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Seabed Prehistory: Area 240 - Exhibition

Seabed Prehistory: Area 240 - Exhibition

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Published by Wessex Archaeology
Wessex Archaeology has just begun a large scale investigation into an area of seabed which lies 13km east of Great Yarmouth. This area, known as Area 240, is targeted by aggregate dredgers collecting sands and gravel for use in construction projects in the UK and on the continent.

In February 2008 75 flint tools and the remains of mammoth, bison, deer and rhino were dredged from this area. The tools are thought to date to around 100,000 years ago - before the last ice age. Prior to this discovery many experts believed that deposits of this date had been destroyed or disturbed by glaciation. These discoveries demonstrate that in some areas at least, they were not, making this one of the most significant Palaeolithic discoveries ever to come from the North Sea.
Wessex Archaeology has just begun a large scale investigation into an area of seabed which lies 13km east of Great Yarmouth. This area, known as Area 240, is targeted by aggregate dredgers collecting sands and gravel for use in construction projects in the UK and on the continent.

In February 2008 75 flint tools and the remains of mammoth, bison, deer and rhino were dredged from this area. The tools are thought to date to around 100,000 years ago - before the last ice age. Prior to this discovery many experts believed that deposits of this date had been destroyed or disturbed by glaciation. These discoveries demonstrate that in some areas at least, they were not, making this one of the most significant Palaeolithic discoveries ever to come from the North Sea.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Wessex Archaeology on Jul 22, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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12/27/2013

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Area 240

...one of the most significant Palaeolithic discoveries
Wessex Archaeology has just begun a large scale investigation into an area of seabed which lies 13km east of Great Yarmouth. This area, known as Area 240, is targeted by aggregate dredgers collecting sands and gravel for use in construction projects in the UK and on the continent. In February 2008 75 flint tools and the remains of mammoth, bison, deer and rhino were dredged from this area. The tools are thought to date to around 100,000 years ago - before the last ice age. Prior to this discovery many experts believed that deposits of this date had been destroyed or disturbed by glaciation. These discoveries demonstrate that in some areas at least, they were not, making this one of the most significant Palaeolithic discoveries ever to come from the North Sea. ICE LAND
Area 240
Wessex Archaeology
This project is funded through the Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund

British archaeological award 2008

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

Area 240
...crucial to our future ability to identify and protect
Over the next two years Wessex Archaeology will be conducting intensive studies into Area 240. This involves mapping the seabed and the layers beneath it with geophysical equipment, studying submerged deposits using geoarchaeological techniques and investigating samples of the seabed for artefacts. The aim of the project is to determine which methods are most effective for this type of investigation. This research is crucial to our future ability to identify and protect our most ancient heritage. It also gives us the opportunity to explore the background of the enigmatic remains retrieved from Area 240.

Boomer data

Parametric Sonar data

Pinger data

Holocene sandwaves and sandripples on seabed
Position of parametric sonar and pinger example

Holocene sandwaves and sandripples on seabed

Sandwaves and sandripples on seabed

Shallow channels at or near the surface

Shallow channels below Holocene Sediments

Sub-bottom not resolved due to diffraction on sand ripples and very hard sediments

Yarmouth Roads Formation overlain by Holocene Sediments

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

Westkapelle Ground Formation

8m

8m

Wessex Archaeology

500 m

250 m

250 m

8m

Area 240
...one of the biggest groups of marine archaeologists
Wessex Archaeology's coastal and marine team is one of the biggest groups of marine archaeologists working anywhere in Europe. The team consists of a core of specialist staff trained in all aspects of marine and coastal archaeology. This includes commercial divers, geoarchaeologists, marine geophysicists and coastal and marine archaeologists. We also have strong links with other organisations working in the marine environment which has allowed us to investigate how archaeology interacts with geology, geography and ecology. The project is supported by Wessex Archaeology's marine and coastal outreach project Time Travelling by Water. For more information search for 'Time Travelling by Water' on the web.

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

Area 240

Design by K.Nichols Wessex Archaeology

Area 240

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