Joe Lee and Tim Simmons

Talent Management with SAP ERP HCM
®

Bonn Ⴇ Boston

Contents at a Glance
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Introduction ............................................................................ Talent Management Overview ................................................ Foundations of Talent Management ....................................... How SAP Defines Talent Management ................................... Induction Phase ...................................................................... Assessment Phase .................................................................. Competency Phase ................................................................. Progression Phase ................................................................... Technical Considerations ........................................................ Best Practices and Lessons Learned ....................................... Talent Management Resources ............................................... 15 25 39 103 181 227 249 273 325 349 359

Contents
Acknowledgments .................................................................................... 13

1

Introduction ..............................................................................
1.1 Target Audience .......................................................................... 1.1.1 HR Managers ................................................................. 1.1.2 HR Administrators .......................................................... 1.1.3 IT Managers ................................................................... 1.1.4 Talent Personnel ............................................................. 1.1.5 Implementation Leaders ................................................. Book Layout ............................................................................... Summary ....................................................................................

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16 16 17 19 19 20 20 23

1.2 1.3

2

Talent Management Overview ..................................................
2.1 Background ................................................................................ 2.1.1 Key to Success ................................................................ 2.1.2 Ownership of Talent Management .................................. 2.1.3 Talent Management Maturity Model .............................. 2.1.4 Employee Engagement and Its Relationship to Talent Management .................................................................. Trends ......................................................................................... 2.2.1 Organizational Trends ..................................................... 2.2.2 Technological Trends ...................................................... Drivers ........................................................................................ 2.3.1 Labor Force Demographics ............................................. 2.3.2 Skills Gap ....................................................................... 2.3.3 Global/Mobile Talent Market ......................................... 2.3.4 Employees’ Expectation Shift .......................................... Summary ....................................................................................

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25 27 28 30 31 32 32 34 35 35 35 36 36 37

2.2

2.3

2.4

3

Foundations of Talent Management ........................................
3.1 Organizational Management ....................................................... 3.1.1 Object-Oriented Design .................................................

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39 41

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...............3.................................................................................8 Person .....................1.......4 Position ...................................4 Organizational Units ..............3 Integration Points .......................1....................................2.................... 3........2..............................................4....................3.................... 103 4............4 Employee Group ........................................ 3.............................................1.............2 Organizational Plan ...............................4 8 ......1... 3.................................................1.............1...............................................................1...........3 3......................... 4................................................................ 4................................... SAP ERP HCM Learning Solution .....1 Predefined versus Flexible Solutions .......... SAP Job Architecture ...........................3.......... 3.................3............................... 3.7 Chief Positions .............................................. 3. 3.......................................1 Organizational Competencies .................. 3..........2 Personnel Area ...1 Company Code .2.........5 3... 3................................................................... 41 42 43 46 48 53 53 55 57 58 58 59 60 61 63 64 67 73 80 80 81 82 82 82 101 4 How SAP Defines Talent Management .............. 3.........................2 4.......4...5 Employee Subgroup ....................4 3.......................................3 SAP ERP HCM Qualifications Catalog ............ 3........6 Positions ...............................3 Personnel Subarea ............... 3....................1. 4................Contents 3........2.......... 3............1 Learning Solution Process ................................2.... 4....2 3.......... 3.....1 E-Recruiting Process .......................5 The Importance of SAP Job Architecture ...........................1 SAP E-Recruiting ............3 Staff Assignments .... 3..1.............................................................................................3.............................................. 3.....................................2............. 4.... 4....4................................ 3.... 104 105 115 117 118 123 131 133 136 151 152 4................................3 4...........................................2 Individual Competencies ........1....................................3 Jobs .2 Integration Points .... Qualifications Catalog .....3.5 Creating Organizational Units ...... Personnel Administration .. 3....9 Organizational Management Summary ..2.3........ 3......................................2 Integration Points ...... SAP ERP HCM Enterprise Compensation Management .............................2 Job Family .............. 3.................................2 Performance Management Process .......... Summary ................1 Functional Area .............2.......................................... 4.. SAP ERP HCM Performance Management ................................................

............................ 5.............. 181 5.2 ..4 Position Management in SAP ... Position Management ........................................1 Prepare . 5........6.......3 The Cost of Unfilled Positions .........................2 Source .................. 5............3 Screen ...........................................3...... 6......................... 4.................................................... 5...............4.........................3.......... 4...............1 E-Recruiting .................................1 Position Management Tools ................................................. 227 6....................4 Interview ................................................................1. 4.................................6..............2 Integration Points .. 4....................2......... 228 228 228 235 237 9 6.....3...3 Learning Solution ......2 Integration Points ........................................... 5.. 5....2 Talent Profile for Managers and Talent Management Specialists .4 5..............................5 4.... 6............ 5.................................................................................................................. 5.............2 Workforce Planning .........5 Hire ..................................................2.................... Talent Assessment ......................................................................................... 182 184 185 186 186 187 193 194 203 208 211 213 216 217 221 225 5..2 Performance Management ................... 4......................................................... SAP ERP HCM Talent Development and Succession Planning ...................................2............ 4........................................................................ 5..5.....1.............................................2............................ 5..........................................6........................................4 Enterprise Compensation Management ... 4..1 Potential .1 Requisition .......................................4.......................3 5............6.......... 6.................. Summary ...................................4..............2 Why Is Position Management Important? ... Talent Profile ............................ 4............ Summary ...........6........2 Planning ................................................3.......................3......5......................5 Talent Development and Succession Planning ........1 Talent Profile for Employees ..........................Contents 4.........1 5......1 Enterprise Compensation Process ..4...2............................................................. 154 166 167 168 176 177 177 178 178 179 179 5 Induction Phase .... E-Recruiting .......................5 6 Assessment Phase ...................................1 Talent Development Process ..................................................6 4................................................................... 5......................1 SAP ERP HCM Performance Management: Objective Setting ......

.. 7.............................3 Talent Groups .....................................................2 8 Progression Phase ......4 6.2....................2..............................1.............3............ and Preparing the Talent Review Meeting ...............................................................2.. 8...... 8.......1........1 SAP ERP HCM Performance Management: Year-End Review .....3..2 Catalog .......................... 8...................................................2........2 Employee ....... 249 7.. 6..................... 249 249 253 254 258 261 265 270 7..1 STVN SuccessionPlanning ...........................................................................................Contents 6.... 7...................................................... 273 275 278 281 281 284 287 289 290 291 296 299 300 300 8.............................................1............. 8................ Summary ......................2 Review Process ...................1............. 7.........4 Approval Process ....1 SAP ERP HCM Learning Solution ....3..........2.............3 Profile ..2 Conducting the Talent Review Meeting ........................................ Talent Review Meeting ....................................................5 Talent Groups ...................4..................1..... Summary ..................... 8...........................................................................................................2.......................................5 Participation ......1............................. 6.... 7..........3 8..........................................................................................4 10 .... 6....................... SAP ERP HCM Enterprise Compensation Management ... Succession Planning ......1 Budgeting Process ............. 8............................. 238 238 239 240 241 241 244 247 7 Competency Phase ..............................3 Competencies .............4 Schedule .......3 6..........3 Controlling Process ................1 Creating...1.......................................... 7........... 8........................................................................2 8.... 8............... 8.................................... 6..........................................................................................................2............. Planning...............2 Complete Year-End Assessment ..........................................3......... 8...................................................1 Manager ....3....................4 Derailers ................1 Complete Self-Assessment ........................................ 273 8...................................1..............2........ 7...........2 Risks ............. 6....... SAP ERP HCM Performance Management: Mid-Year Review .......................1 Content ................6 Close-Out ......................................

................................................................. 8...9 Reporting and Analytics ................................................................5...1........................... Summary ............... 9.....4..............1 SAP E-Recruiting ...............................................1..........5 Talent Development .........2 Tracking and Maintaining the Development Plan ........Contents 8................... 8............................ STVN Technical Requirements .... 8..............................1...........................5 9.6 Succession Management .....6 Comparing STVN SuccessionPlanning and SAP Functionality .......... User Interfaces ... 9........................................................................ 350 351 11 .4 Enterprise Compensation Management .....2 Staffing ............................................... Web Dynpro for ABAP .........1 Architecture .........5 8......................2 Configuration ........4...6 10 Best Practices and Lessons Learned .......................1......... 9.......................................................... 8......................................... 349 10......... Summary ......................... 8............................2 SAP NetWeaver Business Client ...........................................................................3 Status Handling ............................................................................................................ 9....................4 9.............................................1..... 9.......................................................4.........4........4.. 9................................. 9....................................................2 303 304 304 305 306 307 314 315 319 319 322 323 9 Technical Considerations ..... Business Add-Ins ..................1 SAP NetWeaver Portal ..4..........3............ 8....................................................... 8.......7 Assigning Successors ................................ Talent Development ............... 9........2........... 10...........2 Performance Management ......8 Wizards and Comparison ............ 9...............3 9.... 8...................1 Implementation Considerations ......................................................................3 Developing with Web Dynpro for ABAP .......1.................5 Bench Strength ................................3 Learning Solution .......................................................2 9.....................................................1 Technical Architecture ...........3................... 8..........................................1 Creating the Development Plan .............. 9........ 325 326 327 328 328 329 329 329 331 331 332 333 337 339 342 346 348 9.5......4 Successor Pools ... 325 9........................4........................................6 Talent Identification ............................4........ 9..2..... 8...................3..................

Contents

10.3 Change Management .................................................................. 10.3.1 Change Management on Closer Inspection ..................... 10.3.2 Change Management Strategy ........................................ 10.4 Summary ....................................................................................

352 353 354 357

11 Talent Management Resources ................................................. 359
11.1 On-Premise and Cloud-Based Talent Management Solutions from SAP .................................................................................... 11.1.1 SAP Roadmap ................................................................ 11.1.2 Advantages and Disadvantages ....................................... 11.1.3 The Future ..................................................................... 11.2 Mobile Solutions ........................................................................ 11.3 SAP Resources ............................................................................ 11.3.1 SAP Service Marketplace ............................................... 11.3.2 SAP Community Network ............................................... 11.4 HR Expert .................................................................................. 11.5 Conferences ............................................................................... 11.5.1 SAP HR Conference ........................................................ 11.5.2 SAPPHIRE ...................................................................... 11.6 SAP User Groups ......................................................................... 11.7 Social Media ............................................................................... 11.7.1 LinkedIn ......................................................................... 11.7.2 XING .............................................................................. 11.7.3 Facebook, Google+, and Twitter ..................................... 11.8 Summary .................................................................................... 359 360 361 363 363 365 365 367 368 369 370 370 370 371 371 372 372 373

Appendices ....................................................................................... 375
A Bibliography ......................................................................................... B The Authors ......................................................................................... Index ......................................................................................................... 375 377 379

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Organizations must have a process for identifying, acquiring, developing, and retaining their employees, which makes establishing workforce plans that align with the business strategies a necessity. This is all encompassed in the induction phase. After new employees are hired, they can maintain their talent profile in preparation for the development phase.

5

Induction Phase

Now that you have a deeper understanding of the Talent Management modules from both an EhP 5 and basic integration perspective, let’s explore the integration of the Talent Management modules in further detail as we walk through a year in the life of an employee from an SAP perspective. The first of four phases, the induction phase, involves creating the new position in SAP and ensuring that the proper qualifications have been assigned. As soon as the new position has been entered into the SAP system and is available to be filled, either the recruiter or hiring manager enters a new requisition into the system. The candidate then applies for this position, is screened by a recruiter through various activities, and then interviewed and eventually hired—all via the SAP E-Recruiting module (which we’ll refer to as simply E-Recruiting). After the candidate becomes an employee, his journey with the new company continues when he starts maintaining his talent profile. This includes current and previous education, work experience, and career goals. Required qualifications can be viewed in the talent profile, so that the new employee can develop to become qualified for his next position in the company. However, before we can talk about getting the new position into SAP, we need to first discuss the workforce planning process, which enables organizations to do the following:
E E E E

Develop a strategy for allocating resources to meet its staffing goals. Prepare a framework for the growth and progress of the organization. Proactively anticipate the workforce needs of the company. Create a foundation for making strategic business decisions. 181

5

Induction Phase

Planning for HR needs is one of the greatest challenges facing managers and leaders. To meet this challenge, a uniform workforce planning process that provides a disciplined approach for matching HR with the anticipated needs of the organization is essential.

5.1

Workforce Planning

Workforce planning refers to the method of ensuring that an organization has access to talent and the necessary tools for success. It’s a process designed to anticipate and integrate the HR response to an organization’s strategic plan. Simply put, workforce planning is the process of placing the right number of people with the right skills, experiences, and competencies in the right jobs at the right time. Workforce planning is a fluid process that typically takes place on an annual, quarterly, and ongoing basis. Moreover, many companies have created their own processes and terminology for workforce planning, but they are all very much alike and include the following key components:
E E E

Present workforce competency analysis Identification of future required competencies Comparison of current and future workforce needs to identify competency gaps and surpluses Execution of a plan to build the workforce required in the future Evaluation processes to ensure that objectives are being met

E E

Workforce planning is also an endeavor for developing information that can help an organization make decisions for both the short and long term, yet allow for flexibility in an ever-changing environment. The plan is intended to help provide solutions to staffing issues that are related to position movement into, around, and out of an organization. Workforce planning is also a management framework that ties HR decisions to the strategic plan of the organization. It provides managers with a framework for making staffing decisions based on an organization’s mission, strategic plan, budgetary resources, and a set of desired workforce competencies. Managers can develop a better understanding of the areas of the organization’s workforce that need to be

182

Some components of workforce planning. and it involves asking questions such as the following: E E Is the organization aligned with strategic business goals? Are there certain parts of the organization that experience higher turnover than others? What is the right organizational structure? Can the organization identify the factors that contribute to turnover? Have the skill sets within certain parts of the organization been reduced due to turnover? E E E Answering these questions helps organizations identify competencies needed in the workforce and determine how recruiting. as well as retention and restructuring strategies. Because all employers compete for employees from the same labor pool. and succession planning. Workplace planning is of paramount importance because organizations need to ensure they have adequate resources to help fulfill their strategic goals. 183 . This step is the key element in the workforce planning process. retirement projections.1 strengthened. are already familiar to managers. such as workforce demographics. Several relatively recent trends illustrate the importance of workforce planning: E E E E Aging of the population Baby boomers redefining the age of retirement Technology trends that are changing the HR function Unprecedented growth of job candidates with advanced educational degrees A key consideration of workforce planning is the benefit it has to managers.Workforce Planning 5. Workforce planning provides managers with a solid foundation for making HR decisions. and training employees can build the workforce of the future. It allows them to anticipate change and provides them with the means for addressing present and future workforce issues. workforce planning is critical for attracting and retaining the talent required to serve the needs of the organization. developing. Workforce planning has become increasingly important to organizations over the past several years in large part due to increased retirements.

and the organizational grouping of positions to carry out the work done during the workforce planning process. Some examples of position management guideline considerations include (but aren’t limited to) the following: E E What work needs to be completed? Does the position description accurately reflect currently assigned responsibilities? Is the vacant position considered a critical position? Can the responsibilities be redistributed across the rest of the remaining team members? E E Only after these guidelines have been considered should the hiring manager (in consultation with the supervisor and HR specialist) make an informed decision on whether the vacancy should be filled. An important aspect of workforce planning is position management. a uniform process that provides a disciplined approach for matching HR with the anticipated needs of the organization is critical. it contributes to the achievement of organizational strategic objectives by providing a basis for justifying budget allocations and workload staffing levels. 5. the competencies needed within the organization. Because planning for human capital needs is one of the greatest challenges facing managers and leaders.5 Induction Phase Workforce planning provides transparency and allows managers to better plan by providing more information on changes to be anticipated. At a high level. position management is the continuous and systematic process for determining the number of positions needed. and key positions that may need to be filled. 184 . A workforce plan is a fundamental planning tool important to quality performance. hiring managers should adhere to position management guidelines that ensure the workforce plan is considered when evaluating vacated positions. the skill and knowledge requirements of those positions.2 Position Management To support an organization’s strategic objectives. which helps organizations ensure that they have adequate resources to help fulfill their strategic goals.

these types of tools should be used in different combinations to achieve sound position management. 185 . 5. there are established guidelines that use common “symptoms” to help managers diagnose problems.1 Position Management Tools Like any discipline. It requires more supervisors. These reviews should be initiated by upper management to be deemed effective.2. E Fragmentation This is a situation when an organization is needlessly split into many small segments. or can they be shifted. To this end. Each organization should review its position management methods and processes periodically in an effort to make continuous improvements. This can be corrected by asking questions such as “Are all of these functional areas really necessary?” Because no two organizations are identical. To be effective at position management. position management has tools designed to improve position management methods and processes. You can correct this symptom by asking questions such as “Are all administrative assistant positions needed. and causes over-specialization.2 Position management is a significant aspect of each manager’s personnel management responsibility. interferes with communications.Position Management 5. Inaccurate position descriptions can be alleviated by periodic review of position descriptions with employees and by rewriting descriptions immediately when changes are required. restricts the development of employees. with the incumbents being over-graded or under-graded. or both?” E Inaccurate position descriptions This can result in misclassifications. Some examples of these “symptoms” include (but aren’t limited to): E Layering This occurs when there are too many levels in the chain of command. eliminated. a conscious effort needs to be made to organize and assign the work in the most efficient and economical way. This can be corrected by asking questions such as “What is the ratio of supervisors to workers?” E Unnecessary positions This sometime occurs when there are “carryovers” from previous operating structures or simply duplicate positions that may not be needed.

if position management is used wisely. Several organizations calculate the cost of a hire—some even calculate the cost of a bad hire—but few take the time to calculate the cost of a vacant position. Employees can use their capabilities to the fullest.3 The Cost of Unfilled Positions Numerous costs are associated with an unfilled position in any company. Many of these costs are difficult to quantify.2 Why Is Position Management Important? Organizations can gain direct advantages from practicing sound position management. 5. E E E E Although these benefits may not be achieved in every organization. Processes can be streamlined. E Employee impacts Vacancies may cause overworked employees. these are potentially significant financial impacts. 186 . you should gain several such improvements after sound position management methods and processes have been implemented. nonetheless. Organizations can provide better career opportunities for their employees. Roadblocks such as high turnover can be reduced. The organization can be staffed using the available labor market in more effective ways.2. and can have a negative impact on the company’s bottom line. Examples of these impacts include the following: E Product/productivity Vacancies in key skill positions can mean that products and projects may need to be dropped altogether. including the following: E E E Work can be done more efficiently. and attain a competitive advantage. organizations can be more effective at adjusting their own positions and organizational structures to meet the needs of the enterprise.2. Given the fact that many vacancies often exceed 100 days. realize economies of scale. but they are very real. Employee engagement can improve. which may lower productivity or force the affected employees to resign. Finally.5 Induction Phase 5.

Position Management 5.2. E Image/recruiting High vacancy rates could send a message to future recruits that the organization isn’t able to easily recruit replacements or that no one wants to work there.” which could mean higher costs (especially if those consultants are billing hourly). To this end. you’ll create a position based on the following SAP Job Architecture example that was used in Chapter 3: E E E Functional Area = Human Resources Job Family = HR Payroll Job = Payroll Administrator 187 . E Competitive advantage Vacancies in key positions or a large number of vacancies could lead to hiring too quickly and ultimately weaken the corporate culture. The first step in this process is to create a new position in SAP and ensure that the proper qualifications have been assigned. these organizations can create a competitive advantage in the marketplace by using mitigation strategies in their position management methods and processes. When they realize the potential significant costs involved. E Customers Excessive vacancies may cause confusion for suppliers and customers regarding whom they can contact. forcing them to push aside their own responsibilities. E Out-of-pocket costs Vacancies in key positions could lead to having to hire high-cost consultants as “fill-in help. let’s begin the process of walking through a year in the life of an employee from an SAP perspective. 5. and might send the message that the organization is getting weak or that it doesn’t care about them.4 Position Management in SAP Now that the workforce plan has been created and aligned with the strategic plan of the organization.2 E Increased management time Vacancies often oblige managers to “fill in” for the vacant employee. Organizations that take the time to calculate the cost of vacant positions understand the implications.

As a result. Figure 5. Figure 5. This will allow the position to inherit the qualifications that have already been assigned to the job within the SAP Job Architecture. Figure 5.1 shows the Basic data tab of the newly created position. you highlight 188 .2 illustrates the Payroll Manager position that will be modified. To do this. you can now create the position of Payroll Manager that will eventually be filled by the new employee. we’re only reviewing the standard SAP transactions for position management.5 Induction Phase Using the steps outlined in Chapter 3. you need to create the relationship to the payroll administrator job. Now let’s establish the relationship between the newly created payroll manager position and the payroll administrator job using Transaction PP01.1 Payroll Manager Basic Data Key Point There are a handful of frontend (visualization) solutions on the market that allow positions to be created and managed and the organizational structure to be generally managed in a more aesthetically pleasing graphical user interface (GUI). After you’ve found the Payroll Manager position in Transaction PP01.

3.2 Payroll Manager Position in Transaction PP01 Figure 5.2 the Relationships row and select the Create icon from the menu in the top lefthand side of the screen in Figure 5.Position Management 5.3 Create Relationship Infotype in Transaction PP01 189 . Figure 5.

4 illustrates both the number of relationship options and your selection. 190 .5 Induction Phase On the new screen that appears. we want to have the Position of PY MAN (Payroll Manager) described by the job of Payroll Administrator (entered in the Name field). In this case. Figure 5. Figure 5. you’ll create the relationship B|007 (Is described by).5. as shown in Figure 5. the first piece of information to be defined is the type of relationship you want to create. In this case.4 Relationship Type B|007 (Is Described By) You now need to define the type of object that the new payroll manager position needs to be described by.

you can go to Transaction PPPM to see that the Payroll Manager position has inherited the qualifications from the payroll administrator job (from Chapter 3). We’ll review 191 .5 Payroll Administrator Job Describes Payroll Manager Position After the information is saved.6. as well as in STVN SuccessionPlanning.2 Figure 5.6 Payroll Manager Position Inherits Qualifications of Payroll Administrator Job The final task within position management in SAP involves indicating whether the position is a “key position.Position Management 5.” This can be accomplished for individual positions via Transaction HRTMC_PPOM. as shown in Figure 5. Figure 5.

5 Induction Phase Transaction HRTMC_PPOM first.7 Payroll Manager Key Indicator Tab 192 . Figure 5. Figure 5. we’ll assume that the payroll manager position has been identified and approved as a key position.7 illustrates the information that we’ve included for the Payroll Manager position. Reason Decided By Rejection Reason Decided By Comment For the purposes of this exercise. The Key Indication tab of the position within Transaction HRTMC_PPOM holds the following fields: E E E E E E Nomination Status Nom. The key position capability for STVN SuccessionPlanning will be reviewed in more detail in Chapter 8./Approv.

3 You can also set a number of key positions in a single transaction by using Transaction SE38 (see Figure 5.8 Report RPTMC_SET_KEY_INDICATION Now that the position has been created and a vacancy has been established. As mentioned in Chapter 4. you can use E-Recruiting to find potential candidates to fill the position. Figure 5.8) and running Report RPTMC_SET_KEY_INDICATION.3 E-Recruiting Now that the payroll manager Position has been created in the SAP ERP HCM system. you’ll use the E-Recruiting application to begin the process of filling this key position. 5.E-Recruiting 5. E-Recruiting comes with many flexible tools 193 .

First. let’s take a moment to talk about HCMPF generally to establish context.) Key Point Organizations too often (mistakenly) try to incorporate parts of their workforce planning process into E-Recruiting and contemplate making customizations to the application to help cover up the inefficiencies in their position management process. objectivity. the recruiting process always begins by creating a requisition with the following assumptions: E The position being recruited for has already been approved and created in the SAP ERP HCM system. process flow. and roles. and collaboration from all members involved in the recruiting process.1 Requisition Each organization differs in terms of who creates the requisition and how the requisition is created from a process point of view. 194 . E 5. This structure allows organizations to build their own specific processes. which leverages the SAP Process Integration (PI) framework via the Manager Self-Service (MSS) functionality in the SAP Enterprise Portal (see Figure 5. The HCMPF framework offers an efficient way to manage cross-role processes involving HR master data.5 Induction Phase that can handle high-volume recruiting with efficiency. The HCMPF framework is based on three components: E Table configuration This facilitates the implementation of processes without requiring developers to write any code. For the purposes of this book. The position is available in E-Recruiting via ALE from the SAP ERP HCM system. let’s ask the hiring manager (Dave Maker) to create the requisition using HR HCM Processes and Forms (HCMPF). irrespective of the data. Manager With this in mind. we’ll look at the creation of a requisition from an SAP Best Practice perspective and from the lens of EhP 5.3. It may be necessary to analyze how positions are created and approved to avoid costly enhancements to E-Recruiting. To this end.9). (Refer to Chapter 4 for more information on ALE.

Organizational Data Includes Position. Figure 5. Basic Data Includes Requisition Title (we’ll use “Payroll Manager” in the interest of consistency) and Interest Group fields.E-Recruiting 5.10. The main sections of the form include the following: E Request Template Information from a previous requisition can be used as a template. E SAP Business Workflow This workflow engine enables improved flexibility. and number of positions. E E E 195 . Requester. Contact Person Includes the Hiring Manager.9 Create Requisition Request in Manager Self-Service Now let’s look at the standard requisition form for managers specifically. These selections are shown in Figure 5. Organizational Unit. which saves the manager time.3 E Adobe Interactive Forms This allows for all business roles to be integrated into processes. and Support Group fields.

3 has more information on chief positions. hierarchy level. functional area. he can see all existing positions that are his direct reports. For the purposes of our walk-through. and employment start date. The screen that Dave Maker sees is shown in Figure 5. work contract type. and the name of the existing position holder if the position is currently filled by an incumbent. employment fraction.11. Employment Information Includes branch. salary range. etc.10 Basic Data Information When the manager creates a requisition based on an existing position.).5 Induction Phase Figure 5. Section 1. which includes the following fields: E Payment Information Includes salary information (currency. whether the position is vacant. E 196 . industry. the position of payroll manager will be used in the requisition.

Refer to Chapter 9.E-Recruiting 5. and tasks. Key Point SAP can default posting text into the form from SAP Job Architecture via a delivered BAdI. education level.5.11 List of Existing Positions 197 . for more information on BAdIs. Section 9. Qualifications This is a free-form text field that the manager can use to include required and desired qualifications for the position. field of education. E E Figure 5. requirements. Qualifications are defaulted into the requisition based on the job/position brought over from SAP ERP HCM into E-Recruiting via ALE. Job Posting Text Includes company.3 E Education and Training Includes education type. Any information entered in this field is for informational purposes only. and subject. project. department.

refer to E-Recruiting with SAP ERP HCM by Jeremy Masters. For more information on support groups and other E-Recruiting topics. 2009). For more information on HCMPF. You can decide how to customize the forms and processes based on your specific business requirements. 2010). Dave Maker. refer to Discover SAP ERP HCM by Greg Newman (SAP PRESS. The lead recruiter then logs into SAP Enterprise Portal and views the new requisition in the My Draft Requisitions query.5 Induction Phase Key Point The E-Recruiting administrator should have already set up corresponding support groups with lead recruiters assigned. This default will control how requisitions created from the manager will appear in the dashboard queries for the lead recruiter after the requisition has been released by the manager. each organization will differ in terms of the necessary fields on the form and the required approval process for requisitions. an email will be sent to the lead recruiter letting him know that he has a new requisition to review. Remember that the lead recruiter was defined in the support group that was selected by the manager.12 Payroll Manager Position in My Draft Requisitions Query 198 . and Venki Krishnamoorthy (SAP PRESS. shown in Figure 5.12. Now that all of the specific information for the payroll manager requisition has been entered and it has been routed through the proper approval process. Christos Kotsakis. Figure 5. As discussed earlier.

Recruiter Now the recruiter can review or modify the newly created payroll manager requisition so that it can be released and candidates can begin applying. the recruiter then moves to the Requirements tab.3 Let’s examine the role of the recruiter further. the restricted recruiter creates the requisition directly in E-Recruiting and then sends it to a recruiter for approval.13 that all of the information relating to the General Job Information tab that was entered during creation of the payroll manager requisition has been carried over into the recruiter view. At this point. the recruiter could add additional information that was not included during the initial creation of the requisition such as the following: E E E E E E E Process Template Branch Salary Range/Additional Information Number of Positions Cost Center Attachments Job for Position After completing the General Job Information tab. as it will increase in importance when we discuss the Requirements tab. Notice in Figure 5. he will be able to make the appropriate modifications. The recruiter now reviews the General Job Information tab for the payroll manager requisition. who can also start the create requisition process. 199 .E-Recruiting 5. so that by the time the recruiter gets the notification. we’ll assume at this point that the recruiter and hiring manager have already discussed all of the important information that should go into the payroll manager requisition. In this scenario.14. For the purposes of the book. shown in Figure 5. Key Point One of the standard SAP roles is a restricted recruiter. Take note of the Payroll Manager position.

5 Induction Phase Figure 5. which is broken down into three sections: 200 .14 Requirements Tab The recruiter now reviews the Requirements tab.13 General Job Information Tab Figure 5.

201 .16. In addition. he then moves to the Job Postings tab shown in Figure 5. After the recruiter completes the review of the Support Team tab.4. At this point. Recall that the lead recruiter was defined in the support group that was selected by the manager.2. the recruiter could add additional requirements that were not included during the initial creation of the requisition. the recruiter then moves to the Support Team tab shown in Figure 5.3 E Education Requirements This is carried over from when the manager created the payroll manager requisition. Figure 5. E E At this point. After completing the Requirements tab.E-Recruiting 5. Qualifications These are the same qualifications that were assigned to the payroll manager position in Section 1. The Job Postings tab is broken down into three sections: E General Posting Information this is information that was initially entered in the payroll manager requisition by the manager.15.15 Support Team Tab Members of the support team will be able to view and modify the payroll manager requisition depending on their role. the recruiter can add additional members to the support team. the manager that created the requisition is also defaulted in the Support Team tab. Questionnaires These could be included on the process template or added here on this tab.

the requisition needs to be in a “Released” status. or (as was mentioned previously) it could be defaulted via a BAdI. the recruiter and manager would have already had a discussion regarding the best channels to post the vacancy (job boards. After the recruiter has reviewed all of the information and made the required changes.).16 Job Postings Tab Key Point Many organizations use a job board distributor to post jobs to multiple sites at one time using a single interface. This could have been filled in manually by the manager. Figure 5. internal career site. E-Recruiting can be integrated with a job board distributor based on client-specific requirements by using either SAP NetWeaver PI or a custom interface. but to create publications.5 Induction Phase E Posting Text This contains all of the relevant information that needs to be communicated about the vacancy. which is part of the source process. the payroll manager requisition is posted so that candidates can begin applying. 202 . As discussed previously. E Published Job Postings This is the physical release of the of the posting information for a specified period of time. etc. The posting text can be entered before releasing the requisition.

2 Source The source process begins after the publication has been released. the candidate could search on the company’s career website. The candidate can search for open jobs. let’s follow along as a candidate (Frank Jenkins) searches for the newly posted payroll manager position. we will assume that Frank Jenkins will search on the company’s career website for a payroll-related position.17 Job Search for Payroll Position 203 . Candidate For now.3 5. the recruiter can search the talent pool and invite candidates to apply for open jobs.17. or on various job boards such as Monster or CareerBuilder. In addition. His search is shown in Figure 5. Figure 5.3. At this point. and eventually submit an application. if it’s a company that the candidate is targeting.E-Recruiting 5. Now that the requisition is created and posted. register.

he can complete the application. He will now be asked to register with the website using the Application Wizard shown in Figure 5.18 New Registration in EhP 5 After Frank Jenkins confirms his registration. Figure 5.5 Induction Phase After the results come back from the “payroll” search. The standard system includes supplying the following data in the application process: E E E E E E E Personal data Education/training Work experience Attachments Qualifications Cover letter Complete application 204 . The one major change in the registration screen with EhP 5 is the ability to use an email address as the user name. so he chooses to apply. Frank finds that the payroll manager position best matches his background.18.

Figure 5. information can then be parsed into the Personal Data.E-Recruiting 5. After the résumé is uploaded. and Qualifications sections. Figure 5.19 Education Information of Application It’s also worth noting that the qualifications that were assigned to the position earlier now appear in the Qualifications step of the application process for Frank Jenkins. This will become important when we discuss the talent profile in Section 5. as shown in Figure 5.20. SAP has vendors that have been certified on the résumé parsing interface. as shown in Figure 5.19.3 Key Point Since EhP 4. Work Experience.4. Education/ Training. E-Recruiting has enhanced the application to allow candidates to parse their résumés. Note the education information entered by Frank Jenkins. Attachments. which adds an additional step at the beginning of the process to upload a résumé.20 Qualifications of the Payroll Manager Position 205 .

as shown in Figure 5. the source process consists of two main activities: E E Searching the talent pool Inviting candidates to apply After a recruiter has posted the requisition.21).5 Induction Phase Recruiter From a recruiter point of view. The search criterion defaults the structured data that was initially entered on the payroll manager requisition. a common activity is to search the available (internal or external) candidates within the talent pool that meet the minimum requirements.22. The search can also be executed using unstructured (free-form text) data. Figure 5.21 Talent Pool The search function enables the recruiter to comb through the talent pool for suitable skills and assign them to the requisition. 206 . The talent pool lists the candidates that have released their profile and made themselves available for searches (see Figure 5.

which automatically sends an email message to internal and external candidates.S. As a result. Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). After the recruiter has narrowed down the search results to a suitable number of candidates (only those who have not already applied). To this end. You’ll notice that Frank Jenkins doesn’t appear in the list of candidates within the Inbox tab because he has already applied.23 shows the Invite to Apply selection in the Preselection menu. 207 . Figure 5. he can first assign those candidates to the requisition and then invite the same candidates to apply to the posting using the Invite to Apply activity. companies should consult with their compliance officers or legal counsel during the implementation of E-Recruiting to verify that their recruiting procedures ensure compliance with the OFCCP guidelines and regulations.E-Recruiting 5.22 Search Criteria for the Payroll Manager Requisition Key Point In the United States. organizations are required to follow the guidelines set forth by the U. the candidate search functionality usually becomes a major discussion point with the respective organization’s legal department during implementation.3 Figure 5.

5. each candidate will get an email with a link back into E-Recruiting that allows them to apply to the payroll manager posting. the process then moves on to screening. assesses and ranks candidates by completed candidate questionnaires (shown in Figure 5. ranks the candidates based on other search criteria.23 Invite to Apply Activity After the activity has been completed.3 Screen There are typically three main steps in the screening process: E E E Suitability check Completing assessments (optional) Hiring manager review Let’s explore how each character in the E-Recruiting story plays a role in the screening process. After the recruiter finds candidates that meet the minimum requirements.24 and Figure 5.26.5 Induction Phase Figure 5. the recruiter typically reviews the candidate résumé. 208 .3.25). or performs a side-by-side comparison between multiple candidates using the comparison functionality shown in Figure 5. Recruiter As part of the suitability check.

he may then choose to conduct phone interviews with those candidates deemed suitable.26 Compare Candidates Side by Side After the recruiter completes the suitability check.3 Figure 5. There is also an optional step within the screening process that typically takes place outside of E-Recruiting in which the candidate is sent to an assessment vendor for 209 .E-Recruiting 5.25 Ranking by Questionnaire Figure 5.24 Assess Completed Questionnaires Figure 5.

27. let’s assume that the recruiter has completed a suitability check on all of the applicants and that Frank Jenkins not only meets the minimum requirements but is considered to be one of the top candidates for the payroll manager posting.5 Induction Phase additional screening or processing. Again. Dave Maker. Frank will be sent over to the manager. He then reviews the résumé and questionnaire responses for Frank Jenkins. 210 . After Dave Maker completes the review. If the manager deemed Frank Jenkins to be a suitable candidate. To this end.27 Send Candidate to Manager Activity Manager After the recruiter completes the activity. the process then moves on to the interview. this may not be a step that occurs with every candidate that passes the suitability check.28. After the hiring manager has provided feedback to the recruiter on Frank Jenkins. as shown in Figure 5. but it’s worth mentioning. he completes a questionnaire that will be sent back to the recruiter. Figure 5. for review via an activity that the recruiter executes. as shown in Figure 5. he finalizes the process by filling out a questionnaire that gets sent back to the recruiter. For our purposes. manager Dave Maker receives an email letting him know that Frank Jenkins is ready to be reviewed.

After the interview has been conducted. To let the other candidates down nicely. 3. a Job Interview (correspondence) activity (shown in Figure 5. Conduct the interview.28 Manager Completes Questionnaire 5. 211 . the recruiter multi-selects the shortlisted candidates not selected for hire and organizes them in the system using the status-changing Rejection of Application activity (see Figure 5. The logistics of the interview need to be coordinated and communicated to the appropriate individuals that will be involved in the interview. Frank Jenkins. To this end.29) is executed in E-Recruiting and sent to the candidate.3. Select the candidate. Schedule the interview. the interview team provides feedback about all candidates (including Frank Jenkins) to the recruiter and hiring manager.4 Interview Most of the interview process typically takes place outside of E-Recruiting and consists of the following steps: 1. The interview process begins with the recruiter scheduling interviews with the candidates that have passed the screening process.3 Figure 5. For our purposes. who choose a candidate to hire. 2.E-Recruiting 5. let’s assume that this lucky candidate is Frank Jenkins.30).

29 Interview Correspondence Activity for Frank Jenkins Figure 5.5 Induction Phase Figure 5.30 Rejection of Application Activity We’ll now move on to the hire process with Frank Jenkins. 212 .

31. Frank Jenkins). Section 10.31 Extend Offer Activity Key Point Many organizations want to design several offer letter templates. In our scenario. Be careful! This could potentially add significant time and cost to your implementation. The recruiter first extends an offer to the candidate that was selected during the Interview process (in this case.3. Refer to Chapter 10.3 5. we’ll generate an offer letter (using a Smart Form correspondence activity) and send it to Frank Jenkins through the E-Recruiting application shown in Figure 5. Hire the candidate. 213 . Figure 5. each of them containing tremendous amounts of complex logic and approval workflow. Also be sure you have skilled personnel within your project/development team that are familiar with how to build Smart Forms.5 Hire There are typically three main steps in the hiring process: E E E Extend the offer.2.E-Recruiting 5. Perform pre-employment checks (also known as background checks). for additional information on resource considerations.

32). the recruiter then coordinates preemployment checks. Figure 5. SAP has a vendor that has been certified on the background check interface. E-Recruiting has enhanced the application to allow background checks to be sent directly to third-party vendors as part of a pre-built interface. Some examples of information validated in a pre-employment check include (but aren’t limited to) the following: E E E E Education verification References Substance abuse screening Criminal checks 214 . When the results are returned and determined to be favorable. the candidate is then officially hired. This involves submitting the new hire information to a preemployment check vendor via a Background Check activity (shown in Figure 5. and his data is officially transferred into the core SAP ERP HCM system.5 Induction Phase After the offer is accepted by the candidate.32 Background Check Activity Key Point As of EhP 4.

Figure 5.33 Data Transfer for New Employees Activity 215 .E-Recruiting 5.3 E E E E E E E E E E Driver’s license history Credit report Homeland Security check Employment verification Federal criminal court searches Sex offender registry Workers’ compensation checks I-9 eligibility IQ screening Professional licenses/certifications The vendor processes the information for Frank Jenkins and sends the results back to the recruiter for review. the recruiter then creates the Data Transfer For New Employees activity to eventually transfer the information for Frank Jenkins to the core HR (SAP ERP HCM) system. Figure 5.33 shows the Data Transfer for New Employees activity. After the pre-employment checks have been reviewed to the satisfaction of the hiring organization.

and periodical service HIRE_REQUEST_VIA_XI needs to be activated and scheduled.5.3. Section 4. the form carrying the new hire information for Frank Jenkins then gets sent to the HR administrator.5 Induction Phase As you recall from Section 5. Frank Jenkins has officially been hired. For additional information on this new functionality. the recruiter can begin the process of dispositioning any remaining candidates that weren’t invited to interviews and therefore didn’t receive the rejection letter. the recruiter can take advantage of the enhanced hiring integration with E-Recruiting when hiring Frank Jenkins. As a result. refer to the HCM_ERC_CI_4 business function documentation. and organizational unit. Note that requisitions where candidates have applied can’t be deleted but can be closed. HCMPF is being used in this process in the SAP NetWeaver PI framework. To close the requisition. Key Point If you don’t disposition (reject) the other candidates and withdraw open publications.4 Talent Profile Now that Frank Jenkins has been hired into the organization. education. 5. the talent profile 216 . From a process perspective. Now that Frank Jenkins fills the once-vacant position. who verifies that all of the information is correct and passes it to the core HR system (SAP ERP HCM). and you won’t be able to close the requisition. an EhP 5 business function (HCM_ERC_CI_4) also enables information about Frank’s work experience.1. the system will throw an error message. position. System parameters need to be changed in Table T77SO. In addition to Frank’s basic data such as personal data. and qualifications (along with customer-specific fields) to be transferred from E-Recruiting into SAP ERP HCM.1. Key Point Some configuration is required to take advantage of the SAP NetWeaver PI interface because the standard system uses Transaction PA48 as part of the Data Transfer for New Employees activity. he has to create his talent profile in ESS. especially in relation to talent management and talent development processes. As mentioned in Chapter 4. you must first withdraw all open publications.

Because Frank is a new employee. for whatever reason. a Talent Management specialist can review this information in the same way that Frank’s manager can. date of birth. he will only see one entry for the Payroll Manager position that he has just filled. After Frank has maintained his data. Upon launching the Talent Profile application. Internal Work Experience. 217 . organizational unit. Frank can maintain different attributes about that particular area. job. job and position. age. personnel ID.Talent Profile 5. personnel area. Below this are the six tabs where Frank will enter the information about himself: E E E E E E Internal Work Experience External Work Experience Education Accomplishments Career Goal Mobility In each tab. and personnel subarea. Frank will immediately see a brief summary of his personal and organizational assignment data in the header section of the application. or he can select the value from a predefined list of values. organizational unit. When maintaining data. he can view the date period. is open by default and displays a list of organizational assignments within the company. At any stage. The first tab. the latter is the option available to Frank. This information includes his name.4. his manager can then review and validate this information. For this assignment. In most cases. then either their manager can maintain this information through MSS. manager. Frank can either enter this via a free-text box. or a Talent Management specialist can maintain this information through the Talent Management Specialist portal role.1 Talent Profile for Employees Frank accesses the Talent Profile for Employees by navigating to Career and Job in ESS and selecting Talent Profile. If employees can’t maintain this information themselves.4 is where employees can maintain talent-related information that is used in Talent Management processes. 5.

industry. project contact. he can also upload files that support the entries. he can also upload any relevant attachments. gives Frank the opportunity to validate the work experience that was brought over from E-Recruiting.5 Induction Phase Frank can also maintain details of any projects he has been involved in within the organization. gives Frank the opportunity to validate the education information that was brought over from E-Recruiting. and description. date period. 218 . Education. functional area. Figure 5. his role.34 The External Work Experience Tab in the Talent Profile for Employees The next tab. This won’t be relevant now. Frank can then validate the job title. but Frank can return later to enter data should he become part of an internal project. contract type. Frank reviews the details of his previous positions so that the full scope of his experience is accurate. he will have the option to maintain details such as the project title. and description. Figure 5. The second tab. which summarizes each of his previous positions outside of the company. With each entry. Frank must validate the name of the employer and the period of employment. location. Because so many candidates are high-performing and high-potential individuals with degree-level education. span of control. When he does. working time. which summarizes the details about his education and any training he has received. External Work Experience. hierarchy level. span of control. location.34 shows Frank’s previous employer in the External Work Experience tab of the talent profile for employees.

35 shows the education details that Frank validated in the Education tab of the talent profile for employees. with optional entries for the type of accomplishment. and any relevant documents that were uploaded to support the entries. descriptions. grade. degree title.4 it’s no surprise that the Education tab is focused around this level of education. and most of the entry options reflect this. field. Key Point Traditionally. and no reports exist that allow data to be transferred between the two infotypes. a contact name for verification of 219 . SAP introduced Infotype 7404 with EhP 4 to store education data that is maintained by the employee. Figure 5. location. the accomplishment and period in which it was accomplished must be entered. whether this is the highest level of degree. It’s important to note that there is no integration between these infotypes. this has a legal foundation or is used as the basis for pay grading and salary calculations. whether having two different and separate infotypes is valuable varies from organization to organization. Figure 5. In some countries. degree level. education data has been maintained by HR in Infotype 0022.35 Education Tab of the Talent Profile for Employees In the Accomplishments tab. field of study description. period of education. Note that it’s identical to the data entered into E-Recruiting. Frank can validate institution. Frank can enter details about his personal accomplishments and achievements outside of work and education. There are various advantages and disadvantages of this data model. education type.Talent Profile 5. For each accomplishment.

Frank now enters his career goals and job preferences in the Career Goal tab. He decides to enter this information into his talent profile. choose his preferred jobs.36 shows Frank’s career goal and job preferences. He also adds a preferred job. Job Family. Figure 5. and Job.5 Induction Phase the accomplishment. Figure 5. Key Point A career type is used to identify an employee’s career aspiration and also used to define the projected career path of a job or position. Frank enters a note that he is committed to long-term development to meet his goals.37. Career types also have levels defined so that the career path can be more accurately defined. and enter a note about his career goals. As an example. Frank can also upload any relevant documents to support the entry. as shown in Figure 5. Frank is ambitious and selects a career type of Management Career with level Top Management. HR VP.36 Career Goal Tab of the Talent Profile for Employees The final tab is the Mobility tab. and a description. which he selects through a series of drop-down boxes based on the following job architecture: Functional Area. Frank can select a career type and level. let’s say that Frank has been offering financial advice on an informal basis to friends and family. 220 . Last. and he is very proud of helping these individuals increase their personal wealth and well-being. As with entries on the other tabs.

This is accessed in MSS via Talent Management • Talent Information • Talent Profile. he reviews all of the information before selecting the Save option. Frank also enters a note that he needs a notice of six months for relocation. Frank’s talent profile can also be reviewed by a Talent Management specialist through the TMS portal role via Talent Information • Talent Profile. and regions of countries. 5.4. Frank enters that he is willing to relocate and. Frank also has the option to enter a note. Frank’s manager will be taken to the Overview tab. Frank can specify whether he is willing to relocate. followed by the locations that he would and would not like to relocate to. Now that Frank has completed his talent profile. enters the European Union as encompassing the countries that he would consider. areas of countries. he will see a brief summary of Frank’s personal Talent Data and Organizational Assignment 221 . should this be applicable to his organization.4 Figure 5. The level of granularity is such that Frank can select countries. because he has always liked the idea of living in Europe.2 Talent Profile for Managers and Talent Management Specialists Now that Frank has completed the process of maintaining his talent profile. the data needs to be reviewed and validated by his manager in the talent profile for managers and Talent Management specialists. Upon opening the talent profile for managers and Talent Management specialists. First.37 Mobility Tab of the Talent Profile for Employees Here Frank enters his preferences for relocating to other parts of the country or even to other countries.Talent Profile 5. On the left side.

so the categories will display the text “No Data Available. This information includes his name. job. Mobility. in much the same way as the header in the Talent Profile for Employees. The following are the category boxes contained in the Overview tab that provide Frank’s manager with a detailed overview of Frank’s profile: E E E E E E E E E E E Performance Potential Core Competencies Derailers Mobility Languages Internal Work Experience Future Development Accomplishments Career Goals Mobility The Performance and Potential categories both contain the last three performance and potential ratings of the employee so that the manager can track and review the employee’s progress over the previous three years. organizational unit. level of position (career level). career goal. talent group memberships and status (nominated or approved). functional area. and Development Plan. the Talent Profile for Managers and Talent Management Specialists has six tabs that contain different information: Overview. Key Point EhP 5 includes an integration switch for the Talent Profile for Managers and Talent Management Specialists to display the qualifications assigned to the skills profile. Talent Assessment. rather than just those that are assigned as core competencies. In a similar way to the Talent Profile for Employees. This provides a seventh tab on the talent profile that contains all of the qualifications assigned to the individual.” 222 . job family. mobility. position. manager. and successor nominations. Frank won’t have any data at this stage. risks.5 Induction Phase data. Career Goal. location. Résumé.

these ratings come from the competency assessment of the talent assessment. it will be possible to display the appraisal documents from the Performance Management appraisal process in the talent profile. The competency assessment and derailers assessment are covered in more detail in Chapter 6. although from EhP 5. The last category. The Overview tab of Frank’s talent profile is displayed in Figure 5.38. The Core Competencies category displays the employee’s ratings for those competencies that have been assigned as core competencies. Future Development.4 Beginning with EhP 6. Figure 5. The Languages category displays the languages that are assessed in the competency assessment. displays a summary of the development plan. The Mobility and Internal Work Experience categories display a summary of this data from the talent profile for employees. By default. The Derailers category. With this setting.Talent Profile 5.38 Overview Tab of the Talent Profile for Managers and Talent Management Specialists 223 . displays data from the derailers assessment of the talent assessment. it’s possible to display the ratings directly from the employee’s skills profile. Section 6. Frank’s manager is able to validate Frank’s qualifications without needing to request a list from HR. like the Core Competencies category.2.

Frank’s manager can display each of the completed talent assessment forms so that he can review Frank’s assessment. This is Frank’s organizational assignment data. External Work Experience.5 Induction Phase The Résumé tab enables Frank’s manager to get a graphical representation of Frank’s entire work history. Figure 5.2. and more information can be found in Chapter 6. then Frank’s current manager can display the assessments performed by that manager. From EhP 5. This can be used to verify the qualifications that were assigned from the E-Recruiting system. and accomplishments. These tabs are also available for display inside the Résumé tab.39 Résumé Tab of the Talent Profile for Managers and Talent Management Specialists In the Talent Assessment tab. plus the data he entered in the Internal Work Experience. These forms display as they are seen within the talent assessment process. as shown in Figure 5. and Accomplishments tabs in the talent profile for employees. 224 . If an assessment was performed by a different manager during the period. Education.39. education. the Qualifications tab gives a comprehensive view of Frank’s qualifications that are assigned to his skills profile. Section 6.

Many of these costs are difficult to quantify but are very real. Beginning with EhP 6. it can be monitored from here. creating a foundation for making strategic business decisions. Be diligent in your efforts to quantify what the true costs of unfilled positions are for your organization. and the organizational grouping of positions to carry out the work done during the workforce planning process. To assist with review or correction. and competencies assessments. Development Plan. derailers.5 Both the Mobility and Career Goal tabs display Frank’s information in the exact same way as in the Talent Profile for Employees. then the talent profile Overview tab will display the mean value of the assessment values for the potential. but after the development plan has been created. the skill and knowledge requirements of those positions. If used in a disciplined way.5 Summary It’s vitally important to have a workforce plan in place that aligns with the strategic goals of the organization because it puts the right number of people with the right skills. he can pass on any comments to Frank or HR. position management also provides tools that can be used to improve methods and processes. After the workforce plan is complete.Summary 5. EhP 5 provides the option to print the Talent Profile for Managers and Talent Management Specialists. 5. it will also be possible to get an overview of the learning activities of the employee in their talent profile. displays Frank’s development plan. The final tab. At this stage. experiences. risks. position management can help determine the number of positions needed. The information in the tab is displayed in the same way as in the development plan process (more information can be found in Chapter 8). Key Point If an employee has been assessed by more than one manager for the talent assessment appraisals. and the process can continue to the next phase. or for assisting talent calibration or succession activities. numerous costs are associated with an unfilled position within any organization. 225 . and competencies in the right jobs at the right time. Finally. the Development Plan tab is likely to be empty. Now that the Frank’s manager has reviewed the talent profile. nonetheless.

226 . Most of the interview process takes place outside of E-Recruiting. E-Recruiting has enhanced the application to allow background checks to be sent directly to third-party vendors as part of a pre-built interface. the process can continue. It’s also possible for organizations to set a number of key positions in a single transaction by using Transaction SE38 and running Report RPTMC_SET_KEY_INDICATION. candidates can use their email address as their user name within the source process. and conduct a mid-year review for Frank Jenkins. Finally. which allows those same positions to inherit the qualifications that have already been assigned to the job they are being relationally aligned with. they are subsequently defaulted in when the recruiter creates. Using the key position indicator enables additional succession planning functionality later in the process. he maintains his own talent profile. If qualifications are assigned to a position. The E-Recruiting process always begins with the assumptions that the position being recruited for has already been approved and created in the SAP ERP HCM system. In the next chapter. As of EhP 5. This provides his manager and the Talent Management specialists with a detailed summary of all talent-related information about the individual. As part of the hire process. we’ll look at how to set up performance objectives. after an individual has been hired into the company. This can be accomplished for individual positions via Transaction HRTMC_PPOM as well as in STVN SuccessionPlanning.5 Induction Phase SAP position management allows relationships to be built between positions and jobs. do a talent assessment. and the position is available in E-Recruiting via ALE from the SAP ERP HCM system. Now that Frank Jenkins has been hired and his manager has reviewed the talent profile. reviews. and recruiters can perform side-by-side comparisons as part of the screen process. or maintains the requisition.

130. 342 Enterprise Compensation Management. 157 Budget plan. 142. 362 C Calibration. 289 Controlling process. 167. 124. 350 Booking.Index 2010 Talent Management Factbook. 127. 228. 20 Document. 48. 85 Appraise. 236 Assessment phase. 345 Performance Management. 328 Authorization. 62. 22. 105 Business Server Page (BSP). 255. 154 Budget maintenance. 305 Benefits. 30 B Background check. 164 Architecture. 113 Administrator Portal. 236. 122. 159. 371 Analytics. 214 Base pay. 174. 155. 155. 123. 152 Adobe Connect. 117. 123. 247 Audit Report. 55 Business processes. 281 Approval process. 154 Business Add-In (BAdI). 145. 179 Budget unit. 118. 53. 153 Basic competencies. 58 Behaviors. 155. 18. 219 Activities. 145 Bottom-up budgeting. 173. 342 Learning Solution. 156. 135. 287 Review process. 345 Business area. 152. 128. 177 Calibration grid. 118. 115 Appraisal. 178. 343 Talent Development. 132. 235. 43 Best practices. 121 Appraisals Catalog. 118. 247 Approval. 173 379 . 136 Adobe Document Server. 123. 165. 232. 234. 43 Assessment. 244. 43 Business functions. 163 Authoring Environment. 21 Area. 154. 284 Budgeting. 247 Bench strength. 344 E-Recruiting. 18 Book participants. 138. 23. 256 Template. 174 Authorization concept. 75 Accomplishments tab. 250. 133. 122. 178 Appraiser. 338 Application Link Enabling (ALE). 154. 332 Business unit. 172. 156. 153. 169. 112. 162. 270. 227. 139. 125. 236. 161 Application. 240 Assessment form. 154. 43 A AAP report. 204 Application configuration. 326 Adobe Flash Islands. 103 Business partner. 238 Basic pay. 130. 157. 130 AICC. 129. 349 Blueprint workshop. 157 Budget. 270 Americas SAP Users Group (ASUG). 109. 117. 18.

162. 53. 270 Central person. 233. 252 Cost center. 129. 253. 109. 162 Component configuration. 115. 270. 54. 252 Context. 132. 249. 264 Close-out. 170. 229. 137. 153. 179 Compensation process. 353 Change management plan. 236. 150. 172. 18. 162 Competencies. 238. 350 380 . 236. 140. 241. 158 Chief position. 84. 215 Delivery method. 270 Create Course Date application. 46. 355 Company. 336. 19. 26 Change assignment. 133. 231 Direct report. 127. 253 Course creation. 58. 249. 235. 58 Controllers. 359 Communications. 163. 158 Compensation specialist. 247 Competency assessment. 228. 270 Content administrator. 242. 150 Course capacity. 251. 265. 154. 252. 82. 110 Registration. 156 Course Administrator Portal. 265 Course Appraisal application. 23 Conference room pilot. 164 Core competencies. 203 Profile. 251 Course appraisal. 47 Depreciation meter. 244. 268 Consultant. 247 Correspondence. 57. 249. 238. 259 Critical success factor. 238. 102. 137. 144 Change management. 41. 132. 152. 133. 133 Compensation. 223. 270 Content Administrator Portal. 96 Derailer. 156. 114 Correspondence worklist. 140. 60 Company goals. 166 Compensation review. 64 Cost plan. 22. 58 D Dashboard. 336 Control data. 149. 271 Competitive advantage. 362 Cloud-based solutions. 152. 82. 155. 154. 204 Shortlist. 250. 235. 248 Design phase. 271 Cloud. 172 Competency group. 102 Compliance. 111 Cardinality. 43. 53 Child organization. 66. 239. 341 Controlling process. 140. 352. 18 Course group. 241. 220 Cascade goals. 137. 150. 337 Career goal tab. 168. 260 Course Catalog. 168 Catalog. 161 Compensation Management. 82. 48. 166. 158. 350 Confirm attendance. 15. 153 Budget unit object. 234. 231. 159 Compensation planning. 126. 351 Content. 338 Conclusion. 248 Competency phase. 227. 147 Course type. 135. 17. 149. 177 Currency key.Index Candidate. 133. 53. 139. 124 Data transfer. 251. 55 CEO involvement. 169. 220 Cascading. 177. 47 Classroom training. 140. 161. 252. 17. 245. 55. 126. 172. 178. 133 Company strategy. 20 Compensation analytics. 260. 43 Company code. 239. 282 Compensation plan guidelines. 144. 232. 233. 248 Corporate goals. 223. 178 Department. 253 Course history. 354 Check and release budget. 169. 253. 160. 350 Crystal Reports. 126. 140 Content Management System.

177. 48. 153. 332. 75 Follow-up. 270 Formal evaluation session. 252. 167 In compliance. 362 Application. 104. 122. 175. 350 Flexible solution. 120. 134 External user interface. 43. 60. 267. 58. 219 Education information. 363 381 . 340 Enterprise Compensation Management (ECM). 62 Employee Self-Service (ESS). 55 F Feedback. 48. 54. 176. 179 Defined. 218 G Generating the documents. 231. 110 Administrator. 281. 75 Effective communication. 243.Index Development phase. 118. 248 Google recruiting strategies. 266. 60. 65. 113 Goal. 153. 232. 66 Future development. 16 Group. 174. 216 Division. 194 Hybrid. 114. 16. 16. 66 Object. 261 Subgroup. 213 Extensible Markup Language (XML). 31 Guidelines. 234. 101 Description. 57 Fit gap analysis. 63. 265. 169. 132 Final rating. 136 Enterprise structure. 132. 60. 302 Development. 58. 40 High-performing employees. 61. 159. 361 Disposition. 62. 101 E-Recruiting. 57 Details panel. 218 EEO report. 129. 117. 112. 129. 57. 159 Employee engagement Bottom line. 181. 232. 336 External learning services. 227. 213 Hiring manager. 173 Hierarchy structure. 322. 46. 193. 248 Final appraisal. 248 Development plan. 40. 61. 64. 83. 319. 55 HR administrator. 31 Employees. 113. 198 Evaluate Participants screen. 161. 168. 17 HR Processes and Forms. 43. 62 Structure. 150. 241 Functional area. 225. 356 Eligibility. 178. 245 Goal setting. 67. 116. 153. 323 Enterprise Services. 150 Evaluation process. 17 HR Expert. 167 Financial Accounting. 61 Data. 115. 228 Global implementations. 326 External work experience. 56 Holder relationship. 205 Education tab. 59. 237 Hire. 247 Executive sponsor. 73. 105. 31 Employee performance Rewards and recognition. 261 Enhancement. 237 High-potential employees. 162 H Handout. 235 FLSA status. 350 Extend offer. 308. 368 HR manager. 129. 223 E Education. 210 Holder.

328 Integration. 68 Infotype 1002 (description). 133. 75 Infotype 0008 (basic pay). 174 Individual booking. 228 Impact of loss ratings. 132. 266. 83. 108 Job title. 192 Key position. 129 Jobs Catalog. 22. 73 Job board distributor. 202 Job family. 127. 106. 166. 141. 365. 259. 159 Infotype 0001 (organization assignment). 211 Invite to apply. 270 Personnel Administration. 166. 70 Job family object. 328 Learning Management System. 16. 70. 369 Implementation lead. 179 Job search. 115. 150. 163 Ineligible for review. 115 Analytics& Reports. 170. 350. 167. 148. 167 Performance Management. 166. 201 Job pricing. 64 Job object. 268. 100 Instructor. 223 Internet Communication Framework. 65. 145 Individual goals. 75 Infotype 5070 (job family). 152. 133 Development. 133. 368. 22. 177 Learning Solution. 238 Leadership potential. 80. 256 Learning. 245. 237 Lead recruiter. 80. 18 Job description. 328 Learning Solution. 126. 208 IT manager. 45. 92. 233 382 . 68 Jobs Catalog. 167. 83. 75 Infotype 1610 (EEO/AAP). 116. 112 Interview process. 248 Implementation considerations. 197. 134. 73 Job level. 146. 134. 92. 152. 49. 233. 261 Instructor Portal. 67. 68. 232 Job creation. 65. 144. 75 Infotype 1001 (relationships. 152. 268 Instructor-led training. 234. 98. 245 Courses. 178. 328 Learner profile. 83 Catalog. 63. 192 KPI measurement. 249 Training goal. 177 K Key indication. 82. 19 J Java Virtual Machine (JVM). 134. 152. 133. 73 Task. 261 Learner Portal. 16. 127. 248. 243. 177 Talent Development.Index I Identifying the participants. 115 ALE. 73. 132. 82 Job posting. 116. 300 Hierarchy. 176 Qualifications Catalog. 116. 106. 98. 116. 22 Ineligible. 151. 68 Infotype 1005 (planned compensation). 132. 101. 133 Learning Content Management System. 67. 176 Payroll. 105. 229. 132 Organizational Management. 68 Inheritance principle. 230 L Leadership competencies. 177 ECM. 207. 198 Learner. 347 Job. 177. 149. 152 Internal work experience. 73. 147. 22. 75. 249. 101 Job performance. 152. 20 Incumbent. 23. 63. 133 Enterprise Compensation module. 248 Induction phase. 153. 105 Interview. 217. 254. 159.

159 Organizational trends Engagement. 234. 252 Manage Participants application. 155. 44 Object type P. 349 LinkedIn. 26 Nine-box calibration grid. 229. 158. 144. 53. 156. 255. 80. 58 Lessons learned. 221. 142. 164 Mass booking. 83. 101. 81. 270 Manager Self-Service (MSS). 55. 152. 135 Offline distribution. 228. 48. 165. 145 Materials Management. 159. 363 Mobility. 261 N Nakisa. 331 O Object. 154. 33 Organizational unit. 45. 231 Object. 48. 46. 221. 163. 252 383 . 73 Long-term incentive (LTI). 73. 159 Mid-year assessment. 232. 159. 296 NWBC for Desktop. 101 Structure. 145. 50. 241. 116. 151. 18. 235. 42. 248 Mobile solutions. 67 Object type O. 256. 52. 45. 166. 261 Mandatory training. 332 NWBC for HTML.Index Legal entity. 332 Mandatory course. 54. 52. 128. 145. 73 Organizational assignment. 53 Organization job code. 51. 114 Offline content player. 116. 244. 144. 326. 32 Integrated processes and systems. 58. 232 Orgchart. 41. 261 Mass-adjust. 166. 23. 371 Live-in code. 301 Overbookings. 46. 115 Online content player. 346 New hire administration. 147. 51. 361 Organization. 147. 176. 48. 33 Offshoring. 47. 48 Organizational structure. 17. 169 Organizational competencies. 114. 115. 39. 135 On-premise solution. 81 Organizational Management. 248 Object-oriented design. 41. 33 Harmonizing HR practices. 243 Mid-year review. 18 New Talent Management Network. 83 Objective setting. 126 Organizational planning. 258 Manage Required Courses application. 223 My Learning. 106. 227. 56 Object characteristic. 82 Organizational plan. 173. 53. 255. 56. 220. 80 Object type FN. 75. 247. 174 Nakisa Transport Package. 41 Object type. 43. 55. 41. 116. 170. 255. 40. 64 Object type JF. 54 OFCCP. 49. 258. 50. 179 Merit/Salary tab. 207 Offer. 114 Offer letter. 142. 158. 101 Organizational performance. 57 Merit. 41 Organizational Management structure. 174. 101. 64. 40 Object types. 124. 135 Onboarding. 359. 329. 228. 55. 179 M Manage course participation. 132. 231 Benefits.

237. 106 Publication channel. 231 Performance Management process. 278 Year-end review. 271 Pay grade type. 84. 83 Phased approach. 178 Prepare process. 91. 101. 98. 279 Final ratings. 60. 62. 164 Planning process. 96 Name. 229. 73. 56. 118. 254. 18. 178. 83. 70. 57. 231. 50 Status. 23. 107 Publish course content. 165. 248 Perform course appraisal. 185. 166. 90. 156. 17 Personnel. 52. 89. 55. 157 Performance. 265 Periodic feedback. 270 Profile Match function. 157 Personnel Development application. 351 Plan. 309 Progression phase. 92. 176 Personal development. 279 Goals. 41. 92. 75 Payroll. 159 Planning overview. 39. 98. 48. 227. 62. 54. 130 Performance Management. 42. 255. 248 Performance Measurement. 275. 54. 84. 69. 58 Personnel Administration. 51 Object type. 248 Create. 256. 113 Productive feedback. 247 Review. 169. 247 Appraisal. 277. 168. 233. 169. 241 Proficiency. 239 Scale. 45. 278 Self-assessment. 232. 80.Index P Parent organization. 156. 42. 118 Process template. 241. 238. 116 Personnel area. 172 Form. 83 Profile. 60. 145 Predefined scale. 268 Participation. 137. 70 Description. 116. 88. 184. 238 Percentage change. 43. 60 Person object. 56. 332 Position. 83. 89 Rating. 63. 82. 228 Plugs. 230. 227. 173 Cycle. 237 Predefined solution. 59. 123. 227 Performance Distribution Models. 241 Person. 86. 241 Objectives. 89. 80. 150 Prebooking. 45. 241 Planning. 186. 85. 271. 156 Personal data. 229. 67. 57. 123. 133. 111. 62 Personnel subarea. 302 Position management. 133 Text. 252 384 . 58. 334 Portal Content Directory. 323 Publication. 101. 247 Participant assessment. 58. 65. 132. 18. 222. 88. 48. 55. 124. 58. 54. 258. 166. 117. 19. 144. 235. 57. 99. 44 Part appraiser. 273 Performance Management documents. 228 Process configuration. 53. 244. 54 Object type S. 62. 247. 137. 58. 244 Competencies. 129. 102. 177. 104. 255. 275 Year-end assessment. 174 Rating. 273. 62 Personnel Cost Planning. 112. 49. 125. 56. 50. 179 Payroll manager position. 94. 187 Potential. 248 Power Object Work List (POWL). 60. 115. 116 Assign. 270 Personnel structure. 154. 53. 126 Plan compensation. 174. 101. 247 Performance versus potential. 83. 222 Assessment. 235. 75. 94. 50 Position details panel. 237 Grid.

116. 90. 39 Resources. 261. 361 SAP NetWeaver Business Client. 106. 45. 17. 329. 104. 190 Report RHTM_T77TM_JF_Level. 201 Form. 81. 112. 19. 75 SAP BusinessObjects. 234. 228. 201 Questionnaires. 327. 18. 211. 90. 171 Foundational components. 82. 112. 99 Group. 116. 71 Reports-to hierarchy. 68. 83. 175 Rapid Content Publisher. 73 Salary survey. 88. 177 SAP NetWeaver Composition Environment. 83. 169. 177. 170 SAP Enterprise Learning. 365 SAP HR Conference. 223. 67. 206 Recruiting. 152. 198. 81. 64 Required training. 47. 23. 365 R Ranking. 329. 116. 94. 86. 195 General job information. 178 Recruiting profile. 57 SAP Best Practices for HCM (USA). 367 SAP Corporate Goals and Values. 359 Recruiter. 212 Relationship. 17. 114 Rejection of Application activity. 189 B|007. 83. 139. 85. 19. 199 385 . 360 SAP SAPPHIRE. 110 Essential qualifications. 101. 63. 63. 171. 370 SAP Service Marketplace. 94 Subgroup. 81. 251. 152. 366 SAP Organizational Visualization by Nakisa (SOVN). 42 Foundations. 197. 15. 127. 127. 253. 244. 106. 85. 90 Qualifications Catalog. 370 SAP Job Architecture. 84. 201 Requirements. 136 SAP E-Recruiting. 252. 98 Desired qualifications. 111. 199 Qualifications. 95. 18. 133. 80. 86.Index Q Qualifications. 224. 327. 20. 181. 101. 98. 54. 286 Salary grade/broad band. 104. 199 Education requirements. 102. 84. 191. 140. 211 Restricted recruiter. 83 SAP ERP HCM Performance Management. 174. 154. 205. 64. 300 SAP roadmap. 270 Alternative qualifications. 67. 39. 270 Rapid-deployment solution. 123. 73. 105. 346 SAP NetWeaver Portal. 153 Sales and Distribution. 31 S Salary adjustment. 65. 199 Résumé parsing. 158 Review and Save. 48. 331 SAP NetWeaver Business Warehouse. 205. 111. 114. 108 Rejecting candidates. 83 Requisition. 241 SAP ERP HCM Talent Management. 80. 48. 269 Rewards program. 268. 19. 149. 102. 146. 177 SAP Community Network (SCN). 117. 96. 90 Questionnaire. 83 Block. 68. 66. 104. 247 Qualitative scale. 90. 88 Quantitative scale. 177. 327 SAP Notes. 258 Requirement. 39. 110. 86. 100. 327 Review. 199. 331 SAP NetWeaver Process Integration. 141.

174. 315 Career Planning. 179. 304 Subject matter expert. 346 Software Deployment Archive (SDA). 179. 109 Scales. 63. 361 Talent and engagement lifecycle. 174. 228. 350. 362 Succession. 32 Talent Management Maturity Model Level 1. 85. 147. 173. 346. 36 Evolution of HR. 198. 176. 245 Side-by-side comparison. 359 Software Component Archive (SCA). 362 Analytics. 248. 259. 241. 42. 169. 258 SCORM. 169. 20 Succession Management. 15. 30 Level 3. 35. 177 Successor Calibration grid. 203 Span of control. 171. 227. 346 Source process. 208. 27 Talent group. 168. 362 SuccessFactors Employee Central. 236. 223. 201 T Talent analytics. 312 Successor pools. 300 Talent management. 24 Talent assessment. 235. 144. 247. 238 Talent Development application. 235. 105. 28 Strategies. 351 Static web-based course. 224. 304 Suitability check. 175. 27 Definition. 299 Nomination. 223. 63. 247. 168. 201 Support structure. 29 Decisions. 167 Succession planning. 48. 171. 352 Subprofile. 361. 241. 179 Talent Development/Succession Planning. 238 Staff assignment. 235. 111. 209 Support group.Index SAP Talent Visualization by Nakisa (STVN) SuccessionPlanning. 179. 170. 176. 174. 174. 172. 145. 138. 177. 26 Initiative. 270 Screen process. 248 Potential. 19. 175. 29 Philosophy. 26. 147. 332 386 . 167. 168. 15 Drivers. 29 Primary owner. 18. 248. 149 Status handling. 359 SuccessFactors BizX Suite. 317 Wizards. 30 Level 4. 229. 169. 271 Scheduling a course. 29 Organizational success. 224. 207 Self-assessment. 30 Level 2. 217. 208 Search criteria. 241 Specialist competencies. 221. 168. 50 Staffing. 308 Search listings. 172. 177. 306 Profile Match. 25 Communications. 30 Talent Management specialist. 137. 26 Integration. 29 Responsibility. 236 Risks. 236. 152. 370 SAP Web Dispatcher. 108. 20. 57. 116 Schedule. 105. 83 SuccessFactors. 300 Successor. 26 Support. 327 Save Search Query. 239 Social media. 352 Support team. 371 Software-as-a-service model. 222. 83 Talent-driven organization. 208 Skills profile. 102. 236. 256. 28 Trends. 28 High visibility. 300. 248. 238. 361. 314 Grid. 361 Compare. 314 SAP User Groups. 149. 315.

136 User. 98. 221. 191 Transaction HRTMC_PPOS. 61 387 . 102. 168. 337. 134. 122. 18. 244 Workforce planning. 48. 63. 291 Planning. 173. 261. 85. 42. 168. 361 Talent-related attributes. 62 Top-down budgeting. 301. 248. 162 Transaction PP01. 173. 152. 252 Web-based training. 329 Technological trends Confidentiality and security issues. 34 Twitter. 216. 179. 333. 62 Transfer qualification. 174. 73 Transaction SPRO. 245. 65. 63. 96 View. 340 Virtual Learning Room. 291 Target audience. 326 Succession Management. 34 Data privacy. 19. 153. 61 Waitlisting. 329 V Validity dates. 109 Third-party authoring tools. 267. 16. 138 Time Management. 243 Transaction HRTMC_PPOC. 63. 182 Workplace planning programs. 233. 354 Training Administrator Portal. 188 Transaction PPOME. 102 Transaction PPPM. 46. 60. 65 User interface. 168. 136 W Wage type. 145. 326.Index Talent personnel. 206 Talent profile. 68. 268 Web Dynpro for ABAP. 16 Task area. 63. 102 Transaction LSO_PVCT. 34 Smartphone. 181. 237. 152. 290 Application. 229 Validity period. 362 U Uploading content. 219. 240 Talent review meeting. 169. 34 Facebook. 216 Transaction PECM_CHANGE_STATUS. 47. 118. 172. 325 Enterprise Compensation Management. 339 Window. 84. 300. 34 LinkedIn. 191 Transaction S_AHR_61016497. 294 Review meeting object. 254. 57. 253 Transaction OOSC. 168 Workflow. 48. 102. 329 Talent Development. 334. 53. 34 Tell a Friend. 268. 328. 178. 223. 55. 22. 126. 135 Training and Event Management. 259. 98. 34 Generation Y. 248 Technical architecture. 70. 140. 62. 176. 101 Team goals. 290 Conducting. 232. 116. 291. 242. 327 SAP E-Recruiting. 59. 332. 175. 102 Transaction HRTMC_PPOM. 296 Infotype. 134. 225. 116. 328 Performance Management. 269 TREX. 165 Transaction PECM_EVALUATE_GRANT. 249. 63. 115. 307 Talent pool. 32 Work schedule. 292 Preparation. 239. 60. 233. 234. 19 Talent pipeline. 155 Training. 126. 336. 87 Transaction PA48. 65. 58. 335 Work experience. 141. 228. 64 Tasks. 53. 328 Learning Solution. 52. 152. 248. 135 Training goals. 54.

130 . 177 XING. 372 Y Year-end rating. 129 Year-end review.X Xcelsius.