October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 1

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History
First published in January 2001 as Graphic News, Caribbean Graphic changed its name at the beginning of 2002
to better reflect its mission to be a community newspaper representing the interests of all peoples of Caribbean
origin. The paper went into hiatus in May 2005. In response to popular demand it was reintroduced, under new
ownership, in November 2011.
Content
Caribbean Graphic’s content is intended to reflect the unique sensibilities and lifestyles of its target market readers:
the members of the Canadian-Caribbean community. Coverage includes news of the events and activities both in
Canada as well as in the respective “back home” countries of the Caribbean Region. Caribbean Graphic’s vision
is to serve as a platform to advanced awareness of the achievements, challenges and causes affecting Canadian-
Caribbean peoples. Its mission is to promote the Canadian-Caribbean community’s economic development and
an even greater sense of cohesion amongst its members.
Circulation
Caribbean Graphic is available free of charge at most East and West Indian groceries, some selected chain stores,
Caribbean Consulates and Tourist Board offices, video shops, sports and religious organizations in the Greater
Toronto Area. Every edition 15,000 copies are distributed.
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Brown Sugar’s
Canadian Premiere
Wows Audience
Doorga Entertainment’s CEO & President Vashtie Doorga with Invor Bedessee of
Bedessee Imports at the Canadian Premiere of Brown Sugar Too Bitter For Me.
T
he cinema was
lined with freshly
cut sugar cane
stalks, pineapples, golden
apples, mangoes, and
guavas. All straight from
Guyana’s soil and which every
audience member got to take
home. They also received sugar
cakes and other goodies which
included bottles of wine, as
well as bags of Demerara sugar,
courtesy of Bedessee Imports.
The aforementioned were
parting gifts for attendees
to the Canadian Premiere of
the movie " Brown Sugar Too
Bitter For Me." A Mahadeo
Shivraj Production, it was pre-
sented by Doorga Entertain-
ment on September 29th.
Everyone laughed, cried and
left with a nostalgic feeling of
love for Guyana once again. Un-
doubtedly proud that a wonder-
ful production of this magnitude,
had come out of their homeland.
The producer Mahadeo Shivraj
and actress Radical Olarte, as
well as the writer George Subraj,
were present to walk the red car-
pet for the pre –show. Accompa-
nied by the rocking sounds of the
Riddim Crew Tassa crew.
Petra Roach Named 2013 Caribbean World Personality
BRIDGETOWN, The Interna-
tional Caribbean World Awards
have become the Oscars of
the Caribbean and the awards
recognise excellence in travel,
tourism and property through-
out the Caribbean region, and
accolades are voted for by the
readers of Caribbean World
Magazine.
Quite simply, the awards are
a unique chance for admirers
to celebrate companies and
individuals who have made a
real difference to the Caribbean
region over the past year.
Caribbean World Personal-
ity of the Year, 2013 has been
awarded to Petra Roach, vice
president of the Barbados Tour-
ism Authority in the UK.
The Caribbean World Person-
ality of the Year Award is award-
ed to a person who has made
an outstanding contribution to
promoting the region through
their personal efforts and ac-
tions. Previous winners include
Butch Stewart, CEO of Sandals
and Carole Guntley Brady of the
Jamaican Tourist Board.
“The prestigious Caribbean
World Awards are now in their
19th year and continue to re-
ward and recognise the people
and the places which make the
Caribbean so successful.” com-
mented Ray Carmen, publisher
of the celebrated magazine. Pe-
tra has always been a passion-
ate advocate of Barbados and
believes that one has to always
fnd innovative ways to keep in-
terest and
invest-
ment to
Barbados
fresh. She
was the
brain-
child
behind
the very
success-
ful British
Airways
Football
Legends
Invitational, a legends foot-
ball tournament which sees
64 ex-premier football stars
take to the pitch at Kensington
Oval. Other key sports projects
include Chelsea Football Club
camp, part of a football devel-
opmental plan which sees CFC
s coaches training both coaches
and kids on Barbados.
She sits on the Board of The
Branson Centre for Entrepre-
neurship in Jamaica which is a
hub for aspiring entrepreneurs
and offers practical help to
develop strong business skills
as well as exposure to networks
and fnancial and investment
opportunities. She is also a
Board Director for Sport for
Life which seeks to positively
infuence the lives of kids from
a challenging background in the
UK and the Caribbean through
sport. The Caribbean Tourism
Organisation’s UK chapter is
another board she is actively
involved with.
Petra commented:” The
secret for me is fnding a way
to create a legacy with our
exciting initiatives whilst at the
same time, giving something
valuable back to the commu-
nity. If we invest in our youth
and provide them with enough
opportunities, we can ensure
that the Caribbean region will
continue to grow and dominate
the world stage by producing
world class personalities in
every feld, be it sports, arts,
culture or business.”
Two of Barbados Tourism’s Brightest Stars, Petra Roach
with Sir Garfeld Sobers
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 2
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 3
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J
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e
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C
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i
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Parang Queen: Trinidad & Tobago’s undisputed Parang Queen, Sharlene
Flores will be the headline act for the November 2nd Los Amigos hosted Parang,
Parang Show & Dance. Flores’ captivating beauty and sultry voiced renditions are
sure to be a hit amongst the hundreds expected to converge on the J&J Swagat
Hall as attendees to the Show.
Digicel
Recruits
Dianne
Millan
T
rinidadian-born Dianne
Millan has assumed re-
sponsibilities as Digicel’s
Canadian English Caribbean
Territory Manager. She brings to
the position the valuable experience
gained from her immediate former role
with Ezetop Canada. As the latter’s
Business Development Manager she had
managed Ezetop’s large corporate ac-
counts and worked closely with distrib-
utors in fortune fve hundred companies
including Canada Post and MoneyGram.
Having migrated to Canada from
Trinidad and Tobago at the age of 17,
Millan completed her post secondary
studies in Telecommunications and Net-
working. Initial work stints with AT&
T and Sprint Canada preceded a twelve
year career at Rogers, where she made
highly lucrative contributions towards
organizational goals.
Regarded as an adept sales profes-
sional with profuse expertise in elec-
tronic communications., Millan is also
a multiple sales award recipient for top
industries such as Rogers, AP Global
and Eco Carrier Inc.
Her passion and enthusiasm for
everything she does will be assets to her
desired success with Digicel. With over
13 million customers across its 31 mar-
kets in the Caribbean, Central America
and Asia-Pacifc, Digicel Group Limited
is renowned for delivering best value,
best service and best network.
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October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 4
Publisher/Editor: Tony McWatt
Contributors: Sandra Ann Baptiste, Akua Hinds,
Christine Reid, Sir Ronald Sanders,
Legal: Oumarally and Baboolal
Graphic Design: Adryan Manasan (www.echodesign.ca)
Website: www.caribbeangraphic.ca • Tel: 905.831-4402 • Fax: 416.292.2943 • Email: caribbeangraphic@rogers.com
Sir Ronald
Sanders
Caribbean Court of Justice Delivers
For The Caribbean’s People
F
or years, nationals of the
15-nation Caribbean Com-
munity (CARICOM) have
complained of the discrimina-
tion they’ve experienced at the
border controls of each other’s
countries. This discrimination has
ranged in many cases from extensive
questioning before being allowed entry
for a limited period, to arbitrary refusal
of entry and immediate expulsion.
This unpleasant treatment has galled
CARICOM nationals, causing them to
question the benefts of being part of the
organisation which was set up by Treaty
and which stipulates the obligations of
its member states with regard to the
freedom of movement of their citizens.
On October 3, in a landmark decision,
the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ)
brought at least a legal end to discrimina-
tion and denial of right of entry to Caribbe-
an Community nationals. If such practices
continue in member countries of the Com-
munity they will be unlawful, and affected
persons can seek redress from the CCJ.
According to the CCJ decision, na-
tionals of the Caribbean Community are
legally entitled to enter and stay in each
other’s countries for up to six months
without restriction, unless deemed as
an undesirable person. Border offcials
also cannot arbitrarily deem a CARI-
COM national as “undesirable”.
The CCJ is not yet the fnal appellate
Court for civil and criminal matters for
all CARICOM countries, but it is not in
that form that the Court made its wa-
tershed judgement. The decision was is-
sued by the CCJ as the Court of original
jurisdiction in relation to the CARICOM
Treaty. In that form, its decisions are
binding on the Community member
countries and they cannot be appealed.
The occasion for the CCJ’s judgement
was a complaint brought by a Jamaican
national, Shanique Myrie, against the
government of Barbados. Myrie claimed
that in March 2011 the border authori-
ties in Barbados violated her right to
free movement under the CARICOM
Treaty when she sought to enter the
country. She further claimed that she
was illegally detained and deported and
her human rights were violated when
she was subjected to a “cavity search”
described as a “fnger rape”.
In a lucid, well-presented and easy to
read judgement, the CCJ found for My-
rie against the Barbados government on
the strength of the credible evidence in
her favour. She was awarded US$38,700
in pecuniary and non-pecuniary dam-
ages. Her legal costs are also to be met
by the Barbados government.
But while the case gave redress to Myrie
for her grievances, it was far more signif-
cant for its establishment of the rights of
the people of CARICOM and for eliminat-
ing misconceptions of the supremacy of
“national sovereignty” over “Community
Law” under the Revised Treaty of Cha-
guaramas – the CARICOM Treaty.
As the CCJ stated in its judgement,
among the issues of Caribbean Com-
munity law with which the case dealt,
was “whether and to what extent CARI-
COM (or Community) nationals have
a right of free movement within the
Caribbean Community”.
On this matter, the CCJ was guided by
the 28th Meeting of CARICOM Heads
of Government in 2007 at which they
agreed that “all CARICOM nationals
should be entitled to an automatic stay
of six months upon arrival in order to
enhance their sense that they belong to,
and can move in, the Caribbean com-
munity, subject to the rights of Member
States to refuse undesirable persons en-
try and to prevent persons from becom-
ing a charge on public funds”.
In arriving at their judgement, there-
fore, the CCJ did nothing more than give
judicial acknowledgement and author-
ity to a decision by CARICOM Heads of
Government – the supreme decision-
making body of Community law.
The Court also clarifed the matters
of “undesirable persons” and persons
who might become “a charge on public
funds”. Up until now, both these catego-
ries of persons have been determined by
border authorities based on individual
country guidelines that, for years, CAR-
ICOM nationals have publicly argued
discriminates against them and makes a
mockery of the CARICOM Treaty.
Further, the Court has ruled that
no CARICOM national can be refused
entry by border offcials without being
informed “promptly and in writing not
only of the reasons for the refusal but
also of his or her right to challenge that
decision”. CARICOM countries are also
now required to provide “effective and
accessible appeal or review procedures
with adequate safeguards to protect the
rights of the person denied entry”.
While all of this will bring relief to all
CARICOM nationals and represents a
triumph for the Caribbean people in their
often expressed desire to travel in the
region “hassle free”, the CCJ judgement
does two other very important things.
First, it establishes that being a mem-
ber of CARICOM does give enforceable
legal rights to every Caribbean national
in relation to entry to CARICOM coun-
tries for a period of up to six months.
In this sense, it is an occasion for real
celebration of Caribbean regionalism at
the level of people – it is a rare occa-
sion, but it will help to lift the worth and
meaning of CARICOM.
Second, it has established that there
is CARICOM Community law – devised
and agreed by CARICOM Heads of
Government as the principals that the
Community’s peoples have elected to
represent them – and that such Com-
munity law cannot be invalidated by the
failure on any country to incorporate
those decisions in their municipal laws.
The immigration and law enforcement
departments of all Community countries
should now be ensuring that the regu-
lations and instructions given to their
border offcials refect CARICOM Com-
munity law and the decision of the court.
With regard to the CCJ, the objective,
impartial and learned judgement it has
given should now cause all doubters to
welcome and embrace it as the region’s
fnal court of appeal in all matters. In the
case of Jamaica that argued to stay with
the British Privy Council as its Court of
fnal appeal on the basis that Jamaicans
could not expect justice from a Caribbe-
an court, Shanique Myrie stands as the
symbol of that deeply fawed position.
(The writer is a Consultant, Senior
Research Fellow at London University
and former Caribbean diplomat)
Responses and previous commentaries:
www.sirronaldsanders.com
It’s Parang Time Again!
T
hat there will be garlic
pork in Guyanese-Cana-
dian households, curry
goat amongst the Jamaicans
and souse for the Bajans, are
certainties of the Caribbean-
Canadian Christmas Season. Yet
another is that on almost every weekend
from the beginning of November until
mid-December there will be one Parang
Show after another.
October almost done; November soon
come and it’s Parang Time Again in the
land. For the uninitiated, according to the
offcial Wikipedia description, “Parang
is a popular folk music originating out
of Trinidad and Tobago, it was brought
to Trinidad by Venezuelan migrants
who were primarily of Amerindian and
African heritage, something which is
strongly refected in the music itself. The
word is derived from two Spanish words:
parranda, meaning "a spree or fête", and
parar meaning "to stop".
Over the years, within Trinidad and
increasingly amongst its ex-patriot
populations within Metropolitan cities
such as Toronto, Parang has evolved as a
Christmas celebration.
In Trinidad, traditional parang music
is largely performed around Christmas
time, when singers and instrumental-
ists (collectively known as the parrand-
eros) travel from house to house in the
community, often joined by friends and
neighbours family etc. using whatever
instruments are to hand. Popular parang
instruments include the cuatro (a small,
four-string guitar) and maracas (locally
known as chac-chacs). Other instru-
ments often used are violin, guitar, claves
(locally known as toc-toc), box bass (an
indigenous instrument), tambourine,
mandolin, bandol, caja (a percussive box
instrument), and marimbola (an Afro-
Venezuelan instrument). In exchange
for the entertainment, parranderos are
traditionally given food and drink: pas-
telles, sorrel, rum and ponche de creme
(a form of alcoholic eggnog).
Here in Toronto, sizeable Parang
bands have emerged. In keeping with
the tradition back home, a few are en-
gaged during the Holiday Season to play
at House Parties, or Limes as they are
more popularly known. Compared to
their performances at the Parang Shows
that have become abundant, House
Limes are still far however more of an
exception rather than the rule.
The issue with Toronto’s now burgeon-
ing calendar of Parang Shows is that it’s
more often than not the same list of bands
performing at every Show. Furthermore
they all seem to go to the Shows with one
repertoire of practiced songs. So by the
time you’ve seen and heard them at two
or three shows, you can almost predict
which song is coming next.
The other somewhat more amusing
issue amongst Toronto’s so called “Par-
randeros” is that half the time, especially
when they are performing traditional
Parang songs, they don’t have a clue as to
the meaning of any of the words they are
singing. This comes from the fact that
the lyrics to the majority of Parang music
sung today are actually patios. A most
unique combination of ruralised Spanish
and English. Ask any Canadian Parran-
dero to translate what they are singing
and I’ll bet you they’ll be lost for words.
Despite the issue of recycled bands,
some of Toronto’s Parang Shows are
still worth the price of admission. As a
“Season Opener’” Los Amigos’ “Parang,
Parang” Show, billed for November 2
this year at the J&J Swaggat Convention
Centre, will provide a valuable sneak
preview of what the various bands have
to offer. Parang, Parang will also feature
Trinidad’s Sharlene Torres, regarded as
the Queen of Parang.
Towards the end of the Season, on
December 1st, the 2nd Annual Ultimate
Parang Calypso, featuring Baron, Crazy
and Kenny J, will be a “Can’t Miss” for
any and every Parang music lover. Last
year’s show was sold out so those inter-
ested should get their tickets early.
It’s Parang Time Again!
— Tony McWatt
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 5
416-292-2400 416-292-2400
The members of the Bedessee group of companies would like to thank their
ĐƵƐƚŽŵĞƌƐĨŽƌƚŚĞŝƌĐŽŶƟnued support around the world. Happy Diwali
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 6
Meet your local
Mortgage Advisor.
Bianca Aziz
Home Financing Solutions
As a Scotiabank Mortgage Advisor, I am committed to providing you with
excellent service and innovative mortgage solutions that are right for you. I am
committed to finding the most appropriate solution to meet your unique needs.
Are you thinking of…
• Buying or building a home?
• Refinancing your existing mortgage?
• Renovating your home?
• Consolidating existing debts?
Bianca Aziz
Home Financing Solutions
Greater Toronto Area
647.983.6826
bianca.aziz@scotiabank.com
You’re richer than you think
®
Registered trademarks of the Bank of Nova Scotia.
Meet your local
Mortgage Advisor.
Bianca Aziz
Home Financing Solutions
As a Scotiabank Mortgage Advisor, I am committed to providing you with
excellent service and innovative mortgage solutions that are right for you. I am
committed to finding the most appropriate solution to meet your unique needs.
Are you thinking of…
• Buying or building a home?
• Refinancing your existing mortgage?
• Renovating your home?
• Consolidating existing debts?
Bianca Aziz
Home Financing Solutions
Greater Toronto Area
647.983.6826
bianca.aziz@scotiabank.com
You’re richer than you think
®
Registered trademarks of the Bank of Nova Scotia.

Meet your local Mortgage
Advisor.
Bianca Aziz
Home Financing Solutions
As a Scotiabank Home Financing Advisor, I am committed to providing you with
excellent service and innovative mortgage solutions that are right for you. I am
committed to nding the most appropriate solution to meet your unique needs.
Are you thinking of…
• Buying or building a home?
• Renancing your existing mortgage?
• Renovating your home?
• Consolidating existing debts?
Bianca Aziz
Home Financing Solutions
Greater Toronto Area
647.983.6826
bianca.aziz@scotiabank.com
®
Registered trademarks of the Bank of Nova Scotia.
Wishing you a very special
Mother’s Day
Bianca Aziz
Home Financing Solutions
647-983-6826
bianca.aziz@scotiabank.com
Mama was my greatest teacher, a
teacher of compassion, love and
fearlessness. If love is sweet as a
flower, then my mother is that
sweet flower of love – Stevie
Wonder
Stolen Cattle
BRIDGETOWN, Bajan beef farmers
are raising hell over the continued
theft and slaughter of their cattle at
night, charging that the operations
are so smoothly executed they have
to be the work of professionals.
Just recently thieves removed and
slaughtered a prized bull from a St
Thomas property, leaving only the
head, carcass, intestines and skin at
the end of a long trail in Hangman’s
Hill in the same parish.
In this case, the victim was an
Argentine national in Barbados on a
work permit, who bought the animal
– whose photograph was used as a
symbol for local agricultural produc-
tion and in support of a buy-local
campaign on the trucks of a local
feed company – and fed it until it
was worth in the region of $3 000.
Barbadian businessman Roddy
Davis, of Spring Homes Limited,
with whom the Argentine is em-
ployed, explained that his employ-
ee tied the bull outside his home
before he went to bed, but when
he did not fnd it the next morning
he followed a trail of trampled bush
until he came upon the remains.
“This is really not good enough
and I do not believe the authorities
are doing enough,” Davis said. “Not
so long ago the same thing hap-
pened to me . . . . These people are
professional butchers. When you
look at how they slaughter you have
to agree they are professionals.
Rihanna’s $22 Million
Home Purchase
BRIDGETOWN, Home-loving Bar-
badian megastar Rihanna has put her
money where her mouth is and splashed
out almost US$22 million on an idyllic
oceanfront residence that she rented
for a trip to the island last year. The 25-
year-old singer has bought a home at the
luxurious One Sandy Lane resort on the
island where she was born and raised,
according to Britain’s MailOnline.
The Diamonds girl always returns to
Barbados for Christmas, and last year the
website revealed that she rented the same
fve-bedroom condominium and planned
on her mother Monica Braithwaite and
younger brother Rajad joining her.
While she ended up staying at another
villa on the island, she still remained a
fan of the prestigious One Sandy Lane,
a haunt of the rich and famous that has
welcomed such luminaries as Oprah
Winfrey and Simon Cowell.
The Unapologetic singer, who is said
to be worth about US$90 million, pur-
chased the 10,000-square-foot pad just
down the beach from the famous, fve-
star Sandy Lane Hotel on the island’s
up-market west coast.
The opulent complex is said to be run
like a boutique hotel and even when no
one is in residence a 34-member staff,
including gardeners and security per-
sonnel, maintains the property to the
highest standards.
The around-the-clock security system
works on biometrics so residents can
move freely between different areas in
the building without the need for keys,
but non-residents are instantly detected.
Private elevators and underground
parking complete the glitzy package.
Barbados’ pop princess already has
links with Michael Tabor, the owner
of the complex, after being paid US$2
million to perform at a party hosted
by his son Ashley, the British boss of
Global Radio.
The senior Tabor amassed a fortune
from bookmaking, horse breeding
and property, and helped bankroll the
US$1 billion double purchase of GCap
Media and Chrysalis Radio that created
Global’s broadcasting empire.
Reports are that Rihanna now plans
to spend more time in Barbados. A little
over a year ago, the Grammy award-
winner surprised her mother with a lux-
urious fve-bedroom home in the island,
but they will reportedly all stay together
at One Sandy Lane for the holidays.
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 7
49 Strokes A Month
Billion
Dollar
Water
Plan in the
WorkS
BRIDGETOWN,Barbados will be
working with Canada to roll-out
a more than $1 billion water and
wastewater management infra-
structure programme over the next
few years. It should mean more
consistent monthly water bills.
Minister of Agriculture, Food,
Fisheries and Water Resource
Management Dr David Estwick
has said that Cabinet had given
its approval for the ministry to
work with the Canadian govern-
ment on several projects, includ-
ing the Smart Meter Project, the
construction of the reverse os-
mosis plant and the West Coast
Sewerage Project.
He was speaking at the Canadi-
an High Commission where con-
tracts were signed to fnalize the
Smart Meter Project. Chairman
of the Barbados Water Authority
(BWA) Dr Atlee Brathwaite also
signed a $116 million strategic
contract with the Canadian Com-
mercial Corporation (CCC) for the
start of the project, which will see
the roll-out of almost 100 000
meters across the island
groWth
Plan
neeDeD
BRIDGETOWN, Two top econo-
mists have joined the call for
Government to implement its
growth strategies now as it faces
the possibility of being ignored
by international investors. Bar-
bados Economic Society presi-
dent Jeremy Stephen told local
meadia that unless Government
implements growth initiatives
such as the Four Seasons and
Almond Beach resort projects,
confdence in the Barbados
economy will worsen.
He made the comment on Oc-
tober 17, after the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) released its
forecast of negative 0.8 and 1.1
per cent growth for Barbados –
the worst in the Western Hemi-
sphere. Former BES head Ryan
Straughn said the IMF forecasts
should not be downplayed since
they generally act as a bench-
mark for investors to know where
to put their money.
“Investors do not have the
kind of information which IMF
offcials would collect when
they visit a country . . . and the
IMF was here in July prior to
the investment road show [by
the Minister of Finance] in the
international market. Given that
Barbados is the only country that
isn’t projected to grow, that of
itself would signal to the måar-
ket that something is not right
here,” Straughn stated.
Sandals, Beaches Barbados Bound
BRIDGETOWN, Barbadians
are suffering strokes – some
fatal – at a rate of 49 a month
– which is an increase from
about three years ago.
Consultant cardiologist at
the Queen Elizabeth Hospi-
tal (QEH), Anthony Harris,
disclosed these staggering
fgures on October 17 at the
hospital’s second public accountability
meeting at the Lloyd Er-
skine Sandiford Centre.
He told the small audience
that while the monthly fgures
of 11 heart-related cases were
also alarming, strokes were
more prevalent but were often
treated by Barbadians as “a
neglected stepchild of cardio-
vascular diseases”.
“In truth, it is perhaps even more
prevalent in our population than heart
attacks. We have 11 heart attacks oc-
curring while we had something like
49 strokes a month, and the effect of
a stroke is it can kill you or leave you
severely disabled. Of course, some will
recover but a lot of people, even when
they get a stroke and do not die, wish
they had died because of the debilitating
effects,” Harris stated.
He added that strokes were more
prevalent among the elderly population,
with half of the victims being diabetics.
BRIDGETOWN, Both Sandals and
Beaches Resorts will be opening
to Barbados, Sandals Resort Inter-
national has announced. Sandals
and the government of Barbados
reported their agreement following
“months of negotiations.”
The agreement will see the
former Couples Resort in St Law-
rence reopen as a Sandals resort,
while the former Almond Beach
Resort in St Peter will become a
Beaches Resort. The company
will soon launch a programme of
enhancements to “Sandalize” the
property, which has 280 units.
Stewart said the new Sandals
property would honour all exist-
ing commitments with guests who
had booked up until Nov. 6.
The brand-new Beaches Resort will
be constructed at the former Almond
Beach Resort, a deal that had been
rumoured for several months.
Sandals has resorts in Antigua,
the Bahamas, Jamaica, St Lucia and,
soon, Grenada
Anthony Harris
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October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 8
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ctober 25 – N
ovem
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neWer, Better liat
ST. JOHN’S, Antigua, The acting head of the Caribbean airline,
LIAT, in a message to staff, declared the comfort and well-being of
passengers will be her overriding priority. “At the new LIAT, we are
working to build an airline which places the customer, our loyal pas-
sengers, at the center of our focus,” stated Julie Reifer-Jones, who
was appointed Acting Chief Executive Offcer by the airline’s board
of directors this month.
Recalling LIAT has evolved from a single Piper Apache to its present
feet of 14 aircraft, she asked for patience, “As we go through change
once again, we promise to serve our region better and in more effcient
ways.” She thanked customers and stakeholders for their patience and
support as LIAT transitions from its Dash-8 feet to new ATR aircraft. She
was pleased to note, however, that on several routes, “our passengers
are already experiencing the comfort of our new ATR 72s.”
In addition to the introduction of new aircraft into the feet, the
airline has been able to stabilize its fight schedules throughout the
Caribbean. “By the end of this year, we will have six new aircraft and
this should improve our operational performance considerably,” she
reported. The LIAT acting CEO proclaimed the feet modernisation
which continues into 2014 will improve schedules.
On its 57th year of service to the Caribbean, Reifer-Jones saluted all
LIAT employees “who, throughout the years, have helped to build this
outstanding Caribbean institution. As we move forward, we encour-
age everyone to keep the LIAT fag fying high.”
LIAT is one of the leading Caribbean airlines. It is owned by regional
shareholders, with major shareholders being the Governments of Bar-
bados, Antigua & Barbuda and St. Vincent & the Grenadines.
Sacrifces Needed
For Grenada’s
Debt Restructuring
ST. GEORGE’S, Grenada,
The Grenada government
says the international
community is willing to
restructure the debt owed
to it but insists that the
island would have to make
sacrifces.
“We expect signifcant
reduction in our debt size
and debt programme, we
expect to see reduction
through a haircut, we ex-
pect to see the debt move
over a long period with a lower interest
rate,” Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell
has said.
Mitchell, who is also fnance minister,
has returned home following a visit to
the United States where he held talks
with offcials from the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World
Bank. He said that while the fnancial in-
stitutions were willing to assist Grenada
it was also necessary for St. George’s to
approve and implement a “home grown
restructuring programme”.
Mitchell, whose New National Party
(NNP) came to offce in February this
year, said Grenada had been promised
soft loans and grants which can put the
island on a path of “sustain economic
activity with ability to meet its challeng-
es to the most vulnerable citizens”.
Mitchell has soon after being sworn
into offce announced that Grenada was
unable to pay its creditors and was seek-
ing the assistance of the international
community to restructure its debt.
Since then there have been several
activities aimed at fnding a solution to
restructuring the debt that is estimated
at more than two billion EC dollars (One
EC Dollar = US$0.37 cents)
Among the activities included an IMF
delegation visiting the island, offcials
from the Barbados-based , the Caribbean
Development Bank (CDB) and other do-
nors meeting with a number of stakehold-
ers including the Grenada Trades Union
Council and the business community.
The Conference of Churches Grenada
has also held two workshops aimed at
explaining the debt to its stakehold-
ers and at the same time deciding on
recommendations and suggestions to
the Government. The recommenda-
tions, which were presented to Eco-
nomic Affairs Minister Oliver Joseph,
noted however that whatever strategy is
decided on should not impact negatively
on the vulnerable and marginalize in
the society.
Grenada, at present is unable to
receive any external funding but with
the implementation of the home grown
restructuring programme it is expected
that the island will be able to have ac-
cess to approximately US$300,000.
Though a formal announcement out-
lining the component of the programme
is yet to be announced, Prime Minister
Mitchell recently indicated that there
would be a reduction in income tax
threshold from EC$5, 000 to EC$3,000.
At present, income tax is calculated
at 30 per cent on earnings above
EC$5,000 per month.
Dr. Keith Mitchell
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 9
VinCeyS
launCh
highWay
exPanSion
ProjeCt
KINGSTOWN, St. Vincent, The
government has launched an
EC$40 million Caribbean Devel-
opment Bank funded project that
will see the upgrade of a major
span of the Leeward Highway.
The 18 month project, scheduled
to being in January will see the
widening of the South Leeward
Highway, which runs from the
capital Kingstown, along the west
coast and inland, to the Central
Leeward town of Layou.
Brent Bailey, chief engineer
in the Ministry of Transport and
Works, said the road carriageway
will be widened and among other
things, improvements will be made
to drainage
The minimum width of the road
between the densely populated
suburban area of Campden Park
where an industrial park is located
and Kingstown will be 21.8 feet.
Between Campden Park and
Buccament Bay, where the island’s
only fve-star resort is located, it
will be will be 21 feet.
Between Buccament Bay and
Layou, a relatively short span of
winding road where rocky cliffs
line the road in some sections, the
minimum width will be 19.7 feet.
He further explained that a 300
metre (1,000 feet) of road in one
community will be widened and
realigned. According to Bailey, the
environment and social assessment
study provides the Ministry’s project
team with the requirements for the
contractor’s environmental plan.
The levels of monitoring and the
critical areas to be monitored are
also included.
He stated that community liaison
will be appointed to ensure contin-
ued dialogues with the communi-
ties affected by the construction.
The project is out to tender, which
is slated to end by October 31.
The 25.3 miles (40.7 km) Lee-
ward Highway, which runs from
Kingstown to North Leeward, was
initially upgraded in the 1970s.
25 Yr Prison Term For
72 Year Old Al Capone
ROSEAU, Dominica, A High Court
judge has sentenced a 72-year-old man
to 25 years in prison after he was found
guilty of killing and decapitating a 32-
year-old man.
Justice Birnie Stephenson described
the murder of Damian Dorival as sense-
less, cold blooded and brutal before
imposing the jail term on Edward ‘Al
Capone’ Green, who was found guilty by
a nine-member jury.
The court was told that Dorival was
shot and killed by Green in June 2008
and his body transported to another
place where he was beheaded. The head-
less corpse was found by school children
on June 11, 2008. The head was found
at another location a few days later.
Dorival was Green’s tenant at the time
of the incident
Justice Stephenson said having consid-
ered the age, health and the length of time
the accused had been in custody, a 25
year-jail term would be a “ftting sentence.
“There is no doubt the murder was
premeditated and acted out by the de-
fendant”,” she added.
Defence attorney Peter Alleyne said
the 25 year sentence was equivalent to a
life sentence.
“I was disappointed, I thought he
would get a lesser term…I don’t think he
is a threat to society,” he told reporters.
Trinidad-based attorney, Keith Scot-
land, who prosecuted the case, said that
the killing was unprovoked and senseless.
neViS reaCtS
to CCj ruling
BASSETERRE, St. Kitts, The St.
Kitts-Nevis government says it
will adopt new measures aimed at
improving the treatment of Ca-
ribbean Community (CARICOM)
nationals living in the twin island
Federation. The Denzil Doug-
las government said it has been
studying the ruling of the Trinidad-
based Caribbean Court of Jus-
tice (CCJ) in the case in which a
Jamaican national, Shanique Myrie
successfully challenged a decision
by Barbados Immigration and Cus-
tom offcials to deny her entry into
the country in March 2011.
In addition, she had claimed
an entitlement to a right to free
movement within CARICOM,
making specifc reference to a
right of entry without any form of
harassment, based on the Revised
Treaty of Chaguaramas (RTC) that
governs the 15-member CARI-
COM grouping.
In its ruling, the CCJ dismissed
Barbados argument that the 2007
heads of government decision
was not a binding decision, noting
that it “held that the variance be-
tween what was agreed and was
decided was of no consequence
as it was not unusal for the Com-
munity to record its decisions
while using the word “agreed”.
Myrie was awarded more than
BDS$77,000 (One Barbados dollar
= US$0.50 cents) in damages and
according to Prime Minister Dr.
Denzil Douglas the landmark rul-
ing addresses immigration matters
within CARICOM and his govern-
ment wants to ensure that its
policies are in line with the court’s
directives.
Speaking on his weekly radio
show,”Ask the Prime Minister,” Dr.
Douglas said the rights of CARI-
COM nationals cannot be denied
and he announced the establish-
ment of a special desk to deal with
the concerns of Guyanese and Ja-
maican nationals who reside here.
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 10
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GEORGETOWN, Guyana will stage
a mock food disaster codenamed
“Operation Floodgate” to test the
country’s emergency response sys-
tem, government has announced. The
simulation exercise would be con-
ducted by the Civil Defence Commis-
sion (CDC) from October 21 to 25 in
Regions 4, 5, 6 and 9.
National Disaster Response Coordi-
nator, Dr. Roger Luncheon said the ex-
ercise is aimed at examining the over-
all effectiveness of shift hand-overs
and other procedures essential for the
effective running of the emergency
centres. Operation Floodgate, he said,
would be based on the activation of
Emergency Operation Centres to re-
spond to fooding caused by increased
rainfall and extra high tides.
The second phase will test the
functioning of the system in re-
sponse to a full-blown f lood includ-
ing relocation, and management
and collaboration between the CDC
and its regional administrative
partners. Phase three is expected to
review the procedures to deal with
deactivation and management of
the aftermath of the f looding.
Reports on the exercise will be
compiled and submitted to the Na-
tional Disaster Response Coordina-
tor and Cabinet for consideration.
The CDC has trained more than
three 300 persons from several
regions in Disaster Risk Manage-
ment, Shelter Management, Damage
Assessment and Needs Analysis
and Emergency Operations Centre
Management at the Commission,
Thomas Lands.
Operation Floodgate To
Test Guyana’s Emergency
Response System
CAL Duping Its New York
– Guyana Passengers
P
assengers fying from New
York to Guyana are being
misled by regional carrier
Caribbean Airlines (CAL). So
says President of the Georgetown
Chamber of Commerce and In-
dustry (GCCI) Clinton Urling. He
pointed out that CAL has been declaring
that the fight to Georgetown from New
York is ‘non-stop’ but there is still a stop-
over in Trinidad and Tobago. Urling, who
recently returned to Guyana from New
York on a CAL fight, said this practice
is unscrupulous and the airline needs to
come clean with its passengers.
“I heard about the complaints but I
never experienced it myself until this
weekend. These guys keep repeating
this absurdity that they are doing a
direct fight to Guyana or non-stop fight
to Guyana with a minor stop over in
Trinidad to refuel. When we got to the
destination even the pilots were saying
they didn’t know until the last minute
they were going to do that,” he said.
Reaction from passengers to this
course of action by the airline, he said,
was a clear indication that its failure to
correct this situation soon will result in a
growing number of disgruntled travelers.
“They had a lot of disgruntled pas-
sengers on the plane. For me it’s a bad
thing in the sense that it’s a bad busi-
ness move from Caribbean Airlines
because there are certain contractual
obligations and expectations. When
I pay and I see it’s a non-stop fight, I
am expecting a non-stop fight. Like
any other business you see offering a
peculiar service and somebody paying
for the service, they expect it and when
you show up you don’t give it to them
without any explanation,” Urling stated.
The GCCI President said this action
by the airline was not only an inconve-
nience but also resulted in additional
expenses being incurred by passengers.
“We had a stop-over in Trinidad
which resulted in one hour and a half
additional time. You know it puts people
out; sometimes it even puts people out
in terms of cost because I had people
waiting for me at the airport in Guyana
for over two hours.
Despite his heavy criticism of the air-
line for this blunder, Urling said CAL also
has to be commended for the sterling
contribution it has made to the region,
even in light of its many shortcomings.
“I want to make it clear from the
inception; Caribbean Airlines has to be
commended for what it has done for the
region as a whole. I really think at the
Caricom multilateral level, the heads
of state really need to look at some
form of maybe a subsidy or someway to
support Caribbean Airlines. Without
them and the tremendous service they
have provided to countries like Guyana,
our economy wouldn’t be the way it is
in terms of air transportation because
they’re the only reliable and consistent
airline that we have had in Guyana over
all these years,” he added
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 11
More hiV/
aiDS FunDing
neeDeD
GEORGETOWN, Guyana needs
to dispense more cash into HIV/
AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria
because international funds are
drying up to fght those diseases,
a senior United Nations offcial has
said. While the country is on track
to achieving the UN-set Millen-
nium Development Goal (MDG)
Number 6, Country Coordinator
for UNAIDS, Roberto Campos said
the country needed to provide 50
percent of funding to match the re-
mainder from overseas to continue
to combat those diseases.
Campos said the Ministry of
Finance, Ministry of Health and civil
society have teamed up to craft a
work-plan up to 2015 as cash from
the Global Fund dwindles. He said
the most critical component is the
provision of anti-retroviral treat-
ment for 4,200 persons.
An AIDS hospice has since closed
its doors because funding from the
United States President’s Emergency
Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has
dried up. Latest UN-verifed fgures
show that 87 percent of persons liv-
ing with HIV and AIDS are receiving
anti-retroviral treatments and 89 per-
cent of mothers are on the Preven-
tion of Mother to Child Transmission
Roshana Makes Russian Envoy Courtesy Visit
GEORGETOWN, Miss Guyana Universe
2013, Katherina Roshana, made a spe-
cial courtesy visit on Russian Ambas-
sador to Guyana, His Excellency Nikolai
Smirnov, in whose home city – Moscow
-- the international Ms Universe pag-
eant will be held. Ambassador Smirnov
said he has been monitoring the various
pageants in which Roshana was in-
volved, and has admired her.
Describing her as exceptional, he
said he believes the local queen is very
charismatic and could make Guyana
proud. In what could be a good omen, he
noted that Katherina is a popular Rus-
sian name. The ambassador informed
Roshana about the experiences of the
Russian Miss Universe, and about how
to stay warm in the cold of Moscow. He
advised that, whether in victory or de-
feat, the NEW GPC Inc/Limacol-spon-
sored beauty should always be graceful,
self-respecting, and strong enough to
face the pressures that come with an
international pageant.
He offered to host a cocktail re-
ception for the beauty queen on her
return to Guyana. Roshana said she
was grateful for the meeting with His
Excellency Nickolai Smirnov, and for
the VIP experience extended to her-
self, family members, and the Apsara
Entertainment Group; her trainers,
chaperones and friends. She said she
is grateful
for the ad-
vice given
on the pag-
eant and
Moscow,
and for the
courtesy
shown to
her.
She noted
that
she was
amazed at
the simplicity of the Russian envoy
and his entire staff. She said he has
won her respect and her heart, and she
would always remember him, as she
has met very few people in life with
his personality and sincerity.
(PMTCT). He said that Guyana was
one of 10 countries globally that
have achieved universal access to
treatment and the elimination of
mother to child transmission.
Although the overall prevalence
rate is 1.3 percent, Campos noted
that the fgures are much higher
among high-risk populations: 16
percent among sex workers, 19
percent among homosexuals and
six percent among miners.
The UNAIDS offcial said efforts
needed to be made to scale up
and increase access to remote
and high risk populations like
miners, residents of the hinterland
and as well as youths to avoid
new infections in the future.
Roberto Campos
Katherina Roshana
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 12
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holneSS
aCCuSeS
ShaW oF
PlagariSM
KINGSTON, Opposition and
Jamaica Labour Party (JLP) Leader
Andrew Holness’ campaign team
has said that it is alarmed that the
opposing Team Shaw has claimed
ownership of a fve-point devel-
opment plan Holness has been
promoting for the past two years.
“This fve-point plan has been
promulgated by Mr Holness for
the last two years, in various fora,
including the Salises 50/50 Confer-
ence held between August 24 and
26, 2012 on the way forward for
KINGSTON, The Jamaica parlia-
ment has approved legislation that
places a higher limit on cash trans-
actions with fnancial institutions
as the authorities move to deal with
the proceeds of crime. Parliament
agreed to the Proceeds of Crime
(POCA) Amendment Bill, which
now places a one million dollar (One
Jamaica dollar = US$0.01 cents)
limit on cash transactions with f-
nancial institutions. Legislators had
agreed to increase the ceiling from
J$500,000 but not to the original
proposal of two million.
Cash Transaction Limit Increased
The one million dollar limit means
that under the provisions for the re-
porting of suspicious transactions, cash
transactions of over one million cannot
be undertaken by anyone other than a
“permitted person,” such as a bank or
licenced fnancial institution.
National Security Minister Peter
Bunting, who piloted the legislation,
said it was important for Jamaica to be
fully compliant with the requirements
of the Caribbean Financial Action Task
Force (CFATF).
In its last mutual evaluation in
June 2005, Jamaica was assessed as
being compliant with 30 of the 48
recommendations; partially com-
pliant with 13; and non-compliant
with five.
Bunting told legislators that
between 2005 and 2013, the gov-
ernment has taken several actions
to address the outstanding issues,
including the passage of the POCA
in 2007, which is aimed at strength-
ening the country’s anti-money
laundering framework, and combat-
ing the financing of terrorism.
Bunting said while Jamaica con-
tinues to review its laws to ensure
compliance with the requisite inter-
national standards, there were still
some unresolved issues.
Jamaica,” the team, dubbed Team
JLP, said in a October 17 Release.
The release came hours after
leadership aspirant Audley Shaw
outlined at a press conference fve
key areas -- education, energy,
economy, employment and em-
powerment -- which he said will
receive priority focus if he suc-
ceeds as JLP leader in next month’s
internal election. But Team JLP has
accused Shaw of plagiarism.
“Team JLP is of the view that
this gross act of plagiarism could
either be a sloppy mistake or a
calculated attempt by Team Shaw
to hijack the platform of Mr Hol-
ness and make it their own,”
Team JLP said it hopes that Team
Shaw will “correct its error and
formulate its own innovative plan
for the development of Jamaica,
without expropriating the ideas
and stated policies of incumbent
party leader Andrew Holness.
Team JLP also expressed hopes
that Team Shaw will apologise to
the JLP leader for “this blatant
act of plagiarism”.
The Team JLP release also
included an audio clip from the
Salises 50/50 conference held at
the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel, New
Kingston in August 2012 in which
Holness is recorded stating:
“I think there are fve areas that
Jamaica must focus on, I call it the
fve ‘Es’. For the next 50 years we
must focus on education. We must
focus on our economy We must
focus on our energy problems. We
must focus on our environment, an
area which is often ignored but will
become increasingly important in
the next 50 years, as we continue
to degrade our resources on which
economic progress is built.
We must also focus on effcien-
cy. Jamaica is ineffcient and, on
this I will say a few words because,
there is a new thrust towards
anti-corruption, and that is good,
because wherever there is corrup-
tion there is ineffciency.”
Holness is currently facing a
challenge to his leadership of the
JLP from deputy leader Audley
Shaw. The two will square off at
the party’s annual conference on
November 10.
Peter Bunting
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 13
Shaw’s Plan Revealed
KINGSTON, Leadership aspirant of
the opposition Jamaica Labour Party
(JLP) Audley Shaw has unveiled a policy
framework outlining fve critical na-
tional issues which he intends to tackle
if he is successful in the November 10
internal election. The policy document,
slated for circulation to delegates and
the wider Jamaica, was released at a
October 17 press conference at the Terra
Nova Hotel in Kingston. It highlights
the fve main areas for immediate at-
tention: education, energy, economy,
employment and empowerment.
Shaw said the JLP, under his leader-
ship, will incorporate infant schools as
a formal part of the educational system
in Jamaica and implement the proper
curriculum and nutritional
Education, he said, cannot be a po-
litical football as it requires a national
consensus on the way forward.
Among the other plans for education
is the expansion of access to student
loans for tertiary students, and resource
allocation to schools based on needs as-
sessment along the criteria of age cohort,
gender and rural/urban gaps. As for
energy, Shaw said the plan is to create a
system that incentivises low consump-
tion of electricity at the domestic level.
Under the plan, he said, manufactur-
ers and industrial users of electricity
will also be eligible for incentives.
On the matter of the economy, Shaw
said one of the most important things
that must be done to turn around the
economy is the implementation of a
system that shortens, to less than three
months, the approval process for new
investments. The plan, he said, will be
to foat a special long-term low-interest
bond in order to have an additional pool
to fund small businesses.
He also said that a JLP under his
leadership will not tolerate an oppres-
sive regime that discourages expansion
of the tourism industry.
Team Shaw noted that tax reform will be
a top priority. The plan, according to Shaw,
will be to reverse the decision of the cur-
rent administration by reducing transfer
tax and stamp duties, eliminating double
taxation on dividends and reducing corpo-
rate taxes for unregulated companies.
There are issues related to the Carib-
bean Community that will be addressed
to ensure that there is a level playing
feld for Jamaican manufacturers.
The plan to develop downtown Kings-
ton will also be fast-tracked.
On the issue of employment, Shaw
said the plan will be to ramp up the
HEART programme and introduce
more remedial training programmes in
existing primary and high schools.
In terms of empowerment, Shaw said
a national health insurance plan will
be implemented, which will see con-
tributions similar to those made to the
National Housing Trust.
Public transport, he said, will also be
transformed with the divesting of the
examination and testing of motor vehicles
to private individuals as well as the estab-
lishment of a rural school bus system.
He also announced plans for the
justice system and crime manage-
ment to include
a shift system
at the Supreme
Court, more
intelligence-gath-
ering and support
technology and
mobility for the
police.
Flanked by a
number of his
backers, includ-
ing members of
Parliament Ed
Bartlett and Ru-
dyard Spencer and former parliamentar-
ians Dr Christopher Tufton and Michael
Stern, Shaw said this policy framework
will no longer be a Team Shaw but will
morph into Team JLP as it will be an
inclusive team.
ja to reCeiVe 9.2 Million
euroS in BuDget SuPPort
KINGSTON, Jamaica is to receive
9.2 million euros ($1.3 billion) in
budget support, the European
Union (EU) revealed this week. This
adds to the ¤7 million already paid
in September, the EU said, adding
that the disbursement will be made
in two tranches.
The disbursements were an-
nounced by Andris Piebalgs, EU
commissioner for development, at
an October 12 meeting in Washing-
ton with Jamaica’s Finance Minister
Dr Peter Phillips.
According to the EU, the pro-
gramme has contributed to creat-
ing a commercially viable sugar
cane industry by the completion of
the sector privatisation and social
developments which include:
a) alternative livelihoods which
have been supported with 5.300
micro-grants approved to vulner-
able workers; and
b) improved facilities (including
housing) and services at schools
and clinics granted to displaced
workers and their families.
The EU said that the Jamaican
Government remains committed to
macro-economic stability policies
and is making every effort towards
Public Finance Management Re-
form. Commissioner Piebalgs, the
EU added, congratulated Minister
Phillips for the achievements so far
and encouraged him to continue
efforts in the near future.
Audley Shaw
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Warner
Failing To
Pay Taxes
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Reports indicate that
Austin Jack Warner, the once powerful
football fgure who boasted of hav-
ing deep pockets before his entry into
politics, has been operating outside this
country’s tax laws with impunity for
more than a decade in what tax experts
say is a deliberate scheme to evade the
payment of personal and corporate taxes.
And, as continuing media investiga-
tions have indicated, he failed to disclose
tens of millions of dollars in cash gifts
received from miscellaneous sources and
benefcial interests held in no less than
15 business entities as required by the
CriMinal DePortee
Shot DeaD
PORT-OF-SPAIN, A criminal deportee from
the United States was found shot dead on
the morning of October 18 near a community
centre in Diego Martin.
Police said around 6 a.m. the body of Ron-
ald James, 45, of La Puerta, was found with a
gunshot wound to the head at the communi-
ty centre, located at Senior Road, La Puerta.
Police believe the murder was gang re-
lated. Homicide Bureau offcers are continu-
ing investigations. James’ death takes the
murder toll for the year to date to 308.
Austin Jack Warner,
FooD CarDS
BriBery
DenieD
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Minister of the
People and Social Development
Glenn Ramadharsingh has denied
that 800 food cards were distrib-
uted by the United National Con-
gress (UNC) as alleged by offcials
of the Independent Liberal Party
(ILP) and People’s National Move-
ment (PNM).
Ramadharsingh said food cards
were given out to persons “in
serious or desperate circumstanc-
es”. On October 16 the Move-
ment for Social Justice had issued
a statement, claiming that cam-
paigners at the UNC offce near
Frisco Junction had distributed
hundreds of food cards.
The MSJ stated “this abuse of
power and breach of process and
the Government’s willingness to
stoop to any level to try to garner
votes. There is a process involved
in accessing food cards. This wild
distribution of food cards is there-
fore a clear attempt by the Govern-
ment to sway voters in that area,
just a few days before the Local
Government elections”.
However, Ramadharsingh told
local media: “I don’t think there is
any truth in that at all. That number
being handed out is really unbe-
lievable. Councillors are making re-
quests from the food card depart-
ment, but they (the cards) are not
handed out like that. A temporary
food card may be given out in the
place of a hamper.
“When people say these things
they must have proof of it,” said
Ramadharsingh.
Integrity in Public Life Act (IPLA)
2000.
Warner, who has been the sub-
ject of national and international
investigations into allegations of
fnancial fraud, has failed to fle
corporation tax returns for all of
his registrable interests disclosed
in his statements of return made to
the Integrity Commission (IC), the
State watchdog agency tasked with
keeping public offcials honest.
The stockpile of evidence, col-
lected in an ongoing investigation,
apparently reveals that the former
government minister, Member of
Parliament for Chaguanas West,
interim political leader of the In-
dependent Liberal Party (ILP) and
the man who is offering himself
as a prospective prime minister of
this country, failed to fle corpora-
tion tax returns for any of his many
business interests in more than a
decade and in one or two instanc-
es—seven years.
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 15
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Extended Suspension For CAL Manager
PORT-OF-SPAIN, A Caribbean Airlines
Ltd (CAL) manager has received an
additional two weeks suspension, as an
investigation continues into a multi-mil-
lion dollar alleged racket involving the
use of fraudulent credit cards which has
already cost CAL more than $12 million
in losses. The accounting manager was
initially sent on leave on September 23
for two weeks.
While on leave, management request-
ed he provide the CAL board, led by
Phillip Marshal, with a comprehensive
report about the transactions which led
to CAL’s losses.
Sources say from January 2012 to
June 2013, CAL has lost more than
US$1,721,792 in charge backs. Charge
backs are the return of funds to custom-
ers. It is the reversal of a prior outbound
transfer of funds.
Following a forensic investigation by
CAL’s internal auditing department and
Ernst and Young, the manager at the
airline was suspended for two weeks.
The credit card activities sources say,
involve European, Jamaican and Nige-
rian individuals. Sources say the scam
involves the booking of airline tickets
via credit card.
“Calls to our centres come in after
6 p.m., when banks are closed and we
have no way of verifying the informa-
Ganga Now With UTT
PORT-OF-SPAIN,Former Trinidad
and Tobago cricket captain Daren
Ganga has taken a three-year sab-
batical from State-owned Petrotrin.
Ganga, 34, was seconded to the Uni-
versity of T&T, where he now holds
the post of senior manager, Sports
and Recreation.
The new contracted position took
effect on October 7 and is for a period
of three years. Sources say Ganga,
who worked in Petrotrin’s corporate
communications department, was
interviewed by UTT in May.
He received the nod from a panel
which included vice-president hu-
man resource Alan Ragoonanan, VP
business development and market-
ing Navinett Boodhai, VP quality
assurance Ruby Alleyne and external
expert Sean Roach.
In August, Ganga was contacted
and told he was the successful can-
the national and regional cricketing
bodies to advise that his employer
had refused his request for leave to
play in India.
The refusal was in the form of a let-
ter dated September 17, signed by then
Petrotrin corporate communications
manager Arnold Corneal.
In his letter, Corneal stated:
“Our records have shown you have
received a total of 37 working days
to go on national duties for 2009. As
communicated to you prior to May
21, 2008, November 20, 2008 and
January 5, 2009, leave for national
service shall be granted up to a
maximum of one month per annum
with pay for the duration of such
representation.”
The decision not to grant leave was
rescinded following the interven-
tion of then Energy Minister Conrad
Enill and Chaguanas West MP Jack
Warner.
Ganga was allowed to compete in the
Champions League on no pay leave.
tion on the cards,” the source said.
Adding that the fraudsters normally
booked business class tickets to the United
States, England and several Caribbean
countries, the source said after the booking
was made, the transaction was cancelled,
following which the fraudsters called back
the centres saying they wished to cancel
the transactions and get a refund.
Contacted for a comment, CAL’s com-
munications head Clint Williams said it
was not CAL’s policy to “discuss publicly,
confdential staff matters”.
didate. However, he asked for time to
consider the offer and tie up loose ends
at Petrotrin. Ganga is the recipient of a
Humming Bird Gold medal for his con-
tribution to sport. He was also named as
a sports ambassador by Government.
In 2009, Ganga had initially been
debarred by Petrotrin from taking
part as skipper of the national team
in the Champions League T20 cricket
tournament in India. He had written
Daren Ganga
tWo ChargeD
With theFt
oF hoSPital
MaChinery
PORT-OF-SPAIN, Two men whose
mothers are suffering with cancer
were October 17 denied bail on the
charge of stealing an ultrasound
machine from the San Fernando
General Hospital.
The machine is yet to be found and
more people are being investigated.
The court was told Harripersad, 44,
was a taxi-driver who had sustained
an injury and was now on disability.
Ramoo-Haynes said she wanted to
have the men’s criminal background
checked before bail was granted.
Two months ago, the machine
went missing from the hospital. Chief
executive offcer of the South West
Regional Health Authority (SWRHA),
Anil Gosine, said the machine was
stolen after the hospital’s alarm sys-
tem was disabled.
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 16
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IDENTITY THEFT
Y
ou can reduce the possibility
of becoming a victim of iden-
tity theft by remembering a
few key tips:
When using your credit cards:
• Carry only the identifcation and
credit cards you need when traveling,
whether locally or abroad
• If your chequebook is lost or stolen,
call your bank and inform them of
the cheque numbers missing
• Sign your credit cards in permanent
ink as soon as you receive them
• When making a purchase, keep your
cards in view at all times; ensure you
take your card back as soon as a trans-
action swipe has been completed
• Do not sign a blank charge slip
• Always save your receipts
• Only provide your ID and credit
card information over the phone to
reputable companies when you have
initiated the call
• If you receive a call from someone claim-
ing to represent your credit card issuer
and the caller asks for your account
Inheritance Strategies
number, do not provide it – if the caller is
employed by the issuer, they will already
know your account information
Manage your credit and debit card
statements:
• Check your statements as soon as
they arrive to ensure all charges gath-
ered are correct
• Keep statements in a safe place - they con-
tain sensitive and personal information
• Check your Equifax Credit Report on
a regular basis to determine if there
are any changes
Be prepared in the event something is
lost or stolen:
• Keep a list of the names, account numbers
and expiration dates of all your cards in
safe place separate from your cards
• Call all of your credit grantors imme-
diately upon discovering your cards
are missing
• If your Social Insurance Card is lost
or stolen, contact your employer or
your local Human Resources Devel-
opment (HRDC) offce
• If your Driver’s License is lost or
stolen, contact your local driver and
vehicle license issuing offce and
report it to your local police station
• Additionally, call Equifax toll-free at
1-800-465-7166 or 514-493-2314..
They will add a statement to your fle
to alert credit grantors that you may
be a victim of fraudulent activity
*The information in this article is not intend-
ed as specifc investment, fnancial, account-
ing, legal or tax advice for any individual.
W
hen a loved one passes
away and leaves an
inheritance to you, you
may be flled with a range of
emotions extending from in-
tense grief to relief that some of
the fnancial pressures you face
are about to be lifted. Those mixed
emotions can become even more confusing
when complex wealth transfer rules come
into play. To help you get through what can
be a very diffcult time, here are some plan-
ning tips you should consider if you fnd
yourself receiving wealth.
HONOUR THE INTENTIONS OF
YOUR BENEFACTOR
Sometimes a will specifcally leaves as-
sets to the deceased person’s child – not
jointly to the child and his or her spouse.
This is a way to try and make sure that a
bequest is not subject to “equalization” if
a marriage breaks down. However, the
deceased’s intention can be frustrated by
a son or daughter who invests the inheri-
tance in the matrimonial home or other
family assets that are not excluded from
equalization claims.
The co-mingling of inherited funds
with other assets, so the inheritance can
no longer be identifed or traced, may
also subject the money to equalization.
Children can honour their parents’
intentions, and protect themselves in the
event of a marriage breakdown, by mak-
ing sure the inheritance remains separate
from family assets, including the matri-
monial home. Note that the legislation re-
garding property division upon marriage
breakdown is specifc to each province,
so you should seek the advice of a legal
expert when considering these issues.
PAY OFF NON-DEDUCTIBLE DEBT FIRST
We are a credit society and often depend
on loans to get the things we want.
However, it’s important to recognize
that there is good debt and bad debt.
Good debt has tax-deductible interest
payments and includes most investment
loans1. Bad debt does not allow you to
deduct interest payments – for example,
most credit card balances.
If you decide to use inherited money
to lower your debt load, the best strat-
egy is to eliminate bad debt frst.
After all your non-deductible debt has
been paid off, you may consider paying
off deductible debt, making an RRSP
contribution (assuming that you have
RRSP contribution room available), or
using the funds for another purpose.
This type of simple tax planning can
provide signifcant tax savings.
ASSISTED SUICIDE
W
hat if, God forbid, your
child was born with
a severe brain defect
that hampers his or her mental
development? What if that same
child was unable to speak, walk or care
for herself and was in constant pain? As
she developed, she required ongoing and
multiple surgical procedures.
At the age of twelve, it was patently
obvious that she was operating at the
mental level of a four month old child. She
was not developing mentally or physically
. The one factor that was a constant in the
child's life was constant pain. You, as her
parent, are charged with your child's care
and medicine can do nothing to relieve her
constant pain or her condition. Would you,
as a caring, loving parent, want to bring an
end to her pain and suffering? Would you,
as a sentient human being, try to stop her
suffering? How far would you be willing to
go to stop your child's pain and suffering?
Would you be willing to take her life as an
act of compassion?
You may recall Robert Latimer, the Sas-
katchewan farmer, who was faced with the
above scenario. Having loved and cared
for his daughter, Tracy, who suffered from
severe Cerebral
Palsy, he chose to put her out of her
pain and suffering by ending her life on
October 24, 1993. He admitted to killing
her by placing her in his vehicle and con-
necting a rubber hose to the exhaust while
the vehicle was running. He was tried and
convicted of murder. Why?
Under our Canadian Criminal Code it
becomes an offence to aid or abet a sui-
cide or suicide attempt. Section 241 of the
Criminal Code stipulates that such a per-
son can be imprisoned for up to fourteen
years. It should be noted that under our
criminal justice system, a person who at-
tempts to kill themselves does not commit
a criminal offence but if someone counsels
or assists that person, then that person is
guilty of a criminal offence.
While the Latimer case is now history,
the issue of assisted suicide has resurfaced
recently. Just this month our Minister of
Health, Deb Matthews stated that the is-
sue of doctor assisted suicide
should be discussed. The Minister's
comments were perhaps spurred by
those of Dr. Donald Low, who died in
September. Dr. Low, a prominent Toronto
microbiologist was battling a brain tumor
and he spoke out in favour of doctor as-
sisted suicide.
The main issue for those who argue for
doctor assisted suicide is the right to die
with dignity. After all, if one is ravaged
with a tenninal illness and death is immi-
nent, would it not make sense
to be able to choose to die with the
assistance of someone? Why must the
individual in such a situation continue to
suffer? If they choose to end their life with
dignity and end the pain and suffering, not
to mention sparing their loved ones the
agony of seeing them suffer, then why is it
a crime to help them?
Of course, there are those who will
argue that God giveth life and only He
should decide when it should end. But
what quality of life is there if one is in a
vegetative state ami/or constant painand
unable to care for oneself? Some of the
arguments against doctor assisted suicide
also highlight the fact that if this were
legalized, then there is the potential that it
could be misused against people who are
sick or disabled.
I fnd this argument about misuse uncon-
vincing as it does nothing to address the
problem and it is voiced from a position of
fear and mistrust. For instance, one does
not need a licence to be a parent; anyone
can have a child. However, not all parents
are capable of raising a child. There are
lots of examples in the news of parents
who neglect and abuse their children and
yet we do not legislate who is entitled or
who is not entitled to have a child. I would
suggest that the Health Minister is on the
right track and that the time for discussion
of this sensitive issue is now. Surely we can
establish some strict guidelines such that
if they are
satisfed a person requesting a doctor
assisted suicide would be able to have
one. Perhaps a panel or government body
could be established to review cases on
an individual basis. In my opinion, such a
system would be both more humane and
expedient. It would be humane because
the wishes of the dying person would be
acceded to. In terms of expediency, the
costs savings on the medicare system
would be astronomical. If we are to be
a free and democratic society, then we
ought to respect the view and wishes of
all, especially those who, at some point,
would be unable to speak for themselves
due to ailments.
Legalizing doctor assisted suicide
is, in my opinion, respecting individual
rights and moving towards being a more
humane and caring society. While I
respect the sanctity ofife and marvel at
God's creations, I believe that constant
pain and suffering in the midst of immi-
nent death is something that should be
curtailed. Dying with one's dignity intact
is just as important as living. Choosing
when and how one will die in the face of
terminal illness should be an individual's
choice and criminalizing those who assist
is fundamentally WTong. The time is now
and we ought not to wait for more cases
to surface before we act.
Selwyn R. Baboolal is a partner at Ou-
marally Baboolal practicing in the area
of litigation for the past 19 years. The
foregoing is intended for information
purposes only and you should consult a
lawyer if you need legal representation or
a !ega! opinion.
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 17
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1. CartWheel VieW
A girl came to her mom and said “Mommy! I’ve got 5 dollars” Her mom said
“Where from?” “Tommy from down the road he dared me to do a cart-
wheel” she replied “Dear that boy is just trying to see your panties!” “oohh”
the girl says The next day the girl comes to her mom and says “Mommy I’ve
got 10 dollars!” “I told you dont trust that boy!” “NO mommy I tricked him I
didn’t wear panties today!!!
2. SearChing For jeSuS
One Sunday afternoon down by the Corentyne River, baptism is being per-
formed by a pastor who came to Guyana on a “crusade.” Balgobin proceeds
to walk down into the water and stand next to the preacher. The minister
turns and notices the old drunk and says, “Mister, are you ready to fnd Je-
sus?” Balgobin looks back and says, “Yes sir, meh ready fa fnd am.”

The minister then dunks him under the water and pulls him right back up.
“Have you found Jesus?” the preacher asked. “Nooo!” said Balgobin. The
preacher then dunks him under for quite a bit longer, brings him up and
says, “Now, brother, have you found Jesus?”

“Noooo, meh did not, Mista Pasta.” The preacher in disgust holds Balgobin
under for at least 30 seconds this time, brings him out of the water and says
in a harsh tone, “My God, man, have you found Jesus yet?” Balgobin wipes
his eyes and says to the preacher…”Yuh sure dis is where he fall in?”
3. Water in the CarBuretor
WIFE: “There is trouble with the car. It has water in the carburetor.”

HUSBAND: “Water in the carburetor? That’s ridiculous”

WIFE: “I tell you the car has water in the carburetor.”

HUSBAND: “You don’t even know what a carburetor is. I’ll check it out.
Where’s the car?

WIFE: “In the pool”
B E D E S S E E I M P O R T S L T D .
2 Golden Gate Court, Toronto, On, Canada, M1P 3A5
Tel:(416)292-2400 Fax:(416)292-2943
Website: www.bedessee.com email:info@bedessee.com
We’re i n your Ki tchen more than you Thi nk!
TM
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 18
Is the Caribbean still a paradise?
The epidemic of Diabetes
I
s there something for us
to fear? Will the white
sand and the lush land fix
our problem? What does my
dentist think and how can he
help me?
For unknown reason, t he preva-
lence of diabetes i n t he Caribbean
popul ation i s al armi ngly high.
It i s esti mated t hat i n Jamaica
alone, t here are approxi mately
49,000 new cases of diabetes per
year. At t hi s rate, diabetes i s one
of t he major publ ic healt h chal-
lenges for t he Caribbean i n t he
t went y-f i rst cent ur y!
Diabetes affects different parts of
the body. This is due to the fact that
in all diabetics there is a compro-
mised circulatory system. The most
damaging effects of the disease are
on the smallest arteries of our circu-
latory system. The body is therefore
not able to supply sufficient blood
to the diabetes affected areas and
consequently our body cannot effec-
tively fight infection in these areas.
If the infection is in our mouth and
the small arteries that fill the tissues
are compromised, we have the start of
what could be a very unfortunate out-
come. This is why your dental hygiene
visits are so important.
How does diabetes affect my
mouth?
Too much sugar in your blood from
diabetes can cause pain, infection,
and other problems in your mouth.
This includes your teeth, gums and
surrounding tissues like your tongue,
cheeks and the roof of your mouth.
Gum disease, when it occurs in
patients with diabetes, are usually
more severe. Healing in the dia-
betic patients usually takes longer
when compared to a non diabetic.
Regular visits to the dental office
for your routine cleaning can have a
positively profound impact on your
oral health.
Plaque that is not removed will
collect above and below the gum line
and harden over time. When the
plaque gets to that stage and hardens,
it makes it more difficult to properly
brush and clean between your teeth.
Your gums will become swollen, turn
red and bleed very easily. Often you
will see signs of bleeding during your
regular brushing and f lossing rou-
tine. This is the first stage of gum
disease, called gingivitis.
When gingivitis advances without
treatment, it becomes periodontitis.
At this stage, the gums pull away or
recede away from the teeth and leave
behind spaces where more bacteria
will accumulates and multiply. In the
non diabetic patient the body fights
the bacteria as a natural response to
the plaque as it spreads and grows
below the gum line. The diabetic pa-
tient, who is not controlled, will have
lost this ability, resulting in a more
rapid breakdown of the gum and
surrounding tissues of the teeth. If
periodontitis is not treated, the gums,
bones and tissue that support the
teeth will be permanently destroyed.
The affected areas will have teeth
that may become loose and might
need to be removed.
At your next visit to your dentist,
make sure you update your medical
history as it relates to diabetes as this
information is extremely important to
your oral health.
health MatterS
Dr. Richard Lai
Dental Surgeon
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 19
Isa M. Rahamat
Financial Advisor
Manulife Securities Incorporated
Investments, Retirements,
Estate and Tax Planning
Manulife Securities Incorporated is a Member of the Canadian Investor Protection
Fund. Manulife Securities and the block design are registered service marks and
trade marks of The Manufacturers Life Insurance Company and are used by it
and its affiliates including Manulife Securities Incorporated.
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• RRSPs
• TFSAs
• RRIFs
• RDSPs
• ETFs
• MUTUAL FUNDS
• GICs
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• BONDs
St Kitts Confdent
Of Gaining CPL
Expansion Franchise
Gibson
Staying
Put!
T
he WICB has
denied reports
that Ottis Gibson,
West Indies’ head coach,
is in contention to take over at
Glamorgan. Gibson has been
in his current role since 2010
and signed a three-year contract
extension earlier this year, after
interest from another county in
Warwickshire.
Glamorgan are believed to
have carried out a fnal round of
interviews on October 16 as they
seek to appoint a successor to
Matthew Mott, who is returning
to Australia. However, the West
Indies board rejected sugges-
tions, initially reported by the
BBC, that Gibson could return
to the county he played for in
the 1990s.
“Ottis is not aware of this,” a
spokesman said. “He signed a
new three-year contract this year
and is focused on his role as the
West Indies head coach.”
Gibson oversaw West Indies’
victorious World Twenty20
campaign in 2012 and the
team has won its
last six Tests in
a row - their
best run since
1988. Their next
assignment is
in India, where
West Indies they
will play two Tests - including
Sachin Tendulkar’s farewell in
Mumbai - and three ODIs next
month.
Hugh Morris, the ECB
managing director who
will take up his position
as Glamorgan’s new
chief executive in
January, has been
involved in the
interview process
and played with Gibson during
his spell in Wales. Robert Croft
and Steve Watkin, also former
team-mates and current mem-
bers of the Glamorgan coach-
ing staff, are expected to be in
the running for the head of elite
performance role.
BASSETERRE, St. Kitts,
MINISTER OF SPORTS
Hon. Glen Phillip is
confdent that St. Kitts
and Nevis would be
given the opportunity
to host a Caribbean
Premier League (CPL)
franchise when the
second edition of
the tournament takes
place next year.
Earlier this year,
Minister Phillip had writ-
ten a letter of intent to the
WICB stating that St. Kitts
is desirous of hosting a
franchise.
In a recent interview
with SKNVibes, the
Minister expressed
his confdence in the
Federation hosting a
franchise but admit-
ted to not receiving any correspon-
dence of approval to date.
“I am confdent! As matter of fact,
there is talk going around that St.
Kitts will get one of the franchises
next year. I haven’t received anything
concrete, however, I know of per-
sons from St. Kitts who have been
bidding to have a franchise hosted
here. Based on what we are doing at
the Park, we have a state-of-the-art
Stadium and I see no reason why we
should not attract a CPL team.”
Phillip is also of the view that host-
ing such a franchise could help the
Federation’s sports tourism product.
“It will not only help the economy
of St. Kitts and Nevis; we are speak-
ing about sport tourism and an
opportunity to sell our nation so that
people outside can see what is hap-
pening here, and we can also look at
a cultural aspect.”
A project to facilitate the Warner
Park Cricket Stadium with lights is
currently in progress and this could
certainly create the possibility for the
island hosting a franchise.
Recently, Senior Sports Officer
in the Ministry of Sports Vernon
Springer told SKNVibes that the
current lighting project would put
the Federation in a good position
to do so.
“That is the main focus of the gov-
ernment of St. Kitts and Nevis. We
understand from the CPL organisers
that they are supposed to be an ex-
pansion of two franchises for 2014.
“St Kitts and Nevis are putting
itself in a good position to do so.
There have already been enquiries
about a franchise coming to St. Kitts
and Nevis, even when the 2013 tour-
nament was taking place.
“High on the agenda will be the
execution of the lights. So when the
folks come around from the West
Indies Cricket Board and the CPL and
they see what we have to offer, then
we will take it to the next level.”
The WICB signed an agreement
with the CPL with the aim of further
developing and strengthening West
Indies cricket by expanding the glob-
al fan base as well as increasing the
number of West Indian cricketers un-
der regional retainer contracts, and
showcasing the talent and beauty of
the Caribbean internationally.
The inaugural tournament was won
by the Jamaica’s Tallawahs which de-
feated the Guyana Amazon Warriors
in the Final.
hoMe grounD
FareWell For
tenDulkar
Eden Gardens in Kolkata and the
Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai will
host India’s two Tests against West
Indies in November, which will mark
the end of Sachin Tendulkar’s 24-
year career. While Eden Gardens will
host the frst Test from November 6
to 10, Tendulkar’s farewell Test will
be played at his home ground from
November 14 to 18. The decision
was taken during the BCCI’s tour
programme and fxtures committee
meeting in Mumbai on October 14.
While the frst two ODIs of the tour
will be played at Kochi (November
21) and Visakhapatnam (November
24), either Baroda or Kanpur will
stage the last match of the series on
November 27. Barabati Stadium in
Cuttack will host the visitors’ prepa-
rations prior to the series, including
a three-day game to be played from
October 31 to November 2.
Once Tendulkar had requested the
BCCI to play his last competitive
game at his home ground, the deci-
sion with regard to his farewell Test
- also his 200th - was a mere formal-
ity at the meeting of the committee
headed by BCCI vice-president Rajiv
Shukla. As a result, the Cricket As-
sociation of Bengal, which had been
promised Tendulkar’s 200th before
he announced his decision to retire
after the Test, was awarded with
Tendulkar’s penultimate Test.
The series against West Indies
wasn’t scheduled on the FTP. When
it was announced in September, it
raised doubts over the schedule and
duration India’s tour to South Africa,
and whether the series would be
Tendulkar’s last. Tendulkar recently
confrmed that it would indeed be
his farewell Series. India Series Will
Test Team Progress Says Gibson
“We’ll have some sessions with the
sports psychologist,” Gibson said.
“We’ll do things other than cricket
as we bond and become a stronger
unit. It’s a long tour, starting with
India and then straight on to New
Zealand and we’ll only be back next
year. It’s new and the guys are look-
ing forward to it.”
“We understand the importance
of the two games, the signifcance
of Sachin Tendulkar’s 200th Test, but
we have to be focussed on our job,
which is to get there and give India
a good fght and if after fve days of
ferce competition it happens that we
are on top, then so be it.”
October 23, 2013 CARIBBEAN GRAPHIC PAGE 20