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maria
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gets lucky
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taylor
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by Erica Schwartz
DUST
TO
DI GI T
A
L
W
o
rk
in
g
G
irl
3 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
music
COLUMNS
EDITOR’S PLAYLIST:
Ten Tunes Worth Noting
THE FIRST WORD:
Indie is the New Punk
WHAT’S YOUR MUSICSCOPE?
Astrology for Musicians
Pains of Being Pure At Heart
Roxy Epoxy & The Rebound
Lady Antebellum
The Belleville Outfit
Maria Taylor
Joker’s Daughter
Chairlift
Psychostick
The Dumps
Erin McCarley
Tinted Windows
The Roots
Deaf Judges
The Airborne Toxic Event
Spring Tigers
SpOtLightS
24
13
21 27
25 36
62
68
12
20
19
11
16
24
23
21
20
19
14
13
12
9
6
80
ALSO:
TOUR DIARY:
Dead Confederate Takes On Te UK
ARtS &
ENtERtAiNMENt
MOVIE PREVIEWS:
Worth your money?
UpCOMiNg DVD RELEASES

FOOD
MEALS FOR YOUR BROKE ASS:
Grills Gone Wild!
ALSO iNSiDE:
CALENDAR OF EVENTS:
Go Ahead, Make My Date
ATHENS LIVE: Te Month in Photos
64
68
62
36
EAR CANDY: Album Reviews
UpCOMiNg CD RELEASES
THIS DAY IN MUSIC HISTORY 38
35
32
25
27
26
28
75
70
30
5 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
from the editor
Nicole D. Black
The Athens
Blur Magazine
P.O. Box 7117
Athens, Ga
30604
Main Ofce
(706) 353-7799
Sales
(706) 207-9091
for general comments
and inquiries:
editorial@athensblur.com
for advertising
opportunities:
sales@athensblur.com
The athens blur
Magazine issue 7,
copyright©2009
by The athens blur
Magazine, inc. all rights
reserved. no part of
this publication may be
reproduced in whole or
part in any way by any
means unless written
permission is received
from the publisher.
published monthly
except for each summer
issue in the united
States of america and
distributed free of charge
(limit one copy per
reader, each subsequent
copy is distributed
at a charge of $4.95).
postmaster send address
changes to the athens
Blur magazine, P.o. Box
7117 athens, ga. 30604
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F
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T
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E
D
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WhO We Are
editor-in-chief
nicole black
nicole@athensblur.com
executive editor
alec Wooden
alec@athensblur.com
director of Sales
Stephen Simmons
stephen@athensblur.com
account executives
adrienne Klein
adrienne@athensblur.com
Jim Mcgahee
jim@athensblur.com
advertising interns
elaine emma Kelch,
Morgan Kelly, Julia ott
design
colin dunlop, lily feinberg
lauren Mullins, carlye
norton, alec Wooden
editorial interns
Will Hackett, lindsey lee
Kristen lee, Julie Mccollum
erica Schwartz
contributing writers
Jacquie brasher,
Melissa coker,
natalie b. david, chris
Homer, ed Morales, Jon Ross,
Zac Taylor, pT umphress,
deMarco Williams,
Jenni Williams
ONThe COVer: Maria Taylor,
photo by autumn de Wilde,
courtesy nettwerk Music group
Looking for BLUr?
try here:
40 Watt Club
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Your Pie
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W
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W
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A
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E
editor’S PLayLiSt
oLd oR NEw, 10 SoNGS wE cAN’T GET ENoUGH of THIS MoNTH
Nicole Black
Editor-in-Chief
Alec Wooden
Executive Editor
“Does Tis Mean You’re Moving On?”
Te Airborne Toxic Event (TATE)
“Bad Infuence” Pink
“Champagne” Trances Arc
“If You Want Blood, You’ve Got It”
AC/DC
“A Little Less Conversation”
JXL Remix, Elvis Presley
“Gasoline” TATE
“Personal Jesus” Johnny Cash version
“Bad Company” Bad Company
“Sometime Around Midnight” TATE
“My Generation” TeWho
“Geraldine” Glasvegas
“Te Feeling” Peter Bjorn & John
“All Tis Time” Sara Watkins
“Just Pretend”
Te Fascination Movement
“Me No” Clem Snide
“Up To Our Nex”
Robyn Hitchcock & Te Venus 3
“Woods” Bon Iver
“Rain, Fire, and Brimstone” Madeline
“Shotgun Wedding” JazzChronic
“Rebel Side of Heaven”
Langhorne Slim
for more LocationS, viSit athenSBLUr.com
Dear Readers,
Like springtime, new things are blossoming here at Blur and in this issue we are introducing
a new recurring section called, “Tour Diary”, where a local band shares their thoughts with
us during their road travels. Kicking of this launch, Brantley Senn of Dead Confederate
journals his ten days on a recent European tour with the band.
As a new magazine on the verge of turning one, we continue to make small changes in
an efort to polish the overall look and feel of our magazine that some of our avid readers
may have been noticing with each new issue. As we continue to move forward with this
publication, there will undoubtedly be more to come but we do so in order to make this
Georgia’s ultimate music variety magazine.
Tat said, we have fnally decided on a slogan that sums up what we feel is Te Athens Blur
Magazine, a magazine for fans of music and those who make it. And of course, we sprinkle
our pages with a little variety such as movie previews, interviews with actors/actresses,
investigative features, and our infamous food section, Meals For Your Broke Ass.
And speaking of new…we have recently discovered the joys and addiction of Twitter.
Already on MySpace and Facebook, Twitter will surely help put us on the map as we
aimlessly update our status and join our fellow competitors, musicians, and new and current
readers. Also, be sure to continually check www.athensblur.blogspot.com for daily buzz
worthy news and noise. In all seriousness — we really are in the process of a website but,
as the saying goes, all good things come to those who wait.
As always, keep your comments coming, and support our local businesses!
Or grab a copy at two publication boxes downtown — at the corner of
College and Clayton, in front of Wuxtry Records, and across the street
in front of Te Fred Building.
6 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 7 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
In the genesis of any unique genre of
music, there is a clearly defned sound and
mentality existing within the typical fan
and/or creator of said sound. As time goes
on, that sound and mentality may increase
in popularity — inspiring sub-genres,
spin-ofs and the ever-despised fakers.
Whatever the case, as a given genre grows
and evolves, it becomes less and less the
defned seed of creativity and more a thin-
ning root of inspiration running through
the various ofshoots.
Tis is why “indie” is the new “punk.”
Early on “punk” had defnition, both a
unique sonic experience and a rebellious,
middle-fnger mentality toward the es-
tablishment. Fast-forward a decade or
two and things get mighty blurry. Now-
adays, everything can be a little “punk” if
it wants to be. Modern mainstream “punk”
isn’t dangerous or sincere — it’s trendy and
purchasable. True punk never cared to be
mainstream, and that’s exactly why it blew
up — there’s nothing cooler than some-
one who does their own thing and couldn’t
give a shit what you think of them.
Enter indie rock. Similar to early punk,
early indie rock had a uniform and recog-
nizable sound and attitude. Bands weren’t
in it for the fame and money, didn’t dress to
impress and shied away from major labels
(or were simply ignored by them). Tey
put their albums on vinyl — before it was
cool again — for crying out loud.
Enter the digital revolution. Pro Tools,
home recording rigs, MySpace, Facebook,
P2P flesharing services, torrents. Sud-
denly the means of self-production, dis-
tribution, and promotion are cheaper and
more accessible. Suddenly major label sup-
port is harder to justify — every band
wants to be independent.
And so, as with punk, at one time “indie”
rock identifed a particular sound, but now,
because so many artists have latched onto
the indie attitude of DIY, we have artists
from all genres going “indie.”
A shining example of this is Radio-
head. Yes, that Radiohead — a band that
could sell out Madison Square Garden ev-
ery night of every day of every year, forev-
er. Clearly not a bottom feeder, Yorke and
company are “indie” nonetheless because
they have no major label backing. Tey do
it all on their own. Tey may not sound in-
die, but they operate indie.
Ten there’s “indie music,” which is
where the watered down nature of the term
becomes most evident. Let’s see… there
are indie bands that don’t play indie music
(Minor Treat or Reel Big Fish), bands that
play indie music that have major label sup-
port and thus are not truly indie (Te Shins
or Manchester Orchestra), and then you’ve
got Sufan Stevens,who is an indie artist who
plays indie music.
But then again, what the hell is indie
music anyhow? A particular sound de-
fned by some elite panel of hipster judg-
es? It’s easy to see why musicians them-
selves eschew genres, since a band can
be defned diferently depending on who
you ask. Take Wilco. It can be called in-
die, folk, rock, country, Americana, or even
pop. Are any of them entirely right? Are
any of them entirely wrong?
Any of those genre adjectives mean
a number of things to diferent people.
Tey’re just vines of inspiration, winding
in and out of various bands down through
the years, and as time goes on, they thin out.
It’s rare a new band goes so far back to the
roots in which it is inarguably defnable —
both in sound and attitude — as that core,
source genre. Tey still exist — dyed in the
wool punk and indie bands — but sure-
ly they themselves cringe when attempting
to explain their place in the musical spec-
trum, knowing their hard-earned, well-de-
served adjective is meaningless to anyone
else. And it can never go back.
We live in a world where Avril Lavigne
has been called “punk” and “indie” bands
go platinum overnight by popping up in
an Apple commercial. And there’s not a
goddamn thing the hardest of the hard-
core or the indiest of the indie can do to
change that.
Indie is the new punk. But hey, it was a
fun ride while it lasted.
— Te lethal combination of PT Umphress
and Ed Morales contributed to this column.
Got something to say? Send your thoughts to
editorial@athensblur.com!
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indie iS the new PUnk
THE ATTITUdE IS GoNE — ALL THAT’S LEfT IS A SHELL of THE GENRE.
Similar to
early punk,
early indie rock had
a uniform and recognizable
sound and attitude.
Bands weren’t
in it for the fame and
money, didn’t dress
to impress and shied
away from major labels
(or were simply ignored
by them). They put
their albums on
vinyl — before it was
cool again.
MUSI c
9 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
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It resounds in a rush —
fuzzed out guitars crafted in
big city streets, punctuated by
lyrics of drug addiction and
the calamity of love. Te sound
— unmistakable, yet fresh —
elicits ’80s underground rock
and forgotten bands such as
Te Field Mice, Rocketship
and Black Tambourine.
Te Field Mice? Rocketship?
Where do 20-somethings fnd
these bands? Tese inspirations?
Unknown depths of coolness
wrought from tales of big
city excess? No, someplace
darker. Tink Moons Over My
Hammy.
“I grew up in suburban
Pennsylvania with my mom
and hung out with my three
friends, sitting in Denny’s
smoking section but not
smoking, drinking bottomless
cups of cofee, discussing
anarchy and wondering if
anything cool would happen,”
said Kip Berman, lead singer
and principal songwriter of
Brooklyn’s Te Pains of Being
Pure at Heart. “We’d go to
punk shows and stuf, but were
never as punk as the real punks.
We’d talk about how there
was never anything to do, but
looking back on it, I think that
we had fun all the time.”
Started in a warehouse to
celebrate the keyboardist’s
birthday, POBPAT (“taken
from the title of an
unpublished children’s book,”
Berman notes) still isn’t made
of real punks, but fnds itself
with plenty to do. Comprised
of Berman, drummer Kurt
Feldman, singer-keyboardist
Peggy Wang and bassist Alex
Naidus, the band recently
embarked on an international
tour to promote its self-titled
full length debut and in the
process, far exceed its wildest
expectations.
“I always used to joke with
Peggy, ‘all our dreams are
coming true’ — like when we
played a sandwich shop in
Tallahassee to between three
and six people,” Berman said.
“But now, they really are.”
Tose dreams are sowed on
the strength of Pains’ initial LP,
a collection of shoegaze gems
and bouncy beats belied by
forlorn lyrics (“Can’t you see
his arms are a hell and won’t
ever leave?” Berman sings on
“Stay Alive”). “Everything
With You,”found single success
and steady airplay on Sirius
XM. Signed to slumberland
Records (home to dreamy
indie pop bands), POBPAT
fnds the label suits its musical
and commercial tastes.
“Growing up, we loved so
many of the bands they put
out — Rocketship, Velocity
Girl, Aislers Set,” Berman
said. “Tanks to the Internet
and home recording, there’s
a great leveling of the playing
feld, because now a band on a
small indie label can still record
for cheap, get attention and
distributed.”
Pains saw the Internet’s
power frsthand. Touring to
support its debut EP in 2007,
the band grabbed a Saturday
afternoon slot at Popfest, and
an hour before it took the stage,
the Black Kids leapt into indie
buzz history with a blazing set
that sent bloggers into a frenzy.
And though Pains missed the
online bustle that day, it did
stumble upon something just
as satisfying.
“We did a tour to Athens
Popfest and there were less
than 10 people at every show,”
Berman remembers. “Te
wonderful thing was, we were
all having so much fun, it wasn’t
disappointing in the least.
We ate a lot of Dairy Queen,
especially in Georgia, where it
was 105 degrees in August, and
discovered Jagermeister. — at
frst in a tongue in cheek ‘we’re
doin it’ way, but then...”
Tose small show days are
long gone, as the Pains hype
grows. Pitchfork called the
LP one of the year’s best and
NME and Te New York
Times praised the band’s
retro-yet-new-sound rise to
prominence. Berman appreciates
it all, realizing it wasn’t long
ago he wanted to sit where he
is right now. After all, being
cool happens when you’re not
looking for it.
“I know it’s hard for people
to understand, but no one
was a super cool 13-year-old
listening to Te Flatmates
and Meat Whiplash,” he said.
“We were pretty much typical
teenagers into Nirvana and
learned about Te Vaselines
and began to know about
these other amazing bands like
Teenage Fanclub, Te Pastels,
Beat Happening, and the
underground pop bands of the
’90s and ’80s. Don’t worry about
being cool, because lots of cool
music isn’t ‘cool’ — I mean,
we all jam out to Smashing
Pumpkins’ ‘Siamese Dream’ in
the tour van more than people
might assume.”

— Ed Morales
the PainS of Being PUre at heart
cAUGHT BETwEEN MooNS oVER MY HAMMY ANd NEw YoRK cITY
courtesy the weepies PHOTO: ANNIE POWERS
who’S who
alex naidus (bass),
Kip berman (guitar,
vocals), Kurt feldman
(drums), peggy Wang (key-
board, vocals)
formed
2007 in brooklyn, n.Y.
LaBeL
slumberland Records
LateSt reLeaSe
The Pains of Being Pure at
Heart (2008)
on the weB
www.thepainsofbeingpu-
reatheart.com
the PainS of Being PUre at heart
11 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Te shoes of Siouxie Sioux,
Joan Jett and Chrissie Hynde
are hard ones to fll, but Roxy
Epoxy slides her toes into
those ass-kicking boots and
laces up with ease. Te former
frontwoman for synth-infused
punk band Te Epoxies, Roxy
vocally channels DEVO’s
Mark Mothersbaugh in equal
measure to her feminine punk
predecessors for a sound that is
uniquely her own.
On a phone call from a
friend’s house in Seattle, Roxy
is easygoing and immediately
amiable. It’s the second-to-last
date on the inaugural tour for
Roxy Epoxy and Te Rebound,
her new band, and her frst
outing since Te Epoxies called
it quits.
“It’s been really good,” she
says of the tour. “It’s been
interesting to see what the
crossover might’ve been from
my old band. Tere’s a little bit
going on, but there’s defnitely
a degree of starting over again,
which is pretty cool actually.”
Before unofcially breaking
up in late 2007, Te Epoxies
gained a loyal fan following for
its sci-f infuenced punk and
new wave sound, as well as for
the group’s penchant for over-
the-top stage shows, which
included smoke machines,
guitars equipped with lasers,
and costumes made of duct
tape all in conjunction with
Roxy’s commanding stage
presence.
But an end to Te Epoxies
didn’t mean an end to Roxy
Epoxy. When asked if she ever
thought the breakup meant the
demise of her musical career,she
laughs, “I got pretty stubborn
right away. It was intimidating,
but I just went for it and tried
to see what would happen, and
I’m pretty psyched about how
it’s gone so far.”
Te songs that would
become her debut with Te
Rebound, Band-aids On Bullet
Holes, had been partially
written and set aside during
her tenure with Te Epoxies.
But the resulting sound fnds
Roxy embracing more rock
‘n’ roll infuences, which she
credits to Drat, her signifcant
other and songwriting partner,
whose musical background
is entrenched mostly in goth,
rock and glam.
“We just spent a long time at
home fguring it out between
work, because of course we both
still have day jobs,” she remarks
of the demoing process. “Punk
rock don’t pay the bills.”
Despite Roxy’s fercely
DIY ways (she created all the
artwork for the album and
even lived at the Seattle studio
during recording), the demos
were mailed out to various
record labels, fnally coming
to land at the goth/industrial
label Metropolis.
“It’s appealing to self-release
these days because the music
industry is so unpredictable,
which kind of makes it fun as
far as I’m concerned because
you get to fgure out all these
new ways of doing things,” she
says, “but we went through a
label because we had no money
to record.”
As for touring, gone are the
days of stage show gimmicks
with her former band.Although
Te Rebound’s personality is
still being determined, Roxy
sounds confdent that, for now,
she has all of the right bases
covered.
“I think that we’re putting on
a great show just physically as-
is, which is the frst thing that
you need to make sure is going
on,” she says. “If you’re going
to see a band you want to see
something good or you could’ve
just stayed home and listened
to the album, especially ‘cause
we’re all broke these days.”
— Natalie B. David
on the reBoUnd
foRMER EpoxIES fRoNTwoMAN fINdS A NEw STIcKY SITUATIoN
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As they say, great things
come in three — and that
fact rings true with trio Lady
Antebellum.
All are steeped in infuential
background ingredients.Multi-
i ns t r ument al i s t / har mony
vocalist Dave Haywood is from
Augusta, where he met Charles
Kelley (tenor) at Riverside
Middle School. While the
two started writing together
at the University of Georgia,
Nashville is where they met the
group’s feminine side — alto
Hillary Scott, who actually
approached Kelley after having
seen/heard him on MySpace.
Te daughter of Grammy-
winning artist Linda Davis and
musician Lang Scott, she hails
from Nashville (better known
as “Te Athens of the South”).
“I’m the analytical
perfectionist, Hillary brings
the silliness and the emotion,
and Dave is the calming glue,”
Kelley observes. “Everyone
balances everybody else out.”
Teir balance has already
brought numerous successes.
Tey’ve been certifed Gold
(complete with a surprise
plaque presented on Te Ellen
DeGeneres Show), garnered two
Grammy nominations, a Top 5
hit (“Love Don’t Live Here”)
and can now say they’ve been
on the iTunes Top 10 country
albums chart for a full year.
Last year, they took trophies
at the ACM Awards for “Best
New Vocal Group” and CMA
Awards for “New Artist of the
Year.” Tis year, they crossed
the line with a nomination in
the even more elite “Top Vocal
Group” category. An even
bigger bestowed honor was
getting to perform their new
single, “I Run to You,” on a
special stage with enthusiastic
fans crowded around them.
“It was unbelievable [to
play “Run”]…actually getting
to perform was one of the
most exciting things for us,”
exuded Haywood, while
already in Vegas for rehearsal
nights before the ceremony.
Teir previous single –
“Lookin’ for a Good Time” –
still holds its own in the award
world. In particular, CMT is
praising its video counterpart.
It’s up for three “Video of the
Year” awards for their fan-
voted award show which airs
June 17. Tough set up as a
clean-cut back in time TV
show, the video does get pretty
dirty — and even a little oiled
up. Tat is, there’s a mechanic
who deigns to dirty up Dave
with a slightly smudgy tap
on the shoulder, producing a
don’t-you-dare response.
“Time” included, the trio
had a hand in ten of the eleven
album tracks. “Run” makes
a much slower sound than
many may expect from the
three, but they’re still living
in fast forward. Fresh of the
ACM’s, they’ve found their
next good time with Kenny
Chesney. Suiting up for some
sun fun with Chesney and
the boys aboard the acclaimed
concert-thrower’s hot “Sun
City Carnival Tour,” they join
fellow fre starter Miranda
Lambert with dates booked
now through August’s end.
“We keep our shows loose
and spontaneous,” Haywood
shares. “Probably my favorite
song to play live, though, is
‘All We’ll Ever Need.’ It’s frst
one we wrote together, a really
special, personal song. Being a
ballad we do in the middle of
our set, people really sit back
and take in the lyrics. I get to
play piano on it. And you know,
Georgia’s our old stompin’
ground. We love getting to
play such a big show for the
hometown crowd. A bunch
of my friends are coming
out, tailgating…we’ve all got
friends coming out. Hillary has
ties to Georgia too.”
Videos the band’s uploaded
tie in heavily to their shows.
“We put a video up for just
about every single show on the
Martina [McBride] tour a year
and a half ago,” he adds. “We
kept it up, in what we now call
‘Webisode Wednesdays.’”
Haywood’s really needled
(in a good way) if a fan shares
a story of how a song’s afected
them.
“‘One Day You Will’ has
inspired a lot of listeners,” he
says. “We had a girl tell us it
helped her dad get through
during his cancer struggle. It’s
amazing to give such hope,
especially when we put so
much of ourselves into these
songs.”
Lady A will shine their heart
on you in Alpharetta on May
28.
“Tis is the tour to be on
this summer,” says Scott. “Not
only will we be playing in front
of hundreds of thousands of
die-hard country music fans
over the next few months, but
Kenny is just the most gracious
host and has already made us
feel so welcome. We couldn’t
feel any more fortunate that
he invited us to come out with
him.”
From the sound of it, Lady
A have forged their way from
on the fringe to inside music’s
circle — thanks to a career that’s
already taken great shape.
— Melissa Coker
ante UP!
Two GEoRGIA BoYS ANd A GREAT ScoTT UNITE
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PHOTO COURTESY LADY ANTEBELLUM
PHOTO COURTESY ROXY EPOXY
who’S who
Roxy epoxy (vocals), Qat
bergler (guitar), drat (gui-
tar/vocals), Jarius dathan
(keys), lola gold (bass/vo-
cals), Ryan Moore (drums)
formed
2006 in portland, ore.
LaBeL
Metropolic Records
LateSt reLeaSe
Band-aids on Bullet Holes
(2009)
on the weB
www.roxyepoxy.com
roXy ePoXy &
the reBoUnd
who’S who
Hillary Scott (vocals),
charles Kelley (vocals),
dave Haywood (vocals,
guitar, mandolin)
formed
2006 in nashville, Tenn.
LaBeL
capitol nashville
LateSt reLeaSe
Lady Antebellum (2008)
on the weB
www.ladyantebellum.com
Lady anteBeLLUm
12 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 13 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
When three kids out of
Spartanburg High School in
South Carolina formed Te
DesChamps Band, most people
thought they were “cute,” a trio
emulating the late Champ
Hood’s Uncle Walt’s Band and
playing gigs around the city for
“fun.”
But for members Rob Teter,
Marshall Hood and Jef Brown,
it meant much more. Tey were
actually writing their own songs
and doing it for more than just
good times. When high school
ended and college carted them
farther West,their potential was
anything but lost. A booking in
Wilkesboro, N.C., for the 2007
MerleFest simultaneously did
two great things for this group
of bluegrass boys; it reunited
the DesChamps talent, adding
some new sounds and faces,
and before a few months could
change their mind, birthed a
brand new touring outft—Te
Belleville Outft.
School went on hold,
(although each member plans
to return one day) and in 2008
they released Wanderin’ as a
direct result of touring for a
growing fan base and having
nothing to leave behind. “Our
goal was just to get something
out,” Teter says. “We were
touring with no disc so we said,
‘Ok, we’ve got 12 tunes. Let’s
make it happen.’” Teir self-
released album did “better than
we ever thought it would,”Teter
admits, “but it didn’t transmit
the energy people found in our
live shows.”
Tus,Time To Stand followed,
bringing a more cohesive track
fow and a true identity for
Belleville.
“We sequenced it to be more
like our live show and something
that was radio-friendly.” A
crossover from the smorgasbord
of sound their frst disc ofered,
this one sounds more like
bluegrass, yet still maintains the
Belleville originality that the
frst carried.
It was a learning process
for this group of young
20-somethings, Teter says,
explaining that “when you
get serious making an album
you really have to whittle it
down. We all write songs, so
we’ve all got stuf, got ideas,
but you really have to learn to
compromise to get the album
you need.”
Almost every song is
written by several members,
a collaboration if you will, of
the talent across the board
within the various members of
the Outft. Tey consist of the
original Spartanburg three, plus
Jonathan Konya and Connor
Forsyth from college days with
Teter in New Orleans, and
Phoebe Hunt, a friend Hood
picked up in Austin. Although
still shy of the ofcial Time To
Stand release, the group plans
to get started on a third album
as soon as this one releases.
“We’re on the fast-track
now,”Teter says. And it shows.
Not only have they shared the
stage with Lyle Lovett, Ricky
Skaggs, Kentucky Tunder
and the Del McCoury Band,
the Belleville Outft attracts a
wide audience of listeners with
Time To Stand, and, according
to Teter, “makes you wanna
dance.”
Tat’s exactly what happens
at a Belleville show. According
to Teter, with old American
musicians’ infuence like Ray
Charles and Muddy Waters,
“people are just spinning and
twirling all over the place” at
their shows. And with 200+
days on the road, playing
for a party like that makes it
worthwhile — not to mention
makes them all a little more
confdent in that “college later”
decision.
Like no bluegrass you’ve ever
heard (think rock, alternative
blues, and even some swing),
Te Belleville Outft truly
represents its music. Lyrics
from their debut album, like,
“if I lost it all — if I lost
everything I knew, I’d want to
love somebody like you,”proves
what their music is, something
you’d want if nothing else in
the world was right.
It makes you feel good and
makes you want to groove, and
the best part is this group has a
lot more music to come.
— Jennifer Williams
Looking for a new oUtfit?
BELLEVILLE MIxES BLUEGRASS ANd RocK foR A pERfEcT MATcH
who’S who
Rob Teter (guitar, vocals),
connor forsyth (piano),
Jonathan Konya (drums,
vocals), Jef brown (bass,
vocals), Marshall Hood
(guitar, vocals), phoebe
Hunt (violin, vocals)
formed
2007 in austin, Texas
LaBeL
independent
LateSt reLeaSe
Time to Stand (2009)
on the weB
www.bellevilleoutft.com
the BeLLeviLLe
oUtfit
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PHOTO: JOHN GRUBBS
14 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
“I don’t know if I did it
on purpose, but I defnitely
allowed myself to feel (at
home) in more places,” says the
artist who has thus far in her
already lengthy (though still
quite young) career set up shop
in numerous musical hotbeds.
Born in Birmingham, Ala.,
Taylor began in her hometown
with the band Little Red
Rocket at the ripe age of 15.
Since, she’s had mailing
addresses in Athens, Ga.,
with the likes of Azure Ray and
Now It’s Overhead, as well as
Omaha, Neb., with the Conor
Oberst/Bright Eyes/Saddle
Creek Records crew.
“Tere’s no place like where
you grew up, so probably
Birmingham feels like home
the most,” she continues. “But
I do love that, where I feel that
I have all these homes. When I
get close to Athens or Omaha,
I’m already making plans to
see all my friends — and now
Los Angeles kind of feels like
home, and I can’t wait for the
last show (of the current tour)
there.”
Speaking from Birmingham,
Taylor is just days removed
from a lengthy European run
(and prepping for a stateside
run) with fellow folk-artist
Joshua Radin — a tour played
mostly solo with some backing
help from Radin’s regular
guitar player.
“When you’re by yourself,
you’re in control of all the
dynamics and I feel like you can
still have a dynamic set,” she
says. “I really enjoy performing
both ways, and it’s cool to be
able to let people hear the songs
both ways. But I am excited to
pull out the electric guitars and
distortion pedals for this tour.”
Taylor is a bit of a musical
mystery, tough to nail down
in any setting, be it recorded
or live. Largely known for her
intensely personal, stripped
down acoustic tracks, she does
have the ability and propensity
to rock out — and does so on a
multitude of instruments (she
spent a stint as the touring
drummer for Bright Eyes).
“I love playing drums, but
I have friends that are much
better drummers than I am,”
she says modestly — though,
while not discounting her talent
behind the kit, she’s probably
right. When it’s suggested she
simply title all her new albums
Maria Taylor Has Cooler
Friends Tan You, she laughs
— but they easily could be. Te
production and performance
eforts of her previous solo
records, 11:11 and Lynn Teeter
Flower, featured the likes of
Mike Mogis,Conor Oberst and
Nate Walcott (all from Bright
Eyes), Andy LeMaster (Now
It’s Overhead), David Barbe
(Sugar), Jim Eno (Spoon) and
Doug Easley (Cat Power).
“I’m fortunate to have a lot of
friends who are super talented
so I don’t have to compromise
my sound by working with
them,” she says. “Tey bring
inspiration, that’s for sure. But
it’s not just their talent. I love
being around them on every
level — they’re all just beautiful
people and that inspires me to
be a better person and a better
musician. And we’ve all spent
so many years together that
we defnitely feel like we’re a
family.”
Tat “family,” along with
a new helping hand from
R.E.M.’s Michael Stipe, has
again helped Taylor crank out
what promises to be another
in her trend of critically-
acclaimed records, LadyLuck.
“I defnitely felt like this
album felt very inspired,” she
says. “Everything in my life was
changing, so it seems natural
that some of these songs were
going to be flled with more
emotion than some of my other
songs.”
Te documentation of that
change has resulted in one of
the most introspective and
personal records Taylor has
produced to date — yet, she
doesn’t feel any discomfort with
allowing fans into her open
wounds, if only metaphorically.
“Sometimes I get
uncomfortable (letting the fans
in) after the fact because people
want to know even more,”
she says. “But as I’m writing,
I don’t think about it. I can’t
keep secrets. I’m an open book.
So I try to be honest in my
music — and the way I write
songs is pretty similar to how I
communicate as a person.”



Alec Wooden
a SoUthern Lady BringS
it aLL home(S)
who’S who
Maria Taylor (guitar, vocals)
formed
2005 in los angeles, calif.
LaBeL
nettwerk Music group
LateSt reLeaSe
LadyLuck (2009)
on the weB
www.myspace.com/mari-
ataylor
maria tayLor
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PHOTO: AUTUMN DE WILDE
maria
taylor
gets lucky
She probably doesn’t have an “Auntie
Em” or a land plot in Kansas. It’s doubtful
she owns red slippers or a little dog named
Toto. But make no mistake - Maria Taylor
knows there’s no place like home. Now, if
she could just fgure out where home is…
17 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Joker’s Daughter, the mon-
iker of the ethereal synth-pop
band fronted by UK-based
Helena Costas, has just re-
leased a highly anticipated de-
but full-length album, Te Last
Laugh. A collaboration with
acclaimed producer Danger
Mouse (Gnarls Barkley), the
record has a sonic and emo-
tional depth that pulls you in
and out of her dark, mysti-
cal world. As the featured new
artist of New York indie label
Team Love (Bright Eyes, Jen-
ny Lewis), Joker’s Daughter
has some serious momentum.
Athens Blur Magazine:
What was it like collaborating
with Danger Mouse? How did
you initially hook up with him?
Did you discuss a lot of the sonic
textures in detail, or did you both
create the soundscapes as a team
as you went along?
Helena Costas: It all started
when I was playing an acous-
tic set of my songs at a bar in
Soho, London, and a friend of
his approached me and said he
knew someone who may be in-
terested in my songs. So I sent
Danger Mouse some comput-
er recordings, and it just kept
going from there. If he liked
a song I would send over the
parts so that he could add to
them. When I heard what he
did to them I loved it straight
away, it was like I had the
songs, but there was only so far
I could go with them, and he
knew instinctively what to do
with them. Tis was where his
amazing talent would step in
and make the songs go to plac-
es I hadn’t seen before.
ABM: Did you use
samples or real strings for the or-
chestral sounds?
HC: Danger Mouse used the
Sonus Quartet to record live
strings on the album, which I
absolutely loved, and it created
such texture in the songs that I
could not record. Tere are also
parts where I play the violin
experimentally, and some sam-
ples were used, too.
ABM: How important is this
production to the emotional im-
pact and weight of the songs?
HC: Enormously! Te dif-
ferent layers fll in the gaps of
the initial skeleton parts of the
songs. It brings them all alive.
ABM: How has your song-
writing style evolved leading up
to this record?
HC: My style has shift-
ed signifcantly. When I com-
pare my frst songs to what I
write now, I have grown to re-
alize what my strengths are
in writing and tried to evolve
them—I will always learn
something new and be con-
stantly changing. Te songs on
this album were picked from
material over fve years, so the
diversity in styles are prom-
inent. Sometimes I like to
crossover styles; I don’t like to
set boundaries, as I think song-
writing for me is about playing
with inspiration and allowing
for any possibilities.
ABM: Do you keep a note-
book, or record quick ideas into a
laptop, etc?
HC: I’ve got a notebook for
lyrics, and I also record my
guitar strumming and sing-
ing onto my Blackberry Dict-
aphone — it’s easily reachable
for quick ideas.
ABM: With regards to your
early classical training, how
much of it do you actively use in
your current compositions? Does
it ever get in the way?
HC: Because the training
was at such an early age, I don’t
think it afected the sponta-
neity that goes with not being
classically literate as it were. I
improvise more than I calcu-
late when it comes to the actu-
al music-making process. I can
have the best of both worlds
where I can use the classical
training that I had to be able to
hear string arrangements and
want to use them but in a way
that can be experimented with.
So no, it never gets in the way
— on the contrary, it enhances
the creative process.
ABM: How do you prepare to
make the songs and overall stage
show shine and keep the audience
engaged in your world?
HC: I did have quite a theat-
rical image in my head of how
I could perform these songs on
stage, with multiple visions fy-
ing around. I want to convey
the sounds you hear on the al-
bum as much as possible, and
I’d like to have more visuals to
create the illusions in some of
the songs that are fantasy-rid-
den. I will be experimenting
to see what works and what
doesn’t. Initially, I think it will
be a simple afair...for now, that
is!
ABM: What aces do you have
up your sleeve from here on
out? Are you looking forward to
touring?
HC: An Ace of Wands for a
creative adventure, and an Ace
of Cups for fying high but
staying grounded! Touring will
be great fun!
ABM: What will the live act
consist of?
HC: Te live act will proba-
bly consist of a few other mu-
sicians on stage and myself.
I want to recreate as much of
the sound you hear on the al-
bum as possible, so there may
be laptops involved, too!
— Zac Taylor
getting the LaSt LaUgh
UK SoNGSTRESS coLLABoRATES wITH dANGER MoUSE oN dEBUT
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PHOTO: STEPHEN DOWLING
who’S who
Helena costas
(vocals, guitar)
formed
2003 in london
LaBeL
Team love Records
LateSt reLeaSe
The Last Laugh(2009)
on the weB
www.jokersdaughter.co.uk
joker’S
daUghter
19 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Te newest iBand may not
be a household name yet, but
I bet you know all the words to
their single “Bruises,” of iPod
commercial fame.
You know the one — “I tried
to do handstands for you/I
tried to do handstands for
you,” by the Brooklyn-based
trio with Colorado roots is
certainly catchy, but don’t think
everything from Chairlift’s
debut album follows in the
vein of the twee pop ditty.
“People are approaching our
album with the idea of getting
a whole record full of “Bruises”
which is not what we’re about,”
said a thoughtfully speaking
Caroline Polachek, the lead
vocalist of the trio. “But at
the same time, I think a lot of
people are being surprised by
the rest of the record in a way
that they really enjoy. A lot of
people are fnding themselves
with a record of kind of
experimental music who would
never otherwise.”
Chairlift’s music is a kind of
hybrid pop that incorporates
several genres. Te band
has said that their original
intention in forming was
to create a soundtrack for a
haunted house, and Polachek’s
voice is a beautiful, spooky
instrument that goes beyond
simply singing.
“I think the way we think of
our music is pop the way we
want pop to be,” Polachek said.
“It’s pop that isn’t one- size-
fts-all, it’s not put through
the meat grinder. It’s got a
whole range of feelings, but it
is hooky and catchy. It appeals
to people from the lyrics to the
melody.”
Polachek and guitarist Aaron
Pfenning share song writing
duties, writing songs that are,
in Polachek’s words, “about
abstract things going on in our
lives. Or maybe they’re more
abstractions of our real lives.”
Either way, they write alone.
“We don’t jam,” she insists.
“Our song-writing is pretty
solitary, either me or Aaron by
ourselves.”
“I think we are totally
comfortable talking about
anything in front of each
other,” Polachek said. “I think
it’s more being able to be alone,
to have the time and space to
think of [personal] things like
that.”
Polachek explained how, in
today’s fckle music industry,
song writing requires more
attention to detail than ever
before in music history.
“If you can get people to
remember a hook, that’s like
the same thing as getting
them to remember a song 20
years ago or something. It’s
just microscoping, you have
to ft the whole concept of the
song into just a couple lines
because that’s how people
sample music. Tat’s how fast
someone will come up with an
idea of whether or not they like
something. It’s very fast.”
Te band re-released its
debut album Does You Inspire
You April 21 via Columbia
Records and will see two new
tracks added to the original
slate of 11.
“I think [the re-release]
completes the world that record
is,” said Polachek. “To me that
record is kind of a cinematic
trip, and I think it had a feeling
of incompleteness before, like
you ended up at the ending
without a full explanation
of how you got there. Te
two new tracks make it more
symmetrical and satisfactory.”
Tey are also working on
several new music videos, an
experience Polachek describes
as “just as much fun as making
music,” which will debut soon
on their Web site and merge art
and sound (Polachek studied
art in college).
Te trio is poised to see their
careers in the music business
really take of. What started
with the iPod commercial
was followed by touring with
music’s new golden boys
MGMT — but Polachek hasn’t
let any of it go to her head.
“I don’t feel famous in the
‘coke, rockstar’ kind of thing,”
she explained. “I feel like I have
a job that involves getting to
meet a lot of people, which is
really really fun.”
— Lindsey Lee
doing more than handStandS
cHAIRLIfT STARTS THE RIdE To THE Top of THE MUSIc MoUNTAIN
who’S who
aaron pfenning (guitar),
caroline polachek (vocals,
keyboards), Kyle Mccabe
(bass)
formed
2006 in boulder, colo.
LaBeL
columbia Records
LateSt reLeaSe
Does You Inspire You (2009)
on the weB
www.chairliftmusic.com
chairLift
courtesy the weepies
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PHOTO COURTESY BIG HASSLE MEDIA
Comical heavy-metal band,
Psychostick, is bringing fans
‘humor-core’ once again with
Sandwich, a follow up to the
band’s debut, We Couldn’t Tink
of a Title. Songs on the new
album like “Cafeine,” “Vah-
Jah-Jah” and “Do You Want a
Taco?” promise to deliver the
same raunchy, entertaining
metal songs as before, but this
time with more tracks.
Rob “Rawrb” Kersey phoned
in from Arizona to chat about
the album and magic carpets.
ABM: Did you guys all sit
together and write the songs on
the album all at once? Or was
this a collaboration compiled over
a period of time?
Rob Kersey: When we
were starting to get ready to
put together a new CD, we got
signed and started touring so
we didn’t really have time to
sit down and fnish writing a
record. So a lot of it was already
put together. Ten we brought
in Jake (McReynolds) and
Jimmy (Grant), the two newer
members, who are both very
talented writers and creative
all around. Half was ready
to go and the other half was
just about sitting down and
fnishing it up to get it ready to
record.
ABM: Do you get tired of
playing the “Beer song”?
RK: No, actually, it’s a lot
of fun. People ask me that
question quite a bit, but I don’t
because it’s a lot of fun to play
— everybody loves it; I love it.
Everybody in the band loves it.
ABM: Is it harder to write
dark lyrics versus humorous
lyrics?
RK: Absolutely, I think it’s
way more difcult to write. I
mean, how many times can you
say ‘this pain inside’? Te thing
about writing what we write,
it’s all based of of just what
happens around us. And there’s
always something happening
around us, always. A lot of the
times we’ll just start singing
funny lyrics and then one of
them starts throwing a rif with
their mouth. It’s so much easier.
It just feels natural for us to
write funny songs rather than
songs about how my girlfriend
broke my heart.
ABM: Do you ever worry
what you fnd funny isn’t so
funny to others?
RK: Honestly, when we’re
writing we’re not even thinking
about if people will laugh at it.
If it makes us laugh, then we’re
happy. We try to make it funny
to where everybody will get it
but it’s still funny to us.
ABM: Will you ever write a
serious song?
RK: As far as Psychostick
is concerned, it will always
be humor, metal-hardcore;
“humor-core” as we call it. But
we ( Josh, Alex and myself )
do have a side project called
Evacuate Chicago. Any time
we have a song that doesn’t ft
Psychostick it will go there.
ABM: What can fans expect
when they come to a show?
RK: Expect the unexpected.
Don’t go in there thinking it’s
going to be a standard rock
show. Te further up or closer
to the front you are, the more
heckling you are going to get
— from me, in particular. I will
interact with you; you will be
part of the show.
ABM: Do you travel by bus or
van?
RK: We tried to travel by
magic carpet, but decided to
get a van instead. I wanted to
[get a magic carpet] because
it would save us a lot of gas
money. Unfortunately that
technology doesn’t exist like it
used to.
ABM: How do you think gas
prices and the economy will afect
your tour?
RK: Usually in a recession
like this a lot of people turn
to entertainment to distract
themselves from their debts
and pain and sufering. I think
the entertainment world will do
just fne as far as this recession
goes. Tat’s what I predict.
ABM: What’s your guilty
pleasure song?
RK: (laughs) I listen to a lot
of Jewel!
ABM: How would you describe
your music to a deaf person?
RK: I would fail my arms up
and down, let me think…yeah,
just jump around like a monkey,
failing my arms around and
throw lots of stuf at them.
— Nicole Black
not yoUr Standard PB&j
BUT A SANdwIcH ALL THE SAME
who’S who
Rob “Rawrb” Kersey (vocal-
ist), alex “Shmalex” preiss
(drums), Joshua “Joshy”
Key (guitarist), Jimmy “Jim-
mychanga” grant (bass-
ist), Jake “Jackermeister”
McReynolds (guitarist)
formed
2000 in Tempe, ariz.
LaBeL
Rock Ridge Music
LateSt reLeaSe
Sandwich (2009)
on the weB
www.psychostick.com
PSychoStick
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PHOTO COURTESY PSYCHOSTICK
20 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 21 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Starting a band can
sometimes be a religious
experience — but more often
than not, it proves quite the
opposite.
“I was just at a point in my
life where I was pissed of at
everything — in the dumps,
if you will,” remarks guitarist/
vocalist Andy Hollingsworth.
While Te Dumps remain,
at their core, punk/metal with
the three original members,
the addition of Patrick Ware
creates a nostalgia in its sound
for bands (i.e. Motorhead)
that played in “smoky/sweaty/
shitty” venues and eventually
saw their names at the top of
marquees.
Te indie-laden town of
Athens is a tough place to set
oneself apart, but the way Te
Dumps see it, the music scene
in the Classic City is a perfect
place to run a business model
that today’s music industry
requires.
As bassist Jef Rapier puts it,
“We’re happy with recording
fve or six songs at a time and
releasing EP’s, just to keep our
name out there and remind
people of what we’re all about.”
In other words, distribution is
everything.
On the current state of
the industry, Hollingsworth
predicts, “I think it (the music
industry) will all level out. It’s
just a diference of how people
consume music — it’s really
going to fuck up the big names
and big labels more than
anyone else.”
Sitting in a smoky room
in the backstage of 40 Watt,
there is a moment of clarity
on how Athens music thrives
in today’s cutthroat business.
It’s both a respect for the past
and anticipation of the future
that forces today’s musicians to
realize whether or not they can
provide a sustainable project.
As all four members of Te
Dumps have been playing in
Athens for nearly a decade,
sustainability is one of their
fortes.
“To me, touring and playing
shows is great and everything,
but making a good record is the
ultimate,” says Ware, “because
that’s what people dig up —
recordings are timeless.”
As these words come from
Ware’s mouth, there is a sense
of confdence and calmness
that fortifes what Te Dumps
are all about: communicating
with fans and making awesome
records.
“I mean that’s why we’re on
planet Earth,” he continues.
“Fuckin’ dig that shit up and
listen to Te Dumps.”
Looking at the backstage
walls, you will see years and
years of random thoughts of
musicians — a process that
doesn’t seem to have any
pattern or any method. After
talking with Te Dumps, it is
an eclectic nature that, in fact,
ties everything together more
cohesively and helps to make
sense of it all.
Having members from
Georgia and Ohio along with
infuences from all genres of
music, Te Dumps embrace
their individual diferences
and use them to fuel their
cohesiveness as a group. As
drummer Jason “Mohawk”
Richardson puts it, “the four
of us have been infuenced by a
whole bunch of diferent sorts
of music.”
However diferent those
infuences are, Te Dumps
have been able to fortify their
sound into their records and
live shows and in turn have
created a solid following from
Texas to the Northeast.

—Will Hackett
the revivaL of recordingS
LocAL METAL GRoUp dUMpS THE pRoGRESSIVE MUSIc ModEL
who’S who
andy Hollingsworth
(guitar, vocals), Jef Rapier
(bass, vocals), Jason Rich-
ardson (drums), daniel Ray
(guitar, vocals)
formed
2005 in athens, ga.
LaBeL
independent
LateSt reLeaSe
EP 1 (2009)
on the weB
www.myspace.com/the
dumps
the dUmPS
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PHOTO: MIKE WHITE
23 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
If any of you watch “Grey’s
Anatomy,” “One Tree Hill,”
or “Ghost Whisperer,” you
may be familiar with breaking
artist Erin McCarley’s catchy
pop tunes from her debut
album, Love, Save the Empty.
McCarley’s had multiple tracks
appear on such shows and most
recently the title song appeared
on the soundtrack and in the
last scene of the romantic
comedy “He’s Just Not Tat
Into You.” Signed to Universal
Republic Records after her
performance at last year’s
SXSW festival, McCarley
has received nationwide
recognition and praise for her
songwriting abilities and her
soulful singing voice. Taking a
break after a month-long tour
we were able to catch up with
McCarley to talk about her
debut album and adjusting to
her music career.
Athens Blur Magazine: How
have you adjusted to life on the
road? It seems like it’s easier for
guys to travel on a tour bus for
weeks. How is it being a girl on
the road?
Erin McCarley: (laughs) I
don’t know if it’s harder, well,
I guess it kind of is because
guys get to wake up and throw
something on, and they can
actually wear that to the show
and look normal and cool. But
that’s probably the hardest part
for the girl; there are just so
many diferent pieces to your
outft even if you are non-high
maintenance.
ABM: Do you get nervous or
anything or do you just get excited
to perform?
EM: I always get so nervous.
I’m really not like the normal
artist who wants all the
attention on them…I’m a
pretty private person and when
I go up there on stage, it’s a
little nerve-wracking, but I’m
getting better at that.
ABM: So what do you do to
calm your nerves before you go
onstage?
EM: I usually try not to
drink too much, just have a
shot or like a glass of wine or
something, and um, whoever
I’m playing with, I usually
get them to sing the “Never
Ending Story” with me as a
warm up [before] I play.
ABM: After the frst song
or two do you get over the
nervousness?
EM: Yeah, I think so. I think
I ease up. A lot of the times the
whole frst song I give myself
a pep talk, of, ‘Okay, don’t take
yourself so seriously, people
are coming here to escape and
listen to music, and they’re
entertained probably more
easily than you are, and they
just want to have a good time,
and let them.’ (laughs) And I
just say that to myself a lot.
ABM: What made you decide
to play pop music instead of
country, since you were playing
in a country cover band while
attending college in San Diego
after living for some time in
Nashville?
EM: I grew up on pop. I
didn’t grow up on country.
Tere was nothing to grasp
from country for me. I learned
to write country later on, but
it’s not what is innately inside,
you know. When I was in
San Diego, I did fnd myself
getting more country and it
was so weird because…I tried
my favorite country songs, but
I could never deliver right. I
could try and have a country
thing, but it just [wasn’t]
natural.
ABM: What has been the
highlight so far of this musical
journey you’ve begun?
EM: One highlight was the
day my record came out…I
was in New York, my favorite
city, and [I performed on]
Letterman, and that whole day
I’m preparing for that, which
was so exciting. Ten, that
night, I played a record release
show at Joe’s Pub, where it was
always a dream of mine to play
there. It was a pretty big day.
ABM: Why was Joe’s Pub so
special and unique to you?
EM: I guess whenever I was
starting to write… I would
always research people who
were doing what I wanted to
do and see where they were
playing and you know, just kind
of follow their career.
ABM: Why should one of our
readers pick up Love, Save the
Empty?
EM: I just think it’s real
because I’m talking about a
lot of things that people will
say out loud, ‘Oh, this is one
of those situations you always
get yourself in,’…and it’s about
wanting [fulfllment] and
[having] something to release
and not having that void inside
anymore.
ABM: And is that kind of
what Love, Save the Empty
means?
EM: Oh yeah. Defnitely.
ABM: I read that the
songwriting that went into this
debut was a search for authenticity
in yourself and others. Did you
fnd what you were searching
for?
EM: (laughs) I don’t know.
No, not yet.
ABM: Tat will be the second
album?
EM: Tat’ll be the second
one. Hopefully, the second one
will be a little bit [happier].
— Nicole Black
Love can Save the emPty
RISING STAR offERS HopE THRoUGH MUSIc
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PHOTO: REID ROLLS
who’S who
erin Mccarley
formed
2005 in San francisco, calif.
LaBeL
universal Republic
LateSt reLeaSe
Love, Save the Empty (2009)
on the weB
www.erinmccarley.com
erin mccarLey
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P
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Apart the members of Tinted
Windows have played, written
and sang on some of power-
pop’s most memorable tunes —
from “1979”and “I Want You to
“Want Me” to “mmmBop” and
“Stacey’s Mom”. Together their
music epitomizes the genre with
loud guitars, ample hooks and
plenty of radio-ready energy.
A bizarre grouping, the lineup
includes Taylor Hanson, the
big-voiced middle brother from
Hanson, James Iha, former
lead guitarist for the Smashing
Pumpkins, Adam Schlesinger,
bassist for Fountains of Wayne
and rampant pop songwriter,
and Bun E.Carlos,the legendary
drummer for Cheaap Trick.
However strange the band
may seem to outsiders, when
speaking to Schlesinger, it
all seems to make sense. Te
nucleus of the group,Schlesinger
had known both Hanson and
Iha for years when, fnally, three
years ago he brought them
the idea of slotting Hanson’s
unique-yet-familiar vocals over
loud, power-pop guitars. Both
were immediately on board.
“Once we came up with the
idea, it sort of made sense to
everybody right away,” he says,
“even though it was a little bit
bananas.”
Te last remaining challenge
was acquiring a drummer. With
some songs written, the group
began tossing around ideas for
drummers, all in the vein of
Bun E. Carlos.
“Ten we thought we
should just ask Bun E. Carlos,”
Schlesinger says matter-of-
factly, mentioning that both
Fountains of Wayne and the
Smashing Pumpkins had
played shows with Cheap Trick.
“We thought it was a long shot,
but he just wanted to hear the
music. He heard it. He liked it.
And he said ‘Yes.’”
Regardless of their
pronounced musical pedigree,
Schlesinger downplays the
group’s status as a so-called
“supergroup.”
“We don’t think of ourselves
as, alone, being brand names
that are worth something all by
themselves,”he laughs.“Tis was
really just four musicians that
came together and had some
overlapping tastes and thought
we could do something cool.
We didn’t have any illusions of
being super.”
Brand names or not, the
band members are recognizable.
Although the act has certainly
benefted from the shock factor
of its lineup, Schlesinger thinks
once people hear them, the
focus will shift from who they
are to what they’re doing. “We
knew people would do a little
bit of a double take to see these
four people,” he says, explaining
that the band wasn’t announced
until after the record was
completed in an attempt to of-
set any quick judgments. “We
think that once people hear the
music, they’ll understand where
the idea came from, and it will
stop being such a weird concept,
and it will just be a band.”
Te group’s eponymous
debut is 100 percent pure
power-pop with overfowing
guitars and ample “oh ohs” and
“cha chas.” Full of slick love
songs peppered with hooks and
abundant energy, from the start
of album opener and lead single
“Kind of a Girl” the album
moves furiously through its 11
tracks without ever stopping for
a breath. However, with only
a few shows at SXSW under
its belt and a few dates lined
up for summer, it still remains
to be seen whether Tinted
Windows will live beyond the
one-of album. Schlesinger says
that Tinted Windows exists in
conjunction with its members’
other musical obligations and
the band’s future relies primarily
on how enjoyable it continues
to be.
“Te whole reason we’re
doing this thing is just to have
fun, so that’s really as far as I’ve
thought it through,” he says.
“We just want to enjoy it.”
— Natalie B. David
hanSonS, PUmPkinS, foUntainS and trickS - oh my!
MEET THE BIZARRo-woRLd SUpERGRoUp TINTEd wINdowS
PHOTO COURTESY BIG HASSLE MEDIA
who’S who
bun e. carlos (drums),
James iha (guitar), adam
Schlesinger (bass), Taylor
Hanson (vocals)
formed
2007 in new York city

LaBeL
S-curve Records
LateSt reLeaSe
Kind of a Girl (2009)
on the weB
www.myspace.com/tint-
edwindows
tinted
windowS
24 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 25 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Te Roots probably aren’t hip
hop’s frst green band. Tey’re
just its most well-known.
“In 2009,” begins Roots
drummer Ahmir “Questlove”
Tompson, “you can’t aford
not to be somewhat on the road
to that direction. I mean, we’re
not 100 percent green as is, you
know, our house isn’t convert-
ed or solar-powered. But we’re
slowly making a move there. I
know that right now my [Toy-
ota] Scion is sort of easy on gas
guzzling but I would eventu-
ally like to get of the waiting
list for a Prius. Tat’s probably
the hardest car to obtain now
in the tri-state area.”
Lead vocalist Tariq “Black
Tought”Trotter adds, “I’d love
to have a Prius, but I have to
settle for my CR-V.”
While it’s unclear if the crew
rode in a vegetable oil-run-
ning tour bus from its native
Philly to Washington D.C. for
late February’s environmental
summit Power Shift ’09, we do
know that Te Roots rocked
the house with snippets from
its forward-thinking catalog
of jazz-infused hip hop. But
that’s been the group’s M.O. —
Touring! Toughtfulness! Toe-
tapping! — since its magical
debut, Do You Want More?!!!??!,
was released in ’95.
Others have come (A Tribe
Called Quest) and gone (Di-
gable Planets), but the Roots
have kept to its, well, roots and
remained germane.
“It has something to do
with longevity,” explains Black
Tought, an MC who far too
often is excluded from anyone’s
“Best Rapper” discussions. “I
mean, the fact that people still
care what Te Roots is doing
at this late date in our career is
success.”
Questlove continues, “As
long as we’re working, that, to
me, is successful. Tere’s not
too many people from the class
of 1992 that got signed when
we got signed that are still able
to make a living in 2009 doing
what we’re doing.”
Tat leads us to the oth-
er green growing synonymous
with Te Roots. With seven
studio albums, ranging from
brilliant (Illadelph Halfife) to
blah (Te Tipping Point), that
have reached as high as No.
4 on Billboard, the Grammy-
winning band has seen success
at the cash register. But where
this crew’s really cashed in and
separated itself from nearly ev-
eryone else is with its insane
touring schedule. Te Roots
have been known to be on the
road 200 days out of the year
(they’re scheduled back in At-
lanta on June 10).
Of course, with their new
gig as the ofcial house band
on “Late Night with Jimmy
Fallon”, the guys’ long bus rides
to shows in Richmond, VA,
and Burlington, VT, have to
stop, right? Nope.
“We’re still touring,” insists
Quest, who also reveals that
the band just started record-
ing its ninth album, How I Got
Over. “As it stands now, there’s
probably 10 weeks of tour-
ing that we will do spread out
throughout the year. We’re def-
initely still doing shows on the
weekends.”
Whew, that was a close one
for Te Roots’ international
following.
“People in the States shouldn’t
have anything to worry about,”
clarifes Questlove. “I don’t
know if people in South Africa
will see Te Roots in any time-
ly manner, or when we’re going
back to Macedonia.”
Sorry, guys.
However, if you have ac-
cess to NBC, you can still see
Te Roots looking surpris-
ingly dapper every weeknight
as they “Slow Jam the News”
with Jimmy or come up with
wacky birthday songs for the
talk show’s guests. Tough
they appeared a bit nervous the
frst couple of nights, Tought,
Quest and the others have
eased into your TV sets much
like their matchless brand of
hip hop has worked its way into
your speakers over the years.
“I think,” ofers Questlove,
“that this will probably show
that there’s absolutely no chal-
lenge or obstacle that we can’t
master, if given to us. I just
think this is the ongoing linear
voyage of Te Roots, you know.
Not necessarily the end of a
sentence — just another chap-
ter in our history.”
—DeMarco Williams
the root of the SoLUtion
HIp-HoppERS TRY THE LATE SHow oN foR SIZE
who’S who
Tariq Trotter aka black
Thought (Mc), ahmir
Thompson aka Questlove
(drums), leonard Hubbard
aka Hub (bass), Kamal grey
(keyboard), frank Walker
aka f. Knuckles (percus-
sion), and Kirk douglass
aka captain Kirk (guitar)
formed
1987 in philadelphia, penn.
LaBeL
def Jam
LateSt reLeaSe
Rising Down (2008)
on the weB
www.theroots.com
the rootS
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PHOTO COURTESY NBC
If you thought Athens was
just a swirling melting pot
of indie, rock and pop bands,
think again. Te hip-hop scene
is starting to make some legit
noise, and whether you want to
hear it or not, it’s there — and
it’s getting louder.
Deaf Judges, Athens’ favorite
hip-hop group (according to
the 2008 Flagpole Athens Mu-
sic Awards) agree that though
the hip-hop scene doesn’t al-
ways make itself as present as
the indie or rock ‘n’ roll scene,
it’s there.
“And defnitely, like I wish
there was more interface in
general between other hip-hop
groups and rock groups and
stuf because there is good tal-
ent out there and they get pi-
geon-holed like, ‘Tis is rap
night,’” says Austin Darnell
(aka Produceman) in a raspy
voice thanks to a show at Farm
255 the night before.
For that reason, the Judges
try to expose themselves to all
diferent types of audiences by
playing with bands that are not
hip-hop at all. Teir frst show
in Athens took place on New
Year’s Eve in 2007 with Music
Hates You (metal/punk), Dark
Meat (psychadelic) and Mous-
er (pop), and they have been
slapping mad beats all around
town, and the Southeast, ever
since.
“Tat’s why it’s so fun to do
these bills,” says Produceman,
“because we like good music
and there’s a lot of people in
this town making really good
stuf so it’s great just to be able
to come together with peo-
ple where we like what they do
and they like what we do. It’s
totally genre unrelated. It’s just
good music.”
Te rap quartet released its
debut album, All Rise, last year
boasting unique beats and lyr-
ics slightly comparable to the
Beastie Boys but with a little
Southern rap twist. Produce-
man feels the music itself is a
refection of the fact that they
like everything and pull from
everything from Vanilla Ice to
their single biggest infuence,
Wu Tang Clan.
And though the album has
been well-received, it’s their
high energy shows that im-
press people most and keep
them coming back for more.
“We’ve just been fortunate
enough to have people seem
like they’re into it ever since
that night [their frst show]
compared to even last night”
says Louie Dangerous. “People
seem to be into it and excited.”
You can’t possibly talk about
four white dudes trying to
make it in the rap world with-
out mentioning the big ele-
phant in the middle of the hip-
hop scene.
“It’s such a little piece of the
puzzle as far as that element
goes,” says Louie Dangerous.
“It becomes an issue in the
MTV kind of sense, but that’s
not the kind of shit we’re try-
ing to work in anyway,” adds
Produceman. “And under-
ground has always been open
to everybody who loves music
and that’s the cool thing about
it; it’s pretty non-judgmental.”
And by the looks of the
Judges, you would never think
to yourself, “Now these guys
look like rappers.” Tey give
of a sort of geeky vibe, but this
works to their advantage.
“We have had some good re-
sponse in that regard because
people underestimate us like
hell,” says Produceman. “Tis
guy came up to me after a show
and he was like, ‘Dude y’all got
on stage and y’all just looked
like geeks!’ And I was like, ‘OK,
we’re kinda nerdy’ and he was
like, ‘No, you specifcally!’ And
I was like, ‘Right on,’ and he
was like, ‘But you killed it!’”
“We’re an inspiration to fat
kids everywhere,” adds Louie,
the apparent goof ball of the
group.
Tough the boys have played
around in diferent bands from
blues to punk to metal, it seems
they’ve all found their niche
here in the Athens hip-hop
scene and hope to break out of
it real soon.
“‘Rolling Stone and the
Playboy mansion,” Louie says
of where he sees the band in
fve years.
“Tis is honestly my hope,”
adds Produceman. “It sounds a
little bit ridiculous, but I would
defnitely like for us to be tour-
ing like 300 days a year in the
next couple of years and Eu-
rope for sure, getting out of
America for sure if we can do
it. Tat’s my goal in the next
two years. And so fve...hope-
fully we’ll be somewhere for
real in fve.”
— Kristen Lee
making Some noiSe
ANd wE cAN HEAR IT LoUd ANd cLEAR
who’S who
Rorshak, produceman,
louie dangerous, dJ
cubenza
formed
2007 in athens, ga.
LaBeL
ec Ruins
LateSt reLeaSe
All Rise (2008)
on the weB
www.myspace.com/deaf-
judges
deaf jUdgeS
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PHOTO: MIKE WHITE
26 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 27 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Imagine you and your friends
just formed a band and have
barely fnished recording a
single when you get a call from
the biggest terrestrial station in
existence, L.A. base KROQ.
Tey inform you that your
new single will be in rotation
on their station, and that
they would have called your
manager or label frst, but you
don’t have either. Such was the
case for one of L.A.’s indie-
rock bands, Te Airborne Toxic
Event (T.A.T.E.), who created
a phenomenon in the music
world with their no-hook-
or-chorus single, “Sometime
Around Midnight.”It would be
the frst time in over ten years
KROQ included an unsigned
band in their regular rotation.
Te song is a story about the
emotions of seeing an ex leaving
a club with someone else, and
the music only emphasizes the
melancholy tone of the lyrics,
which most of us at some point
in our lives can relate to.
Since then, T.A.T.E.’s music
has spread massively nationwide
and into Europe, where they
sell out venues in London. Te
self-titled debut album released
there in February broke the
UK’s Top 40.
“We’re like a little art project
disguised as a rock band,”
reveals lead singer and guitarist
Mikel Jollett, phoning in from
Nevada before getting on a
plane back to his home in
California. “We never expected
all of this. I never thought our
song would be on a fucking
radio, for sure. We’re an indie-
rock band from L.A. We
home-recorded and produced
the record and put it out.”
Before his musical journey
began, Jollett was a writer
working on his frst novel, and
in one week his mother was
diagnosed with cancer, he with
a genetic autoimmune disease,
and, to add to the string of
unfortunate events, he and his
long-term girlfriend broke
up. While some of us might
experience a ft of depression,
Jollett instead released his
emotions through music and
writing, locking himself in his
emotional world for a year
before joining forces with fellow
band members. Together,
they combine orchestra, rock
and poetry to create musical
brilliance and a unique sound
not heard on mainstream radio
today. “I didn’t even know what
a hook was,” he admits.
Despite lacking the standard
song-writing formula, the
album continues to impress
the music and entertainment
industry (Carson Daly declared
“Tis is the kind of band you
bet the farm on”). T.A.T.E
generated even more hype
after a January performance
on Te David Letterman
show. A usually indiferent
Letterman responded with
genuine enthusiasm after they
performed and applauded —
not his usual polite one time,
but twice. “I was surprised by
how much his reaction was
like a big deal to other people,”
Jollett admits.
Te band was recently picked
up by Island Def-Jam, but only
under the circumstances that
the group remains partnered
with indie label, Majordomo,
and that the record is left
unaltered. Since acquiring
the backing of a major label,
T.A.T.E. just fnished their frst
bus tour. “We started of in our
own cars when we frst started
touring,” Jollett shares. “We
were touring within a month
after we formed the band…
we went from the caravan to a
passenger van to a sprinter, to
a larger sprinter, to a sprinter
with a trailer, to now a coach
bus.”
What you hear on the album
is what you can expect to hear
live, only the experience is
heightened to a higher level.
“We’re primarily a live band,”he
says. “Our record was recorded
live…our record’s basically a
shoddy re-creation of our live
show. I think it’s usually the
other way around.”
Jollett said in a recent
interview that they didn’t
use pro-tools as most bands
do these days. “A lot of these
PHOTO COURTESY BIG HASSLE MEDIA
an intoXicating event
SoMETIME ARoUNd MIdNIGHT
who’S who
Mikel Jollet (lead vocals,
guitar), Steven chen (lead
guitar), noah Harmon
(bass), anna bulbrook (vio-
lin), daren Taylor (drums)
formed
2006 in los feliz, calif.
LaBeL
Majordomo Records/island
Records
LateSt reLeaSe
The Airborne Toxic Event
(2008)
on the weB
www.theairbornetox-
icevent.com
the airBorne
toXic event
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songs were written in some
real isolated times…Tere
was a real sense of wanting to
bring people into that moment.
Like the moment would be so
much better if it was a shared
one, and I think that is very
much important as well at an
Airborne show.”
Te band is becoming
renowned for engaging the
audience during shows by
inviting fans to dance on stage
with them. One such show
in England left Jollett with a
bruised eye. “We invited the
whole audience on to the stage
for awhile,” he recalls. “And [a
guy] was really into the show,
like head banging, and the back
of his head hit my eye…I kept
singing…and the audience was
really into it. I had this huge
black eye for like the next week
and we had all this press to
do.”
Te creative band members
have also made a 10-part
acoustic video series of the
songs appearing on the album,
using confned places such as a
pontoon boat, where drummer
Daren Taylor never misses
a beat while being captain
— and inside a van where he
demonstrated his ability to
keep rhythm using the roof of
the vehicle as his drum. “He’ll
get drunk at a bar and just start
banging on anything,” Jollett
jokes.
With all the media frenzy
surrounding the group, Jollett
remains grounded.“Tere’s a lot
of bands that come as far as we
have and then just fall on their
faces” he refects. “We don’t feel
like we’ve done much…we just
go on tour playing shows like
every other rock band.”
— Nicole Black
“A lot of these songs were written in some
real isolated times…Tere was a real sense of
wanting to bring people into that moment.
Like the moment would be so much better if it
was a shared one and I think that is very much
important as well at an Airborne show.”
— Te Airborne Toxic Event —
PHOTO COURTESY BIG HASSLE MEDIA
28 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Spring Tigers may be fair-
ly new faces to the Ath-
ens music scene, but the band
has quickly established itself
since forming in 2008. Com-
posed of Kris Barratt (vocals,
guitar), Shane Davis (guitar,
keys), Eli Barnard (bass, vo-
cals), Chase Prince (drums, vo-
cals) and Stephen James (keys),
the synth-friendly rock group
is preparing their debut album
for release on Oakland label,
Bright Antenna.
Remarkably, Spring Tigers
has played SXSW, landed a
management deal and a record
contract all within the frst 12
months of being a band. How-
ever, vocalist Kris Barratt could
be considered an indie rock
veteran. A native of the U.K.,
Barratt was previously part of
synth-rock outft, the Capes.
Barratt’s frst group split ways
after conficts developed with
its label.
“It made me a lot more care-
ful about who I worked with,
as we were totally ripped of by
our label,” Barratt said of his
experience with the Capes.
Since leaving the U.K.,
Barrat has quickly grown to
love the Athens music scene.
“I loved all of the Elephant
6 stuf back in the day,” Barratt
said. “Olivia Tremor Control
is my favorite band from that
scene. It’s funny, I sort of end-
ed up here by accident, I think
a lot of people do. It’s like an
indie rock Bermuda Triangle.
Or Narnia. You walk through
a closet and end up in Athens
and never leave.”
Barratt also points out the
cheap living-cost of Athens as
a major beneft to musicians.
“It’s pretty easy to get by f-
nancially here and focus on just
making music,” he said. “After
the Capes broke up, my work
visa would only allow me to
earn money by playing music,
so I had almost a whole year at
home just writing songs, which
was amazing.”
While it’s easy to see a hint
of the Capes sound in the
high-spirited, rock-meets-
electronica style of the Spring
Tigers’ songs, Barratt says that
his newer band has several im-
portant diferences.
“Creatively, I wanted the
songs to be a bit more emo-
tionally engaging. Not emo
though, just a bit more shiv-
ery in parts,” Barratt explained.
“Tat feeling you get when
someone hits that perfect, un-
expected note and you get a
tingle in your spine. I felt that
the Capes stuf was maybe a
bit shallow and one dimen-
sional. I want this stuf to con-
nect more.”
Spring Tigers has a more ad-
vanced sound in Barratt’s eyes,
but his love for infusing rock
parts with electrifying key and
synth melodies has remained
constant.
“I like to have a lot of dif-
ferent textures in recordings.
Plain old guitar, bass and drums
sounds really dull to me for my
own stuf,” Barratt explained of
the Spring Tigers’ style. “Oth-
er people like Sonic Youth can
make new textures with their
guitars, but I’m not so good at
that. So I tend to layer on a lot
of synths and percussion.”
“To be honest,” he continues,
“I fnd it really difcult to even
put acoustic guitar on any of
my tracks. It sounds too vanilla
to me.”
Like Barratt’s unconven-
tional song-writing style, the
group’s upcoming six song
“mini-album” used a record-
ing process that’s downright
spacey.
Spring Tigers turned to en-
gineer Sep V. in Oakland to re-
cord its debut. In addition to
being a member of the Irani-
an royal family, he uses NASA
equipment to record. He also
owns the tape machines that
NASA used to record the mes-
sages within deep-space probes
explaining what the human
race is to any aliens that may
one day fnd them.
“It sounds like a lie, but
it’s actually true,” Barratt
promised.
Spring Tigers currently has
demos of the tracks from their
debut on MySpace. It’s a sur-
prisingly diverse set of songs
that varies from the frantic-
paced synth-rock of “New Im-
proved Formula” and “Beep
Beep” to the smart, catchy pop-
melodies of “Car Song” and
“Suddenly.”
— Chris Homer
ready to SPring
BANd pUTS dowN RooTS, pUTS oUT ALBUM
who’S who
chase prince (vocals,
drums), Kris barratt (guitar,
vocals), eli barnard (bass,
vocals), Shane davis (gui-
tar, keys), Stephen James
(keys)
formed
2007 in athens, ga.
LaBeL
bright antenna
LateSt reLeaSe
debut forthcoming
on the weB
www.myspace.com/
springtigers
SPring tigerS
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PHOTO:MIKE WHITE
30 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Mike Pardew
Azul
Jazz-fusion is proba-
bly the most unrewarding
genre on the planet. Tere’s
a stigma that either you’re
Medeski, Martin and Wood,
or you’re not — and that’s
a pretty tall mountain to
climb. Yep, Jazz-rock fu-
sion can be a tough sell.
But Portland’s Mike Pardew
sells it well on Azul – an in-
telligent and unpredictable
collection of tunes not at
all unlike MMW and other
heavyweights of the genre.
Te record is under
Pardew’s name, but he
doesn’t necessarily go out
of his way to make sure the
listener sees him as the star
of the show. Tere’s as much
to be said for the moments
when he wisely allows the
record’s co-conspirators
to the forefront as there
is for the moments when
he is, indeed, making your
head spin with his techni-
cal romps around all-things
minor and modal. More
correctly, let’s call Azul a
co-bill with his bandmates
— bassist Damian Erskine
is fashy but not masturba-
tory and drummer Micah
Kassell is expertly unpre-
dictable in keeping the con-
sistent inconsistency of the
polyrhythmic joy ride that
is Azul.
— Alec Wooden
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EAR CANDY
Larry Keel & Natural
Bridge
Backwoods
Larry Keel & Natural
Bridge’s Backwoods fuses
bluegrass of new and old
for an album with a freshly
classic appeal. Keel’s
passion for preserving
mountain music fuels his
unparalleled abilities as a
fatpicking guitarist. His
band favors the album with
powerful plucking and fery
fddling, giving this group
an unmistakable sound.
Add Keel’s smooth yet
gritty voice and you’ve got
that kind of “Dark Horse,”
Johnny Cash sound to his
music. Backwoods highlights
the best of bluegrass with a
refreshing new spin to Tom
T. Hall’s “Faster Horses” and
a surprisingly impressive
remake of the Beatles’
“Mother Nature’s Son.” Also,
with original tracks like
“Diamond Break” and “Tey,”
Keel’s Backwoods ofers
everything you could want
in a bluegrass record – a little
twang, a little grit, a little
romance, a little something
old and a little something
new. Hats of to Keel and
company on this one.
— Erica Schwartz
Te HEAP
Deluxe
Te new record from
Athens-based Te HEAP is
if anyting -a good time. Tey
recently put on a P-Funk
cover show, which is a huge
hint at what kind of music
you can expect to fnd on this
release. Tese aren’t exactly
just-broke-up-with-the-love-
of-your-life-for-the-third-
time tunes, with lyrics like
“Blame it on the Alcohol.” Te
songs start to sound similar,
but there are a few stand-
outs, including the opener,
“One of Tose Days,” and
“8 lb Hammer,” the kind of
song that gets stuck in your
head for a full 24 hours. Te
HEAP thoughtfully included
a bonus instrumental version
of all of the songs for those
who aren’t into the vocal
stylings of Bryan J. Howard.
For those who are, he and
his band mates deliver nine
catchy, horn-heavy funk
tunes with sing-along hooks
ideal for a live show. Listeners
who don’t crack a smile while
they’re listening to this
need a serious injection of
adrenaline to the heart, Pulp
Fiction style, because this is
the kind of music that makes
the average person want to
bust a move.
— Julie McCollum
Wovenhand
Ten Stones
Listening to this album
was like pulling teeth...and
not the baby ones. It’s not
the musical composition
that got me, it’s David Eu-
gene Edwards’ harsh, mono-
tone voice that turned me
away from what could have
been a sufcient album oth-
erwise. Te heart-catching
drums and smashing guitars
guide you through this jun-
gle-like album with the ban-
jo, bass, piano, and accordion
taking their stand, as well.
Edwards plants his lyrics in
Biblical imagery and waters
them with Native Ameri-
can legends. Tis he can at-
tribute to his grandfather, a
Nazarene preacher who has
been said to be the biggest
infuence on Edwards’ ee-
rily unique style. It wasn’t
until “Quiet Nights of Qui-
et Stars” that Wovenhand f-
nally got a hold on me. It’s
here where Edwards reveals
to us the extensive range of
his voice, weaving in an old-
timey sound, and still keep-
ing a creepy quality to it.
Te album was gripping
and not boring in any sense
of the word, yet it never lost
its ability to scare the hell
out of me — is that a good
thing? It’s worth giving Ten
Stones a listen for yourself.
— Kristen Lee

Western Civ Shower the People You Love With Gold
I’m all for retro music, and this is why I initially enjoyed
Western Civ’s Shower the People You Love With Gold. It sounds
as if it were created in 1987, fghting for college radio air-
time with Te Connells and Te Railway Children. But here-
in lies the problem: It’s one thing to be from 1987, but quite
another to sound like 1987. Te album was great for a listen,
but it just made me run back to my Waxing Poetics’ cassette.
New artists too often borrow, trying to mask these ap-
propriations with subtle fourishes — an added bridge here, a guitar solo there.
As “I Am A Waterfall” kicks in, it hits me: Lloyd Cole! Yes, that was a good al-
bum. With “Rally” I’m with the Lemonheads, before Evan Dando lost any sense
of reality. “Te Disturbing Presence of Chachi” brings Robyn Hitchcock and his
Egyptians to the fore, while “Paper Hornet Parade” puts Let’s Active front and
center. Te last one can’t be pinned too much on Western Civ — Mitch Eas-
ter, Let’s Active founder/lead singer, serves as producer on Shower the People.
Western Civ created a greatest guitar rifs from my youth, and it’s good for a vis-
it. But when bands of today such as M83 and Oxford Collapse take old school to new
depths, playing music ripped from the past makes a band as relevant as a Betamax.
So thanks for ofering a ride, Western Civ, but you’re a little late. By about 22 years.
— Ed Morales
Te Decemberists Te Hazards of Love
Long-form concept music has a rich history. From Jethro
Tull’s 1973 album, A Passion Play, to NOFX’s Te Decline, aural
narratives have prospered in a variety of genres. Te Decem-
berists have made a career of toeing the line between songs of
traditional pop length and involved musical epics. Te Hazards
of Love fnally tips that balance into the narrative column, fn-
ishing what the band started in 2004 with Te Tain.
Complete with fully developed characters (lead singer Colin
Meloy and guest artists Shara Worden and Becky Stark each have title roles) Hazards
of Love spins a baroque tale of love and death. While the record can be broken up into
songs, it’s best listened to all at once.
Te music is pure Decemberists prog-rock fare broken into themes that pop up again
and again; the same melodic structure is manipulated across the entire album. Tis the-
matic material is heard right of the bat in the “Prelude,” where it rises from a din of
sustained organ notes, settling down as a weaving undercurrent on acoustic guitar for
“Te Prettiest Whistles Won’t Wrestle the Tistles Undone.” Lyrics and musical images
fade in and out of the piece, sometimes in slightly altered form.
Hazards of Love is an exceptional album that makes good on the band’s storytell-
ing promise. But after such a strong showing, the album peters out one song too soon.
Choosing a lethargic goodbye, “Te Hazards of Love 4,” for the fnal music is a slight
misstep in a pleasurable and listenable album.
— Jon Ross
Psychostick Sandwich
Phoenix, Ariz. metal/comedy group, Psychostick, has fnished working on their
latest album, Sandwich. A follow-up to the 2006 release, We Couldn’t Tink of a
Title. it includes an amalgamation of celebrations of food, email spamming, vah-
jay-jay’s, bad directions and more food. Tey even proclaim that P is the best
letter in the alphabet. Psychostick practices a PR tactic in their track “373 Tank
You’s” by personally thanking the 373 people who donated $50 or more to help
the band pay for studio time and studio equipment—the track is over 14 minutes
long. With the conglomeration of track imagination and thoughtful selling tactics,
Sandwich promises to deliver to Psychostick fans a good efort in continuing their
style of meshing metal and comedy. Te album is set for release in mid-May.
— Will Hackett
32 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Loxsly
Tomorrow’s Fossils
Loxsly’s new record, To-
morrow’s Fossils, manag-
es to fnd a title which
sums up the whole sound
of the band: familiar yet
new. Tey sound some-
where between Te Killers
and Death Cab for Cutie,
with a splash of old school
Flaming Lips. Songs like
“Pet Results (Te Dog
Tat Talked Back)” have
the quirk factor to them
that makes you listen
closer. Tere is also more
experimentation than you
would see in mainstream
bands, such as the in-
strumental tip-toe called
“Mouse Pedals.” Te ex-
perimentation has fnesse
though; there is a feeling
that nothing in the record
was haphazard. While
some of the songs get
dangerously close to dull,
others succeed, particular-
ly the opening song, “Ped-
al to the Coast,” and “As
the Constellation’s Arms
Uncurled.” If you are a
sucker for indie music and
songs that have lots of
slower, layer-heavy, spac-
ey jams with lots of re-
verb, Loxsly is your band.
— Julie McCollum
Venice is Sinking Azar
Te latest ofering from local group Venice is Sinking embodies
a sort of rueful sadness that has me imagining it as the score to a
cool indie flm about coming-of-age.
“Okay” has an up-tempo pop feel that just begs to score a night
out on the town, while “Wetlands Dance Hall” is the perfect
background music for the dance of the cool kids at the party they
put on in lieu of going to the prom. For the heartbreaking scene
where the protagonist cries on her bed, “Young Master Sunshine”
should play softly in the background. Roll credits to “Iron Range.”
In an age where the art of “the album” is often lost due to the rise of a singles-driven
market, Azar is comprehensively crafted and complete. While each song is incredibly
well-crafted and comes across as thoughtful, there is variety across the tracks, but an
overarching theme pulls them all together.
Te overall sound of the record is spacey and oh-so pretty with layered guy-on-girl vocal
harmonies that lend a rich texture to the album as a whole. Te guitars sparkle while the
vocals soothe.
Te album whispers, rather than screams, and is instantly likable, though it gets better
the more you hear it. It has a quiet presence that, while underwhelming, is hard to ignore.
— Lindsey Lee
Robert Gomez
Pine Sticks & Phosphorus
Robert Gomez is a master
of his craft. He has dabbled
in almost every genre of
music: classical guitar, jazz,
latin (he once headlined in a
band called Te Latin Pimps
— classy, I know). He even
did a short stint with Te
Ringling Brothers and Bar-
num & Bailey Circus. Tank-
fully though, Gomez has set-
tled into an indie-folk phase
that embodies his newest
release, Pine Sticks and Phos-
phorus. Tink Elliott Smith
meets wider instrumen-
tal arrangement — enter
organ, fute, cello, French
horn. Gomez’s hushed sing-
ing over dreamy melodies
and his exceptional guitar
plays out like a foggy haze
of quiet folk ballads pep-
pered with darker elements.
Songs like “On this Day” and
“A Paper Figurine,” show-
case Gomez’s lyrical talents,
while instrumental ballads
capture Gomez’s unparal-
leled musical talent in “At
Nemili Bats” and “October
Tird Post.” Tis album qui-
ets your soul and sends your
mind wandering. Favorite
song: “Open Your Eyes/Es-
cape From Burning Trees.”
— Erica Schwartz
Jazz Chronic
Share Te Wealth
Athens band Jazz
Chronic has recently re-
leased their frst full-
length album entitled
Share the Wealth. Te
genre-jumping produc-
tion incorporates soul,
funk, acid-jazz and rock
to literally share the
riches of musical tal-
ent and collaboration.
Tis innovative and cre-
ative work truly creates
a powerful musical ex-
perience that will, in the
words of the band, “melt
your mind.” As the latter
half of the band’s name
alludes, be sure to stock-
up on your MJ, sit back
and realize the musical
experience. Titles such
as “Do the Math,” and
“Soul True” will be sure
to take the listener to au-
dio-vana, a place of lis-
tening heaven that all
Jazz Chronic fans have
grown accustomed to.
Te group will be play-
ing numerous shows
around Athens in the up-
coming months, includ-
ing a 5/2 set at Te Cale-
donia Lounge in Athens.
— Will Hackett
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upcoming CD releases
may
5
Akron/Family
Set ‘Em Wild, Set ‘Em Free
J.B. Beverly & The Wayward Drifter
Watch America Roll By
Ciara
Fantasy Ride
The Dangerous Summer
Reach For The Sun
Ben Harper & Relentless7
White Lies For Dark Times
Hatebreed
For the Lions
may
12
Art Brut
Art Brut vs. Satan
Bricolage
Bricolage
Crisis In Hollywood
Safe And Sound
Steve Earle
Townes
may
19
Tori Amos
Abnormally Attracted To Sin
Busta Rhymes
Back on my B.S.
Eminem
Relapse
Iggy Pop
Preliminaries
Jason Lytle
Yours Truly, The Commuter
Chrisette Michele
Epiphany
Passion Pit
Manners
Lionel Richie
Just Go
Ruben Studdard
Love Is
Iron & Wine
Around the Well
may
25
may
26
june
2
june
9
Phoenix
Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix
Simple Minds
Graffiti Soul
WAND (James Jackson Toth Proect)
Hard Knox or Are You Sure Hank Jr.
Done it This Way?: Home
Recordings 1999-2007
Grizzly Bear
Veckatimest
Marilyn Manson
The High End of Low
Mandy Moore
Amanda Leigh
311
Uplifter
Elvis Costello
Secret, Profane & Sugarcane
Dave Matthews Band
Big Whiskey and the Groogrux King
Ryan Star
11:59
9mm Solution
The Dream is Dead
Black Eyed Peas
The E.N.D.
Lil Wayne
Rebirth
Sonic Youth
The Eternal
Release dates are subject to change. Check artists
or store websites as these dates approach.
Hey local bands! Got a release date coming up? Let
us know at editorial@athensblur.com
35 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Te fight was only
seven hours, but we lost fve
on the way. Everyone is giddy; it’s the
kind of giddy people get when they are up
past their bedtime and everything is hilarious,
for no apparent reason. We hop on a bus toward
downtown Dublin. Te taxis are on strike today so
we have to carry our bags and gear about a half-mile
to the hotel. Our giddiness subsides. We realize later
that John’s luggage is still on the bus, and now we
know the tour has ofcially begun. We meet in the
hotel bar for our frst pints of Guinness. After a
few rounds, we take our drinking out on the
town. A realization hits me. Dublin and
Athens should become sister cit-
ies. Drunk, obnoxious sister
cities.
Day 1 — Dublin
Did
a good bit of
sightseeing today. Tere are
lots of street musicians in Dublin,
and they play mostly American music.
No matter how hard they may try, I still
hear the infuence of Irish folk music in their
covers of American songs. I guess it’s much the
same as how bands from the South will undeni-
ably sound Southern to everyone else, regardless
of their intentions. Tonight was the frst show
of the tour. I was more nervous than I thought
I’d be about playing in a new country for the
frst time, though all went well. A few of
the guys from the bands forget about
sleep and stay out drinking all
night.
Day 2 — Dublin
7 a.m.rolls around
pretty quickly. It’s a short
fight to Glasgow. I grab lunch at
Quizno’s, where the guy making sand-
wiches is ecstatic and asks me if I’ve ever eaten
there before. Apparently, Quizno’s is a totally new
thing and everyone is excited to have another sand-
wich option besides Subway (America is apparently
taking over the world one fast food joint at a time).
It’s kind of depressing. Te show was fantastic to-
night. Glasgow has really enthusiastic crowds. Te
Scottish accents are difcult to understand, and
even more so when you’ve had a few pints
too many. I think I sold a Scotsman the
rights to our songs. I’m not sure,
but I defnitely agreed to
something.
Day 3 — Glasgow
dead confederate
tour diary:
Below is
an account of Dead
Confederate’s frst UK
tour with Darker My Love and A
Place To Bury Strangers. For the
purposes of keeping this tour diary
interesting, I will skip most of the
details of our shows. The tour di-
ary below is more of an account
of the “other” stuff that
went on, music aside.
brantley senn of
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Te
venue is located in
an industrial section of town
that appears to be pretty run-down.
Tere isn’t anything to do but sit at the
club and wait for the show to start. Tonight
has the smallest crowd of the tour. Tis city
could be easily confused for Birmingham, Ala.,
in every way except the pronunciation (which
is “Birming-um”, not “Birming-HAM”).
We’ve been very fortunate to have time
to sightsee and to play for good size
crowds thus far, so I can’t complain.
At least I’ll get a good night’s
sleep.
Day 7 — Birmingham
London
reminds me
of New York City but
cleaner and calmer. I could
defnitely see myself living
here. Sold-out, rocking show
tonight. Perfect way to end
our tour with APTBS and
Darker My Love. A late-
nighter is had by
all.
Day 8 —
London
We
spend the day
lounging around a friend’s
house because everyone is too
exhausted to really do much else. On our
way to the venue the police stop us. Tey
search our van and verify our ID’s. Tey’re look-
ing for terrorists. I suggest they search Walker
because he looks like a redneck Osama. Tey
are far friendlier than any American police I’ve
encountered. Tey don’t carry guns and I think
that may play a part in why they don’t bully
people. We play a headlining show at
Te Victoria. It feels good to play
our own show with a full-
length set.
Day 9 —
London
Our
friend Bernard
gives us a music history tour
around the west side. We see: Abbey
Road studios, David Gilmore’s old house,
the Tabernacle where Pink Floyd frst played
(back in the Syd Barrett days), Rough Trade
records, the diferent neighborhoods where Punk,
Glam and the Psychedelic music scenes blossomed,
respectively. We play a show with our old tour bud-
dies, Manchester Orchestra, in the Camden Market
section of town. I wonder, do people in the UK
think they are an orchestra from Manchester?
Arriving at the airport to fy home, it fnally
rains for the frst time since we’ve been
here. Dead Confederate leaves think-
ing it is 65 and sunny in the UK
year-round.
Day 10 — London
Tere are
a lot of really old
buildings that are beauti-
ful and massive. Good lord our
country is young! Te bar we play is
where Radiohead played their frst gig.
After the show, the promoter takes us to
a club. It’s three dance clubs in one giant
building where they play an awful lot
of American music. I heard everything
from Huey Lewis to Pantera. Some
people will dance to anything. Also,
not coincidentally, ecstasy is
really popular here.
Day 6 — Oxford
I
really like Leeds. It’s
laid-back and not as “posh” as
some of the other cities in the UK,
a comparison similar to how one might
describe Athens and Atlanta. It seems every-
one here loves discussing the diferences in our
cultures as much as we do. One of the bouncers
explains to me how he’s envious of Americans’ right
to protect their homes. He tells how homeowners can
get sued if a burglar injures himself breaking in to your
home. He says if you kill or injure an armed person
breaking in to your home, even if you’re protecting
your family, you will most likely get time in prison. I
don’t know if any of what he said is actually true,
but for a minute, I feel really proud to be Amer-
ican. We leave Leeds that night and stay
in Nottingham with one of Ricky’s
friends. Tey are obsessed
with Guitar Hero.
Day 5 —
Leeds/Nottingham
Today is our frst
day on the road with our
driver for the week, Ricky. We change
his name to Ricky Bobby immediately,
because we’re jerks. Our Sprinter van has four
vertical, stif seats and a beanbag. A Sprinter is
not anywhere close to the comforts of an American
Econoline. After the show I go for a walk to stretch
out the ol’ sea legs. When I walk back in the venue,
I’m wearing the hood of my sweatshirt over my
hat. Te bouncers tell me I need to take the hood
of my head and, apparently, the cops will tell
me the same. Tey have to be able to see a
person’s profle at all times on the CCTV
cameras around the city. Ooohhh,
1984!
Day 4 — Manchester
For more stories and pictures from the road
with Dead Confederate, as well as the latest
news and exclusive downloads, visit them on
their Wrecking Blahg,
http://deadconfederate.typepad.com
M
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36 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 37 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
MUSIC THIS DAY IN MUSIC HISTORY
1
M
A
Y
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
1969 - Jimi Hendrix
is busted at Toronto
international airport for
possession of narcotics and
released on $10,000 bail.
1989 – employees of a
california jewelry store
call police to investigate a
suspicious person shopping
at the store — who turns
out to be Michael Jackson
shopping in disguise.
1959 - Winners of the frst
annual grammy awards are
announced.
1968 – Reginald
dwight ofcially
changes his name to
elton John.
1991 - a judge in
Macon, ga., dismisses
a wrongful death suit
against ozzy osbourne
after a local couple
fails to prove his music
inspired their son to
attempt suicide.
1974 – 43
people are
arrested after
throwing
bottles outside
a Jackson 5
concert at RfK
Stadium in
Washington,
d.c. More than
50 people are
injured as a
result.
1971 – a judge
grants Jerry lee
lewis a divorce
from his third
cousin Myra.
1983 - Meatloaf
fles for
bankruptcy.
1957 – elvis presley is taken to an l.a.
hospital to have a cap from his tooth
removed from his lung after inhaling it.
1995 – Stone Temple pilots’ front man,
Scott Weiland, is arrested in california
for trying to buy drugs in a motel
parking lot.
1968 – The doors lead singer, Jim
Morrison, incites a riot during a concert
in chicago.
1974 - eric clapton records “i Shot the
Sherif.”
1980 - The South african
government bans pink
floyd’s song “another brick in
the Wall (part ii)”.
1998 - loretta lynn
announces her decision to
return to college and get a
degree.
1970 –The
beatles release
their 13th and
fnal album, Let
it Be.
1957 - buddy Holly
and the crickets
audition for “arthur
godfrey’s Talent
Scouts” and are
rejected.
1974 – elvis
presley and Robert
plant perform an
impromptu version
of “love Me” after a
concert by presley.
1998 – george Michael is fned,
given 80 hours community service
and ordered to undergo counseling
stemming from charges for
committing a lewd act in a park
restroom.
1969 – president nixon
has Stevie Wonder to
the White House.
1995 – former guns
n’ Roses drummer,
Steven adler, is
arraigned on a felony
count of possession of
heroin and two other
misdemeanor drug
charges.
1986 – dolly parton opens
her own theme park,
dollywood, in pigeon forge,
Tenn.
1944 –“You are My
Sunshine” songwriter,
Jimmie davis, becomes
governor of louisiana.
1990 – Rebellious
songstress, Sinead
o’ connor refuses to
perform on “Saturday
night live” after
andrew “dice” clay was
announced as the host.
1965 – Keith
Richards is inspired
to start writing
the Rolling Stones’
“Satisfaction” while
sitting in a florida
hotel room.
1977 – over 76,000
fans attend a led
Zeppelin show
in pontiac, Mich.,
setting a new
record for the
largest audience
at a single-act
concert.
1985 – president
Ronald Reagan
presents Michael
Jackson with a
humanitarian
award.
MUSIC THIS DAY IN MUSIC HISTORY
16
1958 - bobby darin’s “Splish
Splash” is released as the frst
eight-track master recording
pressed to a 45-RpM disc.
1965 – While investigating the
lyrics to “louie, louie” by The
Kingsmen, fbi agents make a visit
to Wand Records.
1958 - Jerry lee lewis
confrms that he has married
his 13-year-old cousin, Myra.
2003 - The fnal manuscript
of beethoven’s ninth
Symphony, which included
annotations by the
composer, sells on the
auction block for $3.47
million.
1996 - bradley nowell of Sublime is
found dead of a drug overdose at the
age of 26 in a San francisco hotel room.
1957 - The national
academy of Recording arts
and Sciences (naRaS) is
established. naRaS is best
known for organizing the
grammy awards.
2000 -
britney
Spears
releases
Oops!..I Did It
Again.
1969 - John lennon and
Yoko ono begin their
famous ten day “bed-
in” in Montreal’s Queen
elizabeth Hotel.
2003 - Scott Weiland (Stone
Temple pilots) is arrested for
drug possession.
2003 – after an incredible
run of 6,680 shows during
16 years on broadway, “les
Miserables” closes.
1979 - genesis takes a turn in
the box ofce, selling tickets to
its beneft show at l.a.’s Roxy.
1998 - philadelphia mayor ed
Rendell proclaims May 24th to
be the ofcial “Van Halen day” in
philadelphia.
1968 - The beatles begin recording
the White Album.
1999 - lenny Kravitz walks of a new
Jersey stage after 40 minutes and
collapses from heat exhaustion. He
had been performing in a fur coat.
1964 – cited for having a
hair style “like Mick Jagger,”
11 boys were suspended
from a school in coventry,
england.
1987 - during a show at
Rome’s flaminio Stadio, u2
sets of two neighborhood
earthquake alarms with its
sound system.
1975 - elton John releases Captain Fantastic
and the Brown Dirt Cowboy, which becomes
the frst album to be certifed as a million-
seller on its frst day of release.
2000 - The eagles fle suit against a dallas
restaurant named “Hotel california,” claiming
trademark violations.
1964 - ella fitzgerald’s
cover of “can’t buy Me love”
hits #34 on the u.K. charts,
making her the frst artist
to chart in the u.K. with a
beatles cover.
1998 – a Hanson show
slated for June 29th at the
pine Knob amphitheatre
(capacity 15,000 plus) in
detroit sells out in less than
20 minutes.
1973 - clive
davis is fred from
columbia Records
for misappropriating
$100,000.
1999 - The Manic Street
preachers refuse to perform
at a concert because Queen
elizabeth ii is present.
The group had previously
vowed to never perform for
the monarchy because they
considered it outdated and
pointless.
1971 - peter
cetera (of the
band chicago)
is beaten up at
a cubs-dodgers
game by four
men who
objected to the
length of his hair.
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
1956 - buddy
Holly is
inspired to
write “That’ll
be the day” after seeing
the John Wayne movie
“The Searchers.”
38 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 39 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
1) howare you doing, George?
Bad.
2) ha. That’s what I thought you’d say.
So way back when you were young
and traveling fromgig to gig, did you
sleep in the car? Were you making
money? howdid that go in the early
years?
Just whatever it took to survive. Get a
cheap motel room. Sometimes the club
itself would put us up. Or sometimes
we’d go to a town and there would be
people who were sympathetic to poor
musicians and would let us stay at their
house. It was a very common story for
most bands starting out.
3) Was it frustrating? Or did you guys
feel like you were on a righteous path
and it was no big deal to rough it?
When I was in Boston in 1974, it
was a real gas because I knew we had
something good going. Pretty much
every place we played, especially in
Connecticut, we knocked people silly
with our show and our songs. After
the middle of 1975, it started to get
frustrating.You got to understand
— we were opening for people like
Howlin’ Wolf, John Hammond,
Muddy Waters, and Hound Dog
Taylor. And everybody loved us. And
that’s not an easy thing to do in that
area — open for these blues legends
and have people dig you — all the guys
in Muddy’s band and Howlin’ Wolf ’s
band said, ‘You guys are terrifc! When
are you gonna put out a record?’ And
that was the next step.
4) In the last 30 years, I’msure you’ve
seen a lot of development in the music
industry. I’msurrounded by a bunch
of young, aspiring musicians, like you
once were, and we get very frustrated
trying to open for people and make
money and drive around New
england. In this current state of the
industry, what would you fnd exciting
if you were a young musician?
Tat’s a tough one. I don’t see anything
exciting... Te time of a scrufy kid
band getting together — you got to
have a lot of push behind you to get
people’s attention these days. Te
exciting thing is there’s this House
of Blues in Boston. You don’t need a
record deal to go down there to get a
shot at opening for somebody like me.
When I was around and J. Geils was
playing there, I’d go down and camp
out on the doorstep and say, ‘Hey, put
me on frst!’ Tat’s an exciting thing.
But everything’s weird now. People
lip-sync, play tapes, and do all sort of
bizarre stuf. Our band is looked upon
like a bunch of freaks because we plug
into the amp and play. I think the most
exciting thing you can think about is
the music itself. If you’re excited about
the music you’re playing, that’s all the
excitement you need.
5) What are some of your favorite old
school guitar toys you’ve had over the
years that you can’t live without? Any
newones?
I play a Gibson 125. Tat’s all I can
play. I can’t play any other guitar. You’d
be surprised at how few guitars I have.
My guitars are the tools of my trade.
I’m sure Brooks Robinson doesn’t
ten
ques t i ons wi t h
george
thorogood
Blues-rock pioneer George Thorogood is one of the pre-eminent slide guitar
players of the last three decades. With rock anthems like “Bad to the Bone,”“One
Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer,” and “Move It on Over,” George Thorogood & The
Destroyers are a staple on any classic rock radio station. By Zac Taylor
everything’s weird now... our band is
looked upon as a bunch of freaks because
we plug in the amp and play.
41 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
have a room full of gloves. Tey’re
instruments of his occupation. I have
the ones I need — that’s it.
6) howabout the other instrument
you play —your voice? You have
a pretty badass voice, but I was
wondering if you drink tea or anything
to help with vocal strain before you
play? howdo you maintain vocal
health these days?
You’re not going to believe this, but
limited use. A lot of times, it’s not fair
when you see a vocalist do interviews,
if he looks dull, or didn’t have anything
to say, or didn’t talk much. Tey’re just
saving their vocals. I drink a lot of tea.
Alcohol is not good for your vocal
cords. If you’re a heavy drinker, it’s bad
because alcohol is acidic. It can tear
into your vocal cords. If you have one
or two drinks, that’s nothing. But if
you do it regularly, it wears the vocal
cords down. [Tea] is healthier and I
drink a lot of that. Plus, the style of
vocal I do, its almost like the worse my
voice gets, the better it sounds! I can’t
explain that. But I’ve always been a
gutbucket singer. I’m no kind of singer,
really. But I’ll pick songs that are right
for my voice.
7) Did you see that movie“Cadillac
records”with Muddy Waters, howlin’
Wolf, and all those guys?
No I didn’t see that one. I’ve seen
Howlin’ Wolf. I’ve met Chuck Berry.
I’ve been to Chess Records. Tat’s all
I need. I don’t need to go see a movie
about it.
8) Who are some current bands that
are rockin’ that you listen to?
Jonas Brothers. Bacon Brothers.
Cheetah Girls.
George. C’mon.
I got to listen what my daughter
listens to. Tat’s the only music I’m
exposed to, except for my own. Jonny
Lang’s pretty good. We’re going to
play with him. He’s not so much a
youngster anymore, but he’s younger
than me. He’s got a lot going for him.
9) What’s the best blues record I have
never heard of before that I should go
pick up?
Tere’s two excellent records by
John Hammond called Source Point,
and John Hammond Solo. Tere’s an
album by John Lee Hooker called Is
He the Worlds’ Greatest Blues Singer?
And Te London Sessions by Howlin’
Wolf. Tere’s an album you got to
get by Elmore James with a song on
it called “Something Inside Me.” It’s
the greatest blues song you’re ever
gonna hear, ever — by anybody, not
just Elmore James. His voice is just
amazing.
10) Do you have any advice for
prospective guitar students? There are
thousands of guitar players and not a
whole lot of jobs for them.
Play for fun. Play for the joy of playing,
and all the things that you seek will
come to you if you play with that
attitude. Always make it fun frst. And
two other things. Very important: stay
away from fried foods and stay out of
Italian cars. b
we’re on the
interweb!
industry
news.
defender of
awesome.
athensblur.blogspot.com
industry
noise.
42 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
DUS
T
TO
DI G
I
T
A
L
It’s a hazy Sunday in 1997 and,
though it’s barely mid-morning,
Atlanta’s downtown connector is
crowded with well-dressed men and
women on their way to one of the
many churches that pepper the metro
area. Perhaps they chat lightly, rubbing
sleep from their eyes and pondering
the possibilities of the forthcoming
sermon, all the while making plans
for brunch after the service.
Tucked in a small DJ booth at
Georgia State University, Lance
Ledbetter settles into his seat and
prepares a handful of LPs — sprinkled
with a few cassettes, no doubt — for
his morning-ride specialty radio show
featuring rare and largely out-of-print
gospel recordings.
“It’s our culture – America’s
vernacular music. It’s what we have,
you know, it’s our original music of
this country,” begins Ledbetter some
12 years later, still speaking from
Atlanta but now doing so in the ofce
of his self made anthology and re-issue
company, Dust-to-Digital. Trough
his reassuring and polite Southern
drawl, you get a sense of urgency in
his voice. He’s a man on a constant
mission to preserve and protect music
and recordings of a time and medium
that seems nearly lost on the MP3-
driven Generation Y.
“I think the fact that so much of this
material was not available on record or
cassette or CD, to me that’s a tragedy
because even bands that are new now
that may not be doing traditional
music can still learn from the old
material,” he says. “Tey can still
adapt it into their style or into their
songwriting. To me it’s something
that needs to be heard by people to
keep this history alive.”
As referenced, Ledbetter began
his study of “America’s vernacular”
in 1997 as a DJ at “Album 88” —
on the dial at WRAS 88.5 FMz, the
ofcial radio station of Georgia State
University.
“Tis buzz was starting around
the reissue of Harry Smith and the
Anthology of the American Folk Music,
which was on CD for the frst time,”
recalls Ledbetter. “I’d read all tons of
music publications, and there was this
buzz around it, and I really didn’t know
what it was. I ordered a copy through
the station and just took it home, and
it blew my mind. It was one of those
experiences you really don’t have too
often in life.”
Tat experience led Ledbetter to
take over the Sunday morning show
on the station, opening his eyes to the
wide world of reissued classics in jazz,
blues, folk and, particularly, gospel.
“I started to, especially with the
Sunday morning radio slot here in the
South, I wanted to fnd some really
good gospel music for people to listen
to going to church,” he explains. “So I
started to track down record collectors
that had reissue records we were using
put out on cassette, LP and CD.”
Ledbetter’s passion became a time-
consuming hobby and, before long, a
full time labor-of-love job. Between
classes at Georgia State, he tirelessly
expanded his search for rare and out
of print recordings, ordering two
cassettes a week from some collectors
at a rate of 50 cents per song. Before
long, he no longer wanted these
recordings just for himself — rather,
From a college DJ booth to the biggest stage in the music
industry, Lance Ledbetter’s passion for out-of-print
rarities is becoming an unavoidable phenomenon.
by Alec Wooden
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404-526-9366
www.sae.edu
CREATE YOURSELF WITH SAE
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44 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 45 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
from some pretty high places.
“We were getting ready for the
release party way back in November
of 2007 and I sent out an email to our
newsreader list, people who subscribed
to our newsletter, and one response I
got was from a reporter at the New
Yorker magazine,” says Ledbetter. “He
expressed interest in possibly doing
a story on Art and what we had put
together. He came down to the release
party in Athens and ended up staying
with us for a couple days
afterward, and he made
another trip down later. In
April 2008 the New Yorker
published an article about
the Art of Field Recording
and Art’s work, and I
think it really helped when
we got nominated for a
Grammy — a lot of people
that vote for Grammy
awards were more familiar
with us than if that article
had not been written.”
So roughly 10 years
after beginning work on
Goodbye, Babylon and
fve years removed from
his frst nominations,
Ledbetter again took his
seat in Los Angeles’ Staple
Center, nervously scrolling
in his head the million or
so reasons why, for the
second time, he wasn’t
about to win a Grammy.
“We had gone out (to
L.A.) for Babylon, we
were nominated for two
categories then, and we
didn’t win those,” he says of his 2009
Grammy mentality. “So in the back
of my mind I was thinking, ‘Here we
go again, another oh-for-two, so we’ll
just have a good time and celebrate
our loss and take it with a grain of
salt.’”
Celebrate he did, but it wasn’t for a
loss. When the famed envelope was
opened and the winner announced,
Ledbetter and Rosenbaum found
themselves living an unparalleled
dream sequence of accepting one of
the highest honors bestowed upon
(and by) industry professionals.
“It was amazing. Tey called out our
names, we walked up to the stage, and
it was just a great, great experience. It
was pretty surreal to receive that level
of an honor for the work,” he says. “I
felt really great for Art to be honored
for all the hard work he had done over
the century, including putting all of
those recordings together.”
Ledbetter doesn’t strike you as the
sort of person to dwell on things —
not even Grammy Awards. Rather,
he seems the type to leave the stage,
return to his seat and begin penning
out the outline for his next release on
an iPhone. It comes as no surprise,
then, when he can hardly hide the
excitement in his voice over the next
Dust-to-Digital project to be released
later this year. Ledbetter plans
to archive the early recordings of
Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville —
the man who has only recently been
proven to have recorded sound before
the commonly accepted origin of such
by Tomas Edison.
“In 1877, Thomas Edison was
widely regarded as the first
person to record sound,” begins
Ledbetter, showing off the
encyclopedic knowledge that is an
unspoken requirement in a field
like Ledbetter’s.
Scott’s device was the
PhonoAutograph, a crude device with
a horn for speaking into at one end
and a bristle to record the shape of
the sound waves at the other.
While this was the earliest
form of recording invented,
Scott was never able to fnd
a proper channel for playing
back the audio he had
captured - leaving clear sound
waves on paper but no audio
to boot.
“It wasn’t until last March of
2008 that some people from
America went over to Paris
and went through some of
Scott’s archives and brought
back some of the sheets
of paper and took them to
California and scanned them
on a fat bed scanner,” says
Ledbetter.
What they found on the
scanner was multiple snippets
of a young French girl (perhaps
a daughter or relative of Scott
himself) singing the famed
French Folk Song “Au Clair de
la Lune.”
“So Edouard-Leon Scott
lived to see Edison get the
credit for recording sound,
but he knew I guess the whole
time that he had done it frst, and in
2008 that was proven,” says Ledbetter,
adding that the release would be of
the 45 RPM 7” vinyl variety and will
simply be titled Au Claire de la Lune.
“We look forward to issuing that,
and hopefully it should be out in the
middle of this year.”
If the release is on time, someone
should start warning the Grammy
voters — though if recent history
repeats itself, they won’t be able
to avoid Ledbetter’s next batch of
handiwork. b
he became transfxed with the
idea of reissuing them for public
consumption and enjoyment. He
quit school, founded Dust-to-Digital
and immediately set about with his
frst project of rare gospel recordings
entitled Goodbye, Babylon.
“We had so much material when
all was said and done, so we had to
look at the idea of a box set,” he says.
“I think at one point we had over
300 tracks for consideration and we
whittled it down to 160. And it was a
six CD box set. Te whole thing took
four and a half years to do and we
fnally released it back in October of
2003.”
Babylon became a critical darling
of 2003-2004, building a steady
reputation as one of the most
authoritative and compelling box
sets in recent memory.
“People really responded to it
strongly,” says a grateful Ledbetter,
who admits there was “quite a bit
of debt” thrown behind the project.
“I wanted it to be something that
people could come to and it could
sort of be an access point to all this
great gospel music. Te material that
was in print was sort of scattered
around as a compilation here, or a
complete retrospective there. Tere
was no good way to approach that
music that I could fnd.”
And people found it indeed —
Ledbetter sold more than he could
have ever fathomed, (to this day,
he still hand assembles each box
set in Atlanta) and caught the
attention of the Recording Academy,
which honored Dust-to-Digital and
Goodbye, Babylon with two Grammy
nominations at the 2004 awards show.
While Ledbetter couldn’t have been
more pleased with the reception of
Babylon, he faced a serious problem: it
had taken him the better part of four
years to complete the box set. Four
years in the music business, even
when dealing with rare and ancient
recordings, is an eternity. Not even
a Grammy nomination guarantees
continued momentum over a stretch
that long. Was Ledbetter willing to
take that risk?
“Te question I sort of had to ask
myself after Goodbye, Babylon was,
‘Do we do a normal album and have
material come out on a regular basis,
or do we go away for another fve
years and come out with another
epic compilation or release?’” he says.
“And you know, I started to think,
‘Yeah, we’d be better of to have
material coming out on a regular
basis.’ But the problem was that in
order to have things coming out on
regular basis there’s no way I could
shoulder all the work because it just
took so long, and we’d also set the
bar so high because Goodbye, Babylon
came out with a 200 page book. We
put emphasis on historic research,
text, images, and we wanted to put
that sort of aesthetic throughout
every release. So, what I decided
to do was start collaborating with
people. Some of these musicologists
we had met, instead of me doing the
editing, compiling, everything, we
started sort of sharing the work load.
And so that‘s what we’ve sort of done
ever since; we’ve always collaborated
with someone on each release.”
Enter Te Art of Field Recording,
a two-volume set that has become
DTD’s latest critical success – a
collaborative efort that drew largely
from Athens, Ga., native and rare
recording collector/archivist Art
Rosenbaum. Rosenbaum’s inspired
guidance and tireless years of
collecting, coupled with the mission
and drive of Ledbetter’s now-
reputable company, fused into the
magical combination at the core of
Field Recording.
“I mailed Art a copy (of Goodbye,
Babylon) and he invited me over to
Athens for lunch one day,” begins
Ledbetter on the story of the pairs
introduction. “He took me to the
University of Georgia archive at the
library and we started pulling out
music he had collected over the last
half century. When we were listening
to those tapes, that same feeling
came over me when I was listening
to tapes from the 78” collectors
gospel music, which is, ‘Why is this
music so hard to get to? Why is it not
in print? Why can’t people listen to
this?’ Tat’s when Art and I started
to hatch the idea of reissuing some of
his recordings.”
Tanks to the success of his
previous releases, there was a built-in
cult audience lying in wait for Te Art
of Field Recording (as there had been
for smaller releases in between). Tat
didn’t mean, however, he couldn’t
aford help — and loads of praise —
46 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
by Erica Schwartz
* lineups indicate artists listed as of press time — check websites for updates!
50 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 51 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
* lineups indicate artists listed as of press time — check websites for updates!
52 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 53 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
* lineups indicate artists listed as of
press time — check websites for updates!
54 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
A
h, college. Te best four, fve,
maybe six years of your life.
For Ben Folds, it’s been the best,
well…20. And counting. Tough
he’s a couple decades from the
undergraduate days, it’s arguable that
his presence on campus — any and
all of them nationwide — has grown
exponentially since.
“I can’t seem to graduate,” said
Folds, laughing. “I play universities
all the time, so I seem to be reliving
[the college days] at every show.”
Tough Folds is over 40 now, he
does indeed still center entire tours
around college campuses but, even
when he’s not playing on campus,
his music infltrates the popular
campus sub-culture of organized
and competitive A Capella singing
groups.
“Well, I spend a lot of time on shit
that goes pretty well unappreciated
to the critical listening audience,” said
Folds of his music’s popularity among
the collegiate groups. “Like if you
listen to, you know, a Frank Sinatra
song, the voice will be perfect and it
will have interesting modulations and
everything will be, you know, all this
nerd shit will be going down. Tat’s
really important when you are trying
to sort of transcribe this for all human
voices or an ensemble of some kind. If
you’ve just got a beat box, like if a song
is just nothing but two chords and a
drum machine, it’s really not an easy
thing to do for an A Cappella group
because they don’t have anything
to work with. It gets old really fast.
Tere’s so much going on in the way of
chords, proper voicing, voice leading
and all that stuf, so I think this is
easier to work with.”
So easy, in fact, that it has long
been difcult to sit through an entire
college A Capella performance without
hearing some sampling of his music.
“His songs are fun,” said Jonathan
Sparks, lead arranger and member
of Te University of Georgia’s
mixed-gender A Capella group, With
Someone Else’s Money (WSEM). “A
lot of his songs have a great sense of
humor to them, which makes them
great for nerdy A Capella kids. Tat,
and his stuf has a lot of layers, which
makes arranging easier.”
WSEM is a patchwork group of
singers from various majors (unlike
other University A Cappella groups,
the pursuit of a music degree is not
a prerequisite for joining). Te dozen
or so members gather twice weekly
when the school day is done to
rehearse. Playful and restless between
takes, they’re all business when the
songs begin — serious and focused,
but always exerting the maximum
amount of energy. Since it’s inception
in 2001, WSEM has been much like
any other college A Capella group in
its propensity to cover a Folds tune –
but it wasn’t until late last year when
Sparks happened to stumble upon
a major opportunity on Folds’ Web
site — aimed directly at the college
groups.
“I just really liked the versions that
I was hearing, the A Cappella versions
of my music,” said Folds, adding it
became an unavoidable part of playing
the various campuses. “Ten, as I got
into it I started realizing, it’s like a
total scene. You know, the A Cappella
scene is huge, so it sort of grew out of
who’S who
ben folds (piano, vocals)
formed
1988 in Winston-salem, n.c.
LaBeL
epic Records
LateSt reLeaSe
University A Capella (2009)
on the weB
www.benfolds.com
Ben foLdS
Sparks rocks out
in Ben’s studio
Ben
Folds
studio
With Someone
Else’s Money
opens for Folds
Posing for a
group shot in Nashville
With Someone Else’s
Money opens for Folds at
The Taberncale.
big man on campus
by Alec Wooden
15 A Capella groups get the chance of a lifetime
— thanks to pop music’s perpetual undergrad
B
E
N

F
O
L
D
S
56 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 57 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
to Nashville gave the group a unique
chance (literally, they were the only
ensemble to record in Nashville).
“At frst we couldn’t fnd the studio,”
said WSEM singer Rebecca Martin.
“One of the guys just opened a door,
and there was Ben Folds, just standing
there. Of course, we’re all kind of star-
struck. But he was so excited when he
saw us.”
Te fan (and piano player) in
Sparks, of course, soaked in every
second of being in the studio of one of
his idols.
“I played on every piano in that
studio,” he said, laughing. “And I have
a picture of me playing on every piano
in that studio.”
While they say Folds pretty much
“let them do their own thing” during
the tracking, some of his signature
personality from live shows seemed
to leak into the session - the singers
commented on being able to see him
dancing and making motions in the
control booth and ficking the lights
on and of to the sound of the music.
“Yeah, I gave ‘em a light show,” said
a chuckling Folds. “I was so hoping the
one with the light show would be the
best take. I mean I just like [recording]
to be natural. You know, sometimes it’s
a grumpy session and that’s just part
of the natural fow of getting it down.
Tey were really cool and easy to work
with and so totally understood what I
was saying so we could get beyond turd
polishing. I could explain something
and they got it, and therefore the next
thing to do is to make it fun.
Just because something is accessible
and able to be molded for the sake of
an A Capella group, doesn’t mean that
it necessarily will work - and some of
the tunes that made the fnal cut did
so as quite a pleasant surprise to the
songwriter.
“Well, I was really impressed with
“Jesusland” (from 2005’s Songs For
Silverman) for two reasons,” said
Folds. “One is that it’s an all female
group, and you just have to be so much
more inventive to make that sound
good because they don’t have basses.
Te roof has been taken away from
you unless you have a girl that can
sing and carry low notes. And also the
song didn’t really seem conducive to A b
Cappella, you know I remember seeing,
‘Te special’s going to be ‘Jesusland.’
Well, let’s see,’ you know. And it was
cool. So that was kinda neat.”
Folds also walked the fgurative
mile in the students’ shoes, tracking
two songs A Capella himself in a
challenging exercise that served to,
if nothing else, only enhance the
appreciation he had developed for the
stars of the new record.
“Well, it was probably tougher for
me because I don’t get together with
my friends three times a week and work
through all these things, so we kind
of had to work from scratch. Luckily,
I learned a lot by recording all these
groups just in terms of arrangement
and their technique,” he said. “It’s a
pretty incredible amount of work to
have to tear down over and over again.
I’d do eight hours of work and we’re
leaving the studio at midnight and I’d
go, ‘You know we gotta tear it all down
and start again tomorrow.’”
And if nothing else, a newfound
appreciation for the tireless
extracurricular work of the students
seems to be the underlying sentiment
that Folds took from his creation.
“I have to say, I don’t think I could
have even [found the time to sing in a
group in college], said Folds. “I could
barely pay for it all, and keep going
and keep grades and stuf. I was just
sort of paddling, trying to keep up
with life. It seems really easy to, even
at my age, to look back and say, ‘Kids
these days. Tey don’t do this, they
don’t do that. Tey’ve been watching
video games, we had to practice. Blah
blah blah.’”
“Tere’s something about this
record,” he continues, “that I hope, in
some small way, when people hear it,
gives people some hope that there’s
some fber, you know? ‘Cause that
really is the problem at the end of the
day. If everything goes to absolute
shit, it’s because there was no fber.
But this is like full of fber, you know,
All Bran. Tese kids are feeling it, and
that means there’s a lot of integrity.
I mean it’s not as dramatic as I make
it sound, but that’s probably what
compelled me to do this more than
anything – and there’s nothing more
hopeful and bright than that.”
If everything
goes to absolute
shit, it’s because
there was no fber.
But this is like full
of fber, you
know, All Bran. Tese
kids are feeling
it, and that means
there’s a lot of
integrity. I mean
it’s not as dramatic
as I make it sound,
but that’s probably
what compelled
me to do this more
than anything – and
there’s nothing
more sort of
hopeful
and bright
than that.”
that.”
“It” was the idea for Folds latest
record, University A Cappella – a small
idea that became a nationwide call
for submissions of songs from the
Ben Folds catalog from any and all
University-afliated groups.
“We came up with a big list of A
Cappella songs that would work,” said
WSEM member Steven Hutchings.
“Ten we put it out for everyone to
vote and came up with those two.”
When the votes were tallied, With
Someone Else’s Money put on their
best game face and settled into record
two YouTube submissions — tracking
“You Don’t Know Me,” from Folds’
latest album, Way to Normal, and
“Cigarette,” from the 1997 Ben Folds
Five breakout record, Whatever and
Ever Amen.
A relevant song – or one that frst
helped to make Folds a household
name wasn’t necessarily enough to
catch the attention of Folds among
the masses of other video submissions
– rather, the group was faced with
making a video equal parts aurally
pleasing and visually appealing.
“We had so much personality [in
the video],” said Tierney Cosgrove of
the recording. “We interacted a lot; we
talked and interacted with each other
while we were performing it.”
After the work ended for the
submitting groups, it meant only the
beginning of a massive undertaking
for Folds, who promised to — and
indeed did, every night after tour
stops – review every video submission
personally.
“It was tough,” Folds said of the
process. “I mean the frst thing I
did was an initial run-through for
anything that struck my fancy. I
wasn’t being too picky, just keeping
my interest in some way, just very
not technical. So it must have come
down to 90 (laughs). So I’ve got 90 to
listen through on the second batch. I
kept narrowing it down. After I got it
narrowed down to pretty close to the
number of songs on an album. I really
had to take into account sequence,
how many vocalists are high, low,
girls, boys. R&B approach versus more
of a straight ahead or jazz approach,
just start sequencing it in a way that
was gonna make the best album. So
as soon as I got down to a certain
number of songs, it stopped being
about who’s the best and now what
‘makes the best album.’”
When the dust settled, WSEM,
along with 14 other groups (see
sidebar), had made the cut with their
version of “You Don’t Know Me.”
Te arranger — and, moreover, the
fan — in Sparks was overwhelmed
when the reality of the situation sank
in.
“I don’t think I really [felt the
pressure of the arrangement] at frst,”
he said. “I was more excited, than
anything, to do it. When I found it was
going to be on the album, I probably
passed out.”
Folds now faced a unique challenge
in fnding the best way to record each
group — geographical location wasn’t
necessarily a submission requirement
and, as a result, the winners spanned
the entire nation. Bringing each group
to Folds’ studio in Nashville wasn’t
really a feasible option — so, Folds
went to them.
“I recorded most of these people
on campus,” he said. “One’s in a
synagogue, one’s next to a bathroom
or a hallway. Sometimes there would
be an Achilles heel of some kind to the
recording, and sometimes that would
just be, ‘Tis is a beautiful sounding
room that has a really fucking loud air
conditioner.’”
While location wasn’t a requirement
in the contest, it did work our well in
WSEM’s case. Good scheduling breaks
and a drive of only around fve hours
Live at
the Tab-
Live at
the Tabernacle
Live at
the Tabernacle
58 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
With the economy on the fritz, it’s no surprise school
budgets are feeling the efects; cutting costs, cutting
teachers, and cutting programs they do not deem of high
importance on the education meter-such as Music and Arts.
However, Jared Bailey, founder of Athfest and Flagpole, is
focused on keeping music an important part of education
by working with local schools’ after-school programs to
educate and inspire children about music.
“It’s the AthFest Education Committee,” Bailey shares.
“Te program is called ‘AthFest After School.’ We want to
expand it so it’s in the daytime during school.”
Te program is in its beginning stages but is already
being received well by students and faculty members.
“Te response from the After-School Director for the
whole district has been really positive,” says committee
member Jennifer Kumnick, who is also a social worker
for the Athens-Clarke County public schools. “She really
wants us to be more involved next year in the after-school
programs.”
Students participate in hour-long classes where local
musicians perform songs, introduce the instruments they
perform with and give students a brief history of music.
Athfest saving music education
ONE SCHOOL AT A TIME
article & photos by Nicole Black
Most recently, local artists Joel Byron and Carl Lindberg
played teacher for an hour at Burney-Harris-Lyons Middle
School. In Byron’s room, 14 young kids piled onto the
cafeteria stage behind a large curtain and eagerly took their
seats. Byron started out playing some blues. By the time
the second chorus came, some of the kids started tapping
their feet in rhythm. Te tapping spread up to their hands
and they began to clap in beat and soon after, like a wave
at a sporting event, the rest of the kids joined in. After he
fnished he explained to his receptive audience, “blues is
the foundation for all music you hear on the radio today.”
When asked how important Byron feels music is in
correlation to education, he responded, “I think they’re
really important. A lot of the focus with schools now is just
on academics. Tere’s no culture in academics...music and
art are very important. You learn about music and art, and
it broadens your horizon and that’s really what kids need.
We’re stuck in this computer-centric world and everything
is viewed through a monitor.” He adds, “I think it maybe
stems more from our country’s priorities than it does the
school’s budget. If we weren’t so wasteful with our money
we would be able to put more money
back into education.”
Lindberg’s audience proved a little
more challenging, as he was faced
with about 20 pre-teen females, a few
of which had the ‘I’m too cool for this’
front. But Lindberg was eventually
able to break through to all of the
girls and had everyone participating
through clapping while he hummed
the blues and plucked his cello.
“For now, it’s this basic introduction,”
Bailey explains. “But, down the road
we’re hoping to be a lot more. We’re
also thinking that this program
doesn’t have to be just in Clarke
County Schools, and it doesn’t have
to be in just public schools. It could
be in the Montessori School, Athens
Academy; you know the surrounding
county schools. So, if it works well and
we get some support, we can take this
thing statewide — even nationwide.”
Former Counting Crows drummer
turned Clarke County kindergarten
teacher, Ben Mize, shares his thoughts
about the importance of music
education. “My four-year-old son is in
the bathtub singing songs he learned
at school. It occurred to me that we
(adults) take for granted what all
we learned from music.” Mize adds,
“What I know of my son’s learning I
know from the songs he sings: I can
hear what he’s learning in these songs
and I can see his daily progress in the
songs too.”
Mize shares a valid point. We are frst
introduced to our alphabet as well as
basic aptitudes, such as colors, states,
planets, etc., through song and rhyme.
Music seemed to help us absorb what
we were learning at such a young age.
“Tere are entire emergent literacy/
early reading curriculums based on
nursery rhymes and singing and
there’s research that indicates that
kids with this experience read earlier
and better than kids that don’t,” Mize
explains. “Tat is music in school,
and I dare say most of the teachers
I know don’t feel confdent to really
embrace musical learning in their own
classrooms. It certainly shouldn’t be
assumed that they will. Nor should
we trust that school districts will
make up for the loss of music in other
ways, even when they promise for
(hypothetical) example: ‘Oh, we have
given each teacher a Sing a Song of
Poetry book of nursery rhymes, and
we held a seven minute meeting at
each school where we emphasized the
importance of rhyme as a pre-reading
skill, and we have strongly encouraged
teachers to use these books.’”
He concludes his thoughts, “Not to
mention the benefts learning melody
and rhythm has on the pathways of
the brain — if we can’t acknowledge
the value of musical intelligence in
and of itself, we can at least point to
the beneft of musical practice to ways
of thinking that helps one succeed
on standardized tests for the major
subject areas of reading, language arts
and math.”
For now, the community can get
involved with Bailey’s mission by
joining his committee or making
donations to the program. Members
of the committee meet once a month
to plan upcoming classes, and fnd
more local artists to add to the current
roster. Te money raised through
donations and fundraisers help pay
the musicians for their time.
“Although this is still in its infancy,”
adds Bailey, “We have been at this
for over a year now, and we’re really
excited about it. I think it’s got a lot
of promise.”
Join the committee by emailing
education@athfest.com
Donate by contacting Jared Bailey
director@athfest.com
For musicians interested contact
director@athfest.com
A 50/50 Rafe is being held at Alibi Bar
on the eastside Tuesday, May 12th from
7 p.m.-11:p.m. Tickets are $2.00. Half
the money raised will go directly to the
Athfest After-School program and the
rest to a randomly drawn ticket holder.
b
(Above) Joel Byron answers questions from his eager young audience recently at Burney-Harris-Lyons
Middle School. (Below) Byron explains various playing techniques to the students.
60 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 61 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
BattLe for terra
(May 1) (aristomenis Tsirbas) This animated sci-f adventure flm is
set on the peaceful planet of Terra. Two alien teens, voiced by Justin
long and evan Rachel Wood, befriend an injured pilot voiced by luke
Wilson when the planet is invaded by humans feeing fromcivil war.
Soon they learn that with limited resources only one of their races will
survive.
PREDICTION: The end-of-the-world premise is a bit of a departure
fromthe “FindingNemo” brandof kidmovie, but whosaidanimation
is just for the young ones?
adoration
(May 8) (atomegoyan) When Simon receives an assignment
in his high school class based on a real news story about a
terrorist who plants a bomb in the luggage of his pregnant
girlfriend, he takes his story to the internet with false identi-
ty and thus begins a journey deep into the past.
X-men originS: woLverine
(May 1) (gavin Hood) This flm tells the story of Wolverine’s violent and romantic past leading up
to the events of X-Men, including his complex relationship with Victor creed. Hugh Jackman re-
prises the role that made him famous as Wolverine, complete with retractable claws.
PREDICTION: Action for the guys, Jackman for the girls, and appearances by X-Men legends sprin-
kledinfor the die-hardfans; this movie will probably make box ofce bank.
PREDICTION: This quirkyflmbrings somethingdiferent from
the usual onslaught of Summer blockbusters, so it might
bring movie snobs out of hibernationandinto the theater.
ARTS &ENTERTAINMENT
A
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M
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P
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UPcoming on the Screen
MAKING SURE IT’S woRTH YoUR MoNEY by Julie Mccollum
neXt day air
(May 8) (benny boom) This flm tells the story of two inept criminals who mis-
takenly receive a package of cocaine. The mistake turns into a battle for the
drugs between the furious dealer who sent it, the frightened people who were
intended to receive it, and the criminals who plan to turn it into their proft.
PREDICTION: The beat-the-clock plot promises action, and actors like Don-
ald Faison (“Scrubs”) and Mos Def add some comedy favor that will bring all-
around entertainment.
the BrotherS BLoom
(May 29) (Rian Johnson) “The brothers bloom,” played by adrien brody and Mark
Rufalo, are all-star con men millionaires who have decided to take on one fnal job:
showing a beautiful and eccentric heiress around the world, and in the process ex-
tract $2.5 million from her. The con gets a bit complicated when brody’s character
falls in love with their lovely con target.
PREDICTION: The perfect date movie: action, romance andlaughs.
dance fLick
(May22) (damiendanteWayans) TheWayans bros. bring
yet another movie spoofng movie trends, in this case
movies which feature lots of dancing (“Save the last
dance,”“Step up,”“You got Served,” etc.). The premise
is that Thomas uncles bonds with character Megan
White as they attempt to enter an epic dance battle.
PREDICTION: If you were into “Scary Movie” and per-
haps even the subsequent knock-ofs, you might en-
joy the over-the-top laughs in this movie, like a wom-
an giving birth on the dance foor to a break-dancing
baby.
management
(May 15) (Stephen belber) Jennifer aniston stars in (what else?) a romantic comedy
opposite Steve Zahn. aniston’s character is a traveling saleswoman who has a fing
with a hotel manager (Zahn), who then decides to follow her around the country in
attempts towinher love. aniston’s character’s boyfriend, playedbyWoody Harrelson,
throws a wrench in his plans.
PREDICTION: You can guess how this will end before the previews are even over.
angeLS & demonS
(May 15) (Ron Howard) Ron Howard tackles this flm
version of the novel which introduces the character
of Robert langdon, the Harvard symbolist featured in
“The daVinci code”, played again byTomHanks. in this
story, langdon tries to stop a secret society from de-
stroyingVatican city.
PREDICTION: If you enjoyed the “The Da Vinci Code”
flm adaptation, this is a must-see.
eaSy virtUe
(May 22) (Stephan elliot) This Hitchcock re-
make set in the 1930’s stars Jessica biel as
larita, a glamorous american who hastily
marries englishman John Whittaker. When
Whittaker takes larita home to mom, her
new mother-in-law has an instant aversion
to her, and from there tries incessantly to run
her of.
PREDICTION: The monster-in-law plot is a bit
playedout, but the movie may deliver a fresh,
funny take.
A
&
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M
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P
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drag me to heLL
(May 29) (Sam Raimi) in this thriller, the director of “Spider Man” takes on the story
of a loan ofcer who receives a supernatural curse when ordered to evict an elderly
woman fromher house. When her life is transformed into a living hell, in desperation
she goes to a seer, who sets her on a frenzied course to break free of the evil spell.
PREDICTION: Up-and-comersAlisonLohmanandJustinLongstar inthismovie, which
promises a fewjumpinyour seat moments anda temporary fear of oldpeople.
62 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 63 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
W
hen you’re face-to-face with Jaime Pressly you
immediately notice the similarities, or lack
thereof, between her true self and what you see portrayed
every Tursday night on the hilarious sitcom, “My Name
is Earl.” Joy Turner, Pressly’s on-screen character, is very
loud, crass and arguably primetime television’s zaniest
dresser. In person, she’s modestly-attired, polite and well,
only kinda loud. Te point being, this likable 31-year-old
acts her tail of on TV.
“I’m just very blessed,” Pressly says, “to be able to do what
I love to do and to play characters that I love to play. I was
not always so fortunate to be able to go to work and enjoy
myself or enjoy the character I was playing. If it wasn’t for
[“Earl” creator] Greg Garcia giving me the opportunity to
show what I can do and giving me the role of Joy, I would
probably still… well, I might not even be in the business
anymore.”
On the small screen and in flms like the March release
“I Love You, Man,” Pressly is good for a few chuckles. But
the moment she opens up on the struggles of fnding
success in Hollywood, the Kinston, N.C., native turns
dead serious: “I started my clothing line (J’aime) because
I wanted something to fall back on and something else to
do because I was kinda getting fed up [with acting]. But
then the amazing Greg Garcia came around and wrote a
brilliant character for a woman, which is rare. And it sorta
changed my perception. I’m so, so blessed to be able to do
what I love to do. I could never do a 9-to-5 job, although I
did 14 years ago. I had three at a time.”
Now, thankfully, she only has two -- Golden Globe-
nominated actress and new parent. Te former might spark
the fnger-pointing at the airport, but it’s the latter that
warms Jaime Pressly’s heart like nothing else. “Dezi will be
two in May,” announces the proud mom, beaming from ear
to ear. “From day one on our [‘Earl’] set, it’s always been
okay for people to bring their children to come and visit.
Dezi walks on set and says, ‘Ello! Ello!’ He walks around
and they bring him the roll with all the pretty tape on it. He
puts it around his neck. Ten he climbs up on the camera
and goes, ‘And action!’ He’s not afraid by any means.”
By DeMarco Williams
Jaime Pressly
talks doing TV,
making movies
and raising
a child
PHOTO: SCOTT GARFIELD
W
o
r
k
i
n
g

G
i
r
l
upcoming DvD releases
may
5
New Releases:
The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
Last Chance Harvey
Smother
TV Box Sets:
Boston Legal: Season Five
Crusoe: Complete Series
Doctor Who: Battlefield
Lipstick Jungle: Season Two
Mythbusters: Volume Four
October Road: Season Two
Music DVDs:
B.B. King: Soundstage
Dazz Band: Best of Funk
may
12
New Releases:
Of Time and the City
O Jerusalem
Personal Effects
The Grudge 3
Possesstion
S. Darko: A Donnie Darko Tale
Underworld: Rise of the Lycans
TV Box Sets:
Penn & Teller Bullshit: Season Six
The Best of Star Trek: The Original Series
The Jeff Foxworthy Show: Season Two
Two and a Half Men: Fifth Season
may
26
june
2
june
9
New Releases:
Hindsight
Killshot
TV Box Sets:
Gunsmoke: Season Three, V2
Law and Order SVU: Season Nine
The Closer: Season Four
New Releases:
Baby on Board
Defiance
Revolutionary Road
TV Box Sets:
Army Wives: Season Two
Quincy ME: Season Three
Raising the Bar: Season One
The Jetsons: Season Two, Volume One
Weeds: Season Four
New Releases:
Gran Torino
Powder Blue
TV Box Sets:
Father Knows Best: Season Three
My Family: Season Three & Four
The Best of Whose Line is it Anyway?
Music DVDs:
Dave Matthews Band: Hope Springs Eternal
Release dates are subject to change. Check
artists or store websites as these dates ap-
proach.
may
19
New Releases:
Paul Blart: Mall Cop
My Bloody Valentine 3D
Valkyrie
TV Box Sets:
24: Season Seven
Friday Night Lights:
64 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
65 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Jaime credits cofee and “a lack of sleep to where you get delirious” for all the
energy she resonates. Plus, it doesn’t hurt that she shut down the clothing line.
“Before Dezi,” explains the former international model, “I could do the show
full time and run my company full time. But once I had Dez, it became almost
impossible to go to work. I certainly wasn’t taking the clothing line over my
son. If I had a day of, instead of wasting my time to drive downtown, I would
just have [my employees] come to set or have the girls email me and I would do
a lot of stuf. I would go in on Saturdays and stuf like that and bring Dezi with
me. Tings change when you have a baby. Tere’s so much more important than
designing clothes.”
Jaime’s only slightly less excited when speaking of her other baby, “My Name
is Earl.” A show that’s part moral analysis and part poor white trash exposé,
“Earl” is an out-of-nowhere hit that just laughed its way through a fourth season.
But if you think seeing Joy Turner pick on kids in glasses or push around Betty
White is a good time, Pressly swears you haven’t seen the half.
“It’s the greatest job on the planet,” claims the woman Maxim once called
the 30
th
hottest lady on the planet. “Everybody loves going to work. We all
truly adore each other. We really enjoy each other’s company. We all know each
other so well know. Our families are all friends. Our kids play together. We have
amazing writers. We have amazing crew. We all genuinely respect and admire
each other and there’s not a bad seed in the group. Tere’s no drama.”
If you’re wondering why you don’t see Jaime Pressly in more movies, there’s
no dramatic explanation there either. She simply says scheduling around “Earl”
and Dezi hasn’t permitted leading lady roles to come her way.
“I’ll be honest with you,” she states, “if I get to play really amazing roles and
it’s fve or six scenes –hell, if it’s three scenes with a really great cast- I’m fne
being in the supporting cast because it still allows me some normalcy in my
life. It allows me some time to be with my son. It gives me a break so I don’t get
burnt out, which I’ve done so many times.”
I was not always so fortunate to be able to go to
work and enjoy myself or enjoy the character I was
playing. If it wasn’t for [“Earl” creator] Greg Garcia
giving me the opportunity to show what I can do and
giving me the role of Joy, I would probably still…
well, I might not even be in the business anymore.”

— Jaime Pressly —
b
Pressly and Jon Favreau on the set of I Love You, Man.
MoRE wAYS To pINcH pENNIES wITH YoUR GRocERY LIST
meaLS for yoUr
By Jacquie Brasher
GrIllS
g o n e
wiLd
ah, spring. everything’s in bloom, the weather’s lovely, and
suddenly staying indoors is the last thing you want to do. it’s the
perfect time to drag out the barbecue grill.
These days, pretty much anything is grill-worthy. and the added
bonus is, you don’t have to spend a ton of money to get great food
from a grill. Here are some easy meal ideas to make your spring and
summer months a breeze. all these recipes should serve two people.
directions:
Mix the garlic, lime, oil, pepper
fakes, salt and pepper in a bowl.
add the raw chicken to the mixture
and marinate for at least two hours
in the refrigerator. Mix well.
after the chicken strips have
marinated, take them out and
thread them on metal skewers.
place skewers of chicken on a low
fame of a gas grill. (You can use a
charcoal grill as well.) grill for about
three minutes on each side or until
all the pink is gone. if the chicken
gets too dry, you can baste it with
a little more olive oil. Serve with a
salad and garlic bread for a light,
favorful meal.
Garlic–Lime
Chicken Skewers
2 chicken breasts, cut lengthwise into
thick strips
2 garlic cloves, minced
Juice of 1 lime
2 tablespoons olive oil
½ teaspoon red pepper fakes (optional)
Salt and pepper to taste
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2 zucchinis, halved
lengthwise
2 yellow squash,
halved lengthwise
4 salad onions,
halved lengthwise
(they look like
green onions, only
with a bigger bulb
at the end)
1 eggplant, sliced
thickly diagonally
Marinade:
½ cup olive oil
¼ cup red wine
vinegar
1 teaspoon garlic
powder
1 teaspoon oregano
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
Grilled Mixed Vegetables
directions:
Mix the marinade in a small bowl. Whisk briskly to
incorporate all ingredients. place the vegetables in
a larger bowl. pour marinade in with vegetables and
toss to coat. let stand for one hour. on a low-fame
gas grill, place the vegetables fat side down. (Reserve
the extra marinade.) do not put the vegetables over
direct fame, by the way—just of to the side a bit. grill
for about three to four minutes on each side. if you
like your vegetables crunchy, don’t grill them too long.
after you remove the vegetables from the grill, toss
with the reserved marinade. Serve on a platter as an
accompaniment to your meal.
Veggie phase
Think veggies are not suitable for the
grill? Think again! now that the warmer
months are upon us, fresh veggies will
be plentiful—and they are fabulous on
the grill.
Burger Phase
burgers don’t have to be boring. You can add
all sorts of ingredients to the ground meat to
make it explode with favor. Try this burger
recipe for added zing!
Zesty Burgers
1 pound ground beef
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon hot sauce
1 minced garlic clove
½ onion, minced
Salt and pepper to taste
directions:
Mix all the ingredients into the ground beef. Your hands
are the best tools, so use them! (Wash them well before
and after.) after the beef has been thoroughly mixed with
the ingredients, form into two big patties.
grill on each side according to how well you like your
burgers cooked. (if you’re adventurous, try mixing in about
¼ cup of fnely crumbled bleu cheese to the ground beef.)
note: ground meats for the grill should have a little more
fat in them. if you use leaner meats, they tend to dry out.
68 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE 69 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
go ahead : make my date
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atLanta
may 1
telepath, eliot Lipp
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $10/
adv.
cursive man man
Variety Playhouse, 8:30p.m.,
$16/adv.
may 2
vaSt, Branded with fear,
Stand alone and guests
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $13/
adv.
Ben harper & relentless 7
Variety Playhouse, 8:30p.m.,
$35/adv.
hermon hitson, noot
d’noot
The Drunken Unicorn, $10/adv.
may 3
Big Business, tweak Bird
The Drunken Unicorn, 8p.m.,
$10/adv.
may 4
Protest the hero and guests
Masquerade-Hell, 6:30p.m.,
$12.50/adv.
may 5
the gaslight anthem,
heartless Bastards, a death
in the family
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $12/
adv.
may 6
Parkway drive, Stick to
your guns, my children, my
Bride, as dawn Breaks
Masquerade-Heaven, 6:30p.m.,
$12/adv.
amos Lee
Variety Playhouse, 8p.m., $25/
adv.
may 6
the Supervillians, 50:50
Masquerade-Hell, 7 p.m., $10/
adv.
el ten eleven, La chansons,
magic apron
The Drunken Unicorn, $6/adv.
may 7
jimmy herring Band
featuring oteil Burbridge,
greg osby, jef tinsey, and
jef Sipe
Variety Playhouse, 8:30p.m.,
$20/adv.
fUck yeSSS dance Party,
Le castle vania, rrrump
The Drunken Unicorn, $5/adv.
For 21+, $7 for < 21
may 8
Shpongle, evolve, ent, eP3
Masquerade-Heaven, 7p.m.,
$20/adv.
o’Brother cd release Show,
dignan, a. armada
The Drunken Unicorn, 9p.m.,
$6 for 21+, $8 < 21
may 9
the horrorpops and guests
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $13/
adv.
wye oak, Pomegranates,
Pretty & nice
The Drunken Unicorn, $8/adv.
vienna teng, Ben Sollee,
with special guest katie
herzig
Variety Playhouse, 8:30p.m.,
$15/adv.
may 10
cyril neville
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $20/
adv.
may 11
chain & the gang, the hive
dwellers, Pine hill haints,
the coathangers
The Drunken Unicorn, 8p.m.,
$8/adv.
the Burning hotels, tBa
Smith’s Olde Bar, 7p.m., $5/adv.
may 12
metal Blade young guns
tour 2009 featuring:
Psyopus, rose funeral, woe
of tyrants, moltov Solution
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $10/
adv.
may 13
kreator, exodus, Belphagor,
war Bringer, epicurean
Masquerade-Heaven, 6:30p.m.,
$20/adv.
mc chris, whole wheat
Bread, i am the dream
The Drunken Unicorn, $12/adv.
ty reynolds, Ben deignan &
Suburban Soul, christopher
alan yates, tyler herrin duo
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $8/adv.
upcoming events in athens and atlanta
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may 14
nightwish
Masquerade-Heaven, 8p.m.,
$25/adv.
Pretty Lights and dieselboy
Masquerade-Hell, 8p.m., $15/
adv.
Lions and Scissors, Lake
inferior
The Drunken Unicorn, $5
comcast Bands on demand,
the nigel depree Band,
the Quazimotors, elli Perry,
junior dolan & cash
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $10
may 15
damon moon and the
whispering drifters, owl
eyes
The Drunken Unicorn, $5 for
21+, $8 for < 21
may 16
the thermals, the Shakey
hands, Point juncture, wa
Masquerade-Hell, 8p.m., $12/
adv.
horse feathers, joe Pug
The Drunken Unicorn, $8/adv.
web wilder, the
Backyardbirds
Smith’s Olde Bar, 6p.m., $15/
adv.
***contribute #2 to
america Beneft
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $20
may 17
her Space holiday, city
Light, mother/father
The DrunkenUnicorn, 8p.m., $10
reed Pittman, magic math
Smith’s Olde Bar, 7p.m., $8/adv.
may 18
6 day Bender, Breaking
twilight, tBa
Smith’s Olde Bar, 7p.m., $5
may 19
Soul of john Black, mike
Zito
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $12/
adv.
may 20
Suburban Soul, that’s what
She Said, the humms
The Drunken Unicorn, $5
may 21
Passafre
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $10/
adv.
the villains, nathan Beaver,
Steve Baskin, james david
carter
Smith’s Olde Bar, 7p.m., $8/adv.
may 22
marcy’s Playground
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $13/
adv.
Silent and Listen
cd release Show,
cinemasophia, ringfnger
The Drunken Unicorn, $8
wiLX, moontower
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $8/
adv.
may 23
the deep vibration,
roman candle, the
rosewood thieves,
Ben chapman and the
accents
The Drunken Unicorn, $8
may 24
highland Blues, Sam
thacker
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $10/
adv.
may 25
justin kennedy Band, the
first Stone, trees Leave
Smith’s Olde Bar, 7p.m., $5
tony Lucca, joey degraw
andrew hoover
Smith’s Olde Bar-Atlanta
Room, 8p.m., $10/adv.
may 26
Static-X, Bury your dead,
Seventh void, dirge
Masquerade-Heaven, 6:30p.m.,
Stanton moore trio (2 full
Sets)
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $13/
adv.
may 28
Sean mcconnell
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $10
may 29
Bonnie Prince Billy
Variety Playhouse, 8:30p.m.,
$16/adv.
Lefty williams
Smith’s Olde Bar-Atlanta
Room, 8p.m., $7/adv.
may 30
testament, Unearth,
Lazerus ad
Masquerade-Heaven, 7p.m.,
$22/adv.
the Bridge
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $12/
adv.
may 31
the Business, flatfoot 56
Masquerade-Heaven, 7p.m.,
$12/adv.
june 4
tab Benoit, the Legendary
jc’s
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $17.50/
adv.
june 5
Bassnectar and guests
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Masquerade-Heaven, 8p.m.,
$15/adv.
arc angels featuring
charlie Sexton, doyle
Bramhall ii and chris
Layton
Variety Playhouse, 8:30p.m.,
$22.50/adv.
june 6
Little feat
Variety Playhouse, 8:30p.m.,
$30/adv.
Passion Pit
The Drunken Unicorn, $12/adv.
the downtown executives,
dale arbor Band, the
wheels
Smith’s Olde Bar, 8p.m., $10/
adv.
june 8
threat Signal, the agonist,
flatline, thy will Be done
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $12/
adv.
cas haley
Smith’s Olde Bar-Atlanta
Room, 8p.m., $10/adv.
june 9
me without you, the dear
hunter, and guest
Masquerade-Hell, 7p.m., $13/
adv.
june 11
femi kuti, king Sunny ade
Variety Playhouse, 8p.m., $30/
adv.
athenS
may 1
Packway handle Band
Georgia Theatre, 10p.m., $10
the help, oblio, the Starter
kits
40 Watt Club, 9:30p.m., $5
chuck Leavell with the
randall Bramblett Band
The Melting Point, 8p.m., $100
gift horse, arizona, russian
Spy camera
Caledonia Lounge, 10p.m., $6
may 2
telepath
Georgia Theatre, 10p.m., $10
Bit Brigade (as
castlebandia), Buddy
System, Powers
40 Watt Club, 9:30p.m., $6
free Lunch, jazz chronic
Caledonia Lounge, 10p.m., $5
death on two wheels,
elevation, the Shut-Ups,
harrison hudson
Tasty World, 10p.m.
may 4
david cook with ryan Star
Georgia Theatre, 9p.m., $15
may 5
terrapin tuesday: north
georgia Bluegrass Band
The Melting Point, 7p.m., $3
Sweetbox, Sybris, +1
Caledonia Lounge,
10p.m., $5
may 6
andy davis
40 Watt, 9p.m., $5/adv.
romanenko, Soapbar,
only Living Boy, eureka
california
Tasty World, 10p.m.
may 7
Shpongle with dr. fameus
vs. dj drizno and dj triz
Georgia Theatre, 9:30p.m., $20
Supernaut, Paster of
muppets
Caledonia Lounge, 10p.m., $5
Sonia Leigh, Levi Lowery
and the community house
Band
Tasty World, 10p.m.
may 8
Presidents of the United
States of america
40 Watt Club, 9p.m., $15/adv.
colt ford
Georgia Theatre, 9p.m., $15
may 9
the walkmen with kuroma
40 Watt Club, 9p.m., $10/adv.
colt ford: Special kid
friendly all ages Show
Georgia Theatre, 2p.m., $15
colt ford
Georgia Theatre, 9p.m., $15
Pegasuses-XL,
yeahBig+kidStatic, the
Buddy System
Caledonia Lounge, 10p.m., $5
may 11
annual kids hoot
The Melting Point, 7:30p.m.,
free
Stinking Lizaveta, hot
Breath, darsombra
Caledonia Lounge, 10p.m., $6
may 12
terrapin tuesday Bluegrass
Series featuring Smokey’s
farmland Band
Melting Point, 7p.m., $4.50/
adv.
may 13
ghost, majik markers
Tasty World, 10p.m.
may 15
a Beneft for true Love
canines with Bloodkin and
friends
Georgia Theatre, 10p.m., $7
athfeSt cd reLeae w/
david Barbe and the Quick
hooks, holy Liars, Brave
new citizen
Tasty World, 10p.m.
may 16
caroline aiken
Georgia Theatre, 10 p.m., Price
TBD
may 19
terrapin tuesday: the
mudfapjacks
The Melting Point, 7p.m., $3
may 21
Brandie carlile and gregory
alan isakov
The Melting Point, 8:30p.m.,
$27/adv.
may 26
terrapin tuesday: the
drovers old time medicine
Show
The Melting Point, 7p.m., $3
thrones, chrissakes
Caledonia Lounge, 10p.m., $7
may 28
3 fott Swagger
Georgia Theatre, 10 p.m., Price
TBD
may 29
Lazer/wulf, gaylord, classic
Bastards
Caledonia Lounge, 10 p.m., $5
the arcs, gift horse
Georgia Theatre, 10 p.m., Price
TBD
may 30
kinchafoonee cowboys
Georgia Theatre, 10p.m., $10
casper and the cookies
(cd release), marshmallow
coast (cd release), the
Lolligags
Caledonia Lounge, 10p.m., $5
june 1
wolves in the throne room,
a Storm of Light
Caledonia Lounge, 10 p.m., $10
june 2
terrapin tuesday: mayhem
String Band
The Melting Point, 7p.m., $3
june 8
athfest Sampler hoot
The Melting Point, 7:30p.m.,
free
june 9
terrapin tuesday: redline
express
The Melting Point, 7p.m., $3
june 11
ted Leo & the Pharmacists
with titus andronicus, all
the Saints
40 Watt Club, 9p.m., $10/adv.
june 12
X, Steve Soto, twisted
hearts
40 Watt Club, 9p.m., $20/adv.
Calendar listings are
subject to change. List-
ed prices may be for ad-
vance tickets only, and
listed times are door times
of the given shows. We
suggest you call ahead
before heading out!
Hey bands! Got a cal-
endar listing? Send it
to editorial@athens-
blur.com and include
the following:Name
of the Act(s), venue,
door time and price.
athens live seen around town

see your
photos here!
submit to
editorial@athensblur.com
75 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
pHoToS BY SANdRA GALLARdo, GEoff poSS of VIII EAST GRApHIcS,
LIZ BoESLER, ALEc woodEN, NIcoLE BLAcK, AdRIENNE KLEIN

see your
pics here!
submit to
editorial@
athensblur.com
pHoToS BY GEoff poSS of VIII EAST GRApHIcS, LIZ BoESLER,
AdRIENNE KLEIN, NIcoLE BLAcK

see your
pics here!
submit to
editorial@
athensblur.com
77 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
Kris davidson paints during STS9 @ Georgia Theatre (wes Elkin) Ben Kweller’s band @ 40 Watt (Haleigh Hofman) STS9 @ Georgia Theatre (wes Elkin)
Bloodkin @ 40 watt (Nicole Black) Soulja Boy @ Legion Field (Geof Poss/VIII East Graphics) Backyard Tire fire @ 40 watt (Nicole Black) watson Twins @
40 Watt (Haleigh Hofman) pigs on The wing: Apink floyd Tribute @ Georgia Theatre (Joshua payne) Ben Kweller @ 40 Watt (Haleigh Hofman) . pigs on The
wing: Apink floyd Tribute @ Georgia Theatre (Joshua payne) oulja Boy @ Legion Field (Geof Poss/VIII East Graphics) The Arcs @ caledonia Lounge (daniel
peiken) Twin Tigers/WUOG Prom @ Cine (Alyssa De Hayes) chairlift @ 40 watt (Alyssa de Hayes) The Interns @ 40 watt (Alyssa de Hayes)
1
11
14
6 7

see your
pics
here!
submit
to
editorial@
athensblur.com or
let us know when
you’re playing! you
never know when
we’ll show up...
on the stage concert shots
2
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GEMINI
(05/21-06/21)
Your split personality is really
showing this month, and your
fellow band members are tak-
ing notice — and not in a good
way.
SAGITTARIUS
(11/22-12/21)
Finally, someone takes notice
of your talent this month. Be
humble about the opportunity
they present to you or you could
blow it.
TAURUS
(04/20-05/20)
Don’t let others dissuade you
from picking up an instrument
they don’t think is suited for
you. Follow your instinct and
ignore the ridicule.
VIRGO
(08/23-09/22)
An ex shows up at an upcoming
gig to try to get back together
with you, appearing to be “with
you” by staying close to your
side, scaring of any potential
suitors.
ARIES
(03/21-04/19)
You’re feeling more stressed
than usual this month. What
better way to release your stress
then to smash an old, used up
instrument onstage.
CAPRICORN
(12/22-01/19)
No matter what your signifcant
other says, do not try out to be
lead vocalist in a local band.
Singing karaoke while intoxi-
cated does not merit you to be
the next Celine Dion.
PISCES
(02/19-03/20)
remember these words, dear
Pisces: you’re only as good as
your last album. That said, get
back in the studio and start
recording!
SCORPIO
(10/24-11/21)
A stomach virus causes you to
miss an important show. Ofer
to play a free show to make up
for your cancellation and keep
fans happy.
CANCER
(06/22-07/22)
Make those fnishing touches
on your eP and get out on the
streets of Athens to saturate the
town with your music.
(07/23-08/22)
You and fellow band members
have been contemplating play-
ing a diferent style of music;
now is the time for that musical
transition.
AQUARIUS
(01/20-02/18)
If you’re feeling uninspired to
write music this month, try
attending a music festival to
break the blockage and get your
creative fow moving again.
LIBRA
(09/23-10/23)
Stop procrastinating. You’re
never going to be a rock star
sitting on the couch playing
“Guitar hero” all day, dreaming
of being in a band.
LEO
what’s your
Musicscope?
Astrology for
Musicians
by MISS
TERIOUS
B
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80 ATHENS BLUR MAGAZINE
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Ad Name: Full Flavor
Item #: PSE20089386
Job/Order #:594830-199138
Trim: 8.25 x 10.75
Bleed: 8.75 x 11.25
Live: 7.5 x 10
Closing Date: 1.7.9
QC: RR
Pub: Athens Blur