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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 49
BUDGET BATTLE
NATION PAGE 7
NEW TAHOE
BEAR TACTICS
STATE PAGE 5
49ERS CRUSH
THE CARDS
SPORTS PAGE 11
GOP DEMS HIT IMPASSE OVER
SPENDING
Stubborn Fat?
Dr. Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Dr. Carie Chui, M.D.
ALLURA SKIN & LASER CENTER
280 Baldwin Ave. Downtown San Mateo
(650)344-1121
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — With a
midnight strike deadline
approaching, the Bay Area Rapid
Transit’s two largest unions
announced they won’t walk off the
job late Sunday to allow one more
day of contract negotiations.
“We are not going to go on
strike because the public deserves
to have a riding system that
works. We will give the (transit
agency) one more day to get it
together,” said Antonette Bryant,
leader of Amalgamated Transit
Union Local 1555, one of the two
unions in talks with BART.
BART officials said they pre-
sented the last best offer Sunday
afternoon, and that the unions
have two weeks to consider it
before it’s taken off the table.
The unions said workers will
walk off the job at midnight
Monday if an offer isn’t reached
by then.
BARTworkers went on strike for
nearly five days in July and were
set to do so again Friday when a
cooling-off period ordered by
Gov. Jerry Brown ended, but they
agreed to negotiate through the
weekend.
Nearly 370,000 riders take
BART every weekday, and its 104
miles of track make it the nation’s
fifth-largest commuter rail sys-
tem.
In a sign of how seriously
another shutdown is looming over
the region, state lawmakers from
Bart strike on hold for a day
Unions and management reach impasse; more negotiations needed
ANGELA SWARTS/DAILY JOURNAL
Chaplain Leo McArdle accepted his Veteran of the Year award this past Wednesday from state Sen. Jerry Hill, D-
San Mateo.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
At age 68, with years of commu-
nity and military service under his
belt, Chaplain Leo McArdle was
named Veteran of the Year by state
Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo earli-
er this week.
In addition to his eight years as
an active serviceman with the U.S.
Army in the Vietnam War and five
years in the Army Reserves, he
also has been active in the
Wreaths Across America group
that puts wreaths on grave sites of
deceased veterans.
McArdle was surprised with the
honor at Hill’s San Mateo office
Wednesday.
“I was totally floored,” said the
Burlingame resident. “It’s not
often you catch me at a loss for
words. I don’t do what I do for
awards or recognition, but it
means a lot. It’s still quite an
honor. ”
He was especially surprised to
see his niece Maureen in the audi-
ence, who came from out of state
for the occasion. Others who have
worked with McArdle over the
years and are active in veterans
group also came to surprise him
with the award, which is given to a
resident in the 13th Senate
District annually.
At the surprise occasion
Wednesday, Hill noted it was for a
“lifetime of service” and that it’s
impressive McArdle is so active
during his years of retirement.
McArdle retired after 25 years as
a maintenance engineer at a Daly
City condo complex and currently
acts as a chaplain, providing com-
fort for veterans and their fami-
lies. He works with other veterans
to pay respects to those recently
deceased service people in the
community, making sure that the
deceased are provided with appro-
priate military honors at their
funerals.
He serves for a number of veter-
an organizations along the
Peninsula. He works as chief of
staff for honors with the U.S.
Vet surprised with award
State Sen. Jerry Hill recognizes Chaplain Leo McArdle for ‘lifetime of service’
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The city of San Carlos is not
required to raise residential
garbage rates in 2014 but is con-
sidering doing so to bring them
more in line with service costs and
stave off future increases.
The recommended changes
would add $3 to 20-gallon cans, $2
to 32-gallon cans and a 1.69 per-
cent increase for all unscheduled
services. Larger 64- and 96-gallon
cart customers will see a $10
decrease.
On Monday night, the City
Council will discuss if that is the
route it prefers and schedule a pub-
lic hearing on the proposal Dec. 9.
The recommended increase does-
n’t bring in any new revenue to the
city because it is a move toward
aligning residential cart rates.
However, it changes where the rev-
enue comes from.
The council could also hold rates
at 2013 levels to offset future
increases which would actually
create a small revenue surplus
because of decreasing labor costs
but it doesn’t help the city move
toward aligning with actual cart
costs, according to a report by
management analyst Kristen
Elderson.
The $286,645 surplus could
equal a 3.5 percent drop in total
rates but, as it is only an estimate
of 2014, there would be rate
City is considering
garbage rate hike
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Incumbents Albert Stuebing and
Betty Linvill, along with first-
time candidate Michael Malekos,
almost walked onto the Board of
Directors of the Mid-Peninsula
Water District in an uncontested
race this November until three-
time Belmont mayor Dave Warden
decided to not seek another term
on the council he currently serves,
opting instead to file papers for a
run on the water board just as the
filing deadline was set to expire.
The four are now seeking three
open seats on the water board,
which serves mostly Belmont, as
longtime director David Altscher
is not seeking re-election after
first joining the board in 1999.
Altscher actually encouraged
Malekos to run for the board,
Malekos told the Daily Journal.
Malekos is a former Belmont
finance commissioner and has
been in charge of putting together
the Belmont Greek Festival at the
Church of the Holy Cross the past
few years. He is retired after work-
ing as a utility executive and finan-
cial services professional and has
lived in Belmont for 18 years.
Malekos applied for a seat on the
board in 2009 after one of the
directors abruptly retired but even-
Four in the hunt for
3 water board seats
See VET, Page 20
See WATER, Page 20
See GARBAGE Page 19
See BART, Page 20
Former President Theodore
Roosevelt, campaigning for the
White House as the Progressive candi-
date, was shot in the chest in
Milwaukee by New York saloonkeeper
John Schrank. Despite the wound, Roosevelt went ahead
with a scheduled speech, declaring, "It takes more than one
bullet to kill a bull moose."
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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Actor Jon
Seda is 43.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1912
“Sometimes we have to get
really high to see how small we are.”
— Skydiver Felix Baumgartner, after becoming the first man
to shatter the sound barrier without using a jet or a
Ralph Lauren is
74
Joe Girardi is
49
Birthdays
REUTERS
An NYPD officer looks at revellers while they take part in the annual Hispanic Day Parade in New York
Columbus day: Sunny. Highs in the mid
60s to lower 70s. North winds 5 to 10
mph.
Monday ni ght: Clear. Lows near 50.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s
to mid 70s. East winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Clear. Lows around 50. Northwest winds
around 5 mph in the evening...Becoming light.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the 70s.
Wednesday night through thursday night: Clear.
Lows around 50. Highs in the 60s to 70s.
Friday through sunday: Mostly clear. Highs in the 50s
to upper 60s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1066, Normans under William the Conqueror defeated
the English at the Battle of Hastings.
I n 1586, Mary, Queen of Scots, went on trial in England,
accused of committing treason against Queen Elizabeth I.
(Mary was beheaded in February 1587.)
I n 1890, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th president of the
United States, was born in Denison, Texas.
I n 1908, the E.M. Forster novel "A Room With a View"
was first published by Edward Arnold of London.
I n 1939, a German U-boat torpedoed and sank the HMS
Royal Oak, a British battleship anchored at Scapa Flow in
Scotland’s Orkney Islands; 833 of the more than 1,200 men
aboard were killed.
I n 1944, German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel committed
suicide rather than face execution for allegedly conspiring
against Adolf Hitler.
I n 1947, Air Force test pilot Charles E. ("Chuck") Yeager
broke the sound barrier as he flew the experimental Bell XS-
rocket plane over Muroc Dry Lake in California.
I n 1960, Democratic presidential candidate John F.
Kennedy suggested the idea of a Peace Corps while address-
ing an audience of students at the University of Michigan in
Ann Arbor.
I n 1961, the Frank Loesser (LEH’-sur) musical "How to
Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," starring
Robert Morse as J. Pierrepont Finch, opened on Broadway.
I n 1964, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was
named winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.
Actor Roger Moore is 86. Classical pianist Gary Graffman
is 85. Movie director Carroll Ballard is 76. Former White
House counsel John W. Dean III is 75. Country singer Melba
Montgomery is 76. Singer Sir Cliff Richard is 73. Actor Udo
Kier is 69. Singer-musician Justin Hayward (The Moody
Blues) is 67. Actor Harry Anderson is 61. Actor Greg Evigan is
60. TV personality Arleen Sorkin is 58. World Golf Hall of
Famer Beth Daniel is 57. Singer-musician Thomas Dolby is
55. Actress Lori Petty is 50. Actor Steve Coogan is 48. Singer
Karyn White is 48. Actor Edward Kerr is 47. Country musician
Doug Virden is 43. Country singer Natalie Maines (The Dixie
Chicks) is 39.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
TRICK GUARD INVOKE EYELID
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The man who sold fake tennis equipment
online was charged with — RACKETEERING
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
WELLD
LIYLH
SUMOFA
REBHAC
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print your
answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Eureka, No. 7,
in first place; Lucky Charms, No. 12, in second
place; and Solid Gold, No. 10, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:47.02
9 2 1
3 27 37 45 48 46
Mega number
Oct. 11 Mega Millions
8 10 26 57 58 4
Powerball
Oct. 12 Powerball
15 24 28 29 31
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 5 4 1
Daily Four
9 8 0
Daily three evening
5 7 13 31 43 20
Mega number
Oct. 12 Super Lotto Plus
Hugh Jackman raises $1.85M
with birthday benefit
LOS ANGELES — Hugh Jackman
threw himself a birthday party with
4,500 guests, but they had to pay to
attend.
The actor spent his 45th birthday
Saturday at Hollywood’s Dolby
Theatre, where he sang, danced and told
stories for “One Night Only,” a benefit
concert that raised $1.85 million for
the Motion Picture & Television Fund.
“This is probably the most narcis-
sistic way to spend your birthday,” he
said after the show. “I chose my
favorite songs and told stories about
my life.”
Backed by a 17-member orchestra,
Jackman performed a variation of his
recent Broadway show, with personal
stories, a few film clips and selections
from classic Hollywood musicals —
including a tap-dancing routine during
“Singin’ in the Rain.” He talked about
his family, sang a tribute to his wife
and shared music and images of his
native Australia.
“A lot of guys would say to their
wife, ‘Do you mind if I go play golf
with my buddies?’ That’s how I am
about the show,” he said. “I love it. If
there’s a song I don’t like, I cut it and
bring in a new song. Everything is
something I want to do. So to be here
tonight, supporting this cause — and
it couldn’t have been a more generous
crowd if it tried — in every way it was
great.”
Jackman said he donated his birthday
performance to the Motion Picture &
Television Fund because it offers “that
unconditional helping hand you get in
a family.” The organization provides
health care and other services to enter-
tainment-industry workers and
retirees.
Cybill Shepherd, Bryan Singer,
Darren Criss and songwriter Carole
Bayer Sager were among the famous
faces in the industry-heavy audience
for the two-and-a-half-hour show,
which ended with Jackman auctioning
off an electric Fiat, a pair of Wolverine
claws and two sweaty undershirts he
wore during the night’s performance.
The shirts went for $11,000 each.
Oh my! Flying monkey among
Maine Oz exhibit draws
ROCKLAND, Maine — Far from
Kansas, far from any yellow brick road
and all the way to Maine, fans of “The
Wizard of Oz” can catch a peek of
Dorothy’s blue gingham dress, a pair
of her ruby slippers and even a flying
monkey.
A new exhibit that opened Saturday
at the Farnsworth Art Museum in
Rockland features those items and
more from the world’s largest Wizard of
Oz collection. The 107-piece display
includes props from various Wizard of
Oz movies, rare first-print copies of
the original Wizard of Oz book, movie
posters and an array of Oz memorabil-
ia.
The exhibit, which runs through
March, will give fans a sense of all
things Oz, starting with L. Frank
Baum’s 1900 book “The Wonderful
Wizard of Oz,” said Willard Carroll, a
filmmaker from nearby Camden who
owns the items with his longtime part-
ner. Carroll, 57, has amassed more
than 100,000 Oz items since he first
became enthralled with the story at age
10.
The Wizard of Oz story has endured
for more than a century and is enjoying
a resurgence this year with the release
of the 1939 movie in 3-D and the
approach of the movie’s 75th anniver-
sary. “Oz the Great and Powerful,” a
prequel to the 1939 film that explores
the origins of the wizard, was released
this year, and the hit musical “Wicked”
continues to run on Broadway.
“It’s one of these pop culture things
that really has held on,” Carroll said.
“There are times it’s spiked, and it’s
spiking now because of the 75th
anniversary.”
The story of Oz originated with
Baum’s book, which spawned numerous
movies and stage productions, a radio
series, animated cartoons and spinoff
products such as toys, dolls, puzzles and
even wallpaper panels. It’s best known,
of course, from the 1939 “The Wizard of
Oz” movie, whose color, music and fan-
tasy storytelling captured the fascina-
tion of moviegoers.
J
edediah Strong Smith was born in
New York Jan. 6, 1799. His parents
ran a unprofitable store that they left
in 1811 for greener pastures on the frontier,
first in Pennsylvania then in Northeast
Ohio. Jedediah matured fast and became
interested in the sailor’s life so he left for
the Great Lakes. He got a job on a boat but
it ended with the War of 1812. With no job,
he read the ad put out by General William
Henry Ashley in St. Louis that wanted “100
good men” to trap in the west. Jedediah
walked to St. Louis in 1821 and applied for
the job. He became a clerk due to his small
education and was assigned to a keelboat
they were taking up the Missouri River.
After backbreaking work getting the keel-
boat up the river, they stopped at the
Arickara Indian village where they bought
horses. Jedediah was not your typical
roughshod, hard-drinking trapper. He was
very religious, a Methodist who never drank
nor smoked or used profanity. He absorbed
information from everybody and every
experience in hopes of making his travels
easier. Atrading post was established for the
winter and his men put out their traps to col-
lect pelts. ASioux Indian raid depleted them
of their horses and, when General Ashley
found this out, he decided to buy more hors-
es from the Arickara. Unfortunately, the
Indians were now unfriendly and, after pay-
ing for the horses in lead and gun powder,
the Indians attacked at dawn and 13 men
were killed and the horses lost.
After this experience, the trapping further
upstream proved to be good and many pelts
were gotten. Ashley, however, decided to
split up the group and Smith’s group were
sent to the Black Hills where pelts were
plentiful. One experience he did not want
while setting out traps occurred. He sudden-
ly came face to face with a bear. He ran for
his rifle but the bear was faster and he hit
Smith with a paw that opened the side of his
head, virtually tearing off his ear. Smith
managed to shoot the bear and, although in
awful pain and in shock, he directed his
buddy to sew his ear back on and clean the
deep cut. He survived but he allowed his hair
to grow long after that so as to hide his
scars.
Winter came and Smith and his group
decided to stay over winter at Salt Lake.
While there, he grew restless and formed a
plan to go to Spanish-controlled
3
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
BURLINGAME
Vandalism. A car was keyed on the 1600
block of Bayshore Highway before 10:54
a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2.
Vandalism. Acar window was broken on the
1300 block of Broadway before 10:22 a.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 2.
Burglary. Tools were taken from a home
under construction on the 3000 block of
Atwater Drive before 7:59 a.m. Tuesday, Oct.
1.
BELMONT
Suspicious person. Two men on bikes were
holding flashlights at the intersection of
Ralston Avenue and Hiller Street before 10:44
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6.
Suspended license. A man was cited and
released for driving with a suspended license at
the intersection of Ralston Avenue and
Alameda De Las Pulgas before 9:53 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 6.
Suspicious circumstances. A man was
asking residents if the vehicles in the drive-
way were for sale on Continentals Way before
6:47 P.M. Sunday. Oct. 6.
Suspended license. A man was cited and
released for driving with a suspended license at
the intersection of Ralston Avenue and Avon
Street before 3:36 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 6.
Disturbance. A person was pushed and
yelled at by a couple on Alameda De Las Pulgas
before 5:36 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5.
Police reports
Take me out to the ballgame
A man wearing a baseball cap was
arrested for public intoxication on
Woodside Road in Redwood City before
9:28 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 9.
Mountain Men — Jedediah Smith
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
Rare photo of a mountain man.
See HISTORY, Page 19
4
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
EXAMINATIONS
and
TREATMENT
of
Di seases & Di sorders
of t he Eye
EYEGLASSES
and
CONTACT LENSES
DR. ANDREW C. SOSS
OD, FAAO
GLAUCOMA
STATE BOARD CERT
1159 BROADWAY
BURLINGAME
650- 579- 7774
Provi der for VSP and most maj or medi cal
i nsurances i ncl udi ng Medi care and HPSM
www. Dr- AndrewSoss. net
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Apassenger involved in a 2011
fatal crash on Highway 101 is
suing the driver of the vehicle
carrying her and the victim,
another driver once criminally
charged with causing the death
because he was intoxicated and
the motorist whose blown tire is
thought to have started the colli-
si on.
Denise Bravo, whose fellow
passenger Andrel Norcel Gaines,
19, died in the crash, is seeking
damages and reimbursement of
medical expenses for injuries to
her back and nervous system,
shock and mental suffering,
according to a lawsuit filed Oct.
10 in San Mateo County Superior
Court.
Bravo’s suit names Mauricio
Centino, Leonardo Lazo, Jerry
Struthers, Razeleyn Ambrocio,
Billy Ray Heard, Dennis Dallas
Leffew Jr. and 10 unnamed people
who may be involved. The indi-
viduals represent the drivers and
owners of the vehicles involved
in the Nov. 6, 2011 collision on
Highway 101 just before the
Millbrae Avenue exit.
Bravo and Gaines were two of
four passengers in a 2003
Cadillac driven by Billy Ray
Heard, and traveling south from a
night out in San Francisco.
The Chevrolet Tahoe driven by
Lazo lost a tire which stopped in
one southbound lane and Heard
swerved to miss it, colliding with
the center divider and stopping in
the middle lane. Bravo’s lawsuit
cites both drivers and owners
with “negligently and carelessly”
maintaining and operating their
respective vehicles which led to
the respective road hazard and
collision.
Minutes later, prosecutors said
Leffew crashed his Nissan 300ZX
into the car, pushing it down the
highway for a distance. The
Cadillac’s passengers received
various injuries but Gaines suf-
fered a traumatic head injury and
remained on life support until
Nov. 18, 2011 when he was
removed.
Bravo, who was seated in the
Cadillac’s front seat, was injured
in “her health, strength and activ-
i t y,” the suit states.
While Leffew was hospitalized
with his own injuries, a blood
sample placed his blood alcohol
level at .12 percent. He was
charged with Gaines’ death the
following March but the
Cadillac’s initial collision com-
plicated the case. An accident
reconstruction specialist hired by
his defense found that even a
sober driver could not have avoid-
ed the accident and prosecutors
dropped his gross vehicle
manslaughter charge to one of
misdemeanor driving while under
the influence. He received time
served.
In 2012, Heard also sued
Leffew, Tahoe driver Lazo and
owner Centeno, and the state
Department of Transportation for
allegedly keeping dangerous con-
dition of public property. The
suit against the state was dis-
missed earlier this year. Leffew
also sued the state, Centeno and
Lazo but that case was also dis-
missed.
In his compensation claim to
the state and subsequent lawsuit,
Heard stated the crash caused him
severe brain damage and bleeding
and facial, pelvic and wrist frac-
tures. He sought reimbursement
of his current medical expenses,
then totaling more than
$270,000, and future costs esti-
mated to pass more than a half-
million dollars.
Bravo likewise is looking to
the future in her suit, specifically
seeking a judgment for ongoing
care and loss of earnings and
impairment of earning capacity.
A case management conference
is scheduled for Feb. 6.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Passenger sues in fatal crash
5
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Steelhead
Oktoberfest
October 7–20, 2013
In addition to our dinner menu, we offer:
Grilled Bavarian Bratwurst
Served with housemade sauerkraut, German
potato salad and a woodfired brewers pretzel.
Jägerschnitzel
Fresh veal cutlets, lightly breaded and fried,
served with red potatoes, braised red cabbage
and a gewürtstraniner mushroom sauce.
Schweinshaxe
Beer braised pork shank, with whipped potatoes,
pork au jus and sautéed vegetables.
Sauerbraten
Slow roasted beef braised in wine sauce, served
with red cabbage and parsley red potatoes.
Dessert
Apple Streusel Cheesecake
Emil’s Octoberfest Marzen
A red-gold German lager with a smooth,
toasty malt finish.
Reservations accepted for parties of 8 or more.
333 California Ðr., ßurlingame º 650-344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Two teens arrested for
multiple home burglaries
Two teenagers who were arrested for
attempted burglary in South San
Francisco last week have admitted to
burglarizing two other homes, accord-
ing to police.
The two boys were arrested Thursday
when a resident spotted them prowling
in a neighborhood in the 100 block of
Knoll Circle, according to South San
Francisco police.
The suspects, whose names were not
released because they are minors,
admitted in custody that they were
responsible for at least two other
home burglaries, one on West Orange
Avenue, and a second in the 500 block
of Mayfair Avenue, police said.
Property from both residences was
recovered from one of the suspect’s
homes over the weekend, police said.
The property has been returned to the
victims, police said.
The suspects were booked into
Hillcrest Juvenile Detention Center for
burglary, conspiracy, and attempted
burglary.
Massive pumpkins roll into Half
Moon Bay for annual weigh-off
Pumpkins weighing nearly a ton are
rolling into Half Moon Bay this week-
end to take part in an annual pumpkin
weigh-off.
The 2013 Safeway World
Championship Pumpkin Weigh-Off
takes place Monday and kicks off Half
Moon Bay’s weeklong Art & Pumpkin
Festival.
Dozens of growers from across the
country are trucking their massive
pumpkins to San Mateo County’s
coastside, where a cash prize deter-
mined by weight will be given to the
owner of the year’s heaviest pumpkin.
In 2012, Thad Starr of Pleasant Hill,
Ore., won first prize with a pumpkin
that weighed 1,775 pounds.
At $6 per pound, Starr received a
cash prize of $10,650.
Safeway has offered a bonus prize of
$30,000 for any pumpkin that breaks
the world record, which currently
stands at 2,009 pounds.
Cash prizes will also be handed out
to the grower the heaviest pumpkin
grown in California’s, the heaviest
grown in San Mateo County, and the
competition’s “prettiest” pumpkin,
which will be judged by audience
applause.
The weigh-off is scheduled to begin
at 7 a.m. in the parking lot at 735
Main St., Half Moon Bay.
Damaged power pole prompts
road closure in Hillsborough
Aportion of Hillsborough Boulevard
was closed for most of Sunday while
utility crews tend to a damaged power
pole, San Mateo County emergency
officials said.
The pole was damaged in a traffic col-
lision earlier Sunday morning, offi-
cials said.
The 600 block of Hillsborough
Boulevard was closed to traffic in both
directions until the afternoon, officials
said.
There were no reports of any outages
in the area, according to PG&E.
Costco recalls rotisserie
chicken linked to Foster Farms
salmonella outbreak
Costco is recalling chicken prod-
ucts sold at a South San Francisco store
last month in connection with a major
outbreak of antibiotic resistant salmo-
nella linked to Foster Farms chicken.
The products include rotisserie
chickens, rotisserie chicken leg quar-
ters, rotisserie chicken salad and rotis-
serie chicken soup sold at the store at
1600 El Camino Real between Sept. 11
and Sept. 23, the company said
Saturday.
The chicken products have been
linked to an outbreak of antibiotic
resistant salmonella Heidelberg
reported earlier this week by the U.S.
Department of Agriculture’s Food
Safety and Inspection Service, the
company said.
Consumers are advised not to con-
sume the products if they still have
them and to discard or return any uneat-
en leftovers, the company said in a
message for customers.
The salmonella outbreak has been
linked to Foster Farms chicken distrib-
uted mainly to retailers in California,
Oregon and Washington, and 73 per-
cent of cases have been reported in
California, according to the Centers
for Disease Control and USDA.
As of Oct. 11, a total of 317 cases
involving seven strains of salmonella
Heidelberg had been reported across 20
states and Puerto Rico, the
CDC reports.
Of those cases, 42 percent of those
infected have been hospitalized, but
no deaths have been reported, the CDC
said.
Most reported cases occurred
between March 1, 2013 and Sept. 26,
2013, but more recent cases might not
have been reported yet, CDC officials
noted.
The USDA threatened to shut down
the three Foster Farms plants linked to
the outbreak. On Oct. 10, however, the
companyand health officials
announced that the company would
be allowed tocontinue operating, after
it
submitted plans to improve its oper-
ating procedures.
State public health officials did not
ask Foster Farms to recall chickens
because the meat is safe for consump-
tion with proper handling and prepara-
tion, according to a statement from Dr.
Ron Chapman, the director of the
California Department of Public
Health that was issued Wednesday.
“Chicken is a raw animal protein
that is expected to have some level of
naturally occurring bacteria present.
Cooking chicken fully to 165 degrees
Fahrenheit will kill the bacteria that
are present. Provided that consumers
do not cross-contaminate fully cooked
chicken with raw chicken juices, it is
safe to consume,” Dr. Chapman said in
the statement.
The Centers for Disease Control has
established a web page tracking the
outbreak at http://www.cdc.gov/sal-
m o n e l l a / h e i d e l b e r g - 1 0
13/index.html.
Local briefs
Hunter found alive after 18 days in Calif. forest
UKIAH — ASan Francisco man who was missing in the
Mendocino National Forest for 18 days after he slipped and
lost consciousness in steep terrain has been rescued and is
in surprisingly good condition.
The Ukiah Daily Journal reported Sunday
(http://bit.ly/GY9aaC ) that 72-year-old Gene Penaflor sur-
vived in the Yuki Wilderness by eating squirrels, lizards, a
snake, berries and algae and covering himself with leaves to
stay warm.
Mendocino County Sheriff’s Office detective Andrew
Porter tells the newspaper that Penaflor had been missing
since Sept. 24 when he failed to meet up with his hunting
partner for lunch.
Afour-day search that started the next day was called off
after no clues to his whereabouts surfaced.
Another group of hunters stumbled upon the missing man
on Saturday and carried him out of the forest.
San Diego mayoral PAC fined for ethics violations
SAN DIEGO — A political action committee formed by
opponents of a former San Diego city councilman has been
fined $7,500 for violating campaign disclosure laws.
Conservatives for Gay Rights Supporting Carl DeMaio
made calls and distributed leaflets stating that DeMaio is
gay. The leaflets showed him standing near a man dressed in
drag.
DeMaio, an openly gay Republican, lost last year’s San
Diego mayoral race to Democrat Bob Filner, who recently
resigned following a sexual harassment scandal.
The PAC actually had ties to the Democratic party and
Filner. But the San Diego Ethics Commission said Friday it
found no evidence Filner knew of the group’s actions.
The PAC was fined for not supplying a valid address or
keeping records of expenditures.
DeMaio is now running for Congress.
Puppies abandoned in Tahoe dumpster find homes
RENO, Nev. — Six puppies abandoned in a Lake Tahoe
trash bin have found permanent homes in the Reno-Tahoe
area.
Becky Goodman of the Pet Network Humane Society in
Incline Village says the dogs were adopted after being fea-
tured at a community reception a week ago.
She told the Tahoe Daily Tribune (http://bit.ly/1gqX1sv )
that her organization received as many as 75 adoption
applications from across the country for the animals, but
sought to place them in local homes.
State briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAKE TAHOE — It’s not your aver-
age bear battle.
After years of trying to keep the
region’s black bears from being cap-
tured and possibly killed, animal
rights activists in Lake Tahoe are
using increasingly aggressive strate-
gies to keep California and Nevada
game wardens from trapping bears that
break into homes, businesses and
campsites in search of food.
Members of the Bear League, a grass-
roots group that tries to educate people
not to fear the animals and to keep better
tabs on their trash, have started keeping
vigils by traps and booing the
game wardens who set and
check on them, The
Sacramento Bee reports.
“They are just gorgeous crea-
tures, and they are so misunder-
stood,” said Carolyn Stark, a
Bear League board member.
She helped maintain a round-
the-clock vigil at a trap
recently set at an Incline Village
home where a female bear had twice
broken into the garage. “It’s so unfair.
I want to help protect them.”
Other activists have coated the devices
with Pine-Sol to deter bears and even
used teddy bears as decoys, the newspa-
per said. And a Facebook page called the
Lake Tahoe Wall of Shame prints the
addresses of places that have been care-
less with garbage bins or where traps are
rumored to be imminent.
Residents and business owners who
have called wildlife officials to report
bears on their property also have been
caught in the crosshairs with anonymous
threats and online slurs, The Bee said.
John Brissenden, manager of
Sorensen’s Resort, said
employees were
threatened after two bears were killed
there last year.
“We were branded as murderers and exe-
cutioners,” Brissenden said. “It was
alarming, discouraging, given our 40
years of protecting wildlife habitat,
including bear habitat.” Bear League
Executive Director Ann Bryant says her
group only intervenes legally and does
not endorse threats or trap-tampering.
“We are accused of all kinds of things,”
Bryant said. “People who don’t like
bears don’t like us. We know that.”
The combination of tactics has made
property owners reluctant to call
wildlife officials for assistance,
Nevada Department of Wildlife
director Tony Wasley said.
“We’ve had residences bro-
ken into by bears where the
occupants made the
statement that the peo-
ple were more danger-
ous than the bears,”
Wasley said. “For
that reason, they did-
n’t want a trap or, in
one case, asked that the
trap be removed.”
New tactics emerge in
battle over Tahoe bears
6
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Senate
Republicans and Democrats hit an
impasse Sunday over spending in
their last-ditch struggle to avoid
an economy-jarring default in just
four days and end a partial govern-
ment shutdown that’s entering its
third week.
After inconclusive talks
between President Barack Obama
and House Republicans, Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-
Nev., and Minority Leader Mitch
McConnell, R-Ky., took charge in
trying to end the crises, although
a conversation Sunday afternoon
failed to break the stalemate.
“I’m optimistic about the
prospects for a positive conclu-
sion to the issues before this
country today,” Reid said as the
Senate wrapped up a rare Sunday
session.
The two cagy negotiators are at
loggerheads over Democratic
demands to undo or change the
automatic, across-the-board
spending cuts to domestic and
defense programs that the GOP see
as crucial to reducing the nation’s
deficit.
McConnell insisted a solution
was readily available in the pro-
posal from a bipartisan group of
12 senators, led by Sens. Susan
Collins, R-Maine, and Joe
Manchin, D-W.Va., that would re-
open the gov-
ernment and
fund it at current
levels for six
months while
raising the debt
limit through
Jan. 31.
“It’s time for
Democrat lead-
ers to take ‘yes’
for an answer,” McConnell said in
a statement.
But six Democrats in the group
and a spokesman for Collins said
that while negotiations continued
this weekend, there was no agree-
ment.
Latest snag
The latest snag comes as
350,000 federal workers remain
idle, hundreds of thousands more
work without pay and an array of
government services, from home
loan applications to environmen-
tal inspections, were on hold on
the 13th day of the shutdown.
Many parks and monuments
remain closed, drawing a protest at
the National World War II
Memorial on Sunday that included
tea party-backed lawmakers who
had unsuccessfully demanded
defunding of Obama’s 3-year-old
health care law in exchange for
keeping the government open.
Unnerving to world economies
is the prospect of the United
States defaulting on its financial
obligations on Thursday if
Congress fails to raise the borrow-
ing authority above the $16.7 tril-
lion debt limit.
Christine Lagarde, the
International Monetary Fund’s
managing director, spoke fearful-
ly about the disruption and uncer-
tainty, warning of a “risk of tip-
ping, yet again, into recession”
after the fitful recovery from 2008.
The reaction of world financial
markets and the Dow Jones on
Monday will influence any con-
gressional talks.
Congress is racing the clock to
get a deal done, faced with time-
consuming Senate procedures
that could slow legislation, like-
ly opposition from tea partyers
and certain resistance in the
Republican-led House before a
bill gets to Obama.
Politically, Republicans are
reeling, bearing a substantial
amount of the blame for the gov-
ernment shutdown and stalemate.
“We’re in a free-fall as
Republicans, but Democrats are
not far behind,” said Sen. Lindsey
Graham, R-S.C., in warning
Democrats about seizing on the
GOP’s bruised brand as leverage
to extract more concessions.
McConnell and Republicans
want to continue current spend-
ing at $986.7 billion and leave
untouched the new round of cuts
in January, commonly known as
sequester, that would reduce the
amount to $967 billion.
Democrats want to figure out a
way to undo the reductions, plus a
long-term extension of the debt
limit increase and a short-term
spending bill to reopen the gov-
ernment.
“Republicans want to do it with
entitlement cuts,” said Sen.
Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.
“Democrats want to do it with a
mix of mandatory cuts, some
entitlements and revenues. And
so how do you overcome that
dilemma? We’re not going to
overcome it in the next day or
two.”
He suggested keeping the gov-
ernment running through mid-
January.
Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois,
the No. 2 Democrat in the Senate,
told reporters the two sides are
roughly $70 billion apart, the
difference between the $1.058
trillion Senate budget amount and
the $988 billion envisioned by
House Budget Committee
Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wi s.
“We haven’t picked a number,
but clearly we need to negotiate
between those two,” Durbin said.
Republicans dismiss the latest
request as Reid moving the goal-
posts in negotiations as they were
getting closer to resolving the
stalemate that has paralyzed
Washington. They also argue that
it is disingenuous for Democrats
to resist any changes in the 3-
year-old health care law while try-
ing to undo the 2011 budget law
that put the cuts on track.
“I think the Democrats are on
the verge of being one tick too
cute as they see the House possi-
bly in disarray — they now are
overreaching, and I think that
what we’ve got to do is get this
back in the middle of the road, act
like adults,” said Sen. Bob Corker,
R-Tenn.
2011 law
Graham and Sen. Rand Paul, R-
Ky., said they would not support
any deal that upends the spending
limits imposed by the 2011 law,
and predicted that their Senate
GOPcolleagues would oppose it as
well.
Out of play, for now, was the
Republican-led House, where
Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio,
told GOPlawmakers early Saturday
that his talks with the president
had ground to a halt. Obama tele-
phoned House Democratic leader
Nancy Pelosi on Sunday, focusing
on the need for any increase in the
debt limit without concessions.
Also sidelined, at least for now,
was the plan forged by Collins
and a bipartisan coalition to
briefly fund the government and
extend the $16.7 trillion debt
limit, in exchange for steps like
temporarily delaying the medical
device tax that helps fund the
health care law.
Spending stumbling block to budget
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — For the second
straight year, millions of Social
Security recipients, disabled veter-
ans and federal retirees can expect
historically small increases in their
benefits come January.
Preliminary figures suggest a ben-
efit increase of roughly 1.5 percent,
which would be among the smallest
since automatic increases were
adopted in 1975, according to an
analysis by The Associated Press.
Next year’s raise will be small
because consumer prices, as meas-
ured by the government, haven’t
gone up much in the past year.
The exact size of the cost-of-
living adjustment, or COLA,
won’t be known until the Labor
Department releases the inflation
report for September. That was
supposed to happen Wednesday,
but the report was delayed indefi-
nitely because of the partial gov-
ernment shutdown.
Disabled vets see small
social security increase
By Marilynn Marchione
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — New research sug-
gests that high levels of BPA, a
chemical in many plastics and
canned food linings, might raise
the risk of miscarriage in women
prone to that problem or having
trouble getting pregnant.
The work is not nearly enough
to prove a link, but it adds to “the
biological plausibility” that BPA
might affect fertility and other
aspects of health, said Dr. Linda
Giudice, a California biochemist
who is president of the American
Society for Reproductive
Medicine.
BPA, short for bisphenol-A, and
certain other environmental chem-
icals can have very weak, hor-
mone-like effects. Tests show BPA
in nearly everyone’s urine, though
the chemical has been removed
from baby bottles and many
reusable drink containers in recent
years. The federal Food and Drug
Administration says BPAis safe as
used now in other food containers.
Most miscarriages are due to egg
or chromosome problems, and a
study in mice suggested BPAmight
influence that risk, said Dr. Ruth
Lathi, a Stanford University repro-
ductive endocrinologist.
With a federal grant, she and
other researchers studied 115
newly pregnant women with a his-
tory of infertility or miscarriage;
68 wound up having miscarriages
and 47 had live births.
“It may be that women with
higher BPA levels do have other
risk factors” for miscarriage that
might be amplified by BPA, Lathi
said.
The study is not cause for alarm,
but “it’s far from reassuring that
BPAis safe” for such women, she
said.
Plastic tied to miscarriage risk
Barack Obama
WORLD 8
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Kay Johnson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEHRAMPUR, India — Mass
evacuations spared India the wide-
spread deaths many had feared from a
powerful cyclone that roared ashore
over the weekend, officials said
Sunday, as the country sorted through
the wreckage of flooded towns, tan-
gled power lines and tens of thou-
sands of destroyed thatch homes.
Cyclone Phailin, the strongest
storm to hit India in more than a
decade, destroyed hundreds of mil-
lions of dollars’ worth of crops, but
more than 20 hours after it made land-
fall in Orissa state on the country’s
east coast, authorities said they knew
of only 17 fatalities.
The final death toll is expected to
climb further as officials reach areas
of the cyclone-battered coast that
remain isolated by downed communi-
cation links and blocked roads, but
the evacuation of nearly 1 million
people appeared to have saved many
lives.
“Damage to property is exten-
sive,” said Amitabh Thakur, the top
police officer in the Orissa district
worst-hit by the cyclone. “But few
lives have been lost,” he said, credit-
ing the mass evacuations.
On the highway to the seaside city
of Gopalpur, where the storm made
landfall early Saturday night, two
tractor-trailers with shattered wind-
shields were lying on their sides,
while a hotel nearby was in tatters,
with tables and chairs strewn about.
“We were terrified,” A-1 Hotel
owner Mihar Ranjan said of himself
and 14 other people who had been
huddling inside when the wind ripped
the tin roof off the building.
On Sunday, Gopalpur’s power lines
sagged nearly to the ground and a
strong surf churned off the coast. But
some shops were opened, doing
brisk business selling bottled drinks
and snacks, and locals expressed
relief that the damage wasn’t worse.
A mermaid statue remained stand-
ing on Gopalpur’s boardwalk, where
most decorative street lamps still
stood along with most of the city’s
buildings.
“Everyone feels very lucky,” said
Prabhati Das, a 40-year-old woman
who came from the town of
Behrampur, about 10 kilometers (7
miles) inland, to see the aftermath at
the coast.
Acargo ship carrying iron ore, the
MV Bingo, sank Saturday as the
cyclone barreled through the Bay of
Bengal, and its crew of 18 — includ-
ing 17 Chinese and one Indonesian
— went missing for a day, coast guard
officials said. They were being res-
cued Sunday evening after their
lifeboat was found about 185 kilome-
ters (115 miles) off the Indian coast,
coast guard Commandant Sharad
Matri said.
Phailin weakened significantly
after making landfall as a Category 4
storm, with sustained winds of up to
210 kilometers per hour (131 miles
per hour), according to Indian meteo-
rologists. Those numbers were
slightly lower than the last advisory
issued by the U.S. Navy’s Hawaii-
based Joint Typhoon Warning
Center, which reported maximum
sustained winds of about 222 kph
(138 mph) and gusts up to 268 kph
(167 mph) four hours before the
storm hit land.
Midday on Sunday, some areas
reported little more than breezy driz-
zles, with winds in some areas blow-
ing at 161 kph (100 mph).
Meteorologists warned that Orissa
and other states in the storm’s path
would face heavy rains, strong winds
and rough seas for several more hours.
“Its intensity is still strong, but
after crossing the coast it has weak-
ened considerably,” Sharat Sahu, a top
official with the Indian
Meteorological Dept. in Orissa, told
reporters.
Indian officials spoke dismissively
of American forecasters who earlier
had warned of a record-breaking
cyclone that would drive a massive
wall of water — perhaps as large as 9
meters high (30 feet high) — into the
coastline.
“They have been issuing warnings,
and we have been contradicting
them,” said L.S. Rathore, director-
general of the Indian Meteorological
Department. “That is all that I want to
say.”
“As a scientist, we have our own
opinion and we stuck to that. We told
them that is what is required as a
national weather service — to keep
people informed with the reality with-
out being influenced by over-warn-
ing,” he said at a news conference in
New Delhi, the capital.
Predicting how massive storms
will develop is difficult in the Bay of
Bengal, where there are no tidal
gauges, ocean buoys or aircraft flying
into storms to measure winds direct-
l y. Instead, both U.S. and Indian
meteorologists rely on satellite
imagery to assess a storm’s strength
and path.
Massive cyclone forces evacuation in India
By Adam Schreck
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BAGHDAD — First came the fire-
ball, then the screams of the vic-
tims. The suicide bombing just
outside a Baghdad graveyard
knocked Nasser Waleed Ali over
and peppered his back with shrap-
nel.
Ali was one of the lucky ones. At
least 51 died in the Oct. 5 attack,
many of them Shiite pilgrims
walking by on their way to a
shrine. No one has claimed respon-
sibility, but there is little doubt al-
Qaida’s local franchise is to blame.
Suicide bombers and car bombs are
its calling cards, Shiite civilians
among its favorite targets.
Al-Qaida has come roaring back
in Iraq since U.S. troops left in late
2011 and now looks stronger than
it has in years. The terror group has
shown it is capable of carrying out
mass-casualty attacks several
times a month, driving the death
toll in Iraq to the highest level in
half a decade. It sees each attack as
a way to cultivate an atmosphere of
chaos that weakens the Shiite-led
government’s authority.
Recent prison breaks have bol-
stered al-Qaida’s ranks, while feel-
ings of Sunni marginalization and
the chaos caused by the civil war in
neighboring Syria are fueling its
comeback.
Al-Qaida surges back in
Iraq, reviving old fears
By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Gunmen abducted
six Red Cross workers and a Syrian
Red Crescent volunteer after stop-
ping their convoy early Sunday in
northwestern Syria, a spokesman
said, in the latest high-profile kid-
napping in the country’s civil war.
Simon Schorno, a spokesman
for the International Committee of
the Red Cross in Damascus, said
the assailants snatched the seven
aid workers from their convoy
near the town of Saraqeb in Idlib
province around 11:30 a.m. local
time (0830 GMT) as the team was
returning to Damascus. He
declined to provide the nationali-
ties of the six ICRC employees,
and said it was not clear who was
behind the attack
Syria’s state news agency, quot-
ing an anonymous official, said
the gunmen opened fire on the
ICRC team’s four vehicles before
seizing the Red Cross workers.
The news agency blamed “terror-
ists,” a term the government uses
to refer to those opposed to
President Bashar Assad.
Schorno said the team of seven
had been in the field since Oct. 10
to assess the medical situation in
the area and to look at how to pro-
vide medical aid. He said the part
of northern Syria where they were
seized “by definition is a difficult
area to go in,” and the team was
traveling with armed guards.
Much of the countryside in Idlib
province, as well as the rest of
northern Syria, has fallen over the
past year into the hands of rebels,
many of them Islamic extremists,
and kidnappings have become
rife, particularly of aid workers
and foreign journalists.
Press freedom advocate
Reporters without Borders calls
Syria “the most dangerous country
in the world” for journalists, with
25 reporters killed and at least 33
imprisoned since the anti-Assad
uprising began in March 2011.
The conflict also has taken a
toll on the aid community. The
ICRC said in August that 22
Syrian Red Crescent volunteers
have been killed in the country
since the conflict began. Some
were deliberately targeted, while
others killed in crossfire, the
group said.
Syria’s bloody conflict has
killed more than 100,000 people,
forced more than 2 million
Syrians to flee the country and
caused untold suffering — psycho-
logical, emotional and physical
— across the nation.
Red Cross workers kidnapped in Syria
REUTERS
Cyclone Phailin was part of the strongest storm in 14 years in India and
left a trail of destruction along the country's east coast
OPINION 9
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Don’t confuse measures P and U
Editor,
On the ballot for the General
Municipal Election this Nov. 5, 2013,
voters will find an initiative which asks
us to approve an increase that intends
to provide necessary financial resources
for our community. This is a separate
issue from the Measure P initiative. The
funds will not come from individual
taxpayers but from businesses in Foster
City.
The city’s business license tax has
not changed since 1972, even while the
cost of providing services has
increased. The city has strived to defer
the levying of a tax until absolutely
required which is why Foster City has
not adjusted the business license tax
previously. Now, as we look ahead, in
order to maintain the level of service
our businesses have become accus-
tomed to, and to protect the essential
services delivered to all those who live,
work and play here, it is critical to
move to a model that is more financial-
ly sustainable.
The Chamber of Commerce has been
engaged with the city over the pro-
posed changes to the business license
tax since January. After reviewing the
proposal with businesses of varied size
and kind, the “Chamber believes the
model proposed is reasonable and that
the interests of the business communi-
ty have been taken into consideration.”
Measure U is not a tax levied upon
citizens but a license tax paid by busi-
nesses.
I ask that you vote “yes” to approve
the amendment to the business license
tax as proposed and appreciate the
value that the business community
plays on the experience we as residents
enjoy due to their contributions.
Herb Perez
Foster City
The letter writer is a member of the
Foster City Council.
PVC pipes
Editor,
As a candidate for San Bruno City
Council, I am focused on lowering San
Bruno’s water and sewer rates. I have
proposed using PVC pipes instead of
ductile iron pipes to reduce costs.
During the League of Women Voters
Candidate Forum in San Bruno Oct. 2,
2013, incumbent Ken Ibarra said PVC
pipes were “unsafe.” It is important for
the public to know that PVC pipe usage
is safe. I spoke at the City Council
meeting Oct. 8 and reported the follow-
ing formation from the Uni-bell PVC
Association:
1. PVC pipes meet or exceed all
required health and safety standards and
regulations governed by the U.S. and
Canadian Safe Drinking Water Acts and
other international statutes. Its use is
monitored by independent agencies
like National Sanitaion Foundation
International, and government bodies
like the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency ensure its safety through
mandatory regular testing.
2. Over 40,000 North American water
utilities use PVC pipes today, and more
than one million miles of PVC pipes
are in service. About 78 percent of all
new drinking water distribution pipes
installed on the continent are PVC
pipes.
Marty Medina
San Bruno
Fire them all
Editor,
It is time the American voter starts
voting for representatives who repre-
sent them. During this government
shutdown, while 800,000 federal work-
ers were on furlough with no pay,
Congress was paid their constitutional-
ly-protected salaries to the tune of
almost $2 million for seven days of
doing nothing.
Fire them all. It is time to vote for a
government that represents the people
and not the corporations who fund their
political campaigns for office.
Our country needs a new direction,
and voting for the lesser of two evils in
the form of the Democratic or
Republican Parties is a rigged game
played on us, the 99 percent.
So, remember this when it’s time to
vote — vote your values not your fears,
and vote for an independent, not the
corpacracy government we have now.
Cynthia Marcopulos
South San Francis
Letters to the editor
The Press-Enterprise
C
alifornia cannot afford to bor-
row recklessly. The absence of
a vast state budget deficit this
year does not mean the state’s enor-
mous long-term debt has vanished.
Legislators need to be sure that state
bond issues target only critical state
needs. And voters should reject bond
measures that do not meet that stan-
dard.
Anew report on the state’s debt from
state Treasurer Bill Lockyer says
California will spend less to repay bor-
rowing this fiscal year than it did last
year. The state general fund will spend
an estimated $7.5 billion on debt serv-
ice in 2013-14, a drop from the $8.6
billion the state paid last year. Lockyer
says that the state’s improved credit
rating helped trim borrowing costs,
and that California was able to refi-
nance billions of dollars of bonds at
lower interest rates.
But those figures give California no
reason to relax vigilance over addition-
al borrowing. California already has a
heavy debt load. The report notes that
the state’s debt per capita is $2,565,
more than double the 50-state median
of $1,074 per person. As of June 30,
the state’s $96.3 billion general fund
was responsible for repaying $86.3
billion in outstanding long-term debt.
But that figure does not include an addi-
tional $36.5 billion in already author-
ized general fund bonds that the state
has not yet issued. Nor does it include a
proposed water bond that legislators
are drafting for the 2014 ballot.
And the state still faces a series of
financial risks which urge caution in
adding to state debt, as the treasurer
noted. The state’s tax-receipt stream
remains highly volatile, for example,
with the potential for large swings
from year to year. The temporary taxes
that prop up this year’s budget also dis-
appear in 2019. Those two factors,
along with legislators’ penchant for
overspending, could easily mire the
state in huge deficits once again.
The state also has a shortfall of more
than $180 billion over the next three
decades in covering often-lavish pub-
lic-worker retirement payouts. Even
with minor reforms legislators enacted
last year, the state faces huge and
expanding pension and retiree health
costs. Without further fixes, those
expenses will consume an escalating
share of the general fund, pulling ever
more money away from public servic-
es.
In addition, the state has yet to repay
the borrowing legislators used to prop
up state budgets over the past decade.
The general fund owes nearly $27 bil-
lion to schools, local governments and
state special funds. That figure also
includes more than $5 billion still out-
standing on the $15 billion voters bor-
rowed in 2004 to help bridge budget
deficits.
California should reserve its limited
borrowing capacity for legitimate pub-
lic needs, not boondoggles such as the
$3 billion for stem cell research in
2004 or the $9.95 billion for an unaf-
fordable, unnecessary “bullet” train in
2008. And legislators should avoid
larding bond measures with self-serv-
ing pork spending, as they did with the
water bond slated for the 2014 ballot.
The state does need to borrow occa-
sionally — to ensure a functioning
transportation system or a reliable
water supply, for example. But legisla-
tors and voters should use that power
carefully, and not load taxpayers with
massive, needless debt.
Avoid more needless state debt
Time to
mend fences
W
hatever happens to Measure P, the San Mateo-
Foster City Elementary School District bond on
the November ballot, the city of San Mateo and
the school district need to reconnect. Aharmonious and pro-
ductive relationship is a top priority for both local entities
and the community they serve.
***
When I joined the elementary school board in the 1970s,
Jane Baker became a member of the San Mateo City Council.
We were friends because we had once lived on the same block
(Sunset Terrace) where we raised our kids. Neither of us was
involved in politics then. But when we became electeds we
decided to forge a relationship between the school district
and the council. We sat down with then superintendent Dave
Thomas and city manager Dick
DeLong and agreed the two bod-
ies should meet on a regular
(once a year) basis. The first
agenda dealt with updates on
major issues and possible con-
flicts. The joint use of city and
school recreation facilities was
controversial among staff,
some of whom were actually
hostile to the other. The good
relationship forged helped us
develop a joint use policy and
to avoid a contentious battle
over redevelopment funds
whereby the school district was
destined to lose much-needed revenue to the city’s redevelop-
ment agency. San Mateo helped the district make up some of
the loss.
When I became a councilmember, we resurrected the prac-
tice of joint meetings. Crossing guards were the issue.
Traditionally, the city paid for them but as San Mateo was
experiencing its own budget woes, some councilmembers
wanted to stop the practice. The matter was settled and good
relations prevailed.
***
The school district also had a rough history with some
members of the Foster City Council. At the time, Foster City
had three district schools, Bowditch Middle and Audubon and
Foster City elementary schools. The latter was housed in
portables (now new buildings.) Foster City councilwoman
Eileen Larsen and some of her colleagues did not want Foster
City children bused to San Mateo schools. Knolls and
Lakeshore both housed predominantly Foster City children.
As Proposition 13 depleted the district’s revenue and the
school population was declining, many schools were shut
including Knolls and Lakeshore in addition to Buena Vista,
Peninsula, Beresford, Turnbull middle school and Lawrence
(Lawrence was shut because of its location in the path of a
potential devastating flood if Crystal Springs Dam ever
became unplugged due to a major earthquake).
The result was that most Foster City children were now
attending school in Foster City. Meanwhile, San Mateo’s
predominantly African-American North Central neighbor-
hood lost its neighborhood schools. Turnbull was turned
into preschool, head start, and kindergarten while Lawrence
was torn down and became the site of commercial and resi-
dential property. Most North Central children were bused to
schools throughout San Mateo. This was to address integra-
tion concerns but black parents worried about their children’s
isolation in all-white schools and wanted their neighbor-
hood schools back. Except for preschool and kindergarten,
this hasn’t happened. Today Turnbull, now College Park
Elementary, is a magnet Mandarin immersion school and
houses several preschool and kindergarten classes.
***
North Central students were never bused to Foster City
because Foster City was considered already integrated. Most
of the African-American residents of North Central who had
good-paying jobs moved to Foster City. The new residents
of North Central were Hispanic. As the student population
began to increase in San Mateo (and in Foster City), some of
the popular schools in San Mateo found they could not
accommodate all neighborhood children or siblings.
Meanwhile, students were bused in from North Central.
Parents asked why Foster City schools did not host some of
the North Central children, too. But Foster City schools were
also full and the city was already integrated.
***
Relations between Foster City and the San Mateo Union
High School District were also strained because a site was set
aside for a high school on the city’s original map. The high
school district could not afford to build and run a new high
school. Besides, polls showed that Foster City teens liked
attending San Mateo High School. The bad feelings spilled
over into Foster City-San Mateo relations and prevented a
merger of the two fire departments. Happily, today, most, but
not all, of these issues no longer exist. But the upcoming
bond issue has opened up old wounds. The two entities — the
San Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District Board of
Trustees and the San Mateo City Council — need to resume a
formal structure of meeting periodically and working collab-
oratively for the good of their citizens. I am sure the council
and the school board would agree.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Other voices
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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By Chistopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Negotiations
in Congress to raise the nation’s
borrowing limit are up against a
deadline of Thursday. If the limit
isn’t raised by then, the govern-
ment will no longer have authority
to borrow to pay its bills.
So what happens if Thursday
comes and goes and the limit isn’t
raised?
The scary thing is, no one really
knows. Going past the deadline
would be unprecedented.
The possible consequences are
complex. But none are good. The
gravest threat is that the govern-
ment would soon fail to make
interest payments on its debt. Any
missed payment would trigger a
default.
Financial markets would sink.
Social Security checks would be
delayed. Eventually, the economy
would almost surely slip into
another financial crisis and reces-
sion.
Even if the government managed
to make its interest payments,
fears about a default could cause
investors to dump Treasurys and
send U.S. borrowing rates soaring.
Here are questions and answers
about the government’s borrowing
limit:
Q. What exactly is it?
A. The borrowing limit is a cap
on how much debt the government
can accumulate to pay its bills. The
government borrows in most years
because its spending has long
exceeded its revenue. The first bor-
rowing limit was enacted in 1917.
Since 1962, Congress has raised
the borrowing limit 77 times. It
now stands at $16.7 trillion.
Q. When will we reach the limit?
A. The national debt actually
reached the limit in May. Since
then, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew
has made accounting moves to
continue financing the govern-
ment without further borrowing.
But Lew says those measures will
be exhausted by Thursday. The
government will then have to pay
its bills from its cash on hand —
an estimated $30 billion — and
tax revenue.
Q. So what happens after
Thursday?
A. The government could pay its
bills for a few days. But sometime
between Oct. 22 and Oct. 31, the
cash on hand and tax revenue
wouldn’t be sufficient, according
to the Congressional Budget
Office. The date isn’t exact because
it’s impossible to foresee precise-
ly how much revenue the govern-
ment will receive and when.
Q. When it runs out of cash, does
the government default?
A. No, not right away. Adefault
would occur if the government
fails to make a principal or interest
payment on any of its Treasurys.
The first interest payment after
Thursday’s deadline is a $6 billion
payment due Oct. 31.
Many experts think that to
avoid a default, Treasury would
make payments on the debt its top
priority.
“We believe the government
would continue to pay interest and
principal on its debt even in the
event that the debt limit is not
raised, leaving its creditworthi-
ness intact,” says Moody’s
Investors Service, a credit rating
agency.
But that is the subject of intense
dispute in Washington. The House
has approved a bill to require such
“prioritization.” The Senate hasn’t
passed it, though. And President
Barack Obama has threatened to
veto it.
Without an increase in the bor-
rowing limit, the government
couldn’t pay other obligations on
time, such as Social Security bene-
fits, bills from government con-
tractors and Medicare reimburse-
ments. Those payments are also
legal obligations, Lew argues, and
failure to pay them would essen-
tially be equivalent to a default.
In any case, making some pay-
ments and not others is harder than
it might sound. Treasury makes
roughly 100 million payments a
month. Nearly all are automated.
Lew says the Treasury’s computer
systems aren’t equipped to choose
some and not others among all
those outgoing checks.
And without cash in reserve, any
minor glitch could cause Treasury
to miss a debt payment — and
default.
“Treasury would do everything
in their power to not miss a debt
payment,” says Donald Marron, an
economist at the Urban Institute
and a former economic adviser to
President George W. Bush. “But
when you’re in untested waters
under a great deal of stress, bad
things happen.”
Q. What other problems might
be raised by prioritization?
A. Consider the legal and politi-
cal obstacles. The government is
legally obligated to pay its con-
tractors. If not, the contractors
could sue for non-payment. And
how long would members of
Congress stand by as Treasury
holders in China and other nations
were paid interest, while payments
to U.S. veterans and Social
Security recipients were delayed?
Q. How would investors react if
the government made its interest
payments but fell behind on other
obligations?
A. Badly, most economists say.
If the government couldn’t pay
veterans’ benefits, federal employ-
ee salaries or other bills, investors
would almost certainly demand
higher interest rates at future
Treasury auctions. That would
drive up the cost to taxpayers of
servicing the government’s debt.
A failure to pay any obligation
“would severely damage percep-
tions of our creditworthiness,”
says David Kelly, chief global
strategist at JPMorgan Funds.
Each week, the government
issues new short-term debt and
uses the proceeds to pay off matur-
ing debt. This step doesn’t
increase total debt. So it would
still be allowed even if the borrow-
ing limit wasn’t raised. But it’s
possible that not enough
investors would want to buy the
new debt. That would leave the
government short of cash to pay
off its maturing debt. The result: a
default.
Q. What else could Treasury do?
A. It could make its interest pay-
ments first — then delay all other
payments until it collects enough
tax revenue to make a full day’s
payments. That would avoid
choosing among competing obli-
gations. Treasury officials favored
this approach during the last bor-
rowing-limit fight in 2011 ,
according the Treasury
Department’s inspector general.
But that approach would eventu-
ally cause extensive delays. On
Nov. 1, nearly $60 billion in
Social Security benefits, Medicare
payments and military paychecks
are due. With no increase in the
borrowing limit, those payments
could be delayed for up to two
weeks.
What happens if US breaks borrowing limit?
Q&A
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Dozens of
medical marijuana dispensaries in
Los Angeles have closed, and the
city attorney says more will be
shutting their doors soon, follow-
ing a voter-approved crackdown.
Thirty-eight pot shops that do not
comply with a municipal ballot
measure approved earlier this year
are in the process of being shuttered,
City Attorney Mike Feuer said.
Another 42 shops have decided on
their own to close since July, when
the new law took effect, he said.
Feuer promised Friday more prose-
cutions will come.
“We’re going to see a major differ-
ence in the way that operators and
property owners perceive the city,”
he told the Los Angeles Times
(http://lat.ms/17w3vyp ).
The city had struggled for more
than five years with how to regulate
the budding medical marijuana
industry. Voters in May overwhelm-
ingly passed Measure D, which
reduced the number of shops
sharply, and taxed those that were
operating legally under state and
local laws.
There were nearly 1,000 nonprofit
dispensaries in the city a few years
ago. The measure allows only the
134 that opened before a moratori-
um was attempted in 2007.
Shops that meet the voter-
approved criteria must move if
they’re located within 600 feet of a
park, a school or a child-care facili-
t y.
To date, no pot shop operators or
landlords — who also can be prose-
cuted under the law — have been
jailed or fined, Feuer said.
City councilors passed an ordi-
nance in 2010 to cut the number of
shops to 70, but dispensaries filed
lawsuits and the ordinance expired in
2012. The city then approved a ban,
but repealed it two months later after
enough signatures were gathered to
put Measure D and two competing
proposals on the ballot.
LA cracking down on pot dispensaries under new law
<< NFL Capsules: Patriots beat Saints page 15
• Dodgers prep for Cardinals page 14
Monday, Oct. 14, 2013
MLB PLAYOFFS: RED SOX BEAT TIGERS>> PAGE 13
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
We believe the appropriate term
for the Menlo College women’s
soccer team right now is “on fire.”
The Lady Oaks once again won
in impressive fashion on
Wunderlich Field Saturday as they
tallied their seventh consecutive
win via a 6-2 drubbing of Simpson
University.
The Lady Oaks were aided by a
pair of multi-goal performances
from Victoria Piazza (13th and
25th minutes) and Danielle
McCarthy (64th and 75th min-
utes) as four different players got
in on the scoring action Saturday.
Despite the lopsided final,
Simpson was first on the board in
the game courtesy of a Natalie
Goens goal off a free kick in the
9th minute of play. It was the first
time Menlo trailed in a game since
Sept. 21.
But Piazza notched the first of
her two first-half goals off a
Natalie Ingram assist in the 13th
minute. The junior from Tracy,
Calif. wasn't done yet, however,
as she worked herself into perfect
position in the box to drive home
a deflected shot in the 24th minute
for her second goal of the game
and third of the season.
Menlo scored one more time in
the first half when Raquel DeJesus
fired a penalty kick past Simpson
keeper Natasha Webb in the 32nd
minute to send the Lady Oaks into
the break leading 3-1.
Simpson again was first on the
board in the second half Natalie
Goens scored off the assist from
Kendra Kaiserman in the 47th
minute, but that would conclude
the scoring effort for the Red
Hawks. Menlo quickly answered
in the 50th minute when Tiare
Fuentes scored off the assist from
Rielle Dopke to make it 4-2.
McCarthy took over from there
scoring a pair of unassisted goals
in the 64th and 75th minutes to
run the score to 6-2. McCarthy
now leads the Lady Oaks with six
goals this season.
The win improves Menlo's cur-
rent winning streak to seven
It’s a winning weekend for Menlo College soccer
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A trip to paradise got off to a
rocky start for the Notre Dame de
Namur soccer teams.
The Lady Argos, who will spend
the next four games (10 days) in
Hawaii, were shut out in a 1-0 loss
to Hawaii Pacific University in
what marks NDNU’s second
straight game without a goal — no
goals against Fresno Pacific
resulted in one point and a draw.
It was a frustrating loss for
NDNU considering that, defen-
sively, they played well enough
with Amy Rich and her eight saves
leading the way.
But a late goal in the 89th
minute on a self-volley by Ashlyn
Ubongen was the difference in the
game. Ubongen gave the Argos
problems the entire afternoon
with four total shots on goal —
the last of which went into the net.
Still, overall it was a rocky start
for the Argos offensively. For the
game, they only forced Hawaii
Pacific goalkeeper Anu Kahele-
Manners to make a pair a saves
while attempting 11 total shots.
Former PacWest Player of the
Week Adriana Cortes had NDNU’s
best chance to score in the first
half when her shot was saved by
Kahele-Manners in the 25th
minute. Both Argo shots on goal
came in the first half.
The loss drops Notre Dame de
Namur to 4-6-1 overall and 2-2 in
PacWest play. Their stay in Hawaii
continues with three games next
week — against University of
Hawaii-Hilo, BYU Hawaii and
Chaminade University respective-
l y. Notre Dame is winless away
from their home field in Belmont.
NDNU returns to California and
Belmont Oct. 24 in a game against
Azusa Pacific University.
Over on the men’s side of the
NDNU soccer spectrum, the Argos
helped the same Sea Warriors kick
NDNU Argos soccer has a
rough start to Hawaii trip
ED SZCZEPANSKI-USA TODAY SPORTS
SF 49ers free safety Eric Reid (35) attempts to recover a fumble during the third quarter against the Arizona Car-
dinals at Candlestick Park.The San Francisco 49ers defeated the Arizona Cardinals 32-20.
See MENLO, Page 12
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Everybody
on the San Francisco 49ers under-
stood the plan perfectly: Get the
ball to Vernon Davis.
He lined up as a wide receiver and
in his natural spot at tight end. He
made an acrobatic, over-the-shoul-
der catch on the sideline even
coach Jim Harbaugh thought was
nearly impossible, and Davis went
straight over the middle for big
gains, too.
Davis caught touchdown passes
of 61 and 35 yards and finished
with a career-best 180 yards
receiving, leading the 49ers past
the Arizona Cardinals 32-20 on
Sunday for their third straight vic-
tory.
“It’s just one of those days,
when you’re in the zone,” Davis
said. “It’s a beautiful thing.”
If Davis keeps this up, perhaps
San Francisco can stop worrying
about the passing game until
Michael Crabtree returns from
injury as soon as next month.
Colin Kaepernick threw for 252
yards and Frank Gore rushed for
101 yards on 25 carries for his sec-
ond 100-yard game of the season.
49ers crush Cards
See ARGOS, Page 12
See 49ERS, Page12
By Dave Skretta
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Raiders
coach Dennis Allen insists that
Terrelle Pryor is growing with
every play in the NFL, even the
ones that end up with the young
quarterback flat on his back.
There were 10 of those on
Sunday.
The Kansas City Chiefs brought
a relentless blitz against
Oakland’s patchwork offensive
line, making life miserable for
Pryor all afternoon.
He wound up throwing three sec-
ond-half interceptions that proved
costly in a 24-7 defeat that ended
the Raiders’ six-game win streak at
Arrowhead Stadium.
“I think it’s a great learning
experience for him,” Allen said,
“and I think he’ll be better for it
when he gets put back in this type
of environment again.”
The 10 sacks were a factor in the
game. The interceptions made the
difference.
The Chiefs (6-0) and Raiders
Raiders fall to Chiefs
See RAIDERS, Page 12
SPORTS 12
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
games and improves its record to 7-1 (4-0).
They remain the only unbeaten team in the
Cal Pac.
MEN’S SOCCER WINS
The Menlo men also welcomed Simpson
University to Wunderlich field for its first
home contest in the month of October on
Saturday and a dominating all-around per-
formance from the Oaks sent the Red Hawks
home with a 3-1 loss.
Andrew Cota set the pace for the Oaks
offense with goals in the 11th and 18th
minutes for his fourth two-goal performance
of the 2013 season. Cota now ranks fourth
in the Cal Pac with a team-leading 10 goals
this season.
Former San Mateo Bearcat and All-Daily
Journal team member Ryan Onizuka got the
Oaks on the board early with an unassisted
goal in just the third minute of play. The
goal was the fourth of the season for the
freshman who is now second on the team in
total goals behind only Cota.
The first of Cota’s two goals came off a
free kick in the 11th minute. Just minutes
later, Tung Le chipped in his second career
assist as a Menlo Oak and Cota did the rest
to cash in for a goal in the 18th minute to
put the Oaks on top 3-0.
From that point forward the Menlo
defense denied nearly every scoring oppor-
tunity for the Red Hawks en route to the win.
Simpson managed to get on the board
with an Efrain Solorzano goal off a penalty
kick in the 52nd minute but that was all the
scoring Simpson could muster as they fell
to 0-11 on the season.
The winning performance improves
Menlo to 5-3-2 on the season and 4-2 in
conference play, good for first place in the
Cal Pac’s north division.
Continued from page 11
MENLO
off a six-game home stand with a 2-2 draw.
The result was positive considering Notre
Dame was coming off a 6-0 loss to Fresno
Pacific University and runs NDNU’s record
to 4-5-2 and 1-2-2 in PacWest play.
The game was played under muddy condi-
tions and just 4:37 in to the game, HPU
defender Daniel Haehre played a long pass
from Marius Stensby, drawing a penalty
kick after a rough foul in the box. Pacific
West Conference goals leader Brais Garcia
would put the penalty away to give HPU an
early 1-0 lead.
The Sea Warriors struck again with less
than a minute remaining in the half when
freshman Erik Kemsies beat the Argonaut’s
goalkeeper after receiving a pass from
Felipe Silva. The 2-0 lead would hold until
the break.
But the Argos would not take that deficit
laying down. In the second half, NDNU
struck early tying the game with goals in
the 47th and 56th minutes.
Jonathan Gonzalez did the honors for the
first goal after he finished a Tyler Matas
cross with a one-touch score. The goal was
Gonzalez’s fifth of the season.
Less than 10 minutes later, Patrick
Balderramos took advantage of a loose ball
after a corner kick and equalized for his first
goal of the year.
Both sides had its chances in the remain-
der of the period, but each keeper made a pair
of tough saves down the stretch to keep
their teams in it.
After a pair of scoreless overtime periods,
the game would end in a 2-2 tie and both
teams did not score a goal in both overtime
periods.
The Argos stay in Hawaii for another three
games next week. The NDNU men have also
yet to record a winning result away from
home.
Continued from page 11
ARGOS
were tied 7-all in the third quarter when
Pryor threw the first of his picks, a rain-
bow off his back foot into the middle of
the field. Jamaal Charles finished off the
drive with his second touchdown run to
give Kansas City its first lead of the
game.
The second interception came as the
Raiders (2-4) were trying to drive for a
tying score, and this time the Chiefs’
Ryan Succop kicked a 33-yard field goal
late in the fourth quarter.
Husain Abdullah returned the final pick
44 yards for a touchdown with 1:35 left in
the game.
“We were right there in the game and we
were punching back and forth,” Pryor
said. “We turned the ball over, and like I
said, I lost the game for us. I’m going to
fall a lot, but I’m going to get up. That’s
how it is. I’m going to get up and I’m
going to come swinging.”
The Chiefs, meanwhile, pressed on with
the second-best start in franchise history
after winning just twice last season. They
won their first nine games during the
2003 season.
They wound up sacking Pryor 10 times,
and ended a three-game skid to the
Raiders.
“We don’t take any wins for granted.
That’s not how we operate,” Chiefs coach
Andy Reid said. “We’re going to enjoy
every one of these, and we’ll come back
and be ready to go next week.”
Chiefs fans were hoping to break the
record for loudest outdoor sports stadium,
set earlier this year by the Seahawks.
They finally did it in the closing seconds
of the game when they hit 137.5 decibels,
an official from Guinness World Records
told The Associated Press.
Pryor and his patchwork offensive line
struggled to deal with the crowd noise,
especially in the second half.
On one possession, Pryor was twice
whistled for delay of game penalties part-
ly because third-string center Mike
Brisiel couldn’t hear him. Oakland also
had a false start on the same drive.
The Raiders finished with 11 penalties
for 68 yards.
“It was a factor in the game,” Allen said
of the crowd. “Obviously we had some
trouble getting in and out of the huddle.
We had some trouble with snap-count
communication.”
Continued from page 11
RAIDERS
Kendall Hunter ran for a 6-yard touchdown
that sealed it for the 49ers (4-2) with 6:35
remaining.
Rookie safety Eric Reid made his team-
leading third interception and also recov-
ered a fumble to stop an Arizona drive deep
in 49ers territory in the third quarter. San
Francisco forced four turnovers for the sec-
ond straight game.
“There’s a direct correlation to winning
games in the National Football League
when you get those turnovers,” safety
Donte Whitner said.
A tough day for Arizona (3-3) became
frightening when the Cardinals lost star
defensive end Calais Campbell to an
unspecified injury late.
For the 49ers, this balanced offensive
performance was something they have
searched for from Week 1.
“I’m going to give Vernon his chances
when I can,” said Kaepernick, who got back
on track after four straight games of fewer
than 200 yards passing. “He makes a lot of
great plays.”
Carson Palmer was 25 of 41 for 298 yards
with a 75-yard touchdown pass to Larry
Fitzgerald, but inconsistent play plagued
Arizona’s offense again.
Trailing 22-14 late in the second quarter,
the Cardinals missed a big opportunity to
take momentum into halftime.
Michael Floyd was flagged for offensive
pass interference when he pushed Tarell
Brown out of the way before making what
would have been a 44-yard touchdown catch.
Floyd redeemed himself with a 10-yard TD
reception midway through the third quarter
when he got by Brown in the left corner of
the end zone. But Arizona failed on a 2-
point conversion try, leaving the 49ers up
22-20.
The Cardinals’ much-improved defense
took a big blow when Campbell was carted
off with 4:56 left. He was hurt when he land-
ed awkwardly on a tackle of Gore.
“He left the field with movement and the
feeling was coming back,” coach Bruce
Arians said. “He had numbness. It was pre-
cautionary. ”
Fitzgerald didn’t seem hampered by a ten-
der hamstring when he got between two
defenders as the 49ers tried for another
interception, and his touchdown put
Arizona ahead 7-6 late in the first quarter.
There was some question whether
Fitzgerald would play, with the Cardinals
gearing up for two games in a five-day
stretch. The Seahawks visit the desert
Thursday night. But he played in his 96th
straight game.
Continued from page 11
49ERS
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — David Ortiz revived the
Red Sox with a tying grand slam in the
eighth inning, then Jarrod Saltalamacchia
hit a winning single in the ninth as
Boston stunned the Detroit Tigers 6-5
Sunday night to even the AL champi-
onship series at 1-all.
The Tigers were cruising to their second
straight win at Fenway Park, with starter
Max Scherzer taking a no-hitter and a 5-0
lead into the sixth inning.
But with one swing, Big Papi flipped
everything. Ortiz hit a two-out shot that
sent right fielder Torii Hunter jack-knifing
into the Boston bullpen in a futile attempt
to catch the ball, making it 5-up.
Saltalamacchia’s single came after a
series of Tigers misplays in the ninth. A
wild throw, a wild pitch and a missed catch
by first baseman Prince Fielder on a foul
ball set up the game-ending hit.
The teams head to Detroit for Game 3 on
Tuesday. Justin Verlander will face
Boston’s John Lackey.
Boston’s big comeback followed a dra-
matic New England Patriots’ victory right
down the road in which Tom Brady threw
the game-winning touchdown pass with 5
seconds left to beat New Orleans. The
score was greeted with cheers by Red Sox
fans waiting for the baseball game to start.
A day after Anibal Sanchez and the
Detroit staff combined on a one-hitter for
a 1-0 win, Scherzer excelled. He fanned 13
while allowing two hits in seven innings,
and was pulled after 108 pitches.
“It’s playoff baseball,” Tigers manager
Jim Leyland said. “Looked like we had
one in hand and we let one get away,
there’s no question about that. But there
have been two great games.”
Miguel Cabrera and Alex Avila homered
off Clay Buchholz in Detroit’s four-run
sixth inning.
Boston scored once in the bottom of the
sixth and then loaded the bases against
three relievers in the eighth before closer
Joaquin Benoit came in to face Ortiz.
On his first pitch, Ortiz hit a line drive
into the glove of the Red Sox bullpen
catcher, with Hunter flopping headfirst
over the chest-high wall in pursuit.
The fans waited until the trainers verified
that Hunter was OK to start chanting,
“Papi!” and call the Red Sox slugger out
of the dugout for a curtain call.
It was the first career postseason grand
slam for Ortiz, a star of the 2004 playoff
run that ended in Boston’s first World
Series title in 86 years.
“When you consider down four runs, not
a very likely scenario that you come back
from that many runs that late in the
game,” Red Sox manager John Farrell
said.
Koji Uehara pitched a perfect ninth for
the win. Rick Porcello took the loss.
Jonny Gomes led off the bottom half
against Porcello with groundball to the
left of shortstop Jose Iglesias, a defensive
replacement. The former Red Sox prospect
fielded it but rushed the throw and it
bounced past Fielder and into the Boston
dugout as Gomes slid headfirst into the
bag with an infield hit.
With Gomes on second because of the
error, Saltalamacchia hit a high popup
near the rolled-up tarp that bounced off
Fielder’s glove.
Afan reached up trying to catch the foul.
Fielder looked as if he wanted an interfer-
ence call — replays showed he simply let
the ball glance off his glove.
Gomes took third on Porcello’s wild
pitch and Saltalamacchia hit a sharp
grounder through the left side of the
drawn-in infield to set off a celebration on
the Fenway infield.
Scherzer, who led the majors with 21
wins, struck out 13 and did not allow a hit
until Shane Victorino singled to left with
two outs in the sixth.
It was an unprecedented third consecu-
tive playoff game in which a Tigers starter
took a no-hit bid into the sixth inning.
SPORTS 13
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – I
recently received a
phone call from a
local realtor who
was shocked to find
an urn with
cremated remains
located in the closet
of an empty house under renovation. He
had been told by someone working on the
property to just throw these cremated
remains into a dumpster, which didn’t seem
right, and he wanted my advice. I told him
that under no circumstances are cremated
remains to be thrown into a dumpster. In
cases where unidentified human remains are
discovered, the County Coroner’s Office is
to be notified so they can investigate and
determine the appropriate course of action.
Discovering unidentified or seemingly
abandoned cremated remains is disturbing
but not uncommon. Stories of cremated
remains being found on their own in an
unoccupied house or apartment is a problem
that is significant and needs to be addressed.
I’ve met with countless families at the
Chapel of the Highlands who’ve selected
cremation as the final disposition. Even
though these families have decided on
cremation, this is still not the final step of
the process. The next-of-kin is required to
inform us on where the cremated remains
are to go after the physical cremation has
taken place. The cremated remains can
either to be inurned in a cemetery, scattered
at sea or taken to the residence of the next-
of-kin. Those who select to keep the
cremated remains at home feel a desire to
have their loved one’s ashes close to them,
or simply have not decided on a final
location to place their loved one’s cremains.
The key concept for these families to
understand is that keeping cremated remains
at home is a temporary solution and not a
final destination. Some may think that the
cremated remains will be passed down to
following generations and cared for in their
family, but this idea is not being realistic. It
is important to be prepared with a plan to
place the cremated remains in a more
permanent location such as a cemetery or
having them scattering at sea. At the Chapel
of the Highlands we regularly assist families
by guiding them toward a comfortable
solution when these types of situations come
up. Even after long periods with cremated
remains being kept at home we can always
help families in making the correct decisions
and to plan for the future.
Remember, if cremated remains are kept
at home, no matter how well intended,
unforeseen situations can and do come up.
The next-of-kin, who has custody of the
cremated remains, may become ill or pass
away without leaving instructions on what to
do if the cremated remains are left behind.
No matter what the situation you can call us
at the Chapel of the Highlands and we will
help in finding an appropriate solution for
placement of the cremated remains.
If you are still keeping cremated remains
at home please plan a permanent disposition
by leaving instructions in a will, with family
or an executor. This will help insure that the
cremains will be given a final resting place
and shown the respect they deserve.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Cremated Remains Found
In Unoccupied Residence
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SPORTS 14
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ST. LOUIS — Star shortstop
Hanley Ramirez was a late lineup
scratch for the Los Angeles
Dodgers in Game 2 of the NL
championship series because of
sore ribs that hindered his swing,
and his availability was in doubt
for Game 3.
Manager Don Mattingly
learned X-rays were negative dur-
ing Saturday’s 1-0 loss to the St.
Louis Cardinals put them down 2-
0 in the best-of-seven series.
“I don’t know what that means
at this point,” Mattingly said.
“If he can move and be able to
swing the bat, then he’d be able
to play.
“So, I don’t know where that’s
going to go.”
A CT scan was scheduled for
Sunday, a day off for both teams.
Ramirez was hit by a pitch in the
ribs in the first inning of Game
1 .
“It hurts,” Ramirez said. “We
just want to make sure we do
everything we can do to fix it.”
Ramirez batted .500 (8 for 16)
in the division series against
Atlanta, tying the NL division
record with six extra-base hits,
with a homer and six RBIs.
Lingering soreness
Andre Ethier was out with lin-
gering soreness after making his
first postseason start in Game 1
and playing 13 innings in center
field. Ethier struck out pinch-hit-
ting to end the game.
Earlier in the day, Mattingly
had described Ramirez as “iffy”
and a gametime decision. Not
long after Ramirez made a leap-
ing catch on a soft liner by Matt
Holliday in the bottom of the
first Friday night, he was bent
over in the dugout and getting
medical attention.
Ramirez said the decision was
made at the “last minute.”
“I was trying to go all day, ”
Ramirez said. “I tried to hit and
it didn’t work the way we wanted
it to work.”
In place of Ethier
Skip Schumaker started in cen-
ter field in place of Ethier and
Nick Punto started at shortstop,
batting seventh and eighth.
Carl Crawford and Mark Ellis
remained in the top two spots of
the order and the rest moved up a
slot with Adrian Gonzalez bat-
ting third and Yasiel Puig at
cleanup.
Puig struck out all four at-bats
and is 0 for 10 the first two
games.
Ramirez rib injury ongoing concern for Dodgers
REUTERS
Hanley Ramirez slides into third after hitting a triple in game three against
the Atlana Braves.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Tom Brady’s
17-yard touchdown pass to Kenbrell
Thompkins with 5 seconds left gave the
New England Patriots a wild 30-27 win and
knocked the New Orleans Saints from the
ranks of the unbeaten Sunday.
It capped a 70-yard drive in which the
Patriots marched downfield with no timeouts
after getting the ball with 1:08 to go.
The Saints (5-1) had taken a 24-23 lead
with 3:29 remaining on Drew Brees’ 34-yard
touchdown pass to Kenny Stills, but could-
n’t put away New England.
The Patriots (5-1) survived an intercep-
tion by Keenan Lewis on their first snap
after Garrett Hartley’s 39-yard field goal
made it 27-23.
PACKERS 19, RAVENS 17
BALTIMORE — Aaron Rodgers threw a
64-yard touchdown pass to Jordy Nelson,
Mason Crosby kicked four field goals and
Green Bay held on to beat Baltimore.
Eddie Lacy rushed for 120 yards to fuel the
Packers’ first road win of the season. Green
Bay (3-2) took a 16-3 lead into the fourth
quarter and was up 19-10 with 4 minutes left,
but the Ravens (3-3) kept coming back.
After Baltimore closed to 19-17 on an 18-
yard touchdown pass from Joe Flacco to
Dallas Clark with 2:04 remaining, Rodgers
clinched the victory with a 52-yard comple-
tion to Jermichael Finley on a third-and-3.
Rodgers went 17 for 32 for 315 yards.
Despite playing without injured line-
backer Clay Matthews, the Packers limited
Baltimore to 47 yards rushing and registered
five sacks, including three by A.J. Hawk.
The defending Super Bowl champion
Ravens had won 13 straight at home against
NFC foes.
BRONCOS 35, JAGUARS 19
DENVER — Peyton Manning threw for
two scores and Knowshon Moreno ran for
three to lead Denver to a tougher-than-
expected victory over winless Jacksonville.
The Broncos (6-0) came in as 27-point
favorites, and much of the pregame hype
centered on whether they’d cover the spread
and when Manning would come out of the
game.
Neither happened.
Manning finished 28 for 42 for 295 yards,
but lost two fumbles and threw a pick-6 — a
59-yard interception return by Paul
Posluszny that pulled the Jaguars (0-6) with-
in 14-12 at halftime.
It was a two-point game late in the third
quarter, before Moreno scored his last touch-
down, an 8-yard run, for a 28-19 lead.
Moreno finished with 42 yards.
Justin Blackmon had 14 catches for 190
yards for Jacksonville.
STEELERS 19, JETS 6
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Ben
Roethlisberger threw a 55-yard touchdown
pass to Emmanuel Sanders, Shaun Suisham
kicked four field goals, and Pittsburgh won
its first game of the season.
The Steelers (1-4) were off to their worst
start since 1968, when they lost their first
six games during a season in which they fin-
ished 2-11-1. Sunday’s victory was also the
600th in franchise history, including the
postseason, as Pittsburgh became only the
fourth team to reach the milestone.
Pittsburgh was coming off a bye-week
break and appeared quite a bit sharper than
New York (3-3), which had a short week to
prepare after a 30-28 win at Atlanta last
Monday night.
Geno Smith was intercepted twice by a
Steelers defense that entered the game as the
only team in the league without a takeaway.
PANTHERS 35, VIKINGS 10
MINNEAPOLIS — Cam Newton threw
three touchdown passes and ran for another
score, and Carolina romped past Adrian
Peterson and Minnesota.
Peterson finished with 62 yards on 10 car-
ries and 21 yards on three receptions, but the
Vikings (1-4) trailed the whole game and
didn’t have much use after halftime for
Peterson. The NFLMVPlearned Friday that a
2-year-old son of his died in South Dakota of
injuries from alleged abuse.
Matt Cassel threw two interceptions, both
to Mike Mitchell, and the Panthers (2-3)
responded each time with a touchdown.
Whether the team was distracted by the
tragedy or not, the Vikings were thoroughly
embarrassed on both sides of the ball.
RAMS 38, TEXANS 13
HOUSTON — Sam Bradford threw three
touchdown passes, St. Louis added a score
on defense and special teams and the Rams
stunned mistake-prone Houston.
The Rams (3-3) were up 24-6 early in the
third quarter before rookie Daren Bates
returned Keshawn Martin’s fumble on a kick-
off return for a touchdown.
Alec Ogletree pushed the lead to 38-6
when he took an interception by T.J. Yates
back 98 yards for a touchdown. Yates was in
after Matt Schaub sustained an apparent
right ankle injury.
Schaub didn’t have a turnover after throw-
ing six interceptions, three of them returned
for touchdowns in the past three games.
But several other Texans had key gaffes as
preseason Super Bowl hopeful Houston (2-
4) lost its fourth straight game.
SEAHAWKS 20, TITANS 13
SEATTLE — Marshawn Lynch ran for two
touchdowns and had 155 all-purpose yards,
Richard Sherman came up with his third
interception of the season, and Seattle final-
ly shook Tennessee in the fourth quarter.
Seattle (5-1) won its 11th straight at home
despite a long list of mistakes that allowed
the Titans (3-3) to hang around into the
fourth. There was a careless turnover, missed
defensive assignments and a comical muffed
field goal attempt that led to the Titans’ only
touchdown on the final play of the first half.
But the Seahawks made enough plays
thanks to Lynch, quarterback Russell
Wilson and Sherman’s interception to
remain on top of the NFC West. Lynch had
TD runs of 3 yards and 1 yard.
BENGALS 27, BILLS 24 OT
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Mike Nugent
hit a 43-yard field goal with 6:44 left in
overtime.
Brandon Tate’s 29-yard punt return to the
Bills 33 set up the decisive score. Andy
Dalton went 26 of 40 for 337 yards, with
three touchdowns and an interception. He
bounced back after a two-game touchdown
drought and led the Bengals (4-2) to their
first road win of the season.
The Bills (2-4) were led by quarterback
Thad Lewis, starting in place of injured
rookie EJ Manuel. Lewis went 19 of 32 for
216 yards and two touchdowns after being
promoted off the practice squad last week.
Both touchdown passes came in the fourth
quarter, including a 40-yarder to Marquise
Goodwin with 1:08 remaining.
Lewis also scored a touchdown rushing in
making only his second career start.
LIONS 31, BROWNS 17
CLEVELAND — Matthew Stafford threw
three of his four touchdown passes in the
second half, rallying Detroit.
The Lions (4-2) outscored the Browns 24-
0 in the second half, sealing their win when
Stafford hooked up with tight end Joseph
Fauria with 2:01 left. Fauria caught three TD
passes for the Lions, who played like a com-
pletely different team in the second half after
being dominated up front and trailing 17-7
at the half.
The Browns (3-3) had their chances at a
comeback end when quarterback Brandon
Weeden’s baffling shovel pass with 4:36 left
was intercepted by linebacker DeAndre
Levy.
Lions running back Reggie Bush finished
with 135 total yards, 121 in the second half.
Stafford finished 25 of 43 for 248 yards.
EAGLES 31, BUCCANEERS 20
TAMPA, Fla. — Nick Foles threw three
touchdown passes and ran for a fourth, lead-
ing Philadelphia over winless Tampa Bay.
Foles finished a long first-quarter scoring
drive with a 4-yard run and threw TD passes
of 12 and 36 yards to DeSean Jackson.
With the injured Michael Vick active but
not playing, Foles made his seventh career
start and beat the Bucs (0-5) for the second
time. He was 1-5 as a rookie a year ago, with
that victory also coming at Tampa Bay.
But unlike last December, he didn’t have
to throw a last-second TD pass for the win.
He gave the Eagles (3-3) the lead for good
with a 47-yard scoring pass to Riley Cooper
in the third quarter, then gave his team
breathing room with his second TD pass to
Jackson.
SPORTS 15
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 166 179
Dallas 3 3 0 .500 183 152
Washington 1 4 0 .200 107 143
N.Y. Giants 0 6 0 .000 103 209
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 5 1 0 .833 161 103
Carolina 2 3 0 .400 109 68
Atlanta 1 4 0 .200 122 134
Tampa Bay 0 5 0 .000 64 101
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 4 2 0 .667 162 140
Chicago 4 2 0 .667 172 161
Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 137 114
Minnesota 1 4 0 .200 125 158
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 5 1 0 .833 157 94
San Francisco 4 2 0 .667 145 118
St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 141 154
Arizona 3 3 0 .500 111 127
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 5 1 0 .833 125 97
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 104 135
Buffalo 2 4 0 .333 136 157
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 1 0 .800 139 79
Tennessee 3 3 0 .500 128 115
Houston 2 4 0 .333 106 177
Jacksonville 0 6 0 .000 70 198
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 4 2 0 .667 121 111
Baltimore 3 3 0 .500 134 129
Cleveland 3 3 0 .500 118 125
Pittsburgh 1 4 0 .200 88 116
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 6 0 0 1.000 152 65
Denver 6 0 0 1.000 265 158
San Diego 2 3 0 .400 125 129
Oakland 2 4 0 .333 105 132
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 6 5 1 0 10 23 15
Boston 4 3 1 0 6 10 5
Montreal 5 3 2 0 6 17 10
Detroit 5 3 2 0 6 13 13
Tampa Bay 5 3 2 0 6 18 14
Ottawa 5 1 2 2 4 11 16
Florida 6 2 4 0 4 13 24
Buffalo 6 0 5 1 1 6 16
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 5 4 1 0 8 20 13
Carolina 6 2 2 2 6 13 18
N.Y. Islanders 5 2 2 1 5 16 13
Columbus 4 2 2 0 4 11 10
New Jersey 6 0 3 3 3 11 21
N.Y. Rangers 5 1 4 0 2 9 25
Washington 5 1 4 0 2 13 20
Philadelphia 6 1 5 0 2 8 17
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 5 5 0 0 10 18 4
St. Louis 4 4 0 0 8 19 7
Chicago 5 3 1 1 7 15 13
Minnesota 5 2 1 2 6 14 12
Winnipeg 6 3 3 0 6 17 16
Dallas 4 2 2 0 4 9 11
Nashville 5 2 3 0 4 9 15
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 5 5 0 0 10 24 7
Anaheim 5 4 1 0 8 18 12
Calgary 5 3 0 2 8 18 17
Phoenix 6 4 2 0 8 17 17
Los Angeles 6 4 2 0 8 16 14
Vancouver 6 3 3 0 6 17 20
Edmonton 5 1 3 1 3 17 25
NOTE:Two points for a win,one point for overtime
loss.
Saturday’s Games
Boston 3, Columbus 1
Toronto 6, Edmonton 5, OT
Detroit 5, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 5, Tampa Bay 4
Colorado 5, Washington 1
Chicago 2, Buffalo 1
St. Louis 5, N.Y. Rangers 3
Nashville 3, N.Y. Islanders 2
Minnesota 5, Dallas 1
Montreal 4, Vancouver 1
San Jose 3, Ottawa 2
Sunday’s Games
Phoenix 5, Carolina 3
Los Angeles 3, Florida 0
Winnipeg 3, New Jersey 0
Anaheim 4, Ottawa 1
Monday’s Games
Detroit at Boston, 11 a.m.
Edmonton at Washington, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m.
Sunday’sSportsTransactions
National HockeyLeague
MINNESOTAWILD—Reassigned G Darcy Kuem-
per to Iowa (AHL).
American Hockey League
GRANDRAPIDSGRIFFINS—Announced G Jared
Coreau was reassigned to Toledo (ECHL).
MILWAUKEEADMIRALS—Assigned G Scott Dar-
ling to Cincinnati (ECHL). ECHL
DENVER CUTTHROATS—Waived Fs Jeff Nieten-
bach, Beau Walker, Brandon Metz, Jordan Either,
Nick Polaski, Brent Sands, August Aiken and Scott
Stafford; Ds Andrew Jasicki, Dustin Henning and
Bill Horton, and G Casey Sherwood.
QUADCITY MALLARDS—Waived Fs Tony Rizzi,
Stephen Genua,Rob Dongara and John Heffernan
and Ds Mike Grace and Matt Carlson.
RAPID CITYRUSH—Waived G Alex Dupuis and
Fs Tyler Gjurich and Cody Keefer.
WICHITATHUNDER—Waived Fs Jeff Martens and
Karol Csanyi; Ds Nick Schneider, Zach Firlotte and
Paul Kurceba, and G John Griggs.
Saturday’sSportsTransactions
National Football League
CLEVELANDBROWNS—SignedWRCharlesJohn-
son from the Green Bay practice squad. Placed QB
Brian Hoyer in injured reserve.
KANSASCITYCHIEFS—Placed TE Travis Kelce on
injured reserve. Signed DB Bradley McDougald
from the practice squad.
NEWENGLANDPATROITS—Signed DL Marcus
Forstonfromthepracticesquad.ReleasedDTAndre
Neblett.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released C Jason Spitz.
Signed WR Bryan Walters from the practice squad.
Sunday’sGames
Carolina 35, Minnesota 10
Kansas City 24, Oakland 7
St. Louis 38, Houston 13
Green Bay 19, Baltimore 17
Philadelphia 31,Tampa Bay 20
Pittsburgh 19, N.Y. Jets 6
Cincinnati 27, Buffalo 24, OT
Detroit 31, Cleveland 17
Seattle 20,Tennessee 13
Denver 35, Jacksonville 19
San Francisco 32, Arizona 20
New England 30, New Orleans 27
Dallas 31,Washington 16
Open: Atlanta, Miami
Monday’sGame
Indianapolis at San Diego, 5:40 p.m.
NHL GLANCE TRANSACTIONS
By Schuyler Dixon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas — Dwayne
Harris and the Dallas defense were
so good that Tony Romo didn’t
have to do it all for the Cowboys.
Harris returned a punt 86 yards
for a touchdown and set up anoth-
er score with a 90-yard kickoff
return, helping the Cowboys hand
Robert Griffin III his first loss in
his home state with a 31-16 vic-
tory against the Washington
Redskins on Sunday night.
Romo had just 170 yards pass-
ing a week after getting 506 in a
wild 51-48 loss to Denver.
That’s because Harris had 222
total return yards and Kyle Wilber
forced and recovered a fumble on a
sack of Griffin that left the
Cowboys needing just 3 yards for
a clinching score in the fourth
quarter.
The Cowboys (3-3) gave owner
Jerry Jones a win on his 71st
birthday.
Dallas kept the defending NFC
East champion Redskins (1-4)
from building any momentum
after a win and a bye following an
0-3 start.
Joseph Randle, playing because
running back DeMarco Murray
was out with a sprained left knee,
got his first career touchdown
after Wilber’s big play. He scored
from the 1 when he stayed on his
feet with a defender draped over
him and was pushed into the end
zone by center and fellow rookie
Travis Frederick for a 31-16 lead.
Harris’ punt return gave Dallas a
14-3 lead in the second quarter,
and the big kickoff return came
after Kai Forbath’s third field goal
pulled Washington to 14-9 in the
third.
Romo finished the job after
Harris’ long kick return. He
stepped out of a potential sack
and threw off balance into the cor-
ner of the end zone, where
Terrance Williams got two feet
down just as he made the catch and
was pushed out of bounds by E.J.
Biggers for a 15-yard score and a
21-9 lead.
Griffin, who was brilliant in a
Thanksgiving win at the
Cowboys as a rookie last year,
said he was rejuvenated after a bye
following the Redskins’ first win
of the season against Oakland.
And he looked it.
The 2011 Heisman Trophy win-
ner from Baylor had 246 yards
passing and another 77 rushing as
the Redskins outgained Dallas
416 to 213.
Alfred Morris, who had a career-
high 200 yards rushing when the
Redskins beat the Cowboys in a
playoffs-or-bust finale last year,
was held in check before a 45-yard
touchdown run trimmed Dallas’
lead to 21-16 in the third quarter.
Morris finished with 81 yards.
Morris’ touchdown came a play
after safety Barry Church was
penalized for unnecessary rough-
ness when he hit Griffin as the
quarterback scrambled out of
bounds. That was the second time
in the third quarter that Church
was penalized 15 yards for a hit on
Griffin along the sideline.
Murray ran 4 yards for a touch-
down on Dallas’ opening drive,
but left early in the second quarter
with a sprained left knee.
The Cowboys also lost defen-
sive end DeMarcus Ware before
halftime because of a right quad
injury.
Redskins linebacker Bryan
Kehl left with a sprained left
knee, and cornerback David
Amerson was ruled out after sus-
taining a concussion.
There were flags along the
Redskins sideline after Harris’
punt return with 2:26 left in the
first half. But the penalty was for
someone not in uniform on the
Redskins bench inadvertently
bumping into an official during
the play. The score stood and the
unsportsmanlike conduct penalty
was enforced on the kickoff.
Another Washington penalty
had provided Harris with a second
chance at a return. The Redskins
were flagged for illegal motion,
and Dallas accepted the penalty
that forced them to kick again,
setting up the fifth-longest punt
return in Cowboys history.
Harris, defense carry Cowboys past Redskins 31-16
DATEBOOK 17
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
V
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located in San Carlos, VIP serves
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www.vilmont.com
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of homes for sale in your area.
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I
s your neighbor’s dog howling at the
moon or barking through the night?
We hear about this common issue
from residents in every community. Most
people explain they have tried yelling at
the dog or banging on the fence. That’s
human nature — we want to do something
quick, easy and avoid confrontation with
the dog’s owner. It might even feel good to
pound the fence when we’re frustrated. But,
an aggressive approach generally makes
the problem worse. Before I go further, I
should note that barking dog complaints
should be directed to your city’s police
department, as these complaints are treated
like other public disturbance issues. This,
however, isn’t your only recourse. It’s
always helpful to understand why a dog
might be barking. Some bark when they
are excited or bored. Some bark to protect
their territory. We believe many dogs bark
out of boredom. Dogs left alone for hours
without adequate stimulation and exercise
often resort to barking. The first and best
step is direct contact with the dog’s owner;
we strongly recommend a friendly, caring
approach. The dog’s owner may not even
realize his or her dog is barking if the
barking occurs while they are at work, for
example. You can always refer dog owners
to Peninsula Humane Society’s free animal
behavior helpline. Our staff will kindly
recommend bringing the dog inside if left
out at night, and/or rigorous exercise prior
to being left alone during the day. We’ll
also suggest hiring a dog walker or even a
mature youngster in your neighborhood
you would trust to walk your dog.
Remember, the dog might be barking at
you, the stranger on the other side of the
fence. Offer to meet your neighbor’s dog
and become familiar with each other. That
is a great way to begin a conversation, as
many of us like showing off our dogs!
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer
Service, Behavior and Training, Education,
Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty
Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR
program areas and staff. His companion,
Murray, oversees him.
By Derrick J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — “Gravity”
won’t be held down.
The Warner Bros. astronaut
adventure directed by Alfonso
Cuaron and starring Sandra
Bullock and George Clooney
landed in the top spot at the box
office for the second weekend in a
row, according to studio esti-
mates Sunday.
“Gravity” earned $44.3 mil-
lion, raising its domestic total to
$123.4 million.
“They say what goes up must
come down, but that’s not really
true with ‘Gravity,”’ said Paul
Dergarabedian, senior media ana-
lyst for box office tracker
Rentrak. “To have opened as big
as it did last week and only drop
21 percent, that’s really an amaz-
ing hold. It’s a direct testament
to the word of mouth on the
movie.”
“Gravity” also fared well over-
seas, making $28 million in 38
territories such as Russia,
Australia, Germany and Spain.
Sony’s “Captain Phillips”
launched in second place with a
respectable $26 million. The
high seas drama directed by Paul
Greengrass stars Tom Hanks as a
cargo ship captain who is held
captive by Somali pirates.
“We think the success of
‘Gravity’ will also bode well for
‘Captain Phillips,”’ said Rory
Bruer, head of distribution for
Sony Pictures. “This is the
extraordinary kind of film that
we think audiences will flock to
over the next several months
moving forward.”
The animated Sony movie
“Cloudy with a Chance of
Meatballs 2” gobbled up third
place in its third weekend with
$14. 2 million, bringing its
domestic haul to $78 million.
The weekend’s only other new
release, “Machete Kills,” opened
in fourth place with $3.8 mil-
lion. The gun-toting sequel from
director Robert Rodriguez and
starring Danny Trejo and
Michelle Rodriguez is the fol-
low-up to “Machete,” which
earned $11.4 million when it
opened in 2010.
‘Gravity’ eclipses ‘Phillips’ at box office
1.“Gravity,”$44.3 million ($28 mil-
lion international).
2.“Captain Phillips,”$26 million.
3. “Cloudy with a Chance Of
Meatballs 2,”$14.2 million ($9.1
million international).
4. “Machete Kills,” $3.8 million
($575,000 international).
5.“Runner Runner,” $3.7 million
($5.3 million international).
6.“Prisoners,” $3.7 million ($7.4
million international).
7.“Insidious:Chapter 2,”$2.6 mil-
lion ($7.1 million international).
8.“Rush,”$2.4 million ($6 million
international).
9.“Don Jon,”$2.3 million.
10.“Baggage Claim,”$2 million.
Top 10 movies
“Gravity”earned $44.3 million at the
box office over the weekend.
THEDAILYJOURNAL
TOM JUNG
CuriOdyssey Gala Co-Chairs Danielle Simon,left,and Kaarin Hardy,center,get to know Horus,
a peregrine falcon, with the help of Animal Enrichment Keeper Jennifer Gale. Horus and
other animals met the guests at the fundraiser in Hillsborough on Sept. 28. CuriOdyssey is a
science and wildlife center at Coyote Point in San Mateo that offers up-close encounters
with native wildlife, along with hand-on science education programs.
Close-up encounters
Au Pair Care au pairs Shoko Yoshimoto (Japan/San Mateo), Mai Koike (Japan/San Mateo),
Silvia Samajova (Czech Republic/Burlingame),Ines Grabengiesser (Germany/Hillsborough),
Clarissa Egelhof (Germany/Burlingame),Irina Potapov (Germany/Burlingame) and Chie Naito
(Japan/Burlingame) picked up trash on the bay shores of San Mateo’s Ryder Park during the
29th annual California Coastal Cleanup Day,sponsored by the California Coastal Commission
and staffed by community members.The Commission estimates well over 500,000 pounds
of garbage and recyclables were collected in this annual one-day effort.
Au pairs clean-up
18
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013
AAA recently donated $5,000 to
the San Mateo Fire Department
for high hose nozzles and cadet
helmets.
Fire
donation
LOCAL/NATION 19
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
California. It would be dangerous because
foreigners were not allowed in Spanish
California. This didn’t daunt Smith and he
chose 16 of his men to accompany him on
the trip.
The journey was horrible. He had no
knowledge of how to travel the deserts and
lack of streams and water almost killed them
as they traveled west. They finally reached
Mission Gabriel Mission and were immedi-
ately thrown into jail because they had no
passport. Luckily, a sailor vouched for the
men and after Gov. José María de Echeandia
granted him permission to stay a while, he
told Smith and his men to return going east
out of California. Smith obeyed part of this
directive as he returned to the Mojave Desert
but then turned west and crossed over the
Tehachapi Mountains into the great San
Joaquin Valley. They were uninterrupted in
the travel until they reached Placerville
where Digger Indians attacked them. They
caused no harm but Smith decided not to
continue to their destination of the
Colombia River in Oregon and returned to
Salt Lake City. Smith left part of his group
at the Stanislaus River (Calif.) to trap
beaver.
There was snow on the mountains but the
group was able to cross the Sierra Nevada in
eight days. On July 3, he was back at Bear
Lake (Utah) where he sold the pelts they had
left with his group by Salt Lake. Not having
had enough excitement on the first trip,
Smith planned a return trip, this time he was
going directly to his men in the San Joaquin
Valley.
He replenished his supplies for the trip
and chose 16 men to go along with him.
Things went OK until he began crossing the
Colorado River at Needles, Calif. when the
Indians attacked the party and killed half of
them besides stealing the horses and sup-
plies. Their trip from Needles was all hard-
ship until they entered California. After
acquiring horses, the remaining group fol-
lowed the San Joaquin Valley to where they
had left their men on the first trip of trap
beaver. On Sept. 18, 1827, after two days
resting, he went to San Jose to get a pass-
port for California, but instead they were
thrown into jail at Mission San Jose. This
was a repeat of San Gabriel Mission but
eventually he got permission to travel to
Salt Lake by acting Gov. Don Luis Arguello.
Smith replenished his supplies in San
Francisco, acquired 300 horses, and lit out
for Oregon instead of going east. After
being attacked by Indians in Oregon and
losing his pelts, horses and supplies, he
continued north to the Hudson Bay
Company at Fort Vancouver where the Chief
Factor (boss) let him recover. Later, they
returned to the Indians who attacked the
group and they were able to get back much
of their gear and pelts worth $2,370 which
was enough to re-supply the group.
The group spent the winter of 1828-1829
at the fort then left for Salt Lake and a
“mountain man” reunion where they could
sell their pelts. By now, Smith told his men
that he was going to sell his business and
retire. Wanting to continue fur hunting,
there were men who wanted to buy the com-
pany, so he sold it to them and formed the
Rocky Mountain Fur Company to hunt furs
in that area. Smith, however, was talked
into taking one more trip to Santa Fe and
hunt around that area. On the trip, Smith
was killed by Comanche Indians. He was
32. His contribution in opening the routes
to California by land will always be con-
tributed to this courageous mountain man.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily Journal.
Continued from page 3
HISTORY
increases if the projected revenue is not
met.
A third new rate option would increase
cart rates but not as much as the plan rec-
ommended by city staff. That proposal calls
for a $2 increase on 20-gallon carts and $1
per month increase for 32-gallon carts. The
larger sizes would see a $5 decrease for 64
gallons and $10 drop for 96 gallons. Like
the preferred method, this option makes
some progress toward alignment, albeit
slower.
Vice Mayor Mark Olbert said Friday he
still needs to evaluate the two increase pro-
posals to parse out the differences between
the relatively minor adjustments. Although
he said the increases are understandable,
particularly as more recycling has led to
smaller garbage cans, he also knows why
residents question the yearly jumps.
“I understand exactly how frustrating it is
for people,” Olbert said.
He is also hoping by Monday’s meeting
to get some information on the charges of
commercial collection.
Councilman Ron Collins said he is still
studying the details but his usual position
is favoring systems that “pretty much
keeps the city solvent” and “revenue neu-
tral.”
One of the chief complaints he hears is
that the rate structure is unfair because those
with larger carts are not being charged the
full cost of picking up the solid waste, he
said.
Mayor Bob Grassilli had not had the
chance yet to look at the options because of
the ongoing pipeline situation with Pacific
Gas and Electric taking his time but said not
raising rates at all might be acceptable if
there aren’t any consequences in doing so.
The city receives its service from
Recology which contracts with the South
Bayside Waste Management Authority. The
SBWMA, also known as RethinkWaste,
formed in 1982 and its members include
Atherton, Belmont, Burlingame, East Palo
Alto, Foster City, Hillsborough, Menlo
Park, Redwood City, San Carlos, San
Mateo, San Mateo County and the West Bay
Sanitary District.
Nearly every member has wrangled with
service rate increases to cover the projected
change in costs and reconciling balances
owed to previous provider Allied Waste.
Last year, the San Carlos City Council
learned it needed a 12 percent rate adjust-
ment to fully fund collection services in
2013 followed by a 3.25 percent increase in
unscheduled service rates. The council ulti-
mately passed a 6 percent to 9 percent base
rate increase plus a $1-$2 additional charge
for the 20- and 30-gallon containers. Doing
both met the 12 percent adjustment needed.
Earlier this year, the city learned that
Recology overcharged San Carlos cus-
tomers more than $750,000 by collecting
money to close out the former contract with
Allied Waste even though those charges
were supposed to end in 2011. The charges
were applied to the 2012 and 2013 rates,
resulting in roughly 18 months of erro-
neous collection. In June, city officials said
the overcharging might mean customers
might not get a 2014 increase.
The credit was included as part of the 2012
revenue reconciliation included in the figur-
ing of the rates, according to
Administrative Services Director Rebecca
Mendenhall.
If the City Council does adjust the upcom-
ing rates, they will become effective Jan. 1.
The San Carlos City Council meets 7
p.m. Monday, Oct. 14 at City Hall, 600 Elm
St., San Carlos.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
GARBAGE
By Matt Volz
and Gillian Flaccus
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HELENA, Mont. — The govern-
ment shutdown is slowing the
wheels of justice in federal courts
by delaying civil cases, forcing
prosecutors to operate with skele-
ton staffs and raising uncertainty
about the system’s immediate
future if the stalemate continues
past Thursday.
That’s when federal courts offi-
cials expect the reserve funds they
have been using since the Oct. 1
start of the shutdown will run out.
Criminal cases, which are
required by law to go to a speedy
trial, are still moving ahead, as are
most bankruptcy cases and
appeals. Civil cases and those in
immigration court, however, are
feeling the greatest impact from
the shutdown.
“The Constitution tells us what
we have to do and we can’t control
our workload. It walks in the door,
whether we’re funded or not fund-
ed,” said U.S. District Court Chief
Judge Loretta Preska in New York,
who has put all civil cases except
those already in trial on hold at
the request of the U.S. Attorney
there.
She said the nearly 450 district
court employees that serve the
New York metro area will report to
work to keep criminal cases on
track even if funds run out.
Officials at courts based in San
Francisco, Philadelphia and St.
Louis, Mo., also say their
employees will work.
Prosecutors, staff and experts
from other federal agencies such as
the Fish and Wildlife Service and
the Drug Enforcement Agency
needed to help try civil cases have
been furloughed. U.S. attorneys
requested judges to temporarily set
aside some cases, while a few dis-
tricts have requested a blanket halt
to all civil cases.
In Los Angeles, 51 federal pros-
ecutors and nearly 50 staff work-
ing civil cases have been sent
home, leaving the Justice
Department to file stay requests as
deadlines approach. Some requests
have been granted, others denied,
U.S. Attorney Andri Birotte Jr.
said.
In Montana, U.S. Attorney
Mike Cotter has requested stays in
more than a dozen civil cases,
with more to come.
Just over half of Cotter’s staff
has been furloughed, and while
those who have been sent home
are eligible for unemployment
benefits, some of those who are
working without a paycheck are
considering borrowing money or
dipping into retirement savings
to make ends meet, he said.
“We all have bills, car pay-
ments, mortgages and medical
payments to make,” Cotter said.
Immigration court proceedings
are largely shut down, too.
Rafael Sanchez has been waiting
two years to make his case for a
green card after he and his family
from Bogota, Colombia, over-
stayed their U.S. tourist visa in
1997. Their New Hampshire court
hearing scheduled for Wednesday
(Oct. 9) was canceled because of
the shutdown.
Sanchez’s daughter Karina, a
high school senior, is not sure
how she’ll be able to go to col-
lege. Without a green card, she
won’t qualify for financial aid.
Her father said that after coming
from a country with so much cor-
ruption and violence, he doesn’t
understand why the leaders of this
country of plenty can’t work
together. “At what point do the
politicians think about how many
lives are dependent on them?” he
said.
Decisions on whether to delay
civil cases vary district by dis-
trict, and often, case by case.
In New York, Preska issued an
order stopping all civil cases,
except civil forfeiture cases. An
exception is the government’s
suit against Bank of America
Corp. over high-risk mortgages
sold before the financial crisis by
Countrywide Financial, which
the bank acquired in 2008.
In Washington, the Justice
Department was recently denied a
request prompted by the shutdown
to push back a November trial in
its antitrust lawsuit aimed at
blocking the merger of American
Airlines and US Airways.
In Pennsylvania, Justice
Department attorneys have asked
a judge to delay Geneva College’s
lawsuit challenging federal health
care reform mandates that would
require the Christian school to
provide employee health insur-
ance that covers forms of birth
control it finds objectionable.
Justice’s wheels slowed as shutdown hits courts
LOCAL 20
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, OCT. 14
Safeway World Championship Pumpkin
Weigh-Off. 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. IDES Grounds,
735 Main St., Half Moon Bay. Free. For more
information call 726-9652.
ItalianFestival. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. San Bruno
Senior Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Rd.
Spaghetti and meatballs for lunch, live
band with dancing and accordion music.
Tickets at the front desk. For more informa-
tion call 616-7150.
TUESDAY, OCT. 15
Dine Out. Participating restaraunts in Daly
City. Peninsula Volunteer’s Inc. Meals on
Wheels will be supported by restaurants
fromDaily City to Fremont. For more infor-
mation go to www.penvol.org/events.
San Mateo County Newcomers Club
Luncheon. Noon. Basque Cultural Center,
599 Railroad Ave., South San Francisco.
Social begins at 11:30 a.m., lunch begins at
noon, program begins at 1 p.m. There will
be a bazaar and bake sale with treasures,
baked goods and books. Deadline for pur-
chasing tickets was Wednesday, Oct. 9. For
more information call 286-0688.
Teen Read Week Celebration. 3:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas. Celebrate Teen Read Week with
treats, books and the announcement of the
winners of a short story contest. For ages
12-18. For more information email con-
rad@smcl.org.
Latino Immigrant Success Stories. 6 p.m.
San Mateo Main Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. The program will feature three
local immigrant success stories.There is free
parking in the library’s parking garage. For
more information call 533-7818.
Health Seminar. 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Foster
City Recreation Center, Lagoon Room, 650
Shell Blvd., Foster City. $35 includes a light
dinner. For more information call 415-378-
6789.
Movie screening: ‘Bully.’ 6:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Facilitated by Peninsula
Conflict Resolution. Part of San Mateo
County’s RESPECT 24/7 month-long proj-
ect. Free. For more information go to
www.smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16
Free blood-glucose level screening. 9 a.m.
to 10 a.m. Twin Pines Senior & Community
Center, 20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont. The
Sequoia Hospital will be holding this free
screening. For best results, a four hour fast is
suggested before the screening.
Beginning Word Processing. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Learn the basics of
Microsoft Word 2007. Free. For more infor-
mation email conrad@smcl.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance Weekly
NetworkingLunch. Noon to 1 p.m. Spiedo
Ristorante, 223 E. 4th Ave., San Mateo. Free
admission, $17 lunch. For more information
call 430-6500.
Teen Gaming. 3:30 p.m. Belmont Library,
1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Join
us for fun XBOX or Wii gaming with Just
Dance, Dance Central, Kinect Sports, Super
Smash Bros and more! For ages 12-19. Free.
For more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
‘Fresh’ food film screening. 6 p.m. to 9
p.m. Redwood City Library, 1066
Middlefield Rd., Redwood City. A movie
about transforming the unhealthy industri-
al food system. Light dinner, discussion
about the emerging food revolution and a
presentation. Free, but donations are
requested. To RSVP email
PRGeventinfo@gmail.com.
Zoppé Family Circus. 6:30 p.m. Red
Morton Park, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood
City. The seventh generation of Zoppé
Family Circus will be in town fromOct. 11 to
Oct. 20. Show times vary daily. Events are
wheelchair accessible andopentothe pub-
lic, all ages. Adult tickets: $15 to $25; youth
tickets: $10 to $15. For show times and
more information go to http://www.red-
woodcity.org/events/zoppe.html.
Community Needs Assessment Public
Hearing. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. San Mateo City
Hall Conference Room C, San Mateo.
Residents are invited to share their ideas
about the most important needs of their
community. Free. For more information call
522-7229.
Silent Light - Small Wonders exhibit. The
Main Gallery, 1018 Main St., Redwood City.
Exhibit runx through November 17th. For
more information call 701-1018.
THURSDAY, OCT. 17
San Mateo County Supervisor Tissier
Announces Upcoming Age Well Drive
Smart Seminars. 9 a.m. to12:30 p.m. Senior
Center, 2645 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. For more information call 363-4572.
AARP Meeting. Noon. Beresford
Recreation Center, 2720 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. For more information
call 345-5001.
Drinking with Lincoln. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El Camino Real,
San Mateo.
An Afternoon with Maggie Stiefvater. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Hear
Maggie Stiefvater, a New York Times best-
selling young adult writer and a Printz
award winner, talk about ‘The Dream
Thieves,’ the second book in ‘The Raven
Cycle’ series. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Movies for School Age Children: ‘Finding
Nemo.’ 3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public Library,
55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
Dancin’ Off the Avenue. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Downtown Burlingame, Park Road at
Burlingame Avenue, at the Burlingame
Farmers’ Market. Live music and dancing,
beer and wine garden, pet and family
friendly. Free. For more information email
burlingamebid@gmail.com.
Luau at Little House Peninsula
Volunteers. Dinner 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Dance 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Little House Activity Center,
800 Middle Ave., Menlo Park. $15 includes
dinner and dance. RSVP by Oct. 14. To RSVP
call 326-2025 ext. 222.
Burlingame Block Party. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
1200 block of Burlingame Ave., Burlingame.
The Chamber of Commerce and the
Downtown Business Improvement District
Association are hosting a block party to cel-
ebrate the completion of the first block of
the Downtown Streetscape Improvement
Project. Activities include a ribbon cutting
in front of Pottery Barn at 6pm; music; spe-
cial promotions and discounts offered by
merchants and restaurants; clown and bal-
loon artist for the kids; the Fresh Market;
and Dancin' Off the Avenue.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Broadway Caltrain Station on California
Drive and Carmelita Ave., Burlingame.There
will be a 10-vendor lineup. For more infor-
mation call 415-274-2510.
TomHuening Book Launch and Signing.
5:30 p.mto 7 p.m. San Mateo Main Library,
55W.ThirdAve., SanMateo. Joinauthor Tom
Huening and subject John Kelly to be inter-
viewed on the debut of this newbiography
- John Kelly: Samaritan. Free. For more infor-
mation contact San Mateo Public Library.
BalsamHill Community Grand Opening.
5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. 1561 Adrian Rd.,
Burlingame. There will be food trucks and
tours of their showroom. For more informa-
tion email lclark@balsambrands.com.
ZoppéFamilyCircus. 6:30p.m. RedMorton
Park, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City. The
seventh generation of Zoppé Family Circus
will be in town through Oct. 20. Showtimes
vary daily. Events are wheelchair accessible
and open to the public, all ages. Adult tick-
ets: $15 to $25; youth tickets: $10 to $15. For
show times and more information go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/zopp
e.html.
Dragon Productions presents: ‘Rich and
Famous,’ a play by John Guare, directed
byMeredithHagedorn. 8 p.m.The Dragon
Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood City. A
surreal comedy with music that is part
vaudeville, part absurd, and an entirely
funny romp through the perils of being a
successful artist. Tickets range from $25 to
$35 and can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs through Nov. 3.
FRIDAY, OCT. 18
Senior Scam Stopper. 9:30 a.m. to 11:30
a.m. Chetcuti Room, 450 Poplar Ave.,
Millbrae. Seating is limited. For more infor-
mation call 349-2200.
Rendez Vous Idol. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Rendez
Vous Cafe, 106 S. El Camino Real, San Mateo.
ZoppéFamilyCircus. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Red
Morton Park, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood
City. The seventh generation of Zoppé
Family Circus will be in town through Oct.
20. Showtimes vary daily. Events are wheel-
chair accessible and open to the public, all
ages. Adult tickets: $15 to $25; youth tickets:
$10 to $15. For showtimes and more infor-
mation go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/zopp
e.html.
Samantha Wells Guitar Liveat Angelicas.
6:30 p.m. Angelicas, 863 Main St., Redwood
City. For more information email
sam@samanthacwells.com.
Teen Open Mic Night. 6:45 p.m. to 8:45
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas. You have six minutes to show what
you’ve got. For ages 12 and up. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
Norwegian Heritage Night. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Highland Community Club, 1665
Fernside St., Redwood City. A soup supper
and Norwegian desserts will be available.
For more information call 851-1463.
NDNUMusical Arts OnStage goes to the
movies. 7:30 p.m. Notre Dame de Namur
University, Taube Center, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. The show features new hits and
old favorites, spanning from ‘The Jazz
Singer,’ through ‘Singin’ in the Rain,’ ‘The
Wizardof Oz,’ Disney oldandnew,‘Chicago,’
‘Mamma Mia,’ ‘Grease,’ ‘Hairspray,’ ‘Les
Misérables,’ and many more. Tickets are $25
general and$15 for students andseniors.To
purchase tickets go to www.brownpa-
pertickets.comor call 1-800-838-3006.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting. 7:30
p.m. Redwood City Veterans Memorial
Senior Center, 1455MadisonAve., Redwood
City. Barry Johnson of the Peninsula Rose
Society will present the film, ‘A Celebration
of Old Roses.’ Free. For more information
call 465-3967.
‘Lettice and Lovage.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Tickets start at $23 andcanbe purchasedat
www.HillbarnTheater.org or by emailing
boxoffice@hillbarntheater.org.
Dragon Productions presents: ‘Rich and
Famous,’ a play by John Guare, directed
byMeredithHagedorn. 8 p.m.The Dragon
Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood City. A
surreal comedy with music that is part
vaudeville, part absurd, and an entirely
funny romp through the perils of being a
successful artist. Tickets range from $25 to
$35 and can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs through Nov. 3.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
tually lost the seat to Stuebing, who
was appointed by the San Mateo
County Board of Supervisors to serve
the district.
Warden is leaving the City Council
after serving on it for 12 years. He told
the Daily Journal that a crop of good
candidates in the race for council this
year made him think it was a good time
to step down. With the water district
suffering from a recent embezzlement
scandal, however, and with the district
hiring a new general manager, Warden
said that a run for the water board
might bring it a little more attention
since most of its elections are often
uncontested, with candidates having to
do little campaigning or public out-
reach to win a seat on the board.
Warden is also seeking answers as to
how one of the water district’s former
employees was able to embezzle more
than $200,000 from the special tax
district that has an annual $9 million
budget and more than $17 million in
assets.
The San Mateo
County District
Attorney’s Office
filed charges last
week against
Catherine Abou-
Remeleh, 53, with
crimes that carry up
to eight years in
prison including
theft of government
funds over
$200,000, identity
theft and an allega-
tion of committing
aggravated white
collar crime.
Prosecutors began
looking at Abou-
Remeleh after the
district turned over
its suspicions but
was waiting on the results of a lengthy
forensic audit before filing charges,
District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said
Friday.
Linvill told the Daily Journal that
financial controls have already been
put in place that should prevent future
fraud at the special tax district.
Linvill’s main mission while serv-
ing the board is to make sure the “best
water in the nation”
gets delivered to
Belmont residents
at a reasonable rate.
“Our service lev-
els are good and our
clients are happy, ”
said Linvill, who
has lived in
Belmont since
1998.
The district has
hired a new auditor,
the new general
manager is top-
notch and every-
body’s clicking,
Linvill said.
The district hired
Tammy Rudock ear-
lier this year to
replace the retired
Paul Regan as general manager and
morale is up for its 18 employees,
Stuebing said.
“We have some of the best financial
controls of any special district,”
Stuebing said.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
WATER
Volunteer Honors Guard, Vietnam
Veterans of America, Veterans of
Foreign Wars, AMVETS, Disabled
American Veterans, the American
Legion, Association of the United
States Army and the National
Association of Uniformed Services.
Sheryl Shaffer, host of Veterans
Helping Veterans TV, nominated
McArdle for the honor.
“I have known Leo for 20 years, and
there is no one, no one, who does more
for veterans in San Mateo County, ”
she wrote when she heard Hill had
selected McArdle for the award. “I am
so glad Sen. Hill chose him.”
McArdle has two sons from his first
marriage and a stepson with foster
brother from his current marriage to
his wife Carol. A Bay Area native,
McArdle was born in San Francisco
and grew up in Daly City and South San
Francisco.
Last night in South San Francisco,
the Golden Gate National Cemetery
Support Committee hosted a dinner
and dance event to benefit Wreaths
Across America.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
VET
the Bay Area and Lt. Gov. Gavin
Newsom dropped by the talks Sunday
to encourage the two sides to reach a
resolution.
Newsom told reporters he believes a
deal is close and can happen Sunday
night.
“It would be preposterous for both
sides at this stage when you’re getting
this close to put, at risk, your reputa-
tion and the economy of the entire
region,” he said.
BARTand union representatives said
in the late afternoon that they were
still hopeful a strike could be averted.
Sticking points in the 6-month-old
negotiations include salaries and
workers’ contributions to their health
and pension plans. BART workers cur-
rently pay $92 a month for health care
and contribute nothing toward their
pensions — generous benefits BART
management is seeking to curtail.
The unions, which represent 2,375
mechanics, custodians, station
agents, train operators and clerical
workers, want a raise of nearly 12 per-
cent over three years, while BART has
proposed a 10 percent increase over
four years. Workers from the two
unions now average about $71,000 in
base salary and $11,000 in overtime
annually, BARTsaid.
Labor leaders also are pressing
demands to make stations safer, such
as better lighting in tunnels, bullet-
proof glass in agents’ booths and
improved restroom access.
BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost
said the negotiating teams met sepa-
rately and face-to-face Sunday while
reviewing and fine-tuning their respec-
tive proposals.
No details on the latest offers or the
pace of progress were released, howev-
er, at the mediator’s request.
If a strike is called for Monday,
BART is planning to offer free bus
trips between San Francisco and the
East Bay, and ferry service to the city
would be expanded. But people who
travel on the system’s north-to-south
routes in the East Bay would be strand-
ed, and freeway traffic is expected
become snarled as more commuters opt
to take cars.
Continued from page 1
BART
Betty Linvill
Al Stuebing
Mike Melakos
Dave Warden
COMICS/GAMES
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numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

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called cages, must combine using the given operation
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4 Band bookings
8 Trail behind
11 Egg producers
13 Litter cries
14 NASA counterpart
15 Ugh!
16 Concert performers
18 Snoozes
20 Jalopy
21 Orbison or Acuff
22 TV brand
24 Coquette
27 Thataway
30 Cautious
31 Subatomic particle
32 Pen part
34 24 horas
35 Sheet candy
36 Verdi opera
37 Jeans go-with (hyph.)
39 Pilgrim John
40 Dot in the Seine
41 Kind
42 Drugs, briefy
45 B vitamin
49 Garbage holder (2 wds.)
53 Conscript
54 Zip
55 Brief note
56 — fxe
57 Do slaloms
58 Marshal Dillon
59 Ballpark fg.
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1 Reasons
2 Shoe part
3 Formerly
4 “Let Me Entertain You”
musical
5 Square root of IX
6 College stat
7 Nine-digit ID
8 — majeste
9 Whodunit terrier
10 Huff and puff
12 Cooking wine
17 “If — — a Hammer”
19 Cauldron
22 Chess piece
23 MSNBC rival
24 ATV feature
25 Cafe au —
26 S&L assets
27 Mongol dwelling
28 Oklahoma city
29 Use a taxi
31 Female horse
33 Prohibit
35 Puppeteer Baird
36 Caustic solution
38 Snake’s warning
39 Ms. MacGraw
41 Fort Knox bar
42 Natural elevs.
43 Mr. Satie
44 Surrealist Salvador
46 Yield
47 “Blue Tail Fly” singer
48 Moscow turndown
50 “Let me think ...”
51 “Luck — — Lady”
52 Lb. or oz.
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MOnday, OCTOBer 14, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Set the record straight
when it comes to how you want things done, at home
and in the workplace. Change is imperative and should
be initiated before you fnd yourself hemmed in.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Emotional matters will
surface; dealing with them quickly will help you avoid a
scene. Be prepared to use a bit of force if necessary. A
different approach will keep you in the lead.
sagiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Positive change
is heading your way. Keep your chin up and your
fnger on the pulse of events. Participation will be
key when trying to impress someone you want to
spend more time with.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Stand up and be
counted. Persistence will result in being handed the
reins of leadership. Don’t let past experience frighten
you from taking on more responsibility. A positive
change will raise your earning potential.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Apply your knowledge
and experience to a job you’ve been given, and you will
excel. Someone you meet will change your outlook and
your immediate future.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) — Personal matters
must be handled with integrity and, above all, honesty.
There will be no room for vague or misleading
information. If you want to take advantage of an
opportunity, build on your reputation.
aries (March 21-April 19) — Shy away from anyone
who appears to be holding back information. Step into
the spotlight and take control of whatever situation you
face, but do so with compassion and understanding.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) — Follow your heart and
your dreams. Live in the moment and enjoy what
life has to offer. Participate in activities conducive to
building a close bond with friends and family.
geMini (May 21-June 20) — Disillusionment will set
in if you believe everything you hear. Read between the
lines, especially when dealing with affairs of the heart.
Using force will backfre.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) — Get out and take time
to play. Entertainment or traveling to an unfamiliar
destination will brighten your day. Emotional
encounters will stimulate your senses. Take action
and follow through.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Play it safe when it comes
to domestic affairs. Listen carefully and prepare to
make whatever changes are necessary to keep the
peace. Make sure you think things through carefully
before taking a plunge.
VirgO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Shoot for the stars
when it comes to making valuable connections. How
you express your desires and ideas will capture the
attention of someone willing to help.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training. 800-603-1072.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
Immediate openings for full time
Dietary Aide and part-time Cook.
Must be experienced with excellent
communication skills and ability to 4/2
schedule. Apply in person at
2140 Carlmont Dr., Belmont, CA
SUPPORT.COM, INC. is a global provid-
er of software & services that automate
the resolution of tech problems. We have
openings in our Redwood City, CA office
for a Sr. Software Engineer to dev, test &
debug SW features, apps & solutions.
Pls mail resume to 900 Chesapeake Dr.,
Fl 2, Redwood City, CA 94063, Attn: E.
Tate. No calls or emails pls.
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, “Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
GENERAL -
NOW HIRING!
Delivery carriers and Book baggers to
deliver the local telephone directory in
San Mateo North, Central and sur-
rounding towns. Must have own relia-
ble vehicle. $12-$14 per hour. Call 1-
855-557-1127 or (270)395-1127.
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOME INSPECTOR
Ladder, camera, tape measure, vehicle.
We have work for you. Full Training, Top
Pay & expenses, (650)372-2811
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
23 Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
110 Employment
JANITOR/CARPET CLEANER,
retirement community. 32hrs/wk
& benefits. 3-11:30pm, read, write &
speak English. Experience preferred
$10-11/hr. Apply 201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae.
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PERSONAL CARE Aides, retirement
community. Part time, understand, write
& speak English. Experience required
$10/hr. Apply 201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae.
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI DRIVER, Wanted, full time, paid
weekly, between $500 and $700 cash,
(650)766-9878
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257577
The following person is doing business
as: Ievgen Handyman 754 Glenview Dr.,
Apt. 202, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ievgenii Alieksieienko same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Ievgenii Alieksieienko /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/23/13, 09/30/13, 10/07/13, 10/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257740
The following person is doing business
as: Sinomedia Digital Printing, 360 Swift
Ave., Ste 42., SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Sinomedia Int’l
Group, Inc, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Xin Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/30/13, 10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257815
The following person is doing business
as: Onsite Test Safety Service, 125
Northwood Ave., Ste. C, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: David F.
Bernal, 1212 El Camino Real #H264,
San Bruno, CA 94066. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ David F. Bernal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/30/13, 10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257658
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Artweekend, 350 Sharon Park
Dr., #F23, MENLO PARK, CA 94026 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Amir Sharif and Vera Shokina, same
address. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Vera Shokina /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/30/13, 10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257775
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Well-Connected Leader, Inc., 2)
Thought Leadership Lab, 3) Brosseau &
Associates 62 Pelican Ln., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94062 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Well-Connected
Leader, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Denise M. Brossean /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13, 10/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257515
The following person is doing business
as: Brainstorm Consulting, 14 Almendral
Ave., ATHERTON, CA 94027 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Esq
Systems Integrations Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Diane Sandhu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13, 10/28/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, FOUND!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
210 Lost & Found
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)315-5902
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
296 Appliances
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$70 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
300 Toys
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
SOLD!
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $50 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
304 Furniture
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
24
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
304 Furniture
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
307 Jewelry & Clothing
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
MORTAR BOX Filled with new mansory
tools, $50 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
310 Misc. For Sale
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO SUNDIAL - vintage armillary iron
+ 18" rd, $60 request photos to
green4t@yahoo.com
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
310 Misc. For Sale
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo
(650)345-3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. (650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-5902
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
316 Clothes
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 SOLD!
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo., sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
25 Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Actor Damon
5 Like unfizzy soda
9 Relatively cool
heavenly body
14 Suffix with buck
15 Grocery section
16 “All done!”
17 Long-running
musical variety
TV show
19 Hunter’s hides
20 Spiral-shaped __
fries
21 Fair-hiring abbr.
23 Wiesel who said,
“Indifference, to
me, is the
epitome of evil”
24 “Just __
suspected!”
25 Pre-playoffs
baseball drama
29 Work on, as a
vintage auto
31 Sudoku grid line
32 Honorary legal
deg.
33 ’30s-’40s film dog
34 Logger’s tool
36 Man and Capri
38 Final triumph after
apparent failure
42 Fancy mushroom
45 Metric distances:
Abbr.
46 Roadies’ loads
50 Prefix with sex
51 Yale student
54 Kevin Kline’s
“French Kiss” co-
star
56 Offensive in the
First Gulf War
59 __-Caps: candy
60 Bug-killing brand
61 Deer daughter
62 How some stock
is sold
64 Sent to the
unemployment
line
66 Retrace one’s
steps, and what
ends of 17-, 25-,
38- and 56-
Across can
literally have
69 Key in
70 Mine, to Mimi
71 Java Freeze
brand
72 Swiped
73 Tree anchor
74 Breakfast, e.g.
DOWN
1 Eyelash
application
2 Stirs to action
3 One of a
vacationing
busload
4 Turnpike fee
5 Pres. on a dime
6 “Glee” actress __
Michele
7 Sci-fi invader
8 Karaoke singer’s
ineptitude, to the
chagrin of the
audience
9 Gas additive
letters
10 See-through
11 Revealing, as a
celeb interview
12 “An” or “the”
13 Tends to a lawn’s
bare spot
18 AutoCorrect
target
22 John’s Yoko
26 Distinctive
periods
27 Bagel shop call
28 Itty-bitty branch
30 Fish story
35 Moose relative
37 __-Pei: wrinkly
dog
39 Angel or Athletic,
briefly
40 Rifle range need
41 Laptop operator
42 Confuses
43 Price of bubble
gum, once
44 Trattoria rice dish
47 Leader in social
networking until
2008
48 Cure-all
49 Enjoy coral reefs
52 Inc., in the U.K.
53 Meteorologist’s
pressure line
55 Future MBA’s
exam
57 Actress Georgia
of “Everybody
Loves Raymond”
58 Julio’s “I love you”
63 Quick haircut
65 Profitable rock
67 Suitor’s murmur
68 Model-ship-to-be
By C.C. Burnikel
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/14/13
10/14/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 96k, great con-
dition, $7500, obo, (650)692-4725.
Leave Message
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
14' BASS Boat no motor with trailer $99
(650)851-0878
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, SOLD!
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
670 Auto Parts
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
SPI CONSTRUCTION INC
• Remodels • New Additions
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
For all your construction needs
(650)208-8855
Lic. #812356
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
• Chain Link
• Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Electricians
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Handy Help
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
t :BSE DMFBO VQ BUUJD
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JODMVEJOH DBST USVDLT BOE
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&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
t $PNQMFUF MBOETDBQF
NBJOUFOBODF BOE SFNPWBM
t 'VMM USFF DBSF JODMVEJOH
IB[BSE FWBMVBUJPO
USJNNJOH TIBQJOH
SFNPWBM BOE TUVNQ
HSJOEJOH
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
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t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
27 Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Painting
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Services include:
Gutter Cleaning, Air duct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off any one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Insurance
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
28
Monday • Oct. 14, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
There Is
New Hope!
A Health Center
Dedicated to
Severe Disc
Conditions
If you suffer with lower back,
neck, or leg pain, we invite you to try
our non surgical solution. The pain
from degenerating and bulging discs
affects everything that you do, from
work, to play, and ultimately your
quality of life. At Crossroads Heath
Center, we have created an entire
facility dedicated to patients with
severe disc conditions that have not
responded to traditional care. Our
revolutionary, Crossroads Method,
provides a very high success rate to
patients with serious back, neck,
leg and arm pain – even when all
else has failed. This FDA cleared;
non-surgical treatment allows us
to rehabilitate your herniated or
degenerative disc(s) by reversing
internal pressure and enabling your
disc(s) to heal from the inside out.
We succeed where other treatments
have failed – by removing the
pressure that is causing pain to
your disc(s) and nerves – without
drugs, injections, invasive surgery or
harmful side effects.
The only office to have
“The Crossroads Method”
This method which includes
computerized true disc
decompression is considered by
many doctors to be the most
advanced and successful non-
invasive treatment of serious back,
neck, leg or arm pain.
This procedure allows for a much
higher success rate by increasing
hydration of your discs, fexibility,
relaxation of muscles and ligaments
along with improving muscle and
core strength, balance and posture.
This results in a more effective and
lasting solution to your pain. There
are no side effects and no recovery
time is required.
This gentle and relaxing treatment
has proven to be effective… even
when drugs, epidurals, traditional
chiropractic, physical therapy
and surgery have failed… The
Crossroads Method has shown
dramatic results.
Patient Testimonials
During the 1 1/2 years of having
constant daily lower back pain and
spasms, I took anti-infammatory
and pain medication, but nothing
helped lessen the pain. When
an MRI showed that I had two
degenerative discs, I went through a
series of lumbar epidural injections
without success. The only thing
that made the pain and spasms go
away was Spinal Decompression
treatments at Crossroads Health
Center. Four years later and I am
still pain-free!
Lisa K.
My severe low back and sciatica
pain have been reduced signifcantly
since receiving spinal decompression
therapy at Crossroads Health Center.
I am now able to walk, golf, and do
things that I haven’t been able to do in
years! I would also like to say thanks
to Dr. Ferrigno and the offce staff as
they went above and beyond to make
sure my back problem was resolved. I
couldn’t be happier!!
C.M. Allard
How Will I Know If I Qualify
for Treatment?
When you come in for a
complimentary consultation we will
ask a series of questions and perform
a comprehensive examination to
determine exactly where the pain is
coming from. If x-rays are necessary,
we can take them in our offce. Once
we determine the cause of your
pain we will let you know if we can
help you and if you qualify for our
treatment protocol.
If we don’t feel like we can help we
will refer you to someone who can.
Serious Back or Neck Trouble?
Leg/Arm Pain or Numbness?
Have You Been Diagnosed With a
Bulging, Herniated or Degenerative Disc?
Paid Advertisement
Disclaimer: Due to Federal Law, some exclusions may apply.
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
Campbell San Mateo
855-240-3472 650-231-4754
www.BayAreaBackPain.com

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