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Man who annoyed by saying "Aye,aye"

Man who annoyed by saying "Aye,aye"

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Published by Nevin
Laughter in Ballymoney Court, 1933

"The Chairman - Some people are not worth while keeping in humour; it takes so little to aggravate them."
Laughter in Ballymoney Court, 1933

"The Chairman - Some people are not worth while keeping in humour; it takes so little to aggravate them."

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Published by: Nevin on Jul 30, 2009
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05/11/2014

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BALLYMONEY SESSIONS

MAN WHO ANNOYED BY SAYING "AYE, AYE"
SUMMONS DISMISSED Mr R D Pinkerton presided at these sessions on Monday; other magistrates adjudicating were: Captain R A Cramsie, Messrs F J Boyle VS, and Wm Stuart. James Blair, Maddykeel, summoned William Patton, Cabra, for alleged use of abusive and threatening language. Complainant said he was going to Ballymoney on the 24th ult. Defendant was in a turnip field trimming the plants, and without any provocation he came from the field and insulted witness. The Chairman said many a time they had all been insulted. Complainant - Yes, but it was worse this time. The Chairman - Oh, I see, it was worse because it was you. (Laughter) Well, what did he say? Complainant - That was all he said. (Laughter) He just insulted me. The Chairman - You were disappointed because he did not say more. Did he hurt you in any way? - No Only your feelings - Yes. This man did not leave a finger on you? No, not in any way. You were mad because he did not? - I don't know. Maybe he had great control of his feelings when he stopped short at that? - Likely The Chairman informed complainant that the Bench wished to know what defendant had said to hurt his feelings. Complainant - He said "Aye, aye; Aye, aye" all the time. (Laughter) The Chairman - Oh, no human being could stand that at all. That was terrible. Complainant - He called me all the names of the day, and Robert Glass, of the same townland, along with him. The Chairman - What names did he call you? Complainant - He called me "bulldog" and everything the day before.

The Chairman - We take it that he exhausted all the possibilities of vituperation? Complainant - Yes, he did all that. Defendant denied calling complainant names. He stopped where defendant was working and told him about a sore hand he had. Witness asked him how he got it and complainant said he got it out of jumping out of a motor car. Witness remarked to complainant that if he could jump out of a motor car when it was going he should be in a circus and complainant then said he would summons defendant for making fun of him on a public road. (Laughter) Mr F Boyle - Did the word "bulldog" come into the conversation? Defendant - No, it did not. The Chairman - No "bulldog" or any other variety. Was anything in the nature of "Aye, aye" said? Defendant - I didn't call that at all. The Chairman - If you had said it would it have meant anything to complainant? Defendant - Not that I know of but I did not say it. The Chairman - Some people are not worth while keeping in humour; it takes so little to aggravate them. Captain Cramsie (to defendant) - Do you live far from each other? - No Had you a quarrel at any time, or was there any ill feeling? - None The case was dismissed on the merits. Source - Northern Constitution, December 23, 1933

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