1

Assignment 3 — Solutions 1/30/04 (revised 2/8/04)
Problem 2.9
First, we'd like an expression for electrostatic force on an infinitesimal patch of an arbitrary surface charge distribution
÷”
s. Griffiths (Intro. to Electrodynamics, §2.5.3) has a nice derivation of this, but basically if E ˜ is the electric field just
above/below an infinitesimal patch the surface, the electric field due to everything but the patch itself (no pulling your
own bootstraps!) is the average of the two to get rid of the self-contribution. The force on the patch is that electric field
times the amount of charge in the patch:
1 ÷”
÷”
÷”
F = ÅÅÅÅÅ IE> + E< M s A
2

For our problem, choose coordinates with the sphere centered at the origin and cut along the x-y plane, so
÷”
E = E0 z` = constant.
(a)

÷”
Jackson 2.14 gives the potential for an uncharge insulated conducting sphere in E :

F = -E0 Ir - a3 ë r2 M cos q
i
2 a3 y
∑F ƒƒ
s = -e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ
= e0 E0 jjjj1 + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz cos q = 3 e0 E0 cos q
∑ r ƒr=a
r3 {
k
i
∑F ` 1 ∑F ƒƒ
÷”
÷”
E> = -“ F•r=a = -r` ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ - q ÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ
= 3 e0 E0 cos q r` - E0 jjjj1 ∑r
r ∑ q ƒr=a
k
= 3 e E cos q r`
0

a3 y
`
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz sin q q
3
r {

ƒƒƒ
§ƒ
ƒƒ
r=a

0

Since the sphere is a conductor, the electric field is discontinuous by s ê e0 perpendicularly across the boundary, which
÷”
makes E < = 0. This should be obvious from the statement we proved way back when as to how conductors shield their
÷”
insides. Integrating F , note that we need only do the z-component because by the rotational symmetry of the system
the x and y components must cancel. So the total force on the upper hemisphere is
ÅÄÅ cos4 q ÑÉÑpê2
2p
pê2
1
9
9
÷”
Ñ
Å
F> = ‡ F ÿ z` = ‡
a sin q f ‡
a q ÅÅÅÅÅ H3 E0 cos qL2 e0 cos q = ÅÅÅÅÅ E02 a2 e0 2 p ÅÅÅÅ- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÑÑÑÑ
= ÅÅÅÅÅ p a2 e0 E02
Ñ
Å
4 ÑÖ0
2
2
4
ÅÇ
0
0
ÅÄÅ cos4 q ÑÉÑp
2p
p
1
9
9
Ñ
Å
a sin q f ‡ a q ÅÅÅÅÅ H3 E0 cos qL2 e0 cos q = ÅÅÅÅÅ E02 a2 e0 2 p ÅÅÅÅ- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÑÑÑÑ
= - ÅÅÅÅÅ p a2 e0 E02
F< = ‡
ÅÅÇ
4 ÑÑÖpê2
2
2
4
0
pê2

As expected F< = -F> for the z < 0 hemisphere, the minus sign coming in because the electric field points in the
opposite direction there. The total force (though there may be some debate as to interpretation here) is thus
9
F> - F< = ÅÅÅÅÅ p a2 e0 E02
2

2

(b)
Since the induced surface charge distribution above completely compensates for the effects of the external
electric field on the surface potential, any excess charge will simply distribute uniformly. Thus the potential outside
only has an additional term like that due to a point charge Q at the center:
i
a3 y
Q
F = -E0 jjjjr - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz cos q + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
2
4 p e0 r
r {
k
∑F ƒƒ
Q
= 3 e0 E0 cos q + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
s = -e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ
∑ r ƒr=a
4 p a2
Q
÷”
÷”
`
`
E> = -“ F•r=a = 3 e0 E0 cos q r + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ2ÅÅ r
4 p e0 a
¦ =
¦ - s ê e = 0 ï ÷E”
E<
E>
< = 0
0
F> = ‡

2p

a sin q f ‡

pê2

1 i
Q
y2
a q ÅÅÅÅÅ jj3 E0 cos q + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz e0 cos q
2
2 k
4 p e0 a {

pê2
ij
yz
1
3 E0 Q
Q2
= ÅÅÅÅÅ a2 e0 2 p f ‡
a q jjj9 E02 cos2 q + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ cos q + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzz e0 cos q sin q
2
2
2
4 p e0 a
16 p2 e0 a4 {
0
k
Épê2
ÄÅ
ÅÅ 9 E02 cos4 q
i 9 E2
y
Q2
cos2 q ÑÑÑ
E0 Q
Q2
3 E0 Q cos3 q
= p a2 e0 ÅÅÅÅ- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
= p a2 e0 jjjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ0ÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÑÑÑÑ
2
2
2
2
ÅÅÇ
2 p e0 a
3
2 ÑÑÖ0
2 p e0 a
4
16 p2 e0 a4
32 p2 e0 a4 {
k 4
0

0

1
9
Q2
= ÅÅÅÅÅ E0 Q + ÅÅÅÅÅ p a2 e0 E02 + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
2
4
32 p e0 a2

As before, the only difference in calculating F> is the limits on the q integral:

Ép
ÄÅ
Å 9 E02 cos4 q
Q2
3 E0 Q cos3 q
cos2 q ÑÑÑÑ
1
9
Q2
2 e ÅÅÅ- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÑÑ
p
a
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅ
= ÅÅÅÅÅ E0 Q - ÅÅÅÅÅ p a2 e0 E02 - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
F> =
0 ÅÅÅ
Ñ
2
2 p e0 a2
3
2 ÑÑÖpê2
4
2
4
32 p e0 a2
ÅÇ
16 p2 e0 a4

9
Q2
F> - F< = ÅÅÅÅÅ p a2 e0 E02 + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
2
16 p e0 a2

Problem 2.10
We can calculate the potential of the top plate (an equipotential) far from the boss:

z
V

D

a

JG
far from
E → E0 zˆ origin

V = -‡

0

D

z E0 = -E0 D

ϖ

(a)
For D p a, we can think of the parallel plates as producing a constant electric field in which we place a
conducting sphere at the origin. This leads us to guess

3
i
F = -E0 jjjjr k
F§z=0 = 0

y
i
a3 y
a3
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz cos q = -E0 z jjjj1 - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz cos q
2
3ê2
r {
Hv2 + z2 L {
k

-3ê2 y
ij
y
i a3 y
a3 i v2
zz
zz cos q = -E0 D + jjjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz
F§z=D = -E0 D jjjj1 - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ jjjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ + 1zzzz
z
3
2
3
D kD
{
kD {
{
k

i.e. F satisfies the boundary conditions in the region of interest and so is (well almost) the potential for the system,
thanks to uniqness. The surface charge densities on the boss (surface normal r` ) and plane (surface normal z` ) are
∑ F ƒƒ
= 3 e0 E0 cos q
sboss = -e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §
∑ r ƒƒr=a
i
a3 y
∑ F ƒƒ
splane = -e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ
= e0 E0 jjjj1 - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz
∑ z ƒz=0
v3 {
k

sboss

splane

3e0 E0

-pê2
(b)

3e0 E0

pê2

0

Total charge on boss:
Qboss = ‡

0

2p

f a sin q ‡

0

pê2

q

0

v

pê2

É
ÄÅ
ÅÅ cos2 q ÑÑÑpê2
a q 3 e0 E0 cos q = a2 2 p 3 e0 E0 ÅÅÅÅ- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÑÑÑÑ
2 ÑÑÖ0
ÅÅÇ

= 3 p a2 e0 E0

(c)
A trick we can apply is to double the system, i.e. instead of one plane with a boss we can consider a plane with
a sphere embedded at the center. Any point charge q above the sheet will then induce an image charge q£ in the sphere
as well as an image charge -q below the plane, which will in turn induce an image charge -q£ in the sphere below the
plane:

JG
y

q

q
d

h

q'

special case

øøøøøøøøøö

-q'

JJG
y′

a d

q'

a2 d

-q'

2

d

h

-q
-q

The placement of charges should be symmetric under inversion of the z-axis, i.e. ÷y”£ = ÷y”§aØp-a where a is the angle
between ÷y” and z` . For our special case this just switches the signs on the z components. Let Fs Hx” , ÷y”L be the potential

4
due to a charge q at ÷y” and its accompanying image charge for a grounded conducting sphere as in Jackson 2.1. Immediately we see that
÷”L ª F Hx
÷” ÷”
÷” ÷”£
FHx
S , yL - FS Hx , y L
q ê 4 p e0
Ha ê yL q ê 4 p e0
÷”, ÷y”L = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
FS Hx
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ÷”ÅÅÅÅÅ
÷†x” - ÅÅÅÅ
÷y”ŧÅÅÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
÷” - Ha
2 ê y2 L y§
†x

automatically satisfies F§÷x”=a r` = 0 since FS §÷x”=a r` = 0 by construction, and in the z = 0 plane ÷y” = ÷y”£ so
F§z=0 = FS Hx” , ÷y”L - FS Hx” , ÷y”L = 0. So F obeys the desired boundary conditions and is the potential for the system. Using
∑†b x” - c”§n ê ∑r = n b †b x” - c”§n-2 Hb r - c” ÿ x` L computed in the last homework, the charge density on the boss is
∑ F ƒƒ
∑ ÷” ÷” -1
r - ÷y” ÿ x`
, ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ †x
- y§
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
s = -e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ
÷” - ÷y”ÅÅÅŧ3ÅÅÅÅ
∑ r ƒr=a
∑r
†x

÷”, ÷y”L ƒƒ
∑ i q ê 4 p e0
a
q ê 4 p e0
q ij a - ÷y” ÿ x`
a a - Ha2 ê y2 L ÷y” ÿ x` yz
∑ FS Hx
ƒ
zyz
jj- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzz
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
=
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
j
÷” - ÷y”§
÷” - Ha2 ê y2 L ÷y”§ {
ƒƒr=a
∑r k †x
y †x
4 p e0 k †a x` - ÷y”§3
y †a x` - Ha2 ê y2 L ÷y”§3 {
∑r
r=a
y
q i
a - ÷y” ÿ x`
a
a - Ha2 ê y2 L ÷y” ÿ x`
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ jjjj- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz
ÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
4 p e0 k Ha2 - 2 a x` ÿ ÷y” + y2 L3ê2
y Ha2 - 2 Ha3 ê y2 L x` ÿ ÷y” + a4 ê y2 L3ê2 {
a - ÷y” ÿ x`
q i
y2
a - Ha2 ê y2 L ÷y” ÿ x` yz
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ jjjj- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzz
4 p e0 k Ha2 - 2 a x` ÿ ÷y” + y2 L3ê2
a2 Hy2 - 2 a x` ÿ ÷y” + a2 L3ê2 {
qa
1 - y2 ê a2
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
4 p e Ha2 - 2 a ÷y” ÿ x` + y2 L3ê2
0

For the special case ÷y” = d z` = -÷y”£ :

÷”L ƒƒ
÷” ÷”
÷”, ÷y”£ L
∑FHx
∑ FHx
qa
y
i ∑FHx , yL
ƒ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ
= jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
∑r ƒƒr=a
∑r
∑r
4 p e0
{r=a
k

ij
y
1 - d 2 ê a2
1 - d 2 ê a2
jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz
j 2
3ê2
3ê2
Ha2 + 2 a d cos q + d 2 L {
k Ha - 2 a d cos q + d 2 L

Changing variables to u ª cos q ïu ª -sin q q :

0

2p

a sin q f ‡

pê2
0

0
1
1
a q ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ = -2 p a2 ‡ u ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
3ê2
2
2
2
2
1
Ha ≤ 2 a d cos q + d L
Ha + d ≤ 2 a d uL3ê2
ÅÄÅ
ÑÉÑ1
2
Å
Ñ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÑÑÑÑ
= 2 p a2 ÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÇ ≤ 2 a d H2 - 3L Ha2 + d 2 ≤ 2 a d uL1ê2 ÑÑÖ
0
2pa
-1ê2
-1ê2
2
2
2
2
= ¡ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ AIa + d ≤ 2 a dM
- Ia + d M
E
d
2pa
-1ê2
= ¡ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ AHd ≤ aL-1 - Ia2 + d 2 M
E
d

Total induced charge on boss:

5
∑ F ƒƒƒ y
i
a q jj-e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ zz
∑r ƒƒr=a {
k
0
0
2
2
q a H1 - d ê a L 2 p a ij 1
1
1
1
y
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ jjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz
è!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!
è!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!
2
2
2
2
4p
d kd+a
d
a
a +d
a +d {

Q£ = ‡

2p

a sin q f ‡

pê2

q a H1 - d 2 ê a2 L 2 p a
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
4p
d
i
d 2 - a2 yz
z
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ!ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
= -q jjjj1 - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
è!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!ÅÅÅÅÅ zz
d a2 + d 2 {
k

2d y
2
jij- ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz
jj è!!!!!!!!
!
!!!!!!!
2
d - a2 {
a2 + d 2
k

Problem 2.11
(a)

First a quick calculation of field due to a line charge t:

τ

Qenclosed
a Ev = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
e0
pillbox
tL
2 p v L Ev = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
e0
t
÷ ” ÷”
`
Et Hx ; vL = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ v
2 p e0 v

JG
E = Eϖϖˆ

L

ϖ

Choose an arbitrary reference point v0 at which the potential is zero. Then by equation 1.20 we can integrate radially
÷÷ ” `
v to get the potential at any point v:
outwards along l = v
÷”; vL = Ft Hx

v ÷ ” ÷÷÷”

v0

E ÿ l = - ‡

v

v
t
t
t
v0
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ v£ = - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ @ln v£ D
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ lnJ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ N
2 p e0
2
p
e
v
0
v0

v0 2 p e0 v£

Now consider the composite system of cylinder and line charge, which we can arbitrarily place on the x-axis. For the
1ê2
r > b region only [here r ª Hx2 + y2 L ], we can use an image line charge in the -b § r § b region. By symmetry we
expect the image line charge to be on the x -axis as well:

y

b

Φ→0

ρ

τ′

ϖ′ ϖ

τ

r
V

x

÷÷v
÷” = -R x` + r r`
÷÷v
÷”£ = -r x` + r r`

R

The total potential is just F = Ft + Ft£ . We want this to be constant on the cylinder at r = b :

6
t
v0
v0

ij
i
y
y
÷”; vL§
÷” £
V = Ft Hx
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅ zz + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ lnjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz
r=b + Ft Hx ; v L§ r=b = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ lnj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
`
`
2 p e0 k †-R x + b r§ { 2 p e0 k †-r x` + b r`§ {

First off we see that we should take t£ = -t so as to cancel off the singularity from taking v0 Ø ¶ (which is where
we really want the potential to vanish). Then we have
ÉÑ
v0
†-r x` + b r`§ zy
v0
t ÄÅÅ i
zyz - lnjij ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
zyzÑÑÑÑ = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅtÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ lnjij ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
V = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅlnjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ z = constant
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
` Ñ
`
2 p e0 k †-R x` + b r`§ {
2 p e0 ÅÅÇ k †-R x` + b r`§ {
k †-r x + b r§ {ÑÑÖ

Since ln is a monotonic increasing function this can only hold if the argument itself is constant, i.e.
b †r` - Hr ê bL x` §
†-r x` + b r`§
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅ = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
c = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
`
`
†-R x + b r§
R †x` - Hb ê RL r`§

Just as for the sphere we see that this can be done by choosing
r
b
ÅÅÅÅÅ = ÅÅÅÅÅÅ ï
b
R

b2
r = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
R

(b)
To determine the potential for r < b we will need to calculate V (interestingly enough we can't make the
cylinder be at an arbitrary potential and still require F Ø 0 at infinity). This is easy since we've fixed r such that
c = b ê R and can just read V = Ht ê 2 p e0 L lnHb ê RL off (1). Now note that there are no sources inside the cylinder, so
since F§ r<b = V satisfies all boundary conditions it is the correct potential. Thus
l
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

÷
m
FHx L = o
o
o
o
o
o
o
n

t
iby
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ lnjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz
, r § b
2 p e0 k R {
i †r r` - Hb2 ê RL x` § yz
t
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ lnjjjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz , r ¥ b
2 p e0 k †r r` - R x` § z{

In my humble opinion "far from the cylinder" should mean r p b, so we should expand this around b ê r Ø 0. This is
pure legwork, and Mathematica reports
ÄÅ
É
` `
ÅÄÅ
ÑÉ
Å b 4 ÑÑ
yz 2 r x` ÿ r` ij b yz2 r2 I1 + 2 Hx ÿ rL2 M ij b yz4 ÑÑÑ
r2
÷”L = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅtÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅlnijjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÑÑ + ÅÅÅÅijj ÅÅÅÅÅ yzz ÑÑÑÑ
z
j
j
z
z
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
Å
lim FHx
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
z
Å j
Ñ
z
ÅÅÅk r { ÑÑÑ
rpb
R2
2 p e0 ÅÅÅÇ k †r r` - R x` § {
R
kr{
k r { ÑÑÑÖ
Ç
Ö

However most people might do the expansion around r Ø ¶, which gives a much simpler result (of course) though
note technically correct if we consider that R is given to us and may be huge. I suppose one could argue that we can
take r arbitrarily large and so make it moot. Matter of taste. Anyway applying the expansions
1 ê H1 + xL = 1 - x + x2 + Hx3 L and lnH1 + xL = x - x2 ê 2 + Hx3 L with x = 1 ê r Ø 0:

(1)

7

2
2
2
†r r` - Hb2 ê RL x` §
r2 - 2 r Hb2 ê RL x` ÿ r` - Hb2 ê RL
1 - 2 Hb2 ê r RL x` ÿ r` - Hb2 ê r RL
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
ÅÅ = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅ
Å
=
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅ
`
`
`
`
`
`
†r r - R x§2
r2 - 2 r R x ÿ r + R2
1 - 2 HR ê rL x ÿ r + HR ê rL2
ÅÄÅ
ÑÉ
2
É
ÅÅ
1
2 b2 x` ÿ r` 1 i b2 y 1 ÑÑÑÅÄÅ
i 1 yÑÑ
= ÅÅÅÅ1 - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅ - jjjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÑÑÑÑÅÅÅÅ1 + 2 R x` ÿ r` ÅÅÅÅÅ + jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzÑÑÑÑ
ÅÅ
r
R
r k R { r2 ÑÑÖÅÇÅ
k r2 {ÑÑÖ
Ç
`
`
2
2b xÿ r 1
1
i 1 y
= 1 - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅ + 2 R x` ÿ r` ÅÅÅÅÅ + jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz
R
r
r
k r2 {
`
`
2 HR2 - b2 L x ÿ r 1
i 1 y
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅ + jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz
= 1 + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
R
r
k r2 {

`
`2
i
2 HR2 - b2 L x` ÿ r` 1
t
t
ji †r r - Hb2 ê RL x§ zyz
i 1 yy
zz = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ lnjjjj1 + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅ + jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzzzz
lim ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ lnjjjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
z
`
`
2
rض 4 p e0
4 p e0 k
R
r
k r2 {{
{
k †r r - R x§
`
`
t
xÿ r
i 1 y
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ IR2 - b2 M ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ + jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz
2 p e0
Rr
k r2 {

÷”L =
lim FHx

rض

(c)

As usual for conductors we have a nice expression for the surface-charge density:

ƒ
∑F ƒƒƒ
t ∑
÷” - Ib2 ë RM x` • - ln †r
÷” - R x` §Mƒƒ§
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ Iln °r
s = -e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒƒ
ƒƒƒ
∑ r ƒ r=b
2p ∑r
r=b
1
t i
∑ ÷”
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ`ÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ °r
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
- Ib2 ë RM x` • ÷

2
2 p k †r - Hb ê RL x§ ∑ r
ƒ
r - R x` ÿ r` yzƒƒ
t ij r - Hb2 ê RL x` ÿ r`
zz§
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
Å
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
Å
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ jjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
z
÷” - R x` §2 ƒƒ
÷” - Hb2 ê RL x` §2
2 p k †r
†r
{ƒ r=b
`
`
`
`
2
t R êb - R xÿ r - b + R xÿ r
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
2p
R2 †Hb ê RL r` - x` §2

ƒ
1
∑ ÷”
` §zyzƒƒ§
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
Å
†r
R
x
÷” - R x` § ∑ r
†r
{ƒƒƒ r=b
y
t i b - Hb2 ê RL x` ÿ r`
b - R x` ÿ r`
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
ÅÅÅ
Å
Å
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ jjjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ`ÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz
`
2
2
2 p k b2 †r` - Hb ê RL x` §2
R †Hb ê RL r - x§ {

t
R2 - b2
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
2 p b †b r` - R x` §2

Again we've used our (very useful!) formula ∑†b x” - c”§n ê ∑†x” § = n b †b x” - c”§n-2 Hb †x” § - c” ÿ x` L. Plotting this:

s
s
b2 - R2
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
tê2p b
b2 - 2 b R cos f + R2

1 - HR ê bL2
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
1 - 2 HR ê bL cos f + HR ê bL2

-p

-pê2

pê2

p

f

Rêb = 4
-5ê3
Rêb = 2
-3

(d)

The force on the line charge is that due to the image line charge. We know the electric field from part (a):

t£ v
t
÷ ” ÷” £
Et£ Hx ; v L = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ = - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
£
2 p e0 v
2 p e0

÷÷÷”£
v
t
r r` - Hb2 ê RL x`
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ = - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
v£2
2 p e0 †r r` - Hb2 ê RL x` §2

8

The force per unit length on the line charge is (remember that r r` = R x` at the position of the line charge):
÷”
t2
R x` - Hb2 ê RL x`
t2
R - Hb2 ê RL
F
÷”
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ` ÅÅÅÅÅÅ = - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ x`
ÅÅÅÅÅÅ = t Et£ HR x` ; v£ L = - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
`
2
2 p e0 †R x - Hb2 ê RL x§
2 p e0 @R - Hb2 ê RLD2
L
R
t2
= - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ x`
2
2 p e0 R - b2

It's attractive, as should be expected.

Problem 2.13
(a)
You could in principle go through the whole separation of variables solution detailed in §2.11, but since we as
physicists are into conservation of energy, let's just work with the answer. We know that if the given F satisfies
laplace's equation in the interior (since there are no sources) and the boundary conditions, then uniqueness guarantees
that it is the solution. So we first want to check that
V1 + V2
V1 - V2
i 2bv
y
FHv, fL = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ tan-1 jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ cos fzz
2
2
b
2
p
v
k
{

satisfies “2 F = 0 for the region 0 § f § 2 p, 0 § v < b. This is a whole lot of algebra. Fortunately it's been done for
us. Recall equation 2.65 in Jackson:
2V
i sin p x ê a y
YHx, yL = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ tan-1 jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zz ì “2 Y = 0
p
k sinh p y ê a {

where I've renamed things to avoid confusion. We see that if we choose a = p, and identify the variables x = f + p ê 2
and y = sinh-1 @Hb2 - v2 L ê 2 b vD we have
2V
i 2bv
y
Y = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ tan-1 jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ cos fzz , “2 Y = 0
p
k b2 - v2
{

This means the second piece of F satisfies laplace's equation (obviously the first piece does) provided the coordinate
transformations we made were legal. sin is defined for all arguments so there's no problem with the x transformation.
So is sinh and sinh-1 (they're even "nicer", being monotonic increasing) so we're safe.
Finally we need to check boundary conditions. As r Ø b, the argument of tan-1 approaches ≤¶ depending on the
sign of cos f, i.e. +¶ if cos f > 0 and -¶ if cos f < 0 (there is an ambiguity at cos f = 0, but we will see that this is
the singular region of the gaps in the cylinders anyway and can't be helped since the potential is actually discontinuous
there). So

9

V1 + V2
V1 - V2
lim FHv, fL = ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
vØb
2
p
l
o
o
o
o
o
FHb, fL = m
o
o
o
o
o
n

l
o tan-1 H+¶L = p ê 2 , -p ê 2 § f § p ê 2
m
o -1
n tan H-¶L = -p ê 2 , p ê 2 § f § p

1
ÅÅÅÅÅ HV1 + V2 + V1 - V2 L = V1 , -p ê 2 § f § p ê 2
2
1
ÅÅÅÅÅ HV1 + V2 - V1 + V2 L = V2 , p ê 2 § f § p
2

This is what we wanted to get, and incidentally we see that the slits are at f = ≤p ê 2. What we've done may sound an
awful lot like begging the question, but rest assured that it is really straightforward to separate variables, etcetera,
etcetera. If anyone would really like to see this drop me a note and I'll write it up.
(b)

ƒƒƒ
Ä
2 ÉÑ-1
∑F ƒƒ
V1 - V2 ÅÅÅ
2 b H-2 v2 L y
ƒ
i 2bv
y ÑÑ i 2 b
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ §ƒ
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅ1 + jj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ cos fzz ÑÑÑÑ jjjj ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ - ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ zzzz cos f§ƒ
2
ƒƒ
ÅÅÇ
2
2
∑ v ƒv=b
p
k b2 - v2
{ ÑÑÖ k b2 - v2
Hb - v L {
ƒv=b
ƒƒƒ
Ä
É
2 ÅÅ
2 ÑÑ-1
2
2
2
2
3
2
ƒƒ
Hb - v L ÑÑÑ 2 Hb + b v L
V1 - V2
Hb - v L ÅÅÅ
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ cos f ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅ1 + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÑÑÑ ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ cos f§ƒ
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
ƒƒƒ
2
2
Å
Ñ
p
4 b v cos f ÅÇ
4 b v cos f ÑÖ
Hb - v L
ƒv=b
ƒƒƒ
ÄÅ
2 ÉÑÑ-1
2
2
Å
ÅÅ
Hb - v L ÑÑ
V1 - V2
HV1 - V2 L 2 b3
ƒƒ
ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÅÅÅÅ1 + ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ÑÑÑÑ Ib3 + 2 b v - b v2 M§ƒ
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
= ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
ƒƒƒ
2 p b2 v2 cos f ÅÅÇ
4 b2 v2 cos2 f ÑÑÖ
2 p b4 cos f
ƒv=b
∑ F ƒƒ
V1 - V2
= e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ
sHfL = +e0 ÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅÅ ƒ§
∑v ƒv=b
p b cos f

` . The result
The derivative in the last line comes in with positive sign because the normal to the inside surface is -v
holds for both halves of the cylinder.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master your semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.