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WTO - Supply Chain Perspectives and Issues: A Literature Review

WTO - Supply Chain Perspectives and Issues: A Literature Review

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Global value chains (GVCs) have become ubiquitous. The literature that attempts to understand and explain GVCs is vast, multi-disciplinary and no less complex than the phenomenon itself. This volume is an ambitious attempt at a fairly comprehensive review of literature on the subject

The many manifestations of international production sharing have become the organizing theme for practically any discussion on production, trade, investment, development and international economic cooperation more generally. GVCs are at the economic heart of globalization. Policies of governments are central to outcomes, influencing the establishment, configuration and operation of GVCs in numerous ways. Technological possibilities and firm behaviour are also crucial determinants of what happens in the supply chain world.

Co-published with the Fung Global Institute.
Global value chains (GVCs) have become ubiquitous. The literature that attempts to understand and explain GVCs is vast, multi-disciplinary and no less complex than the phenomenon itself. This volume is an ambitious attempt at a fairly comprehensive review of literature on the subject

The many manifestations of international production sharing have become the organizing theme for practically any discussion on production, trade, investment, development and international economic cooperation more generally. GVCs are at the economic heart of globalization. Policies of governments are central to outcomes, influencing the establishment, configuration and operation of GVCs in numerous ways. Technological possibilities and firm behaviour are also crucial determinants of what happens in the supply chain world.

Co-published with the Fung Global Institute.

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05/03/2014

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The topic of sustainability has expanded rapidly within the public arena since 1987,

when the UN-initiated Brundtland Commission published its landmark report entitled

“Our Common Future”. The 1990s saw many environmental and socially sustainability

issues rise to the forefront in cases such as global warming, child labour, and corporate

social responsibility.

The 2000s brought more corporate awareness and acceptance, with the adoption of an

economic sustainability dimension; that of profting sustainably (Elkington 1998; Linton,

Klassen, and Kayaraman 2007; Nidumolu, Prahalad, and Rangaswami 2009). This public

awareness and recognition of the signifcance of sustainability has resulted in substantial

political momentum demanding the implementation of sustainability policies. For example,

Linton, Klassen, and Jayaraman (2007) point to legislation that was adopted worldwide

over a relatively short timeframe to phase out chemicals with ozone depleting potential.

Research, then, has a signifcant opportunity to contribute to the policy making process,

Supply chains and sustainability

168Supply Chain Perspectives and Issues

and to business strategies on sustainability (Srivastava 2007; Halldorsson, Kotzab, and

Skjott-Larsen 2009).

As embodiments of global fows of goods, labour, capital, and information, supply chains

provide a powerful context for understanding sustainability. Both share an emphasis on

system dynamics, and the concept of an ultimate supply chain extending from raw inputs

to fnal outputs provides fertile grounds in which to test concepts of sustainability.

From a business perspective, the advancement of sustainable supply chain management

(SSCM) is particularly pressing, in light of the fact that current legal and political trends

will force many changes, regardless of whether academics or practitioners are prepared.

The Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change (2006) attributed 40 per cent of

global greenhouse gas emissions to agriculture, industrial production and transport, and

Elkington (1998) anticipates that individual companies will be pushed to take increasing

responsibility over an extending network of partners (Halldorsson, Kotzab, and Skjott-

Larsen 2009).

The following section will review the feld by frst defning sustainability and its closely

associated concepts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the triple bottom

line. Following that, is a discussion of the theoretical frameworks that have been built

on top of these defnitions, with a particular emphasis on SSCM. Finally, the empirical

work is reviewed by research methodology and industrial/geographical coverage before

concluding with opportunities for future research.

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