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com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 47
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Carlos officials met with the
California Public Utilities
Commission yesterday over the
next steps in validating the safety
of a prominent city gas pipeline
including the hiring of outside
experts at a cost of $250,000.
The CPUC will conduct its own
investigation but the technical
consultants hired by San Carlos
will provide another set of eye-
balls, said City Manager Jeff
Maltbie.
The San Carlos City Council
City to spend $250K
for gas pipeline test
San Carlos officials, CPUC work
on next steps to ensure safety
Negotiations set to continue this
weekend, possible strike Monday
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Further environmental review
may be needed for the Burlingame
Elementary School District to
reopen Hoover Elementary
School, according to a judge’s ten-
tative ruling this week.
San Mateo County Superior
Court Judge Marie Weiner tenta-
tively ruled
Wednesday in
favor of the
Alliance for
Re s p o n s i b l e
Nei ghborhood
Planning that
sued the dis-
trict, stating it
needs to pre-
pare a full
Environmental Impact Report on
traffic impacts.
Superintendent Maggie
MacIsaac said the district is hesi-
tant to respond to anything for-
mally at this time because the rul-
ing is tentative.
“When she [the judge] issues a
statement of decision, we’ll know
more of the details of the deci-
sion,” she said. “We’re hopeful
because of our traffic analysis and
throughout the whole process,
we’ve been more than open to
making sure to work with neigh-
bors to meet their needs. We hope
they will take into consideration
that we’re excited to open the
school.”
The school is currently under
construction and slated to open for
the 2014-15 school year, but
MacIsaac said keeping that sched-
ule depends on the details of the
official ruling.
In contrast, Christine
Fitzgerald, one of the petitioners
in the case and member of the
alliance, was pleased with the
decision.
“We’re thrilled obviously
because it’s what we’ve been say-
School may need more review before opening
Judge tentatively rules district needs more traffic analysis for Hoover
Maggie
MacIsaac
See HOOVER, Page 23
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The desks for sale and other aged
items that used to fill the former
Collective Antiques building on
Third Avenue in downtown San
Mateo are long gone.
They have been replaced by
some of the most innovative
gadgets produced by some of the
most innovative minds in the
world such as the Tesla desk at
what is being called Hero City, the
latest offshoot of Draper
University.
Draper opens Hero City
Chamber honors university founder, along with other business leaders
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Hero City in downtown San Mateo features a desk made out of a Tesla car and other innovative gadgets at the
former Collective Antiques Building,which is now part of the Draper University of Heroes.Below:Draper University
founder Tim Draper wore a superhero costume under his suit during last night’s festivities.
See DRAPER, Page 23
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Amajor San Francisco Bay Area
rapid transit system will continue
to run train service after unions
and management agreed to extend
labor talks past a midnight dead-
line.
Bay Area Rapid Transit and two
of its unions agreed late Thursday
to resume talks on Friday and pos-
sibly through the weekend as they
were facing the end of a 60-day,
state-mandated cooling-off period
that prohibited a strike.
If the clock had stuck midnight
with no agreement, BARTworkers
could have walked off the job —
and hundreds of thousands of com-
muters could have been left strand-
ed again.
“We’re just trying to keep the
trains running,” BARTspokesman
Rick Rice said.
Union leaders have not dis-
counted the possibility of striking
Monday.
“BARThas every opportunity to
resolve this,” said Chris Finn of
the Amalgamated Transit Union
Union leaders
call off BART
strike,fornow
See TEST, Page 23
See BART, Page 20
County rethinks investments
The week of Oct. 11, 2008, San
Mateo County officials were think-
ing about limit how much money is
allocated to any one investment and
hire an outside party to help monitor
its portfolio as ways to prevent
future losses like the $150 million
hit caused by the
Lehman Brothers bank-
ruptcy.
The County
Investment Fund had 5.9
percent of its $2.6 billion in
Lehman Brothers, leading to a
potential $150 million loss by the
Wall Street company's bankruptcy
declaration. County financial experts
were still working out exactly how
much the cities, school districts and
special districts invested in the fund
stood to lose but the general agree-
ment is that it wasn’t going to be
pretty.
U.S. to take stake in
banks, first since Depression
The government was set to buy an
ownership stake in a broad array of
American banks for the first time
since the Great Depression, Treasury
Secretary Henry Paulson said the
week of Oct. 11, 2008, announcing
the historic step after stock markets
jolted still lower around the world
despite all efforts to slow the selling
stampede.
Separately, the United States and
the globe's other industrial powers
pledged to take "decisive action and
use all available tools" to prevent a
worldwide economic catastrophe.
"This is a period like none of us
has ever seen before,"
declared Paulson at a
rare Friday night news
conference.
Stock prices had hur-
tled downward in the United
States, Europe and Asia, even as
President Bush tried to reassure
Americans and the world that the
United States and other governments
were aggressively addressing what
had become a near panic.
County gets stellar credit rating
San Mateo was one of four
California counties whose credit rat-
ing was rated at the highest level by
financial services company Standard
& Poor’s, it was announced the week
of Oct. 11, 2008.
San Mateo County’s credit rating
went from AA+ — a designation for
quality borrowers — to AAA, which
denotes the best quality borrowers
who are considered reliable and sta-
ble.
San Diego, Marin and Santa
Barbara counties also had their credit
ratings change, the first time the
state’s counties have reached “this
exceptional level of creditworthi-
ness,” according to S&P Oct. 7,
2008 announcement.
Both San Mateo and San Diego
counties were rated AAA.
San Mateo’s rating, according to
S&P, was based on a number of fac-
tors including its being home to
industry leaders
Genentech and Oracle, a
strong job market and sus-
tainable real estate sector
due to high incomes. The
county’s strong cash position, esti-
mated at $285 million as of Oct. 2,
countered its $70 million subsidy for
the San Mateo Medical Center, S&P
found.
Parcel tax finalized
The week of Oct. 11, 2008, the San
Bruno Park Elementary School
District Board of Trustees approved
the language for a five-year, $87 a
parcel tax for the March 2009 ballot.
The board said the need for raising
revenue was a combination of cut-
ting more than $3.2 million from
the district’s budget over theprior
several years. Rocky financial times
in the state and federal government
added to the concerns for needing a
steady revenue stream.
From the archives highlights stories origi-
nally printed five years ago this week. It
appears in the Friday edition of the Daily
Journal.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actor Luke Perry is
47.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
Pope John XXIII convened the first
session of the Roman Catholic
Church’s Second Vatican Council,
also known as “Vatican 2.”
“When a friend speaks to me,
whatever he says is interesting.”
— Jean Renoir, French movie director (1894-1979)
Actress Joan
Cusack is 51.
Golfer Michelle
Wie is 24.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A devotee of the Chinese Bang Neow Shrine is helped with blades pierced through his cheek before the beginning of a street
procession during the annual vegetarian festival in Phuket,Thailand.The festival,featuring face-piercing,spirit mediums and
strict vegetarianism celebrates the local Chinese community’s belief that abstinence from meat and various stimulants
during the ninth lunar month of the Chinese calendar will help them obtain good health and peace of mind.
Friday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower
to mid 60s. East winds around 5
mph...Becoming southwest in the after-
noon.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
mid 40s to lower 50s. Northwest winds 5
to 10 mph.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the 60s. Light
winds...Becoming west around 5 mph in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Highs in the 60s.
Sunday night: Clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Columbus Day through Wednesday night: Mostly
clear. Highs in the 60s. Lows in the mid 40s to lower 50s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1779, Polish nobleman Casimir Pulaski, fighting for
American independence, died two days after being wounded
during the Revolutionary War Battle of Savannah, Ga.
In 1811, the first steam-powered ferryboat, the Juliana
(built by John Stevens), was put into operation between New
York City and Hoboken, N.J.
I n 1862, during the Civil War, Confederate forces led by
Gen. J.E.B. Stuart looted the town of Chambersburg, Pa.
I n 1890, the Daughters of the American Revolution was
founded in Washington, D.C.
I n 1910, Theodore Roosevelt became the first former U.S.
president to fly in an airplane during a visit to St. Louis, Mo.
I n 1932, the first American political telecast took place as
the Democratic National Committee sponsored a program
from a CBS television studio in New York.
I n 1942, the World War II Battle of Cape Esperance began
in the Solomon Islands, resulting in an American victory
over the Japanese.
I n 1958, the lunar probe Pioneer 1 was launched; it failed to
go as far out as planned, fell back to Earth, and burned up in
the atmosphere.
I n 1968, Apollo 7, the first manned Apollo mission, was
launched with astronauts Wally Schirra, Donn Fulton Eisele
and R. Walter Cunningham aboard. The government of
Panama was overthrown in a military coup.
I n 1984, space shuttle Challenger astronaut Kathryn
Sullivan became the first American woman to walk in space.
I n 1986, President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail S. Gorbachev opened two days of talks concerning
arms control and human rights in Reykjavik, Iceland.
I n 1992, in the first of three presidential debates, three can-
didates faced off against each other in St. Louis, Mo. —
President George H.W. Bush, Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and
businessman Ross Perot.
(Answers tomorrow)
BAKED THIRD SLOWLY EXCUSE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When fumes started drifting in from the nearby
factory, the homeowner — BLEW HIS STACK
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PAROV
GIRRO
FRODAF
METLUB
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Answer
here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Big Ben, No. 4,
in first place;Money Bags,No.11,in second place;
and Eureka, No. 7, in third place. The race time
was clocked at 1:47.09.
4 9 5
6 15 19 23 40 5
Mega number
Oct. 8 Mega Millions
3 9 19 33 38 18
Powerball
Oct. 9 Powerball
1 7 22 26 16
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 0 0 6
Daily Four
5 2 8
Daily three evening
1 32 33 38 43 16
Mega number
Oct. 9 Super Lotto Plus
Actor Earle Hyman is 87. Former U.S. Defense Secretary
William Perry is 86. Actor Ron Leibman is 76. Actor Amitabh
Bachchan is 71. Country singer Gene Watson is 70. Sen. Patty
Murray, D-Wash., is 63. Rhythm-and-blues musician Andrew
Woolfolk is 63. Actress-director Catlin Adams is 63. Country
singer Paulette Carlson is 62. Actor David Morse is 60. Actor
Stephen Spinella is 57. Pro Football Hall of Famer Steve
Young is 52. Rock musician Scott Johnson (Gin Blossoms) is
51. Comedy writer and TVhost Michael J. Nelson is 49. Actor
Sean Patrick Flanery is 48. College Football Hall of Famer and
former NFLplayer Chris Spielman is 48.
3
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Burglary. A house was broken into and
items were missing on Greendale Drive
before 9:07 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2.
Narcot i cs. At least two people were drink-
ing and smoking marijuana on Third Lane
before 11:21 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1.
Burglary. A Wi-Fi mobile hotspot device
was stolen from a room at the Travelodge
Hotel on South Airport Boulevard before
9:53 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1.
Petty theft. A wallet was stolen at Safe
Harbor on North Access Road before 3:33
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1.
Burglary. Avehicle was broken into and a
camera was taken at McDonald’s on South
Airport Boulevard before 10:43 a.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 1.
SAN MATEO
Theft. Beer was stolen on the 500 block of
South Norfolk Street before 4:22 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 5.
Theft. Prescription frames were stolen on
the first block of Hillsdale Shopping Center
before 4:51 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4.
Theft. Avehicle’s license plate was stolen
on the 1800 block of Canyon Oak Court
before 8:48 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 3.
Theft. Items were stolen from O’Reilly Auto
Parts at the 2600 block of South El Camino
Real before 10:59 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 3.
Police reports
Doggone it!
An officer responded and assisted in
finding a dog that escaped from a home
on the 3000 block of Atwater Drive in
Burlingame before 3:34 p.m. Sunday,
Sept 15.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
One of several San Mateo County men
caught in an online child pornography
sting was sentenced Thursday to a year in
jail for felony possession and ordered to
register as a sex offender for life.
Paul Michael Ambler, 60, pleaded no con-
test to the single count in July 2012 and his
sentencing has been delayed several times
since, most recently in September when he
failed to appear in court and his attorney
said he couldn’t afford to fly back to
California from Arizona. On Thursday, he
was also placed on four years probation and
must surrender Jan. 11.
Authorities looked at Ambler after
Microsoft received a cyber tip in October
2010 about child pornography being
accessed from his IP
address, prosecutors said.
A search of his home
allegedly returned images
and videos of children
between the ages of 6 and
15 in various sexual acts
and some of the pornog-
raphy came from as far
away as the United
Kingdom. Authorities
reported also finding
numerous emails related to trading or for-
warding the images, too.
Ambler and nine others — Gordon Lee,
44, of Daly City, Charles Vela Reyes Jr., 46,
of Menlo Park, Christopher Daniel Winans,
24, of East Palo Alto, Paul Tazbaz, 36, and
Samnang Chun, 23, both of San Mateo,
Steve Wilson, 52, and Cruz-Martin Caseiro-
Rosas, 32, both of South San Francisco,
and Stephen Wolf, 64, of Portola Valley —
were arrested in March after being identified
as possibly being in possession of child
pornography during a Silicon Valley ICAC
Task Force investigation headed by the San
Jose Police Department. The task force tar-
gets peer-to-peer file sharing online by
tracking images of pre-pubescent children
through individual Internet protocol
addresses. The police then searched the
homes where those addresses originated.
Lee also pleaded no contest to a single
possession felony and received 10 months
for possessing videos and images of young
minors in sexual situations. Winans
received a year in jail and three years proba-
tion. Both must register as sex offenders.
The case against Tazbaz was dropped in
May for insufficient evidence, according to
the District Attorney’s Office.
Chun has since committed suicide.
Child porn brings year jail
Paul Ambler
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A motorist convicted of driving a stolen
vehicle into a man exiting his car to attend
a church Christmas pageant last year, then
fleeing to his girlfriend’s home where
authorities later discovered ammunition and
stolen property was sentenced yesterday to
14 years in prison.
Michael John Weiler, 28, was also ordered
to pay $89,150 to his victim, $1,348,708
to Sutter Select health plan and other resti-
tution. Weiler has credit of 325 days and
must serve 85 percent of his term.
The lengthy sentence was due in part to
the circumstances of the current case and a
juvenile criminal history, said District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.
Weiler pleaded no contest in May to
felony hit-and-run, causing great bodily
injury and having prior convictions in
return for up to 14 years in prison. Charges
related to the alleged stolen property were
dismissed earlier because prosecutors could
not prove he committed the Millbrae rob-
bery.
Weiler was driving a stolen Ford F-250
truck Dec. 19, 2012, when, just before 7
p.m., he collided with a man exiting his
vehicle on the 400 block of Miller Avenue
to attend the Christmas pageant at All Souls
Church in South San Francisco.
The driver did not stop but cameras in a
nearby parking lot filmed the collision and
a South San Francisco police officer later
recognized the truck from a photo. The vic-
tim was taken to a local hospital with life-
threatening injuries. He survived.
The officer tracked the truck to the South
San Francisco home of Weiler’s girlfriend
and contacted Weiler, who denied any
involvement with either the stolen 1997
vehicle or the hit-and-run incident.
Witnesses later identified Weiler and the
truck.
Hit-and-run driver imprisoned 14 years, ordered to pay $1.4M
4
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
by
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Keeping the city’s finances in
order, along with growing business
and consolidating services are top
issues for four candidates seeking
two open seats on the Millbrae
City Council.
Reuben Holober, appointed
incumbent Anne Oliva, Douglas
Radtke and Ann Schneider — spoke
with the Daily Journal for endorse-
ment interviews last week. Oliva
was appointed to the council after
the death of Nadia Holober, former
councilwoman and Reuben’s moth-
er. Mayor Gina Papan is termed
out. Handling construction and the
city’s fire assessment tax were also
of interest to candidates.
Interviews were held to help the
Daily Journal determine endorse-
ments. To allow each candidate a
forum to express their opinions on
the issues discussed, candidates
were given the same questions and
asked to answer each in around 50
words. Answers are arranged alpha-
betically by the candidate’s last
name.
Describe your vi si on f or
Site One.
Reuben Holober: Site One is
adjacent to the BART/Caltrain sta-
tion. It is well suited for mixed use
development that includes residen-
tial, retail and commercial space,
generating jobs, revenue and better
shopping options for Millbrae.
Convenient access to public tran-
sit makes Site One an ideal loca-
tion for bringing tech companies
to our city.
Anne Ol i va: I see lots of
potential. I believe the property
owners and developers will bring
us choices. And while they do their
jobs, council and city staff can be
actively promoting all the great
things Millbrae has to offer to help
attract interest in Millbrae.
Doug Radtke: Site One should
accommodate a prominent retail
anchor store, shopping and offices
primarily. For example the average
Target brings in $38 million in
sales at 9 percent is $3.42 million
in sales tax revenue. Focusing on
hotels would be a disservice to
Millbrae residents. Southbound
BART ridership would increase
because of shopping.
Ann Schneider: An award-win-
ning destination of remarkable
urban TOD design that significant-
ly increases our economic base,
provides new shopping, dining
and entertainment opportunities
including commercial, office and
living spaces, BART project con-
nectivity while providing a quick,
safe and vibrant gateway to the
largest multimodal transit station
west of Mississippi.
How do you envision the
ci t y’s fire department in fiv e
years?
Reuben Holober: Millbrae is
considering a fire department merg-
er with Burlingame, Hillsborough
and San Bruno. A well-designed
merger will reduce excessive over-
head and management costs, allow-
ing Millbrae to retain frontline
firefighters and maintain prompt
response times and excellent serv-
ices. I’ll make sure any merger
agreement guarantees that Millbrae
controls our fire services.
Anne Ol i va: I see our fire
department in the black in terms of
funding, providing outstanding
service to residents and working
collaboratively with other cities in
the region.
Doug Radtke: Sharing fire
services has helped create efficien-
cy in the budget, but our relation-
ship with the [Central County Fire
Department] needs to be moni-
tored. Giving up control gives City
Hall an excuse to often not be
directly accountable to the resi-
dents. We need to balance the budg-
et and consider our options careful-
l y.
Ann Schneider: Millbrae Fire
will join Central County Fire
Department [Joint Powers
Agreement]. We will have afford-
able funding sources in place that
allows for more than adequate and
timely responses to our entire com-
munity. We will gain resources of a
larger pool of employees and
equipment. Services and efficien-
cies will be greatly enhanced.
Do you think downtown has
the right mix of businesses?
Reuben Holober: Downtown
needs a stronger mix of stores,
consumer services and restaurants.
Better restaurant and retail variety
would keep Millbrae residents
shopping here and attract shoppers
from out of town. To attract higher
end stores and more dining
options, City Hall should collabo-
rate with property owners to allow
larger size storefronts.
Anne Oliva: Millbrae has a
diverse collection of businesses
and services. I rarely have to leave
town to find what I want to eat, buy
or do.
Doug Radtke: The free market
will determine what businesses
thrive or fail. If residents are criti-
cizing the mix of businesses, they
should be aware it is a direct reflec-
tion of lack of cooperation from
our government. All business
owners on Broadway are upset
about the City Council. I’m the
only candidate with a business
mind.
Ann Schneider: No. We need
restaurants, retail shopping and
service opportunities that appeal
to Millbrae’s diverse population
and to the many hundreds of daily
visitors. Business property own-
ers should partner and consult with
city staff to attract the right “mix”
for our downtown business dis-
tricts instead of “overloading” on
similar ones.
What do you think of the
ci t y’s current financial situa-
t i on?
Reuben Hol ober: Millbrae
carefully balances its budget with
a 15 percent reserve. To stabilize
revenue and strengthen city serv-
ices, we must attract new business-
es to the area adjacent to the BART
station, and make downtown more
vibrant for retail. Improved rev-
enue will enable Millbrae to pay
for needed road and sewer repairs.
Anne Ol i va: We are operating
under a balanced budget and that is
good. But we need more revenue
coming in so that we can do more
to care for our city and residents —
for example, we need to put more
money into infrastructure like our
streets and aging sewer system.
Doug Radtke: As an auditor, I
find Millbrae’s financial situation
unacceptable. We have not had
reserves for a decade. Our budget is
propped up by Band-Aid solutions
like the fire assessment. Millbrae
should be aware the City Council
has made no secrets about introduc-
ing yet another tax next year.
Rampant indiscriminate spending
by the City Council created our
shortfalls and financial woes.
Ann Schneider: The five-year
budget forecast shows Millbrae
with a small increase in revenue
over expenditures. If the fire
assessment isn’t renewed within
nine months, the revenue loss will
be approximately $1.2 million.
Millbrae has great business poten-
tial. Projects bringing in new rev-
enue need to be sought to prevent
future shortfalls.
A number of devel opments
along El Camino Real have
had chal l enges wi th con-
struction quality issues. How
can the city better work with
developers and resi dents to
help with those problems and
prevent such probl ems i n the
future?
Reuben Holober: With several
developments on the horizon,
Millbrae needs adequate building
inspectors to work proactively to
prevent problems and ensure quali-
ty construction, as well as suffi-
cient code enforcement staff. The
city can avoid many problems by
making sure developers use rep-
utable local contractors who hire
skilled local construction workers.
Anne Oliva: Collaboration and
communication are keys — during
the planning phase, construction
phase and after projects are fin-
ished. We have a recent example of
how to accomplish great work —
the Safeway project used profes-
sionals paid prevailing wages. And
it demonstrated how the City can
work with developers to achieve
success for all.
Doug Radtke: Those develop-
ments on El Camino were assisted
by Millbrae’s former [redevelop-
ment agency]. Individuals on
council have received campaign
funding and gifts from this devel-
oper. Millbrae’s inspector should
be held liable for allowing shoddy
work to pass. Individuals with
conflict of interest issues should
not dictate policy on the City
Council.
Ann Schneider: Developers
and residents must meet with the
city first. Building criteria and
codes are available.
Communication is essential. The
developer is responsible for con-
struction quality. Well-trained
workers and paying prevailing
wages is important for successful
projects. Staff should be available
to work with developers and resi-
dents to resolve issues amicably in
a timely manner.
Millbrae candidates respond to city issues
Age: 25
Education: B.A.
political science/
communication,
University of
Washington
Experience:
Biotech employee
at Natera; former
Millbrae Sister City
commissioner; former intern for U.S.
Rep.Tom Lantos
Family: Single, no children
Residence: 22 years in Millbrae
Reuben Holober
Age: 53
Education: B.A.
psychology, Notre
Dame de Namur
University
Experience:
Councilmember,
Millbrae; broker,
owner real estate
business; past
president San Mateo County
Association of Realtors
Family: Married, three children
Residence: 22 years in Millbrae
Anne Oliva
Age: 29
Education: B.A.
economics and
business
administration —
financial
accounting,
University of
California at
Riverside
Experience: Governmental auditor for
Badawi & Associates, CPAs; Pi Alpha Phi
National Fraternity Board of Directors
as national treasurer and director of
expansion; co-founder of social gaming
startup
Family: Mother and father
Residence: 16 years in Millbrae
Douglas Radtke
Age: 56
Education: B.A.
analysis of
ecosystems and
geography at
University of
California at Los
Angeles;
coursework
completed for M.S.
environmental science, University of
San Francisco
Experience: Leadership, program
development and government liaison
at Hewlett Packard, contract
management for city of San Jose,
advisor to Mills High School Green
Youth Alliance
Family: Single
Residence: Millbrae for 28 years
Ann Schneider
6
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With the intention of addressing growing
enrollment and inequity, the Sequoia Union
High School District voted 4-1 to allow
more students from East Palo Alto to attend
Menlo-Atherton High School.
The board’s approval of changing its
open enrollment policy is designed to be an
interim step toward implementing boundary
changes currently under discussion.
Specifically, students who participated in
the anti-discrimination lawsuit K-8 Tinsley
transfer plan, along with Ravenswood com-
munity area and Tierra Linda Middle School
students will be able to request transfers to
Menlo-Atherton. The policy provides for
these transfer requests to be honored up to
the extent to which Menlo-Atherton has
enrollment capacity. This will need to be
revised again as new boundaries are imple-
mented, according to a staff report.
The Tinsley transfer plan is a court-
ordered desegregation program that allows
students in the Ravenswood City School
District attendance area, who will be enter-
ing kindergarten, first or second grade in the
following school year, to apply for trans-
fers to the following seven districts:
Belmont-Redwood Shores, Las Lomitas,
Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Portola Valley, San
Carlos and Woodside. Non-minority stu-
dents in those seven districts and Redwood
City may apply for transfers to
Ravenswood.
Trustee Carrie Du Bois voted against the
updated open enrollment policy for several
reasons, including the difficulty in navigat-
ing open enrollment and the district’s lack
of strategic plan.
“I am not a big fan of open enrollment as
a way of solving our issues because a lot of
our kids don’t have parent advocates going
around and choosing schools for them and
filling out paperwork for by Jan. 31,” she
said. “I’m not crazy about that system; it
leaves our most disadvantaged students
behind, like foster children who move in to
the district later in the year. I think the issue
is really complicated, it’s not just about
proximity, it’s about making sure we serve
all kids as well as we possibly can.”
She added that Menlo-Atherton is a very
rigorous school and that doesn’t work for
all kids.
“I would prefer to work on difficult issues
upfront before making the changes,” she
said.
The decision comes on the heels of an
ongoing process to address growing enroll-
ment, which according to a study, will
increase from 8,200 students currently to
10,000 students in 2020.
Board President Chris Thomsen believes
this is a modest, imperfect step in the direc-
tion of bringing communities together, but
he is very enthusiastic about it.
“As we’ve gone around the community
and heard throughout the district, we’ve
found a strong belief in keeping communi-
ties together,” Thomsen said. “We heard
loud and strong from parents from East Palo
Alto that’s it’s a good plan and will be help-
ful to bring the community together. ”
In terms of school boundary changes, the
potential modifications most directly affect
three communities within the district:
Ravenswood City Elementary District and
the North Fair Oaks neighborhood, both of
which sends its students to three different
high schools, and Tierra Linda Middle
School in San Carlos. Atentative map will
be brought to the board in November, fol-
lowed by meetings to give input into the
map.
At previous board meetings, North Fair
Oaks residents expressed concern for the
new boundaries, including that switching to
Sequoia and Carlmont high schools from
Menlo-Atherton High School would mean
longer travel times for their students and
less academic and athletic options for their
children.
Trustee Olivia Martinez said there was a
much smaller crowd at the meeting
Wednesday night, with a majority of the
speakers being parents, students, faculty
and staff from the Ravenswood area.
“Some were concerned the district needed
a strategic plan,” she said. “We’ve done
careful analysis of students currently in
Ravenswood schools and transfers in and
out of M-A, and it would be about 60 new
students per year if changes are made, which
they can easily accommodate.”
The bigger issue for Menlo-Atherton is
the 400 additional students in its current
boundaries who are going to be added to the
school in the near future, Martinez said.
Afacilities task force had its first meeting
Sept. 27 to explore options such as bound-
ary changes, open enrollment or even
opening a new school to address growth.
Additionally, the district has discussed the
possibility of seeking a construction bond
to go on the June 2014 ballot that would
pay for the additional classrooms and site
infrastructure.
Martinez notes that there will be a study
on how the district is going to pay for added
growth and consideration of the bond meas-
ure.
“The district is perfectly capable of mak-
ing basic changes to accommodate stu-
dents,” she said. “The difference is going to
be the caliber of lab space. I don’t know if
we would have enough funds locally [to fund
the growth]. We don’t want to jeopardize
excellent standards of the programs we
have.”
The most viable option seems to be
adding classrooms, she said, as finding 40
acres of land for a new school seems unreal-
istic.
Brown signs bill for pricier
community college classes
SAN FRANCISCO — Abill that will allow
a handful of California’s community col-
leges to offer additional courses at inflated
prices during short summer and winter ses-
sions earned Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature
on Thursday despite strong opposition
from student leaders and the chancellor of
the state’s 2-year college system.
AB955, sponsored by Assemblyman Das
Williams, D-Santa Barbara, authorizes six
specific colleges to charge students who
enroll during the special sessions fees of
$200 per unit, compared to the state-subsi-
dized $46 per unit price charged during tra-
ditional semesters and quarters. A typical
three-unit class that costs $138 during the
regular academic year therefore would cost
$600 during the winter or summer “interses-
sions.”
Brown vetoes ‘imperfect’
teacher discipline bill
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown on
Thursday vetoed what he termed an “imper-
fect” union-backed bill intended to stream-
line the dismissal of teachers accused of
misconduct, calling on lawmakers to try
again next year.
The bill, AB375 by Assemblywoman
Joan Buchanan, D-Al amo, was
approved by lawmakers a year after a
more stringent measure died in the state
Assembl y af t er opposi t i on by t he
state’s main teachers union.
Both measures responded to last year’s
arrest of a Los Angeles elementary school
teacher who was charged with nearly two-
dozen counts of engaging in lewd conduct
with students, including allegations that he
blindfolded his students and fed them his
semen in what he described as a tasting
game.
Brown signs laws to help veterans
SAN DIEGO — Gov. Jerry Brown signed a
number of bills Thursday aimed at helping
veterans, including legislation that could
provide funds to expand affordable housing
to combat homelessness among former
service members.
California is home to a quarter of the
country’s homeless veterans.
Law requires breaks for
workers during hot weather
SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry Brown has
signed legislation that will ensure workers
in industries such as agriculture and land-
scaping get rest breaks during hot weather.
Under the legislation from Democratic
Sen. Alex Padilla of Los Angeles, workers
exposed to extreme heat must be granted
cool-down periods during the work day.
Padilla’s office says SB435 is intended to
prevent illness, injury and death among
workers.
Sequoia changes open enrollment policy
Around the state
NATION 7
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The nation’s economy
on the line, President Barack Obama and
congressional Republicans groped incon-
clusively Thursday for a compromise to
avert an unprecedented U.S. default as early
as next week and end the 10-day-old partial
government shutdown.
“We expect further conversations
tonight,” House Majority Leader Eric
Cantor said cryptically at nightfall, after
he, Speaker John Boehner and a delegation
of other Republicans met for more than an
hour with Obama at the White House.
The White House issued a statement
describing the session as a good one, but
adding, “no specific determination was
made.”
Yet it seemed the endgame was at hand in
the crises that have bedeviled the divided
government for weeks,
rattled markets in the
U.S. and overseas and
locked 350,000 fur-
loughed federal workers
out of their jobs. Both
sides expressed fresh
hopes for a resolution
soon.
The up-and-down day
also featured a dour warn-
ing from Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, who
told lawmakers that the prospect of default
had already caused interest rates to rise —
and that worse lay ahead.
Appearing before the Senate Finance
Committee, Lew said the Treasury must pay
Social Security and veterans benefits as
well as salaries to active duty military
troops during the second half of this
month. He said failure to raise the $16.7
trillion debt limit by Oct. 17 “could put
timely payment of all of
these at risk.”
Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid advanced leg-
islation to simply raise
the debt limit and stave
off the threat of an
unprecedented federal
financial default — a
measure that
Republicans are likely to
block unless he agrees to change it.
Across the Capitol, Boehner left open
the possibility of launching a rival measure
in the House on Friday.
As he described it for his rank and file in a
closed-door morning session in the
Capitol, it would leave the shutdown in
place while raising the nation’s $16.7 tril-
lion debt limit and setting up negotiations
between the GOP and the president over
spending cuts and other issues.
Shutdown/debt talks but no resolution yet
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Under pressure from
governors, the Obama administration said
Thursday it will allow some shuttered
national parks to reopen — as long as states
use their own money to pay for park opera-
tions.
Governors in at least four states have
asked for authority to reopen national parks
within their borders because of the econom-
ic impacts caused by the park closures. All
401 national park units — including such
icons as the Grand Canyon and Yosemite and
Zion national parks — have been closed
since Oct. 1 because of the partial govern-
ment shutdown. More than 20,000 National
Park Service employees have been fur-
loughed, and lawmakers from both parties
have complained that park closures have
wreaked havoc on nearby communities that
depend on tourism.
Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said the
government will consider offers to use
state money to resume park operations,
but will not surrender control of national
parks or monuments to the states. Jewell
called on Congress to act swiftly to end
the government shutdown so all parks can
reopen.
Utah Gov. Gary Herbert said his state
would accept the federal offer to reopen
Utah’s five national parks.
Utah would have to use its own money to
staff the parks, and it will cost $50,000 a
day to operate just one of them, Zion
National Park, said Herbert’s deputy chief of
staff, Ally Isom.
Interior Department spokesman Blake
Androff said the government does not plan
to reimburse states that pay to reopen
parks. Costs could run into the millions of
dollars, depending on how long the shut-
down lasts and how many parks reopen.
Congress could authorize reimbursements
once the shutdown ends, although it was not
clear whether that will happen.
Feds will let states pay to reopen national parks
Mich. governor testifies
about Detroit bankruptcy
LANSING, Mich. — Michigan Gov. Rick
Snyder testified behind closed doors
Wednesday about his role taking Detroit
into bankruptcy, a rare interview with
lawyers for creditors who pressed him about
retiree pensions and asked if the city could
have done more to avoid the historic filing.
Snyder waived executive privilege and
gave a three-hour deposition at his office in
Lansing. The testimony can be used as evi-
dence in an upcoming trial that will deter-
mine whether Detroit is eligible to shed or
restructure at least $18 billion in debt in
U.S. Bankruptcy Court.
Snyder, a Republican, didn’t speak to
reporters but issued a statement that repeat-
ed many of his previous justifications for
the largest public bankruptcy in U.S. histo-
ry.
Scott Carpenter, second
U.S. astronaut in orbit, dies
DENVER — Scott Carpenter, the second
American to orbit the Earth, was guided by
two instincts: overcoming fear and quench-
ing his insatiable curiosity. He pioneered
his way into the heights of space and the
depths of the ocean floor.
“Conquering of fear is one of life’s great-
est pleasures and it can be done a lot of dif-
ferent places,” he said.
His wife, Patty Barrett, said Carpenter
died Thursday in a Denver hospice of com-
plications from a September stroke.
Carpenter, who lived in Vail, was 88.
Carpenter followed John Glenn into
orbit, and it was Carpenter who gave him
the historic sendoff: “Godspeed John
Glenn.”
Around the nation
John Boehner Barack Obama
LOCAL/NATION 8
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – I
recently received a
phone call from a
local realtor who
was shocked to find
an urn with
cremated remains
located in the closet
of an empty house under renovation. He
had been told by someone working on the
property to just throw these cremated
remains into a dumpster, which didn’t seem
right, and he wanted my advice. I told him
that under no circumstances are cremated
remains to be thrown into a dumpster. In
cases where unidentified human remains are
discovered, the County Coroner’s Office is
to be notified so they can investigate and
determine the appropriate course of action.
Discovering unidentified or seemingly
abandoned cremated remains is disturbing
but not uncommon. Stories of cremated
remains being found on their own in an
unoccupied house or apartment is a problem
that is significant and needs to be addressed.
I’ve met with countless families at the
Chapel of the Highlands who’ve selected
cremation as the final disposition. Even
though these families have decided on
cremation, this is still not the final step of
the process. The next-of-kin is required to
inform us on where the cremated remains
are to go after the physical cremation has
taken place. The cremated remains can
either to be inurned in a cemetery, scattered
at sea or taken to the residence of the next-
of-kin. Those who select to keep the
cremated remains at home feel a desire to
have their loved one’s ashes close to them,
or simply have not decided on a final
location to place their loved one’s cremains.
The key concept for these families to
understand is that keeping cremated remains
at home is a temporary solution and not a
final destination. Some may think that the
cremated remains will be passed down to
following generations and cared for in their
family, but this idea is not being realistic. It
is important to be prepared with a plan to
place the cremated remains in a more
permanent location such as a cemetery or
having them scattering at sea. At the Chapel
of the Highlands we regularly assist families
by guiding them toward a comfortable
solution when these types of situations come
up. Even after long periods with cremated
remains being kept at home we can always
help families in making the correct decisions
and to plan for the future.
Remember, if cremated remains are kept
at home, no matter how well intended,
unforeseen situations can and do come up.
The next-of-kin, who has custody of the
cremated remains, may become ill or pass
away without leaving instructions on what to
do if the cremated remains are left behind.
No matter what the situation you can call us
at the Chapel of the Highlands and we will
help in finding an appropriate solution for
placement of the cremated remains.
If you are still keeping cremated remains
at home please plan a permanent disposition
by leaving instructions in a will, with family
or an executor. This will help insure that the
cremains will be given a final resting place
and shown the respect they deserve.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Cremated Remains Found
In Unoccupied Residence
Advertisement
T
alking about putting the city of
San Mateo on the map. The city
was named as the best small
town for food by Rand McNally t hi s
week as part of its 2013 Bes t of t he
Road competition. The diversity of food
establishments combined with the ongo-
ing amount of community support set
San Mateo apart from other participating
towns and impressed Rand McNally’s
panel of judges, according to city offi-
cials.
***
Redwood Ci ty’s Parks and
Recreati on Depart ment earned the
“Champi ons for Change — Award
of Excel l ence” from the Network for
a Heal thy Cal i forni a and the Bay
Area Nutri ti on and Physi cal
Act i vi t y Col l aborat i ve for its work
in increasing youth fitness for thou-
sands of Redwood City youth. The BAN-
PAC is a regional collaborative of more
than 200 health-related organizations
dedicated to helping communities
become healthier through better nutri-
tion, physical activity and increased
access to healthy foods.
***
Taiko drummers will help herald the
opening of Japanese retailer UNIQLO
today at the Hi l l sdal e Shoppi ng
Center. The brand launched a flagship
in San Franci sco’s Union Square
one year ago and is opening four mall
stores in the coming weeks.
***
Samaritan House is seeking dona-
tions of Halloween costumes and its
goal is to collect 200 by Oct. 31 to dis-
tribute through its client service depart-
ment. Costumes should be new or good
as new condition, for children up to age
14, family appropriate and not too
scary. So dust off that Elmo mask and
lend a hand.
Donations can be dropped off at the
agency’s office, 4031 Pacific Blvd.,
third floor, San Mateo, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Costumes can
also be purchased through Samaritan
House’s Amazon Wi s hl i s t and
shipped directly:
http://bit.ly/Halloween_SH2013.
***
The Mi l l brae Ci ty Counci l recog-
nized and thanked Eagle Scout Drew
Nakamura for creating the Mi l l brae
Communi ty Youth Center sign at its
Oct. 9 meeting.
***
Joe Tere s i and Janet Fogart y will
be recognized as Millbrae Man and
Woman of the Year at a dinner 6 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 18 at Green Hi l l s
Country Cl ub, 500 Ludeman Lane in
Millbrae. Tickets are $45 a head if pur-
chased by today and $50 thereafter.
***
Local Drew Bi s s el l liked CJ’s
Gourmet Del i catessen in Burlingame
so much, he and a friend tried every sin-
gle sandwich on the menu. Now they
will have a sandwich named after them.
Though still in the research and develop-
ment phase, it’s looking like the sand-
wich will include roasted turkey, spicy
sauce, avocado, lettuce, tomato, garlic
sauce, cream cheese and potato chips in
a hollowed-out and toasted Dutch crunch
roll.
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection
of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.
Reporters’ notebook
CITY
GOVERNMENT
• The San Bruno
Ci t y Counci l,
along with its city
manager and attor-
ney, are interview-
ing 12 candidates
for the nonprofit San Bruno
Community Foundation Board of
Direct ors. Pat Bohm, Jerry Ci mmet,
Anthony Cl i fford, Ben Cohn, Bob
George, Frank Hedl ey, Mi chael
Kessel man, Nancy Kraus, John
McGl othl i n, Greg Pi erce, Emi l y
Robert s and Regina Stanback Stroud
are being interviewed this week, with
interviews finishing up on Saturday.
• The Burl i ngame Pl anni ng
Commi ssi on will review an application
for environmental scoping, a condomini-
um permit, design review and tentative
condominium map for a new three-story,
eight-unit residential condominium at 21
Park Road 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15 at
Council Chambers, 501 Primrose Road.
By Nancy Benac and Jennifer Agiesta
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The debut of the govern-
ment’s health insurance marketplaces drew a
huge audience — and underwhelming reviews.
Just 7 percent of Americans say the rollout
of the health exchanges has gone extremely
well or very well, according to an AP-GfK
poll.
The reaction was somewhat better among
supporters of the new health care law, but still
middling: 19 percent said the rollout went
extremely well or very well.
Among the uninsured — a key audience for
the health exchanges — 42 percent said they
didn’t know enough to judge how well the
rollout had gone, suggesting an ongoing lack
of awareness about the program in its early
days.
Despite the bumpy rollout, plenty of
Americans are giving the system a try.
Seven percent of Americans reported that
somebody in their household has tried to sign
up for insurance through the health care
exchanges, according to the poll.
While that’s a small percentage, it could
represent more than 20 million people.
Three-fourths of those who tried to sign up
reported problems, though, and that’s reflect-
ed in the poor reviews.
George Spinner, 60, a retired government
worker from Ruther Glen, Va., said he man-
aged to create an online account and password
before he got stuck.
“It kept telling me there was an error,” he
said.
Reynol Rodriguez, a computer technician
from San Antonio, said he was able to do
some comparison shopping online but
computer glitches kept him from signing
up.
“I was very much looking forward to it,”
said Rodriguez, 51. “That’s what this country
needs — affordable health care.”
Rodriguez pledged to keep trying — just
what President Barack Obama has been rec-
ommending to those who’ve run into trouble.
Count Janice Brown, a semiretired travel
agent from Prather, Calif., among those who
had a positive experience.
After some initial trouble on the website,
she got through to a help line and downloaded
an application to buy a plan for $1,500 a
month for herself and her husband. That’s
$1,000 less than her current private plan.
Poll says health exchange
rollout gets poor reviews
OPINION 9
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
W
ith four candidates for two open
seats on the Millbrae City
Council, voters have an inter-
esting array of choices in front of them.
Anne Oliva was appointed to fill the seat of
the late Nadia Holober and Mayor Gina
Papan is termed out. Oliva joins Reuben
Holober, Douglas Radtke and Ann
Schneider in this campaign.
Holober is incredibly impressive for
someone of his age. While it might be easy
to dismiss someone in their mid-20s as not
having enough real-life experience,
Holober has the firmest grasp on the city’s
issues of all candidates and reveals a deep
understanding of what it takes to lead the
city into the future. From development and
attracting new business to having a keen
focus on the city’s finances and maintain-
ing the proper approach to sharing servic-
es, Holober shows he has a tremendous
command of the city’s past, present and
future needs. He comes from a family of
public servants. His mother served on the
Millbrae City Council until her death earli-
er this year. His father, Richard Holober,
serves on the San Mateo County
Community College District Board of
Trustees. But he has his own ideas and can
express them eloquently. And he is the face
of the city’s future. While being young
could be seen as a liability, he represents
the next generation of leaders and has the
ability to begin that leadership now.
Radtke is also young and has some inter-
esting ideas about the city’s finances and
development plans. One idea he has is lur-
ing an anchor store such as Target to Site
One, directly adjacent to the Millbrae
BART/Caltrain station. Perhaps not the
exact fit for the location, but it’s practical
and an example of out-of-the-box think-
ing. However, Radtke doesn’t seem to have
the mindset to work on a five-member
council and could be more disruptive than it
is worth. Coming up with new ideas is one
thing, but working in collaboration with
others who may have a different set of
experiences and perspectives is quite
another. We hope he remains interested and
shares his point of view in a productive
way.
Schneider has a history of community
service and a broad knowledge of the city’s
issues. We disagree with her desire to keep
the fire assessment fee permanent, and
would like to see the city explore new
avenues of revenue instead. But that can be
accomplished through thoughtful delibera-
tion about the appropriate mix of develop-
ment near transit and an emphasis on eco-
nomic development. Schneider has a good
handle on both and is also interested in fur-
ther exploring partnerships with other
governmental agencies such as school dis-
tricts to get more bang out the city’s
municipal buck.
Oliva has a solid tenure of community
service and a vote for her would certainly
not be wasted. However, as an appointed
incumbent, we would have liked to have
seen a better focus on details.
In this race, the best candidates for the
two open seats are Holober and Schneider.
Congress has failed us
Editor,
I consider myself the typical citizen; I
believe the politicians I elected should rep-
resent me and do what we, the majority, ask
them to do. Our present congressmen and
women have failed us completely. The
party line is more important than the peo-
ple they represent. My suggestion is since
the federal government has been brought to
a stop and services are refused to us citi-
zens, there is only one answer. Since we
are not getting the services we pay for, we
should refuse to pay federal taxes for the
period they play this game. Shame on you,
Congress.
Robert Nice
Redwood City
Remember the
conduct of candidates
Editor,
Regarding the lawsuit brought by
Redwood City Council candidate Corrin
Rankin over the ballot designation of can-
didate Ernie Schmidt and her demand that
the city pay her attorney fees from the city,
some facts need to be set straight
(“Redwood City candidates square off” in
t he Oct. 3 edition of the Daily Journal).
Ms. Rankin’s attorney has made appar-
ent misstatements about the circum-
stances and unfairly criticized the city of
Redwood City and the councilmembers
who, reluctantly, and in an effort to pre-
vent further expenditure of tax dollars,
authorized the payment of the fees.
There was no judgment by a court deter-
mining that Mr. Schmidt’s ballot designa-
tion as chair of the Redwood City
Planning Commission was improper. Mr.
Schmidt was on solid legal ground for his
designation, and it is the type of designa-
tion that was previously approved by San
Mateo County.
Mr. Schmidt, to avoid ongoing litiga-
tion and expenditure of city tax dollars,
voluntarily, without court order, agreed to
change his designation to “business-
man.” He could have fought the matter in
court or insisted that the designation also
include “planning commissioner” but he
did not. There was no effort made on the
part of Ms. Rankin to discuss or resolve
her concerns prior to her filing a lawsuit.
Ms. Rankin’s attorney feels Ms.
Rankin was “shamed” by councilmember
comments made when they reported on
their decision to pay the fees. It appears
Ms. Rankin would prefer that the public
be presented with only her side of the
story. Her attorney remarked that the vot-
ers should remember the councilmembers
when they go to the polls — and of
course they should remember the conduct
of the candidates, including Ms.
Rankin’s.
Rachel Holt
Redwood City
The letter writer is an
attorney for Ernie Schmidt.
Holober, Schneider for Millbrae City Council
Editorial
Other voices
Shortage of jurors
remains a problem
Sacramento Bee
L
ike voting or serving in public
office, jury service is a duty and
privilege of citizenship. Gov. Jerry
Brown was right to veto Assembly Bill
1401, which would have allowed nonciti-
zens to serve on juries and by so doing sub-
tly diluted what it means to be a citizen.
Yet the problem the bill sought to address
— a persistent shortage of jurors — remains
vexing and expensive for the courts.
Statewide approximately 10 million jurors
are summoned for service, but only 4 mil-
lion of those are available and qualified for
the task. And even fewer, 1.5 million
prospective jurors, actually report to courts.
Courts struggle to find sufficient numbers
of jurors to serve and the cost of jury service
to the courts and to those who serve has
become a real strain.
Remedies are available. The Legislature
could consider granting the courts authority
to reduce both the size of juries and the num-
ber of peremptory challenges that can be
applied to prospective jurors. Some 39
states have already reduced jury sizes,
according to a report this year by the
Presiding Judges Advisory Committee Jury
Working Group.
That report made several specific recom-
mendations: For all felonies, there would be
no change to the traditional 12-member
jury. However, the number of peremptory
challenges in which lawyers are not required
to state a reason would be reduced from 20
per side to 12 for cases involving life sen-
tences and from 10 to six per side for all
other felonies. For death penalty cases, the
20 peremptory challenges allowed per side
under current law would not be changed.
For misdemeanors where conviction car-
ried the potential for penalties of six
months or more, jury size would be reduced
from the current 12 to eight and the number
of peremptory challenges reduced from 10 to
six per side.
All other misdemeanors would be adjudi-
cated in court trials with a judge presiding
and no jury at all.
In all civil cases, the number of jurors
would be reduced from 12 to eight.
It’s estimated that the changes proposed
would save beleaguered California courts an
estimated $5.1 million annually in direct
costs. Community costs, which include the
loss of productivity, wages and business
activity, would be reduced by approximately
$174 million annually.
The reason to reduce jury sizes, however,
is not to save the courts money. Indeed,
there’s an argument to be made that
California should pay jurors more to make
up for lost wages and workplace hassles and
to make jury duty more attractive. Reducing
the size of juries, however, would make it
easier to bear these costs.
The changes suggested are not without
controversy. Opponents, mostly from the
defense bar, argue that reducing the size of
juries or the number of peremptory chal-
lenges would result in juries with less diver-
sity in viewpoints, background, experi-
ences, races, age and gender.
The push back from supporters is that
peremptory challenges have been used his-
torically to exclude minority jurors and thus
reduce diversity.
Despite the savings, and despite the rec-
ommendations of judges most knowledge-
able about the problem, the forces support-
ing the status quo have prevailed. Asingle
very modest bill introduced on the subject
this year — to reduce the number of peremp-
tory challenges allowed in misdemeanor
cases — failed to even get a hearing.
The courts are facing serious economic
distress. In some counties courts have gone
dark, and access to justice has been serious-
ly reduced. Gamesmanship in jury selection
wastes everyone’s time and money. The
reforms recommended deserve considera-
tion.
San Mateo County Community College District
Richard Holober
Tom Mohr
Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary School
District
Rakesh Hegde
Amy Koo
Charles Velschow
Hillsborough City Elementary School District
Lynne Esselstein
Don Geddis
Kaarin Hardy
San Bruno Park School District
Patrick Flynn
John Marinos
Henry Sanchez
San Carlos Elementary School District
Nicole Bergeron
Carol Elliott
Kathleen Farley
Sequoia Union High School District
Alan Sarver
Chris Thomsen
Belmont City Council
Warren Lieberman
Eric Reed
Charles Stone
Burlingame City Council
Michael Brownrigg
Russ Cohen
Ann Kieghran
San Mateo City Council
Josh Hugg
David Lim
Robert Ross
Measure R-YES
$174 parcel tax for the Belmont-Redwood Shores
Elementary School District
Measure P-YES
$130 million bond measure for the San Mateo-
Foster City Elementary School District
Daily Journal
endorsements
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BUSINESS 10
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Dow 15,126.07 +323.09 10-Yr Bond 2.68 +0.03
Nasdaq 3,760.75 +82.97 Oil (per barrel) 102.97
S&P 500 1,692.56 +36.16 Gold 1,286.40
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Ruby Tuesday Inc., down $1.29 at $6.26
The casual restaurant chain posted a fiscal first-quarter loss due to a
weak economy that’s keeping people away from its restaurants.
OfficeMax Inc., up 95 cents at $13.26
A Janney analyst gave the office supply retailer’s stock a “Buy” rating
citing the costs it will save when it merges with Office Depot.
The Buckle Inc., down $4.49 at $47.17
The teen clothing retailer said that sales in stores open at least a year fell
4.5 percent in the 5-week period ending Oct. 5.
Quest Diagnostics Inc., down $3.04 at $58.66
The medical lab operator forecast disappointing third-quarter results as
demand weakened in the latter part of the quarter.
Marriott Vacations Worldwide Corp., up $2.50 at $47
The timeshare company’s third-quarter net income rose thanks to
stronger results from its rental and resort-management businesses.
Nasdaq
Acura Pharmaceuticals Inc., up 19 cents at $1.88
The drug developer reached a settlement with two generic drugmakers
over future sales of new versions of Pfizer Inc.’s painkiller Oxecta.
Fred’s Inc., up 66 cents at $15.84
The discount store operator said that sales at stores open at least a year
rose 2.8 percent in September compared with a year ago.
Hub Group Inc., down $2.26 at $35.05
The transportation-management company posted third-quarter and
annual profit outlooks below analysts’ forecasts.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — You can almost hear
Wall Street exhaling.
The Dow Jones industrial average
soared more than 300 points Thursday
after Republican leaders and President
Barack Obama finally seemed willing to
end a 10-day budget standoff that has
threatened to leave the U.S. unable to
pay its bills.
The news drove the Dow to its
biggest point rise this year and ended a
three-week funk in stocks. It also
injected some calm into the frazzled
market for short-term government debt.
Republican leaders said Thursday
they would vote to extend the govern-
ment’s borrowing authority for six
weeks. Aspokesman for Obama said the
president would “likely” sign a bill to
increase the nation’s ability to borrow
money so it can continue paying its
bills.
“Congressmen and women are com-
ing to terms with how calamitous it
would be if the debt ceiling was not
raised,” said Joseph Tanious, Global
Market Strategist for J.P. Morgan Asset
Management. “Cooler heads are pre-
vailing.”
The Dow jumped 323.09 points, or
2.2 percent, to close at 15,126.07, its
high for the day.
The final surge came even as Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid said
Democrats would not negotiate with
Republicans as long as the government
remains partly shut. Reid’s comments
were reported about 15 minutes before
the market closed at 4 p.m. Eastern
time.
Stocks have steadily declined since
mid-September as Washington’s grid-
lock got investors worried that the U.S.
could default on its debt and wreak
havoc on global financial markets.
While traders applauded a potential deal
between the White House and
Congress, more volatility could be
ahead if it falls through.
“We don’t need some grand bargain.
We just need to avoid a default,” said
Brian Reynolds of chief market strate-
gist at Rosenblatt Securities. “Just
don’t bring us to the edge again.”
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose
36.16 points, or 2.2 percent, to
1,692.56 and the Nasdaq composite
rose 82.97 points, or 2.3 percent, to
3,760.75.
Thursday’s gains were extraordinarily
broad. Of the 500 stocks in the S&P
500 index, only 11 fell. Banks and
industrial stocks rose the most.
A possible compromise between the
two political parties could not come
soon enough. Treasury Secretary Jack
Lew has said the government will hit its
borrowing limit on Oct. 17. That would
leave the U.S. with enough cash to last
just a week or two before a default
became a real risk.
A short-term extension of the debt
limit is “the right approach,” said Jack
Ablin, who manages $66 billion as
chief investment officer at BMO Private
Bank.
“It allows politicians to turn down
the heat a bit while still keeping the
broader issues on the front burner, ”
Ablin said.
In another bullish signal, small-com-
pany stocks rose even more than the
rest of the market. Those stocks tend to
be riskier than large, well-established
companies but can also offer investors
greater rewards. A sharp increase in
small-company stocks means investors
are more comfortable taking on risk.
The Russell 2000 index jumped 26.04
points, or 2.5 percent, to 1,069.50. It
is less than 20 points from an all-time
high reached on Oct. 1.
There were also hopeful signs in the
market for short-term U.S. government
debt. The yield on the one-month
Treasury bill eased to 0.21 percent from
0.27 late Wednesday.
The yield had spiked from near zero at
the beginning of the month to as high
as 0.35 percent Tuesday as investors
dumped the bills out of concern that the
government might not be able to pay
them back when they’re due. Investors
demand higher yields when they per-
ceive debt as being risky.
Wall Street exhales as threat of default eases
Starbucks asks customers to sign petition
NEW YORK — Starbucks, known for its piping hot
coffee, is throwing itself in the middle of yet another
heated national debate.
The world’s biggest coffee chain said Thursday that it
will ask customers and businesses to sign a petition
calling for an end to the partial government shutdown
that has forced hundreds of thousands of federal workers
off the job.
The petition, which will be available at all Starbucks
11,000 U.S. locations to sign beginning Friday, calls
for reopening the government, paying debts on time
and passing a long-term budget deal by the end of the
year. In addition to Starbucks customers, the company
is trying to get the CEOs of the nation’s largest compa-
nies to sign.
The move is unusual for a company like Starbucks.
While big brands generally steer clear of politics to
avoid alienating customers, Starbucks and its outspo-
ken CEO, Howard Schultz, in recent years have run
toward the spotlight by trying to gain a voice in nation-
al political issues.
Safeway 3Q net income drops but beats Street
PLEASANTON — Safeway said Thursday its third-
quarter net income fell 58 percent, hurt by a software
impairment charge, higher theft and lower property
gains.
Results beat expectations however and shares rose 6
percent in aftermarket trading.
The grocery chain, which operates 1,406 stores in the
U.S., also says it’s exiting the Chicago market by early
2014 to focus on more profitable business. It operates
72 Dominick’s stores in Chicago that have been losing
money. The move comes after Safeway said in June it
would sell its Canadian stores.
Business briefs
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The number of peo-
ple applying for U.S. unemployment
benefits jumped by 66,000 last week to
a seasonally adjusted 374,000. But the
spike was largely because California
processed a huge backlog of claims and
the partial government shutdown
prompted some companies to cut jobs.
The Labor Department said Thursday
that the less volatile four-week average
rose 20,000 to 325,000. The sharp
increase in both the weekly figures and
the four-week average comes after
applications hovered near a 6-year low
the previous week.
A government spokesman said that
about half the weekly increase occurred
in California, where officials processed
applications that were delayed several
weeks by a computer upgrade. One-quar-
ter of the increase reflected applications
from employees at government con-
tractors and other workers affected by
the shutdown.
Applications are a proxy for layoffs.
Before last week, they had declined
steadily over the past three months.
That’s a sign companies are cutting
fewer workers.
“The broader picture is still that labor
market conditions are improving,
albeit not quite as much as we previous-
ly thought,” Paul Ashworth, an econo-
mist at Capital Economics, said.
Federal workers temporarily laid off
by the shutdown may also file for bene-
fits. But their numbers are reported sep-
arately and published a week later than
the other applications.
Lockheed Martin said Monday that it
is furloughing about 2,400 employees.
That’s lower than the 3,000 employees
the company initially said it would fur-
lough because Defense Secretary Chuck
Hagel has recalled most of the
Pentagon’s civilian employees to
work.
Falling applications are typically
followed by more hiring. But there
aren’t any signs that that has happened
yet. Instead, job gains have slowed in
recent months.
It’s not clear if hiring trends changed
last month. The government was
unable to issue the September employ-
ment report because of the shutdown.
However, last week payroll provider
ADPsaid businesses added just 166,000
jobs in September, evidence that hiring
remains sluggish. The ADP figures usu-
ally diverge from the government’s
more comprehensive employment
report.
U.S. jobless claims jump to 374,000 due to backlog
<<Boldin to face team that drafted him, page 13
• Kelly, Greinke to go in Game 1 of NLCS, page 15
Friday, Oct. 11, 2013
BREAKING IT DOWN: THE DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS STAFF LOOKS AT THE PAL IN GREATER DETAIL >> PAGE 12
Favorites face off
in league opener
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
OK, now it’s for real.
And if you are Mills and El
Camino football teams, Friday
doesn’t just mark the beginning of
the 2013 Peninsula Athletic
League schedule. No, with five
non-league games in the books,
it’s clear the Vikings and Colts are
the two front-runners in the PAL
Lake Division.
So, with their 3 p.m. matchup
today in Millbrae, the winner
assures themselves of the upper-
hand very early in the league sea-
son.
It doesn’t get much realer than
that.
“In my mind, Mills is definitely
someone to contend with,” said El
Camino head coach Mark Turner.
“They’ve had a real strong presea-
son. It’s tough to tell who’s at the
top of the league. Every week,
every day things can change with-
in this league. I do like the fact
they’ve had a good season because
it helps us know that they’re for
real. If we want to get where we
Carlmont (0-0 Lake, 2-2 overall)
at Hillsdale (0-0, 2-2), 3 p.m.
Both of these teams are coming
off a bye. … The Scots succumbed
to San Mateo 19-10 two weeks
ago. … The Knights were annihi-
lated by Alameda, 55-24. …
Hillsdale beat Carlmont 30-14 last
season. … If defense wins champi-
onships, Carlmont has a shot at a
Lake Division title. The Scots are
allowing the second-least amount
of points among Lake team, giv-
ing up an average of 15.7 points
per game. … Conversely, the
Scots have struggled offensively,
averaging 14.7 points. … If
Hillsdale defense can step up even
a little bit, the Knights have a
shot to make some noise. They’re
scoring nearly 30 points per game
— which any coach would take —
but they’re giving up 35. … RB
Giancarlo Boscacci has returned
for the Knights and has already
rushed for four TDs in just two
games.
Sequoia (0-0 Bay, 3-1 overall)
at Terra Nova (0-0, 4-0), 7 p.m.
Both these teams were off last
week. … The Cherokees were
crushed 34-7 by Cedar City-Utah
two weeks ago. … The Tigers
torched Salinas 38-13. … This
will be Sequoia’s first taste of Bay
Division play since the PAL
became a power league and was
formed in 1996. … The Cherokees
were held to just 174 yards of
offense last week, including only
28 rushing yards on 29 carries. …
Before the loss two weeks ago,
Sequoia was averaging 42 points
per game. … Terra Nova has
looked unstoppable through the
first four weeks of the season,
scoring an average of 47 points
while giving up 17 per game. …
QB Anthony Gordon has already
become one of the most prolific
passers in CCS in just his first var-
sity season. The junior has thrown
for 1,316 yards, averaging 329
yards passing per game with 12
TDs. … Unlike the last several
Tiger QBs, Gordon is almost pure-
ly a pocket passer, having rushed
just three times this season.
Half Moon Bay (0-0 Ocean, 1-3
overall)
at Woodside (0-0, 0-5), 7 p.m.
The Cougars had a bye last week.
Two weeks ago, they were crushed 47-
6 by Menlo School. … These two last
met during the 2011 season, with Half
Moon Bay recording a 48-21 win. …
See GOTW, Page 14 See BEST, Page 14
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
El Camino running back BrandonGip gets most of the publicity, but teammate Danny Ruiz, above, has proven
to be equally effective for the Colts this season.
Best Bets
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Justin Verlander pitched
another Game 5 gem in Oakland while carry-
ing a no-hit bid into the seventh inning,
and Miguel Cabrera homered to lead the
Detroit Tigers past the Athletics 3-0
Thursday night and back into the AL cham-
pionship series.
Joaquin Benoit retired Seth Smith on a fly
ball with two on in the ninth to close out
the deciding game of their division series.
The Tigers became the first team to reach the
ALCS in three straight years since the New
York Yankees from 1998-2001.
Game 1 is Saturday in Boston. The Tigers
went 4-3 against the Red Sox this year.
They have never faced each other in the
postseason.
Verlander gave up a clean, two-out single
to Yoenis Cespedes in the seventh to end his
chance at the third no-hitter in postseason
history. The hit hardly fazed him, however.
On a night he allowed only three baserun-
ners, Verlander made it a postseason-record
30 straight scoreless
innings against one team
since Coco Crisp hit a
leadoff home run for the
A’s in Game 1 last
October.
Just 364 days earlier,
Verlander tossed a four-
hit, 6-0 masterpiece in
Game 5 in this very ball-
park, a 122-pitch per-
formance for his first
career postseason shutout and complete
game.
He nearly matched that with a spectacular
111-pitch outing in a rematch of his
thrilling pitcher’s duel with rookie Sonny
Gray five days earlier in Game 2.
Aching slugger Cabrera hit a two-run
homer in the fourth off with a drive into the
left-field seats for his first homer since Sept.
17 and just his third extra-base hit in 99 at-
bats. That ended a 20-inning scoreless
streak by the Tigers at the Coliseum.
Gray danced with danger from the start
with stuff not nearly as crisp as just five
Verlander tosses a gem, Tigers KO A’s
Tigers 3, A’s 0
See ALDS, Page 16
Justin
Verlander
SPORTS 13
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SANTACLARA— His black hooded sweat-
shirt pulled over his head and covering most
of his face, Anquan Boldin stood at his locker
Thursday staring back at a dozen or so
reporters with a serious expression.
No reason to dress up or soak in the spot-
light. Boldin said it’s “just another week.”
Sure it is.
The wide receiver will be facing his former
Arizona team for the second time Sunday when
the San Francisco 49ers (3-2) host the
Cardinals (3-2) in an NFC West matchup.
Boldin spent his first seven seasons with
Arizona before being traded to Baltimore for
two draft picks following the 2009 season.
Boldin also downplayed the reunion leading
up to his first meeting against the Cardinals in
2011 in Baltimore.
He took out any lingering feelings on the
field, catching seven passes for 145 yards to
rally the Ravens past Arizona 30-27.
Boldin sees no reason to be sentimental
this week.
After all, he said, the
franchise he played for in
Arizona — and helped lead
to the Super Bowl after the
2008 season, when the
Cardinals lost to the
Pittsburgh Steelers — has
had so many changes it’s
almost unrecognizable
now.
“I don’t know any of those guys. Probably
about two guys remain,” Boldin said.
Plenty has changed for him as well since his
days in the Arizona desert.
Boldin won the Super Bowl with the Ravens
in February. He was traded to the 49ers in the
offseason for a sixth-round draft pick in a
cost-cutting move by Baltimore.
And at age 33, he’s become Colin
Kaepernick’s No. 1 target with so many
injuries to other wide receivers, notably
Michael Crabtree, who will be out until at
least November rehabbing a torn right
Achilles tendon.
“Anquan has been everything we expected
and then some,” 49ers offensive coordinator
Greg Roman said.
Boldin leads San Francisco with 26 recep-
tions and 393 yards. But he has caught just
one touchdown pass since the season opener,
when he had 13 catches for 208 yards and a
score in a win over Green Bay.
What the 49ers love most about Boldin is
that, whether the team wins or losses, his
demeanor never changes.
The same qualities that defined him earlier in
his career— he’s smart, savvy and plays with
an angry attitude — are still a driving force in
the locker room and in the huddle in San
Francisco.
“Sometimes it kind of comes off as quiet or
even a little angry, but he’s just serious about
winning and serious about his job and I love
that about him,” 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh
said on a conference call with Arizona
reporters this week.
“I really don’t think I exaggerate this when
I say it, but with the kind of presence that he
has, he would very much make a great senator.
“I think Senator Boldin is something that
could be in his future because he cares about
people, he’s very smart and he’s got extreme-
ly high character.”
San Francisco will settle for what Boldin
has done on the field for now.
Boldin’s production this season has been
tied mostly to the health of tight end Vernon
Davis, who has 14 receptions for 224 yards
and four touchdowns.
Boldin’s best games have come when Davis
played — and played well — to ease the pres-
sure from the constant double teams defenses
throw at one of them.
That was a familiar script during Boldin’s
time in Arizona, too. He teamed with
Cardinals wideout Larry Fitzgerald to form one
of the NFL’s best tandems.
The two still found success without each
other. And they remain friends off the field,
including going to Africa on a relief mission
this offseason. But Sunday will be different.
Anquan Boldin to face former team
Anquan Boldin
Minnesota coach Jerry Kill
on leave for epilepsy
MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota coach Jerry
Kill has taken an open-ended leave of
absence from the team to focus on treatment
and management of his epilepsy.
The university announced the decision
Thursday, before a news conference with
athletic director Norwood Teague and defen-
sive coordinator Tracy Claeys.
“It’s a big step for him,” Claeys, the act-
ing head coach, said at TCF Bank Stadium.
Kill had to miss the last game at Michigan
when he suffered a seizure at home that
morning and was unable to travel with the
team, and Claeys called that the turning
point in Kill’s thinking about needing more
time away to rest, recuperate and adjust to
new medication.
Teague and others have talked about the
importance of taking more responsibilities
off Kill’s plate to reduce stress and fatigue,
which can be triggers of seizures, though
there’s no predictability to them.
“This was a difficult decision to make, but
the right decision,” Kill said in a statement
distributed by the university. “Our staff has
been together a long time and I have full
confidence in Coach Claeys and them during
my time away. Every decision that will be
made will be in the best interest of the play-
ers and the program. I look forward to
returning to the Minnesota sideline on a
full-time basis soon.”
Sports brief
SPORTS 14
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Despite only one win between them, both these squads faced
some tough competition in non-league play. Of the eight com-
bined teams they have played, six came from “A” leagues. …
The 56 points Half Moon Bay scored in a Week 3 win over
South City is more than the Cougars have scored in their three
losses — 48. … Woodside managed only 182 yards of offense
against a stiff Sacred Heart Prep defense last week. … The
Wildcats have allowed more than 40 points each of their last
three games. … Josh Holman has been one of the best two-way
players in the PAL this season. He is the Wildcats’ most dan-
gerous offensive threat and is tied for first on the team in unas-
sisted tackles with 19.
Sacred Heart Cathedral (0-1 WCAL, 2-2 overall)
at Serra (1-0, 4-0), 7 p.m.
The Irish were shut out 21-0 by Valley Christian last week.
… The Padres prevailed over Bellarmine, 17-7. … Serra won
34-7 last year. … SHC comes into the game averaging just
over 27 points per game, while allowing just under 20. …
Serra’s win last week was a season low in points allowed.
Through four games, the Padres’defense has allowed 20 points
or more only once — 21 to De La Salle, which has since aver-
aged more than 35 points over its last four games. … The
Padres also came up with four sacks last week. … Making his
first varsity start, Serra QB Anthony Smock delivered, throw-
ing for 163 yards. … Offensively, the Padres piled up 346 yards
against Bellarmine.
Continued from page 11
BEST
Aragon (0-0 Ocean, 3-1 overall)
at Capuchino (0-0, 1-3), 3 p.m.
The Dons had a bye last week. They were beaten by Scotts
Valley 28-19 two weeks ago. … The Mustangs also were off
last week. They outmuscled by El Camino 33-0 two weeks
ago. … Aragon beat Capuchino 42-7 last season. … In their
three wins, the Dons are averaging just under 40 points per
game. … Capuchino took a step backward in the loss to El
Camino, considering the Mustangs were coming off an
impressive 35-7 win over Gunn the previous week. … In
their three losses, the Mustangs are surrendering an average
of 37 points.
Menlo-Atherton (0-0 Bay, 3-1 overall)
at South City (0-0, 2-2), 7 p.m.
The Bears had last week off. Two weeks ago, they blasted
Silver Creek, 52-13. … The Warriors also had a bye. They
were walloped 51-0 by Burlingame Sept. 27. … This is the
first meeting between these teams since M-Awon 21-20 in
2008. … M-Ais averaging 182 yards passing and 187 yards
rushing so far this season. … The Bears have thrown for a
combined 515 yards in their last two games. … RB Isiah
Nash is averaging just over six yards per carry and has
rushed for 469 yards and seven TDs. … Nash has scored two
TDs per game over his last three games. … South City, after
winning its first two games by a combined two points, has
lost its last two by a combined score of 107-14. … The
Warriors are averaging 15 points of offense per game so far
this season.
King’s Academy (2-2 overall) at Burlingame (4-0), 7 p.m.
The Knights blasted Calvary Murrieta 49-14 last week. …
The Panthers pounded Jefferson, 54-6. … This is the only
the second time these teams have faced each other. King’s
Academy beat Burlingame 41-14 in 2008, the Knights’ first
season in the Peninsula Athletic League. … It’s been feast
or famine this season for King’s Academy. In its two wins,
the Knights are averaging 52 points and allowing 10.5. In
their two losses, the Knights have scored an average of
seven points while giving up an average of 48.7. …
Burlingame has destroyed every team in its path so far this
season, averaging 48 points per game and have eclipsed the
50-point mark in its last two contests. … Defensively, the
Panthers are just as impressive, having allowed a total of 18
points this season and have recorded two shutouts.
The Rest
want to get — our goal is to win the championship — then
that’s the first step.”
Mills is off to its best start in ages. Under Mike Krieger,
the Vikings are 3-1 — which equals last year’s season total.
With running back Antonio Jeffrey leading the way, Mills
has put up high offensive totals. They come into the game
averaging almost 38 points per game. Defensively, they’ve
pitched a shutout, and despite surrendering 28 points twice,
only one of those games ended in a loss — two weeks ago
against Los Altos.
“They’ve been playing good football,” Turner said. “So
with that said, that’s alerted our guys with, ‘Hey, they’re for
real.’ They’re a real contender in this league which we
believe we are also. It’s helped motivate our kids. Now the
games really count. This league, you only get five games,
you really have to take advantage of them. We’ve been
through this before, but we have a new group of guys and
we’ve been trying to stress to these guys the importance of
executing and cutting down on the mental mistakes. If we do
those, we’ll be fine in this league.”
So far, the formula has worked for the Colts, who are also
3-1. In El Camino’s lone loss, they gave Ocean Division
contender Aragon all they can handle. In their three win, the
Colts have allowed less than five points a game. Turner said
the week leading up to the league opener, it’s been back to
the fundamentals — solid defense and handing the ball to
their workhorse, Brandon Gip.
“We accomplished a lot of what we wanted to accomplish
during the preseason,” Turner said. “But that said, there’s a
lot of work to do, it’s a work in progress. These are young
minds we’re dealing with, so every day consistency is what
we’re looking for and we haven’t gotten that yet. But that’s
why we have to keep coming out and working, keep getting
better. ”
With a high octane offense led by Jeffrey and comple-
mented handsomely by Victor Beglitsoff and Marquis
Adkins, the El Camino defense will have to be on point.
“I believe your defense travels with you,” Turner said.
“You have to take it everywhere you go. We just have to exe-
cute and run the ball offensively. We have to execute a little
bit in the passing game, but we really need to get some
defensive stops, take care of the ball on offense, and run the
ball like we’re used to. That’s what we need to do. That’s El
Camino football. Maybe we’ll make a big play or two.”
Mills — and Turner for that matter — knows a thing or
two about big plays. On Friday, it’s something the El
Camino coach knows his team will have to limit.
“That’s a scary team over there,” Turner said. “They have
speed over there. And speed is one of the things we’ve strug-
gled with over the years. We’ve had issues with that. And
Mills has three guys that are scary, scary speed-wise. They
can fly. But I feel pretty confident with what we’ve done
these last couple of weeks and how we’ve been working. I
feel pretty good.”
Continued from page 11
GOTW
SPORTS 15
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Woodside girls’ volleyball scored a criti-
cal comeback win over Burlingame – 25-
22, 12-25, 17-25, 25-15, 15-13.
With the match hanging in the balance of
a 13-13 tie in Game 5, Woodside benefitted
from back-to-back unforced hitting errors
by Burlingame to win it.
The key victory keeps Woodside in the
thick of the Bay Division race, as the
Wildcats maintain a second-place tie with
Carlmont. Woodside is headed for a show-
down at first-place Menlo-Atherton next
Tuesday.
“If we can carry this energy into M-A, and
beat M-A, it’ll be a three-way tie for first
place,” Woodside head coach Kyle Mashima
said. “So, it will make everything pretty
crazy if we do that.”
But Woodside’s energy seemed to be lack-
ing early Thursday. The Wildcats fell behind
in Game 1 until Ana Oropeza went on a big
service run. The senior had four of her five
match aces to lead Woodside (5-1 PAL Bay,
12-7 overall) to a win in the opening set.
Burlingame (3-3, 11-7) then bounced back
to take a 2-1 match lead, however.
“The second and third sets, it was like we
had no energy,” Mashima said. “We were
really flat. After the third set I thought we
were done.”
Woodside’s heavy hitters finished strong.
Wildcats senior Christine Alftin notched a
match-high 31 kills, and sophomore Jesse
Larkin added 10 kills. Burlingame outside
hitter Morgan McKeever tabbed a team-high
17 kills, while Tatum Novitsky had 14
kills, and Bianca Alvarez had 12 kills.
“At this point, I feel kind of sorry for
Burlingame because they are just as good as
everyone else, and they’re getting the short
end of the stick,” Mashima said.
Other Bay results
Carlmont (5-1, 12-7) downed San Mateo
(1-5, 4-12) – 25-14, 25-19, 25-18. Scots
senior Ella McDonough had a team-high 12
kills, while sophomore Alexis Morrow had
a career-high nine kills and three blocks.
Menlo-Atherton (6-0, 12-3) swept
Aragon (1-5, 10-7) – 25-21, 26-24, 25-19.
M-Ajunior Devin Joos paced the squad with
17 kills and 16 digs. Leanna Collins had
seven kills, and Katie Wilcox had three
blocks. Aragon libero Maddy Lee had eight
digs.
Bears senior hitter Pauli King did not play
after an high-intensity game Tuesday in M-
A’s critical win over Carlmont.
“We figured we could rest her,” Menlo-
Atherton head coach Ron Whitmill said.
“She took almost 60 swings Tuesday … and
we figured [yesterday] wasn’t a massive
game we needed her for. So, we figured we’d
give her the night off.”
Ocean Division results
Sequoia (6-0, 14-4) downed Mills (3-3, 7-
10) – 25-13, 25-19, 25-22. Cherokees
sophomore hitter Rachel Fink tabbed 10
kills and 30 digs, while junior libero
Camille Louie notched her season-high 31
digs.
With the Cherokees sitting atop the
Ocean Division, they have a chance to dis-
tance themselves from the pack next week
with an Oct. 17 matchup with second-place
Terra Nova.
“I think this league is going to come
down to us and them,” Sequoia head coach
Dustyn Woropay said.
Sequoia isn’t taking anything for granted
though, and will enter next week coming off
a major tune-up in non-league tourney play
at Saturday’s Mountain View-Los Altos
Tournament. The Cherokees will open the
tourney against Bay Division powerhouse
Carlmont.
“We’ll have a test this weekend to see
where we stand so far as success,” Woropay
said.
Terra Nova (5-1, 12-2) swept El Camino
(1-5) – 25-16, 25-15, 25-19. Tigers middle
hitter Ali Vidali tabbed a match-high 18
kills, and Krissa San Juan had four aces.
“[Vidali] has been monumental during the
first half of the season,” Terra Nova head
coach Craig Dillie said. “With assistance
from a very, very young core, things are
looking bright.”
The Tigers resume play next Tuesday
against Half Moon Bay, but will still be hit-
ting the court to practice on Saturday to pre-
pare for the biggest week of their season to
date.
“We’ll prepare over the weekend and focus
on Half Moon Bay, and work on a couple of
new things,” Dillie said.
Westmoor (4-2, 11-3) defeated Half Moon
Bay – 25-23, 25-13, 25-18. Marinel
Alcantara and Christy Tam paced the Rams
with seven kills apiece. Marlene Alcantara
tabbed 26 digs. Half Moon Bay’s Amy
Francis had a match-high eight kills, and
Hailey Merkes totaled six kills.
Capuchino (2-4, 5-8) bounced back
against Jefferson in four sets – 22-25, 25-
11, 25-15, 25-17.
Woodside finds groove late to down Burlingame
16
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
REUTERS
A’s starting pitcher Sonny Gray allowed all
three Detroit runs in Thursday’s Game 5 loss.
nights before when he matched zeros with the
2011 ALMVP and Cy Young Award winner.
This time, Verlander didn’t allow a baserun-
ner until Josh Reddick drew a one-out walk in
the sixth — but the no-hit bid remained until
Cespedes’ single the next inning. The hardest
hit ball was a fly to the center-field warning
track by Stephen Vogt in the sixth.
Verlander struck out 10 in eight innings,
giving him 21 Ks in these two starts. He has
43 strikeouts in his four playoff outings
against Oakland the past two years.
The A’s saw their season end at the hands of
Detroit for the third time in as many postsea-
sons, including in a four-game sweep in the
2006 ALCS.
Oakland has lost its last six winner-take-all
Game 5s and fell to 1-12 in potential clinchers
since 2000. The A’s struck out 57 times for the
most in a best-of-five playoff series.
Verlander earned the nod for the decider after
Game 1 winner Max Scherzer pitched in relief
of an 8-6, season-saving win Game 4 in
Detroit. Manager Jim Leyland had no qualms
turning again to Verlander, who went 13-12
this season.
When asked before the game about his
bullpen availability, Leyland nodded his head
and quipped, “Verlander, he’s available.”
Gray, meanwhile, looked overmatched this
time. He wiped his brow and never looked
comfortable.
A’s manager Bob Melvin went with Gray
over 18-game winner and 40-year-old Bartolo
Colon, who yielded three first-inning runs to
lose Game 1.
These Game 5s becoming awfully familiar
for both sides in their recent October rivalry.
Detroit held another clinching party in the
visiting clubhouse of the Oakland Coliseum,
where a raucous crowd of 46,959 swirled yel-
low towels until Benoit threw his hands in the
air at the final out.
Catcher Alex Avila met Benoit in front of
the mound for a long embrace as their team-
mates quickly joined them — with cheers of
“Let’s go Oakland!” still ringing out.
The Tigers came together near the mound for
a unique chant in which they squatted in uni-
son and raised their hands in the air.
The 93-win Tigers are determined to take the
next step and win a championship after being
swept in four games of the 2012 World Series
by the San Francisco Giants.
The 23-year-old Gray, pitching to chants of
“Sonny! Sonny!” in his 12th career start,
returned for the sixth inning at 92 pitches but
was done once he allowed consecutive singles
to Victor Martinez and Jhonny Peralta. Omar
Infante then drove in the third run with a field-
er’s choice grounder off Dan Otero.
Along the 880 freeway just outside the
Coliseum, a billboard blared: “IT’S ALWAYS
SONNY IN THE TOWN.” The only thing
sunny was the outfield for the early evening
start, which had players shielding their eyes
to deal with tricky shadows and sun angles.
Center field and right field initially played in
bright sun.
Rookie starters have lost their last six win-
ner-take-all postseason games since Daisuke
Matsuzaka beat Cleveland in the 2007 ALCS
for Boston.
Continued from page 11
ALDS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA— Oakland’s Kevin Burnett isn’t sure yet what
exactly the Raiders will try to do to slow down the unbeaten
Kansas City Chiefs this week.
It might not matter what the plan is the way the Chiefs
have played while winning their first five games.
That’s why even as he buried himself in the film room try-
ing to find an edge, Burnett realized the Raiders will likely
have to go off script if they’re going to give Kansas City its
first loss of the season.
“Nobody’s (stopped the Chiefs) so far,” Burnett said
Thursday. “We’re going into uncharted waters. You want to
go execute your game plan, but everybody’s game plan
works on the practice field. It’s not until Sunday when you
see whether it works or not.”
Part of Oakland’s offseason defensive makeover, Burnett
is sometimes at his best when freelancing on the field.
The ninth-year outside linebacker had 14 tackles in last
week’s win over San Diego, including a stuff of Chargers run-
ning back Danny Woodhead on a fourth-and-goal play from
the 1. He also forced a fumble that safety Charles Woodson
returned for a touchdown.
Those types of plays have become typical of Burnett this
season, his first in Oakland after spending the past two sea-
sons in Miami.
He had 10 tackles and forced a fumble that led to a touch-
down in the Raiders’ 37-21 loss to the Denver Broncos on
Sept. 23.
A week later, when Oakland’s defense gave up a 33-yard
completion from Washington’s Robert Griffin III to tight
end Logan Paulsen, Burnett chased Paulsen down from
behind and knocked the ball loose for another turnover.
“He plays the game fast and he’s instinctive,” Raiders
coach Dennis Allen said. “When you play this game fast and
you play this game instinctively, you’re going to make a lot
of plays. We’re going to continue to put him in a position
where he can do that for us.”
Raiders LB Burnett
fitting in defensively
SPORTS 17
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 2 3 0 .400 135 159
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 152 136
Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 112
N.Y. Giants 0 6 0 .000 103 209
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 5 0 0 1.000 134 73
Carolina 1 3 0 .250 74 58
Atlanta 1 4 0 .200 122 134
Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 70
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 4 2 0 .667 172 161
Detroit 3 2 0 .600 131 123
Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 118 97
Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 115 123
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 4 1 0 .800 137 81
San Francisco 3 2 0 .600 113 98
Arizona 3 2 0 .600 91 95
St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 103 141
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 4 1 0 .800 95 70
N.Y. Jets 3 2 0 .600 98 116
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 112 130
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 1 0 .800 139 79
Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 115 95
Houston 2 3 0 .400 93 139
Jacksonville 0 5 0 .000 51 163
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 3 2 0 .600 117 110
Cleveland 3 2 0 .600 101 94
Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 94 87
Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 110
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 5 0 0 1.000 230 139
Kansas City 5 0 0 1.000 128 58
Oakland 2 3 0 .400 98 108
San Diego 2 3 0 .400 125 129
Thursday, Oct. 10
Chicago 27, N.Y. Giants 21
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 5 4 1 0 8 17 10
Tampa Bay 4 3 1 0 6 14 9
Boston 3 2 1 0 4 7 4
Ottawa 3 1 0 2 4 8 9
Detroit 4 2 2 0 4 8 11
Montreal 3 1 2 0 2 9 8
Florida 4 1 3 0 2 7 18
Buffalo 5 0 4 1 1 5 14
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 3 3 0 0 6 12 3
N.Y. Islanders 3 2 0 1 5 12 7
Carolina 4 2 1 1 5 9 11
Columbus 3 2 1 0 4 10 7
New Jersey 4 0 1 3 3 9 15
N.Y. Rangers 3 1 2 0 2 6 14
Philadelphia 4 1 3 0 2 5 10
Washington 4 1 3 0 2 12 15
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 4 4 0 0 8 13 3
St. Louis 3 3 0 0 6 14 4
Winnipeg 4 2 2 0 4 13 12
Minnesota 4 1 1 2 4 9 11
Chicago 3 1 1 1 3 10 10
Dallas 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Nashville 4 1 3 0 2 6 13
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 3 3 0 0 6 17 4
Vancouver 4 3 1 0 6 15 12
Calgary 4 2 0 2 6 15 15
Anaheim 3 2 1 0 4 8 11
Phoenix 4 2 2 0 4 10 13
Los Angeles 4 2 2 0 4 11 13
Edmonton 3 1 2 0 2 11 15
Thursday’sGames
Colorado 2, Boston 0
Columbus 4, Buffalo 1
Carolina 3,Washington 2
Phoenix 4, Detroit 2
Tampa Bay 7, Florida 2
Toronto 4, Nashville 0
Minnesota 2,Winnipeg 1
NHL GLANCE
vs. Tigers
5p.m.
TBS
10/10
Endregular
season
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/9
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
vs.Heredia
7p.m.
10/23
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
@Jaguars
10:05a.m.
FOX
10/27
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
vs.Steelers
1:05 p.m.
CBS
10/27
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
vs.Dallas
2:30p.m.
NBCSports
10/26
at Blues
5p.m.
NBC
10/15
vs.Rangers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/8
at Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/10
vs.Senators
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/12
vs.Flames
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/19
at Stars
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/17
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Detroit
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
By R.B. Fallstrom
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS — Carpets were still
drying out from a champagne bath
and a few players looked bleary eyed
after a workout at Busch Stadium. A
day after advancing, there wasn’t
much time to rest for the St. Louis
Cardinals.
“Obviously, it was a great celebra-
tion and a lot of fun,” reliever John
Axford said Thursday. “The club-
house guys, I don’t know if they
even went home.”
The Los Angeles Dodgers don’t
have home-field advantage in the NL
championship series, but they got a
few extra days to savor early postsea-
son success. Zack Greinke was get-
ting ready to go in Game 5, then
went on stand-by, and now he guards
against feeling too good in the open-
er Friday night.
“Once we won it, it was just kind of
make the best adjustments possi-
ble,” Greinke said. “I mean, there’s
not much you can really do.”
No telling which side will benefit ,
the team on a roll or the team coming
off a break. Joe Kelly, who flourished
as a replacement starter with St.
Louis and gets the call for Game 1,
was elevated to the fifth starting spot
and then waited almost two weeks
before actually getting on the
mound.
“You could be laid off for eight
days and come out and play absolute-
ly the best baseball you’ve ever
done,” Kelly said. “You could come
out and play the next day and not
have a good game. This is all about
execution.”
As a youth, Kelly was a budding
skateboard star with a sponsor. Like
other Cardinals youngsters, he’s
seemed oblivious to the pressure.
“It’s Game 1 of the NLCS, but me
being me, I’m going to go out there
and just pitch like it’s another
game,” he said.
The staff aces won’t go until later
in the best-of-seven series, with the
Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw set for
Game 2 and the Cardinals’ Adam
Wainwright ready for Game 3.
Rookie Michael Wacha, who has
flirted with a no-hitter his last two
starts, goes in Game 2 for St. Louis.
Dodgers manager Don Mattingly
said he’d probably announce the rest
of the starting assignments on game
day.
The series matches a largely home-
grown team seeking its second World
Series appearance in three years
against one that’s been among the
biggest spenders trying to get there
for the first time in a quarter-century.
The Dodgers spent well over $200
million to put together their team.
Game 1 pitchers set for NLCS
Girls’ tennis
Hillsdale improved to 9-0 with a
5-2 win over Burlingame.
The No. 2 doubles team of
Hannah Bodin and Anne Okada
gave the Knights a rare doubles
win, needing three sets to beat
Burlingame’s Sara Arfania and
Marie Blukher, 6-3, 3-6, (13-11).
All four Hillsdale singles play-
ers continued their undefeated run
in Peninsula Athletic League play
as all four swept their opponents.
Water polo
The Carlmont boys’ team held
off Sequoia 11-8 Wednesday after-
noon to move into a third-place
tie with the Cherokees in the PAL
Bay Division standings.
After finishing the first half tied
at four, Carlmont (3-3 Bay
Division) outscored Sequoia 6-3 in
the third period.
Nico Kapamatzin and Dante
Amigone paced the Scots with
three goals apiece, while Elias
Sebti and Michael Scallen each
scored a pair. Sequoia was led by
George Archibold, who finished
with five goals.
In other boys’ action, Sacred
Heart Prep stayed perfect in WCAL
play with a 16-7 win over Mitty.
On the girls’ side, Carlmont also
got by Sequoia, beating the
Cherokees 8-6.
Sacred Heart Prep improved to 3-
0 in West Catholic Athletic League
play with a n 11-5 win over Mitty
Wednesday. The Gators scored four
goals in both the first and second
periods to lead 8-3 at halftime.
Girls’ golf
Sacred Heart Prep held off rival
Menlo School 226-239 at Palo
Alto Golf and Country Club
Wednesday afternoon.
Menlo’s Jessie Rong took low-
medalist honors with a 2-over 37.
Sacred Heart Prep’s Jessica Keonig
was right behind her with a 38.
The difference in the match was
SHP (6-1-1 WBAL) had five
golfers shoot rounds under 50.
Menlo (3-4), on the other hand,
had only a pair of golfers accom-
plish that feat.
Lauren von Thaden and Isabelle
Chun each shot a 46 for the
Gators, while Maddy Ellison and
Sinead Haley both had 48s for
SHP.
Lauren Yang’s 45 was Menlo’s
only other golfer under 50.
College water polo
The College of San Mateo
kicked off Coast Conference play
Wednesday with a huge 8-5 win
over Merced, the first time the
Bulldogs have ever beaten the
Northern California power.
Jasmine Zaldivar scored four
times for CSM, which evened its
overall record at 6-6 with the vic-
tory. Shelby Chung scored a pair,
while Erica Staben and Sinclaire
Cheong scored a goal apiece for
the Bulldogs.
College volleyball
Cañada continues to play well
under first-year coach Alicia
Karver, improving to 3-2 on the
season following a 24-26, 25-18,
25-18, 25-19 win over Chabot
Wednesday.
Michaella Pietrobono led the
Colts with 10 kills, while Tiyanna
Villareal added eight. Ariel
Mangum finished with 38 assists.
College football
The College of San Mateo had
three players named to the ESPN
Junior College Watch List that was
released Thursday: Dominick
Jackson (so., OL, Alabama com-
mit), Rika Levi (so., DL, undecid-
ed) and Joseph Turner (so., DB,
Washington State commit).
Local sports roundup
By Andrew Barker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Robert
Rodriguez’s “Machete Kills” is a
sequel based on an end-credits joke
from a film that was itself based on
a joke trailer contained within a
half-joke grindhouse homage.
Exactly how many degrees such an
endeavor is removed from anything
resembling serious cinema would
require Jean Baudrillard to calcu-
late, yet for more immediate film-
going purposes, all there is to see
here is a surprisingly long-lived
gag finally running out of gas. As
violent as its predecessor yet
noticeably duller and less outra-
geous, “Machete Kills” is dragged
to the finish line entirely by its
director’s madcap energy and an
absurd cast of major stars in strange
cameos.
Since emerging as a DIY hero in
the 1990s, Rodriguez has always
been an inherently likable figure on
the indie scene. At his best, he can
tap into the most delightfully stupid
adolescent fantasies and infuse
them with a sort of earnestness that
almost verges on sweetness — for
example, casting Rose McGowan
as a stripper with an M4 carbine for
a leg in “Planet Terror.” At his
worst, however, Rodriguez’s fan-
tasies seem taken straight from the
kind of adolescent who spends an
inordinate amount of time with the
school psychologist — for exam-
ple, casting Sofia Vergara as a
bloodthirsty madam who once ate
her father’s genitals and strides into
battle with a machine-gun bra and
strap-on dildo shotgun that fires
when she thrusts her hips. Here
serving as a characteristic one-man
‘Machete’ is a joke
See MACHETE, Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
William Shakespeare’s “The Winter’s
Tale” is a story of miraculous reunion and
redemption after a long period of atone-
ment.
People who aren’t familiar with the play
would scarcely discern that theme in
California Shakespeare Theater’s produc-
tion, called “A Winter’s Tale.” Director
Patricia McGregor conceives the play as
presented by a traveling troupe with a small
group of players.
Therefore, everyone plays multiple roles.
That’s not unusual in contemporary
Shakespearean productions, but it presents
a serious problem here.
L. Peter Callender is first seen as Leontes,
king of Sicily. He later is seen as a
Bohemian shepherd who, in the play’s cli-
max, travels to Sicily to reveal crucial infor-
mation.
However, since he can’t be two characters
at once, this production cuts this scene,
instead glossing over it with a hasty,
almost incomprehensible narrative. Hence,
the power and emotion of the final scenes
are diluted.
In another misstep, an audience member is
asked to play Time, who opens the second
act and explains what has happened during
the 16 years between the opening scenes in
Sicily and the following scenes in
Bohemia. This narrative would be better
delivered by an actor.
The director also has Autolycus, the rogu-
ish cutpurse played by Christopher Michael
Rivera, grabbing too often at his crotch a la
Michael Jackson.
The story focuses on Leontes and his
pregnant wife, Hermione (Omozé
Idehenre), who have been hosting the
king’s longtime friend, Polixenes (Aldo
Billingslea), king of Bohemia. Eager to
return home, Polixenes spurns Leontes’
invitation to stay longer, but acquiesces
when Hermione asks him.
Their conversation ignites an insane jeal-
ousy in Leontes, who accuses his wife of
adultery, has her arrested and rejects their
young son. After she gives birth to a daugh-
ter, he orders a courtier to abandon the baby
in some forlorn place. When he is told that
both his wife and son have died, he suddenly
relents and begins a long period of regret
and mourning.
In the meantime, the shepherd finds the
baby and raises her as his daughter, Perdita
(Tristan Cunningham). When she turns 16,
she’s being wooed by Florizel (Tyee
Tilghman), son of Polixenes.
When Polixenes learns of their courtship,
he cruelly orders his son to give her up or be
disowned. As was the case with Leontes 16
years earlier, Polixenes’ reaction is too
extreme.
However, thanks to the shepherd, who
knows that Perdita is a princess, she has a
joyful meeting with her father, and Florizel
is reconciled with his father.
Then the real miracle occurs. Paulina
(Margo Hall), a lady in waiting, brings out a
lifelike statue of Hermione, who comes to
life before everyone. This production omits
some lines that reveal what happened to her
during the 16 years.
Although most of the principals do well,
Callender is outstanding as his Leontes
descends into irrational jealousy. On the
other hand, Idehenre sometimes speaks so
fast that her Hermione is difficult to under-
stand. Similar problems occur sporadically
with other characters.
Cal Shakes has been trying to reach out to
more diverse audiences, as evidenced by this
production, but in this case with this direc-
tor, the Bard is not well served.
This production will continue through
Oct. 20 at the Bruns Memorial
Amphitheater, 100 California Shakespeare
Theater Way (off Highway 24), Orinda. For
tickets and information call (510) 548-
9666 or visit www.calshakes.org.
Shakespeare gets cold shoulder in ‘Winter’s Tale’
KEVIN BERNE
Omozé idehenre
as Hermione,
Margo Hall as
Paulina, and L.
Peter Callender
as Leontes in Cal
Shakes’‘A
Winter’s’Tale by
William
Shakespeare,
directed by
Patricia
McGregor.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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crew, Rodriguez leans heavily toward the
latter mode.
Reprising his unexpectedly career-defin-
ing role as the monosyllabic, mononymic
Machete, Danny Trejo once again proves to
be a master of granite-faced deadpan.
Machete’s character motivations have hard-
ly developed beyond getting the girl and
killing the bad guys, yet he suffers a tragedy
in the film’s opening reel and is offered
something of a chance at redemption, as
well as American citizenship, from the pres-
ident of the United States (Charlie Sheen,
here credited under his birth name, Carlos
Estevez) in exchange for his services.
Crazed Mexican revolutionary Marcos
Mendoza (Demian Bichir) plans to fire a
nuclear missile at Washington, and Machete
is tasked with stopping him, placed under
the care of a handler (Amber Heard) hiding
in plain sight as Miss San Antonio.
“You know Mexico. Hell, you are
Mexico,” the president tells Machete, a line
that would surely spark a cross-border war
were it spoken by a real-life U.S. leader.
Machete proceeds to effortlessly infiltrate
Mendoza’s Acapulco compound, where he
discovers that not only does the onetime
drug lord suffer from multiple personalities,
he also has the missile launch device
implanted in his heart. Thus Machete must
fight his way back across the border with
Mendoza as his captive to find the bomb’s
American creator, the Bond-villainous
weapons dealer Luther Voz (Mel Gibson).
While the first “Machete” was a far more
complete film than this, it ran into trouble
whenever it became convinced it had actual
satirical points about race and immigration
to make; marrying slapstick cartoon ultra-
violence with, say, the genuinely upsetting
sight of a pregnant migrant being gunned
down requires a complexity of wit that
Rodriguez has never remotely exhibited.
“Machete Kills” aims for nothing more
complex than sheer sanguinary lunacy,
though it nonetheless contains far fewer
original ideas: Heads are heedlessly lopped
off, intestines are once again used as rope,
the phrase “Machete don’t . “ is repeated
three times, and a sex scene between Trejo
and Heard ends with a meta-gag cribbed
straight from Quentin Tarantino’s half of
“Grindhouse.”
The film draws most of its charm from the
obvious fun its supporting cast appears to
have had on set, and Rodriguez has little
trouble holding audience interest when he
can simply introduce a new outrageous char-
acter every five minutes or so. Michelle
Rodriguez and Jessica Alba reprise their
roles from the original; Walt Goggins, Cuba
Gooding Jr., Antonio Banderas and Lady
Gaga all make good with their respective
turns as assassins; and “Spy Kids” alumna
Alexa Vega finally completes her maturation
from child star to ludicrously pneumatic
sexpot.
Yet the spotlight remains trained on the
film’s pair of troubled middle-aged thesps,
grasping the career-rehab lifeline that
Rodriguez extended to Lindsay Lohan the
last time out. Sheen gets a chance to yet
again have fun with his sullied reputation —
his POTUS pounds tequila in the Oval
Office, lights his cigarettes with a butane
torch and receives red-telephone calls in the
midst of a menage a quatre — while Gibson
does another round of penance as a wild-
eyed religious fundamentalist.
“Machete Kills,” an Open Road release, is
rated R by the Motion Picture Association
of America for “strong bloody violence
throughout, language and some sexual con-
tent.” Running time: 107 minutes.
Continued from page 18
MACHETE
Local 1555. “We’ve done everything we
can.”
BART’s chief negotiator, Thomas Hock,
said he would not be the one to walk out of
the late-night negotiations with the ATU
and the Service Employees International
Union Local 1021.
“If we keep meeting, something’s going
to happen,” Hock said.
An estimated 400,000 rail commuters
would be stranded by a work stoppage on
BART, which links far-flung suburbs to big-
ger Bay Area cities and provides a crucial
link under the Bay between San Francisco
and Oakland.
In July, BART workers struck for 4 1/2
days, leading to jammed bridges and road-
ways, and crowded buses throughout the Bay
Area before Gov. Jerry Brown mandated the
cooling-off period.
Earlier in the week, union leaders thought
they had a deal with BART management but
said the proposal presented late Tuesday was
rescinded.
“We thought we were really close and they
totally yanked it off the table,” ATU
President Antonette Bryant said. “We gave
them a counteroffer, and the next day they
said, ‘Oh, you misunderstood what we pro-
posed.’ We said, ‘No we didn’t.”’
Hock said BARTnever made a formal offer
and blamed a mediator for the confusion.
“The mediator misunderstood and mis-
communicated what had been talked about
because we had never put that offer out there
in any way, shape or form,” Hock said.
The two sides have reached agreement on
pension contributions but are still at odds
over compensation, health care and safety.
The unions want a raise of nearly 12 per-
cent over three years while BART has pro-
posed a 10 percent increase over four years.
BARTsaid workers from the two unions now
average about $71,000 in base salary and
$11,000 in overtime annually. The workers
pay a flat $92 monthly fee for health insur-
ance.
State transportation officials released a
statement late Thursday saying they’ll
expand the hours of high-occupancy vehi-
cle lanes and make similar moves Monday
should a strike come, and BART manage-
ment said they would offer limited free char-
ter bus service across the Bay Bridge.
Continued from page 1
BART
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STOCKHOLM — If there were a literary
award bigger than the Nobel Prize, Alice
Munro would probably win that, too.
“Among writers, her name is spoken in
hushed tones,” fellow Canadian author
Margaret Atwood once wrote. “She’s the kind
of writer about whom it is often said — no
matter how well known she becomes — that
she ought to be better known.”
Munro, 82, was awarded literature’s high-
est honor Thursday, saluted by the Nobel
committee as a thorough but forgiving
chronicler of the human spirit, and her selec-
tion marks a number of breakthroughs.
She is the first winner of the $1.2 million
prize to be fully identified with Canada. Saul
Bellow won in 1976, but though he was born
in Canada, he moved to the U.S. as a boy and
is more closely associated with Chicago.
Munro is also the rare author to win for
short stories.
“When I began writing
there was a very small
community of Canadian
writers and little atten-
tion was paid by the
world. Now Canadian
writers are read, admired
and respected around the
globe,” Munro said in a
statement issued by her
publisher, Alfred A.
Knopf. She said she
hopes the Nobel “fosters further interest in
all Canadian writers” and “brings further
recognition to the short story form.”
Her books having sold more than 1 mil-
lion copies in the U.S. alone, she has long
been an international ambassador for the
short story, proof that the narrative arc and
depth of characterization expected from a
novel can be realized in just 30 to 40 pages.
Critics and peers have praised her in every
way a writer can be praised: the precision of
her language; the perfection of detail; the
surprise and logic of her storytelling; the
graceful, seamless shifts of moods; the inti-
macy with every shade of human behavior.
Her stories are usually set in Ontario, her
home province. Among her best-known is
“The Bear Came Over the Mountain,” about a
woman who begins losing her memory and
agrees with her husband that she should be
put in a nursing home. Canadian actress-
director Sarah Polley adapted the story into
the 2006 film “Away from Her,” starring Julie
Christie.
The narrative begins in a relatively tender,
traditional mood. But we soon learn that the
husband has been unfaithful in the past and
didn’t always regret it — “What he felt was
mainly a gigantic increase in well-being.”
The wife, meanwhile, has fallen for a man at
the nursing home.
In the story “Dimensions,” Munro intro-
duces a chambermaid named Doree, who
needs to take three buses for a visit to a
“facility” outside Clinton, Ontario. Munro
explains that Doree is happy in her work,
that she has been told she is “young and
decent looking” and that her picture was
once in the newspaper, in the days when her
spiked blonde hair was wavy and brown.
“Dimensions” begins in close-up, then
steadily pulls back. With every page, the
story darkens, and terrifies. The “facility” is
an institution where Doree’s husband is held.
Doree’s picture was in the paper because her
husband murdered their children.
“In all the time since what had happened,
any thought of the children had been some-
thing to get rid of, pull out immediately like
a knife in the throat,” Munro writes.
Munro won a National Book Critics Circle
prize in 1998 for “The Love of a Good
Woman” and was a finalist in 2001 for
“Hateship, Friendship, Courtship,
Loveship, Marriage.” She is also a three-
time winner of the Governor General’s prize,
Canada’s highest literary honor.
Canada’s Alice Munro wins Nobel literature prize
Alice Munro
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
THE PENINSULA MUSEUM OF ART IN
BURLINGAME HOLDS OPENING RECEPTION
FOR TILT-A-WORLD: SCULPTURE BY SUSAN
ELSE, AND JOE PRICE PART TWO. The Peninsula
Museum of Art invites the public to take part in the open-
ing reception for two new exhibits: Tilt-A-World:
Sculpture by Susan Else and Joe Price Part Two. The recep-
tion begins at 1 p.m. Sun. Oct. 20.
TILT-A-WORLD: SCULPTURE BY SUSAN ELSE.
Susan Else creates structures, then covers them complete-
ly with painted and printed fabric, using collage and quilt-
ing technology. Some – like the “Ferris Wheel” and
“Carousel,” are even motorized. Else said, “I treat cloth
not as a flat surface but as a wild flexible skin for three-
dimensional objects. I like to make work that combines
contradictory ideas and images; life is always a compli-
cated stew of positive, negative, and shades of grey – all
at once – and I want my works to reflect that complexity
and ambiguity. My work has developed in tandem with the
art quilt movement, but I am one of the few artists explor-
ing the sculptural — as opposed to painterly — qualities
of the quilt medium. Making sculpture from fabric pres-
ents unique challenges and creative possibilities — and
makes me approach sculptural problems with a unique
slant.”
JOE PRICE PART TWO. Earlier this year the
Peninsula Museum of Art exhibited Part One: The
Legendary Joe Price, an exhibition of Price’s serigraphs,
as part of PMA’s inaugural show in its new Burlingame
location. Joe Price Part Two showcases more of Price’s
artworks, including one of Price’s most famous works,
“Secrets,” which required 106 screens (think individually
created stencils). Joe Price received his BS degree in
Theater Arts from Northwestern University in Illinois and
eventually moved to San Mateo where, while studying
drawing at the College of San Mateo, he became fascinat-
ed with serigraphy. Price then attended Stanford
University and graduated in 1970 with an MA in Graphic
Design, the first such degree awarded by Stanford. That
same year he joined the faculty of the College of San
Mateo, teaching drawing and printmaking, and remained
there as a full professor until his retirement 24 years later.
Price’s work has been included, by invitation, as a U.S.
printmaker in more than 15 international biennials, and
his record of more than 40 purchase prizes and awards
include The Louis Lozowick Memorial Award, Lessing J.
Rosenwald Prize, Kempshall Clark Award, and Paul
Lindsay Sample Memorial Award.
MUSEUM PARTICULARS. For more information
regarding Peninsula Museum of Art exhibits, classes and
events, visit www.peninsulamuseum.org or call 692-
2101. The Museum store carries artwork created by local
artists, including ceramics, glassware, mosaics,
oil paintings, and scarves of silk, chiffon and
wool. Tilt-A-World: Sculpture by Susan Else and
Joe Price Part Two run from Oct. 20 through Jan.
26, 2014. 1777 California Drive, Burlingame.
Admission is free.
***
THE SAN JOSE MUSEUM OF ART
EXPLORES THE ROLE OF DESIGN IN
EVERYDAY LIFE. The San Jose Museum of
Art explores the unrecognized “heroes” of
industrial design in Hidden Heroes: The Genius
of Everyday Things, telling the stories
behind 36 common objects that have become
tools of modern life. The featured “heroes”
include: ring binder, barcode, pencil, bubble
wrap, paper clip, snap fastener, egg box, pre-
serving jar, rubber band, light bulb, adhesive
tape, coat hanger, Velcro, tin can, corkscrew,
tissue, ballpoint pen, Lego, ear plug, Post-it
Note, zip, umbrella, six-pack carrier, safety
match, tea bag, milk carton and clothes peg.
These unsung examples of design brilliance are
extraordinarily functional and essentially unal-
tered after decades of use. The exhibition exam-
ines the inspiration and the inventors behind
these seemingly run-of-the-mill objects, whose
design, engineering and purpose are so well
matched that they have become part of the fab-
ric of our lives.
San Jose Museum of Art Executive
Director Susan Krane said, “Visitors
may be surprised to see an ordinary light
bulb, tea bag, or paper clip on display in
a museum. These uncelebrated heroes of
everyday life epitomize the spirit of
innovative problem-solving and the strik-
ing genius of great design. This exhibition
puts a spotlight on the real beauty, elegant
thinking, people and fun tales behind little
things we often take for granted. We are pleased to
bring this project to Silicon Valley audiences, who so
highly value the transformative power of innovation and
the surprising course of individual creativity. Hidden
Heroes is a wonderful look behind-the-scenes at the roots
of design thinking, before the digital age.”
The San Jose Museum of Art is located at 110 South
Market St. in downtown San Jose. For more information
call (408) 271-6840 or visit
www.SanJoseMuseumofArt.org. Hidden Heroes: The
Genius of Everyday Things is on view from Oct. 17 to
Feb. 2, 2014.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com or
www.twitter.com/susancityscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
Ferris Wheel by Susan
Else. On display as part
of Tilt-A-World:
Sculpture by Susan
Else, at The Peninsula
Museum of Art in
Burlingame from Oct.
20 through Jan. 26,
2014.
Steelhead
Oktoberfest
October 7–20, 2013
In addition to our dinner menu, we offer:
Grilled Bavarian Bratwurst
Served with housemade sauerkraut, German
potato salad and a woodfired brewers pretzel.
Jägerschnitzel
Fresh veal cutlets, lightly breaded and fried,
served with red potatoes, braised red cabbage
and a gewürtstraniner mushroom sauce.
Schweinshaxe
Beer braised pork shank, with whipped potatoes,
pork au jus and sautéed vegetables.
Sauerbraten
Slow roasted beef braised in wine sauce, served
with red cabbage and parsley red potatoes.
Dessert
Apple Streusel Cheesecake
Emil’s Octoberfest Marzen
A red-gold German lager with a smooth,
toasty malt finish.
Reservations accepted for parties of 8 or more.
333 California Ðr., ßurlingame º 650-344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
Assembly speaker
announces 2014 bid for controller
SACRAMENTO — Assembly Speaker John Perez has
announced that he is running for state controller next year.
The Los Angeles Democrat, who will
be termed out of office in 2014, said in a
statement issued this week that he wants
to help ensure continued improvement
with the state’s finances.
“California has made great strides in its
path to recovery, but our work is far from
complete,” he said.
Democrat John Chiang, the current
state controller, is termed out next year.
The office is in charge of dispersing state
money and helping administer two of the largest public
pension funds in the country.
Another Democrat, Board of Equalization member Betty
Yee, also has announced her candidacy for controller.
Perez starts the campaign with $1.5 million that he trans-
ferred from previous campaign accounts, said Doug Herman,
his political strategist.
Perez was first elected to the Assembly in 2008 and has
served as speaker since 2010, when he became the first
openly gay lawmaker to lead either house of the Legislature.
Jury: Toyota not liable for death of woman
LOS ANGELES — A jury found Thursday that Toyota
Motor Corp. is not liable for the death of a California
woman who was killed when her 2006 Camry apparently
accelerated and crashed despite her efforts to stop.
Jurors deliberated for about five days before reaching their
decision and concluding the vehicle’s design didn’t con-
tribute to the death of 66-year-old Noriko Uno, who died in
August 2009 when she was struck by another motorist,
sending her vehicle into a telephone pole and tree.
Uno’s family was seeking $20 million in damages, claim-
ing that the crash could have been avoided if Toyota had
installed a brake override system. The jury found the 86-
year-old motorist who ran a stop sign and hit Uno should
pay the family $10 million, plaintiffs’ attorney Garo
Mardirossian said.
Around the state
By Mark Lewis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STAVANGER, Norway — All we
know is this: a record 259 candidates,
including 50 organizations, have been
nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize
this year. With no clues from the
judges in Norway, speculation about
the front-runners for Friday’s
announcement is primarily based on
the committee’s previous choices and
current events. Here’s a look at some
of those getting the most attention:
MALALA YOUSAFZAI
The Pakistani girl who was shot in
the head by the Taliban last October
for advocating education for girls is
the bookmakers’ favorite to win the
Nobel Peace Prize this year. Since
recovering from her injuries, she has
toured the world, becoming a global
celebrity. Now 16, she would be the
youngest winner of any Nobel. On
Thursday, she won the Sakharov
Award, the European Parliament’s
50,000-euro ($65,000) human rights
award. Concerns that a Nobel Prize
might pile too much pressure on her
young shoulders were somewhat
assuaged by the mature speech she
gave to the U.N. this summer.
DR. DENIS MUKWEGE
The Congolese surgeon, a powerful
advocate for women, has treated thou-
sands of gang-raped women at the
Panzi Hospital he set up in Bukavu in
1999. Last year he lashed out at the
international community for its inac-
tion on his country’s vicious civil
war. The result: He is now hiding in
Europe following an assassination
attempt last October. Giving him the
Nobel could give world attention to
the conflict — but it might come too
soon after 2011, when two African
women and one Yemeni were honored
with the peace prize for their work for
women’s rights.
RUSSIAN ACTIVISTS
With the 2014 Sochi Winter
Olympics around the corner, the Nobel
committee could be tempted to shine
its spotlight on human rights
activists in Russia. Svetlana
Gannushkina and the Memorial rights
group she heads have been seen as top
candidates for several years. Another
potential candidate is Lyudmila
Alexeyeva, an 84-year-old former
Soviet dissident and a prominent crit-
ic of President Vladimir Putin’s
regime. The committee has broadened
its concept of peace work to include
things like human rights and climate
change, so it could also choose to
honor those fighting the anti-gay leg-
islation recently passed in Russia.
SISTER MAGGIE GOBRAN
The Egyptian computer scientist
chucked in her academic career to
become a Coptic Christian nun and
has been running the Stephen’s
Children charity since 1989. The
group reaches out across religious
boundaries to help the disenfranchised
in Cairo’s slums. With the Arab Spring
revolutions and politics in Egypt tak-
ing a more threatening turn, the com-
mittee might seek to reward someone
seen as untainted by sectarianism and
violence. Lawmakers in the U.S. and
Norway have nominated her.
CHELSEA MANNING
Army Pvt. Chelsea Manning, the
American soldier convicted of giving
classified documents to WikiLeaks in
one of the biggest intelligence leaks
in U.S. history, is considered an out-
sider for the award. She is serving 35-
year prison sentence for sending more
than 700,000 documents to the anti-
secrecy website. Awarding her the
prize would not go down well with the
U.S. government, but the fiercely
independent Norwegian Nobel
Committee is not afraid of riling pow-
erful nations. Its 2010 peace prize to
Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo deeply
angered the Chinese government. NSA
leaker Edward Snowden is also getting
attention in online betting, but that is
wasted money. The deadline for nomi-
nations was Feb. 1, months before he
became known.
Malala, Mukegwe, Manning in
Nobel Peace Prize speculation
John Perez
will sign off on the general fund appro-
priation at Monday night’s meeting.
Maltbie said the city will seek reim-
bursement from Pacific Gas and Electric
once the safety matters are settled.
Maltbie said the CPUC hasn’t given
a definitive timeline for its investiga-
tion but that, after PG&E submits
records as required by next Wednesday,
there will probably be more questions.
“It’s OK in this situation because the
longer Line 147 remains shut down,
the better. We want everybody to take
all the time necessary to know it is
safe,” Maltbie said.
The city-hired expert will also help
the city wade through the records and
process so officials don’t get weighed
down by all the data and technical jar-
gon, he said.
The city declared a state of emer-
gency Friday night after the city
learned of November 2012 emails by a
PG&E engineer questioning the safety
of 84-year-old gas transmission Line
147 which runs parallel to Brittan
Avenue. The former engineer suggested
the city could be “another San Bruno
situation” in reference to the Sept. 9,
2010 gas line explosion and fire that
killed eight, injured dozens and
destroyed 38 homes. The engineer also
questioned if hydrotesting in 2011
exacerbated cracking.
An amended report on the 3.8-mile
line provided to the CPUC showed it
tested to only 1.5 times the maximum
allowable operating pressure.
Judge George Miram imposed an
emergency injunction putting the line
out of service and the CPUC followed
suit. On Thursday, both PG&E and the
city stipulated to lifting the injunction
because the CPUC is the authoritative
jurisdiction.
Meanwhile, PG&E spokeswoman
Brittany Chord emphasized the line
was and is safe and that the company
continues to talk with the city and the
CPUC.
“We are very serious about being
good neighbors and are committed to
rebuilding the trust of our customers,”
Chord said. “We know we have a long
way to go.”
Chord said PG&E hopes to get the
line back in service sooner rather than
later to accommodate the cold winter
months but the priority is first demon-
strating its safety.
Maltbie said the city also has some
concerns about other lines in the city
like Line 101, which runs along
Highway 101 but “we don’t have the
smoking gun on that line.”
The San Carlos City Council meets 7
p.m. Monday, Oct. 14 at City Hall, 600
Elm St., San Carlos.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, OCT. 11
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club
presents: ‘Working on the Crystal
Springs/San Andreas
Transmission Upgrade Project,
Biologist Perspective.’ 7:30 a.m.
Crystal Springs Golf Course, 6650
Golf Course Drive, Burlingame.
Features guest speaker Jill Grant, a
senior biologist with BioMaAs. The
cost of attending is $15 and includes
breakfast. To RSVP call Jake at 515-
5891.
Java with Jerry. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Cafe
Zoe, 1929 Menalto Ave., Menlo Park.
Join Senator Jerry Hill for a cup of cof-
fee and conversation. Bring your ideas,
questions and concerns about leg-
islative issues affecting the
community. Senator Hill provides the
coffee at no taxpayer expense. No ap-
pointments necessary. For more
information call 212-3313.
Rendez Vous Idol. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El Camino
Real, San Mateo.
Zoppé Family Circus. 4 p.m. and 7
p.m. Red Morton Park, 1455 Madison
Ave., Redwood City. The seventh
generation of Zoppé Family Circus
will be in town from Oct. 11 to Oct.
20. Show times vary daily. Events are
wheelchair accessible and open to
the public, all ages. Adult tickets: $15
to $25; youth tickets: $10 to $15. For
show times and more information
go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events
/zoppe.html.
Burlingame Lions Club Bingo. 6
p.m. The Lions Hall, 990 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. $25. For more
information call 875-7569.
Girl Rising Movie Screening. 6:30
p.m. College of San Mateo, 1700 W
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Students
at Middle College at College of San
Mateo are looking to raise money for
micro loans to support women in
Guatemala. For more information
call (415) 786-3737.
The Magic Castle. 7 p.m. Coastal
Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main St.,
Half Moon Bay. Adults: $35, seniors
and students: $25, kids 5 to 12: $20.
For more information and to pur-
chase tickets call 569-3266 or go to
www.coastalrep.com.
Art Guild of Pacifica’s 55th Annual
Members Exhibition. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Sanchez Art Center, 1220-B
Linda Mar Blvd., Pacifica. Runs
through Nov. 17. For more informa-
tion go to artguildofpacifica.org.
Foster City Social Dance. 7:30 p.m.
to 11:30 p.m. Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
There will be various dance lessons
available. Caual dress is fine and no
partner is necessary. Admission
includes light snacks, beverages,
mixer dances, prize drawings, profes-
sional performances and more.
Tickets are $12. For more informa-
tion call 571-0836.
New adaptation of ‘Dracula’ at
Notre Dame de Namur University.
7:30 p.m. NDNU Theatre, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. The
Department of Theatre and Dance at
Notre Dame de Namur University
presents ‘Dracula,’ a new adaptation
of the 1897 novel by Bram Stoker.
Tickets are $10. To reserve tickets call
508-3456 or email
boxoffice@ndnu.edu.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Musical Arts Goes to the Movies.
7:30 p.m. Taube Center, NDNU cam-
pus, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
From ‘The Jazz Singer’ through the
Disney classics and ‘Les Miserables,’
this musical revue will showcase
some of the most famous songs
from the movies. Additional per-
formances on Oct. 11, 12, 18 and 19
at 7:30 p.m. and Oct 13 and 20 at 2
p.m. $25 for adults, $15 for stu-
dents/seniors. Purchase tickets at
brownpapertickets.com/event/4605
3.
‘Rich and Famous’ Opening Night
Gala. 8 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. The show
will run through Nov. 3. Tickets range
from $15 to $35. $10 rush tickets are
available on Thursdays and Fridays
after opening week. For more infor-
mation and to buy tickets visit
http://dragonproductions.net/activ-
ities/2013season/richandfamous.ht
ml.
SATURDAY, OCT. 12
Food Addicts in Recovery
Anonymous. 8 a.m. Central
Peninsula Church, 1005 Shell Blvd.,
Foster City. For more information call
619-3526.
Kaplan Test Prep free SAT practice
test. 9 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
Registration begins Sept. 23. For
more information call the Belmont
Library at 591-8286.
Get Movin’ for Bay Pointe Ballet. 9
a.m. to Noon. Ryder Park, 1801 J. Hart
Clinton Drive, San Mateo. $30 for
adults and $5 for children. For more
information call 954-6948.
October Native Plant Sale. 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. The Mission Blue Nursery,
3401 Bayshore Blvd., Brisbane. Buy
native California species for fall
planting. Please bring your own
carry out box. For more information
please contact San Bruno Mountain
Watch at sanbruno@mountain-
watch.org.
Friends of the Millbrae Library
Outdoor Bargain Book and Media
Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Millbrae
Library, 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. Many
great bargains for everyone. Special
‘bag of books’ deal from 2 p.m. to 3
p.m., one bag of books for $5. For
more information call 697-7607.
San Carlos Art and Wine Faire. 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown San
Carlos. Come and check out some of
the area’s finest wines, delectable
food and much more. Fair also fea-
tures artwork, live entertainment
and a car show. Continues on
Sunday, Oct. 13 from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. For more information contact
Marc Gendron at marcg@marcomm-
pr.com.
San Carlos/Redwood City AAUW
Monthly Meeting. 10:30 a.m.
Community Activities Building, 1400
Roosevelt Ave., Redwood City. John
Ragosta, a Program Manager for
CASA (Court Appointed Special
Advocates) will speak. Free. For more
information call 257-3639.
Native Americans return to the
Bay Area. Noon to 1 p.m. Farmers’
Market, Kelly Street, Half Moon Bay.
The Natives will chat with local farm-
ers and get tips on how to start a
community market in order to grow
foods for a healthy lifestyle. Part of a
visit in honor of the annual PATH-
STAR Alcatraz Swim Week.
Salsa Tasting. Noon to 3 p.m. Half
Moon Bay Library, 620 Correas St.,
Half Moon Bay. Sample from more
than 40 salsas from local restaurants.
Free. For more information email
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage
Lane, Twin Pines Park, Belmont.
Paperbacks are six for $1, trade
paperbacks are two for $1, hard-
backs are two for $2, children’s
books are 25 cents. All proceeds
benefit the Belmont Library. For
more information call 593-5650 or
go to www.thefobl.org.
Draeger’s Home Department:
Trunk show and Reception. Noon
to 4 p.m. 222 E. Fourth Ave., San
Mateo. Local artist, Emily Smith, will
be showing her original flag art. For
more information call 685-3797.
Zoppé Family Circus. Noon, 3 p.m.
and 7 p.m. Red Morton Park, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. The
seventh generation of Zoppé Family
Circus will be in town from Oct. 11 to
Oct. 20. Show times vary daily. Events
are wheelchair accessible and open
to the public, all ages. Adult tickets:
$15 to $25; youth tickets: $10 to $15.
For show times and more informa-
tion go to http://www.redwoodci-
ty.org/events/zoppe.html.
Speed Dating at the Rendez Vous
Cafe. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Rendez Vous
Cafe,106 S. El Camino Real, San
Mateo.
Quilt Show. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sanchez
Adobe, 1000 Linda Mar Blvd.,
Pacifica. An exhibition of traditional
and contemporary quilts will be on
display. There will also be bed turn-
ing event. Refreshments will be
served. Free. For more information
call 359-1462 or go to www.histo-
rysmc.org.
Tricycle Music Fest presents: Cat
Doorman. 2 p.m. Woodside Library,
3140 Woodside Road, Woodside.
Free, family music event to promote
literacy. For more information go to
www.smcl.org.
Family Science and Astronomy
Festival. 2 p.m. to 11 p.m. College of
San Mateo, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd.,
San Mateo. Free. For more informa-
tion go to smcas.com.
An Afternoon with Marcia
Goldman and Lola. 2 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Marcia Goldman and her
dog, Lola, will be visiting the
Belmont Library to share their new
book, ‘Lola Goes to Work: A Nine-to-
Five Therapy Dog.’ Ms. Goldman will
be signing books after the event.
Free. For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Oxford Street Brass. 3 p.m. First
Congregational Church of Palo Alto,
1985 Louis Road, Palo Alto. This ben-
efit concert will raise funds for the
new Performing Arts Center and
Mid-Peninsula High School. $50
(benefit). For more information visit
http://www.fccpa.org/FCCPA_Site/C
oncerts.html.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
ing all along that they [the district]
need to do an EIR because their traffic
study was completely inadequate,” she
said. “Hopefully they’ll look at the
project and come up with a different
plan.”
An EIR is required under the
California Environmental Quality Act
for at least traffic and parking impacts
on this proposed project, the ruling
stated.
Opening arguments in San Mateo
County Superior Court against the dis-
trict over traffic and parking concerns
surrounding the reopening of Hoover
Elementary School were heard July 29.
Growing enrollment in the
Burlingame Elementary School
District resulted in the purchase of the
previously-closed Hoover Elementary
School on Summit Drive in 2010.
Since then, the district has been work-
ing on plans to renovate the building
to meet current standards.
At the July hearing, the alliance’s
attorney Kevin Haroff said the district
failed to address traffic impacts in its
December 2012 mitigated negative
declaration study and review. He also
said the district committed a CEQA
violation by dismissing community
concerns about traffic. Haroff cited an
October 2012 letter from the town of
Hillsborough stating their concerns
about the rebuilding being ignored.
The current plan calls for two 8-foot-
wide curbside bays to be created for
pickup and dropoff along the west side
of Summit Drive adjacent to the school
providing enough curb space for 15
cars. In addition, the existing school
site curb would be shifted west to pro-
vide for the bays and two 10-foot-wide
vehicle travel lanes, which will
increase the width of Summit Drive to
17 feet in some areas.
Some residents who live near the
school felt the plan should be post-
poned to allow for more discussion and
possible changes to the traffic plan,
which led to the lawsuit filed in
January. The court denied the claim
that there was a violation of CEQAfor
not adequately responding to these
concerns.
Hoover was founded in 1931, closed
in 1979 and repurchased by the district
for $4.8 million in 2010. MacIsaac
estimated the costs for renovations
and new equipment will be about $13
million. Measure D, a $56 million
bond measure passed by voters in
November 2012 will cover most of the
costs.
The court will be issuing a subse-
quent proposed statement of decision.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
HOOVER
Continued from page 1
TEST
Hero City, or the Collective
Entrepreneurs Club as it was first
called, officially opened last night
with a street closure, live bands, free
food, superheroes wandering about and
Tim Draper, the venture capitalist
known as the Riskmaster.
Hero City will give entrepreneurs
access to exclusive events, speakers,
professional expertise and an incuba-
tor, plus fresh superhero talent from
Draper University, which has only
been open a little more than a year but
has had its students’ ideas already get
plenty of venture capital support.
Hero City will allow members to
test, launch and sell their ideas to the
world using its secret prototyping lab,
pop-up retail space, media studio and
amphitheater.
Draper was also one of the first to be
honored by the San Mateo Area
Chamber of Commerce last night for
his contributions to the city. The
chamber’s Economic Development
Growth Enterprise, or EDGE, presented
Draper, YouTube’s Chad Hurley and
Steve Chen, AdMob’s Omar Hamoui
and Comcast’s Marc Colombo with
plaques that resembled superhero
shields.
Draper, too, wore a superhero cos-
tume underneath his suit before accept-
ing the award and before three others in
superhero costumes rappelled down the
old Benjamin Franklin Hotel, the
home of Draper University.
Hero City will be a flexible co-work-
ing space that offers collaborative
peer-to-peer workspaces for entrepre-
neurs on daily, weekly, monthly and
annual membership terms.
Hero City will also feature retail
pop-up stores that can be rented on a
short-term basis and a large multi-pur-
pose event space that can be rented out
on evenings and weekends for events
such as art shows, jazz concerts, cor-
porate events and meetings when not
in use by staff or students.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
DRAPER
COMICS/GAMES
10-11-13
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Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


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numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

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called cages, must combine using the given operation
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top-left corners.

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the top-left corner.
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14 Playwright Levin
15 Store event
16 Big family
17 Wizard
19 Roman poet
20 Mil. branch
21 Synthetic fabric
23 Etc. relative (2 wds.)
26 Alleviated
28 — Paese cheese
29 Hwys.
30 Cravat
34 Mild, as weather
36 The lady
38 Actress Thurman
39 Bucket of song
41 It once was wild
42 Tigger’s creator
44 Publicity
46 Techie
47 Barely beats (2 wds.)
52 Lotion additive
53 — de plume
54 Mole, maybe
55 Duck’s haunt
56 Census info
57 Remove, as branches
58 “Have you — wool?”
59 Superman’s emblem
60 Yoko —
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2 Franc replacer
3 Petri dish contents
4 Thorny bunch
5 Worried
6 Strong wind
7 Car import
8 Unadorned
9 Transmit
12 Ancient plants
13 Reprimands
18 — -de-sac
22 Four seasons
23 Recede
24 Drink with scones
25 Each and every
27 Arthur of tennis
29 Pitcher Nolan —
31 Actor’s prompt
32 Mantra chants
33 Trim a doily
35 Gave shape to
37 Mysteries
40 Wails
41 Mo. fractions
42 Honeydew, e.g.
43 Wry humor
45 Bird homes
46 Vineyard valley
48 Be overfond
49 Norway’s capital
50 Atop
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Friday, OCtOBEr 11, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Keep your thoughts to
yourself and your emotions in check, but don’t let
anyone bully you either. Back away from controversy
and gravitate toward making a positive difference in
your community.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — New people, places
and pleasures are heading your direction. Explore
how different people live or what they can offer,
and you will discover unusual ways to enhance
your lifestyle.
sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Don’t let
emotions cloud your point of view regarding work
that has to be completed. You must finish one thing
before starting another. A personal problem is due
to dishonesty.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Keep heading
down a path you are familiar with, and you will reach
the destination of choice. You may be enticed by
detours, but they will only diminish your success.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Follow your
dreams and refuse to let anyone restrict your
attempt to achieve happiness. What you need may
differ from what others want for you, but in the end
it’s your choice.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) — Get all the facts
before you make a move. A relationship may not be
as it appears, but false accusations will not get you
any closer to the truth.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) — Gather your thoughts
and the information you need. You will make a wise
move if you are organized and prepared. Moderation
must be enforced, even if someone encourages you
to do or spend more.
taurus (April 20-May 20) — Do your due diligence,
and you won’t be disappointed with the results you
get. A serious and loyal partnership will improve a
journey you decide to take. Knowledge rules the day.
gEMini (May 21-June 20) — You may be up for a
disappointment or loss pertaining to your home or
assets. Re-evaluate an agreement you have with
someone and question the sincerity and integrity of
certain parties.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) — Plan to have some
fun today. Indulge in events that interest you. Share
your thoughts with unorthodox individuals willing to
contribute and help you put your plans into motion.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Take care of your
responsibilities early so you can enjoy what life has
to offer. Love and romance coupled with travel should
highlight your day.
VirgO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Socialize and take
part in community events that will familiarize you
with what’s out there. Don’t let a personal incident
confuse you. Make a decision based on facts.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training. 800-603-1072.
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
NOVELLES DEVELOPMENTAL SERV-
ICES Ogden Day Program is hiring direct
care staff to work with adults with physi-
cal and developmental disabilities. Mon-
Fri, day shift only. Interested applicants
should fax resume to 650.692.2412 or
complete an application, Mon-Fri, 9am-
3pm at 1814 Ogden Drive, Burlingame.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
Immediate openings for full time
Dietary Aide and part-time Cook.
Must be experienced with excellent
communication skills and ability to 4/2
schedule. Apply in person at
2140 Carlmont Dr., Belmont, CA
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
PERSONAL CARE Aides, retirement
community. Part time, understand, write
& speak English. Experience required
$10/hr. Apply 201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
GENERAL -
NOW HIRING!
Delivery carriers and Book baggers to
deliver the local telephone directory in
San Mateo North, Central and sur-
rounding towns. Must have own relia-
ble vehicle. $12-$14 per hour. Call 1-
855-557-1127 or (270)395-1127.
REPUTATION.COM HAS the following
job opportunity in Redwood City, CA: Sr.
Software Engineer [Req. #SE874]. Archi-
tect, design & develop SW for online rep-
utation mgmt. Mail resumes to 1001 Mar-
shall St, 2nd Fl, Attn: M. Densby, Red-
wood City, CA 94063. Principals only.
Must include Req # to be considered.
26 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
110 Employment
GOOD NITE INN – Redwood City
is hiring for the following positions:
Full-Time Room Attendants- Starting at
$8.45/hr., $8.70 after 90-days.
Full-time Guest Service Agents- Starting
at $9.50/hr., $9.75 after 90-days
Good Benefits and quarterly bonus plan.
Apply in person or online at:
www.goodnite.com (see careers)
Call: 650-365-5500
M/F/D/V & EOE
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOME INSPECTOR
Ladder, camera, tape measure, vehicle.
We have work for you. Full Training, Top
Pay & expenses, (650)372-2811
JANITOR/CARPET CLEANER,
retirement community. 32hrs/wk
& benefits. 3-11:30pm, read, write &
speak English. Experience preferred
$10-11/hr. Apply 201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae.
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, “Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
TECHNOLOGY
Oracle America, Inc. has openings for
the following positions (all levels/types) in
San Mateo County, including Redwood
Shores, CA; Alameda County, including
Pleasanton, CA; San Francisco, CA;
Santa Clara County, including Santa
Clara and San Jose, CA; and other loca-
tions in the San Francisco Bay Area. All
positions require travel to various unanti-
cipated sites throughout the U.S. Some
positions may allow for telecommuting.
Consultants: Analyze requirements and
deliver functional and technical solutions.
Implement products and technologies to
meet post-sale customer needs. Job
Code: CONS1013
Sales Consultants: Provide presales
technical/functional support to prospec-
tive customers. Design, validate and
present Oracle’s software solutions to in-
clude product concepts and future direc-
tion. Job Code: SC1013
Software Developers: Design, develop,
troubleshoot and/or test/QA software.
Job Code: SWD1013
Applications Developers: Analyze, de-
sign develop, troubleshoot and debug
software programs for commercial or end
user applications. Write code, complete
programming and perform testing and
debugging of applications. Job Code:
APD1013
Submit resume to
applicant_us@oracle.com. You must in-
clude the job code # on your
resume/cover letter. Oracle supports
workforce diversity.
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257617
The following person is doing business
as: Strassit, 150 Hanna Way, MENLO
PARK, CA 94025 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Tal Fogel, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Tal Fogel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13, 11/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257912
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Duane Street, 2) Duane Street
Property. 3) Duane Street Apartments,
800 S. B St., Ste. 100, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Ibrahim Matar, 110 Redwood
Dr. Hillsborough Dr., CA 94010 and Imad
Canavati 810 Kraken Ln., Redwood City,
CA 94065. The business is conducted by
Co-Partners. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Ibrahim Matar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523196
AMENDED ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Huei i Lin
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Huei i Lin filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: Huei i Lin, aka Stella Huei
i Lin
Proposed name: Stella Huei i Lin
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on December
10, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/10/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/10/2013
(Published, 10/11/13, 10/18/2013,
10/25/2013, 11/01/2013)
CASE# CIV 523462
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Mei Feng Zheng
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Mei Feng Zheng filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Rebecca Yen Chang
Proposed name: Rebecca Yen Pan
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 31,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/11/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2013
(Published, 09/20/13, 09/27/2013,
10/04/2013, 10/11/2013)
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523902
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Elizabeth Navarro
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Elizabeth Navarro filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Giovanni Paredres Nav-
arro
Proposed name: Giovanni Navarro
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
8, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/04/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/04/2013
(Published, 09/27/2013, 10/04/2013,
10/11/2013, 10/18/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257675
The following person is doing business
as: Rumeysa Jewelry & Carpet, 353 Roll-
ins Rd., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ismail Celik, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Ismail Celik /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257681
The following person is doing business
as: Longshore Resources, 321 N. San
Mateo Dr., #109, SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Blueprint Fit, LLC, CA. The
business is conducted by a Limited Lia-
bility Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Seoyoon Sandro Persing /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257697
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Salon One Seven Three, 61
37th Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Monica Richards and Eli Richardsm
27600 Dobbel Ave., Hayward CA 94542.
The business is conducted by a Married
Couple. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/18/2013.
/s/ Monica Richards /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257235
The following person is doing business
as: Job Well Done Janitorial, 1212 An-
napolis Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Tracy Donis, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Tracy Donis /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257607
The following person is doing business
as: Carlsen Porsche, 3636 Haven Ave.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Carl-
sen Motor Cars, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/08/2002.
/s/ Richard Pasquali /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/20/13, 09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257725
The following person is doing business
as: Whirling Wool & Alpaca, 20 JLB Rd.,
LA HONDA, CA 94020 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cynthia
Martin, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Cynthia Martin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257718
The following person is doing business
as: Realty One Group - Alliance, 1021 S.
El Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: ROG AllianceCorp., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Rosemarie Figueroa /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/27/13, 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257868
The following person is doing business
as: Sukhothai Wellness Center, 656 Wal-
nut St., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Poramat Rattanasungnern, 211 Elm St.
#104, San Mateo, CA 94401. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Poramat Rattanasungnern /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257625
The following person is doing business
as: Enhance Marketing San Mateo, 820
Cypress Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Valentino Agbulos, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Valentino Agbulos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257762
The following person is doing business
as: Serenity Wellness for Women, 412 E.
Ellsworth Ct., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Nancy Chiappe, 445 W. Ellesworth Ct.
San Mateo, CA 94401. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Nancy Chiappe /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257598
The following person is doing business
as: Bright, 644 Cedar St., #8, SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Mahyar Rouhani,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Mahyar Rouhani /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258001
The following person is doing business
as: The Patio Cafe, 601 Gateway Blvd.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Najat Wakeem Shehadeh, 50 Washing-
ton St., Santa Clara, CA 95050. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Najat Wakeem Shehadeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13, 11/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257597
The following person is doing business
as: MB Services 1200 E. Hillsdale Blvd.,
#123, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Marilou B. Brezinka same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Marilou B. Brezinka /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/17/13, 09/24/13, 10/01/13, 10/08/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257599
The following person is doing business
as: Estilos Rodriguez, 395 E. Okeefe St.,
Apt. 51, PALO ALTO, CA 94303 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Eri-
selda Rodriguez, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Eriselda Rodriguez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/12/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13, 11/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257967
The following person is doing business
as: Corner Bakery Cafe #101, 977 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City, CA 94404 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Buon Hospitality, Inc, CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Sam Hirbod /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13, 11/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257959
The following person is doing business
as: Epic Seafood, Inc., 279 Lawrence
Ave, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Epic Instruments, Inc, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
10/05/2013.
/s/ Jonathan Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/07/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13, 11/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257996
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Pediatric Dental Wellness
Group, 1291 East Hillsdale Blvd., Ste
100, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jona-
thon Everett Lee, DDS, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/15/2013.
/s/ Jonathon Everett Lee DDS /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13, 11/01/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258024
The following person is doing business
as: Buyer Exclusive Realty, 116 Francis-
can Dr., DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Karl
Francis Bertram, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/10/2013.
/s/ Karl Francis Bertram /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13, 11/01/13).
27 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257663
The following person is doing business
as: First Response Garage Doors, 436
Avalon Dr., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Sean Michael Sinclair,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/09/2013.
/s/ Sean Michael Sinclair /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13, 11/01/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, FOUND!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)315-5902
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
296 Appliances
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$70 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
300 Toys
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
SOLD!
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $50 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
304 Furniture
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
306 Housewares
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
MORTAR BOX Filled with new mansory
tools, $50 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
310 Misc. For Sale
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, SOLD!
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO SUNDIAL - vintage armillary iron
+ 18" rd, $60 request photos to
green4t@yahoo.com
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo
(650)345-3277
28 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Auto club offering
4 Gregory Peck role
8 Foster on a
screen
13 Stretches of
history
15 He actually
played the lyre
16 Amherst sch.
17 Two-time NBA
MVP Steve
18 Component of
ocean H2O
19 Lawn game
using lobbed
missiles
20 Buff ancient
ruler?
23 Attorney general
before
Thornburgh
24 Yank’s foe
25 Dudes
28 Own a few
James Brown
albums?
33 Fez, e.g.
36 Bankruptcy factor
37 Polynesian island
nation
38 “Break __!”
40 Fare named for
its shape
43 Fabric quantity
44 Mother of three
French kings
46 Shiny fabric
48 Arctic coast
explorer
49 Leaps over an
oily mud puddle?
53 DSL user’s need
54 Mao’s successor
55 Sticky-footed
lizard
59 Beef baloney?
64 Botanist’s
category
66 Dweeb
67 Size measure
68 Competitor’s
dream
69 A bit off the
ground, “up”
70 Sound like an
ass
71 Bobbin
72 Ketel One
competitor
73 NFL stats
DOWN
1 Common break
hr.
2 Speak
3 Refuse
4 “Pitch Perfect”
co-star Kendrick
5 Summer
phenomenon
6 Curved support
7 Short jacket
8 Concession
stand candy
9 Easternmost
Arabian
Peninsula
country
10 “Dr. Strangelove”
feature
11 Adherent’s suffix
12 Start to stop?
14 With 52-Down,
grilled fare
21 Take control
22 Bottom line?
26 __ Gay
27 Ray in the
ocean
29 Boxer’s
attendant
30 Fall back
31 It’s a wrap
32 “Terrif!”
33 Pilgrim to Mecca
34 Diamond clan
35 Trophy case
memento
39 Econ. measure
41 Bug
42 Earthbound bird
45 Crewman for 4-
Across
47 Tech sch. grad
50 Slow boat
51 Hangs around
the house?
52 See 14-Down
56 Pungent Thai
dish
57 Play with, as clay
58 Gives the go-
ahead
60 First name in folk
61 Cause wrinkles,
in a way
62 Joel of “Wicked”
63 Water whirled
64 Some mil. bases
65 Edge
By Marti DuGuay-Carpenter and Jerome Gunderson
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/11/13
10/11/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. (650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-5902
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
310 Misc. For Sale
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 SOLD!
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
316 Clothes
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
316 Clothes
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE
SALE
October
11, 12,
10am - 6pm
521 E. Capistrano Way
San Mateo, 94402
Bassette china cabinet,
dining table with chairs
Antique couch & chairs
Kitchen, household,
sewing items, hook rugs
Vintage modern round
rosewood table with
swivel chairs
BARGAINS GALORE!!!!
GARAGE
SALE
Saturday
October 12
590 Terrace Ave.,
HMB
Washer, gas grill, bookshelves,
HALLOWEEN COSTUMES
(for small girls thru big women),
computer, photography and
camping equipment; fixtures, art
books and MORE!
MOVING
SALE:
Indoor and outdoor
furniture, rugs, art,
housewares, and plants.
Higher quality.
Saturday October 12,
9am-3pm
1626 Albemarle Way
(at Ray Drive)
Burlingame
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. (650)345-
2450.
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
29 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 96k, great con-
dition, $7500, obo, (650)692-4725.
Leave Message
620 Automobiles
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in today’s paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
14' BASS Boat no motor with trailer $99
(650)851-0878
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, SOLD!
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
670 Auto Parts
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
SPI CONSTRUCTION INC
• Remodels • New Additions
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
For all your construction needs
(650)208-8855
Lic. #812356
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
• Chain Link
• Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
30 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gutters
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
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Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
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Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
Painting
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Services include:
Gutter Cleaning, Air duct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off any one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
Food
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
Health & Medical
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
WORLD 31
Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
By Hamza Hendawi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Washington’s decision to with-
hold millions of dollars in mostly military
aid to Egypt is fueling anti-U.S. sentiment
and the perception that Washington supports
Mohammed Morsi, the Islamist president the
military ousted in a July coup.
That could boost the popularity of the mil-
itary chief, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi,
whom the U.S. is trying to pressure to
ensure a transition to democracy and ease
the fierce crackdown on Morsi’s Muslim
Brotherhood.
The aid freeze could also embolden Morsi’s
supporters to intensify their campaign of
street protests in the belief that the military-
backed government is losing the goodwill of
its top foreign backer. The protests, met by a
fierce response by security forces that has
left hundreds dead, have kept the new gov-
ernment from tackling Egypt’s pressing
problems after 2 1/2 years of turmoil.
Still, Egypt’s military-backed government
is unlikely to abandon the road map it
announced when Morsi was removed in a
July 3 coup — to amend the nation’s
Islamist-tilted constitution and put the
changes to a nationwide vote before the end
of the year, and hold parliamentary and pres-
idential ballots in early 2014.
“Egypt is not so desperate that it needs to
compromise on its political agenda,” the
U.S.-based global intelligence firm, Stratfor,
wrote this week.
“The United States will be the one to even-
tually readjust to the old reality of backing
unpopular regimes that can preserve U.S.
influence in the Nile River Valley.”
Warnings that Washington might cut off
aid were met with a defiant response in the
Egyptian media.
“Let American aid go to hell,” screamed the
banner headline of Thursday’s edition of Al-
Tahrir, an independent daily that is a sworn
critic of the Brotherhood and the United
States.
Egyptian newspapers and television have
for weeks taken a deeply hostile line toward
the United States, portraying Washington as
unhappy to see Morsi and his Muslim
Brotherhood lose power and lambasting it
for allegedly meddling in Cairo’s affairs.
The U.S. announced it was freezing hun-
dreds of millions of dollars in aid, most of it
meant for the armed forces, as a show of dis-
pleasure over Morsi’s ouster and the subse-
quent crackdown on his Muslim Brotherhood
and other Islamist allies. Washington said
the aid would be restored if “credible
progress” was made toward setting up an
inclusive, democratically elected govern-
ment.
In its announcement Wednesday, the U.S.
State Department did not provide a dollar
amount of what was being withheld, most of
it linked to military aid, but officials in
Washington said it included 10 Apache heli-
copters at a cost of more than $500 million,
M1A1 tank kits and Harpoon anti-ship mis-
siles.
Freeze of aid whips up anti-U.S. sentiment in Egypt
REUTERS
A riot police officer, on a armored personnel carrier surrounded by anti-Morsi protesters
(foreground), fires rubber bullets at members of the Muslim Brotherhood and supporters of
ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi along a road at Ramsis square.
Google: EU privacy
spat will ‘play itself out’
ATHENS, Greece — Eric Schmidt,
Google’s executive chairman, said Thursday
that he respects but disagrees with com-
plaints about his company’s privacy poli-
cies made by data protection authorities in
six European countries.
Schmidt said the Internet search and ad
giant has “very broadly communicated” its
policies to authorities in the countries
where the complaints have been made.
Data watchdogs in France, Britain,
Germany, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands
have said Google needs to provide addition-
al guarantees to comply with national pri-
vacy protection rules in each of those coun-
tries.
Schmidt made his comments in Athens
while attending a technology event there,
and after meeting with Greek Prime Minister
Antonis Samaras.
“I have reviewed this. I just don’t agree
with the (data protection authorities) that
are making this complaint ... With respect I
just disagree and we just disagree, and we’ll
let it play itself out,” Schmidt said.
“It seems to me that we have said very
clearly what we do with the information,
and ... that we have to be respectful of peo-
ple’s privacy. And if we were to be disre-
spectful of your privacy, you’d go some-
where else or you wouldn’t use us.”
Libyan prime minister
briefly abducted by militias
TRIPOLI, Libya — The abduction was
brief but still audacious: Gunmen from
one of Libya’s many militias stormed a
hotel where the prime minister has a resi-
dence and held him for several hours
Thursday — apparently in retaliation for
his government’s alleged collusion with
the U.S. in a raid last weekend that cap-
tured an al-Qaida suspect.
The brazen seizure of Prime Minister Ali
Zidan heightened the alarm over the power
of unruly militias that virtually hold the
weak central government hostage. Many of
the militias include Islamic militants and
have ideologies similar to al-Qaida’s. The
armed bands regularly use violence to intim-
idate officials to sway policies, gunning
down security officials and kidnapping their
relatives.
At the same time, the state relies on mili-
tias to act as security forces, since the
police and military remain in disarray after
dictator Moammar Gadhafi was overthrown
and killed in 2011.
Around the world
32 Friday • Oct. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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