Ask the pairs to practise reading their dialogues
students if they are more often hosts or visitors in
together quietly. Then ask the best pair/s to read out
other people’s companies. Ask them about the last
their dialogues for the class.
time they were a host/visitor, particularly about the
4 (Option) Take the written dialogues from each pair
welcome they gave/received. How important was it
and redistribute them (so the pairs remain the same
to the success of the meeting?
but they have another pair’s dialogue). First ask the
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student
students to study their new dialogues together
and refer to the instructions and model. Remind
quietly and make sure they can read them. Then ask
students that the dialogue is to practise social
them to practise reading the dialogues aloud.
English, not the meeting itself. Remind them also
that they should use a real-life situation and
personalize the dialogue as much as possible. Ask
them to write the dialogue for homework and bring
it to the next lesson.
3 In the next lesson collect in the dialogues and
correct them.
4 (Option) Leave one of the dialogues uncorrected,
and photocopy one copy of this for each student.
Ask students to try to correct/improve this dialogue
in pairs. In feedback, listen to all the suggestions for
reformulations and discuss with the class which is
the best. Build up the reformulated dialogue on the
board line by line. As a round up, practise reading
the new dialogue aloud in open/closed pairs,
focusing on pronunciation.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 42 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

1.19
Dialogue building: arriving at a company
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Write a short dialogue using the model below. Use a real-life situation.

Receptionist Visitor Host

Greet the visitor. § © Say who you are and why


you have come.

Introduce yourself. Talk § © Welcome the visitor. Ask


about your journey and your about the visitor’s journey and
first impressions of the city. where he/she is staying. Start
the business discussion.
(miss out the main business discussion)

Say that you must leave, § © Thank the visitor for coming,
thank the host, say goodbye. wish them a good trip.

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 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 43 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.1
Leaving a message 1
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 44 This page may be photocopied for use in class
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 45 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.2
Leaving a message 2
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. POSSIBLE ANSWERS.


To revise and extend language for leaving, taking and 1 Good morning, IMB. How can I help you?
checking a telephone message. 2 Good morning, my name is Mr Costa. I’d like to
speak to Mary Hershey, please.
TIME.
3 Hold the line, please … I’m sorry, she’s out of the
40–50 minutes
office at the moment. Would you like to speak to
PREPARATION. her secretary?
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in 4 Yes, please.
the class. 5 I can put you through now.
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. 6 Accounts Department. Gina speaking.
7 This is Mr Costa here. I wanted to speak to
PROCEDURE.
Mary Hershey.
1 Read out some of the original ‘impolite’ phrases
8 I’m sorry, she’s out of the office at the moment.
from worksheet 2.1 and check that students can still
Can I take a message?/(Would you like to leave a
remember the politer versions.
message?)
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student
9 Yes. I’m calling about your last invoice. There
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the
seems to be a problem. I need to speak to Mary as
instructions. Divide the class into pairs, start the
soon as possible.
activity and circulate.
10 Of course, Mr Costa. Could you give me the
ANSWERS. invoice number?
1 b) 2 Hold. The phrase means Wait a moment. 11 It’s AI386.
3 ... out of the office all day/tied up all morning/with a 12 I’m sorry, could you repeat that, please?
customer/out of the country at the moment 13 Yes, AI386. That’s A for Australia and I for India.
4 The phrase means I can connect you now. The Have you got that?
missing word is to. 5 Of course. Certainly. Sure. 14 Yes, I’ve got that now. Is there anything else?
6 for 7 Is there anything else? – No, that’s all./Yes, 15 No, that’s all.
there’s something else. 8 Caller: Thanks for your 16 OK, Mr Costa. I’ll make sure she gets the message
help./Receiver: Thank you for calling. as soon as she comes in.

3 Refer to the instructions for section B. Choose two 4 Refer to the instructions for section C. Divide the
students: one is both Receptionist and Secretary and class into pairs and ask them to sit back to back (or
the other is the Caller. Ask them to read the use a telephone if you have this facility). Remind
dialogue aloud. Let the group listen and discover them to listen carefully and speak naturally (it is not
that it sounds impolite. Then follow the same a memory test). They change roles and repeat when
procedure as worksheet 2.1 for improving the they finish. Start the activity, circulate and make a
dialogue. In brief: note of good/bad language use.
■ tell the students to put their pens down and not 5 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
to write anything until the end for the class.
■ ask the whole class for suggestions on how to 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
improve lines 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 in turn
CULTURAL HINTS.
■ choose two students as Receptionist and Caller
Ä In northern Europe the call ends with a confirmation
and ask them to act out the new version of lines
of individual tasks and the agreed plan of action.
1–5 as an open pair, using the worksheet
Americans press more strongly for answers or quick
version as a prompt (other students listen
action.
and help)
Ä In Japan and south-east Asia the call ends with a
■ repeat this cycle several times, improving a few
promise to call back when group agreement has been
more lines each time as a class and then
reached.
choosing different students to act out the whole
Ä In Latin America and southern Europe the call ends
dialogue up to that point
with more social conversation, exchanging good
■ when the reformulation is finished, students act
wishes and expressing a desire to hear from the other
out the whole dialogue together in pairs,
person again.
changing roles and repeating when they finish
■ the students write the new version in their pairs
■ build up a final, reformulated version on the
board.
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 46 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.2
Leaving a message 2
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Answer the questions.


1 Which is more polite?
a) I want to speak to Masae Makata, please. b) I’d like to speak to Masae Makata, please.
2 Fill in the gap and explain the meaning: –––––––––––––––––––––––––– the line, please.
3 You might hear I’m sorry but she’s in a meeting at the moment. Think of some other reasons why
the person is not available:
I’m sorry but she’s ––––––––––––––––––––––––––
I’m sorry but he’s ––––––––––––––––––––––––––
4 A receptionist might say I can put you through now. What does this mean?
If you want to speak to a particular person or department, you say Can you put me through
–––––––––––––––––––––––––– extension 366, please? What is the missing word?
5 It often sounds better to replace OK by O____ c___________ or Cer___________ or S___________e.
6 You can confirm a letter of the alphabet by using a country or city name. Fill in the missing word:
That was ‘E’, E ______ Egypt.
7 Fill in the missing letters in these phrases used to check if the message is finished.
Is there a___________g e___________e ? © No, ___________’s all.
© Yes, there’s s___________ing e___________e.
8 To finish a call in a friendly way the caller can say Thanks for y___________ he___________ and
the receiver can say Thank you for c___________g.

B Read the dialogue below. Try to improve it.

Receptionist Caller
1 Good morning. IMB. © 2 Mr Costa here. I want Mary Hershey, please.
3 Wait. ..... Not here.
Want to speak to secretary? © 4 Yes, please.
5 I can connect you now.

Secretary
6 Accounts Department. I am Gina. © 7 Mr Costa here. I wanted to speak to
Mary Hershey.
8 Not in office. Message? © 9 Yes. I’m calling about your last invoice.
There is a problem. I must speak to Mary soon.
10 OK. Invoice number? © 11 AI386
12 What? © 13 AI386. Have you got that?
14 Yes, I’ve got that. More? © 15 No.
16 Maybe she’ll get your message.

C Now practise a similar call without using your notes. Caller use your real name and a different
invoice number.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 47 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.3
Exchanging information 1
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. ANSWERS (SELECTED).


To practise saying and checking figures and quantities. 1 three hundred and fifteen 5 five thousand, eight
hundred 6 five thousand, eight hundred and eighty
TIME.
8 six hundred thousand 10 six million, six hundred
30–40 minutes
thousand 12 fifteen point one five 13 one point
PREPARATION. two kilograms (or kilos) 14 fifty-six dollars seventy
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in (or seventy cents) 15 thirty-four pounds eighty (or
the class. eighty pence) 17 forty-three dash F nine 18 AC
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. slash (or forward slash) six 19 WWW dot FT dot com
forward slash main (note: this is an Internet address)
PROCEDURE.
20 radio four at BBC dot co dot UK (note: this is an
1 Write on the board the number 60,905 and ask
e-mail address)
students how to say it (sixty thousand, nine
hundred and five). Problem areas are likely to be the 3 Refer to the instructions for section B. Explain that
position of and and whether or not there is an s on after writing the information the students will
the end of thousand. Note the following dictate it to a partner. Remind them to include a
information: good variety of information, similar to the examples
■ hundred, thousand etc. do not have an s when in section A. Ask the students to fill in the first eight
spoken as part of numbers, but they do in boxes individually.
phrases like hundreds of cars and thousands of 4 Refer to the instructions after the first table and the
people. useful phrases. Divide the class into pairs and ask
■ in British and American usage a comma them to sit back to back (or use a telephone if you
separates the thousands from the hundreds and a have this facility). They change roles and repeat
full stop is a decimal point which separates when they finish. Start the activity, circulate and
whole numbers from decimal fractions. In many make a note of good/bad language use.
Latin countries the comma and full stop are 5 Hold a short feedback slot.
used in exactly the opposite way. CULTURAL HINTS.
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student Ä In Japan and south-east Asia many calls are used
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the simply to gather information as any decision needs
instructions. Ask the students to read out the figures group consensus. Asking questions, listening and
round the class. Go back frequently to problem checking are the main features of the call.
areas and check again with different students Comments, interruptions and argument are avoided.
randomly round the class. If necessary, write up
more figures and elicit the correct answers.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 48 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.3
Exchanging information 1
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Practise saying these figures, quantities and references.


1 315 6 5,880 11 6.6 million 16 10%
2 350 7 60,000 12 15.15 17 43-F9
3 355 8 600,000 13 1.2 kg 18 AC/6
4 5,000 9 6,000,000 14 $56.70 19 www.FT.com/main
5 5,800 10 6,600,000 15 £34.80 20 radiofour@bbc.co.uk

B Write a figure, quantity or reference in each box of the table.


Don’t let other people see your table!
Your figures

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8

Work with a partner. Tell your partner the contents of your table and write down your partner’s
figures in the table below. Use these phrases to check you have the correct information.
The figure in box 1 is ... © ? Sorry, can you repeat that?
? Was that one five, fifteen, or five zero, fifty?
✓ OK, I’ve got that.
Have you got that? © ✓ Yes, got that.
✗ Sorry, can you say it again.
Can you read that back to me? © Yes, of course. Box 1 is ...

Your partner’s figures

1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 49 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.4
Exchanging information 2
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. ANSWERS.
To practise ‘silence fillers’ on the telephone and to 2 Hold on a moment, I’ll just check. 3 Sorry about
revise exchanging information and checking. this, I’m just looking. 4 Bear with me for a moment.
5 I’ll put you on hold. 6 Oh yes, here it is.
TIME.
7 Right, here they are.
30–40 minutes
3 Refer to the instructions for section B. Start by
PREPARATION.
pretending to look for something on your desk, all
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in
the time modelling phrases 1–4 and finishing off
the class.
with phrase 6 or 7. Then divide the class into pairs
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device.
and ask the students to do the same thing.
PROCEDURE. 4 Refer to the instructions for section C. Check that
1 Write up on the board Silence fillers and ask the students understand that they will write two
students what they think it refers to in the context of questions individually and then make a call
telephoning. Elicit some possible phrases, for afterwards. Ask students to write their questions,
example Hold on a moment and pre-teach these two: and circulate to monitor that the questions are
Just bear with me for a moment. appropriate.
I’ll put you on hold. 5 Refer to the useful phrases at the end of section C.
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student Divide the class into pairs and ask them to sit back
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the to back (or use a telephone if you have this facility).
instructions. Divide the class into pairs, start the Start the activity, circulate and make a note of
activity and circulate. good/bad language use.
6 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
for the class.
7 Hold a short feedback slot.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 50 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.4
Exchanging information 2
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Sometimes you need to fill the silence while you look for something. Put these words in the correct
order. Put a comma where you would pause.

1 Right see let just me Right, let me just see.


–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

2 Hold check on just a moment I’ll –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

3 Sorry I’m looking this just about –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

4 Bear moment me for with a –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

5 I’ll you put hold on –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

And when you find the information:


6 Oh here is yes it (singular) –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

7 Right are they here (plural) –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

B Your teacher’s desk is disorganized. Listen to your teacher looking for something. Then ask a partner
to wait while you look for something in your file.

C You will make a call to find out some information. To prepare for the activity:
1 Write a question to ask your partner about a previous lesson: something he/she has to look for in
his/her file, eg a particular word or answer that you want to check.
Can you ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––?

2 Write a question which makes your partner leave the phone, eg ask him/her to look on the
noticeboard, find out something from the teacher, or find something in a dictionary.
Could you ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––?

When you are ready, make a call to a partner. Ask your two questions and reply to your partner’s
questions. Use the phrases below to help you.

Silence fillers while looking When you find the information


Right, just a second, let me see, ... © Right, here it is.
Sorry about this, I’m just looking, ... Right, here they are.
Just bear with me for a moment.

Going away from the phone When you return


Hold on a moment, I’ll just check. © Right, sorry to keep you waiting.
Bear with me, I won’t be a moment.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 51 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.5
Arranging a meeting
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 6 (Option) Ask the students to do the same thing in


To practise telephone calls to arrange and rearrange a pairs. Student A reads some gapped phrases, with
meeting. enough context, and Student B supplies the words.
They change roles when they finish.
TIME. 7 Refer to the instructions and the model for section
40–50 minutes C. Remind the students that section A gave some
PREPARATION. phrases for starting and finishing the call. Divide the
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in class into pairs and appoint As and Bs. Ask the pairs
the class. to sit back to back (or use a telephone if you have
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. this facility). Start the activity, circulate and make a
note of good/bad language use.
PROCEDURE. 8 (Option) Ask the As and Bs to change roles. This
1 Write up on the board the phrases When would suit time ask them to use some ‘small talk’ at the
you? and Can you make that?. Ask if anyone can beginning. Before you begin the role-play elicit
guess the context and write Arranging a meeting some phrases like:
above the phrases as a heading. Elicit the meanings A: Hello? Student B? This is Student A. How are
in this context of to suit (be convenient for) and you?
to make (be in a place at a certain time). Ask what B: Student A! How nice to hear from you! I’m fine.
other phrases would be useful for arranging a How are you?
meeting on the phone and write one or two more A: I’m fine. So what’s the weather like in Tokyo?
on the board.
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student 9 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the for the class.
instructions. Divide the class into pairs, start the 10 Hold a short feedback slot.
activity and circulate. 11 Ask the students to look at section D and refer to
the first line of instructions. Divide the class into
ANSWERS. pairs, start the activity and circulate.
1 Is this a good time to call? 2 Are you in the middle
of something? 3 all/everything 4 Right/So ANSWERS.
5 seeing 6 call/ring 7 regards/best wishes 8 tell 1 make/manage 2 mind 3 back/off 4 must
5 unavoidable
3 Ask the students to look at section B and refer to (Note: put back (UK) = move down (US))
the first line of instructions. Divide the class into
12 Refer to the instructions at the end of section D.
pairs, start the activity and circulate.
Explain that the pairs who made the last call will
ANSWERS. work together again, and that Student B will make a
1 suit/about 2 make (or manage) 3 should/manage follow-up call to cancel the arrangement. Remind
(or make) 4 until/any time 5 busy 6 sounds/get the students that in a situation like this a second
back to/confirm apology (like phrase D4) is essential. Ask the pairs
(Note: that sounds fine = that appears to be fine; to to sit back to back (or use a telephone if you have
get back to somebody = to call somebody again) this facility). Start the activity, circulate and make a
note of good/bad language use.
4 Refer to the instructions at the end of section B.
13 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
Divide the class into pairs, start the activity and
for the class.
circulate.
14 Hold a short feedback slot.
ANSWERS.
Dialogue between A and B, in sequence: A1 B5 A2
B4 A3 B6
5 Practise the target vocabulary by ‘pause reading’.
Ask students to turn over their worksheets. Read
each phrase containing a gap saying ‘mmm’ for the
gap. Give enough context, including a few words
after the gap if necessary, for example say When
would mmm you?. The students supply the missing
word/s chorally.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 52 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.5
Arranging a meeting
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Fill in the gaps in phrases 1–2 and choose the right words in the box below.
At the start of a call, you want to ask Are you busy?. You can say:
1 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– a good time –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ?

2 Are you in the middle –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ?

At the end of the call you want to confirm the plans and finish in a friendly way. Look at the pairs of
words in the dialogue below. Decide if only one is correct, or if both are possible.

A: OK. I think that’s (3) all/everything. A: Right, I’ll do that. Give my (7) regards/best
B: (4) Right/So, I look forward to (5) see/seeing wishes to Mr. Koyama.
you here in Tokyo next Wednesday. Give me B: OK. I’ll (8) tell/say him you called. Goodbye.
a (6) call/ring if you have any problems.

B Complete the sentences below using words from the box.

any time make suit confirm sounds busy


get back to about should until manage

1 When would –––––––––––––––––--–-----–––––– you? How ––––––-----––--–––––––––––––––– next Tuesday afternoon?


2 What time on Wednesday can you ––––––––-------–––––––––––––––– it?
3 OK, I ––––––––––––––––-----–--––––––– be able to –––––––––-----––––––––--––––––– some time after four.
4 Let me see, I’m out of the office –––––--––––-----––––––––––––––– lunchtime, but ––––––––-------–––––––––––––––– after that
would be fine.
5 I’m afraid I’m –––––––-------––––––––––––––––– on Tuesday afternoon. What about Wednesday?
6 That –––––––––––––-----–––––--–––––– fine. Can I ––––––––--––-----–––––––––––––– you later today to ––––-------–––––––––––––––––––– it?

Now put the sentences in the correct order to make a dialogue arranging an appointment.

C Work with a partner.


Student A call Student B. Check it’s a good time to call.
Ä
Try to find a time and place to meet. It’s difficult because you’re both very busy. Eventually you succeed.
Ä
Finish the call by confirming the plans.

D You might have to call back to cancel the arrangement. Look at the pairs of words in the phrases
below. Decide if only one is correct, or if both are possible.

I’m sorry but I can’t (1) make/manage the meeting next week.
Would you (2) mind/matter if we put the meeting (3) back/off to the following week?
I (4) must/should apologize again. I’m afraid it’s completely (5) inevitable/unavoidable.

Now have a second call with the same partner. Student B calls back to cancel and rearrange the
previous meeting.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 53 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.6
Arranging a company visit
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 2 Divide the class into pairs and appoint visitors and
To practise a telephone call discussing a schedule for a hosts. Explain that the host will talk about their
company visit. real-life company.
3 Distribute the correct half of the worksheet to each
TIME. student, either folded over or cut. Give the students
30–40 minutes time to read their own instructions. Check that
PREPARATION. Student A knows B’s (real) company, country and
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in the type of business so that he/she can prepare the
class, and fold or cut them across the middle. questions. Ask the students to prepare the written
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. information individually, and circulate and check
that it is appropriate.
PROCEDURE. 4 When the students are ready, ask the pairs to sit
1 Write up on the board Arranging a company visit. back to back (or use a telephone if you have this
Explain to students that they will practise a phone facility). Start the activity, circulate and make a note
call to discuss plans for a company visit. Elicit a of good/bad language use.
few phrases for the beginning and end of the call 5 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
and write them up on the board. Possible phrases: for the class.
Beginning: Hello? Is that ... ? How are you? Is this 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
a good time to call? I’m calling about … 7 Now, or in the next class as recycling: The hosts and
End: So, I’ll meet you on ... at ... (confirm plans). / visitors change roles and repeat the activity. Hold
Thank you very much for all your help. I’m another short feedback slot.
looking forward to ... .

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 54 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.6
Arranging a company visit
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Student A: Visitor

You are going to Student B’s country to see his/her factory/offices and his/her new products.
You will receive a call from him/her to finalize arrangements for the trip. You have already
booked the flight. Let him/her organize the hotel and anything else necessary.

Before the call, write down:


■ the number of your flight and its arrival day and time –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ how Student B will recognize you at the airport ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ your requirements for a good hotel (business services etc.) –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ some questions about the schedule, or things you want Student B to arrange for you

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Student B: Host

Student A is going to visit you in your country. You are going to take him/her to your
factory/offices and show him/her your new products. You will call him/her to:
■ find out when he/she is arriving (day? time? flight number?)

■ offer to meet him/her at the airport

■ book a room in a good hotel for him/her

■ describe briefly your plans for the visit: the tour of your factory/offices etc.

■ find out if there is anything else Student A wants you to arrange

Before you begin, write down a brief programme for the visit with times, places and things to see/do.
Schedule

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 55 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.7
Yoghurt sales
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Give out the correct half of the worksheet to each


To practise a telephone call involving information student, either folded over or cut. Give the students
exchange and a discussion of sales and markets. time to read their own instructions. Ask the students
to prepare the written information, and circulate and
TIME. check that it is appropriate. (Option: group together
30–40 minutes pairs of students with the same role and ask them to
PREPARATION. prepare the written information together).
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in the 4 When the students are ready, ask the pairs to sit
class, and fold or cut them across the middle. back to back (or use a telephone if you have this
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. facility). Start the activity, circulate and make a note
of good/bad language use.
PROCEDURE. 5 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
1 Write up on the board the numbers 1,000, 1,005, for the class.
1,050, 1500, 1,505, 1,550, 1,555. Revise how to say 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
the numbers. Then elicit a few phrases for checking 7 (Now, or in the next class as recycling) The As and
information on the phone such as: Bs change roles and repeat the activity. The Bs can
Have you got that? write in some different sales figures before starting
–Yes, got that/Sorry, can you say it again? the call. Hold another short feedback slot.
You may also need to quickly revise the opening of
a telephone call. Possible phrases:
Good morning. This is ... . Can I speak to ...?
I’m calling about ...
2 Set the scene: explain that the students will work in
pairs to make a telephone call. Head Office will call
a foreign subsidiary to talk about sales figures, and
there will also be some discussion of sales and
marketing of a specific product line. Divide the
class into pairs and appoint As (Head Office) and Bs
(foreign subsidiary).

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 56 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.7
Yoghurt sales
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Student A: Head Office

You work at the Head Office of Superstores, an international supermarket chain.


Make a call to one of your foreign subsidiaries. You are calling for three reasons.

1 You need to know some sales figures for fruit yoghurt in your colleague’s country last month.
Have a pen ready and check the information carefully.

North region Centre South region Total

strawberry
cherry
banana

2 You want more profit from this foreign subsidiary. Profits from yoghurt are lower than in other
countries. Find out if it is possible to raise the price of yoghurt and get more profit.
3 Find out about the future of the yoghurt market in your colleague’s country. Before the call think
of one or two questions to ask:

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Student B: Foreign subsidiary

You work for a foreign subsidiary of Superstores, an international supermarket chain. Receive a
call from Head Office in another country. The person from Head Office will want to discuss
three things.

1 He/She needs some information about the sales figures for fruit yoghurt in your country last
month. The figures are below.

North region Centre South region Total

strawberry 1050 1290 1200 3540


cherry 2000 1975 1580 5555
banana 1465 1745 1490 4700

2 He/She will want to discuss the prices of your yoghurts. Try to persuade him/her that you should
keep the prices more or less the same for the next year.
3 He/She will ask you about the future of the yoghurt market in your country. Before the call think
of one or two ideas for developing the market:
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 57 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.8
Travel information
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 4 Divide the class into pairs and appoint As and Bs in


To practise making/receiving a telephone inquiry about each pair. Distribute the correct worksheet to each
trains and flights. student. Refer to the sheets and indicate that they
have instructions for both the train information call
TIME. (Situation 1) and the flight information call
30–40 minutes (Situation 2). Ask the students to read through both
PREPARATION. situations carefully. Circulate and help with
Make copies of the Student A worksheet for half the vocabulary.
class, and of the Student B worksheet (next page in this 5 Tell the students that they are going to practise the
book) for the other half. first call, Situation 1. Check the instructions by
Bring in to the class a credit card (e.g. Visa, Mastercard asking who is going to make the call (Student A).
or American Express). See stage 3 below. Ask the pairs to sit back to back (or use a telephone
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. if you have this facility). Start the activity, circulate
and make a note of good/bad language use.
PROCEDURE. 6 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
1 Write on the board Travel information – for the class.
trains/flights. First ask students about trains: 7 Hold a short feedback slot.
■ what kind of fare structure do they have for 8 Tell the students that they are going to practise the
train tickets in their country? second call, Situation 2. (Note that each student
■ are there tickets where you cannot travel at keeps the same worksheet). Check the instructions
certain times or on certain days? by asking who is going to make the call (Student
■ is it possible to book a ticket by phone in B). Ask the pairs to sit back to back (or use a
advance? what about a specific seat? telephone if you have this facility). Start the activity,
Then ask similar questions about flights. circulate and make a note of good/bad language use.
2 Tell the students that they will practise two 9 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
telephone calls, the first asking for information for the class.
about trains and the second about flights. Write up 10 Hold a short feedback slot.
on the board the two headings Making an inquiry
and Receiving an inquiry and elicit and write up a
few phrases for each (see bottom of worksheet).
3 Write on the board Which card do you want to use?
under the heading Receiving an inquiry and the
words Valid from MM/YY and Expires end MM/YY.
Point to the information on your own card. Ask the
students to find the information on their cards.
Check the meanings of valid (legal) and to expire
(to finish). Ask students what the noun from this
word is (expiry) and write on the board the question
What is the expiry date? under the heading
Receiving an inquiry.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 58 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.8a
Travel information: Student A
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Situation 1
Call the Passenger Information Service of British Rail. Find out about trains from London to
Manchester. Have your credit card ready to book a seat.

Times –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Station –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Meals available –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Fares –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Situation 2
You work for the Oxford Street Travel Agency. You will receive an inquiry about flights from another
country to London. Study the information below before you receive the call.
Times Two flights a day, arriving London 09:30 or 17:45
Airport Heathrow
Fares APEX £150 No changes allowed
Standard £180 Changes possible up to 24 hours before departure
Business Class £260 Changes possible up to one hour before departure
Better quality food. More comfortable seats
Business Plus £300 As for Business Class, plus:
– access to executive lounge
– passenger can arrive 20 minutes before departure
Credit card Name:
details Card:
Card number:
Expiry date:

Making an inquiry (Situation 1) Receiving an inquiry (Situation 2)

Travel Information. How can I help you?


I’d like some information about ... Let me see. I’ll just look that up.
I’d also like to know what/if ... Can you repeat your question, please?
So, ... (repeat information to confirm) Which card do you want to use?
What is the expiry date?

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 59 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.8b
Travel information: Student B
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Situation 1
You work for the Passenger Information Service of British Rail. You will receive an inquiry about
trains from London to Manchester. Study the information below before you receive the call.
Times Trains to Manchester leave every hour on the hour
Journey time is 21/2 hours
Station Euston Station
Meals Lunch is available from 12:00 to 2:00
Snacks are available at other times
Fares Standard single £55
Standard return £60
Day return £40 Passenger has to return on same day
Passenger cannot travel between 08:00 and 09:30
Saver return £45 Passenger can return any time during next two months
Passenger cannot travel on a Friday
Credit card Name:
details Card:
Card number:
Expiry date:

Situation 2
Make a call to the Oxford Street Travel Agency. Find out about flights to London from the country
where you live. Have your credit card ready to book a seat.

Times –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Arrival airport –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Fares –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Receiving an inquiry (Situation 1) Making an inquiry (Situation 2)

Travel Information. How can I help you?


Let me see. I’ll just look that up. I’d like some information about ...
Can you repeat your question, please? I’d also like to know what/if ...
Which card do you want to use? So, ... (repeat information to confirm)
What is the expiry date?

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 61 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.9
Office furniture
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 6 Hold a short feedback slot.


To practise a series of sales calls between customer and 7 Ask the students to look at Call 2. Establish that it
supplier. is a few weeks later (this is written on sheet). Give
the students time to read their instructions. When
TIME. they are ready, ask the pairs to sit back to back
40–50 minutes again (or use the telephone). Start the activity,
PREPARATION. circulate and make a note of good/bad language use.
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in the 8 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
class, and fold them across the middle. for the class.
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. 9 Hold a short feedback slot.
10 Before asking the students to look at Call 3, tell
PROCEDURE. them that there is going to be a problem. Ask what
1 Write up on the board Office furniture: customer possible problems the supplier could have, and elicit
and supplier and underneath write the word Terms. (amongst others) that the workers in the factory
Elicit the meaning of terms (the conditions of an might ‘go on strike’. Ask how the supplier would
agreement; the price and payment arrangements). tell the customer this information, and elicit and
Then write on the board the phrase First-time write on the board a few possible phrases such as:
customers pay X% on order, with the balance Y I’ve got some bad news, I’m afraid. The workers in
days after delivery. Ask the students what are our factory have gone on strike.
typical figures for X and Y in a commercial We’re doing everything possible.
situation in their country. You may also need to I really am very sorry about this. I’ll let you know
quickly revise the opening of a telephone call. as soon as the problem is over.
2 Set the scene: explain that the students will work in 11 Ask the students to look at Call 3. Establish that it
pairs to make three telephone calls. A customer will is a few days later (this is written on sheet). Give
call a supplier to find out about new office chairs, the students time to read their instructions. When
and there will be two further calls. Ask the students they are ready, ask the pairs to sit back to back
if they can guess what the second and third call will again (or use the telephone). Start the activity,
be about (but don’t tell them or spend too long on circulate and make a note of good/bad language use.
this). Write up on the board the names of the three 12 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
types of chairs (see worksheet). Explain vocabulary for the class.
as necessary. Divide the class into pairs and appoint 13 Hold a short feedback slot.
As (Customers) and Bs (Suppliers).
3 Give out the correct half of the worksheet to each Note. Additional telephone role-plays between
student, either folded over or cut. Refer to the three customer and supplier can be found in
calls on the sheet and say that at the moment the Business Builder module 8 ‘Company,
students should only look at the information in the products and customer relations’.
box and Call 1. Give them time to read their See worksheets 8.4 ‘Dealing with
instructions. complaints’, 8.9 ‘Selling mobile phones’,
4 When the students are ready, ask the pairs to sit 8.10 ‘Selling your products on the
back to back (or use a telephone if you have this telephone’, 8.11 ‘Apologize, explain and
facility). Start the activity, circulate and make a note offer’ and 8.13 ‘Dialogue building:
of good/bad language use. complaining and apologizing’.
5 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
for the class.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 62 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.9
Office furniture
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Student A: Customer

You want some new furniture for your office. Your company is called McGill & Sons Limited and your
address is 15 Beauleigh Court, London NW3 5HZ.

Call 1
Make a call to a supplier of office furniture. Ask for a quotation for:
■ 2 executive armchairs
■ 16 conference room chairs (Note: You want these chairs in your company’s colours. You can send a
sample to show the exact colour.)
■ 4 typists chairs

A few weeks later ...

Call 2
Make another call to the supplier. You have not heard anything since your last call. Find out when the
chairs are going to be delivered.
A few days later ...

Call 3
Receive a call from the supplier.

Student B: Supplier

Your company supplies office furniture. Your main products are:

■ Executive armchairs £800 each


■ Conference room chairs £300 each (customers can choose their own fabric colour)
■ Typist’s chairs £150 each

Terms
■ Discounts available for large orders.
■ First-time customers pay 25% on order, with the balance 30 days after delivery.
■ Cost for customer’s own fabric colour is 50% extra.

Call 1 Receive a call. A customer will phone about some of your products. Try to get an order. Don’t
forget to write down the customer’s name, company name and address for your files.
A few weeks later ...

Call 2 Receive another call from the customer. You are having a few problems obtaining the colour
he/she wants.
A few days later ...

Call 3 Make a call to the customer. The workers in the textile factory that make the fabric are on
strike. Explain that there will be a short delay.
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 63 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.10
The Lucky Lobster
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 4 When the students are ready, ask the pairs to sit
To practise a series of telephone calls related to booking back to back (or use a telephone if you have this
a restaurant table, asking questions and checking facility). Start the activity, circulate and make a note
information. of good/bad language use.
5 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
TIME. for the class.
40–50 minutes 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
PREPARATION. 7 Ask the students to look at Call 2. Establish that it
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in the is next Sunday morning, after the meal (this is
class, and fold or cut them across the middle. written on sheet). Give the students time to read
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. their instructions. When they are ready, ask the pairs
to sit back to back again (or use the telephone).
PROCEDURE. Start the activity, circulate and make a note of
1 Write up on the board The Lucky Lobster good/bad language use.
Restaurant. Elicit/draw/mime what a lobster is. Ask 8 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
if any of the students have ever eaten lobster. Ask for the class.
them what kind of restaurant they think The Lucky 9 Hold a short feedback slot.
Lobster is (establish that it is expensive and a good 10 Ask the students to look at Call 3. Establish that it
place to take clients). is the same day, a few hours later (this is written on
2 Explain that the students will work in pairs to make sheet). Give the students time to read their
three telephone calls. A customer will call the instructions. When they are ready, ask the pairs to
manager of The Lucky Lobster to book a table. Ask sit back to back again (or use the telephone). Start
the students if they can guess what the second and the activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
third call will be about (but don’t tell them or spend language use.
too long on this). You may need to quickly revise 11 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
the opening of a telephone call. for the class.
3 Divide the class into pairs and appoint As 12 Hold a short feedback slot.
(Customers) and Bs (Managers). Give out the
correct half of the worksheet to each student, either
folded over or cut. Refer to the three calls on the
sheet and say that at the moment the students should
only look at the information in the box and Call 1.
Give them time to read their instructions and ask the
Managers to think of a ‘Dish of the Day’ and write
it in the space.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 64 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.10
The Lucky Lobster
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Student A: Customer

You are entertaining some important clients next Saturday, and you want to
take them to The Lucky Lobster – the best restaurant in town.

Call 1
Make a call to the restaurant.
■ You want to book a table for four people next Saturday at 8 o’clock.
■ There may be one extra person. Can you let them know on Saturday afternoon?
■ Do they have a special ‘Dish of the Day’ on the menu next Saturday?

Next Sunday morning, after the meal ...

Call 2
You enjoyed your meal and drinks at The Lucky Lobster last night. This morning you checked the
VISA receipt in your jacket pocket and it says £280. You are sure the meal cost a lot less than this,
but you can’t find the bill. Call the restaurant.
The same day, a few hours later ...

Call 3
You are now at the airport and your plane leaves in 30 minutes. You can’t find your diary. Call the
restaurant – maybe you left it there. If they have your diary give them your name and address so they
can send it to you.

Student B: Manager

You are the manager of The Lucky Lobster – the best restaurant in town. Notice the following
information from your bookings schedule and fill in the ‘Dish of the Day’:

Saturday
7:30 – 11:00 p.m. Two football teams booked.
Only one free table (four people).

Dish of the Day: ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Call 1
Receive a call from a customer who wants to book a table.
Next Sunday morning, after the meal ...

Call 2
Receive another phone call from the customer. You remember this person from last night. On his/her
table they ordered a lot of expensive drinks after their meal.
The same day, a few hours later ...

Call 3
Receive another phone call. It is the same customer, with a problem. Help in any way you can. Have
a pen ready to take the customer’s name and address if necessary.
 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 65 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.11
Pacific City
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Ask pairs of As to sit together, and pairs of Bs to sit


To practise asking for and giving information about together. These students with the same role now
facts, figures and plans. read through their worksheets together and prepare
arguments/questions. Circulate and help with
TIME. vocabulary.
40–50 minutes 4 Regroup into the A/B pairs who will do the activity.
PREPARATION. Ask the pairs to sit back to back (or use a telephone
Make copies of the Student A worksheet for half the if you have this facility). Start the activity, circulate
class, and of the Student B worksheet (next page in this and make a note of good/bad language use.
book) for the other half. 5 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. for the class.
6 Hold a short feedback slot.
PROCEDURE. 7 (Option) Students stay in the same pairs, but change
1 Write on the board Pacific City – Host to the World roles and personalize the activity. The new journalist
Games. Tell students that Pacific City is an now interviews the new Director of Marketing about
imaginary city that hosted the World Games his/her own real-life city.
(also imaginary) a few years ago. Ask students: 8 (Option) Students write their articles. So the
– what impact they think a major sporting event students who were journalists in the first call use
would have on a city in terms of employment, their notes to write about Pacific City, and the
infrastructure etc., students who were journalists in the second call use
– what would happen after the event finished. their notes to write about their partner’s real-life
Students may know of cities in their own regions in city.
a similar situation.
2 Tell the students that they will practise a telephone
call between the Director of Marketing for Pacific
City and a journalist. The journalist is interested in
the future of Pacific City. Divide the class into pairs
and appoint As (Director of Marketing) and Bs
(Journalist) in each pair. Give out the correct
worksheets.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 66 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.11a
Pacific City: Student A
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Director of Marketing for Pacific City

Pacific City – Host to the World Games

Pacific City is the third largest city in your country. A few years ago Pacific City was host to a major
international sports competition, the World Games. The event was a great success.

It is now several years after the World Games and you are the Director of Marketing for Pacific City.
You have the job of selling your city as a good place to do business. You will receive a telephone call
from a journalist. Study the information below before the call.

Local economy 100 New jobs created

■ The construction of sports arenas and 80


hotels for the World Games helped to 60
create jobs. ’000
40
Year of the
20 World Games
Ä
0

Hotels 80 Number of hotel rooms

■ New hotels are still being built because 60


of the growing number of conferences
’000 40
and trade shows.
■ The occupancy rate of hotels is 20 Year of the
World Games
currently 72%. Ä
0

Attractions for new companies 200 New companies

■ Location: Pacific City is only 30 minutes’ 150


flying time from 70% of the country’s
100
population.
■ Excellent road and rail links to every 50 Year of the
World Games
part of the country. Ä
0
■ Labour costs are low.

Plans for the future


Pacific City wants to become a centre for all sport-related business, for example:

■ Sports goods manufacturers ■ Clothing and footwear companies


■ Sports marketing and advertising companies ■ National and international sports events

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 67 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.11b
Pacific City: Student B
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Journalist

Pacific City – Host to the World Games

Pacific City is the third largest city in your country. A few years ago Pacific City was host to a major
international sports competition, the World Games. The event was a great success.

It is now several years after the World Games and you are a journalist who writes for a national
newspaper. You are writing an article with the title: Pacific City: does it have a future? Make a
telephone call to the Director of Marketing for Pacific City. Make some notes during the call.

■ Local economy. How did the World Games affect employment in Pacific City? And what is the
employment situation now?

■ Hotel use. How is Pacific City using the large number of hotels built for the World Games? Are
there a lot of empty rooms?

■ New companies. What advantages are there for companies thinking about moving to Pacific City?

■ Future plans. Does Pacific City have any plans for future development?

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 69 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.12
Pharmalab
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Write on the board the word patent and elicit the
To practise asking for and giving information about meaning (the exclusive right to make and sell a new
facts, figures and plans. invention for a certain number of years). Ask
students why patents are important in the
TIME. pharmaceuticals industry (profits are large at the
40–50 minutes beginning but then drop when the patent ends and
PREPARATION. other companies can make the same product).
Make copies of the Student A worksheet for half the 4 Tell the students that they will practise a telephone
class, and of the Student B worksheet (next page in this call between a representative of Pharmalab and a
book) for the other half. journalist. The journalist is interested in the merger
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. and the future of the company. Divide the class into
pairs and appoint As (Pharmalab representative) and
PROCEDURE. Bs (Journalist) in each pair. Give out the correct
1 Draw on the board the diagram at the top of the worksheets.
worksheets. Ask students what they think it 5 Ask pairs of As to sit together, and pairs of Bs to sit
represents. Elicit the word merger. Ask what together. These students with the same role now
problems can occur when two companies merge, read through their worksheets together and prepare
and elicit: differences in management culture; arguments/questions. Circulate and help with
differences in product range; loss of jobs. vocabulary.
Refer to the company names and ask the students 6 Regroup into the A/B pairs who will do the activity.
what type of industry they think it is. Write up the Ask the pairs to sit back to back (or use a telephone
words pharmaceuticals industry. Check the meaning if you have this facility). Start the activity, circulate
of pharmaceuticals (medicines, drugs). and make a note of good/bad language use.
2 Ask students what are the two main ways that 7 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
medicines are sold. Write up on the board: for the class.
To doctors and hospitals. 8 Hold a short feedback slot.
Directly to consumers through pharmacies or
chemists (UK) or ‘drug stores’ (USA).

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 70 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.12a
Pharmalab: Student A
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Pharmalab company representative


Medicell Biotex

A recent merger in the pharmaceuticals industry

Pharmalab

You represent Pharmalab, a company recently created by the merger of Medicell and Biotex. You will
receive a telephone call from a journalist to explain the merger. Study the information below before
the call. Use your own ideas where there is a ‘?’.

Medicell Biotex Pharmalab

Management Centralized structure. Decentralized structure.


culture Head Office managed Projects were managed by ?
all projects. lower-level managers.

Product Focused on medical Sold industrial chemicals as ?


range products. well as medical products.

Partnerships Made partnerships with Little interest in making ?


biotechnology companies. partnerships.

Current situation

■ The patent has just ended on your best selling drug, Diasin, so profits from this
product will drop sharply.
■ You will introduce two new drugs onto the market next month: Tiravan, a heart drug,
and Lowcol, which reduces cholesterol levels.
■ The merger will result in a cut of 8,000 jobs. The company will compensate employees
who lose their jobs. The exact details of this scheme are still being discussed.

Pharmalab’s sales after the merger (total $8 billion)

■ Medicines sold to doctors and hospitals 75%


■ Products sold in pharmacies without a doctor’s prescription 18%
■ Vision care: glasses, contact lenses etc. 7%

Possible future strategies for Pharmalab

1 Increase sales in pharmacies, particularly products where the patent has ended.
2 Develop the product range quickly by buying new products developed by other companies such as
biotech companies.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 71 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.12b
Pharmalab: Student B
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Journalist
Medicell Biotex

A recent merger in the pharmaceuticals industry

Pharmalab

You are a journalist writing an article about a new pharmaceutical company called Pharmalab. Make a
telephone call to a representative of Pharmalab, using the questions below to help you. Make some
notes during the call.

1 Management culture
Medicell had a centralized management structure in which Head Office controlled everything. Biotex
was decentralized. What will be the culture at Pharmalab? Will there be problems for the two groups
of staff who now have to work together?

2 Product range
Medicell and Biotex seemed to have a different approach to their product range. What was the
difference? What will be Pharmalab’s approach?

3 Partnerships
Medicell had several strong partnerships with biotechnology companies, while Biotex had little
interest in forming partnerships. What will Pharmalab do?

4 Current situation
Find out more about these three points:
■ The patent on their best selling drug, Diasin, just ended. What effect will this have?
■ Do they have any new products?
■ How many employees will lose their jobs as a result of the merger?

5 Pharmalab’s sales
The main sectors in the pharmaceuticals market are listed below. Which are the most important
sectors for Pharmalab?
■ Medicines sold to doctors and hospitals
■ Products sold in pharmacies without a doctor’s prescription
■ Vision care: glasses, contact lenses etc.

6 Future strategy
What is Pharmalab’s strategy for the future?

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 73 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.13
Global ambitions
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 2 Set the scene: explain that the students will work in
To practise a telephone call involving discussion of pairs to make a telephone call. Both students work
marketing and pricing and the use of persuasion. for the same company, a telecommunications
company. One is the Marketing Director and one is
TIME. the Operations Director. They will discuss a meeting
30-40 minutes next month whose agenda is written on the board.
PREPARATION. Divide the class into pairs and appoint As
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in the (Marketing Director) and Bs (Operations Director).
class, and fold or cut them as indicated. 3 Give out the correct half of the worksheet to each
If possible, set up a telephone and a recording device. student, either folded over or cut. Give the students
time to read their own instructions. (Option: group
PROCEDURE. together pairs of students with the same role and ask
1 Write up on the board the heading Agenda for them to prepare ideas together).
meeting and the three subheadings: 4 When the students are ready, ask the pairs to sit
1 Market opportunities: Africa back to back (or use a telephone if you have this
2 Pricing policy facility). Start the activity, circulate and make a note
3 Senior management vacancies of good/bad language use.
Elicit the meanings of ‘agenda’and ‘vacancies’. 5 (Option) Ask the best pair/s to re-enact the role-play
Refer to items 1 and 2 of the agenda and elicit for the class.
possible areas for discussion in a meeting (market 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
opportunities: new markets bring opportunity for 7 Now, or in the next-class as recycling: The As and
sales and profit but involve high initial cost and Bs change roles and repeat the activity. Hold
risk; pricing policy: reducing price can lead to another short feedback slot.
increased sales and market share but can bring less
profit and damage to brand image).

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 74 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.13
Global ambitions
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Student A: Marketing Director

You are the Marketing Director at Interlink International, a company that operates mobile phone
networks. You will receive a call from a colleague about an important meeting next month. The agenda
of the meeting is:

1 Market opportunities: Africa 2 Pricing policy 3 Senior management vacancies

Receive a call from the Operations Director of your company and discuss the meeting. First look at
these notes for each agenda item:
1 Market opportunities: Africa
Try to persuade your colleague that developing new markets in Africa is vital for the success of your
company.
2 Pricing policy
Try to persuade your colleague that your company should reduce the price of its products to gain
market share.
3 Senior management vacancies
You have heard that the current Vice-President for Marketing in your company is going to retire
soon. Does your colleague know if this is true? You would like the job, so try to persuade your
colleague to say something positive about you the next time he/she is talking to the President of the
company.

Student B: Operations Director


Make a call to the Marketing Director of your company and discuss the meeting. First look at these
notes for each agenda item:

You are the Operations Director at Interlink International, a company that operates mobile phone
networks. You will call from a colleague about an important meeting next month. The agenda of the
meeting is:

1 Market opportunities: Africa 2 Pricing policy 3 Senior management vacancies

1 Market opportunities: Africa


Try to persuade your colleague that it is too risky and too expensive to develop new markets in Africa
at the moment.
2 Pricing policy
Try to persuade your colleague that your company should keep the price of its products the same for
the next 12 months. You have a good reputation in the market and there is no need to cut prices.
3 Senior management vacancies
You have heard that the current Vice-President for Operations in your company is going to retire
soon. Does your colleague know if this is true? You would like the job, so try to persuade your
colleague to say something positive about you the next time he/she is talking to the President of
the company.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 75 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.14
Dialogue building: phone call
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. ALTERNATIVE PROCEDURE (CLASSWORK).


To provide a framework for practising a phone call of 1 Tell the students that they are going to write a short
the student’s choice. telephone dialogue together in pairs. Use any
telephone call where both students can predict the
TIME.
content. For example:
Variable
■ one of the role-plays from this/another book,
PREPARATION. before doing it as a fluency exercise
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in ■ one of the role-plays from this/another book,
the class. after doing it as a fluency exercise
Consider which of the two procedures below you will Note that it is not necessary to write the dialogue
use. with the same partner who was/will be involved in
the role-play.
PROCEDURE (INDIVIDUAL HOMEWORK).
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student.
1 Tell students that they are going to write a short
Divide the class into pairs. Explain that the pair will
dialogue based on a typical phone call that they
think of and write the dialogue together, and that
have in their job.
both students should keep a record of the whole
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student.
dialogue. Set a time limit for the task. Start the
Remind them that they should use a real-life
activity and circulate.
situation and personalize the dialogue as much as
3 Ask the pairs to practise reading their dialogues
possible. Ask them to write the dialogue for
together quietly. Then ask the best pair/s to read out
homework and bring it to the next lesson.
their dialogues for the class.
3 In the next lesson collect in the dialogues and
4 (Option) Take the written dialogues from each pair
correct them.
and redistribute them (so the pairs remain the same
4 (Option) Leave one of the dialogues uncorrected,
but they have another pair’s dialogue). First ask the
and photocopy one copy of this for each student.
students to study their new dialogues together
Ask students to try to correct/improve this dialogue
quietly and make sure they can read them. Then ask
in pairs. In feedback, listen to all the suggestions for
them to practise reading the dialogues aloud.
reformulations and discuss with the class which is
the best. Build up the reformulated dialogue on the
board line by line. As a round up, practise reading
the new dialogue aloud in open/closed pairs,
focusing on pronunciation.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 76 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

2.14
Dialogue building: phone call
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Write a short telephone dialogue.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 77 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.1
Your CV/Resume
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 5 When the students are ready, divide the class into
To discuss aspects of CVs including content, style and pairs for the mini-interview. Elicit and write on the
layout, and then prepare/improve individual CVs. board a few questions that the ‘interviewer’ can use.
Can we start with your education? I see that you
TIME. went to .... What exactly did you study there?
50 – 60 minutes Can we move on to your last job at .... What exactly
PREPARATION. did you do there?
Make one copy of the worksheet and one copy of the So, tell me something about your current job.
Example CV/Resume (next page in this book) for each Can you be a little more specific?
student in the class. Ask the students to exchange their ‘Example CVs’
If your students have no existing CV/Resume they will and give them a minute to read through.
write one in section C and no preparation is necessary 6 Appoint the first interviewer and interviewee in
before the class. If your students already have a each pair and remind them to change roles and
CV/Resume and simply want to review it, then ask them repeat when they finish. Start the activity, circulate
to bring a copy to this lesson. and make a note of good/bad language use. Use the
activity diagnostically to see what language areas
PROCEDURE. the students will need when talking about/writing
1 Write up on the board the words CV and Resume their own CVs.
and ask the students what they are. Explain if 7 Hold a short feedback slot, focusing on language
necessary that ‘resume’ is the word used in areas needed for section C.
America. The differences between them are covered 8 Refer to the instructions for section C. If students do
in section A of the worksheet. not have a CV, then ask them to write one in class or
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet (but not yet the for homework. If students already have CVs, then
Example CV/Resume) to every student and ask divide the group into twos/threes and ask them to
them to look at section A. Refer to the instructions: discuss their CVs, particularly any changes they
it is a silent, individual reading activity. Circulate, would now make having done the earlier activities.
helping with vocabulary. When students have They could produce a new version for homework.
finished reading, have an open class discussion on
their reactions. Note. If a student has changed jobs many
3 Refer to the first line of instructions for section B times they may want to emphasize their
and give out a copy of the Example CV/Resume. abilities and achievements rather than
Ask the students to read it and answer the question their work history. In this case, the major
on the worksheet (answer: yes, it does follow the headings of their CV/Resume will be
advice given in section A, and is actually more like ‘Abilities’, ‘Achievements’, ‘Work
a resume than a CV). History’ and ‘Education’. The ‘Abilities’
4 Refer to the instructions in the second part of and ‘Achievements’ sections will draw
section B. Explain to the students that this is going on experiences in several jobs. The
to be a short practice interview, and that the main ‘Work History’ section will list
interview using their own CV will be in another employers, job titles and dates, missing
class. They should fill in a few of the gaps using out short jobs and putting dates on the
their own ideas, working individually. They can right to de-emphasize them.
invent information. Set a time limit of 5 minutes.
Start the activity and circulate, helping with
vocabulary.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 78 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.1a
Your CV/Resume
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Study these points about CVs (European style) and resumes (American style). Remember that there
are no fixed rules and it depends on national culture and personal preference.
© Employment comes before Education, and the list starts with the most recent job/course first.
© Use short sentences and bullets and leave a lot of white space.
© Use action verbs (coordinated ... negotiated ... supervised ...).
© Use real results (increased sales by X% ... made savings of £Y).
© European-style CVs generally read like continuous text. They often include a short section on
interests, sports etc. and sometimes give the names of referees (people who will give you references).
© American-style resumes are more like notes, are only one page long and do not usually contain
sections on interests, sports and references.
© Some people like to mention their personal characteristics. The following words are typical:

highly motivated creative friendly and sociable perform well under pressure
good at taking initiatives efficient work well in a team excellent communication skills

© Common mistakes include:

■ Using too many long sentences rather than short sentences with action verbs.
■ Focusing on skills/abilities and forgetting achievements (concrete things you have done).
■ Including irrelevant information: short jobs/courses, lists of conferences etc.
■ Making the document too long: two pages (CV) or one page (resume) is usually the limit.
■ Stating your current salary.
■ Using too many character styles with the word processor. This becomes confusing.

© Recent graduates. If you are a recent graduate you know that at your stage most CVs/Resumes look
very similar to an employer. For your CV/Resume to stand out you should consider the following:

■ Skills and abilities. Think of occasions in your life where you ‘resolved a problem’, ‘set objectives
to achieve a goal’, ‘met a challenge’, ‘worked in a team’ etc.
■ Achievements. Even if you have just finished university, you can still think of concrete things you
have done in the areas of project work, trips abroad, membership of a Students Association,
sports, interests, hobbies.
■ Travel/Sports. Employers like to see travel (showing independence and self-confidence) and
participation in sports (showing teamwork and sociability).
■ Translating names. Give the real name of the educational establishment and the qualification. Put
a simple translation in brackets following the real name.
■ Grades. Every country has its own grading system, so put your real grade and then write it in
brackets as a percentage or indicate the range.

B Look at the example on the next sheet. Does it follow the advice given in section A?
In the example there are lots of gaps. Write your name at the top and fill in a few of the gaps (use real
or imaginary information). Then give your sheet to a partner and ask each other questions.

C Talk about – or prepare – your own CV/Resume.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 79 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.1b
Example CV/Resume
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Name Telephone Number


Address Date of birth

Summary More than –––––––––––– years experience in –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– including management posts as
a –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– . Currently employed as a –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– at –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

I am now looking for an opportunity with a multinational company that ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ,

EMPLOYMENT
Current employment
––––––––––––– – present (years) ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (company name) ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ( job title)
During my –––––––––––––– years at –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– I have been responsible for:
■ supervising a team of –––––––––––––– people.
■ negotiating contracts worth ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– with ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ managing the accounts of ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ planning and coordinating marketing campaigns for ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ preparing reports analyzing –––––––––––––––––––

■ increasing sales of –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– by ––––––––––––– % over two years


■ achieving ––––––––––––– % savings in the cost of –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ obtaining ––––––––––––– % market share for –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– within one year.

Previous employment
––––––––––––– – ––––––––––––– (years) ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (company name) ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ( job title)
While at ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– I was part of a team which:
■ planned the launch of –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ developed a new ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ achieved ––––––––––––– % brand recognition for –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– after two years.


■ organized the installation of ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

■ initiated a new system for ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

EDUCATION
––––––––––––––– (final year) –––––––––––––––––––––––– (qualification) –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (establishment)

––––––––––––––– (final year) –––––––––––––––––––––––– (qualification) –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (establishment)

OTHER EXPERIENCE
Computer Skills. Comprehensive knowledge of –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Languages. Spoken and written English to ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– level.

Personal and Professional References provided on request

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 81 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.2
Job interview
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Have a brief whole-class discussion to review ideas


To discuss interview tips and then practise an interview at the end. In a mixed nationality class there will be
based on the students’ own CVs/Resumes. opportunities to talk about cross-cultural
differences. Write up suggestions for point 12 on the
TIME. board.
60– 90 minutes 4 Refer to the instructions and role notes for section
PREPARATION. B. Check the meaning of ‘interviewer’ and
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in ‘interviewee’ (the suffix -ee is used for someone
the class. who receives something e.g. employee, trainee).
Students need a copy of their own CVs/Resumes for Elicit and write on the board a few questions that
section B. They can use the ones they prepared/revised the interviewers can use.
at the end of worksheet 3.1. Can we start with your education? I see that you
went to .... What exactly did you study there?
PROCEDURE. Can we move on to your last job at .... What exactly
1 Write up on the board: did you do there?
Your last job interview So, tell me something about your current job.
1 Describe it briefly Can you be a little more specific?
2 Talk about one thing you did well 5 Divide the class into threes if possible (two
3 Talk about one thing you would do in a different interviewers and one interviewee), otherwise into
way the next time pairs. Appoint the first interviewee in each group.
Divide the class into small groups (two/three Remind the students that they will change roles and
students). Ask them to discuss in turn their last repeat when they finish. Ask the interviewee to give
interview using the three points: a short description their CV to the interviewer/s and allow time for
(the job, the interviewers, the kind of questions), reading. Set a time limit for each interview. Start the
one thing they did well and one thing they would do activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
differently if they were in the same situation again. language use.
Start the activity and circulate. 6 As each group finishes, rotate the interviewee and
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student let the new interviewers look briefly at the new CV
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the before they start again. (There is always an option
instructions. Divide the class into pairs/threes and to leave the final interview in each group for the
ask them to discuss the eleven points. Finally they next class). Continue to circulate and make a note of
should think of another tip of their own for point 12. good/bad language use.
Start the activity and circulate. Vocabulary note: 7 Hold a short feedback slot.
‘buzzword’ = ‘a word or phrase that is fashionable
and popular’.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 82 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.2
Job interview
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Work with a partner. Discuss the following ‘tips’ for a successful interview. Do you agree with all of
them? Add one more of your own.

1 Before the interview, ask a friend/colleague to ask you typical questions. In particular, practise talking
about your strong points using concrete examples from your current job.

2 Before the interview, write to the people who will give you references. Tell them to expect a call and
give them a recent copy of your CV/Resume.

3 Arrive 30 minutes early on site and 10 minutes early for the interview. Use the time to walk in the
fresh air. When greeting the interviewer, smile, make eye contact and shake hands firmly.

4 Your clothes, shoes and hair need to be tidy and above your normal standard.

5 Keep your answers short, simple and relevant – as you would in other business situations. Interviews
are a dialogue so don’t talk more than 60–70% of the time. If the interviewer wants more
information, let him/her ask for it.

6 Occasionally take the initiative and ask questions to show you are interested.

7 Be enthusiastic and positive. Never contradict, argue or interrupt. Never criticize previous employers
during the interview.

8 Don’t be submissive. Treat the interviewer with respect, but as an equal.

9 Don’t ask questions about the salary. If possible, wait for the interviewer to mention it. Ask for higher
than you expect. If in doubt, ask for your current salary plus 15%.

10 Immediately after the interview make notes: write down names, details about the organization, and
especially company ‘buzzwords’. If called for a second interview, make sure you use these.

11 Consider writing a short follow-up letter, particularly after informal interviews where there was no
clear job being advertised. Express your pleasure in meeting everyone (list them by name), comment
on one part of the meeting (something that emphasizes your qualifications), mention again the
benefits you can bring to the company and why you would like to work there (include company
buzzwords).

12 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

B Work in groups of two/three. Have a formal mini-interview.


Interviewee Before you start, give your CV/Resume to your interviewer/s to look through.
Interviewer/s Ask questions, listen carefully, ask follow-up questions.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 83 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.3
Covering letter
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student.


To write a covering letter and have a mini-interview for Refer to the paragraph summary in the box and the
a real job. instructions. Start the activity and circulate,
correcting or asking the students to reformulate as
TIME. you go. The students write individually. You may
60–90 minutes want students to finish the writing for homework.
PREPARATION. 4 (Option) Leave one of the student’s letters
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in uncorrected as you go round (explain to the student
the class. why), and photocopy one copy of this for each
Students need to have a real job to apply for, so do one student. In the next lesson, ask students to try to
of the following: correct/improve this letter in pairs. In feedback
a) Do nothing as preparation, but in the class ask listen to all the suggestions for reformulations and
students to think of a real job in another company discuss with the class which is the best. Build up the
that they would like to apply for, even if no vacancy reformulated letter on the board sentence by
currently exists. sentence.
b) Find a small selection of real job adverts of the kind 5 When the students have finished their letters, tell
that the group might be interested in, compile them them that they will do a role-play in pairs where one
on a sheet or two, and make a photocopy for each person is the applicant and the other is a Personnel
student. Officer who asks questions based on the letter and
c) Bring in some real pages of job adverts for the the job advert. Elicit and write up some questions
students to choose freely. This is more challenging for the Personnel Officer:
in terms of vocabulary so have some Business Why did you apply to this company?
English dictionaries available in the classroom. What do you know about this business/this market/
our products?
PROCEDURE. What interests you most about this job?
1 Write up on the board Job application and elicit the Why should we choose you in preference to the
meaning. Elicit the verb and write up to apply for a other candidates?
job. Write up the names of the two documents that 6 Divide the class into pairs. Ask the students to give
you need when you apply for a job (a CV/Resume their letters and job adverts to their partner, and
and a covering letter). allow time for reading. (Note: if you have used
2 Follow the procedure that corresponds to a), b) or c) option a) above there will be no advert so the
in ‘Preparation’ above: students will have to tell their partner a few words
a) Tell the students that they will write the about the job before they begin.) Appoint the first
covering letter for the job they are interested in. interviewee in each pair, and remind students to
b) Tell the students that you have found some job change roles and repeat when they finish. Start the
adverts that will interest them and that they will activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
choose one and then write a covering letter. language use.
Circulate and help with vocabulary. 7 Hold a short feedback slot.
c) Tell the students that you have some job advert
pages that will interest them and that they will
choose one and then write a covering letter.
Circulate and help with vocabulary.

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Business Builder

3.3
Covering letter
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

Your CV/Resume will have a covering letter. The paragraphs of this letter might follow the pattern below.

1 Subject heading at the top of the letter: Vacancy for a Marketing Director

2 Introduce yourself and mention the purpose of your letter. If you saw an advert in a
newspaper/specialist journal, say which one.

3 Give your background and experience, and emphasize why you are suitable for the job. Refer to
your abilities and achievements, perhaps linking directly to things mentioned in the advert.

4 Ask the reader to look at your CV/Resume, and focus on one or two key points.

5 Close by thanking them for taking the time to read your CV/Resume and say when you are
available for interview.

Choose a job advert from a newspaper/specialist journal or think of a real job that you would like to
apply for. Write the covering letter for your CV/Resume.

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 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 85 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.4
Difficult questions
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 4 Refer to the instructions for section C. Divide the


To practise dealing with difficult interview questions. class into pairs, start the activity and circulate.

TIME. ANSWERS.
50–60 minutes 1 c 2 e 3 g 4 a 5 h 6 f 7 b 8 d 9 j 10 i
After checking the answers stress again that they are
PREPARATION. just possible answers, and other ways of dealing with
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in the questions that the students discussed in section B
the class. are equally valid.
PROCEDURE. 5 Refer to the instructions for section D. Ask students
1 Write up on the board Skills and qualities of an to cover section C with a piece of paper, but leave
ideal job candidate. Brainstorm all the things that section B showing. Divide the class into pairs and
interviewers look for in a candidate and list the appoint the first interviewer and interviewee in each
ideas on the board (eliciting and pre-teaching some pair. The interviewer asks the questions in section B
of the examples from section A of the worksheet). and appropriate follow-up questions. The
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student interviewee should respond in a natural way based
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the list on their own real work and career (it is not a
of skills and qualities and check the meanings. memory test for the answers in section C). They
Then discuss in class the two questions at the end change roles and repeat when they finish. Start the
(including the brainstormed ideas on the board for activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
the first question). language use.
POSSIBLE ANSWERS. 6 Hold a short feedback slot.
First bullet: Perhaps the only skills obvious from a CV are: 7 As a round-up, refer back to section A and have a
Ability to make money class discussion about whether students managed
Ability to work in teams to show any of these skills and qualities in their
Analytical skills mini-interviews.
Second bullet: Interviewers ask difficult questions to get
evidence of the skills and qualities that do not show
on a CV. This evidence can come both from the
content of the replies and also the way that the
interviewee replies (personal qualities show up more
clearly when the interview moves away from safe,
obvious areas).

3 Refer to the instructions for section B. Explain to


the students that this is not an interview (they will
ask and answer the same questions about
themselves in section D), it is a discussion in
general terms to prepare for the interview. Divide
the class into pairs/threes, start the activity and
circulate. Have a brief whole-class discussion to
review ideas at the end.

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Business Builder

3.4
Difficult questions
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Interviewers need to see evidence of the following skills and personal qualities.

Business skills Ability to make money Ability to save money


Ability to save time Ability to follow procedures

Professional skills Honesty Pride in your work Ability to work in teams


Analytical skills Reliability (you can be trusted)

Personal qualities Communication skills Listening skills Self-confidence


Motivation and determination Friendliness and openness
Right for the department Right for the company image

• Which ones will be clear from your CV/Resume?


• Why do interviewers ask difficult questions?

B Look at these typical ‘difficult questions’. Discuss how you would answer them.
1 Perhaps you’d like to start by telling us a little bit about yourself?
2 So what have you learnt from your previous jobs?
3 What would you say are your strong points?
4 And your weak points?
5 Can you work under pressure – time pressure for example?
6 How do you take direction and criticism?
7 It sounds like you enjoy your work. Why do you want to leave your current job?
8 So what sort of challenges are you looking for?
9 And what are your career objectives?
10 Are you willing to go where the company sends you?

C Match the possible responses a–j below with the ten questions from section B.
a ‘Maybe I am a little too perfectionist’. ‘Perhaps I worry too much about deadlines.’ These could be
considered strong points.
b Your current job doesn’t allow you to grow professionally and you want more challenges. Also, be
honest about practical things like distance from your home, job security etc.
c Don’t talk too much. Cover your origins, education and work experience. Then make a bridge to why
you are there.
d You want to grow and develop, and you want more responsibility. Give some examples: learning new
skills, experience of different areas, being in charge of projects etc.
e You have learned the importance of teamwork and of listening to other people’s advice. You have
also developed a good business sense: everything has to be justified in terms of cost.
f You welcome it and listen carefully. It is necessary in order to learn and develop.
g Give two or three points like honesty, working well in a team and determination. Say a few words
about each one to make your comments personal and sincere.
h Yes, you find it stimulating. However, you believe in planning and good time management to reduce
last-minute panic.
i Answer ‘yes’ immediately. Then ask how much travel is involved in the job. You can always not take
the job later if you change your mind.
j Say what kind of job you would like about three years from now, and why.

D Work with a partner. Ask and answer the questions in section B.


 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 87 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.5
Mini-interview: your background and job
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

WORKSHEETS 3.5 TO 3.8.

Worksheets 3.1 to 3.4 provide a comprehensive with a student who is preparing for a specific job
introduction to the topic of Job Interviews, particularly interview. Experienced business people with a good
for students early in their careers. Worksheets 3.5 to CV/Resume and no problems writing a covering letter
3.8 are for additional practice and recycling of can miss 3.1 to 3.4 completely and just work through
different stages of the interview, and will be 3.5 to 3.8 in sequence.
particularly useful for teachers working one-to-one

AIM. 3 Divide the class into pairs. Explain to the students


To practise answering interview questions relating to that they should discuss how they will answer the
education, previous job, current job and personal questions, but it is not a formal interview yet (this
qualities. comes in section B). Start the activity, circulate and
make a note of good/bad language use.
TIME. 4 Hold a short feedback slot.
50–60 minutes 5 Refer to the instructions for section B. Divide the
PREPARATION. class into new pairs (or threes – two interviewers
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in the works well) and appoint the interviewer and
class. interviewee in each pair. They change roles and
Students need a copy of their own CVs/Resumes for repeat when they finish. Explain that the
section B. If they do not have one, they will have to take interviewee should respond in a natural way without
a few minutes at the beginning of the class to write a using their notes (it is not a memory test of the
summary CV with the dates, company names and job preparation in section A). Ask the interviewee to
titles of their main jobs, and the dates and qualifications give their CV/Resume and the worksheet to the
of their higher education courses. interviewer, and allow time for the interviewer to
read the CV/Resume and the worksheet and see
PROCEDURE. which questions the interviewee has prepared. Set a
1 Write up on the board Mini-interview: your time limit for each interview. Start the activity,
background and job and underneath these five circulate and make a note of good/bad language use.
phrases in random order: 6 As each group finishes, rotate the interviewee and
University/higher education After higher education let the new interviewer/s look briefly at the new
Previous job Current job Personal qualities CV/Resume and the worksheet to see which
Divide the class into pairs and ask the students to questions have been prepared. Continue to circulate
decide on the order that these topics would be and make a note of good/bad language use.
covered in a typical interview. Take brief class 7 Hold a short feedback slot.
feedback (there is no correct answer but the order
above is reasonably typical).
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the
groups of questions 1–6 and compare the order of
the topics here with the order discussed in the lead-
in. Refer to the instructions. Ask students to work
individually at first: they put a tick by the questions
they want to answer, and fill in any gaps. Circulate
and help with vocabulary.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 88 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.5
Mini-interview: your background and job
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Prepare for a mini-interview. Decide which of the following questions you want to answer and fill in
any gaps with your own personal information. Then work with a partner to discuss how you would
answer them.
1 I notice that your university/higher education course was in –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– .
■ Which part of the course did you enjoy most? Why did you like that subject?
■ Did you do a project in the final year? Can you tell me about that?

2 I see that after university/higher education you worked in several jobs.


■ One of your first jobs was as a –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ( job) in ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
(company). Can you tell me about that?

3 I see that in your previous job you worked as a ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ( job) in ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (company).
■ Can you tell me about that? What exactly did you do there?
■ What did you learn from that job?
■ Why did you stay so long/so little time in that company?
■ Why did you leave?

4 So, your current job is as a –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– ( job) in –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– (company).


■ Can you tell me a little about the company? What exactly do you do there?
■ What have you learnt in your current job?
■ What personal and professional skills have you developed?
■ How have you kept up to date with new techniques?
■ What experience do you have of –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– technology?
■ How would you describe your management style?
■ Why do you want to leave your current job?

5 I see that you are currently unemployed.


■ Why are you not working? How have you spent your time while you’ve been unemployed?
■ Have you had other interviews? Why do you think you weren’t successful?

6 Tell me something about yourself.


■ What do you do in your free time? What hobbies and interests do you have?
■ What are your strong points?
■ What are your weak points?
■ Can you work under pressure? Can you give me an example?
■ Are you a persistent and determined person? Can you give me an example?
■ What have been your greatest achievements during your career?
■ Can you describe an important challenge in your life?
■ Can you describe an important change in your life?
■ What are your career objectives? Where do you see yourself three years from now?

B Work with a new partner and have a formal mini-interview.


Interviewee Before you start, give your CV/Resume and this worksheet to your interviewer. Make
sure your interviewer knows which questions you have prepared.
Interviewer Use the questions you are given. Listen carefully and ask follow-up questions.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 89 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.6
Mini-interview: the job itself
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 4 Divide the class into pairs. Explain to the students


To practise answering interview questions about a that they should discuss how they will answer the
specific job. questions, but it is not a formal interview yet (this
comes in section B). Start the activity, circulate and
TIME. make a note of good/bad language use.
50–60 minutes 5 Hold a short feedback slot.
PREPARATION. 6 Refer to the instructions for section B. Divide the
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in class into new pairs (or threes – two interviewers
the class. works well) and appoint the interviewer and
interviewee in each pair. They change roles and
PROCEDURE. repeat when they finish. Explain that the
1 Write up on the board Mini-interview: the job itself. interviewee should respond in a natural way without
Elicit and write up on the board typical interview using their notes (it is not a memory test of the
questions about the job itself (see questions A1–A9 preparation in section A). Allow time for the
on the worksheet for examples). interviewer to look at the interviewee’s worksheet
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student with the job title and company name, clarify any
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the first doubts about this, and see which questions the
line of instructions. Explain to the students that they interviewee has prepared. Set a time limit for each
will need to think of a specific job in order to do the interview. Start the activity, circulate and make a
activity. Give them two choices: note of good/bad language use.
a) A real job in a real company that they would 7 As each group finishes, rotate the interviewee and
like (there doesn’t have to be a vacancy in let the new interviewer/s look briefly at the new job
real life). title and see which questions have been prepared.
b) A promotion inside their own company (perhaps Continue to circulate and make a note of good/bad
their boss is leaving soon?). language use.
Ask students to think of the job and then write down 8 Hold a short feedback slot.
the job title and company.
3 Refer to the remainder of the instructions for section
A. Ask students to work individually at first: they
put a tick by the questions they want to answer, fill
in any gaps, make a few notes and add a question.
Circulate and help with vocabulary.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 90 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.6
Mini-interview: the job itself
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Write down the job that you are applying for.


Job title –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Company –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Prepare for a mini-interview. Decide which of the following questions you want to answer and fill in
any gaps with your own personal information. Add a question of your own that you want the
interviewer to ask you. Then work with a partner to discuss how you would answer them.
1 Why did you apply to this company? What do you know about our company?

2 What do you know about this business?

3 What do you know about this market?

4 What do you know about our products?

5 What interests you most about this job?

6 What can you bring to this position? Why should we employ you in preference to the other
candidates?

7 You have very little experience in –––––––––––––-------------------------------------------––––––––––––––– How will you deal with this?

8 You appear to be a little young/old for this position.

9 Are you prepared to travel?

10 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

B Work with a new partner and have a formal mini-interview.


Interviewee Before you start, give the interviewer this worksheet with the job title and company you
are interested in and show him/her which questions you have prepared.
Interviewer Look at the interviewee’s chosen job and check you understand what it is. Then use the
questions you are given. Listen carefully and ask follow-up questions.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 91 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.7
Mini-interview: your management abilities
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Divide the class into pairs. Explain to the students


To practise answering interview questions relating to that they should discuss how they will answer the
experience of teamwork, negotiation, planning and questions, but it is not a formal interview yet (this
decision-making. comes in section B). Start the activity, circulate and
make a note of good/bad language use.
TIME. 4 Hold a short feedback slot.
50– 60 minutes 5 Refer to the instructions for section B. Divide the
PREPARATION. class into new pairs (or threes – two interviewers
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in works well) and appoint the interviewer and
the class. interviewee in each pair. They change roles and
repeat when they finish. Explain that the
PROCEDURE. interviewee should respond in a natural way without
1 Write up on the board Mini-interview: your using their notes (it is not a memory test of the
management abilities. Tell the students that large preparation in section A). Allow time for the
companies often send out a questionnaire about interviewer to check which areas are going to be
management abilities when they call candidates for discussed. Set a time limit for each interview. Start
interview. The candidate fills in the questionnaire the activity, circulate and make a note of good/bad
and sends it off before the interview. In the language use.
interview the candidate’s responses are discussed. 6 As each group finishes, rotate the interviewee and
Ask the students what sort of areas they think are let the new interviewer/s look briefly at the areas to
covered (see worksheet), and how the candidates be discussed. Continue to circulate and make a note
should reply (most such questionnaires emphasize of good/bad language use.
that they only want real examples, not a general or 7 Hold a short feedback slot.
theoretical reply).
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the
instructions. Ask students to work individually at
first: they make notes for any areas that they want to
talk about. Circulate and help with vocabulary.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 92 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.7
Mini-interview: your management abilities
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Prepare for a mini-interview. Decide which of the following areas you want to talk about and make
some notes, using examples from your own experience. Then work with a partner to discuss how you
would answer each question.

1 Team work
Give an example of when you were part of a team. What was the occasion? What were the
objectives? What was your contribution? How did you encourage other team members?

2 Persuasion and negotiation


Give an example of when you attempted to persuade other people. What was the occasion?
What preparation did you do? What actions did you take? What was the result?

3 Planning and objectives


Give an example of when you created a plan to meet specific objectives. What did you have to plan?
What preparations did you make? How did you check progress? Was there a deadline?
Did you achieve your objectives by the deadline?

4 Decision-making
Give an example of a situation where you made a complex decision. What was the situation?
What information did you use? Why did you choose this information? What did you consider before
making your final decision? What was your final decision? What were the advantages and
disadvantages of this decision?

5 Development of others
Give an example of a situation where you encouraged other people. How did you know they were
not performing effectively? What did you do? Why did you do this? What was the result?

B Work with a new partner and have a formal mini-interview.


Interviewee Before you start, tell your interviewer which areas you have prepared.
Interviewer Use the questions above. Listen carefully and ask follow-up questions.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 93 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.8
Mini-interview: using a case-study
Teacher Resource Series

Teacher’s Notes

AIM. 3 Divide the class into pairs. Explain to the students


To practise talking about a real problem situation and its that they should discuss how they will answer the
solution in an interview to show evidence of abilities questions, but it is not a formal interview yet (this
and personal qualities. comes in section B). Start the activity, circulate and
make a note of good/bad language use.
TIME. 4 Hold a short feedback slot.
50–60 minutes 5 Refer to the instructions for section B. Divide the
PREPARATION. class into new pairs (or threes – two interviewers
Make one copy of the worksheet for each student in works well) and appoint the interviewer and
the class. interviewee in each pair. They change roles and
repeat when they finish. Explain that the
PROCEDURE. interviewee should respond in a natural way without
1 Write up on the board Mini-interview: using a case- using their notes (it is not a memory test of the
study. Elicit the meaning of ‘case-study’ (a detailed preparation in section A). Set a time limit for each
account of the development of a particular situation interview. Start the activity, circulate and make a
over a period of time). Tell the students that in an note of good/bad language use.
interview it is common for some time to be spent on 6 As each group finishes, rotate the interviewee.
one particular recent real-life problem that the Continue to circulate and make a note of good/bad
candidate has recently dealt with. Ask the students language use.
why (it helps the interviewer to get an idea of the 7 Hold a short feedback slot.
abilities and personal qualities of the candidate).
Note that even if the interviewer does not ask for
details of one particular case, the interviewee will
be able to introduce it as an example on various
occasions.
2 Give out a copy of the worksheet to every student
and ask them to look at section A. Refer to the
instructions. Ask students to work individually at
first: they make notes for each point. Circulate and
help with vocabulary.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 94 This page may be photocopied for use in class
Business Builder

3.8
Mini-interview: using a case-study
Teacher Resource Series

Worksheet

A Prepare for a mini-interview by making notes on the following points. Then work with a partner to
discuss how you would answer each question.

1 Choose one specific problem you have faced in your job and explain it briefly.

2 What was the solution?

3 Which professional and personal skills did you use to help solve this problem?

4 How did your company benefit? (Try to give figures if possible).

5 Re-examine your own role in the process. What exactly did you contribute?

B Work with a new partner and have a formal mini-interview.


Interviewee Talk about the problem situation you have prepared.
Interviewer Use the questions above. Listen carefully and ask follow-up questions.

 Macmillan Publishers Ltd 2002 95 This page may be photocopied for use in class