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Image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop Elements 6

Image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop Elements 6

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Published by David A Green BD
Revision of teaching materials for image manipulation in Adobe Photoshop Elements v6 for UK Online Centre @ Boulevard W-s-Mare.
Revision of teaching materials for image manipulation in Adobe Photoshop Elements v6 for UK Online Centre @ Boulevard W-s-Mare.

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Published by: David A Green BD on Aug 01, 2009
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Weston College ICT Centre

Image Manipulation Level 1 Elements V6
DAG 2009

DAG 2009 Image Manipulation Page 1 of 70 July 2009 DAG

Image Manipulation

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Contents
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Introduction .............................................................................................. 5 Using Adobe Photoshop Elements 6.0 .................................................... 6 Getting Started ....................................................................................... 10 Saving Files ........................................................................................... 12 Rotate .................................................................................................... 15 Crop ....................................................................................................... 17 Cut, Copy and Paste .............................................................................. 20 Using the Menus .................................................................................... 22 Making a Freehand selection, Lasso and Move ..................................... 30

10. Practice .................................................................................................. 31 11. Recap Exercise ...................................................................................... 32 12. Using the Typing Tool ............................................................................ 33 13. Red Eye Correction................................................................................ 35 14. Using Photos in Word ............................................................................ 36 15. Adding Shapes to a photograph ............................................................ 40 16. Adding a Sepia effect ............................................................................. 42 17. Creating Panoramas .............................................................................. 44 18. Printing................................................................................................... 48 19. Choosing A Digital Camera.................................................................... 52 20. Taking Pictures ...................................................................................... 55 21. Laws & Guidelines ................................................................................. 59 22. Consolidation Exercises......................................................................... 66 Exercise 1 .............................................................................................. 66 Exercise 2 .............................................................................................. 67 Exercise 3 .............................................................................................. 68
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Image Manipulation (Elem 6)

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1.

Introduction

In this course you will be manipulating digital images. If you own a digital camera, you should bring it into the centre, along with its USB cable and we will endeavour to instruct you on how to download the pictures at home. If you don’t have a digital camera you can use one that the Centre has and learn how to download the files while in the Centre. Cameras usually come with their own software. This will enable downloading to a computer and will usually contain basic manipulation tools, but it is better to buy separate specialist image manipulation software. The image manipulation software you are going to use is Adobe Photoshop Elements 6. The “industry standard” of image manipulation programs is “Adobe Photoshop ”. This program has all the features needed for professional image manipulation and consequently it is a very complex program. The “light” version is called Photoshop Elements and this book is an introduction to its main features.

Before commencing this course, please do the following:

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

Open the web browser by double clicking on the shortcut on the desktop In the Address bar type the following address: www.myguide.gov.uk Login using your own username and password Click on the Learning link Click on the First and Next Step Courses link Click on the Using Digital Photography link Follow the onscreen instructions On completion, please add your name to the Help List and ask a Tutor to print a copy of your learning log and load the required files for you

Enjoy your course…

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2.
[1]

Using Adobe Photoshop Elements 6.0
To start the program you need to go to Start | All Programs | Media Player & Graphics | Adobe Photoshop Elements 6.0 raphics

Alternatively, if available double click the Desktop shortcut:

.0 When Elements 6.0 loads it presents the following screen:

This allows you to choose from a wide range of activities: Organise your rganise pictures, edit the detail, create calendars etc – or share images with others, are In this guide we will concentrate on the Editor, beginning with “global” , changes and then moving on to detailed work.

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THE MAIN SCREEN [1] Click on Edit and Enhance

This usually starts with the Effects and the Layer palettes showing on the right hand side (as below). In addition to the Menu bar, there is also a Toolbox, a Settings Toolbar for each tool and a palette bin bin. TABS to Edit, Create & Share Menu bar

Toolbox

Once a tool is selected its individual Setting Toolbar appears. Hovering the mouse over the Ho toolbar icons will bring up a small yellow box which describes what the tool or item does.

Photo Bin Effects & Layers palettes Palette Bin

In the top right corner of the main screen notice the UNDO button, the link to the ORGANIZER – and below the three TABS further options for FULL, QUICK and GUIDED options. Under the Effects bar are icons that represent Filters, Layer Styles, Effects and ALL. Below are the individual EFFECTS ICONS.
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THE TOOLBOX
On the left hand side of the main screen is a box of colourful icons – these represent the tools which are used for fine work on your image.

Move Hand Rectangular Selection Magic wand Type tool Cookie cutter Red eye Clone stamp Brush tool Gradient Blur

Magnify Pipette Lasso

Quick selection tool Crop tool Straighten tool Spot Healing tool Eraser Paint bucket Custom shape Sponge

At the bottom of the toolbox are the foreground and background colour selection boxes

Many of the tools have more than one function. If you RIGHT CLICK the tool a box will appear showing what these are In this example the are. various LASSO tools are shown: >>>>>>>>>>>>

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Depending on which tool is selected from the toolbar the Tool settings bar offers further options for each tool. In this illustration the Clone Stamp tool has been selected and the settings toolbar is visible just above the image.

< TOOLS SETTINGS BAR These settings can be adjusted so that the tool does a range of things. The broad arrow is pointing from the tool icon to the settings toolbar.

Click on the one of the Tool buttons to see the options given in the toolbar.

Note – you have no picture open yet! I have used an open picture in my example – but without one the program window will simply display a grey working area. In the next section you will open a picture and get started using the program for yourself.

IMPORTANT Before you start this section, put your name on the help sheet and ask a Tutor to check that you have all the files you will need.

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3.

Getting Started

Elements 6 has been designed to take images from the ORGANIZER – but that does not prevent you from opening the EDITOR and from that program opening a picture file – much as you would a Word document:OPENING A PICTURE

[1] [2]

To open a picture use File | Open In the Look in: box you need to select the location where your files are kept. (My Documents | L1 Digi Images.) As you will be using Windows XP you can choose the Thumbnail view from the dialogue box and see what picture you are opening. To do this, click on the small arrow next to the View menu and select the thumbnails option:

[3]

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[4]

Find the picture called Sunflower. jpg, click on it once to select it, and , then click on Open The picture will load in the workspace. It will also Open. appear in the Photo Bin below the dark grey area of the workspace. hoto

The title of the loaded image appears either in the workspace window or a separate window if you have not maximised it (as here) along with information about the way in which the picture has been sized (%) to fit the available workspace Elements workspace, tries to get the whole of your image in view by default and it will adjust the percentage of the image size accordingly.

ZOOM IN AND OUT The easiest way to do this is to use the central mouse wheel. Move your mouse over the centre of the picture and roll the mouse wheel away from you. The picture should be magnified. Now roll the mouse wheel in the opposite direction and it should return to normal size. Notice what happens if you increase the percentage (or zoom) beyond 100%. As the image is magnified the pixel structure begins to show and the lines become jagged. This view shows the bee on the sunflower at 100%. From the View menu select Actual Pixels.

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4.

Saving Files

It is good practice always to work on a second copy of an image. Before you work on any image create a folder and save a copy of your file in it reate it. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] So, having opened the file and zoomed it in and out you are goi to going create a folder and save a copy of the file into it. Go to File | Save As and then click on the New Folder icon. A new folder will appear in the Save As window. While the New Folder text is highlighted blue, type in the name of the new folder which will be Photoshop and press Enter on the keyboard. ch To open the folder click on Open.

The Save As box allows you to choose a destination – or create a New Folder as a destination. Notice that the Format box is set to JPEG (*.jpg *.jpeg *.jpe) The checked box “Include in the Organizer shows that Elements will add the Include Organizer” new file to its catalogue of images. It is best UNCHECKED as is the “As a Copy” box.

Please read the information on the following page BEFORE proceeding

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For information only Please do not carry this out until you are instructed to do so
When you Save a picture file in Elements it will use its own file format by default (PSD) although most digital cameras use the JPG format. In order to manipulate an image on more than one occasion use the PSD format. Once you have completed your changes you can then re-save the file in JPG format.

Before you save you need to choose the Format. If the image has a number filename this is the time to change it to something memorable.

If you choose JPG, the save box allows you to change the size (and quality) of the graphic file. For this purpose choose Large File and quality 12 will be selected. Note how Elements shows you the size of the file.

You are now going to save the Sunflower as a JPG file in your Photoshop folder. [6] [7] [8] [9] You should currently have the Save As dialogue box open and have the Photoshop folder selected as the Save In location. In the File name box take out the current name by using the backspace key and type in the new name of Sunflower Copy. The type of file should be JPEG. Click on Save.

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[10]

When the JPEG Options box appears, move the slider to 5 so that the file is not too big. Click OK. Close the file by clicking on the x at ose the corner of the picture frame. You want to keep Elements open.

[11] [12]

NOTE:

When saving files throughout this book, please adjust the JPEG quality option to 5 to save space.

INFORMATION ABOUT FILE TYPES .jpeg (.jpg) - A compressed image file format developed by the Joint Photographic Experts Group. This is one of the most common image types Group. used for web documents and provides the best compression for colour photographs. However JPEG is a lossy format, which means that it discards some of the image data in a trade off to reduce the file size so trade-off quality is reduced. .gif - Graphics Interchange Format is the other most commonly used image type for web documents. It offers the best compression for images consisting of uniformly coloured pieces e.g. coloured lines, shapes and rmly artwork and also gives better quality images for photographs. GIF is a lossless format, meaning that all image information is restored when the file is decompressed during viewing and so for photographs the resulting file may be large. .tiff (.tif) - Tag Image File Format is a common format for exchanging raster graphics (bitmap) images between application programs, including those used for scanner images. One of the most common graphic image formats, TIFF files are commonly used in desktop publishing, faxing and 3 F 3D applications. .png - The Portable Network Graphics format is very similar to the GIF format as it also compresses images in a lossless fashion. Typically, an image in PNG format can be 10 10-30% more compressed than in GIF format. .bmp - Bitmap files consist of coloured dots, or "pixels". All the above image formats are types of bitmaps.

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5.

Rotate

Rotate can be used to turn a picture on its side, completely flip it or just straighten it up. [1] [2] Go to File | Open and select the picture River.jpg. Save a copy of the picture into the Photoshop folder calling it River Copy.

[3]

Go to Image | Rotate|180o. The picture should now be completely flipped. Now go back to Image | Rotate | Flip Vertical. The picture should . now be the correct way up but a complete mirror image of the original. You now want to undo both these actions. Locate and click on the undo button on the toolbar at the top of the screen. This will undo one step, click it again and the picture will return to its again original form. Close this picture without saving the changes. Open the picture tilted.jpg and save a copy of it in your Photoshop folder.

[4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

ne One of the great advantages of digital photography is being able to change a picture by selecting part of an image. [9] The tool we use will be the Rectangular Marquee Tool – it shows on the toolbar as a small dotted square – but if the elliptical version has been used you may have to right cli and make sure your have the square tool click selected. Click it once – then move the cursor into the image. Starting at the top left of an area you want to select, in this case to the top left of the tower.

[10]

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[11]

Click once and, holding down the mouse button, drag down and to the right. A dashed rectangle will appear that marks out your selection for you. (see below). Go to Image | Rotate | Free rotate layer. If you move your mouse over the corner of your selected area you should see a double-headed curved arrow.

[12]

[13]

Click and hold down your mouse on this. Now drag it in the direction you want to straighten-up the tower. If you are unhappy with the results use the undo button and try again. Have a go at straightening up the picture and when you are happy that it is straight click on the tick to commit. Press the ESC key on your keyboard to deselect the area Save the result as straightened in your Photoshop folder.

[14]

[15] [16]

The image will be tidied up in the next section.

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6.

Crop

This tool is used to select an area of your picture so that it is better composed. [1] [2] Open the picture straightened.jpg again. Click the crop tool.

[3]

Click and drag a frame around the area you want to keep. If the area is not correct then press Esc on the keyboard and start again. In this picture, you want to keep most of the image and lose the sections not straightened up previously. When the correct area is selected, click the Click to commit tick. The unwanted area should now disappear.

[4]

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This is the final result of rotating and cropping the picture of Topsham church.

[5]

Save the changes by clicking on the Save icon on the toolbar and close the file.

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Elements provides some useful settings to enable you to crop to a particular ratio or to a particular size: The Use photo ratio enables you to crop the image and preserve the aspect ratio of the original. It will also crop to given print sizes.

The small arrow to the right of Aspect Ratio brings down a list of sizes.

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8]

Open the picture river.jpg save a copy in your Photoshop folder with the name river copy. Select the Crop tool. Click the small arrow next to the Aspect Ratio box and select 3 x 5 in. Using the Crop tool, select the area of the picture you wish to retain. When you are happy with your selection click the Click to commit tick. Save the file in your Photoshop folder with the name cropped. Change the Aspect Ratio back to No Restriction Close the file

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7.

Cut, Copy and Paste

You can use the selection tool process to copy and paste part of an image into itself, or from one image to another. If you use Cut and Paste you will see that the selected area is removed from the original image and a white, or coloured background area left behind so you may prefer to use copy behind, copy. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] Open the file Abutilon1.jpg and resave as Abutilon Copy in your Photoshop folder. Use the Rectangular Marquee Tool to select an area of the flower. Go to Edit | Copy. Go to Edit | Paste Paste. If you look at the layer palette on the right of your screen, you should see Background and Layer 1. Layer 1 is the part of the picture that you have copied and pasted. With Layer 1 still selected (which it should be as long as you haven’t clicked anywhere else in the picture) click on the Move tool in th the toolbox. Small handles will appear around the selected part and you can drag the selection to another place. You should end up with 2 flowers.

[6]

[7] [8]

e Close the image and don’t save it. Open the file yellow flowers.jpg and then the file Clematis2.jpg Clematis2.jpg. Note at this point you should have ONLY the clematis 2 image on the te main screen – if you have any other view, click on Window | Images | Maximise Mode

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At the bottom of the screen there should be a Project bin as shown below below.*

[9] [10] [11] [12]

Click on the yellow flowers picture in the Project bin to make it active. Use the Rectangular Marquee Tool to select an area of the flowers. Go to Edit | Cut. The area you selected has disappeared from the . picture. Now click on the Clematis2 picture in the Photo bin and go to Edit | Paste. The yellow flowers will now appear on top of the Clematis2 . picture. Use the Move tool, as before, to move the yellow flowers to the side. Close the file without saving the changes.

[13] [14]

As you can see, this method only allows you to move a regular shaped regular section of an image. Later in this book you will learn how to select more ater specific areas.

*You can show or hide the Project Bin by clicking the down arrow or up arrow You in the bottom status bar. You can also make sure it appears by checking the Project Bin in the Window menu.

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8.

Using the Menus

There are various menus and menu options available in Photoshop, in this section we will look at some of them. ENHANCE MENU You can fix and adjust lighting problems in images as well as adjusting colour in various ways using the Enhance menu. SMART FIX [1] [2] Open the photo Abutilon copy.jpg. To correct the overall colour balance and improve shadow and highlight detail, choose Enhance | Adjust Smart Fix.

You can then use the slider control to adjust the amount of “fixing”. [3] Close the file but do not save the changes.

SHADOWS AND HIGHLIGHTS [1] [2] [3] Open the file Abutilon copy.jpg again Choose Enhance | Adjust Lighting | Shadows/Highlights Click Cancel to exit the screen. Leave the image open.

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BRIGHTNESS AND CONTRAST [1] Choose Enhance | Adjust Lighting | Brightness and Contrast

[2] [3]

Practice using the sliders to see the effect on the image Click Cancel to exit the screen. Leave the image open.

LEVELS [1] Choose Enhance | Adjust Lighting | Levels

This will adjust the amount of light in the image – use, for example, to lighten a dark image

[2] [3]

Practice using the sliders to see the effect on the image Click Cancel to exit the scr screen. Leave the image open.

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HUE AND SATURATION [1] Choose Enhance | Adjust Colour | Hue and Saturation

This tool can be used to increase or decrease the amount of colour saturation, lightness and hue.

[2] [3]

Practice using the sliders to see the effect on the image Click Cancel to exit the screen. Leave the image open.

It is also possible to remove the colour from an image to make it black and white. [1] Choose Enhance | Adjust Colour | Remove Colour

[2]

Close the image without saving the changes

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COLOUR VARIATIONS [1] [2] Open the file Telehone box.jpg and save it in the Photoshop folder as Telephone box copy Choose Enhance | Adjust Colour | Colour Variations

The following dialogue box will then appear:

Take a closer look at the bottom half of the dialogue box and notice the various options: You can select which area of the image you want to adjust by clicking one of these radio buttons to select it You can Increase or decrease the amount of each colour by clicking on the image thumbnails below and the changes will be shown in the After image in the upper half of the dialogue box

You can adjust the amount of colour with this slider

The effect can be lightened or darkened by selecting one of these options

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[3]

Practice using the different areas and variations to change the telephonebox copy copy.jpg image

[4]

Save the image with the filename telephone box changed.jpg

FILTERS MENU Various effects can be added to images to alter the appearance. It is possible to make a picture look like a painting, appear as if wrapped in plastic or icture embossed – to mention but a few. Lighting effects can also be added as well as complete distortions. It is worth experimenting, but a few effects and how to achieve them are shown below: To create the effect that the image was painted [1] [2] [3] [4] Open the file River copy.jpg Choose Filter | Artistic | Dry Brush Click OK to accept the changes Next choose Filter | Artistic | Watercolour and click OK

[5]

Save the picture as River Painted.jpg. Close the picture.
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Image Manipulation (Elem 6)

To create the effect of wrapping in plastic [1] [2] [3] Reopen the file River copy.jpg Choose Filter | Artistic | Plastic Wrap (Be aware that a large screen window will open showing the effect of the filter at the left.) Click OK

[4] [5]

Save the picture as River wrapped.jpg in your Photoshop folder. Close the picture

To add lighting effects [1] [2] [3] Once again, reopen the file River copy.jpg Choose Filter | Render | Lighting Effects Click on the area indicated and, holding down the left mouse button, drag the circle into the position shown

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[4]

Click OK to achieve the following result

[5]

Close the file, do not save the changes.

The direction of the lighting can be varied by dragging the arc into different positions:

To add a lens flare [1] Open the file Clevedon beach.jpg and save as Beach copy.jpg Choose Filter | Render | Lens Flare

[2]

[3]

Click and drag the cross to the position shown and drag the Brightness slider to adjust the brightness to 139%
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Image Manipulation (Elem 6)

[4] [5]

Click OK Save the file as Reflection.jpg

To distort an image Now for some fun! There is a tool within one of the filters that allows you to distort images to achieve some of the amusing results shown below. [1] [2] Open the image Angelina Jolie.jpg and save as Angelina copy.jpg Choose Filter | Distort | Liquify and the following screen will appear

WARP TOOL Turbulence Tool Twirl Clockwise Tool Twirl Counter – clockwise Tool Pucker Tool Bloat Tool Shift Pixels Tool Reflection Tool Reconstruct Tool Zoom Tool Hand Tool [3] Using the Toolbar diagram above as a guide, see if you can do this: [4] When you have finished, save the file as Angelina changed.jpg into your Photoshop folder Note: The brush size should be adjusted to around 64 and the Pressure to 60 to achieve these effects.

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9.

Making a Freehand selection, Lasso and Move

We have already made a rectangular selection, but very few objects in a photograph are entirely rectangular, to select different shapes we need to use a tool that follows the movement of the mouse to trace round the object. This requires some dexterity and practice. There are three kinds of Lasso tool. You will begin with the ordinary lasso and then see how the magnetic and lasso differs. [1] [2] Open the file Abutilon1.jpg and resave as Abutilon Lasso in your Photoshop folder. Click the Lasso tool, right click on the tool. This gives you a choice of 3 types of Lasso. Click on the Lasso Tool. You are going to use it to draw around the flower in the picture. Click where you want to start and, holding the mouse button down, draw carefully round the flower, finishing at the same spot as you started, then release the mouse button. The flower will now be selected as shown by the dashed marquee line on the picture.

[3]

[4]

Unless you are particularly steady with your mouse it will have been quite difficult to select the flower alone. So let’s try an easier way… [5] [6] [7] Hit the ESC key on your keyboard to cancel the selection Click the Lasso tool again and right click it. This time select the Magnetic Lasso. Position the mouse where you wish to start and click. Release the mouse button and carefully move the cursor around the edge of the flower – you should click at each colour change or direction change as this will anchor the tool. When you get back to the start point, click to join the ends. The flower will now be selected as shown by the dashed marquee line as before. Hit the ESC key if you are unhappy with your selection and have another go. Close the file without saving the changes.
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[8] [9]

Image Manipulation (Elem 6)

10. Practice
Let’s now try creating some effects using some of the skills you have learnt. [1] [2] [3] Open the Abutilon1.jpg file again Select the flower head using the Magnetic Lasso Click Select on the menu bar and choose Inverse so that the background is selected instead of the flower head as shown below:

[4]

Select Enhance | Adjust Colour | Remove Colour to achieve this effect:

[5] [6] [7]

Save the file as Abulition1removed.jpg in your Photoshop folder. Click Undo Select Filter | Blur Gaussian Blur and change the radius to 20 to achieve this effect: Click OK Save the file as Abulition1blurred.jpg in your Photoshop folder. Close the file

[8] [9] [10]

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11. Recap Exercise
Sometimes it can be fun to move the subject of a photo to a location other than where they were photographed This method has been used to move Jenny from the beach at Weston to the Welsh hills.

[1]

Using the skills you have learnt try re creating the above image. You re-creating will need to open the files: Jenonbeach.jpg and Walesbackground.jpg and re-save them into your Photoshop folder Walesbackground. with appropriate names in jpg format. Then use the Lasso tool to select Jen and then Copy and Paste and finally Move her into the Wales background image to create the picture above.

[2]

Note: You will need to resize and move Jen into the position indicated indicated. Remember to commit the changes. [3] Save the changes to the image and close both of the files.

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12. Using the Typing Tool
[1] Open the file Icy.jpg and save a copy of it into your Photoshop folder.

Notice the settings in the type tool settings bar just below the Menu Bar.

[2] [3] [4]

Right click on the Type Tool Select the Horizontal Type Tool Set the toolbar options as below:

[5]

Click into the area at the top of the picture and type in the following text:

It’s SOO cold!
[6] Click the Click to Commit tick:

[7]

Now select the Move tool from the Toolbox:

(Be aware that if you click below the line of text just entered a move Tool icon appears. You can drag the text to a new location. Press the ENTER key to commit.)

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[8]

Click and drag the text to the bottom of the picture to achieve the final result:

[9]

Save the file as Icy Poster in your Photoshop folder in jpeg format as before and Close the file.

NOTE When the TYPE TOOL is first used the font size is set to 12pt – which – for most recent digital images is almost invisible. You will need to set the Font Size to large numbers – even as high as 300 to get a line of text that can be set into a normal size digital image. Also make sure you have chosen a CONTRASTING colour for the Type tool. Use WHITE if you’re not sure.

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13. Red Eye Correction
Red eye is caused by a reflection of the subject’s retina by the camera’s flash. You’ll see it more often when taking pictures in a darkened room because the subject’s iris is wide open. To avoid red eye, use the camera’s red eye reduction feature, if available. If you like, Photoshop Elements can automatically fix red eyes when you bring photos into the Organizer; just select Automatically Fix Red Eyes in the Get Photos dialog box when you import your photos.

Alternatively, the Red Eye Removal tool removes red eye in flash photographs of people. [1] Open the file red eye girl2.jpg

[2]

In the Toolbox, select the Red Eye Removal tool.

[3]

In the image, click into the red areas. When you release the mouse button, the red is removed! Save the file as Red Eye changed in your Photoshop folder. Close the file

[4]

[5]

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14. Using Photos in Word
[1] [2] Open Microsoft Word Change the orientation to Landscape using PAGE LAYOUT TAB – Orientation – Landscape

[3] [4] [5] [6]

Zoom to Whole Page : VIEW TAB - One Page (as above). Click INSERT TAB - Click Picture and a browse box comes up Locate and select the image Clevedon_pier.jpg Click Insert

[7]

Click the picture then set the TEXT WRAPPING (little dog icon … through) THROUGH

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[8]

Now the picture has round handles at each corner and top and side and bottom. RESIZE using the left or right corner handles, and holding the button down drag the picture corner to size the image. a. Click into the image to select it b. Position the mouse cursor on one of the corner selection handles as shown

c. Click and drag to reduce the size of the image as shown in figure 1 below

Figure 1

By clicking on the picture individually you can move the image where you want it on the page. A four headed arrow appears to show that such movement is possible. (If the image refuses to move it is because you have not selected the correct Text Wrapping – remember the little dog?) You can make the picture appear at the front or the back by clicking on the picture and selecting Bring to front or Send to back by clicking the links in the Position part of the ribbon above the little dog icons. Alternatively you may position the images more or less as you want them – sizing up or down as above, and then select one picture by clicking on it and then a right click to bring up menus which allow you to change the ORDER and TEXT WRAPPING of the picture. See below:

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A Right click brings up the contextual menu for the selected image. You can change the order or alter the text wrapping from here.

Word 2007 offers many framing options for the selected picture. There is a row of picture icons to choose from – with more if you select the PICTURE STYLES bar below those icons.

Notice the extensive range of frame effects. You click the bottom drop down to the right of the picture effects to see the full range. [You can also alter brightness and contrast (left), text wrapping and CROP (right)]. [9] Repeat to insert the following images: • • • Bandstand.jpg Ladye bay.jpg Clevedon Tree.jpg

MAKE SURE THAT YOU INSERT THE IMAGES IN THE ORDER SPECIFIED!
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[10]

Select a suitable picture effect from the picture styles bar as shown above. Repeat for the remaining images Insert a text box by clicking the Text Box icon on the Insert Ribbon and type in the text Clevedon Views Views.

[11] [12]

[13] [14] [15]

Amend the text to Papyrus, 48pt, dark blue Position the text box as in figure 1 Right click the text box and change the text box to show no colour fill and no colour line.

[16]

Finally save the file as Clevedon Postcard.

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15. Adding Shapes to a photograph
[1] [2] Open ‘Barmouth Bridge.jpg’ Click Custom Shape tool to open the toolbar

Back To ELEMENTS

[3]

Click on the arrow next to the Shape button and click on the callout icon.

[4]

Click the arrow next to the Colour box and select red as the callout colour Move the cursor onto the image and draw callout as below:

[5]

[6]

Move and resize the callout as required using the Move tool – ensure it is big enough to hold the text Choose the Horizontal type tool

[7]

[8]

Click into the callout and select Comic Sans MS, font size 36
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[9]

Click into the Colour box and choose blue, click back into the callout and type the following: Where HAS the water gone??

[10]

Click the Click to Commit tick.

Your picture should now appear as below:

[10]

If the text doesn’t fit correctly, select the No Entry sign instead of the Click to Commit tick and resize the callout. Save the picture as Barmouth Bridge Caption.jpg in your Photoshop folder. Close the file.

[11]

[12]

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16. Adding a Sepia effect
[1] Open the image Wedding.jpg

[2]

Set the Styles and Effects to fx All and scroll down to the last effects – as per the yellow arrows above. Click on the Sepia Tone option and at the dialogue box DOUBLE CLICK the chosen icon. In the LAYERS view click on the background and then RIGHT CLICK followed by Delete.

[3]

[4]

The remaining LAYER is the SEPIA version of the picture:

[5]

The final Sepia Toned image will appear as below:

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NOTE There are many more Filters and effects available from the Elements menus and it is worth experimenting to see which you like. Some of them are dramatic – like the Liquify option under Render which we tried earlier. Others, like the ones under the Artistic sub menu are variable. I particularly like Filter … Sketch … Graphic Pen

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17. Creating Panoramas
The Photomerge Panorama command combines several photographs into one continuous image. For example, you can take five overlapping photographs of a city skyline, and then assemble them into a panorama. The Photomerge Panorama command can tile photos horizontally as well as vertically. The source photographs play a large role in panoramic compositions. To avoid problems, follow these guidelines when taking pictures for use with Photomerge Panorama: Overlap images sufficiently Images should overlap approximately 15% to 40%. If the overlap is less, Photomerge Panorama may not be able to automatically assemble the panorama. If images overlap by 50% or more, it can be difficult to work with them, and blending may not be as effective. Use a consistent focal length Avoid using the zoom feature of your camera while taking your pictures. Keep the camera level. Although Photomerge Panorama can process slight rotations between pictures, a tilt of more than a few degrees can result in errors when automatically assembling the panorama. Using a tripod with a rotating head helps maintain camera alignment and viewpoint. When photographing a panoramic scene from a high place, the natural inclination is to keep the horizon level in the viewfinder. However, this actually produces a noticeable rotation between images. Try using a tripod to keep the camera level when taking photographs in this situation. Stay in the same position Try not to change your location as you take a series of photographs, so that the pictures are from the same viewpoint. Using the optical viewfinder with the camera held close to the eye helps keep the viewpoint consistent. Or try using a tripod to keep the camera in the same place. Avoid using distortion lenses. Lenses, such as fish-eye lenses, that noticeably distort the image can interfere with Photomerge Panorama. Maintain the same exposure Avoid using the flash in some pictures and not in others. The advanced blending feature in Photomerge Panorama helps smooth out different exposures, but extreme differences make alignment difficult. Some digital cameras change exposure settings automatically as you take pictures, so you may need to check your camera settings to be sure that all the images have the same exposure.

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Load the photos into the computer using the software supplied with the camera. [1] Open Photoshop Elements. Click on File | New | Photomerge Panorama In the Photomerge dialog box click ‘Browse’

[2]

[3]

Navigate to your Photoshop Folder where the required photos can be found.

All of the photos required for the photomerge must be loaded into Photoshop Elements at the same time. [4] [5] Click on the photo at the top of the list, hold down the ‘shift key’ on the keyboard and click on the last photo required. Click ‘Open’

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[6]

In the Photomerge dialog box click OK

Photoshop Elements will start loading the photos into memory (BE PATIENT)

[7] [8]

Photoshop Elements will then start Auto-Matching the photos On completion a ‘photomerge’ will be displayed. Click OK to commit.

[9] [10] [11]

The joined Photo is now displayed Use the Cropping Tool to tidy-up the photo. When happy with the result, click the Click to Commit tick

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[12]

Finally, save the image with the file name Photomerge in the Photoshop folder ,

If offered, select an image quality and click OK.

NOTE (Optional) Panoramas may be created in vertical as well as horizontal formats. Elements 6 also has merging facilities that apply to group photographs and to portraits. You may like to experiment using your own photos – but the interface is rather complicated. You may also like to click on the CREATE tab and select some photos to create a COLLAGE:

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18. Printing
In Version 6 of Elements the printing facility has been considerably improved. There is no Print Preview because that is what you get automatically when you click File.. Print… . [1] Open and then re re-save the file telephonebox.jpg into your Photoshop folder. Go to File | Print Print.

[2]

Notice that the image exceeds the size of the printout. This will almost always be the case unless you are using a low resolution image. We will adjust that presently. Meanwhile. . . [3] The printout will be enhanced by clicking the Borders box and choosing a size of about 8mm and the colour BLACK. (Notice mm that there is a provision to print the filename or a caption – in the latter case this will need to be entered elsewhere in Elements.)

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[4]

To get the picture manageable on the preview screen, click into the box which shows SCALE in the box Scaled Print Size (currently 100%) and type in 20. This will reduce the size of the image as shown and . reveal handles with which you can res resize it manually on the page t page.

[5]

Of course you may want to change the page orientation, in which case you can use the Page Setup Button near the bottom right of the box, but it is easier to either rotate the image or set the orientation using the buttons provided: ed:

The preview pane now shows the whole of the image positioned on your chosen paper size. You can pull the handles by the corners to resize it and position the picture in a different way on the page – provided you uncheck the box which says “Centre Image”. ntre [6] Do not print this picture. Click on Cancel to close the dialogue box and close the picture without saving.

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Elements version 6 now provides a drop down box of Print Sizes:

The paper size still shows in cm but the box below shows that the chosen size is 4 x 6 inches.

It is worth commenting that there are now many other ways of producing prints from digital photos and most retailers offer a service in which you take gital your camera memory card in and get prints on photographic paper. This applies to original image on the card and also improved images if you save images them to a card using a card reader rather than the camera USB link. You can also upload your pictures to interne based print providers. internet Ordinary inkjet paper produces acceptable prints – but for the special ones you will want to use high quality photo inkjet paper, available in gloss, matte and in a host of special textured surfaces including real canvas. Some modern printers are also able to print to the very edges of the paper. Watch dern the cost of cartridges. Should you not wish to or be unable to print your images at home, there are lots of websites that will print images for you (some for free) and also variou various sites where you can share your photos with others. All of the UK photo processing services want your business and are prepared to give you free photos in order to show you what they can do. A (small) list of some of these is shown below:
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• • • • • • • • • •

www.photobox.co.uk www.snapfish.co.uk www.jessopspicturehouse.com www.photobucket.com www.bonusprint.co.uk www.photocanvasprinting.com www.asda-photo.co.uk www.asda www.tescophoto.com www.tescophoto. www.kodakgallery.com www.printmyfotos.com

ADDITIONAL NOTE (Optional) To print more than one picture on a page you can select Print Multiple Pictures from the button on the bottom left of the Elements 6 print screen – on but be aware that this will take you to the ORGANIZER ORGANIZER.

This is very useful for keeping a printed record of complete sets of photos – but in my opinion it is easier to print multiple images arranged on A4 by inserting them into MS Word as we did earlier.

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19. Choosing A Digital Camera
This is a guide to choosing a digital camera in the price range of £100 - £350. The main areas to consider are: • • • • • • • Resolution Lenses Zoom Viewfinder Media Batteries Extras

Resolution This is the single most important thing about any digital camera. It is measured in millions of pixels or “megapixels”. What is a megapixel? A pixel (short for picture element) is the smallest part of an image displayed on a monitor or captured by a scanner or digital camera. A megapixel is approximately one million pixels and is a measure of the level of detail recorded by digital cameras. So, simply put, the higher the megapixel value, the better the camera.

Lenses and Zoom

The second most important thing about a digital camera is its lens. Lens specification is usually given in relation to conventional 35 mm cameras. Most digital cameras have either a 35 mm fixed focal length lens or an optical zoom. Typically this will be a 3X range (around 35-105 mm). Digital cameras will often offer Optical and/or Digital zoom. Optical zooms use the actual lens to adjust the amount of information captured in your picture. Digital zooms crop the image and enlarge the central portion. Some quality is lost. You should choose a camera with a lens appropriate to the kind of pictures you are going to take now and in the future. Most people will be satisfied by 3x or 4x optical zooms.

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Viewfinder

Is a conventional viewfinder needed or will using an LCD display on the back of the camera be acceptable? Most people feel more comfortable using a viewfinder, which is held to the eye, as opposed to holding the camera at arms length, as is the case when using an LCD display. In low light situations and in bright sunlight it is easier to ‘aim’ the camera through a viewfinder. The LCD screen also drains the batteries quicker. Memory

Digital cameras store their images in computer memory that can be erased and reused. Clearly, the more memory you have, the more pictures you can store before either having to delete or transfer them onto your PC. Some cameras have built-in memory and others have removable memory cards that slot into the camera. Compact Flash and SmartMedia are currently the cheapest cards, but the latter is gradually being phased out. New SD/MMC and XD cards will be around for a while but are currently the most expensive. Most cameras that use the Compact Flash cards are also able to take a miniature hard disk or a Microdrive. These can have 1 Gb of memory or more, but at the moment are expensive and have been supplanted by cards of up to 8Gig capacity. Batteries

Digital cameras can be broken down into two categories: those that accept standard AA-size batteries and those that use a rechargeable battery made by the manufacturer, otherwise known as a proprietary battery. The key points to remember about AA and proprietary batteries are: • • Proprietary batteries are more expensive Cameras that use AA-size batteries are usually supplied with disposable alkaline ones. It is highly recommended that you purchase at least one set of rechargeable Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) batteries and a charger (these last longer than Cadmium ones).
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Software Every digital camera comes with a CD containing the essential programs for downloading images to a PC and manipulating images. This will be sufficient to begin with but later on you may wish to buy better software. Try downloading a trial version from the internet. Extras Some things you might want to consider: • • • • • Can the camera be mounted on a tripod Is the manual printed or on CD Can the camera be plugged into the TV Do you really need video? What extra features has it got? e.g. red-eye, rotate, panorama, manual exposure.

Top camera buying tips • • • Go for a model with two or three megapixels for good quality and overall flexibility. Buy an additional memory card immediately. The one supplied is virtually useless in terms of memory size. Carry spare batteries and buy rechargeables if your model came with disposables and

Most Importantly

Handle the camera. See how comfortable it feels and whether the buttons fall beneath your fingers and thumbs. All the features in the world are no good if they’re impossible or frustrating to use. Some useful websites • • • • • • www.novatech.co.uk (hardware) www.qvc.co.uk (hardware) www.freeserifsoftware.com (software) www.choicestationery.com (supplies) www.adobe.com (software) www.dcresource.com/ (on-line magazine for reviews)
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• • •

www.megapixel.net/ (on-line magazine for reviews) www.shortcourses.com/ (for general information) www.howstuffworks.com

20. Taking Pictures
Below are some ‘rules’ to help with taking your own pictures

The Rule of Thirds The rule of thirds helps you create more interesting compositions. Imagine two horizontal and two vertical lines equally dividing your shot, then place subjects on the lines or where they intersect with each other. Place your horizon on the top or bottom line to add emphasis to the ground or to the sky respectively.

Focus The human eye is drawn to elements that are in focus, and this will influence how your photo is seen. Auto-focus (standard on most digital cameras) will focus on what is in the centre of the frame. Use pre-focus to move your subject away from the centre of the frame. (This is done on most digital cameras by pressing down halfway on the shutter button.) Use your zoom lens to reduce the 'depth of field' (sense of depth) and throw the background out of focus. This will emphasise any in-focus element in the foreground.
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Light - Flash Balance the flash with the available light for best results. If your camera has a setting to do this for you, it is probably called 'slow flash' or 'synchro flash'. Use your camera's red-eye reduction setting (if it has one) when taking flash photographs of people. Avoid red-eye by turning up or providing more light in the room. Aiming the flash directly at your subject can result in harsh lighting. Try to bounce the flash off a reflective or white surface, such as the ceiling, to produce a softer light.

Light – Time of day Side or 'cross' lighting at dawn or dusk is great for bringing out the texture of a subject. At dawn and dusk there are natural shadows to help give depth and form to your subject. For night time and early evening shots, you will need to allow for slower shutter speeds. (Shutter speed is the length of time the camera requires to absorb enough light for the required shot.) The slower the shutter speed, the more likely your photographs will be blurry due to camera shake, so use a tripod to keep the camera steady. Don't be afraid to point the lens at a setting sun, but whatever you do avoid looking directly at the sun, especially through the viewfinder of your camera.

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Landscape – Framing Don't be afraid to use take portrait photographs - that is, with the camera on its side. Use natural features in the environment to create a frame for your subject (the thing you are photographing). Zoom in to create a sense of intimacy. Remove from your shots elements like the sun or the sky, which give a feeling of open space.

Experiment with framing. Try framing your shots with lots of land and very little sky, or lots of sky and very little land. Landscape - Proportions Try placing the main point of interest towards the sides of your photographs for more interesting compositions. Place your horizon near the top or bottom of your shots to add emphasis to the ground or to the sky respectively.

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People – Portraits Be aware of how people are framed in your shot. Look for the natural junctions of the human body (where it seems natural to 'cut-off') if you are not including the whole person in the shot. Soft light is preferable for portraits. Try sitting your subject near a window.

People – Children Get the children used to you and the camera by firing off lots of shots first. For small children, pre-focus the camera. This is done on most digital cameras by pressing down halfway on the shutter button. Then move yourself backwards and forwards with the child to keep the shot in focus. Get down on your hands and knees to stay level with your subject and appear less intimidating. Use something to draw the child's attention away from the fact that they are having their photograph taken.

This information and more can be found on the following web site: http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/apictureofbritain/how_to

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21. Laws & Guidelines
Health and Safety Regulations The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 require employers to analyse computer equipment used by employees and assess and reduce risks. Some of the key points are: Monitors should normally have adjustable brightness and contrast controls. Employees who regularly use display screen equipment have the right to ask their employer to pay for regular eye tests and pay for special spectacles if they are required for the job, e.g. spectacles prescribed for the distance at which the screen is viewed. Employees who regularly use display screen equipment should be allowed to take breaks periodically. Working Environment Health issues in your work environment exist so that you can work safely and comfortably. Many countries around the world demand that there is a specific temperature range in which people work. Equipment that gives off harmful fumes e.g. laser printers and photocopiers should be placed at a suitable distance to prevent inhalation of the fused triple oxygen atoms that they produce. It is usually a good idea to put such equipment near an open window. But not so close as to allow rainfall or damp air to affect the equipment. Health Precautions There are many precautions that can be taken to prevent injuries such as R.S.I. and other fatigue related problems. The following is a list of equipment that can be used to minimise the effects: Ergonomic keyboard Fully adjustable chairs Keyboard wrist rests Adjustable monitor. Footrest.

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Safety Precautions Here are some safety precautions you should observe when using computers: Do not overload power points and make sure that all cables are secured safely where they cannot be tripped over or pulled out of your computer by accident. Information Security Sensitive or valuable information is often stored on computers. Therefore, it is often important to protect computer data from unauthorised access. Protecting data from unauthorised access is known as information security. Security on a Network Since a network consists of a number of computers connected to each other, it can be relatively easy to copy or move information from one machine to another. It is the job of the Network Administrator to set passwords for each network user, and to allow or limit access to various parts of the network. The Internet is a particular problem since it is theoretically possible to get information from any other computer connected to the Internet. Hacking Hacking is an attempt to overcome security measures and gain unauthorised access to information held on a computer system. Hacking is a criminal offence and contravenes The Computer Misuse Act 1990. The use of passwords and encryption only offers limited protection against hackers. While the techniques used in protecting data are sophisticated and gradually increasing in sophistication, so are the techniques used in hacking.

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Dealing with Security Risks Any organisation, which stores data in electronic format, should be proactive in dealing with security risks. Organisations should: Have an information security policy that outlines how to the organisation should handle sensitive data. Set up procedures for reporting security incidents. Make staff members aware of their responsibilities with respect to information security. Privacy Issues There are several ways in which you can protect the privacy of your data. One way is to set passwords to restrict access to your computer or your files. The other way is to encrypt your data so that it is unreadable to people who do not have the key. User Names and Passwords Password protection can be used to allow only a few people to gain access to the computer or some of the files on it: Most computers will allow you to set a power up password. You must enter the correct password before your PC will boot. In most organisations your operating system and company domain are usually password-protected. Your system administrator will set up a user account for you on the computer and / or on the company network. When your user account is set up you will be provided with a user name (or user ID) and a password. You user name identifies you on the system and is usually known to everyone. Your password is known only to you. When you start your computer, you must enter your user name and your password before you can start using your operating system or the company network. This is known as logging on. Screen savers can also be password protected. If you stop using your computer for a few minutes, e.g. if you are away from your computer, the screen saver is activated. You will then have to enter a password — or enter your user name and password — before you can use the computer again. Many applications can be password protected, e.g. the company database or your e-mail system. You have to enter a password — or enter a user name and password — before you can use the program. Finally, most applications enable you to password protect files that you create. Depending on the level of security that you specify, users have to enter a password before they can open or edit the file.
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Useful Tips Ideally, passwords should be a mixture of characters and numbers, which are difficult to guess, but easy for the user to remember. Try to avoid passwords that are obvious, e.g. your name or your date of birth. Access Rights Typically, each user on the company network — or on a single PC — has different access rights. Access rights are important because they control exactly what you can and can’t do on your computer or indeed the entire network. For example, a data entry user may be able to use the company database but no other applications. A general user may be able to use applications and access the network, but not install new software or open the network location, which contains the company’s confidential records. An administrator would have unlimited access to the whole system.

Backups There are several ways in which you can lose data. There are electronic reasons: you might accidentally delete a file, viruses can delete data or make files impossible to open, and documents can occasionally become corrupt. There are physical reasons: your hard disk may break down and become unusable, or your computers may be physically damaged by fire or flooding. Finally, you may lose data through criminal activity such as hacking or theft. In order to recover from all of these problems it is imperative that you have a backup policy in place so that all of your data can be backed up. Where to Store Backups There are several places where you can store backups with varying degrees of security. You can store backup copies on your own hard disk. This is a high-risk strategy because you will not be able to recover data if the hard disk fails. Also your disk will become full twice as quickly. You can store backup copies on another hard disk in the office. This is safer than storing backups on your own hard disk and it is easy to retrieve the backed up data. However the backup data will still be at risk. A safer thing to do is store backup copies onto another medium such as CD-R or tape. You can then remove the backups from the office and store them offsite. A combination of this and the previous method is probably best.
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Copyright Software Copyright Most software is copyrighted, which means that the right to make copies lies only with its producer. The same law applies to a number of different products, such as pre-recorded videotapes and music CDs. It is illegal to copy, share or lend copyrighted material. As with videos and CDs, copying software is contrary to The Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, which protects the work of playwrights and artists, but also covers software. Copyright also applies to graphics, text and audio files stored on computers or in electronic format. This also applies to information stored on the Internet. When you view information on the Internet it is downloaded to a cache on your computer automatically. Obviously, this is permitted: you wouldn’t be able to view the information otherwise. However you cannot copy information from a Web site to another location, e.g. to an e-mail message or a document, without the permission of the copyright holder. The availability of removable media such as diskettes, Zip disks and record able CDs have made it easy to create and distribute copies of programs, graphics, text and audio files. However it is illegal to copy data from a removable medium onto your computer, or to copy data from your computer to removable medium for distribution, without the permission of the copyright holder. The exception is when you buy software to install on your computer. The software company permits you to copy the software onto your hard disk and often allows you to make a backup copy of the installation disk for your own use — see the section on End-User License Agreements. Important Point There is a far higher risk of picking up computer viruses from illegal copies of software. Shareware and Freeware While most software is copyrighted, there are some exceptions: Shareware — This is software you can install free of charge so that you can evaluate it for a limited period of time. If you decide to continue using the software after this period, you should register it for a fee. When you register the software you often become entitled to extra features and support. Freeware — This is software that is available free of charge, without limitation, for example, Microsoft® Internet Explorer.
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End-User License Agreements A company may have hundreds of employees who need the same software on their computers. Software manufacturers do not expect such companies to buy individual copies of the software for each employee. Instead, they will issue an end-user license agreement, which means that the company can install the software on an agreed number of computers for their employees to use. If a site has a large number of computers, these computers are often networked. This means that software bought under licence can be installed onto a network server so that all authorised users can access it without it being installed on each individual computer. When you buy a licensed copy of a program the software company will usually provide you with a unique Product ID number — usually printed on the box of the installation CD or on a separate certificate supplied with the software documentation. You must enter the Product ID number when you install the software; otherwise the software cannot be installed. Software companies may sometimes ask for your Product ID number to check that you have a licensed copy of a program, e.g. when you require technical support. In most software applications, to find your Product ID number, choose the Help | About command. Data Protection Legislation - Main Points of the Data Protection Act The Data Protection Act 1998 regulates how personal data is collected, stored and used. Confidentiality (i.e. the right to keep sensitive and personal information private) is now the right of each individual. We now have some control over how information about us is used, and can prevent data being passed between companies for marketing purposes, e.g. mass mailings. The main points of the Data Protection Act are as follows: People who hold personal data and decide purposes of processing it (data controllers) must notify the Information Commissioner who enforces the Act about themselves and types of data they hold. They must specify the purposes for which they intend to use the data and state the source from where it was obtained and to whom they intend to disclose it. A Data Controller must comply with the principles of the Data Protection Act. An individual has the right to know whether any information is held about him or her, and to request to see that information. For example, if you are refused credit, you are entitled to be told the name of the credit checking agency who must then, in turn, tell you what information is held about you.
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Principles of the Data Protection Act: Data shall be processed fairly and lawfully. Data shall be obtained only for one or more specified and lawful purposes. Data shall be relevant and adequate. Data shall be up to date and accurate. Data shall not be kept longer than necessary. Data shall be processed in accordance with the rights of individuals. Data shall be kept secure. Data shall not be transferred to countries outside the European Economic area unless those countries have an adequate level of protection. Your rights: You have the right to find out what information about you is held. You have the right to correct or delete your personal data. You have the right to prevent processing your personal data that may cause damage or distress to you or anyone. You have the right to stop a data controller processing your data for direct marketing You have the right to prevent a data controller making a decision only by using an automated process such as credit ranking. If you have suffered damage or distress due to any breach of the act, you can claim compensation. Important Point: The act now applies to data held manually as well as computerised data. Exemptions from the Data Protection Act There are exemptions from the Act, including: Data associated with national security. Any information deemed to be a risk to national security can be withheld. Records associated with crime prevention or taxation. The police do not have to disclose any personal data held for the detection or prevention of crime, and the tax authorities do not have to disclose their tax records. Records held for internal company business (such as calculating wages), and records held for personal, family or recreational purposes. These records do not have to be registered. Data held for statistical, research purposes or back-up files. The holder does not have to disclose their contents. Occasions when data can be disclosed to a third person, i.e. when an agent or lawyer is acting for someone or the data is required urgently to prevent injury or health damage.
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22. Consolidation Exercises EXERCISE 1
[1] [2] Open the files House.jpg and Enzo.jpg. Using the Magnetic Lasso, copy and paste and the Move Tool, see if you can reproduce the image below…

[3] [4] [5]

On completion, print a copy Save the file to your Photoshop folder with the filename Supercar Close all open images but leave Photoshop open for the next exercise.

NOTE
When using the Move tool to place sections from one picture into another you need to remember that once you have sized and positioned the image selection you need to commit that selection – either using the Commit Tick or pressing the ENTER key. Otherwise the computer may appear to freeze and some menu items be greyed out. Until the software knows that you are finished placing the selection it is waiting for an input. ENTER is easiest.

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EXERCISE 2
[1] [2] [3] Open the file Angelfish.jpg Use the magnetic lasso to select the fish Using the Select and Enhance menus followed by the Move tool to resize, try to produce the image below:

[4] [5] [6]

On completion, save the image to your Photoshop folder with the filename Mini fish Print a copy Close all open images but leave Photoshop open for the next exercise.

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EXERCISE 3
Using the Enhance menu and the Crop and Marquee Tools, see if you can change this:

Into this:

If you are unsure, the instructions are on the next page!
Image Manipulation (Elem 6) Page 68 of 70 July 2009 DAG

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

Open the file Clevedon beach.jpg Crop the image to remove the concrete area of the beach Choose Enhance | Adjust Colour | Colour Variations and increase the blue twice Use the marquee tool to select the beach Choose Enhance | Adjust Colour | Colour Variations and click to decrease blue then lighten, repeat and then increase red, decrease blue and finally lighten and you (should) end up with the completed image Click OK Finally save the file as Beach changed to your Photoshop folder and close the image.

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If you have your own digital camera, please put your name on the help sheet, and ask a tutor about bringing in some of your pictures to work on. If you don’t have a digital camera, please put your name on the help sheet, and ask a tutor to show you how to work the Centre’s digital camera. There are numerous books available for Photoshop Elements – especially the earlier versions, and excellent online help at www.adobe.com

Image Manipulation (Elem 6)

Page 69 of 70

July 2009 DAG

You have now finished the workbook. Please put your name on the help list to ask a tutor for a review and to find out what you will do next.

Image Manipulation (Elem 6)

Page 70 of 70

July 2009 DAG

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